WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling examples kobayashi

  1. Cabibbo--Kobayashi--Maskawa Mixing in Superstring Derived Standard--like Models

    CERN Document Server

    Faraggi, A E; Faraggi, Alon E.; Halyo, Edi

    1994-01-01

    We examine the problem of three generation quark flavor mixing in realistic, superstring derived standard--like models, constructed in the free fermionic formulation. We study the sources of family mixing in these models and discuss the necessary conditions to obtain a realistic Cabibbo--Kobayashi--Maskawa (CKM) mixing matrix. In a specific model, we estimate the mixing angles and discuss the weak CP violating phase. We argue that the superstring standard--like models can produce a realistic CKM mixing matrix. We discuss the possible textures of quark mass matrices that may be obtained in these models.

  2. Super Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, J.M.; Grimus, W.; Raychaudhuri, A.; Zoupanos, G.

    1984-06-14

    We argue that in the minimal SUSY extension of the standard model, CP-violation cannot be explained through SUSY phases alone. But SYSY graphs, especially with gluinos, can make important contributions to CP-violation through the Kobayashi-Maskawa phase.

  3. The Caratheodory and Kobayashi metrics and applications in complex analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Krantz, Steven G.

    2006-01-01

    The Caratheodory and Kobayashi metrics have proved to be important tools in the function theory of several complex variables. But they are less familiar in the context of one complex variable. Our purpose here is to gather in one place the basic ideas about these important invariant metrics for domains in the plane and to provide some illuminating examples and applications.

  4. A Novel Formulation of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Renormalization

    CERN Document Server

    Kniehl, Bernd A

    2009-01-01

    We present a gauge-independent quark mass counterterm for the on-shell renormalization of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix in the Standard Model that is directly expressed in terms of the Lorentz-invariant self-energy functions, and automatically satisfies the hermiticity constraints of the mass matrix. It is very convenient for practical applications and leads to a gauge-independent CKM counterterm matrix that preserves unitarity and satisfies other highly desirable theoretical properties, such as flavor democracy.

  5. Examples of Mathematical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Matthew D.; Edwards, Carina M.; Bodmer, Walter F.; Maini, Philip K.; Chapman, S. Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is being increasingly recognized within the biomedical sciences as an important tool that can aid the understanding of biological systems. The heavily regulated cell renewal cycle in the colonic crypt provides a good example of how modeling can be used to find out key features of the system kinetics, and help to explain both the breakdown of homeostasis and the initiation of tumorigenesis. We use the cell population model by Johnston et al.5 to illustrate the power of mathematical modeling by considering two key questions about the cell population dynamics in the colonic crypt. We ask: how can a model describe both homeostasis and unregulated growth in tumorigenesis; and to which parameters in the system is the model most sensitive? In order to address these questions, we discuss what type of modeling approach is most appropriate in the crypt. We use the model to argue why tumorigenesis is observed to occur in stages with long lag phases between periods of rapid growth, and we identify the key parameters. PMID:17873520

  6. A novel formulation of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix renormalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Sirlin, Alberto [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2008-12-15

    We present a gauge-independent quark mass counterterm for the on-shell renormalization of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix in the Standard Model that is directly expressed in terms of the Lorentz-invariant self-energy functions, and automatically satisfies the hermiticity constraints of the mass matrix. It is very convenient for practical applications and leads to a gauge-independent CKM counterterm matrix that preserves unitarity and satisfies other highly desirable theoretical properties, such as flavor democracy. (orig.)

  7. Hitchin-Kobayashi Correspondence, Quivers, and Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Cónsul, Luis; García-Prada, Oscar

    A twisted quiver bundle is a set of holomorphic vector bundles over a complex manifold, labelled by the vertices of a quiver, linked by a set of morphisms twisted by a fixed collection of holomorphic vector bundles, labelled by the arrows. When the manifold is Kähler, quiver bundles admit natural gauge-theoretic equations, which unify many known equations for bundles with extra structure. In this paper we prove a Hitchin-Kobayashi correspondence for twisted quiver bundles over a compact Kähler manifold, relating the existence of solutions to the gauge equations to a stability criterion, and consider its application to a number of situations related to Higgs bundles and dimensional reductions of the Hermitian-Einstein equations.

  8. On the Kobayashi-Royden pseudonorm for almost complex manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Kruglikov, Boris S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we define Kobayashi-Royden pseudonorm for almost complex manifolds. Its basic properties known from the complex analysis are preserved in the nonintegrable case as well. We prove that the pseudodistance induced by this pseudonorm coincides with the Kobayashi pseudodistance defined for the almost complex case earlier. We also consider a geometric application for moduli spaces of pseudoholomorphic curves.

  9. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  10. Rephasing invariants of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi- Maskawa matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez R, H.; Kielanowski, P., E-mail: kiel@fis.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico); Juárez W, S. R., E-mail: rebeca@esfm.ipn.mx [Departamento de Física, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U.P. “Adolfo López Mateos,” C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-03-15

    The paper is motivated by the importance of the rephasing invariance of the CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) matrix observables. These observables appear in the discussion of the CP violation in the standard model (Jarlskog invariant) and also in the renormalization group equations for the quark Yukawa couplings. Our discussion is based on the general phase invariant monomials built out of the CKM matrix elements and their conjugates. We show that there exist 30 fundamental phase invariant monomials and 18 of them are a product of 4 CKM matrix elements and 12 are a product of 6 CKM matrix elements. In the main theorem we show that a general rephasing invariant monomial can be expressed as a product of at most five factors: four of them are fundamental phase invariant monomials and the fifth factor consists of powers of squares of absolute values of the CKM matrix elements. We also show that the imaginary part of any rephasing invariant monomial is proportional to the Jarlskog’s invariant J or is 0.

  11. The Hitchin-Kobayashi correspondence, Higgs pairs and surface group representations

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Prada, Oscar; Riera, Ignasi Mundet i

    2009-01-01

    We develop a complete Hitchin-Kobayashi correspondence for twisted pairs on a compact Riemann surface X. The main novelty lies in a careful study of the the notion of polystability for pairs, required for having a bijective correspondence between solutions to the Hermite-Einstein equations, on one hand, and polystable pairs, on the other. Our results allow us to establish rigorously the homemomorphism between the moduli space of polystable G-Higgs bundles on X and the character variety for representations of the fundamental group of X in G. We also study in detail several interesting examples of the correspondence for particular groups and show how to significantly simplify the general stability condition in these cases.

  12. Delta Shell: Integrated Modeling by Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Jagers, B.; Baart, F.; Geer, P. V.

    2011-12-01

    We present the integrated modeling environment Delta Shell. It supports the full workflow of integrated environmental modeling: setup, configuration, simulation, analysis and reporting of results. Many components of the environment can be reused independently, allowing development of scientific, geospatial and other applications focused on data analysis, editing, visualization and storage. One of the unique features is that the Delta Shell environment integrates models from many different fields, such as hydrodynamics, hydrology, morphology, ecology, water quality, geospatial and decision support systems. This integration is possible due to flexible general data types, lightweight model coupling framework, the plugin system and the inclusion of a number of high quality open source components. Here we will use the open source morphological model XBeach as an example showing how to integrate models into the Delta Shell environment. Integration of XBeach adds a graphical interface which can be used to make testing coastal safety for complicated coastal areas easier. By using this example, we give an overview of the modeling framework and its possibilities. To increase the usability, the model is integrated with a coastal profile data set covering the whole coast of the Netherlands. This gives the end user a system to easily use the model for scanning the safety of the Dutch coast. The reuse of the components of the environment individually or combined is encouraged. They are available as separate components and have minimal or no dependencies on other components. This includes libraries to work with scientific multidimensional data, geospatial data (in particular geospatial coverages: values of some quantities defined on a spatial domain), editors, visualisation of time-dependent data and the modeling framework (projects, data linking, workflow management, model integration). Most components and the XBeach example are available as open source.

  13. Superallowed Fermi beta decay and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calik, Abdullah Engin; Gerceklioglu, Murat [Dept. of Physics, Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey); Salamov, Djevad Irfan [Dept. of Physics, Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2009-12-15

    In this work, the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing matrix has been investigated by studying the eleven well-known superallowed Fermi Beta decays; their parent nuclei are {sup 10}C, {sup 14}O, {sup 26}Al, {sup 34}Cl, {sup 38}K, {sup 42}Sc, {sup 46}V, {sup 50}Mn, {sup 54}Co, {sup 62}Ga, and {sup 74}Rb. The numerical value of the V{sub ud} element of the CKM mixing matrix has been calculated following the standart procedure. Using a different method from those of the previous studies, the effect of the isospin breaking due to the Coulomb forces has been evaluated more accurately. Here, the shell model has been modified by Pyatov's restoration because of the isospin breaking and the transition matrix elements have been found by means of the random phase approximation (RPA). (orig.)

  14. Kobayashi-Maskawa angles and SU(3) breaking in hyperon beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, J.F.; Holstein, B.R.; Klimt, S.W.

    1987-02-01

    The determination of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V/sub u//sub s/ from hyperon ..beta.. decays has long had a hidden uncertainty due to the almost universal assumption of SU(3) invariance in Cabibbo-type fits, especially since the data definitely indicate the presence of SU(3) breaking. We have reanalyzed the hyperon-decay data using the pattern of symmetry breaking predicted by the quark model including the center-of-mass correction. We find that the SU(3)-broken picture is far superior to the assumption of perfect SU(3), and provides a good fit to experiment. The sensitivity of V/sub u//sub s/ to the breaking is not large and we find V/sub u//sub s/ = 0.220 +- 0.001 +- 0.003 (the errors are experimental and theoretical, respectively), in agreement with the results from kaon decay by Leutwyler and Roos.

  15. Best Practice Examples of Circular Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldmann, Eva

    , and to look for circular business opportunities in this flow of goods and value, is key in a circular economy. Establishing new or closer collaboration with stakeholders within or beyond the traditional supply chain is another important skill in creating circular business models. Many of the examined......Best practice examples of circular business models are presented in this report. The purpose is to inform and inspire interested readers, in particular companies that aspire to examine the potentials of the circular economy. Circular business models in two different sectors are examined, namely...... the textile and clothing sector as well as the durable goods sector. In order to appreciate the notion of circular business models, the basics of the circular economy are outlined along with three frameworks for categorizing the various types of circular business models. The frameworks take point of departure...

  16. Continuum modeling an approach through practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    This book develops continuum modeling skills and approaches the topic from three sides: (1) derivation of global integral laws together with the associated local differential equations, (2) design of constitutive laws and (3) modeling boundary processes. The focus of this presentation lies on many practical examples covering aspects such as coupled flow, diffusion and reaction in porous media or microwave heating of a pizza, as well as traffic issues in bacterial colonies and energy harvesting from geothermal wells. The target audience comprises primarily graduate students in pure and applied mathematics as well as working practitioners in engineering who are faced by nonstandard rheological topics like those typically arising in the food industry.

  17. Phenomenology of the CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nir, Y.

    1989-07-01

    The way in which an exact determination of the CKM matrix elements tests the Standard Model is demonstrated by a two generation example. The determination of matrix elements from meson semi-leptonic decays is explained, with an emphasis on the respective reliability of quark level and meson level calculations. The assumptions involved in the use of loop processes are described. Finally, the state of the art of our knowledge of the CKM matrix is presented. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Learning object models from few examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ishan; Wang, Yuxiong; Hebert, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Current computer vision systems rely primarily on fixed models learned in a supervised fashion, i.e., with extensive manually labelled data. This is appropriate in scenarios in which the information about all the possible visual queries can be anticipated in advance, but it does not scale to scenarios in which new objects need to be added during the operation of the system, as in dynamic interaction with UGVs. For example, the user might have found a new type of object of interest, e.g., a particular vehicle, which needs to be added to the system right away. The supervised approach is not practical to acquire extensive data and to annotate it. In this paper, we describe techniques for rapidly updating or creating models using sparsely labelled data. The techniques address scenarios in which only a few annotated training samples are available and need to be used to generate models suitable for recognition. These approaches are crucial for on-the-fly insertion of models by users and on-line learning.

  19. Precision measurements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) angle $\\gamma$ is still the least known angle of the Unitarity Triangle, and is the only one that can be accessed exclusively through tree-level $B$-meson decays. Its precise determination is of crucial importance to identify possible effects beyond the Standard Model in global CKM fits. Powerful constraints on $\\gamma$ are obtained from the analysis of $B^{\\pm} \\to D^{0} K^{\\pm}$ decays, where the $D^{0}$ meson is reconstructed in the $K^+K^-$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states; the latest results using the Run-1 (2011 and 2012) and Run-2 (2015 and 2016) LHCb datasets are presented. The measurement of $B^{\\pm} \\to D^{*0}K^{\\pm}$ decays using a novel partial reconstruction method is also presented, where both $D^{*0} \\to D^0\\pi^0$ and $D^{*0} \\to D^0\\gamma$ decays are considered. These world’s best results contribute to the ultimate goal of reaching degree-level precision on $\\gamma$, via the exploitation of all possible decay modes and techniques.&a...

  20. Modelling language evolution: Examples and predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan; Zhang, Menghan

    2014-06-01

    We survey recent computer modelling research of language evolution, focusing on a rule-based model simulating the lexicon-syntax coevolution and an equation-based model quantifying the language competition dynamics. We discuss four predictions of these models: (a) correlation between domain-general abilities (e.g. sequential learning) and language-specific mechanisms (e.g. word order processing); (b) coevolution of language and relevant competences (e.g. joint attention); (c) effects of cultural transmission and social structure on linguistic understandability; and (d) commonalities between linguistic, biological, and physical phenomena. All these contribute significantly to our understanding of the evolutions of language structures, individual learning mechanisms, and relevant biological and socio-cultural factors. We conclude the survey by highlighting three future directions of modelling studies of language evolution: (a) adopting experimental approaches for model evaluation; (b) consolidating empirical foundations of models; and (c) multi-disciplinary collaboration among modelling, linguistics, and other relevant disciplines.

  1. Modelling language evolution: Examples and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan; Zhang, Menghan

    2014-06-01

    We survey recent computer modelling research of language evolution, focusing on a rule-based model simulating the lexicon-syntax coevolution and an equation-based model quantifying the language competition dynamics. We discuss four predictions of these models: (a) correlation between domain-general abilities (e.g. sequential learning) and language-specific mechanisms (e.g. word order processing); (b) coevolution of language and relevant competences (e.g. joint attention); (c) effects of cultural transmission and social structure on linguistic understandability; and (d) commonalities between linguistic, biological, and physical phenomena. All these contribute significantly to our understanding of the evolutions of language structures, individual learning mechanisms, and relevant biological and socio-cultural factors. We conclude the survey by highlighting three future directions of modelling studies of language evolution: (a) adopting experimental approaches for model evaluation; (b) consolidating empirical foundations of models; and (c) multi-disciplinary collaboration among modelling, linguistics, and other relevant disciplines.

  2. Best Practice Examples of Circular Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldmann, Eva

    are tightly closed, whereas in other cases they are more open due to initiatives being voluntary, experimental or small scale, covering only part of the market. The study indicates that the ability of companies to apply life cycle thinking, which involves the entire value chain from sourcing to disposal...... are different, circular business models can be found in both. These models operate in both young and mature firms, small and large, which points to the fact that circular business models can be successfully implemented in a wide range of business settings as long as they are individually tailored to each...

  3. Best Practice Examples of Circular Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldmann, Eva

    the textile and clothing sector as well as the durable goods sector. In order to appreciate the notion of circular business models, the basics of the circular economy are outlined along with three frameworks for categorizing the various types of circular business models. The frameworks take point of departure......, however, not the key focus of the current report. The point of the study is to describe the diverse and unique circular business models that companies around the globe have established already within the textile and clothing sector and within the durable goods sector. Even though these two sectors...... are tightly closed, whereas in other cases they are more open due to initiatives being voluntary, experimental or small scale, covering only part of the market. The study indicates that the ability of companies to apply life cycle thinking, which involves the entire value chain from sourcing to disposal...

  4. 12 CFR 332.2 - Model privacy form and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Model privacy form and examples. 332.2 Section 332.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY PRIVACY OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL INFORMATION § 332.2 Model privacy form and examples. (a)...

  5. Ecohydrological modeling in agroecosystems: Examples and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, A.; Feng, X.; Manzoni, S.; Mau, Y.; Parolari, A. J.; Vico, G.

    2015-07-01

    Human societies are increasingly altering the water and biogeochemical cycles to both improve ecosystem productivity and reduce risks associated with the unpredictable variability of climatic drivers. These alterations, however, often cause large negative environmental consequences, raising the question as to how societies can ensure a sustainable use of natural resources for the future. Here we discuss how ecohydrological modeling may address these broad questions with special attention to agroecosystems. The challenges related to modeling the two-way interaction between society and environment are illustrated by means of a dynamical model in which soil and water quality supports the growth of human society but is also degraded by excessive pressure, leading to critical transitions and sustained societal growth-collapse cycles. We then focus on the coupled dynamics of soil water and solutes (nutrients or contaminants), emphasizing the modeling challenges, presented by the strong nonlinearities in the soil and plant system and the unpredictable hydroclimatic forcing, that need to be overcome to quantitatively analyze problems of soil water sustainability in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. We discuss applications of this framework to problems of irrigation, soil salinization, and fertilization and emphasize how optimal solutions for large-scale, long-term planning of soil and water resources in agroecosystems under uncertainty could be provided by methods from stochastic control, informed by physically and mathematically sound descriptions of ecohydrological and biogeochemical interactions.

  6. Simplivariate models: ideas and first examples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos A Hageman

    Full Text Available One of the new expanding areas in functional genomics is metabolomics: measuring the metabolome of an organism. Data being generated in metabolomics studies are very diverse in nature depending on the design underlying the experiment. Traditionally, variation in measurements is conceptually broken down in systematic variation and noise where the latter contains, e.g. technical variation. There is increasing evidence that this distinction does not hold (or is too simple for metabolomics data. A more useful distinction is in terms of informative and non-informative variation where informative relates to the problem being studied. In most common methods for analyzing metabolomics (or any other high-dimensional x-omics data this distinction is ignored thereby severely hampering the results of the analysis. This leads to poorly interpretable models and may even obscure the relevant biological information. We developed a framework from first data analysis principles by explicitly formulating the problem of analyzing metabolomics data in terms of informative and non-informative parts. This framework allows for flexible interactions with the biologists involved in formulating prior knowledge of underlying structures. The basic idea is that the informative parts of the complex metabolomics data are approximated by simple components with a biological meaning, e.g. in terms of metabolic pathways or their regulation. Hence, we termed the framework 'simplivariate models' which constitutes a new way of looking at metabolomics data. The framework is given in its full generality and exemplified with two methods, IDR analysis and plaid modeling, that fit into the framework. Using this strategy of 'divide and conquer', we show that meaningful simplivariate models can be obtained using a real-life microbial metabolomics data set. For instance, one of the simple components contained all the measured intermediates of the Krebs cycle of E. coli. Moreover, these

  7. Geometry and analysis on manifolds in memory of professor Shoshichi Kobayashi

    CERN Document Server

    Mabuchi, Toshiki; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Noguchi, Junjiro; Weinstein, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to the memory of Shoshichi Kobayashi, and gathers contributions from distinguished researchers working on topics close to his research areas. The book is organized into three parts, with the first part presenting an overview of Professor Shoshichi Kobayashi’s career. This is followed by two expository course lectures (the second part) on recent topics in extremal Kähler metrics and value distribution theory, which will be helpful for graduate students in mathematics interested in new topics in complex geometry and complex analysis. Lastly, the third part of the volume collects authoritative research papers on differential geometry and complex analysis. Professor Shoshichi Kobayashi was a recognized international leader in the areas of differential and complex geometry. He contributed crucial ideas that are still considered fundamental in these fields. The book will be of interest to researchers in the fields of differential geometry, complex geometry, and several complex variables ...

  8. B meson decays and Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, P.; Nardulli, G.

    1989-03-01

    We compute Γ(B+-->ppπ+) and Γ(B0-->ppπ+π-) by a dynamical model where one of the final pions are produced by Δ resonance decay. We also analyze the end-point behaviour of the electron spectrum in the decay-->evX, by a calculated B meson wave function and partonic widths as given by QCD. By using recent data from the ARGUS Collaboration we obtain Vbc=(4.8+/-0.4)×10-2 and Vbu/Vbc=0.10+/-0.02.

  9. Kobayashi's and Teichmüller's Metrics on the Teichmüller Space of Symmetric Circle Homeomorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun HU; Yun Ping JIANG; Zhe WANG

    2011-01-01

    We give a direct proof of a result of Earle, Gardiner and Lakic, that is, Kobayashi's metric and Teichmüller's metric coincide with each other on the Teichmüller space of symmetric circle homeomorphisms.

  10. Concerning the Feasibility of Example-driven Modelling Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Simon; Ball, David; Lawson, Zoe Frances

    2008-01-01

    We report on a series of experiments concerning the feasibility of example driven \\ud modelling. The main aim was to establish experimentally within an academic \\ud environment; the relationship between error and task complexity using a) Traditional \\ud spreadsheet modelling, b) example driven techniques. We report on the experimental \\ud design, sampling, research methods and the tasks set for both control and treatment \\ud groups. Analysis of the completed tasks allows comparison of several...

  11. Reflections from European examples on the teaching of modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cabassut

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recommendations of European parliament and Rocard‘s report invite to develop the teaching of modelling. The European Commission programmes like LEMA, PRIMAS and STEAM support the development of resources, training and research on the teaching of modelling. We will study European examples about the teaching of modelling, from secondary and tertiary education and from pre-service and in-service teachers training. They point the different levels of determination and the different didactic questions related to students and teachers practices and to mathematical and didactical organisations. The example of the European program LEMA illustrates a teacher training course on modelling and the difficulties to implement a teaching of modelling. We will present some recent results of research bringing challenges for the teaching of modelling. The idea of this talk is to take examples in Europa about the teaching of modelling in order to reflect on this teaching. In a first time we will browse the institutional context from global to local where the teaching of modelling takes place by giving examples from Europe. Then we develop one of these examples, the LEMA project, in order to reflect on teaching of modelling by illustrating with recent researches.

  12. AISIM (Automated Interactive Simulation Model) Training Examples Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-26

    19 7 Messae rraffic Characteristics .................... 21 8 Message Traffic Matrices ........................... 22 9 Example I Model Structure...Figure 7. Message destinations are ’elected according to tne traffic matrices presenteu in Figare 8. Dalta messages each nave three destinations wnica...destination, processed and eliminated. Eaca of tnese events can be modeled by procedural operacions . Page 69 * 1.-- *,..., .*’. Aany slots circulate on

  13. Progress in liquid crystal (LC) science and technology in honor of Kobayashi's 80th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, Hoi-Sing; Ong, Hiap L

    2013-01-01

    The presence of liquid crystal displays (LCDs) marks the advances in mobile phones and television development over the last few decades. Japanese companies were the first to commercialize passive-matrix TNLCDs and, later on, high-resolution activematrix LCDs.Prof. Shunsuke Kobayashi has made essential contributions to Japan's prominence in LCD development throughout this period. He is well-known not only for his own groundbreaking research, but also for the training of many prominent figures in the display industry, both in Japan and in other countries.This book brings together many prominent

  14. Concerning the Feasibility of Example-driven Modelling Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, Simon R; Lawson, Z

    2008-01-01

    We report on a series of experiments concerning the feasibility of example driven modelling. The main aim was to establish experimentally within an academic environment: the relationship between error and task complexity using a) Traditional spreadsheet modelling; b) example driven techniques. We report on the experimental design, sampling, research methods and the tasks set for both control and treatment groups. Analysis of the completed tasks allows comparison of several different variables. The experimental results compare the performance indicators for the treatment and control groups by comparing accuracy, experience, training, confidence measures, perceived difficulty and perceived completeness. The various results are thoroughly tested for statistical significance using: the Chi squared test, Fisher's exact test for significance, Cochran's Q test and McNemar's test on difficulty.

  15. Collapse of the random phase approximation: examples and counter-examples from the shell model

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Calvin W

    2009-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock approximation to the many-fermion problem can break exact symmetries, and in some cases by changing a parameter in the interaction one can drive the Hartree-Fock minimum from a symmetry-breaking state to a symmetry-conserving state (also referred to as a ``phase transition'' in the literature). The order of the transition is important when one applies the random phase approximation (RPA) to the of the Hartree-Fock wavefunction: if first order, RPA is stable through the transition, but if second-order, then the RPA amplitudes become large and lead to unphysical results. The latter is known as ``collapse'' of the RPA. While the difference between first- and second-order transitions in the RPA was first pointed out by Thouless, we present for the first time non-trivial examples of both first- and second-order transitions in a uniform model, the interacting shell-model, where we can compare to exact numerical results.

  16. Improvement of the Han-Kobayashi Rate Region for General Interference Channel-v2

    CERN Document Server

    Hodtani, Ghosheh Abed

    2010-01-01

    Allowing the input auxiliary random variables to be correlated and using the binning scheme, the Han-Kobayashi (HK) rate region for general interference channel is partially improved. The obtained partially new achievable rate region (i) is compared to the HK region and its simplified description, i.e., Chong-Motani-Garg (CMG) region, in a detailed and favorable manner, by considering different versions of the regions, and (ii) has an interesting and easy interpretation: as expected, any rate in our region has generally two additional terms in comparison with the HK region (one due to the input correlation and the other as a result of the binning scheme). Keywords. Interference channel, Input correlation, Binning scheme

  17. Preferential sampling and Bayesian geostatistics: Statistical modeling and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Lorenzo; Grisotto, Laura; Catelan, Dolores; Lagazio, Corrado; Berrocal, Veronica; Biggeri, Annibale

    2016-08-01

    Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not stochastically independent. In this paper, we present two examples of geostatistical analysis in which the usual assumption of stochastic independence between the point process and the measurement process is violated. To account for preferential sampling, we specify a flexible and general Bayesian geostatistical model that includes a shared spatial random component. We apply the proposed model to two different case studies that allow us to highlight three different modeling and inferential aspects of geostatistical modeling under preferential sampling: (1) continuous or finite spatial sampling frame; (2) underlying causal model and relevant covariates; and (3) inferential goals related to mean prediction surface or prediction uncertainty.

  18. Tecnomatix Plant Simulation modeling and programming by means of examples

    CERN Document Server

    Bangsow, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the development of simulation models as well as the implementation and evaluation of simulation experiments with Tecnomatix Plant Simulation. It deals with all users of Plant Simulation, who have more complex tasks to handle. It also looks for an easy entry into the program. Particular attention has been paid to introduce the simulation flow language SimTalk and its use in various areas of the simulation. The author demonstrates with over 200 examples how to combine the blocks for simulation models and how to deal with SimTalk for complex control and analys

  19. Logistics Distribution Center Location Optimizatio Model An Example Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lingling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes and investigates the situation of the today’s site of distribution centers .Then taking SF Express for an example ,In the light of minimize the total expense ,the location models for single distribution centers is established with the corresponding resolutions given .After that ,The location of the single distribution center of SF Express ,the starting point of which is Zhengzhou Railway Station ,can be determined with the help of distance-testing function of 360 map to conclude its coordinate and then determine its exact service spot .This paper will test the feasibility of above models by the chosen cases with the application of LINGO software.

  20. Two conceptual models of displacement transfer and examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN; Shuwei; WANG; Xin; YANG; Shufeng; HE; Dengfa; ZHAO; W

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents two conceptual models of displacement transfer, reverse symmetry model and infinitely equal division model, based on the fault-bend folding theory. If the fault shape is held constant in the trend, then the distribution of slip magnitude, geometry of imbricate structures and its axial surface map all display reverse symmetry on the process of displacement transfer, as called reverse symmetry model in this paper. However, if the ramp height of thrust fault decreases gradually along its strike, the displacement is postulated to be equally and infinitely divided to every thrust that is formed subsequently, this kinematic process is described using infinitely equal division model. In both models, displacement transfer is characterized by the regular changes of imbricate thrusting in the trend. Geometric analysis indicates that the displacement transfer grads can be estimated using the tangent of deflective angle of hinterland structures. Displacement transfer is often responsible for the distortion and branching of the surface anticlines, especially in the region where the multi-level detachment structures is developed. We also present some examples from the frontal structures of the Southern Tianshan fold-and-thrust belt, Xinjiang, China. Displacement transfer between deep imbricate thrusts in the middle segment of Qiulitag anticline zone causes the Kuqatawu and Southern Qiulitag deep anticlines left-lateral echelon. The region, where these two deep anticlines overlap, is characterized by duplex structures, and extends about 18 km. The shallow anticline is migrated southward displaying obvious "S" form in this area.

  1. SO(10) models with flavour symmetries: classification and examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Lavoura, L.

    2016-10-01

    Renormalizable SO(10) grand unified theory (GUT) models equipped with flavour symmetries are a popular framework for addressing the flavour puzzle. Usually, the flavour symmetry group has been an ad hoc choice, and no general arguments limiting this choice were known. In this paper, we establish the full list of flavour symmetry groups which may be enforced, without producing any further accidental symmetry, on the Yukawa-coupling matrices of an SO(10) GUT with arbitrary numbers of scalar multiplets in the {{10}}, \\bar{{{126}}}, and {{120}} representations of SO(10). For each of the possible discrete non-Abelian symmetry groups, we present examples of minimal models which do not run into obvious contradiction with the phenomenological fermion masses and mixings.

  2. Alluvium-Buttressed Landslides: Conceptual Model and Examples from California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. L.; Cotton, W. R., Sr.; Shires, P. O.

    2016-12-01

    Large, deep-seated landslides typically occur in hillside settings without any natural buttressing, and many of these landslides have relatively low factors of safety (FS), the ratio of driving to resisting forces. However, where deep-seated landslides failed millennia ago into valleys that subsequently experienced alluvial aggradation, a natural buttress of alluvium may be deposited over the landslide toe, increasing the FS of these landslides. The eustatic model for alluvial buttressing of Quaternary landslides involves failure of slopes during sea level low stand at or near the late Pleistocene last glacial maximum (LGM, approximately 20 ka). Following LGM, mean sea level rose by over 120m to its present elevation. This rise in base level resulted in deposition of alluvial sediment in coastal valleys that had been v-shaped and downcutting prior to and during LGM. These valleys now have broad, low gradient floors formed by alluvial sediment, and the thick alluvial strata filling these valleys cover the toes of late Pleistocene landslides. In this study, three examples of large, deep-seated Pleistocene landslides that are buttressed by alluvium are presented. The McCracken Hill Landslide in Orange County and the Potrero Canyon Landslide Complex in Monterey County are located approximately 1.5 and 6 km, respectively, from the modern Pacific shore and closely fit the eustatic model of alluvial buttressing. At Knights Valley, in the upper Russian River watershed of eastern Sonoma County, a deep-seated alluvium-buttressed landslide is located approximately 65 km from the modern shore (measured along the Russian River and its tributary stream). The alluvium in Knights Valley may have ponded due to late Quaternary tectonic uplift of hills west of the valley. Streams that cross these hills are incised into bedrock downstream from Knights Valley and approaching the Russian River. Thus, the Knights Valley example (of an alluvium-buttressed landslide) demonstrates a rare

  3. Tree Modeling with Real Tree-Parts Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ke; Yan, Feilong; Sharf, Andrei; Deussen, Oliver; Huang, Hui; Chen, Baoquan

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a 3D tree modeling technique that utilizes examples of real trees to enhance tree creation with realistic structures and fine-level details. In contrast to previous works that use smooth generalized cylinders to represent tree branches, our method generates realistic looking tree models with complex branching geometry by employing an exemplar database consisting of real-life trees reconstructed from scanned data. These trees are sliced into representative parts (denoted as tree-cuts), representing trunk logs and branching structures. In the modeling process, tree-cuts are positioned in space in an intuitive manner, serving as efficient proxies that guide the creation of the complete tree. Allometry rules are taken into account to ensure reasonable relations between adjacent branches. Realism is further enhanced by automatically transferring geometric textures from our database onto tree branches as well as by guided growing of foliage. Our results demonstrate the complexity and variety of trees that can be generated with our method within few minutes. We carry a user study to test the effectiveness of our modeling technique.

  4. Simple on-shell renormalization framework for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Sirlin, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany). Werner-Heisenberg-Institut

    2006-12-15

    We present an explicit on-shell framework to renormalize the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix at the one-loop level. It is based on a novel procedure to separate the external-leg mixing corrections into gauge-independent self-mass (sm) and gauge-dependent wave-function renormalization contributions, and to adjust non-diagonal mass counterterm matrices to cancel all the divergent sm contributions, and also their finite parts subject to constraints imposed by the hermiticity of the mass matrices. It is also shown that the proof of gauge independence and finiteness of the remaining one-loop corrections to W{yields}q{sub i}+ anti q{sub j} reduces to that in the unmixed, single-generation case. Diagonalization of the complete mass matrices leads then to an explicit expression for the CKM counterterm matrix, which is gauge independent, preserves unitarity, and leads to renormalized amplitudes that are non-singular in the limit in which any two fermions become mass degenerate. (orig.)

  5. A state-based model of prevention: Indiana's example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agley, Jon; Gassman, Ruth

    2008-04-01

    Public health officials in the United States have battled alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use among adolescents for the past few decades, but only in 2002 did they begin to see a decline in rates of use. ATOD use and abuse are associated with numerous problems, including criminal behavior and increased adolescent morbidity and mortality rates. Researchers have sought to identify best-practice procedures for ATOD prevention; the state of Indiana has a strong ATOD prevention system in place that has the potential to serve as a model for other U.S. localities because of its best-practice approach to public health services. This article outlines the activities of the Indiana Prevention Resource Center to provide an example to strengthen public health professionals' ability to prevent ATOD use and abuse and to provide for a healthy adolescent population.

  6. The comparison theorem for Bergman and Kobayashi metrics on Cartan-Hartogs domain of the second type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiaoxia; DING Li; YIN Weiping

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the holomorphic sectional curvature under invariant metric on a Cartan-Hartogs domain of the second type YII(N,p,K) is presented and an invariant K?]lher metric which is complete and not less than the Bergman metric is constructed, such that its holomorphic sectional curvature is bounded above by a negative constant. Hence a comparison theorem for the Bergman and Kobayashi metrics on YII(N,p,K) is obtained.

  7. Learning from video modeling examples : Content kept equal, adults are more effective models than peers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerheide, Vincent; van Wermeskerken, Margot; Loyens, Sofie M M; van Gog, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Learning from (video) modeling examples in which a model demonstrates how to perform a task is an effective instructional strategy. The model-observer similarity (MOS) hypothesis postulates that (perceived) similarity between learners and the model in terms of age or expertise moderates the effectiv

  8. Transition from Model to Proof: Example of Water Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Gürsel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research the prospective mathematics teachers' ability to construct a mathematical model for a real life problem and to prove these models by generalizing them to use in similar situations. The study was conducted with 129 prospective teachers determined on a volunteering basis. The data were obtained with the help of…

  9. On quantum equivalence of dual $\\sigma$ models $SL(3)$ examples

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, Z; Palla, L

    1996-01-01

    The equivalence of several $SL(3)$ sigma models and their special Abelian duals is investigated in the two loop order of perturbation theory. The investigation is based on extracting and comparing various $\\beta$ functions of the original and dual models. The role of the discrete global symmetries is emphasized.

  10. On quantum equivalence of dual sigma models: SL(3) examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, Z. [Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Karp, R.L. [Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Palla, L. [Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    1997-04-14

    The equivalence of several SL(3) sigma models and their special Abelian duals is investigated in two-loop order of perturbation theory. The investigation is based on extracting and comparing various {beta}-functions of the original and dual models. The role of discrete global symmetries is emphasized. (orig.).

  11. Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle gamma in B+/--->D*K+/- decays with a Dalitz analysis of D-->K0(S)pi-pi+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-16

    We report on a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase gamma through a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K0(S)pi-pi+ in the processes B+/- -->D*K+/-, D*-->Dpi0, Dgamma. Using a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure the amplitude ratios r(B)=0.12+/-0.03+/-0.04 and r*(B)=0.17+/-0.10+/-0.03+/-0.03, the relative strong phases delta(B)=(104+/-45(+17+16)(-21-24))degrees and delta*(B)=(-64+/-41(+14)(-12)+/-15) degrees between the amplitudes A(B- -->D*0K-) and A(B- -->D*0)K-), and gamma=(70+/-31(+12+14)(-10-11))degrees. The first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. The results for the strong and weak phases have a twofold ambiguity.

  12. An Example Multi-Model Analysis: Calibration and Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlmann, M.; James, S. C.; Lowry, T. S.

    2007-12-01

    Modeling solute transport is a complex process governed by multiple site-specific parameters like porosity and hydraulic conductivity as well as many solute-dependent processes such as diffusion and reaction. Furthermore, it must be determined whether a steady or time-variant model is most appropriate. A problem arises because over-parameterized conceptual models may be easily calibrated to exactly reproduce measured data, even if these data contain measurement noise. During preliminary site investigation stages where available data may be scarce it is often advisable to develop multiple independent conceptual models, but the question immediately arises: which model is best? This work outlines a method for quickly calibrating and ranking multiple models using the parameter estimation code PEST in conjunction with the second-order-bias-corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc). The method is demonstrated using the twelve analytical solutions to the one- dimensional convective-dispersive-reactive solute transport equation as the multiple conceptual models (van~Genuchten M. Th. and W. J. Alves, 1982. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional convective- dispersive solute transport equation, USDA ARS Technical Bulletin Number 1661. U.S. Salinity Laboratory, 4500 Glenwood Drive, Riverside, CA 92501.). Each solution is calibrated to three data sets, each comprising an increasing number of calibration points that represent increased knowledge of the modeled site (calibration points are selected from one of the analytical solutions that provides the "correct" model). The AICc is calculated after each successive calibration to the three data sets yielding model weights that are functions of the sum of the squared, weighted residuals, the number of parameters, and the number of observations (calibration data points) and ultimately indicates which model has the highest likelihood of being correct. The results illustrate how the sparser data sets can be modeled

  13. The role of modeling in troubleshooting: an example from electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R; Stetzer, MacKenzie R; Lewandowski, H J

    2015-01-01

    Troubleshooting systems is integral to experimental physics in both research and instructional laboratory settings. The recently adopted AAPT Lab Guidelines identify troubleshooting as an important learning outcome of the undergraduate laboratory curriculum. We investigate students' model-based reasoning on a troubleshooting task using data collected in think-aloud interviews during which pairs of students attempted to diagnose and repair a malfunctioning circuit. Our analysis scheme is informed by the Experimental Modeling Framework, which describes physicists' use of mathematical and conceptual models when reasoning about experimental systems. We show that this framework is a useful lens through which to characterize the troubleshooting process.

  14. Rich Counter-Examples for Temporal-Epistemic Logic Model Checking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Busard

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Model checking verifies that a model of a system satisfies a given property, and otherwise produces a counter-example explaining the violation. The verified properties are formally expressed in temporal logics. Some temporal logics, such as CTL, are branching: they allow to express facts about the whole computation tree of the model, rather than on each single linear computation. This branching aspect is even more critical when dealing with multi-modal logics, i.e. logics expressing facts about systems with several transition relations. A prominent example is CTLK, a logic that reasons about temporal and epistemic properties of multi-agent systems. In general, model checkers produce linear counter-examples for failed properties, composed of a single computation path of the model. But some branching properties are only poorly and partially explained by a linear counter-example. This paper proposes richer counter-example structures called tree-like annotated counter-examples (TLACEs, for properties in Action-Restricted CTL (ARCTL, an extension of CTL quantifying paths restricted in terms of actions labeling transitions of the model. These counter-examples have a branching structure that supports more complete description of property violations. Elements of these counter-examples are annotated with parts of the property to give a better understanding of their structure. Visualization and browsing of these richer counter-examples become a critical issue, as the number of branches and states can grow exponentially for deeply-nested properties. This paper formally defines the structure of TLACEs, characterizes adequate counter-examples w.r.t. models and failed properties, and gives a generation algorithm for ARCTL properties. It also illustrates the approach with examples in CTLK, using a reduction of CTLK to ARCTL. The proposed approach has been implemented, first by extending the NuSMV model checker to generate and export branching counter-examples

  15. Explicit examples of DIM constraints for network matrix models

    CERN Document Server

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Mironov, Andrei; Morozov, Alexei; Morozov, Andrey; Ohkubo, Yusuke; Zenkevich, Yegor

    2016-01-01

    Dotsenko-Fateev and Chern-Simons matrix models, which describe Nekrasov functions for SYM theories in different dimensions, are all incorporated into network matrix models with the hidden Ding-Iohara-Miki (DIM) symmetry. This lifting is especially simple for what we call balanced networks. Then, the Ward identities (known under the names of Virasoro/W-constraints or loop equations or regularity condition for qq-characters) are also promoted to the DIM level, where they all become corollaries of a single identity.

  16. Discrete Mesh Approach in Morphogenesis Modelling: the Example of Gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demongeot, J; Lontos, A; Promayon, E

    2016-12-01

    Morphogenesis is a general concept in biology including all the processes which generate tissue shapes and cellular organizations in a living organism. Many hybrid formalizations (i.e., with both discrete and continuous parts) have been proposed for modelling morphogenesis in embryonic or adult animals, like gastrulation. We propose first to study the ventral furrow invagination as the initial step of gastrulation, early stage of embryogenesis. We focus on the study of the connection between the apical constriction of the ventral cells and the initiation of the invagination. For that, we have created a 3D biomechanical model of the embryo of the Drosophila melanogaster based on the finite element method. Each cell is modelled by an elastic hexahedron contour and is firmly attached to its neighbouring cells. A uniform initial distribution of elastic and contractile forces is applied to cells along the model. Numerical simulations show that invagination starts at ventral curved extremities of the embryo and then propagates to the ventral medial layer. Then, this observation already made in some experiments can be attributed uniquely to the specific shape of the embryo and we provide mechanical evidence to support it. Results of the simulations of the "pill-shaped" geometry of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are compared with those of a spherical geometry corresponding to the Xenopus lævis embryo. Eventually, we propose to study the influence of cell proliferation on the end of the process of invagination represented by the closure of the ventral furrow.

  17. A simple model of scientific progress - with examples

    CERN Document Server

    Scorzato, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of scientific research is to provide a description of the empirical data which is as accurate and comprehensive as possible, while relying on as few and simple assumptions as possible. In this paper, I propose a definition of the notion of "few and simple assumptions" that is not affected by known problems. This leads to the introduction of a simple model of scientific progress that is based only on empirical accuracy and conciseness. An essential point in this task is the understanding of the role played by "measurability" in the formulation of a scientific theory. This is the key to prevent artificially concise formulations. The model is confronted here with many possible objections and with challenging cases of real progress. Although I cannot exclude that the model might have some limitations, it includes all the cases of genuine progress examined here, and no spurious one. In this model, I stress the role of the "state of the art", which is the collection of all the theories that ar...

  18. Statistics by Example, Finding Models, Teachers' Commentary and Solutions Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinka, Martha; Sutherland, Michael

    The first part of the teachers' guide for "Finding Models" briefly describes the mathematical background necessary for the student, lists the substantive areas touched on by the problems in the pamphlet, suggests classroom uses for the booklet, and gives background information for the individual chapters. The second part provides complete…

  19. Exact diagonalization: the Bose-Hubbard model as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. M.; Dong, R. X.

    2010-05-01

    We take the Bose-Hubbard model to illustrate exact diagonalization techniques in a pedagogical way. We follow the route of first generating all the basis vectors, then setting up the Hamiltonian matrix with respect to this basis and finally using the Lanczos algorithm to solve low lying eigenstates and eigenvalues. Emphasis is placed on how to enumerate all the basis vectors and how to use the hashing trick to set up the Hamiltonian matrix or matrices corresponding to other quantities. Although our route is not necessarily the most efficient one in practice, the techniques and ideas introduced are quite general and may find use in many other problems.

  20. Modelling bioaugmentation in unsaturated porous media: The linuron herbicide example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Dechesne, Arnaud; Binning, Philip John

    2010-01-01

    at various water saturation levels. A bacterium mineralizing linuron is heterogeneously distributed within a 3-D model domain in spherical hotspots of 2-mm diameter size. Diffusion and advection due to infiltration are the transport processes, and microbial growth follows first order kinetics. Without...... advection, a bead spacing distance of 5 mm at saturated conditions is required to achieve a bioremediation goal of 90% linuron mineralization in 1 year. The gas phase is an important parameter affecting the transport of linuron, however, linuron biodegradation is growth kinetics limited within a broad water...... saturation range. It is hypothesized that the selection of faster degraders can compensate for high amounts of required beads....

  1. The Role of Model Integration in Complex Systems Modelling An Example from Cancer Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Manish

    2010-01-01

    Model integration – the process by which different modelling efforts can be brought together to simulate the target system – is a core technology in the field of Systems Biology. In the work presented here model integration was addressed directly taking cancer systems as an example. An in-depth literature review was carried out to survey the model forms and types currently being utilised. This was used to formalise the main challenges that model integration poses, namely that of paradigm (the formalism on which a model is based), focus (the real-world system the model represents) and scale. A two-tier model integration strategy, including a knowledge-driven approach to address model semantics, was developed to tackle these challenges. In the first step a novel description of models at the level of behaviour, rather than the precise mathematical or computational basis of the model, is developed by distilling a set of abstract classes and properties. These can accurately describe model behaviour and hence d...

  2. Analytical examples, measurement models, and classical limit of quantum backflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearsley, J. M.; Halliwell, J. J.; Hartshorn, R.; Whitby, A.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the backflow effect in elementary quantum mechanics—the phenomenon in which a state consisting entirely of positive momenta may have negative current and the probability flows in the opposite direction to the momentum. We compute the current and flux for states consisting of superpositions of Gaussian wave packets. These are experimentally realizable but the amount of backflow is small. Inspired by the numerical results of Penz [Penz, Grübl, Kreidl, and Wagner, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/39/2/012 39, 423 (2006)], we find two nontrivial wave functions whose current at any time may be computed analytically and which have periods of significant backflow, in one case with a backward flux equal to about 70% of the maximum possible backflow, a dimensionless number cbm≈0.04, discovered by Bracken and Melloy [Bracken and Melloy, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/27/6/040 27, 2197 (1994)]. This number has the unusual property of being independent of ℏ (and also of all other parameters of the model), despite corresponding to an obviously quantum-mechanical effect, and we shed some light on this surprising property by considering the classical limit of backflow. We discuss some specific measurement models in which backflow may be identified in certain measurable probabilities.

  3. Pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation: examples, models and consistent theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Elisa N; Shu, Jiang; Cserhati, Matyas F; Weeks, Donald P; Ladunga, Istvan

    2016-06-01

    We present a theory of pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation. To bridge the gap between empirical studies and mathematical models, we integrate pre-existing observations with our meta-analyses of the ENCODE ChIP-Seq experiments. Earlier evidence includes fluctuations in levels, location, activity, and binding of transcription factors, variable DNA motifs, and bursts in gene expression. Stochastic regulation is also indicated by frequently subdued effects of knockout mutants of regulators, their evolutionary losses/gains and massive rewiring of regulatory sites. We report wide-spread pluralistic regulation in ≈800 000 tightly co-expressed pairs of diverse human genes. Typically, half of ≈50 observed regulators bind to both genes reproducibly, twice more than in independently expressed gene pairs. We also examine the largest set of co-expressed genes, which code for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Numerous regulatory complexes are highly significant enriched in ribosomal genes compared to highly expressed non-ribosomal genes. We could not find any DNA-associated, strict sense master regulator. Despite major fluctuations in transcription factor binding, our machine learning model accurately predicted transcript levels using binding sites of 20+ regulators. Our pluralistic and stochastic theory is consistent with partially random binding patterns, redundancy, stochastic regulator binding, burst-like expression, degeneracy of binding motifs and massive regulatory rewiring during evolution.

  4. An example of debris-flows hazard modeling using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Melelli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a GIS-based model for predicting debris-flows occurrence. The availability of two different digital datasets and the use of a Digital Elevation Model (at a given scale have greatly enhanced our ability to quantify and to analyse the topography in relation to debris-flows. In particular, analysing the relationship between debris-flows and the various causative factors provides new understanding of the mechanisms. We studied the contact zone between the calcareous basement and the fluvial-lacustrine infill adjacent northern area of the Terni basin (Umbria, Italy, and identified eleven basins and corresponding alluvial fans. We suggest that accumulations of colluvium in topographic hollows, whatever the sources might be, should be considered potential debris-flow source areas. In order to develop a susceptibility map for the entire area, an index was calculated from the number of initiation locations in each causative factor unit divided by the areal extent of that unit within the study area. This index identifies those units that produce the most debris-flows in each Representative Elementary Area (REA. Finally, the results are presented with the advantages and the disadvantages of the approach, and the need for further research.

  5. Showing a model's eye movements in examples does not improve learning of problem-solving tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marlen, Tim; van Wermeskerken, Margot; Jarodzka, Halszka; van Gog, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eye movement modeling examples (EMME) are demonstrations of a computer-based task by a human model (e.g., a teacher), with the model's eye movements superimposed on the task to guide learners' attention. EMME have been shown to enhance learning of perceptual classification tasks; however, it is an

  6. Showing a model's eye movements in examples does not improve learning of problem-solving tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marlen, Tim; van Wermeskerken, Margot; Jarodzka, Halszka; van Gog, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eye movement modeling examples (EMME) are demonstrations of a computer-based task by a human model (e.g., a teacher), with the model's eye movements superimposed on the task to guide learners' attention. EMME have been shown to enhance learning of perceptual classification tasks; however, it is an o

  7. Rich Counter-Examples for Temporal-Epistemic Logic Model Checking

    CERN Document Server

    Busard, Simon; 10.4204/EPTCS.78.4

    2012-01-01

    Model checking verifies that a model of a system satisfies a given property, and otherwise produces a counter-example explaining the violation. The verified properties are formally expressed in temporal logics. Some temporal logics, such as CTL, are branching: they allow to express facts about the whole computation tree of the model, rather than on each single linear computation. This branching aspect is even more critical when dealing with multi-modal logics, i.e. logics expressing facts about systems with several transition relations. A prominent example is CTLK, a logic that reasons about temporal and epistemic properties of multi-agent systems. In general, model checkers produce linear counter-examples for failed properties, composed of a single computation path of the model. But some branching properties are only poorly and partially explained by a linear counter-example. This paper proposes richer counter-example structures called tree-like annotated counter-examples (TLACEs), for properties in Action-R...

  8. Evidence for B(0) --> rho(0)rho(0) decays and implications for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Sanchez, P Del Amo; Barrett, M; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Lodovico, F Di; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Nardo, G De; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-03-16

    We search for the decays B(0) --> rho(0)rho(0), B(0) --> rho(0)f(0)(980), and B(0) --> f(0)(980)f(0)(980) in a sample of about 384 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S) --> BB[over] decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We find evidence for B(0) --> rho(0)rho(0) with 3.5 sigma significance and measure the branching fraction B = (1.07 +/- 0.33 +/- 0.19) x 10(-6) and longitudinal polarization fraction f(L) = 0.87 +/- 0.13 +/- 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. The uncertainty on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix unitarity angle alpha due to penguin contributions in B --> rho rho decays is 18 degrees at the 1 sigma level. We also set upper limits on the B(0) --> rho(0)f(0)(980) and B(0) --> f(0)(980)f(0)(980) decay rates.

  9. Effects of creating video-based modeling examples on learning and transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerheide, Vincent; Loyens, Sofie M M; van Gog, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether acting as a peer model for a video-based modeling example, which entails studying a text with the intention to explain it to others and then actually explaining it on video, would foster learning and transfer. In both experiments, novices were instructed to study

  10. Importance of fish behaviour in modelling conservation problems: food limitation as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Railsback; Bret Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Simulation experiments using the inSTREAM individual-based brown trout Salmo trutta population model explored the role of individual adaptive behaviour in food limitation, as an example of how behaviour can affect managers’ understanding of conservation problems. The model includes many natural complexities in habitat (spatial and temporal variation in characteristics...

  11. Effects of modelling examples in complex procedural skills training: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Anne Sofie; Hilberg, Ole; van Gog, Tamara; Charles, Peder; Eika, Berit

    2013-09-01

    Learning complex procedural skills, such as bronchoscopy, through simulation training, imposes a high cognitive load on novices. Example-based learning has been shown to be an effective way to reduce cognitive load and enhance learning outcomes. Prior research has shown that modelling examples, in which a human model demonstrates the skill to a learner, were effective for learning basic surgical skills. However, principles derived from simple skills training do not necessarily generalise to more complex skills. Therefore, the present study examined the effectiveness of integrating modelling examples into simulation training for a more complex procedural skill - bronchoscopy. Moreover, this study extended previous simulation studies by using a physical demonstration rather than video-based modelling examples. Forty-eight medical students were randomised into a modelling group and a control group. They all practised on eight bronchoscopy simulation cases individually, followed by standardised feedback from an instructor. Additionally, the modelling group watched three modelling examples of the simulated bronchoscopy, performed by the instructor. These modelling examples were interspersed between cases. Assessments were carried out at pre-, post- and 3-week retention tests with simulator-measured performance metrics. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of segments entered/minute. Other measures were wall collisions, red-out, the percentage of segments entered and the time to completion. Group differences were examined using repeated measures analysis of variance (anova). A clear learning curve was observed for both groups, but as hypothesised, the modelling group outperformed the control group on all parameters except the percentage of segments entered on the post-test and retained this superiority at the retention test. For the primary outcome measure, the percentage of segments entered/minute, the modelling group achieved a 46% higher score at the post

  12. Meta-Analysis in Higher Education: An Illustrative Example Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Nida; Seltzer, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide higher education researchers with an illustrative example of meta-analysis utilizing hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). This article demonstrates the step-by-step process of meta-analysis using a recently-published study examining the effects of curricular and co-curricular diversity activities on racial…

  13. A Laborative Model of Geomagnetism as an Example of Creative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytz, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    Creative learning is discussed with respect to a specific physics topic. A teaching example, based on an apparatus that demonstrates the standard dynamo model of geomagnetism, is presented. It features many of the basic physics concepts within the syllabus of electromagnetism at high-school and university. To stimulate conceptual learning and to…

  14. Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Balslev, Thomas; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Balslev, T., Holmqvist, K., Nyström, M., Scheiter, K., Gerjets, P., & Eika, B. (2012). Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples. Instructional Science, 40(5), 813-827. doi:10.1007/s11251-012-9218-5

  15. Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Balslev, Thomas; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Balslev, T., Holmqvist, K., Nyström, M., Scheiter, K., Gerjets, P., & Eika, B. (2012). Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples. Instructional Science, 40(5), 813-827. doi:10.1007/s11251-012-9218-5

  16. A Laborative Model of Geomagnetism as an Example of Creative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytz, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    Creative learning is discussed with respect to a specific physics topic. A teaching example, based on an apparatus that demonstrates the standard dynamo model of geomagnetism, is presented. It features many of the basic physics concepts within the syllabus of electromagnetism at high-school and university. To stimulate conceptual learning and to…

  17. Meta-Analysis in Higher Education: An Illustrative Example Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Nida; Seltzer, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide higher education researchers with an illustrative example of meta-analysis utilizing hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). This article demonstrates the step-by-step process of meta-analysis using a recently-published study examining the effects of curricular and co-curricular diversity activities on racial…

  18. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analytic structural equation modeling: examples and analyses in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mike W-L

    2014-03-01

    Meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) combines the ideas of meta-analysis and structural equation modeling for the purpose of synthesizing correlation or covariance matrices and fitting structural equation models on the pooled correlation or covariance matrix. Cheung and Chan (Psychological Methods 10:40-64, 2005b, Structural Equation Modeling 16:28-53, 2009) proposed a two-stage structural equation modeling (TSSEM) approach to conducting MASEM that was based on a fixed-effects model by assuming that all studies have the same population correlation or covariance matrices. The main objective of this article is to extend the TSSEM approach to a random-effects model by the inclusion of study-specific random effects. Another objective is to demonstrate the procedures with two examples using the metaSEM package implemented in the R statistical environment. Issues related to and future directions for MASEM are discussed.

  19. Applications of meta-analytic structural equation modelling in health psychology: examples, issues, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mike W-L; Hong, Ryan Y

    2017-09-01

    Statistical methods play an important role in behavioural, medical, and social sciences. Two recent statistical advances are structural equation modelling (SEM) and meta-analysis. SEM is used to test hypothesised models based on substantive theories, which can be path, confirmatory factor analytic, or full structural equation models. Meta-analysis is used to synthesise research findings in a particular topic. This article demonstrates another recent statistical advance - meta-analytic structural equation modelling (MASEM) - that combines meta-analysis and SEM to synthesise research findings for the purpose of testing hypothesised models. Using the theory of planned behaviour as an example, we show how MASEM can be used to address important research questions that cannot be answered by univariate meta-analyses on Pearson correlations. Specifically, MASEM allows researchers to: (1) test whether the proposed models are consistent with the data; (2) estimate partial effects after controlling for other variables; (3) estimate functions of parameter estimates such as indirect effects; and (4) include latent variables in the models. We illustrate the procedures with an example on the theory of planned behaviour. Practical issues in MASEM and suggested solutions are discussed.

  20. Model for safety reports including descriptive examples; Mall foer saekerhetsrapporter med beskrivande exempel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Several safety reports will be produced in the process of planning and constructing the system for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Sweden. The present report gives a model, with detailed examples, of how these reports should be organized and what steps they should include. In the near future safety reports will deal with the encapsulation plant and the repository. Later reports will treat operation of the handling systems and the repository.

  1. A defeasible reasoning model of inductive concept learning from examples and communication

    OpenAIRE

    Ontañón, Santiago; Dellunde, Pilar; Godo, Lluís; Plaza, Enric

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a logical model of inductive generalization, and specifically of the machine learning task of inductive concept learning (ICL). We argue that some inductive processes, like ICL, can be seen as a form of defeasible reasoning. We define a consequence relation characterizing which hypotheses can be induced from given sets of examples, and study its properties, showing they correspond to a rather well-behaved non-monotonic logic. We will also show that with the addition of a...

  2. Limit on the B0-->rho0rho0 branching fraction and implications for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M

    2005-04-08

    We search for the decay B0-->rho(0)rho(0) in a data sample of about 227x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider at SLAC. We find no significant signal and set an upper limit of 1.1x10(-6) at 90% C.L. on the branching fraction. As a result, the uncertainty due to penguin contributions on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity angle alpha measured in B-->rhorho decays is decreased to 11 degrees at 68% C.L.

  3. Models and Strategies for Factor Mixture Analysis: An Example Concerning the Structure Underlying Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shaunna L.; Muthén, Bengt; Kaprio, Jaakko; D’Onofrio, Brian M.; Viken, Richard; Rose, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The factor mixture model (FMM) uses a hybrid of both categorical and continuous latent variables. The FMM is a good model for the underlying structure of psychopathology because the use of both categorical and continuous latent variables allows the structure to be simultaneously categorical and dimensional. This is useful because both diagnostic class membership and the range of severity within and across diagnostic classes can be modeled concurrently. While the conceptualization of the FMM has been explained in the literature, the use of the FMM is still not prevalent. One reason is that there is little research about how such models should be applied in practice and, once a well fitting model is obtained, how it should be interpreted. In this paper, the FMM will be explored by studying a real data example on conduct disorder. By exploring this example, this paper aims to explain the different formulations of the FMM, the various steps in building a FMM, as well as how to decide between a FMM and alternative models. PMID:24302849

  4. Unified Probabilistic Models for Face Recognition from a Single Example Image per Person

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pin Liao; Li Shen

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique of unified probabilistic models for face recognition from only one single example image per person. The unified models, trained on an obtained training set with multiple samples per person, are used to recognize facial images from another disjoint database with a single sample per person. Variations between facial images are modeled as two unified probabilistic models: within-class variations and between-class variations. Gaussian Mixture Models are used to approximate the distributions of the two variations and exploit a classifier combination method to improve the performance. Extensive experimental results on the ORL face database and the authors' database (the ICT-JDL database) including totally 1,750facial images of 350 individuals demonstrate that the proposed technique, compared with traditional eigenface method and some well-known traditional algorithms, is a significantly more effective and robust approach for face recognition.

  5. Unified Probabilistic Models for Face Recognition from a Single Example Image per Person

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PinLiao; LiShen

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique of unified probabilistic models for face recognition from only one single example image per person. The unified models, trained on an obtained training set with multiple samples per person, are used to recognize facial images from another disjoint database with a single sample per person. Variations between facial images are modeled as two unified probabilistic models: within-class variations and between-class variations. Gaussian Mixture Models are used to approximate the distributions of the two variations and exploit a classifier combination method to improve the performance. Extensive experimental results on the ORL face database and the authors' database (the ICT-JDL database) including totally 1,750 facial images of 350 individuals demonstrate that the proposed technique, compared with traditional eigenface method and some well-known traditional algorithms, is a significantly more effective and robust approach for face recognition.

  6. Open data models for smart health interconnected applications: the example of openEHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Hans; Garde, Sebastian; Hildebrand, Claudia

    2016-10-22

    Smart Health is known as a concept that enhances networking, intelligent data processing and combining patient data with other parameters. Open data models can play an important role in creating a framework for providing interoperable data services that support the development of innovative Smart Health applications profiting from data fusion and sharing. This article describes a model-driven engineering approach based on standardized clinical information models and explores its application for the development of interoperable electronic health record systems. The following possible model-driven procedures were considered: provision of data schemes for data exchange, automated generation of artefacts for application development and native platforms that directly execute the models. The applicability of the approach in practice was examined using the openEHR framework as an example. A comprehensive infrastructure for model-driven engineering of electronic health records is presented using the example of the openEHR framework. It is shown that data schema definitions to be used in common practice software development processes can be derived from domain models. The capabilities for automatic creation of implementation artefacts (e.g., data entry forms) are demonstrated. Complementary programming libraries and frameworks that foster the use of open data models are introduced. Several compatible health data platforms are listed. They provide standard based interfaces for interconnecting with further applications. Open data models help build a framework for interoperable data services that support the development of innovative Smart Health applications. Related tools for model-driven application development foster semantic interoperability and interconnected innovative applications.

  7. Examples of the application of the cause-effect ergonomic evaluation model to the wheelchair cushions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà-Guillem, Ricard; Page, Álvaro; Laparra, José; Durà, Juan V

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the potential of the application of the cause-effect model for the ergonomic evaluation in the field of cushions. User involvement in the prescription and development of assistive devices have been identified a key aspect for positive interventions, although the reality is that we lack of systematic approaches and examples of best practices. The potential benefits are identified for the development of new products and in the prescription process. Additional research would be necessary to better link the characteristics of the cushions and users with the biomechanical and physiological performance of the interface cushion-user and the consequences measured in health, user perception and activity performance. This article shows examples of the relationship in this three levels from the point of view of the user perception.

  8. Comparison of Parameter Estimation Methods in Stochastic Chemical Kinetic Models: Examples in Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankur; Rawlings, James B

    2014-04-01

    Stochastic chemical kinetics has become a staple for mechanistically modeling various phenomena in systems biology. These models, even more so than their deterministic counterparts, pose a challenging problem in the estimation of kinetic parameters from experimental data. As a result of the inherent randomness involved in stochastic chemical kinetic models, the estimation methods tend to be statistical in nature. Three classes of estimation methods are implemented and compared in this paper. The first is the exact method, which uses the continuous-time Markov chain representation of stochastic chemical kinetics and is tractable only for a very restricted class of problems. The next class of methods is based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. The third method, termed conditional density importance sampling (CDIS), is a new method introduced in this paper. The use of these methods is demonstrated on two examples taken from systems biology, one of which is a new model of single-cell viral infection. The applicability, strengths and weaknesses of the three classes of estimation methods are discussed. Using simulated data for the two examples, some guidelines are provided on experimental design to obtain more information from a limited number of measurements.

  9. Assessment of urban thermal stress by UTCI – experimental and modelling studies: an example from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażejczyk, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach to the study of the spatial variability of heat stress in urban areas. The Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI was applied for this purpose. The spatial variability of UTCI at the local scale was studied using examples of urban areas with different sizes and geographical locations. The experimental research on urban heat stress was conducted in Warsaw. The research covers both differences between UTCI in urban to rural areas as well as the variation of heat stress within small residential districts in Warsaw. We found a very large and significant heat stress gradient between downtown Warsaw and rural stations. Spatial variability of UTCI was also observed in microclimate research. A modelling approach was presented based on examples from Warsaw, a city with a population of almost 2 million, as well as examples from several spa towns with populations of up to 40,000 located in various parts of Poland. GIS analysis (ArcGIS for Desktop and IDRISI was applied for this purpose.

  10. Developing population models: A systematic approach for pesticide risk assessment using herbaceous plants as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmolke, Amelie; Kapo, Katherine E; Rueda-Cediel, Pamela; Thorbek, Pernille; Brain, Richard; Forbes, Valery

    2017-12-01

    Population models are used as tools in species management and conservation and are increasingly recognized as important tools in pesticide risk assessments. A wide variety of population model applications and resources on modeling techniques, evaluation and documentation can be found in the literature. In this paper, we add to these resources by introducing a systematic, transparent approach to developing population models. The decision guide that we propose is intended to help model developers systematically address data availability for their purpose and the steps that need to be taken in any model development. The resulting conceptual model includes the necessary complexity to address the model purpose on the basis of current understanding and available data. We provide specific guidance for the development of population models for herbaceous plant species in pesticide risk assessment and demonstrate the approach with an example of a conceptual model developed following the decision guide for herbicide risk assessment of Mead's milkweed (Asclepias meadii), a species listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. The decision guide specific to herbaceous plants demonstrates the details, but the general approach can be adapted for other species groups and management objectives. Population models provide a tool to link population-level dynamics, species and habitat characteristics as well as information about stressors in a single approach. Developing such models in a systematic, transparent way will increase their applicability and credibility, reduce development efforts, and result in models that are readily available for use in species management and risk assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rasterizing geological models for parallel finite difference simulation using seismic simulation as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehner, Björn; Hellwig, Olaf; Linke, Maik; Görz, Ines; Buske, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    3D geological underground models are often presented by vector data, such as triangulated networks representing boundaries of geological bodies and geological structures. Since models are to be used for numerical simulations based on the finite difference method, they have to be converted into a representation discretizing the full volume of the model into hexahedral cells. Often the simulations require a high grid resolution and are done using parallel computing. The storage of such a high-resolution raster model would require a large amount of storage space and it is difficult to create such a model using the standard geomodelling packages. Since the raster representation is only required for the calculation, but not for the geometry description, we present an algorithm and concept for rasterizing geological models on the fly for the use in finite difference codes that are parallelized by domain decomposition. As a proof of concept we implemented a rasterizer library and integrated it into seismic simulation software that is run as parallel code on a UNIX cluster using the Message Passing Interface. We can thus run the simulation with realistic and complicated surface-based geological models that are created using 3D geomodelling software, instead of using a simplified representation of the geological subsurface using mathematical functions or geometric primitives. We tested this set-up using an example model that we provide along with the implemented library.

  12. Example models of building trust in supply chains of metalurgical enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is an introduction to the notion of building trust in supply chains. Foreign publishers offer many articles connected with trust and some of the most important ones were quoted in this article. In business world there are models based on trust of the companies which are connected with one another and such models are very popular. Trust becomes the key link in the organisation of supply chains. It is one of the basic mechanisms of action co-ordination which provides the correctness of functioning in the whole chain. The growth of importance of trust between the links of the chain is also observed in metallurgy sector. For the purpose of this publication example models of supply chains structures were constructed in which relationships are based on mutual trust with characteristics of the metallurgical sector taken into account.

  13. Model for impedance of an ionic conductor sandwiched between blocking electrodes. [Example: yttria-stabilized zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.C.

    1992-06-24

    The simplest model for the impedance of an ionic conductor sandwiched between two blocking electrodes is a resistor in series with a capacitor (rc pair) representing the bulk material and the conductor-electrode interface, respectively, and a second capacitor parallel to the rc pair representing the electronic dielectric response of the system. In practice, to describe the experimental data satisfactorily, one needs to replace the interface capacitor with a constant-phase-angle (CPA) element and to add a non-Debye dielectric element parallel to the resistor to represent the local ionic movement. In this paper, some of the existing physical models for the CPA and non-Debye dielectric elements are discussed, and an example is presented for analyzing the impedance data using the resultant circuit model.

  14. Examples of testing global identifiability of biological and biomedical models with the DAISY software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomani, Maria Pia; Audoly, Stefania; Bellu, Giuseppina; D'Angiò, Leontina

    2010-04-01

    DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems) is a recently developed computer algebra software tool which can be used to automatically check global identifiability of (linear and) nonlinear dynamic models described by differential equations involving polynomial or rational functions. Global identifiability is a fundamental prerequisite for model identification which is important not only for biological or medical systems but also for many physical and engineering systems derived from first principles. Lack of identifiability implies that the parameter estimation techniques may not fail but any obtained numerical estimates will be meaningless. The software does not require understanding of the underlying mathematical principles and can be used by researchers in applied fields with a minimum of mathematical background. We illustrate the DAISY software by checking the a priori global identifiability of two benchmark nonlinear models taken from the literature. The analysis of these two examples includes comparison with other methods and demonstrates how identifiability analysis is simplified by this tool. Thus we illustrate the identifiability analysis of other two examples, by including discussion of some specific aspects related to the role of observability and knowledge of initial conditions in testing identifiability and to the computational complexity of the software. The main focus of this paper is not on the description of the mathematical background of the algorithm, which has been presented elsewhere, but on illustrating its use and on some of its more interesting features. DAISY is available on the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/ approximately pia/.

  15. Effect of Epistemic Uncertainty Modeling Approach on Decision-Making: Example using Equipment Performance Indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana Kelly; Robert Youngblood

    2012-06-01

    Quantitative risk assessments are an integral part of risk-informed regulation of current and future nuclear plants in the U.S. The Bayesian approach to uncertainty, in which both stochastic and epistemic uncertainties are represented with precise probability distributions, is the standard approach to modeling uncertainties in such quantitative risk assessments. However, there are long-standing criticisms of the Bayesian approach to epistemic uncertainty from many perspectives, and a number of alternative approaches have been proposed. Among these alternatives, the most promising (and most rapidly developing) would appear to be the concept of imprecise probability. In this paper, we employ a performance indicator example to focus the discussion. We first give a short overview of the traditional Bayesian paradigm and review some its controversial aspects, for example, issues with so-called noninformative prior distributions. We then discuss how the imprecise probability approach treats these issues and compare it with two other approaches: sensitivity analysis and hierarchical Bayes modeling. We conclude with some practical implications for risk-informed decision making.

  16. Modelling the habitat suitability of cetaceans: Example of the sperm whale in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praca, Emilie; Gannier, Alexandre; Das, Krishna; Laran, Sophie

    2009-04-01

    Cetaceans are mobile and spend long periods underwater. Because of this, modelling their habitat could be subject to a serious problem of false absence. Furthermore, extensive surveys at sea are time and money consuming, and presence-absence data are difficult to apply. This study compares the ability of two presence-absence and two presence-only habitat modelling methods and uses the example of the sperm whale ( Physeter macrocephalus) in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The data consist of summer visual and acoustical detections of sperm whales, compiled between 1998 and 2005. Habitat maps were computed using topographical and hydrological eco-geographical variables. Four methods were compared: principal component analysis (PCA), ecological niche factor analysis (ENFA), generalized linear model (GLM) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS). The evaluation of the models was achieved by calculating the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of the models and their respective area under the curve (AUC). Presence-absence methods (GLM, AUC=0.70, and MARS, AUC=0.79) presented better AUC than presence-only methods (PCA, AUC=0.58, and ENFA, AUC=0.66), but this difference was not statistically significant, except between the MARS and the PCA models. The four models showed an influence of both topographical and hydrological factors, but the resulting habitat suitability maps differed. The core habitat on the continental slope was well highlighted by the four models, while GLM and MARS maps also showed a suitable habitat in the offshore waters. Presence-absence methods are therefore recommended for modelling the habitat suitability of cetaceans, as they seem more accurate to highlight complex habitat. However, the use of presence-only techniques, in particular ENFA, could be very useful for a first model of the habitat range or when important surveys at sea are not possible.

  17. Online Video-Based Training in the Use of Hydrologic Models: A Case Example Using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrologic models are increasingly important tools in public decision-making. For example, watershed models are used to develop Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) plans, quantify pollutant loads, and estimate the effects of watershed restoration efforts funded by the public. One widely-used tool is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which has been applied by state and federal agencies, consultants, and university researchers to assess sources of nonpoint source pollution and the effects of potential solutions, and used in testimony in at least one lawsuit. The SWAT model has the capability to evaluate the relative effects of different management scenarios on water quality, sediment, and agricultural chemical yield at the watershed scale. As with all models, the model user and the decisions that s/he makes in the modeling process are important determinants of model performance. The SWAT model has an open structure, leaving most decisions up to the model user, which was especially appropriate when the model was primarily used in research by highly-experienced modelers. However, as the model has become more widely applied in planning and assessment, by people who may have limited hydrology background and modeling knowledge, the possibility that users may be using the model inconsistently or even incorrectly becomes a concern. Consistent training can lead to a minimum standard of knowledge that model users are expected to have, and therefore to higher use of best practices in modeling efforts. In addition, widespread availability of training can lead to better decisions about when and where using the model is appropriate, and what level of data needs to be available for confidence in predictions. Currently, most training in model use takes place in occasional face-to-face workshops, courses offered at a few universities, and a short tutorial available in the manual. Many new users simply acquire the model and learn from the manual, other users, trial and error

  18. An approximate Kalman filter for ocean data assimilation: An example with an idealized Gulf Stream model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumori, Ichiro; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola

    1995-01-01

    A practical method of data assimilation for use with large, nonlinear, ocean general circulation models is explored. A Kalman filter based on approximation of the state error covariance matrix is presented, employing a reduction of the effective model dimension, the error's asymptotic steady state limit, and a time-invariant linearization of the dynamic model for the error integration. The approximations lead to dramatic computational savings in applying estimation theory to large complex systems. We examine the utility of the approximate filter in assimilating different measurement types using a twin experiment of an idealized Gulf Stream. A nonlinear primitive equation model of an unstable east-west jet is studied with a state dimension exceeding 170,000 elements. Assimilation of various pseudomeasurements are examined, including velocity, density, and volume transport at localized arrays and realistic distributions of satellite altimetry and acoustic tomography observations. Results are compared in terms of their effects on the accuracies of the estimation. The approximate filter is shown to outperform an empirical nudging scheme used in a previous study. The examples demonstrate that useful approximate estimation errors can be computed in a practical manner for general circulation models.

  19. River Loire levees hazard studies – CARDigues’ model principles and utilization examples on Blois levees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Along the river Loire, in order to have a homogenous method to do specific risk assessment studies, a new model named CARDigues (for Levee Breach Hazard Calculation was developed in a partnership with DREAL Centre-Val de Loire (owner of levees, Cerema and Irstea. This model enables to approach the probability of failure on every levee sections and to integrate and cross different “stability” parameters such topography and included structures, geology and material geotechnical characteristics, hydraulic loads… and observations of visual inspections or instrumentation results considered as disorders (seepage, burrowing animals, vegetation, pipes, etc.. This model and integrated tool CARDigues enables to check for each levee section, the probability of appearance and rupture of five breaching scenarios initiated by: overflowing, internal erosion, slope instability, external erosion and uplift. It has been recently updated and has been applied on several levee systems by different contractors. The article presents the CARDigues model principles and its recent developments (version V28.00 with examples on river Loire and how it is currently used for a relevant and global levee system diagnosis and assessment. Levee reinforcement or improvement management is also a perspective of applications for this model CARDigues.

  20. Music Therapy, Social Policy and Ecological Models: A Located Example of Music in Australian Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Hew Dale Crooke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While music therapy courses rarely cover the finer points of social policy, a basic knowledge of how this system of governance works can be highly beneficial for those wanting to maximise their presence and impact in a given field. Taking an ecological approach, this article presents how music therapy as a discipline and practise can be seen as located within a structure of policy. Further, it illustrates how understanding this structure can help practitioners and researchers capitalise on the opportunities they provide, and work around the barriers they impose. It does this by providing a background of the ecological model approach, and discussing how this approach can be useful for thinking about the relationship between music therapy and social policy. It then uses the policy situation surrounding music in Australian schools to give a grounded example of how understanding this situation can help position music therapy to meet key policy goals at national and localised levels. It is hoped that increased awareness, and an example of how it can be applied, will empower music therapists to learn about policies in their specific areas, and capitalise on the opportunities they provide.

  1. Atmospheric inverse modeling with known physical bounds: an example from trace gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many inverse problems in the atmospheric sciences involve parameters with known physical constraints. Examples include non-negativity (e.g., emissions of some urban air pollutants or upward limits implied by reaction or solubility constants. However, probabilistic inverse modeling approaches based on Gaussian assumptions cannot incorporate such bounds and thus often produce unrealistic results. The atmospheric literature lacks consensus on the best means to overcome this problem, and existing atmospheric studies rely on a limited number of the possible methods with little examination of the relative merits of each. This paper investigates the applicability of several approaches to bounded inverse problems and is also the first application of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC to estimation of atmospheric trace gas fluxes. The approaches discussed here are broadly applicable. A common method of data transformations is found to unrealistically skew estimates for the examined example application. The method of Lagrange multipliers and two MCMC methods yield more realistic and accurate results. In general, the examined MCMC approaches produce the most realistic result but can require substantial computational time. Lagrange multipliers offer an appealing alternative for large, computationally intensive problems when exact uncertainty bounds are less central to the analysis. A synthetic data inversion of US anthropogenic methane emissions illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  2. An example of model result correction to study the impact of climate change on electricity consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parey, S.; Galloy, G.; Nogaj, M.

    2012-04-01

    Climate is changing and temperature evolutions are thought to impact electricity consumption in the future. In order to estimate these possible shifts, climate model results for two future periods: 2050 and 2100 are considered. However, the use of the electricity consumption forecast model with climate model outputs for the current period give unrealistic results compared to forecasts made with observations. As a matter of fact, consumption is forecasted using a taylor-designed mean of French temperatures. Therefore, it is necessary for the model results to be as close as possible to this observed mean. The first studies had been made using the so-called "delta method", which consists in adding future changes to the observations. This however supposes that there is no variance change, which is not necessarily valid. Thus, in a second step, the percentile correction method has been used, firstly considering the whole annual distribution. This is however not satisfactory, as the seasonal distributions remain too much biased. Thus, the correction had to be applied on a monthly basis. The method and results of the correction will be presented for this example of France.

  3. Estimating Parameters in Physical Models through Bayesian Inversion: A Complete Example

    KAUST Repository

    Allmaras, Moritz

    2013-02-07

    All mathematical models of real-world phenomena contain parameters that need to be estimated from measurements, either for realistic predictions or simply to understand the characteristics of the model. Bayesian statistics provides a framework for parameter estimation in which uncertainties about models and measurements are translated into uncertainties in estimates of parameters. This paper provides a simple, step-by-step example-starting from a physical experiment and going through all of the mathematics-to explain the use of Bayesian techniques for estimating the coefficients of gravity and air friction in the equations describing a falling body. In the experiment we dropped an object from a known height and recorded the free fall using a video camera. The video recording was analyzed frame by frame to obtain the distance the body had fallen as a function of time, including measures of uncertainty in our data that we describe as probability densities. We explain the decisions behind the various choices of probability distributions and relate them to observed phenomena. Our measured data are then combined with a mathematical model of a falling body to obtain probability densities on the space of parameters we seek to estimate. We interpret these results and discuss sources of errors in our estimation procedure. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. Functional Modeling of Perspectives on the Example of Electric Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai

    2009-01-01

    The integration of energy systems is a proven approach to gain higher overall energy efficiency. Invariably, this integration will come with increasing technical complexity through the diversification of energy resources and their functionality. With the integration of more fluctuating renewable ...... which enables a reflection on system integration requirements independent of particular technologies. The results are illustrated on examples related to electric energy systems.......The integration of energy systems is a proven approach to gain higher overall energy efficiency. Invariably, this integration will come with increasing technical complexity through the diversification of energy resources and their functionality. With the integration of more fluctuating renewable...... energies higher system flexibility will also be necessary. One of the challenges ahead is the design of control architecture to enable the flexibility and to handle the diversity. This paper presents an approach to model heterogeneous energy systems and their control on the basis of purpose and functions...

  5. Revisiting an interdisciplinary hydrological modelling project. A socio-hydrology (?) example from the early 2000s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Roman; Barthel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Interdisciplinary scientific and societal knowledge plays an increasingly important role in global change research. Also, in the field of water resources interdisciplinarity as well as cooperation with stakeholders from outside academia have been recognized as important. In this contribution, we revisit an integrated regional modelling system (DANUBIA), which was developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers and relied on stakeholder participation in the framework of the GLOWA-Danube project from 2001 to 2011 (Mauser and Prasch 2016). As the model was developed before the current increase in literature on participatory modelling and interdisciplinarity, we ask how a socio-hydrology approach would have helped and in what way it would have made the work different. The present contribution firstly presents the interdisciplinary concept of DANUBIA, mainly with focus on the integration of human behaviour in a spatially explicit, process-based numerical modelling system (Roland Barthel, Janisch, Schwarz, Trifkovic, Nickel, Schulz, and Mauser 2008; R. Barthel, Nickel, Meleg, Trifkovic, and Braun 2005). Secondly, we compare the approaches to interdisciplinarity in GLOWA-Danube with concepts and ideas presented by socio-hydrology. Thirdly, we frame DANUBIA and a review of key literature on socio-hydrology in the context of a survey among hydrologists (N = 184). This discussion is used to highlight gaps and opportunities of the socio-hydrology approach. We show that the interdisciplinary aspect of the project and the participatory process of stakeholder integration in DANUBIA were not entirely successful. However, important insights were gained and important lessons were learnt. Against the background of these experiences we feel that in its current state, socio-hydrology is still lacking a plan for knowledge integration. Moreover, we consider necessary that socio-hydrology takes into account the lessons learnt from these earlier examples of knowledge integration

  6. Evidence for direct CP violation in the measurement of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle γ with B∓ → D(*)K(*)∓ decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Amo Sanchez, P; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Zhao, M; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Aitchison, I J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Santoro, V; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sun, S; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Guttman, N; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-09-17

    We report the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating angle γ through a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D-meson decays to K(S)(0) π+ π- and K(S)(0) K+ K- produced in the processes B∓ → DK∓, B∓ D* K∓ with D* → Dπ(0), Dγ, and B∓ → DK*∓ with K*∓ → K(S)(0) π∓, using 468 million BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+ e- collider at SLAC. We measure γ = (68 ± 14 ± 4 ± 3)° (modulo 180°), where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third reflects the uncertainty in the description of the neutral D decay amplitudes. This result is inconsistent with γ = 0 (no direct CP violation) with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations.

  7. Multistage modeling of protein dynamics with monomeric Myc oncoprotein as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaojiao; Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Niemi, Antti J.; Ilieva, Nevena

    2017-03-01

    We propose to combine a mean-field approach with all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) into a multistage algorithm that can model protein folding and dynamics over very long time periods yet with atomic-level precision. As an example, we investigate an isolated monomeric Myc oncoprotein that has been implicated in carcinomas including those in colon, breast, and lungs. Under physiological conditions a monomeric Myc is presumed to be an example of intrinsically disordered proteins that pose a serious challenge to existing modeling techniques. We argue that a room-temperature monomeric Myc is in a dynamical state, it oscillates between different conformations that we identify. For this we adopt the C α backbone of Myc in a crystallographic heteromer as an initial ansatz for the monomeric structure. We construct a multisoliton of the pertinent Landau free energy to describe the C α profile with ultrahigh precision. We use Glauber dynamics to resolve how the multisoliton responds to repeated increases and decreases in ambient temperature. We confirm that the initial structure is unstable in isolation. We reveal a highly degenerate ground-state landscape, an attractive set towards which Glauber dynamics converges in the limit of vanishing ambient temperature. We analyze the thermal stability of this Glauber attractor using room-temperature molecular dynamics. We identify and scrutinize a particularly stable subset in which the two helical segments of the original multisoliton align in parallel next to each other. During the MD time evolution of a representative structure from this subset, we observe intermittent quasiparticle oscillations along the C-terminal α helix, some of which resemble a translating Davydov's Amide-I soliton. We propose that the presence of oscillatory motion is in line with the expected intrinsically disordered character of Myc.

  8. A method to derive vegetation distribution maps for pollen dispersion models using birch as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, A; Rotach, M W; Gehrig, R; Clot, B

    2012-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution of sources is a crucial prerequisite for the application of pollen dispersion models such as, for example, COSMO-ART (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases). However, this input is not available for the allergy-relevant species such as hazel, alder, birch, grass or ragweed. Hence, plant distribution datasets need to be derived from suitable sources. We present an approach to produce such a dataset from existing sources using birch as an example. The basic idea is to construct a birch dataset using a region with good data coverage for calibration and then to extrapolate this relationship to a larger area by using land use classes. We use the Swiss forest inventory (1 km resolution) in combination with a 74-category land use dataset that covers the non-forested areas of Switzerland as well (resolution 100 m). Then we assign birch density categories of 0%, 0.1%, 0.5% and 2.5% to each of the 74 land use categories. The combination of this derived dataset with the birch distribution from the forest inventory yields a fairly accurate birch distribution encompassing entire Switzerland. The land use categories of the Global Land Cover 2000 (GLC2000; Global Land Cover 2000 database, 2003, European Commission, Joint Research Centre; resolution 1 km) are then calibrated with the Swiss dataset in order to derive a Europe-wide birch distribution dataset and aggregated onto the 7 km COSMO-ART grid. This procedure thus assumes that a certain GLC2000 land use category has the same birch density wherever it may occur in Europe. In order to reduce the strict application of this crucial assumption, the birch density distribution as obtained from the previous steps is weighted using the mean Seasonal Pollen Index (SPI; yearly sums of daily pollen concentrations). For future improvement, region-specific birch densities for the GLC2000 categories could be integrated into the mapping procedure.

  9. A workflow example of PBPK modeling to support pediatric research and development: case study with lorazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, A R; Barrett, J S; Edginton, A N

    2013-04-01

    The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in the field of pediatric drug development has garnered much interest of late due to a recent Food and Drug Administration recommendation. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the developmental processes involved in creation of a pediatric PBPK model incorporating existing adult drug data. Lorazepam, a benzodiazepine utilized in both adults and children, was used as an example. A population-PBPK model was developed in PK-Sim v4.2® and scaled to account for age-related changes in size and composition of tissue compartments, protein binding, and growth/maturation of elimination processes. Dose (milligrams per kilogram) requirements for children aged 0-18 years were calculated based on simulations that achieved targeted exposures based on adult references. Predictive accuracy of the PBPK model for producing comparable plasma concentrations among 63 pediatric subjects was assessed using average-fold error (AFE). Estimates of clearance (CL) and volume of distribution (V(ss)) were compared with observed values for a subset of 15 children using fold error (FE). Pediatric dose requirements in young children (1-3 years) exceeded adult levels on a linear weight-adjusted (milligrams per kilogram) basis. AFE values for model-derived concentration estimates were within 1.5- and 2-fold deviation from observed values for 73% and 92% of patients, respectively. For CL, 60% and 80% of predictions were within 1.5 and 2 FE, respectively. Comparatively, predictions of V(ss) were more accurate with 80% and 100% of estimates within 1.5 and 2 FE, respectively. Using the presented workflow, the developed pediatric model estimated lorazepam pharmacokinetics in children as a function of age.

  10. Statistical modeling of volume of alcohol exposure for epidemiological studies of population health: the US example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gmel Gerrit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol consumption is a major risk factor in the global burden of disease, with overall volume of exposure as the principal underlying dimension. Two main sources of data on volume of alcohol exposure are available: surveys and per capita consumption derived from routine statistics such as taxation. As both sources have significant problems, this paper presents an approach that triangulates information from both sources into disaggregated estimates in line with the overall level of per capita consumption. Methods A modeling approach was applied to the US using data from a large and representative survey, the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Different distributions (log-normal, gamma, Weibull were used to model consumption among drinkers in subgroups defined by sex, age, and ethnicity. The gamma distribution was used to shift the fitted distributions in line with the overall volume as derived from per capita estimates. Implications for alcohol-attributable fractions were presented, using liver cirrhosis as an example. Results The triangulation of survey data with aggregated per capita consumption data proved feasible and allowed for modeling of alcohol exposure disaggregated by sex, age, and ethnicity. These models can be used in combination with risk relations for burden of disease calculations. Sensitivity analyses showed that the gamma distribution chosen yielded very similar results in terms of fit and alcohol-attributable mortality as the other tested distributions. Conclusions Modeling alcohol consumption via the gamma distribution was feasible. To further refine this approach, research should focus on the main assumptions underlying the approach to explore differences between volume estimates derived from surveys and per capita consumption figures.

  11. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D.; Green, Martin; England, Gary C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided. PMID:28804710

  12. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D; Green, Martin; England, Gary C W

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided.

  13. Construction of predictive promoter models on the example of antibacterial response of human epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wingender Edgar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Binding of a bacteria to a eukaryotic cell triggers a complex network of interactions in and between both cells. P. aeruginosa is a pathogen that causes acute and chronic lung infections by interacting with the pulmonary epithelial cells. We use this example for examining the ways of triggering the response of the eukaryotic cell(s, leading us to a better understanding of the details of the inflammatory process in general. Results Considering a set of genes co-expressed during the antibacterial response of human lung epithelial cells, we constructed a promoter model for the search of additional target genes potentially involved in the same cell response. The model construction is based on the consideration of pair-wise combinations of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS. It has been shown that the antibacterial response of human epithelial cells is triggered by at least two distinct pathways. We therefore supposed that there are two subsets of promoters activated by each of them. Optimally, they should be "complementary" in the sense of appearing in complementary subsets of the (+-training set. We developed the concept of complementary pairs, i.e., two mutually exclusive pairs of TFBS, each of which should be found in one of the two complementary subsets. Conclusions We suggest a simple, but exhaustive method for searching for TFBS pairs which characterize the whole (+-training set, as well as for complementary pairs. Applying this method, we came up with a promoter model of antibacterial response genes that consists of one TFBS pair which should be found in the whole training set and four complementary pairs. We applied this model to screening of 13,000 upstream regions of human genes and identified 430 new target genes which are potentially involved in antibacterial defense mechanisms.

  14. More examples of structure formation in the Lemaitre-Tolman model

    CERN Document Server

    Krasinski, A; Krasinski, Andrzej; Hellaby, Charles

    2003-01-01

    In continuing our earlier research, we find the formulae needed to determine the arbitrary functions in the Lemaitre-Tolman model when the evolution proceeds from a given initial velocity distribution to a final state that is determined either by a density distribution or by a velocity distribution. In each case the initial and final distributions uniquely determine the L-T model that evolves between them, and the sign of the energy-function is determined by a simple inequality. We also show how the final density profile can be more accurately fitted to observational data than was done in the previous paper. We work out new numerical examples of the evolution: the creation of a galaxy cluster out of different velocity distributions, reflecting the current data on temperature anisotropies of CMB, the creation of the same out of different density distributions, and the creation of a void. The void in its present state is surrounded by a nonsingular wall of high density.

  15. Comparing the Rξ gauge and the unitary gauge for the standard model: An example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tai Tsun; Wu, Sau Lan

    2017-01-01

    For gauge theory, the matrix element for any physical process is independent of the gauge used. However, since this is a formal statement, it does not guarantee this gauge independence in every case. An example is given here where, for a physical process in the standard model, the matrix elements calculated with two different gauge - the Rξ gauge and the unitary gauge - are explicitly verified to be different. This is accomplished by subtracting one matrix element from the other. This non-zero difference turns out to have a subtle origin. Two simple operators are found not to commute with each other: in one gauge these two operations are carried out in one order, while in the other gauge these same two operations are carried out in the opposite order. Because of this result, a series of question are raised such that the answers to these question may lead to a deeper understanding of the Yang-Mills non-Abelian gauge theory in general and the standard model in particular.

  16. Carrying-over toxicokinetic model uncertainty into cancer risk estimates. The TCDD example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, L. [Division of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Heinzl, H.; Mittlboeck, M. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Medical Computer Sciences

    2004-09-15

    Estimation of human cancer risks depends on the assessment of exposure to the investigated hazardous compound as well as on its toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic in the body. Modeling these processes constitutes a basic prerequisite for any quantitative risk assessment including assessment of the uncertainty of risk estimates. Obviously, the modeling process itself is part of the risk assessment task, and it affects the development of valid risk estimates. Due to the wealth of information available on exposure and effects in humans and animals 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD) provides an excellent example to elaborate methods which allow a quantitative analysis of the uncertainty of TCDD risk estimates, and which show how toxicokinetic model uncertainty carries over to risk estimate uncertainty and uncertainty of the dose-response relationship. Cancer is usually considered as a slowly evolving disease. An increase in TCDD dose may result in an increase of the observable cancer response not until some latency time period has elapsed. This fact needs careful consideration when a dose-response relationship is to be established. Toxicokinetic models are capable to reconstruct TCDD exposure concentrations during a lifetime such that time-dependent TCDD dose metrics like the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) can be constructed for each individual cohort member. Two potentially crucial model assumptions for estimating the exposure of a person are the assumption of lifetime constancy of total lipid volume (TLV) of the human body and the assumption of a simple linear kinetic of TCDD elimination. In 1995 a modified Michaelis-Menten kinetic (also known as Carrier kinetic) has been suggested to link the TCDD elimination rate to the available TCDD amount in the body. That is, TCDD elimination would be faster, of nearly the same rate, or slower under this kinetic than under a simple linear kinetic when the individual would be highly, moderately, or slightly

  17. Example-based learning: Effects of model expertise in relation to student expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Boekhout (Teun); T.A.J.M. van Gog (Tamara); M.W.J. van de Wiel (Margje); D. Gerards-Last (Dorien); F. Geraets (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Worked examples are very effective for novice learners. They typically present a written-out ideal (didactical) solution for learners to study. nAims. This study used worked examples of patient history taking in physiotherapy that presented a non-didactical solution (i.e., ba

  18. Examples of New Models Applied in Selected Simulation Systems with Respect to Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tolerance of damage rule progressively meets the approval in the design casting parts procedures. Therefore, there were appeared thenew challenges and expectations for permanent development of process virtualization in the mechanical engineering industry.Virtualization is increasingly developed on the stage of product design and materials technologies optimization. Increasing expectations of design and process engineers regarding the practical effectiveness of applied simulation systems with new proposed up-grades modules is observed. The purpose is to obtain simulation tools allowing the most possible realistic prognosis of the casting structure, including indication, with the highest possible probability, places in the casting that are endangered with the possibility of shrinkage– and gas porosity formation. This 3D map of discontinuities and structure transformed in local mechanical characteristics are used to calculate the local stresses and safety factors. The needs of tolerance of damage and new approach to evaluate the quality of such prognosis must be defined. These problems of validation of new models/modules used to predict the shrinkage– and gas porosity including the chosen structure parameters in the example of AlSi7 alloy are discussed in the paper.

  19. Examples of New Models Applied in Selected Simulation Systems with Respect to Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignaszak Z.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The tolerance of damage rule progressively meets the approval in the design casting parts procedures. Therefore, there were appeared the new challenges and expectations for permanent development of process virtualization in the mechanical engineering industry. Virtualization is increasingly developed on the stage of product design and materials technologies optimization. Increasing expectations of design and process engineers regarding the practical effectiveness of applied simulation systems with new proposed up-grades modules is observed. The purpose is to obtain simulation tools allowing the most possible realistic prognosis of the casting structure, including indication, with the highest possible probability, places in the casting that are endangered with the possibility of shrinkage- and gas porosity formation. This 3D map of discontinuities and structure transformed in local mechanical characteristics are used to calculate the local stresses and safety factors. The needs of tolerance of damage and new approach to evaluate the quality of such prognosis must be defined. These problems of validation of new models/modules used to predict the shrinkage- and gas porosity including the chosen structure parameters in the example of AlSi7 alloy are discussed in the paper.

  20. GEOSTATISTICAL MODEL EVALUATION OF LIMING ON OSIJEK-BARANYA COUNTY EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vukadinović

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Unfavorable pH of soil is the main reason for several different problems in debalance of mineral nutrition which can cause many problems in plant growth; such as leaves and fruit chlorosis and necrosis; etc. Therefore; liming as a measure for improving amount of acids soils must be conducted very carefully; with detail chemical soil analyses. This paper presents a segment of computer model for liming recommendation at the example of Osijek-Baranya County. Results of liming recommendation were obtained by geostatistical interpolation method – kriging. Totals of 9023 soil samples were analyzed in the period 2003–2007. The substitution acidity average was 5.49 (minimum 3.41 to maximum 8.20. Kriging shown that 241 379 ha (58.3% area of Osijek-Baranya County were acids soil. Therefore 90 593 ha have substitution acidity lower than 4.5 and 150 786 ha have pH KCl between 4.5 and 5.5. Except carbocalk; other "slowly-effect" materials can be recommended for liming; especially for vineyards and orchards.

  1. Self-consistent seismic cycle simulation in a three-dimensional continuum model: methodology and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranger, C. C.; Le Pourhiet, L.; May, D.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction zones evolve over millions of years. The state of stress, the distribution of materials, and the strength and structure of the interface between the two plates is intricately tied to a host of time-dependent physical processes, such as damage, friction, (nonlinear) viscous relaxation, and fluid migration. In addition, the subduction interface has a complex three-dimensional geometry that evolves with time and can adjust in response to a changing stress environment or in response to impinging topographical features, and can even branch off as a splay fault. All in all, the behaviour of (large) earthquakes at the millisecond to minute timescale is heavily dependent on the pattern of stress accumulation during the 100 year inter-seismic period, the events occurring on or near the interface in the past thousands of years, as well as the extended geological history of the region. We address the aforementioned modeling requirements by developing a self-consistent 3D staggered grid finite difference continuum description of motion, thermal advection-diffusion, and poro-visco-elastic two-phase flow. Faults are modelled as plastic shear bands that can develop and evolve in response to a changing stress environment without having a prescribed geometry. They obey a Mohr-Coulomb or Drucker-Prager yield criterion and a rate-and-state friction law. For a sound treatment of plasticity, we borrow elements from mechanical engineering, and extend these with high-quality nonlinear iteration schemes and adaptive time-stepping to resolve the rupture process at all time scales. We will present these techniques together with proof-of-concept examples of self-consistently developing seismic cycles in 2D and 3D, including phases of stress accumulation, fault nucleation, dynamic rupture, and healing.

  2. 3D Geologic Modeling. The example of the Farim-Saliquinhé Phosphates Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, António; Charifo, Gilberto; Almeida, José

    2010-05-01

    The construction of three-dimensional geologic models representing both the structure and properties inherent to each geological unit is nowadays possible due to the computational development of the last decades. The 3D Geologic Modeling (3DGM) is very efficient for storage, display and transfer of geoscience information, and is a key tool in the oil industry in particular for the reservoir characterization and modeling; its use in other geosciences areas has been growing in recent years but is still scarce. In the present work we show a 3D geologic model of the phosphates mineralization of Farim-Saliquinhé (Guinea-Bissau) as a first example of the work being developed in the research center CICEGe (FCT-UNL) by its novel research group on 3DGM, and to demonstrate the usefulness of this kind of geologic models, built with appropriate software, in order to better represent, study, characterize and visualize a geologic case study. The phosphates mineralization of Farim-Saliquinhé (Guinea-Bissau) is a sedimentary deposit located near Saliquinhé, Farim and the Rio Cachéu. The deposit is composed by two members: 1) FPB, an early Middle to Upper Lutetian calcareous-phosphate member; 2) FPA, an upper member of descarbonatized phosphate. Micritic limestones are underlying the mineralized layers, while dolomitic limestones, the FPO phosphate interval, and a younger sandy clayey cover are overlying the phosphatic members (BRGM, 1983; Prian et al., 1987). This work is based on geologic and geochemical data from 69 vertical boreholes carried out by BRGM in the 80s (completed with topographic data). This survey covered an area of about 10x5 km and was aimed to determine the geometry and the reserves of the FPA and FPB phosphate mineralization. The 3D geologic model was developed in gOcad software, which uses a distinctive interpolation method to build the geometry of objects, the DSI - discrete smooth interpolation. The 3D geologic model was built on the BRGM's study area

  3. Modeling coastal aquifers in a Mediterranean area: the example of Taranto gulf (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Giovanna; Giudici, Mauro; Negri, Sergio; Margiotta, Stefano; Cattaneo, Laura; Vassena, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    Water resources stored in coastal aquifers are of strategic relevance for several regions throughout the world and in particular in the Mediterranean basin. They are extremely important in areas characterized by heavy urbanization, active industrial or touristic systems, where the need for fresh water is very acute and, sometimes, they are the only water resources available. This in turn can lead to the phenomenon of seawater intrusion because of aquifer overexploitation to satisfy the demand of an increasing population in coastal plains. Furthermore, karstic aquifers are well known for their specific vulnerability to natural and human-induced contamination, due to their particular characteristics such as thin soils, point recharge in dolines and swallow holes and increased hydraulic conductivity. Within this framework, the Taranto gulf is an example of paramount importance. In fact the presence of a wide industrial area close to the city of Taranto and the numerous maritime and military activities in the harbor area favored the increase of population density in the XX century. Moreover, they constitute factors of great concern for the protection of groundwater quality and quantity, in particular for the presence of the highly-vulnerable basins of Mar Piccolo and Mar Grande. In this area, groundwater resources are stored in a karst multilayered aquifer, which is very complex from the hydrostratigraphic point of view. Furthermore, the presence of highly water-demanding activities makes the seawater intrusion phenomenon very serious, especially along the coastline. In order to characterize the groundwater dynamic in the study area, we discuss the hydraulic relationships between the different hydrostratigraphic units and between the sea and the aquifer system by developing a numerical groundwater model to test and refine the preliminary conceptual model and estimate the most uncertain hydraulic parameters. To achieve these objectives, we used different data-sets to

  4. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    . The potentiality of the new EARLINET data products and first examples of integrated studies with models will be presented at the conference. Acknowledgments: ACTRIS2 Research Infrastructure Project is funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the grant agreement n. 654169 and previously under FP7 grant agreement n. 262254.

  5. Marginal and Random Intercepts Models for Longitudinal Binary Data with Examples from Criminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey D.; Loeber, Rolf; Farrington, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Two models for the analysis of longitudinal binary data are discussed: the marginal model and the random intercepts model. In contrast to the linear mixed model (LMM), the two models for binary data are not subsumed under a single hierarchical model. The marginal model provides group-level information whereas the random intercepts model provides…

  6. Marginal and Random Intercepts Models for Longitudinal Binary Data with Examples from Criminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey D.; Loeber, Rolf; Farrington, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Two models for the analysis of longitudinal binary data are discussed: the marginal model and the random intercepts model. In contrast to the linear mixed model (LMM), the two models for binary data are not subsumed under a single hierarchical model. The marginal model provides group-level information whereas the random intercepts model provides…

  7. Evidence for Direct CP Violation in the Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Angle gamma with B-+ to D(*) K(*)-+ Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    We report the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating angle {gamma} through a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D meson decays to K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sup +}K{sup -} produced in the processes B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK{sup {-+}}, B{sup {-+}} {yields} D* K{sup {-+}} with D* {yields} D{pi}{sup 0}, D{gamma}, and B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK*{sup {-+}} with K*{sup {-+}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {-+}}, using 468 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. We measure {gamma} = (68 {+-} 14 {+-} 4 {+-} 3){sup o} (modulo 180{sup o}), where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty and the third reflects the uncertainty in the description of the neutral D decay amplitudes. This result is inconsistent with {gamma} = 0 (no direct CP violation) with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations.

  8. A Model of Self-Explanation Strategies of Instructional Text and Examples in the Acquisition of Programming Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recker, Margaret M.; Pirolli, Peter

    Students learning to program recursive LISP functions in a typical school-like lesson on recursion were observed. The typical lesson contains text and examples and involves solving a series of programming problems. The focus of this study is on students' learning strategies in new domains. In this light, a Soar computational model of…

  9. Big data to smart data in Alzheimer's disease: Real-world examples of advanced modeling and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Magali; Stephenson, Diane; Romero, Klaus; Gordon, Mark Forrest; Zach, Neta; Geerts, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Many disease-modifying clinical development programs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have failed to date, and development of new and advanced preclinical models that generate actionable knowledge is desperately needed. This review reports on computer-based modeling and simulation approach as a powerful tool in AD research. Statistical data-analysis techniques can identify associations between certain data and phenotypes, such as diagnosis or disease progression. Other approaches integrate domain expertise in a formalized mathematical way to understand how specific components of pathology integrate into complex brain networks. Private-public partnerships focused on data sharing, causal inference and pathway-based analysis, crowdsourcing, and mechanism-based quantitative systems modeling represent successful real-world modeling examples with substantial impact on CNS diseases. Similar to other disease indications, successful real-world examples of advanced simulation can generate actionable support of drug discovery and development in AD, illustrating the value that can be generated for different stakeholders.

  10. Comparison Theorem for Einstein-K(a)ihler Metric and Kobayashi Metric on Hartogs Domain%一类Hartogs域的Einstein-K(a)hler度量和Kobayashi度量的比较定理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶薇薇; 王安

    2012-01-01

    The authors discuss a class of Hartogs domains denoted by (Ω), and obtain the implicit solution to the generating function about the Einstein-K(a)hler metric. To some specific parameters, the explicit expression of the complete Einstein-K(a)hler metric is given. Furthermore, the authors get the comparison theorem between Einstein-K(a)hler metric and Kobayashi metric on this domain.%研究了一类Hartogs域(Ω),得到了该域上Einstein-K(a)hler度量生成函数的隐式解和在某些参数情况下完备的Einstein-K(a)hler度量显式表达式,且给出了该域上Einstein-K(a)hler度量和Kobayashi 度量的比较定理.

  11. THE METHOD OF FORMING CAE MODELS ON THE EXAMPLE OF DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGICAL ELABORATION OF THE PLUNGER OF FORCED HYDROMACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Puzanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing on the manufacturability with ensuring the functionality requirements of the product determines the analysis of a large number of designs. The paper proposed a method of forming CAE models from CAD models, taking into account simplification models (with the exception of nonfunctional elements, the use of symmetry, etc., add the missing data (including the use of the properties of materials differ from the CAD model, the possibility of a multidisciplinary analysis in one or more software systems. An example of design and technological elaboration of the plunger of forced hydraulic machine is shown.

  12. Volcanic Plume Elevation Model Derived From Landsat 8: examples on Holuhraun (Iceland) and Mount Etna (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Michele, Marcello; Raucoules, Daniel; Arason, Þórður; Spinetti, Claudia; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of both height and velocity of a volcanic plume is an important issue in volcanology. As an example, it is known that large volcanic eruptions can temporarily alter the climate, causing global cooling and shifting precipitation patterns; the ash/gas dispersion in the atmosphere, their impact and lifetime around the globe, greatly depends on the injection altitude. Plume height information is critical for ash dispersion modelling and air traffic security. Furthermore, plume height during explosive volcanism is the primary parameter for estimating mass eruption rate. Knowing the plume altitude is also important to get the correct amount of SO2 concentration from dedicated spaceborne spectrometers. Moreover, the distribution of ash deposits on ground greatly depends on the ash cloud altitude, which has an impact on risk assessment and crisis management. Furthermore, a spatially detailed plume height measure could be used as a hint for gas emission rate estimation and for ash plume volume researches, which both have an impact on climate research, air quality assessment for aviation and finally for the understanding of the volcanic system itself as ash/gas emission rates are related to the state of pressurization of the magmatic chamber. Today, the community mainly relies on ground based measurements but often they can be difficult to collect as by definition volcanic areas are dangerous areas (presence of toxic gases) and can be remotely situated and difficult to access. Satellite remote sensing offers a comprehensive and safe way to estimate plume height. Conventional photogrammetric restitution based on satellite imagery fails in precisely retrieving a plume elevation model as the plume own velocity induces an apparent parallax that adds up to the standard parallax given by the stereoscopic view. Therefore, measurements based on standard satellite photogrammeric restitution do not apply as there is an ambiguity in the measurement of the plume position

  13. Improved Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle alpha using B0(B) --> rho+rho- decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kazuhito, S; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-07-22

    We present results from an analysis of B(0)B(0)--> rho(+)rho(-) using 232 x 10(6) Gamma (4S) --> BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. We measure the longitudinal polarization fraction f(L) = 0.978 +/- 0.014(stat) + 0.021 / -0.029(syst) and the CP-violating parameters S(L)= -0.33 +/- 0.24(stat) + 0.08 / -0.14(syst) and C(L)= -0.03 +/- 0.18(stat) +/- 0.09(syst). Using an isospin analysis of B --> rhorho decays, we determine the unitarity triangle parameter alpha. The solution compatible with the standard model is alpha = (100 +/- 13) degrees.

  14. Limits and failures in hydrology: examples and lessons learned from three decades of process oriented hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstert, Axel

    2016-04-01

    In hydrological sciences there have been rather many attempts to develop new mathematical analysis and modelling tools. Some (or even many?) of them failed or were at least only partially successful. Unfortunately, such nun-successful attempts are hardly reported on, because our common academic recognition is based on reports about success only. With all due respect to successful attempts, the scientific community could benefit a lot from reports of unsuccessful attempts or unexpected results. Therefore, in this contribution, the author presents examples of modelling failures from his own experiences during the last three decades. Emphasis is given on results obtained from process-oriented hydrological models, where the "right answer" was obtained "for the wrong reasons". Such example comprise, for instance, modelling infiltration experiments at the plot scale, modelling runoff generation from hillslope scale and in experimental catchments and modelling runoff from glaciated catchments It is explained how the "wrong reasons" could be identified and what was learned from such failures. It is argued that failures, which causes can be identified by the modeller or anybody else, could significantly contribute to a progress in hydrological system understanding or - at least - to the identification of research needs. Identification of causes of failure may even contribute more to scientific progress then brute force modelling of parameter sensitivity and uncertainty.

  15. [Quality system in cardiology: practical example to develop an organizational model for management certification without bureaucracy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Paolo; Pasini, Evasio; Pitocchi, Oreste; Bovenzi, Francesco; Sorino, Margherita; de Luca, Italo

    2003-04-01

    It is a difficult task to define practical guidelines and a pragmatic achievement for the new document of the Italian Ministry of Health for structures of the national health system obtaining a quality system according to the ISO 9000 standard. The present article illustrates the different steps to accomplish the quality management in our cardiology department, recently internationally certified, and it gives several practical examples of the path followed in the different sections of the department to obtain the best management of all the Operative Units, identifying customer requests and measuring customer satisfaction.

  16. Atmospheric inverse modeling with known physical bounds: an example from trace gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2014-02-01

    the relative merits of each. This paper investigates the applicability of several approaches to bounded inverse problems. A common method of data transformations is found to unrealistically skew estimates for the examined example application. The method of Lagrange multipliers and two Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods yield more realistic and accurate results. In general, the examined MCMC approaches produce the most realistic result but can require substantial computational time. Lagrange multipliers offer an appealing option for large, computationally intensive problems when exact uncertainty bounds are less central to the analysis. A synthetic data inversion of US anthropogenic methane emissions illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  17. Visual Basic, Excel-based fish population modeling tool—The pallid sturgeon example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Edward H.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Green, Nicholas S.; Albers, Janice L.

    2016-02-10

    The model presented in this report is a spreadsheet-based model using Visual Basic for Applications within Microsoft Excel (http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7057D0Z) prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It uses the same model structure and, initially, parameters as used by Wildhaber and others (2015) for pallid sturgeon. The difference between the model structure used for this report and that used by Wildhaber and others (2015) is that variance is not partitioned. For the model of this report, all variance is applied at the iteration and time-step levels of the model. Wildhaber and others (2015) partition variance into parameter variance (uncertainty about the value of a parameter itself) applied at the iteration level and temporal variance (uncertainty caused by random environmental fluctuations with time) applied at the time-step level. They included implicit individual variance (uncertainty caused by differences between individuals) within the time-step level.The interface developed for the model of this report is designed to allow the user the flexibility to change population model structure and parameter values and uncertainty separately for every component of the model. This flexibility makes the modeling tool potentially applicable to any fish species; however, the flexibility inherent in this modeling tool makes it possible for the user to obtain spurious outputs. The value and reliability of the model outputs are only as good as the model inputs. Using this modeling tool with improper or inaccurate parameter values, or for species for which the structure of the model is inappropriate, could lead to untenable management decisions. By facilitating fish population modeling, this modeling tool allows the user to evaluate a range of management options and implications. The goal of this modeling tool is to be a user-friendly modeling tool for developing fish population models useful to natural resource

  18. Visual Basic, Excel-based fish population modeling tool - The pallid sturgeon example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Edward H.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Green, Nicholas S.; Albers, Janice L.

    2016-02-10

    The model presented in this report is a spreadsheet-based model using Visual Basic for Applications within Microsoft Excel (http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7057D0Z) prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It uses the same model structure and, initially, parameters as used by Wildhaber and others (2015) for pallid sturgeon. The difference between the model structure used for this report and that used by Wildhaber and others (2015) is that variance is not partitioned. For the model of this report, all variance is applied at the iteration and time-step levels of the model. Wildhaber and others (2015) partition variance into parameter variance (uncertainty about the value of a parameter itself) applied at the iteration level and temporal variance (uncertainty caused by random environmental fluctuations with time) applied at the time-step level. They included implicit individual variance (uncertainty caused by differences between individuals) within the time-step level.The interface developed for the model of this report is designed to allow the user the flexibility to change population model structure and parameter values and uncertainty separately for every component of the model. This flexibility makes the modeling tool potentially applicable to any fish species; however, the flexibility inherent in this modeling tool makes it possible for the user to obtain spurious outputs. The value and reliability of the model outputs are only as good as the model inputs. Using this modeling tool with improper or inaccurate parameter values, or for species for which the structure of the model is inappropriate, could lead to untenable management decisions. By facilitating fish population modeling, this modeling tool allows the user to evaluate a range of management options and implications. The goal of this modeling tool is to be a user-friendly modeling tool for developing fish population models useful to natural resource

  19. Economic Transformation in Slovenia: From a Model Example to the Default Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žídek Libor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Slovenian economy appeared on the brink of bankruptcy at the end of 2013. The situation was caused by high level of classified debts in state-owned banks. This can be seen as surprising because Slovenia used to be (for a long time considered as a (textbook example of the gradualist transformation approach. The goal of this article is first to describe the transformation process in the country and consequently to determine causes of the economic problems that resulted in the 2013 crisis. The article concludes that the economic problems were rooted already in the specific functioning of the centrally planned system in Yugoslavia. These specifics had a direct influence on the transformation process in the country and stood behind the application of gradualism. Among the most telling features of gradualism were slow privatization, cold attitude towards foreign investment and the foremost lasting casual economic environment caused by behaviour of the state-owned banks. My conclusion is that the country’s economic problems can be ascribed to gradualism and that they are a clear example of the path dependence development.

  20. The application of equilibrium models to incidence situations using the example of the exposure pathway human milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Martin; Karcher, Klaus; Nosske, Dietmar [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The radiation exposure after a short-term release of radioactive substances is often calculated assuming equilibrium conditions. An example is that of the German Incident Calculation Bases for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Here, the contamination of human milk is calculated using transfer factors. Applying this equilibrium model to incident situations raises the question whether baby's radiation exposure is adequately assessed. This contribution shows that compliance with the relevant dose limits of paragraph 49 of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance is ensured for design basis accidents on the assumption that the hypothetical breastfeeding period starts at the beginning of the activity release. Comparative analyses were performed against the biokinetic models applied by ICRP for radiation protection purposes, taking the reference nuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 131}I, {sup 241}Am and long-lived plutonium isotopes as examples. (orig.)

  1. Nonlinear Models of Development: An Example from the Socialization of Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William L.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses both the advantages and difficulties of using nonlinear modeling in the context of a model used to study the relations between parental warmth and control and preschool children's competence. (HOD)

  2. Examples of EOS Variables as compared to the UMM-Var Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Simon; Lynnes, Chris

    2016-01-01

    In effort to provide EOSDIS clients a way to discover and use variable data from different providers, a Unified Metadata Model for Variables is being created. This presentation gives an overview of the model and use cases we are handling.

  3. User's manual for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM) with selected parametric examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-30

    The Seasonal Performance Model (SPM) was developed to provide an accurate source of seasonal energy consumption and cost predictions for the evaluation of heat pump design options. The program uses steady state heat pump performance data obtained from manufacturers' or Computer Simulation Model runs. The SPM was originally developed in two forms - a cooling model for central air conditioners and heat pumps and a heating model for heat pumps. The original models have undergone many modifications, which are described, to improve the accuracy of predictions and to increase flexibility for use in parametric evaluations. Insights are provided into the theory and construction of the major options, and into the use of the available options and output variables. Specific investigations provide examples of the possible applications of the model. (LEW)

  4. Clustering of Parameter Sensitivities: Examples from a Helicopter Airframe Model Updating Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdi, H.; C. Mares; W. Wang; J. E. Mottershead

    2009-01-01

    The need for high fidelity models in the aerospace industry has become ever more important as increasingly stringent requirements on noise and vibration levels, reliability, maintenance costs etc. come into effect. In this paper, the results of a finite element model updating exercise on a Westland Lynx XZ649 helicopter are presented. For large and complex structures, such as a helicopter airframe, the finite element model represents the main tool for obtaining accurate models which could pre...

  5. Metabolic emergent auditory effects by means of physical particle modeling : the example of musical sand

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Annie; Castagné, Nicolas; Tixier, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    International audience; In the context of Computer Music, physical modeling is usually dedicated to the modeling of sound sources or physical instruments. This paper presents an innovative use of physical modeling in order to model and synthesize complex auditory effects such as collective acoustic phenomena producing metabolic emergent auditory organizations. As a case study, we chose the "dune effect", which in open nature leads both to visual and auditory effects. The article introduces tw...

  6. Writings as modelling examples: Scaffolds for academic writing in a post-graduate curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firssova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The presented study investigated the effectiveness of learning from models in the context of post-graduate academic writing. Two questions were pursued: whether studying model writings supports mature students in writing in a new genre and whether integrating additional scaffolds in such models has

  7. Testing gradual and speciational models of evolution in extant taxa: the example of ratites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurin, M.; Gussekloo, S.W.S.; Marjanovic, D.; Legendre, L.; Cubo, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since Eldredge and Gould proposed their model of punctuated equilibria, evolutionary biologists have debated how often this model is the best description of nature and how important it is compared to the more gradual models of evolution expected from natural selection and the neo-Darwinian

  8. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daminov, Ildar; Tarasova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Tatyana; Avazov, Artur

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt) and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  9. Writings as modelling examples: Scaffolds for academic writing in a post-graduate curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firssova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The presented study investigated the effectiveness of learning from models in the context of post-graduate academic writing. Two questions were pursued: whether studying model writings supports mature students in writing in a new genre and whether integrating additional scaffolds in such models has

  10. A hidden Markov model to identify and adjust for selection bias: an example involving mixed migration strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Fieberg, John R.; Paul B Conn

    2014-01-01

    An important assumption in observational studies is that sampled individuals are representative of some larger study population. Yet, this assumption is often unrealistic. Notable examples include online public-opinion polls, publication biases associated with statistically significant results, and in ecology, telemetry studies with significant habitat-induced probabilities of missed locations. This problem can be overcome by modeling selection probabilities simultaneously with other predicto...

  11. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.;

    2006-01-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities in many cases display dynamic developmental patterns. Model biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in laboratory flow-chamber setups represent examples of such behaviour. Dependent on the experimental conditions the bacteria...... organisms do not possess comprehensive genetic programs for biofilm development. Instead the bacteria appear to have evolved a number of different mechanisms to optimize surface colonization, of which they express a subset in response to the prevailing environmental conditions. These mechanisms include...

  12. Growth and yield models in Spain: Historical overview, Contemporary Examples and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, F.; Alvarez-Gonzalez, J. G.; Rio, M. del; Barrio, M.; Bonet, J. a.; Bravo-Oviedo, A.; Calama, R.; Castedo-Dorado, F.; Crecente-Campo, F.; Condes, S.; Dieguez-Aranda, U.; Gonzalez-Martinez, S. C.; Lizarralde, I.; Nanos, N.; Madrigal, A.; Martinez-Millan, F. J.; Montero, G.; Ordonez, C.; Palahi, M.; Pique, M.; Rodriguez, F.; Rodriguez-Soalleiro, R.; Rojo, A.; Ruiz-Peinado, R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, M.; Trasobares, A.; Vazquez-Pique, J.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present a review of forest models developed in Spain in recent years for both timber and non timber production and forest dynamics (regeneration, mortality,..). Models developed are whole stand, size (diameter) class and individual-tree. The models developed to date have been developed using data from permanent plots, experimental sites and the National Forest Inventory. In this paper we show the different sub-models developed so far and the friendly use software. Main perspectives of forest modelling in Spain are presented. (Author) 107 refs.

  13. Adjoint Assimilation in Marine Ecosystem Models and an Example of Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qing; LIU Yuguang; L(U) Xianqing

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at a review of the work carried out to date on the adjoint assimilation of data in marine ecosystem models since 1995. The structure and feature of the adjoint assimilation in marine ecosystem models are also introduced.To illustrate the application of the adjoint technique and its merits, a 4-variable ecosystem model coupled with a 3-D physical model is established for the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea. The chlorophyll concentration data derived from the SeaWiFS ocean colour data are assimilated in the model with the technique. Some results are briefly presented.

  14. An Antenna-Theory Method for Modeling High-Frequency RF Coils: A Segmented Birdcage Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest that center-fed dipole antenna analytics can be employed in the optimized design of high-frequency MRI RF coil applications. The method is illustrated in the design of a single-segmented birdcage model and a short multisegmented birdcage model. As a byproduct, it is shown that for a long single-segmented birdcage model, the RF field within it is essentially a TEM mode and has excellent planar uniformity. For a short shielded multisegmented birdcage model, the RF field is optimized with a target-field approach with an average SAR functional. The planar homogeneity of the optimized RF field is significantly improved compared with that of a single-segmented birdcage model with the same geometry. The accuracy of the antenna formulae is also verified with numerical simulations performed via commercial software. The model discussed herein provides evidence for the effectiveness of antenna methods in future RF coil analysis.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daminov Ildar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  16. Writings as modelling examples: Scaffolds for academic writing in a post-graduate curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Firssova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The presented study investigated the effectiveness of learning from models in the context of post-graduate academic writing. Two questions were pursued: whether studying model writings supports mature students in writing in a new genre and whether integrating additional scaffolds in such models has added value. A quasi-experimental control group design study was realised in an on-going distance learning curriculum. Performance on a sequel of writing tasks in a new genre was compared both with...

  17. An Antenna-Theory Method for Modeling High-Frequency RF Coils: A Segmented Birdcage Example

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Chen; Victor Taracila; Timothy Eagan; Hiroyuki Fujita; Xingxian Shou; Tanvir Baig; Robert Brown

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that center-fed dipole antenna analytics can be employed in the optimized design of high-frequency MRI RF coil applications. The method is illustrated in the design of a single-segmented birdcage model and a short multisegmented birdcage model. As a byproduct, it is shown that for a long single-segmented birdcage model, the RF field within it is essentially a TEM mode and has excellent planar uniformity. For a short shielded multisegmented birdcage model, the RF field is optimized ...

  18. Technical Assistance Model for Long-Term Systems Change: Three State Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Christina; Hurth, Joicey; Lucas, Anne; Marshall, Jacqueline; Terrell, Adriane; Jones, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC) Technical Assistance (TA) Model for Long-Term Systems Change (LTSC) is grounded in conceptual frameworks in the literature on systems change and systems thinking. The NECTAC conceptual framework uses a logic model approach to change developed specifically for states' infant and…

  19. The Vroom and Yetton Normative Leadership Model Applied to Public School Case Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, John

    This paper seeks to familiarize school administrators with the Vroom and Yetton Normative Leadership model by presenting its essential components and providing original case studies for its application to school settings. The five decision-making methods of the Vroom and Yetton model, including two "autocratic," two "consultative," and one group…

  20. Igpet software for modeling igneous processes: examples of application using the open educational version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael J.; Gazel, Esteban

    2016-09-01

    We provide here an open version of Igpet software, called t-Igpet to emphasize its application for teaching and research in forward modeling of igneous geochemistry. There are three programs, a norm utility, a petrologic mixing program using least squares and Igpet, a graphics program that includes many forms of numerical modeling. Igpet is a multifaceted tool that provides the following basic capabilities: igneous rock identification using the IUGS (International Union of Geological Sciences) classification and several supplementary diagrams; tectonic discrimination diagrams; pseudo-quaternary projections; least squares fitting of lines, polynomials and hyperbolae; magma mixing using two endmembers, histograms, x-y plots, ternary plots and spider-diagrams. The advanced capabilities of Igpet are multi-element mixing and magma evolution modeling. Mixing models are particularly useful for understanding the isotopic variations in rock suites that evolved by mixing different sources. The important melting models include, batch melting, fractional melting and aggregated fractional melting. Crystallization models include equilibrium and fractional crystallization and AFC (assimilation and fractional crystallization). Theses, reports and proposals concerning igneous petrology are improved by numerical modeling. For reviewed publications some elements of modeling are practically a requirement. Our intention in providing this software is to facilitate improved communication and lower entry barriers to research, especially for students.

  1. Igpet software for modeling igneous processes: examples of application using the open educational version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael J.; Gazel, Esteban

    2017-04-01

    We provide here an open version of Igpet software, called t-Igpet to emphasize its application for teaching and research in forward modeling of igneous geochemistry. There are three programs, a norm utility, a petrologic mixing program using least squares and Igpet, a graphics program that includes many forms of numerical modeling. Igpet is a multifaceted tool that provides the following basic capabilities: igneous rock identification using the IUGS (International Union of Geological Sciences) classification and several supplementary diagrams; tectonic discrimination diagrams; pseudo-quaternary projections; least squares fitting of lines, polynomials and hyperbolae; magma mixing using two endmembers, histograms, x-y plots, ternary plots and spider-diagrams. The advanced capabilities of Igpet are multi-element mixing and magma evolution modeling. Mixing models are particularly useful for understanding the isotopic variations in rock suites that evolved by mixing different sources. The important melting models include, batch melting, fractional melting and aggregated fractional melting. Crystallization models include equilibrium and fractional crystallization and AFC (assimilation and fractional crystallization). Theses, reports and proposals concerning igneous petrology are improved by numerical modeling. For reviewed publications some elements of modeling are practically a requirement. Our intention in providing this software is to facilitate improved communication and lower entry barriers to research, especially for students.

  2. Uncertainty modelling and analysis of environmental systems: a river sediment yield example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesman, K.J.; Koskela, J.; Guillaume, J.H.; Norton, J.P.; Croke, B.; Jakeman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Throughout the last decades uncertainty analysis has become an essential part of environmental model building (e.g. Beck 1987; Refsgaard et al., 2007). The objective of the paper is to introduce stochastic and setmembership uncertainty modelling concepts, which basically differ in the assu

  3. An Example of the Use of Fuzzy Set Concepts in Modeling Learning Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Michael J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The way a particular clinician judges, from data, the degree to which a child is in the category "learning disabled" was modeled on the basis of clinician's statement of the traits that comprise the handicap. The model illustrates the use of fuzzy set theory. (Author/RL)

  4. Fitting macroevolutionary models to phylogenies: an example using vertebrate body sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooers, Arne Ø.; Schluter, Dolph

    1998-01-01

    How do traits change through time and with speciation? We present a simple and generally applicable method for comparing various models of the macroevolution of traits within a maximum likelihood framework. We illustrate four such models: 1) variance among species accumulates in direct proportion to

  5. Uncertainty analysis in WWTP model applications: a critical discussion using an example from design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist; Neumann, Marc B.

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on uncertainty analysis of WWTP models and analyzes the issue of framing and how it affects the interpretation of uncertainty analysis results. As a case study, the prediction of uncertainty involved in model-based design of a wastewater treatment plant is studied. The Monte Ca...

  6. Regression-based air temperature spatial prediction models: an example from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Szymanowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Geographically Weighted Regression ? Kriging (GWRK algorithm, based on the local Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR, is applied for spatial prediction of air temperature in Poland. Hengl's decision tree for selecting a suitable prediction model is extended for varying spatial relationships between the air temperature and environmental predictors with an assumption of existing environmental dependence of analyzed temperature variables. The procedure includes the potential choice of a local GWR instead of the global Multiple Linear Regression (MLR method for modeling the deterministic part of spatial variation, which is usual in the standard regression (residual kriging model (MLRK. The analysis encompassed: testing for environmental correlation, selecting an appropriate regression model, testing for spatial autocorrelation of the residual component, and validating the prediction accuracy. The proposed approach was performed for 69 air temperature cases, with time aggregation ranging from daily to annual average air temperatures. The results show that, irrespective of the level of data aggregation, the spatial distribution of temperature is better fitted by local models, and hence is the reason for choosing a GWR instead of the MLR for all variables analyzed. Additionally, in most cases (78% there is spatial autocorrelation in the residuals of the deterministic part, which suggests that the GWR model should be extended by ordinary kriging of residuals to the GWRK form. The decision tree used in this paper can be considered as universal as it encompasses either spatially varying relationships of modeled and explanatory variables or random process that can be modeled by a stochastic extension of the regression model (residual kriging. Moreover, for all cases analyzed, the selection of a method based on the local regression model (GWRK or GWR does not depend on the data aggregation level, showing the potential versatility of the technique.

  7. Prediction Accuracy in Multivariate Repeated-Measures Bayesian Forecasting Models with Examples Drawn from Research on Sleep and Circadian Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Kogan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In study designs with repeated measures for multiple subjects, population models capturing within- and between-subjects variances enable efficient individualized prediction of outcome measures (response variables by incorporating individuals response data through Bayesian forecasting. When measurement constraints preclude reasonable levels of prediction accuracy, additional (secondary response variables measured alongside the primary response may help to increase prediction accuracy. We investigate this for the case of substantial between-subjects correlation between primary and secondary response variables, assuming negligible within-subjects correlation. We show how to determine the accuracy of primary response predictions as a function of secondary response observations. Given measurement costs for primary and secondary variables, we determine the number of observations that produces, with minimal cost, a fixed average prediction accuracy for a model of subject means. We illustrate this with estimation of subject-specific sleep parameters using polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. We also consider prediction accuracy in an example time-dependent, linear model and derive equations for the optimal timing of measurements to achieve, on average, the best prediction accuracy. Finally, we examine an example involving a circadian rhythm model and show numerically that secondary variables can improve individualized predictions in this time-dependent nonlinear model as well.

  8. Prediction Accuracy in Multivariate Repeated-Measures Bayesian Forecasting Models with Examples Drawn from Research on Sleep and Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Clark; Kalachev, Leonid; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2016-01-01

    In study designs with repeated measures for multiple subjects, population models capturing within- and between-subjects variances enable efficient individualized prediction of outcome measures (response variables) by incorporating individuals response data through Bayesian forecasting. When measurement constraints preclude reasonable levels of prediction accuracy, additional (secondary) response variables measured alongside the primary response may help to increase prediction accuracy. We investigate this for the case of substantial between-subjects correlation between primary and secondary response variables, assuming negligible within-subjects correlation. We show how to determine the accuracy of primary response predictions as a function of secondary response observations. Given measurement costs for primary and secondary variables, we determine the number of observations that produces, with minimal cost, a fixed average prediction accuracy for a model of subject means. We illustrate this with estimation of subject-specific sleep parameters using polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. We also consider prediction accuracy in an example time-dependent, linear model and derive equations for the optimal timing of measurements to achieve, on average, the best prediction accuracy. Finally, we examine an example involving a circadian rhythm model and show numerically that secondary variables can improve individualized predictions in this time-dependent nonlinear model as well.

  9. Mesh generation and computational modeling techniques for bioimpedance measurements: an example using the VHP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A. A.; Salamatova, V. Yu; Vassilevski, Yu V.

    2012-12-01

    Here, a workflow for high-resolution efficient numerical modeling of bioimpedance measurements is suggested that includes 3D image segmentation, adaptive mesh generation, finite-element discretization, and the analysis of simulation results. Using the adaptive unstructured tetrahedral meshes enables to decrease significantly a number of mesh elements while keeping model accuracy. The numerical results illustrate current, potential, and sensitivity field distributions for a conventional Kubicek-like scheme of bioimpedance measurements using segmented geometric model of human torso based on Visible Human Project data. The whole body VHP man computational mesh is constructed that contains 574 thousand vertices and 3.3 million tetrahedrons.

  10. A Realistic Process Example for MIMO MPC based on Autoregressive Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2014-01-01

    Advanced controllers such as model predictive control are i n use for a wide range of application in the process industry. The potential utili zation of such advanced predictive controllers is far from exhausted. One barrier for more wide spread implementation is the lack of simple methodologies...... for advanced control design develo pment which may be used by non experts in control theory. This paper presents and illustra tes the use of a simple methodology to design an offset-free MPC based on ARX models. Hence a mecha nistic process model is not required. The forced circulation evaporator by Newell...

  11. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  12. Mathematical simulation of soil vapor extraction systems: Model development and numerical examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathfelder, Klaus; Yeh, William W.-G.; Mackay, Douglas

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a numerical model for prediction of soil vapor extraction processes. The major emphasis is placed on field-scale predictions with the objective to advance development of planning tools for design and operation of venting systems. The numerical model solves two-dimensional flow and transport equations for general n-component contaminant mixtures. Flow is limited to the gas phase and local equilibrium partitioning is assumed in tracking contaminants in the immiscible fluid, water, gas, and solid phase. Model predictions compared favorably with analytical solutions and multicomponent column venting experiments. Sensitivity analysis indicates equilibrium phase partitioning is a good assumption in modeling organic liquid volatilization occurring in field venting operations. Mass transfer rates in volatilization from the water phase and contaminant desorption are potentially rate limiting. Simulations of hypothetical field-scale problems show efficiency of venting operations is most sensitive to vapor pressure and the magnitude and distribution of soil permeability.

  13. Clustering of Parameter Sensitivities: Examples from a Helicopter Airframe Model Updating Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shahverdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for high fidelity models in the aerospace industry has become ever more important as increasingly stringent requirements on noise and vibration levels, reliability, maintenance costs etc. come into effect. In this paper, the results of a finite element model updating exercise on a Westland Lynx XZ649 helicopter are presented. For large and complex structures, such as a helicopter airframe, the finite element model represents the main tool for obtaining accurate models which could predict the sensitivities of responses to structural changes and optimisation of the vibration levels. In this study, the eigenvalue sensitivities with respect to Young's modulus and mass density are used in a detailed parameterisation of the structure. A new methodology is developed using an unsupervised learning technique based on similarity clustering of the columns of the sensitivity matrix. An assessment of model updating strategies is given and comparative results for the correction of vibration modes are discussed in detail. The role of the clustering technique in updating large-scale models is emphasised.

  14. Introducing a Method for Modeling Knowledge Bases in Expert Systems Using the Example of Large Software Development Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Felix Füssl

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Goal of this paper is to develop a meta-model, which provides the basis for developing highly scalable artificial intelligence systems that should be able to make autonomously decisions based on different dynamic and specific influences. An artificial neural network builds the entry point for developing a multi-layered human readable model that serves as knowledge base and can be used for further investigations in deductive and inductive reasoning. A graph-theoretical consideration gives a detailed view into the model structure. In addition to it the model is introduced using the example of large software development projects. The integration of Constraints and Deductive Reasoning Element Pruning are illustrated, which are required for executing deductive reasoning efficiently.

  15. Which benefits in the use of a modeling platform : The VSoil example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafolie, François; Cousin, Isabelle; Mollier, Alain; Pot, Valérie; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Moitrier, Nicolas; Nouguier, Cedric; Moitrier, Nathalie; Beudez, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    In the environmental community the need for coupling the models and the associated knowledges emerged recently. The development of a coupling tool or of a modeling platform is mainly driven by the necessity to create models accounting for multiple processes and to take into account the feed back between these processes. Models focusing on a restricted number of processes exist and thus the coupling of these numerical tools appeared as an efficient and rapid mean to fill up the identified gaps. Several tools have been proposed : OMS3 (David et al. 2013) ; CSDMS framework (Peckham et al. 2013) ; the Open MI project developed within the frame of European Community (Open MI, 2011). However, what we should expect from a modeling platform could be more ambitious than only coupling existing numerical codes. We believe that we need to share easily not only our numerical representations but also the attached knowledges. We need to rapidly and easily develop complex models to have tools to bring responses to current issues on soil functioning and soil evolution within the frame of global change. We also need to share in a common frame our visions of soil functioning at various scales, one the one hand to strengthen our collaborations, and, on the other hand, to make them visible by the other communities working on environmental issues. The presentation will briefly present the VSoil platform. The platform is able to manipulate concepts and numerical representations of these processes. The tool helps in assembling modules to create a model and automatically generates an executable code and a GUI. Potentialities of the tool will be illustrated on few selected cases.

  16. Alternative model for assessment administration and analysis: An example from the E-CLASS

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R; Hobbs, Robert D; Aiken, John M; Welch, Nathan M; Lewandowski, H J

    2016-01-01

    The primary model for dissemination of conceptual and attitudinal assessments that has been used within the physics education research (PER) community is to create a high quality, validated assessment, make it available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model also provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof-of-concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges t...

  17. The Establishment and Development of Finite Element Model of Human Cervical Vertebra and Its Application Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xiao-wen; YU Hang-ping; ZOU Wei

    2008-01-01

    .The incidence rate of cervical spondylosis is high,and due to the complicacy of cervical vertebra structure, irregularity of shapes and non-uniformity of components, sometimes it's difficult to achieve planned objectives by experiments in vitro through stress and strain analysis. Besides, the biomechanical factors are of vital significance in the cause of spinal disorders. In this paper the author makes a summary of the present modeling of human cervical vertebra and describes the major methods of establishing the finite element model of human cervical vertebra through several self-constructed models. With the advance of computer technology, the finite element methods have been rapidly developed in cervical vertebra biomechanical researches and have became a major approach for biomechanical researches to simulate more and more clinical conditions.

  18. [The model of development of science by the example of limnology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshutkin, V V; Levchenko, V F

    2010-01-01

    Limnology--the science about lakes is the young and relatively closed area of studies; its existence is owing to several hundreds of scientists. The International Society of Limnologists holds its meetings since 1922. We used materials of these meetings to find out the main stages of development of this science; among these stages there were both fast and relatively calm periods. Based on analysis of these data, we constructed a model of development of the science, the same data being used for tuning and verification of the model. We have suggested that the main regularities and of development of limnology can be extrapolated to other sciences. The main "acting person" in the model is population of scientists. Each scientist, with some probability, can propose new ideas as well as use in his elaborations some particular complex of the already accumulated knowledge and ideas. The model also takes into consideration how the scientific information is spreading, specifically some individual peculiarities of model scientists, such as age, experience, communicability. After the model parameters had been chosen in such a way that is described adequately the development of limnology, we performed a series of experiments by changing some of the characteristics and obtained rather unexpected results published preliminary in the short work (Levchenko V. F and Menshutkin V. V. Int. J. Comp. Anticip. Syst., 2008, vol. 22, p. 63-75) and discussed here in the greater detail. It is revealed, that the development of science is passing irregularly and sharply decelerated at low level of scientists communication and absence of scientific schools, and that the age of "scientific youth" of scientist begins usually only after 40 years.

  19. Clues on chemical mechanisms from renormalizability: The example of a noisy cubic autocatalytic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jean-Sébastien; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2017-08-01

    We study the effect of external power-law noise on the renormalizability of a specific reaction-diffusion system of equations describing a cubic autocatalytic chemical reaction. We show that changing the noise exponent modifies the divergence structure of loop integrals and thus the renormalizability of the model. The effects of noise-generated higher order interactions are discussed. We show how noise induces new interaction terms that can be interpreted as a manifestation of some (internal) ;chemical mechanism;. We also show how ideas of effective field theory can be applied to construct a more fundamental chemical model for this system.

  20. MODELS OF FATIGUE LIFE CURVES IN FATIGUE LIFE CALCULATIONS OF MACHINE ELEMENTS – EXAMPLES OF RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz SZALA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper there was attempted to analyse models of fatigue life curves possible to apply in calculations of fatigue life of machine elements. The analysis was limited to fatigue life curves in stress approach enabling cyclic stresses from the range of low cycle fatigue (LCF, high cycle fatigue (HCF, fatigue limit (FL and giga cycle fatigue (GCF appearing in the loading spectrum at the same time. Chosen models of the analysed fatigue live curves will be illustrated with test results of steel and aluminium alloys.

  1. Concept mapping as an approach for expert-guided model building: The example of health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soellner, Renate; Lenartz, Norbert; Rudinger, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Concept mapping served as the starting point for the aim of capturing the comprehensive structure of the construct of 'health literacy.' Ideas about health literacy were generated by 99 experts and resulted in 105 statements that were subsequently organized by 27 experts in an unstructured card sorting. Multidimensional scaling was applied to the sorting data and a two and three-dimensional solution was computed. The three dimensional solution was used in subsequent cluster analysis and resulted in a concept map of nine "clusters": (1) self-regulation, (2) self-perception, (3) proactive approach to health, (4) basic literacy and numeracy skills, (5) information appraisal, (6) information search, (7) health care system knowledge and acting, (8) communication and cooperation, and (9) beneficial personality traits. Subsequently, this concept map served as a starting point for developing a "qualitative" structural model of health literacy and a questionnaire for the measurement of health literacy. On the basis of questionnaire data, a "quantitative" structural model was created by first applying exploratory factor analyses (EFA) and then cross-validating the model with confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). Concept mapping proved to be a highly valuable tool for the process of model building up to translational research in the "real world".

  2. Technical Assistance Model for Long-Term Systems Change: Three State Examples. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Christina; Goode, Sue; Hurth, Joicey; Lucas, Anne; Marshall, Jacqueline; Terrell, Adriane; Jones, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The NECTAC Technical Assistance (TA) Model for Long-Term Systems Change (LTSC) recognizes that components of a state system are highly interactive and changes at one level are not likely to be sustained without supportive changes at all related levels. Improved child and family outcomes require: intervention practices that are research-based,…

  3. Model selection as a tool for phylogeographic inference: an example from the willow Salix melanopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Bryan C; Brennan, Reid S; Chua, Vivien; Duffie, Caroline V; Harvey, Michael G; Koch, Rachel A; McMahan, Caleb D; Nelson, Bradley J; Newman, Catherine E; Satler, Jordan D; Seeholzer, Glenn; Posbic, Karine; Tank, David C; Sullivan, Jack

    2013-08-01

    Phylogeographic inference has typically relied on analyses of data from one or a few genes to provide estimates of demography and population histories. While much has been learned from these studies, all phylogeographic analysis is conditioned on the data, and thus, inferences derived from data that represent a small sample of the genome are unavoidably tenuous. Here, we demonstrate one approach for moving beyond classic phylogeographic research. We use sequence capture probes and Illumina sequencing to generate data from >400 loci in order to infer the phylogeographic history of Salix melanopsis, a riparian willow with a disjunct distribution in coastal and the inland Pacific Northwest. We evaluate a priori phylogeographic hypotheses using coalescent models for parameter estimation, and the results support earlier findings that identified post-Pleistocene dispersal as the cause of the disjunction in S. melanopsis. We also conduct a series of model selection exercises using IMa2, Migrate-n and ∂a∂i. The resulting ranking of models indicates that refugial dynamics were complex, with multiple regions in the inland regions serving as the source for postglacial colonization. Our results demonstrate that new sources of data and new approaches to data analysis can rejuvenate phylogeographic research by allowing for the identification of complex models that enable researchers to both identify and estimate the most relevant parameters for a given system.

  4. GIS used as a tool in NOM modelling - Examples from the NOMiNOR project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Ståle

    2016-04-01

    GIS incorporate spatial data information. Regarding NOM, spatial information on basic data on rainfall-runoff and air temperature is interesting. The NOMiNOR project is a cooperation between waterworks in Finland, Norway, Scotland and Sweden. NOMiNOR uses digital terrain models (DTMs) in GIS environments for modelig and predicting future NOM concentrations and quality changes for raw water sources.

  5. Adapting the SCOR model to suit the military: A South African example

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bean, WL

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available of military supply chains, therefore it was decided that supply chain management in conjunction with the SCOR model should be used during a logistics and supply chain improvement project for the South African National Defence Force (SANDF). Three case studies...

  6. Control design on the basis of approximate nonlinear models: the inverted pendulum example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Lottin, Jacques

    The main interest of linear models is the wide panel of control structures that are available. This also motivated a large amount of work to extend these structures to nonlinear plants, either by local or exact linearization, or by introducing robustness properties. At the same time other works...

  7. Role of Validation and Predictions in Modeling: Specific Examples from Semiconductor Industry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sadasivan

    2012-02-01

    With the advent of newer non-Silicon materials, using modeling to estimate properties are becoming necessary for process technology development. Since these materials are integrated as part of larger devices, interfaces and material domains are increasingly modulating properties of materials. Unlike in bulk materials, electronic and thermodynamic properties are difficult to characterize in these material structures as the device sizes overlap with material domains. We will illustrate specific cases from semiconductor processing and property estimation on the importance of verification of models for internal consistency and validation with experimental data. Given the discrepancy of scales between predictions and measurement, techniques need to bridge them. In addition, models that are developed need to be modular with open interfaces for cross-checking and integration across scales as indicated in the recently announced Materials Genome Initiative.[4pt] [1] President's initiative on Materials Genome Initiative for Global Competitiveness, June 2011[2pt] [2] S. Shankar, B. V. McKoy, W. L. Morgan, ``Self-Consistent Modeling of Weakly Ionized Plasmas-Challenges in Quantum and Classical mechanics,'' Sixth U.S. National Congress on Computational Mechanics, U.S. Association for Computational Mechanics, Dearborn, Michigan, (2001)

  8. Selection of asset investment models by hospitals: examination of influencing factors, using Switzerland as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals are responsible for a remarkable part of the annual increase in healthcare expenditure. This article examines one of the major cost drivers, the expenditure for investment in hospital assets. The study, conducted in Switzerland, identifies factors that influence hospitals' investment decisions. A suggestion on how to categorize asset investment models is presented based on the life cycle of an asset, and its influencing factors defined based on transaction cost economics. The influence of five factors (human asset specificity, physical asset specificity, uncertainty, bargaining power, and privacy of ownership) on the selection of an asset investment model is examined using a two-step fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The research shows that outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are particularly favored in the presence of two combinations of influencing factors: First, if technological uncertainty is high and both human asset specificity and bargaining power of a hospital are low. Second, if assets are very specific, technological uncertainty is high and there is a private hospital with low bargaining power, outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are favored too. Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis, it can be demonstrated that investment decisions of hospitals do not depend on isolated influencing factors but on a combination of factors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. DATA FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING (D4EM): BACKGROUND AND EXAMPLE APPLICATIONS OF DATA AUTOMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data is a basic requirement for most modeling applications. Collecting data is expensive and time consuming. High speed internet connections and growing databases of online environmental data go a long way to overcoming issues of data scarcity. Among the obstacles still remaining...

  10. Age dependent dietary assessment model (AGE MODE). Folate and vitamin A as examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waijers PMCM; Dekkers ALM; Boer JMA; van Rossum CTM; CVG

    2007-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft de werking van het model AGE MODE. AGE MODE is een methode om de gebruikelijke inneming van microvoedingsstoffen, vitaminen en mineralen, te schatten en te toetsen aan de voedingsnorm.
    AGE MODE is ontwikkeld door het RIVM. AGE MODE is een kwantitatieve methode om de

  11. [Structural models of simple sense organs by the example of first metazoans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronova, M Z

    2009-01-01

    Basic variants of the evolutional program for formation of simple sensor system--structural models of gravitation receptor, organ of vision, chemoreceptor organ as well as of the nervous system at early stages of the metazoan phylogenesis--are considered from results of our own morphofunctional studies and literature data.

  12. Modeling complexity in engineered infrastructure system: Water distribution network as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Xiang; Li, Ke

    2017-02-01

    The complex topology and adaptive behavior of infrastructure systems are driven by both self-organization of the demand and rigid engineering solutions. Therefore, engineering complex systems requires a method balancing holism and reductionism. To model the growth of water distribution networks, a complex network model was developed following the combination of local optimization rules and engineering considerations. The demand node generation is dynamic and follows the scaling law of urban growth. The proposed model can generate a water distribution network (WDN) similar to reported real-world WDNs on some structural properties. Comparison with different modeling approaches indicates that a realistic demand node distribution and co-evolvement of demand node and network are important for the simulation of real complex networks. The simulation results indicate that the efficiency of water distribution networks is exponentially affected by the urban growth pattern. On the contrary, the improvement of efficiency by engineering optimization is limited and relatively insignificant. The redundancy and robustness, on another aspect, can be significantly improved through engineering methods.

  13. Weight Loss Self-Efficacy and Modelled Behaviour: Gaining Competence through Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Marvin J.

    2011-01-01

    The Weight Efficacy Life-Style Questionnaire (WEL) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) assessed self-efficacy and physical activity for 124 volunteers aged 17-61. It was administered before and after participants attended a video modelling workshop. Half of the participants in the treatment and control groups were given…

  14. The Groningen Active Living Model, an example of successful recruitment of sedentary and underactive older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Martin; de Jong, Johan; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Many physical activity interventions do not reach those people who would benefit the most from them. The Groningen Active Living Model (GALM) was successful in recruiting sedentary and underactive older adults. Method. In the fall of 2000 older adults in three municipalities in the Nether

  15. Moving from Introverted to Extraverted Embedded Librarian Services: An Example of a Proactive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Valerie R.; Loftis, Charissa

    2012-01-01

    Librarians at Wayne State College have developed an extraverted online embedded librarian model whereby librarians proactively push out content to students at time-appropriate moments. This article outlines why extraverted approaches are more effective than introverted approaches. It also details how to develop an extraverted program. First,…

  16. Aerospace Example

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a textbook, created example for illustration purposes. The System takes inputs of Pt, Ps, and Alt, and calculates the Mach number using the Rayleigh Pitot...

  17. Upscaling Fracture Network Models to Continua: An Example Using Weathered Granitic Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A.; Doe, T.; Jones, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    In the early 1990's, a proposed landfill site on the Campo Indian Reservation in San Diego County, California, was the object of a characterization program involving over ninety exploration and monitoring wells, geophysical investigations, flow meter logging, tracer testing, and fracture characterization. This intensively studied site rests on deeply weathered tonalite. The weathered zone extends several tens to about 100 feet below the surface; however, the deeply weathered material follows hydraulically active fractures to even greater depths. The flow meter logging was especially valuable both for locating conductive fractures but also, in un- pumped mode, for defining regions of upward and downward vertical flow. The deep weathering on the conductive fractures gives each pathway a large effective porosity that translates to lower flow velocities compared with unweathered fractures with similar transmissivities. The simulation of the groundwater flow at this site used a local-scale fracture network model which was upscaled to a continuum code at regional scales. At the largest scale we generated a small number of major fractures to match the topographic lineaments. At an intermediate scale we had geophysical lineaments that were deterministic under the site footprint, and stochastic elsewhere using generation parameters based on the lengths, orientations and intensities of the deterministic features. The fractures of the most detailed scale were background fractures that were stochastically generated from borehole data. The site-scale fracture network model was incorporated into a regional-scale MODFLOW model, by overlaying the MODFLOW grid on the fracture network model and calculating equivalent porous medium properties for each MODFLOW grid cell using the Oda tensor method. This fast algorithm calculates a permeability tensor for each MODFLOW grid cell by summing the oriented area-weighted permeabilities of each fracture. The resulting MODFLOW model was then

  18. Mechanics and rates of tidal inlet migration: Modeling and application to natural examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.

    2016-11-01

    Tidal inlets on barrier coasts can migrate alongshore hundreds of meters per year, often presenting great management and engineering challenges. Here we perform model experiments with migrating tidal inlets in Delft3D-SWAN to investigate the mechanics and rates of inlet migration. Model experiments with obliquely approaching waves suggest that tidal inlet migration occurs due to three mechanisms: (1) littoral sediment deposition along the updrift inlet bank, (2) wave-driven sediment transport preferentially eroding the downdrift bank of the inlet, and (3) flood-tide-driven flow preferentially cutting along the downdrift inlet bank because it is less obstructed by flood-tidal delta deposits. To quantify tidal inlet migration, we propose and apply a simple mass balance framework of sediment fluxes around inlets that includes alongshore sediment bypassing and flood-tidal delta deposition. In model experiments, both updrift littoral sediment and the eroded downdrift inlet bank are sediment sources to the growing updrift barrier and the flood-tidal delta, such that tidal inlets can be net sink of up to 150% of the littoral sediment flux. Our mass balance framework demonstrates how, with flood-tidal deltas acting as a littoral sediment sink, migrating tidal inlets can drive erosion of the downdrift barrier beach. Parameterizing model experiments, we propose a predictive model of tidal inlet migration rates based upon the relative momentum flux of the inlet jet and the alongshore radiation stress; we then compare these predicted migration rates to 22 natural tidal inlets along the U.S. East Coast and find good agreement.

  19. ESIP's Emerging Provenance and Context Content Standard Use Cases: Developing Examples and Models for Data Stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdeen, S.; Hills, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth science data collections range from individual researchers' private collections to large-scale data warehouses, from computer-generated data to field or lab based observations. These collections require stewardship. Fundamentally, stewardship ensures long term preservation and the provision of access to the user community. In particular, stewardship includes capturing appropriate metadata and documentation--and thus the context of the data's creation and any changes they underwent over time --to enable data reuse. But scientists and science data managers must translate these ideas into practice. How does one balance the needs of current and (projected) future stakeholders? In 2011, the Data Stewardship Committee (DSC) of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) began developing the Provenance and Context Content Standard (PCCS). As an emerging standard, PCCS provides a framework for 'what' must be captured or preserved as opposed to describing only 'how' it should be done. Originally based on the experiences of NASA and NOAA researchers within ESIP, the standard currently provides data managers with content items aligned to eight key categories. While the categories and content items are based on data life cycles of remote sensing missions, they can be generalized to cover a broader set of activities, for example, preservation of physical objects. These categories will include the information needed to ensure the long-term understandability and usability of earth science data products. In addition to the PCCS, the DSC is developing a series of use cases based on the perspectives of the data archiver, data user, and the data consumer that will connect theory and practice. These cases will act as specifications for developing PCCS-based systems. They will also provide for examination of the categories and content items covered in the PCCS to determine if any additions are needed to cover the various use cases, and also provide rationale and

  20. Application of DOI index to analysis of selected examples of resistivity imaging models in Quaternary sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glazer Michał

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of resistivity cross sections may be in many cases unreliable due to the presence of artifacts left by the inversion process. One way to avoid erroneous conclusions about geological structure is creation of Depth of Investigation (DOI index maps, which describe durability of prepared model with respect to variable parameters of inversion. To assess the usefulness of this interpretation methodology in resistivity imaging method over quaternary sediments, it has been used to one synthetic data set and three investigation sites. Two of the study areas were placed in the Upper Silesian Industrial District region: Bytom - Karb, Chorzów - Chorzow Stary; and one in the Southern Pomeranian Lake District across Piława River Valley. Basing on the available geological information the results show high utility of DOI index in analysis of received resistivity models, on which areas poorly constrained by data has been designated.

  1. A QSAR model for the estimation of carcinogenicity: example application to an azo-dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enslein, K; Borgstedt, H H

    1989-12-01

    Since carcinogenicity bioassays are time-consuming, costly, and use animal resources, structure-activity relationship equations which model toxicological end-points have been developed to make available alternative methods which approximate the results that could be obtained from bioassays but which are less expensive and time-consuming and use fewer, if any, animals. These equations are based on sets of bioassay results and explain the end-point under consideration in terms of substructural and other parameters which describe the chemical entities. The resulting equations--or models--can then be used to estimate--or predict--the end-point for new structures. The estimation is followed by validation procedures.

  2. Improving models of democracy: the example of lagged effects of economic development, education, and gender equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, Mikhail

    2014-07-01

    The author examines how time delayed effects of economic development, education, and gender equality influence political democracy. Literature review shows inadequate understanding of lagged effects, which raises methodological and theoretical issues with the current quantitative studies of democracy. Using country-years as a unit of analysis, the author estimates a series of OLS PCSE models for each predictor with a systematic analysis of the distributions of the lagged effects. The second set of multiple OLS PCSE regressions are estimated including all three independent variables. The results show that economic development, education, and gender have three unique trajectories of the time-delayed effects: Economic development has long-term effects, education produces continuous effects regardless of the timing, and gender equality has the most prominent immediate and short term effects. The results call for the reassessment of model specifications and theoretical setups in the quantitative studies of democracy.

  3. Extending the GTAP data base and model to cover domestic support issues using EU as example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, Kirsten; Jensen, Hans Grinsted; Brockmeier, Martina

    The EU Single Farm Payment (SFP) is currently distributed in proportion to primary factor shares in version 8 of the GTAP database. In this paper, we investigate whether this way of modeling the EU SFP makes a difference in analyzing agricultural policy reforms. To do so, we create alternative...... PSE tables. We provide a detailed overview supplemented with assumptions of payment allocation, shock calculations and in particular, the Altertax procedure to update value flows and price equations extended in the GTAP model. Subsequently, we illustrate the impact of those assumptions by simulating...... that the effect on welfare and the trade balance decreases with an increasing degree of decoupling. This experiment shows that the allocation of the SFP can have strong impacts on simulation results....

  4. Integrable models for quantum media excited by laser radiation: a method, physical interpretation, and examples

    OpenAIRE

    Savva, Vadim A.; Zelenkov, Vadim I.

    2014-01-01

    A method to build various integrable models for description of coherent excitation of multilevel media by laser pulses is suggested. Distribution functions over the energy levels of quantum systems depending on the time and frequency detuning are obtained. The distributions follow from Schr\\"odinger equation exact solutions and give the complete dynamical description of laser-excited quantum multilevel systems. Interpretation based on the Fourier spectra of the probability amplitudes of a qua...

  5. Modeling Methodology of Progressive Collapse by the Example of Real High-Rise Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Mariya Barabash

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to find out several ways to design real buildings with protective measures against progressive collapse. There are no uniform guidelines for choosing the type of finite element able to provide the necessary accuracy of the calculation model taking into account all the main factors affecting the strength and stability of the building. Therefore it is required to develop numerical methods for calculation on progressive collapse of buildings bearing structural ele...

  6. A game dynamic model for vaccine skeptics and vaccine believers: measles as an example

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Eunha; Grefenstette, John J.; Albert, Steven M.; Cakouros, Brigid E.; Burke, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    Widespread avoidance of Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccination (MMR), with a consequent increase in the incidence of major measles outbreaks, demonstrates that the effectiveness of vaccination programs can be thwarted by the public misperceptions of vaccine risk. By coupling game theory and epidemic models, we examine vaccination choice among populations stratified into two behavioral groups: vaccine skeptics and vaccine believers. The two behavioral groups are assumed to be heterogeneous with res...

  7. NOx dispersion modelling around roundabout in a small city, example from Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Orsolya; Rákai, Anikó; Czáder, Károly; Török, Ákos

    2013-04-01

    The present paper focuses on the modelling of pollutant distribution and dispersion in an urban region that is located in a moderately industrialized town of Hungary, Székesfehérvár, with a population of 100,000. The study area is located close to the city centre, with different housing styles and different building elevations. High-rise buildings with 10 floors to small houses with gardens are found in the modelled area. The roundabout has 5 access roads; three major ones and two minor ones with different geometries and traffic load. The traffic load of the roads was defined by traffic count, while for the meteorological characteristics wind-statistics were created. Additional input parameters were the ground plan and the elevation of buildings. To simulate the airflow and the dispersion of pollutants a Computational Fluid Dynamics code called MISKAM was used. The background concentration was taken from the dataset of a nearby air quality monitoring station. According to vehicle counting the 5 roads of the roundabout have very different loads from 12 vehicles to more than 412 vehicles/hour. Three different grid systems were applied ranging from half million to 5 million cells. The difference in the results related to grid density was also evaluated. Wind speed distribution, wind turbulence and building wake flow patterns were identified by using the model. With the help of the simulation the NOx flow and dispersion of pollutants around the roundabout can be estimated and the critical locations with higher pollution concentration are presented. The results of the modelling can be more generalized and used in the design of the layout, development, traffic-control and environmental aspects of roundabouts located in small urban areas.

  8. Modeling Employment on Regional Labor Markets(Through the Example of the Khabarovsk Territory of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Valerievna Zikunova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The disbalance of demand and supply on the labor market acquires special sense for remote and underpopulated settled lands. The lack of perspective estimations of the regional labor markets development leads to the outflow of human capital assets from regions, and their high concentration in central regions of the country. It results in the loss of competition effects on the labor market, aggravation of the mismatch of the demand and supply for labor resources according to the types of economic activity. Ultimately, the inertia policy in the area of planning regional employment can lead to the loss of skilled personnel and loss of effects related to regional specialization. The aim of this article is to substantiate the model to predict the number of the employed in the region. Firstly, the article generalizes regional and national tendencies of the labor market development. Secondly, based on the analysis of demographic and economic characteristics of the region, the model related to predicting the employment in the region is offered. Its quality is proved by subsequent approbation on the basis of real statistic data. The article displays the perspectives of applying such models in other regional economic systems taking into account their industry specialization.

  9. Optimizing the Drude-Lorentz model for material permittivity: Method, program, and examples for gold, silver, and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehmi, H. S.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    Approximating the frequency dispersion of the permittivity of materials with simple analytical functions is of fundamental importance for understanding and modeling the optical response of materials and resulting structures. In the generalized Drude-Lorentz model, the permittivity is described in the complex frequency plane by a number of simple poles having complex weights, which is a physically relevant and mathematically simple approach: By construction, it respects causality, represents physical resonances of the material, and can be implemented easily in numerical simulations. We report here an efficient method of optimizing the fit of measured data with the Drude-Lorentz model having an arbitrary number of poles. We show examples of such optimizations for gold, silver, and copper, for different frequency ranges and up to four pairs of Lorentz poles taken into account. We also provide a program implementing the method for general use.

  10. Inferring tectonic activity using drainage network and RT model: an example from the western Himalayas, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ramendra; Jain, Vikrant

    2017-04-01

    Morphology of the landscape and derived features are regarded to be an important tool for inferring about tectonic activity in an area, since surface exposures of these subsurface processes may not be available or may get eroded away over time. This has led to an extensive research in application of the non-planar morphological attributes like river long profile and hypsometry for tectonic studies, whereas drainage network as a proxy for tectonic activity has not been explored greatly. Though, significant work has been done on drainage network pattern which started in a qualitative manner and over the years, has evolved to incorporate more quantitative aspects, like studying the evolution of a network under the influence of external and internal controls. Random Topology (RT) model is one of these concepts, which elucidates the connection between evolution of a drainage network pattern and the entropy of the drainage system and it states that in absence of any geological controls, a natural population of channel networks will be topologically random. We have used the entropy maximization principle to provide a theoretical structure for the RT model. Furthermore, analysis was carried out on the drainage network structures around Jwalamukhi thrust in the Kangra reentrant in western Himalayas, India, to investigate the tectonic activity in the region. Around one thousand networks were extracted from the foot-wall (fw) and hanging-wall (hw) region of the thrust sheet and later categorized based on their magnitudes. We have adopted the goodness of fit test for comparing the network patterns in fw and hw drainage with those derived using the RT model. The null hypothesis for the test was, the drainage networks in the fw are statistically more similar than those on the hw, to the network patterns derived using the RT model for any given magnitude. The test results are favorable to our null hypothesis for networks with smaller magnitudes (< 9), whereas for larger

  11. The perceptual trap: Experimental and modelling examples of soil moisture, hydraulic conductivity and response units in complex subsurface settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Demand, Dominic; Allroggen, Niklas; Loritz, Ralf; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    In order to discuss hypothesis testing in hydrology, the question of the solid foundation of such tests has to be answered. But how certain are we about our measurements of the components of the water balance and the states and dynamics of the complex systems? What implicit assumptions or bias are already embedded in our perception of the processes? How can we find light in the darkness of heterogeneity? We will contribute examples from experimental findings, modelling approaches and landscape analysis to the discussion. Example soil moisture and the soil continuum: The definition of soil moisture as fraction of water in the porous medium assumes locally well-mixed conditions. Moreover, a unique relation of soil water retention presumes instant local thermodynamic equilibrium in the pore water arrangement. We will show findings from soil moisture responses to precipitation events, from irrigation experiments, and from a model study of initial infiltration velocities. The results highlight, that the implicit assumption relating soil moisture state dynamics with actual soil water flow is biased towards the slow end of the actual velocity distribution and rather blind for preferential flow acting in a very small proportion of the pore space. Moreover, we highlight the assumption of a well-defined continuum during the extrapolation of point-scale measurements and why spatially and temporally continuous observation techniques of soil water states are essential for advancing our understanding and development of subsurface process theories. Example hydraulic conductivity: Hydraulic conductivity lies at the heart of hydrological research and modelling. Its values can range across several orders of magnitude at a single site alone. Yet, we often consider it a crisp, effective parameter. We have conducted measurements of soil hydraulic conductivity in the lab and in the field. Moreover, we assessed infiltration capacity and conducted plot-scale irrigation experiments to

  12. Numerical modelling of agricultural products on the example of bean and yellow lupine seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andrzej; Kaliniewicz, Zdzisław; Markowski, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Numerical models of bean seeds cv. Złota Saxa and yellow lupine seeds cv. Juno were generated with the use of a 3D scanner, the geometric parameters of seeds were determined based on the models developed, and compared with the results of digital image analysis and micrometer measurements. Measurements of seed length, width and thickness performed with the use of a micrometer, 3D scanner and digital image analysis produced similar results that did not differ significantly at α = 0.05. The micrometer delivered the simplest and fastest measurements. The mean surface area of bean seeds cv. Złota Saxa and yellow lupine seeds cv. Juno, calculated with the use of mathematical formulas based on the results of micrometer measurements and digital image analysis, differed significantly from the mean surface area determined with a 3D scanner. No significant differences in seed volume were observed when this parameter was measured with a 3D scanner and determined with the use of mathematical formulas based on the results of digital image analysis and micrometer measurements. The only differences were noted when the volume of yellow lupine seeds cv. Juno was measured in a 25 ml liquid pycnometer.

  13. a Topic Modeling Based Representation to Detect Tweet Locations. Example of the Event "je Suis Charlie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morchid, M.; Josselin, D.; Portilla, Y.; Dufour, R.; Altman, E.; Linarès, G.

    2015-09-01

    Social Networks became a major actor in information propagation. Using the Twitter popular platform, mobile users post or relay messages from different locations. The tweet content, meaning and location, show how an event-such as the bursty one "JeSuisCharlie", happened in France in January 2015, is comprehended in different countries. This research aims at clustering the tweets according to the co-occurrence of their terms, including the country, and forecasting the probable country of a non-located tweet, knowing its content. First, we present the process of collecting a large quantity of data from the Twitter website. We finally have a set of 2,189 located tweets about "Charlie", from the 7th to the 14th of January. We describe an original method adapted from the Author-Topic (AT) model based on the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) method. We define an homogeneous space containing both lexical content (words) and spatial information (country). During a training process on a part of the sample, we provide a set of clusters (topics) based on statistical relations between lexical and spatial terms. During a clustering task, we evaluate the method effectiveness on the rest of the sample that reaches up to 95% of good assignment. It shows that our model is pertinent to foresee tweet location after a learning process.

  14. Viroporins, Examples of the Two-Stage Membrane Protein Folding Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martinez-Gil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Viroporins are small, α-helical, hydrophobic virus encoded proteins, engineered to form homo-oligomeric hydrophilic pores in the host membrane. Viroporins participate in multiple steps of the viral life cycle, from entry to budding. As any other membrane protein, viroporins have to find the way to bury their hydrophobic regions into the lipid bilayer. Once within the membrane, the hydrophobic helices of viroporins interact with each other to form higher ordered structures required to correctly perform their porating activities. This two-step process resembles the two-stage model proposed for membrane protein folding by Engelman and Poppot. In this review we use the membrane protein folding model as a leading thread to analyze the mechanism and forces behind the membrane insertion and folding of viroporins. We start by describing the transmembrane segment architecture of viroporins, including the number and sequence characteristics of their membrane-spanning domains. Next, we connect the differences found among viroporin families to their viral genome organization, and finalize focusing on the pathways used by viroporins in their way to the membrane and on the transmembrane helix-helix interactions required to achieve proper folding and assembly.

  15. Basement deformation during continental collision: a modelling example of the Swedish central Caledonides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Rémi; Hieronymus, Christoph; Almqvist, Bjarne

    2017-04-01

    Recent geophysical investigations (Hedin et al., 2012; Yan et al., 2015; Juhlin et al., 2015), carried out as part of the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project, provide an improved picture of the upper crust over the central Swedish Caledonides. The geometry and lithology of the basal detachment (surface to 1-2 km depth) are relatively well constrained by various observations (Seismic reflection, magneto-telluric, field observations ...), whereas deeper structures (1-2 km depth) observed in the Precambrian autochthonous basement are more ambiguous and may be interpreted as possible deformation zones or dolerite intrusions (dykes). In this study we interpret these structures as shear zones formed during a pre- or syn-Caledonian convergence event, at the boundaries of strong layers (e.g.: dolerites dykes) intruding the basement. In this collisional context, shear zones would work as thrust sheets accommodating the shortening, while the dolerite intrusions would rotate but remain mostly undeformed. We use a two-dimensional thermal-mechanical model to test this hypothesis. Our model is set up as follows: a 200km x 30km rectangular box composed of a sedimentary cover (5-7km thick) and a weak alum shale layer (100-500 m thick), overlying a continental basement intruded by vertical dolerite dykes and horizontal sills. Shortening velocities are applied on the right and bottom boundaries while the left side is fixed and the top boundary defined as a free surface. We use a visco-elasto-plastic rheology to characterize the three layers that compose the model and use consistent thermal parameters to define the temperature field. The governing equations of momentum, energy, and mass conservation are solved using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element software. The three main objectives of this study are to: 1) Analyze the localization and distribution of deformation in the basement and in the overlying layers. 2) Quantify the amount of shortening

  16. Supply-demand 3D dynamic model in water resources evaluation: taking Lebanon as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hong; Hou, Zhimin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, supply-demand 3D dynamic model is adopted to create a measurement of a region’s capacity to provide available water to meet the needs of its population. First of all, we draw a diagram between supply and demand. Then taking the main dynamic factors into account, we establish an index to evaluate the balance of supply and demand. The three dimension vector reflects the scarcity of industrial, agricultural and residential water. Lebanon is chosen as the object of case study, and we do quantitative analysis of its current situation. After data collecting and processing, we calculate the 3D vector in 2012, which reveals that agriculture is susceptible to water scarcity. Water resources of Lebanon are “physical rich” but “economic scarcity” according to the correlation chart and other statistical analysis.

  17. Field Fractal Cosmological Model As an Example of Practical Cosmology Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshev, Yu V

    2008-01-01

    The idea of the global gravitational effect as the source of cosmological redshift was considered by de Sitter (1916, 1917), Eddington (1923), Tolman (1929) and Bondi (1947), also Hubble (1929) called the discovered distance-redshift relation as "De Sitter effect". For homogeneous matter distribution cosmological gravitational redshift is proportional to square of distance: z_grav ~ r^2. However for a fractal matter distribution having the fractal dimension D=2 the global gravitational redshift is the linear function of distance: z_grav ~ r, which gives possibility for interpretation of the Hubble law without the space expansion. Here the field gravity fractal cosmological model (FGF) is presented, which based on two initial principles. The first assumption is that the field gravity theory describes the gravitational interaction within the conceptual unity of all fundamental physical interactions. The second hypothesis is that the spatial distribution of matter is a fractal at all scales up to the Hubble radi...

  18. A Model for Integrating Computation in Undergraduate Physics: An example from middle-division classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, Marcos D

    2013-01-01

    Much of the research done by modern physicists would be impossible without the use of computation. And yet, while computation is a crucial tool of practicing physicists, physics curricula do not generally reflect its importance and utility. To more tightly connect undergraduate preparation with professional practice, we integrated computational instruction into middle-division classical mechanics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Our model for integration includes the construction of computational learning goals, the design of computational activities consistent with those goals, and the assessment of students' computational fluency. To assess students' computational fluency, we used open-ended computational projects in which students prepared reports describing a physical problem of their choosing. Many students chose projects from outside the domain of the course, and therefore, had to employ mathematical and computational techniques they had not yet been taught. After completing the project, most stud...

  19. Modeling Methodology of Progressive Collapse by the Example of Real High-Rise Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Barabash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to find out several ways to design real buildings with protective measures against progressive collapse. There are no uniform guidelines for choosing the type of finite element able to provide the necessary accuracy of the calculation model taking into account all the main factors affecting the strength and stability of the building. Therefore it is required to develop numerical methods for calculation on progressive collapse of buildings bearing structural elements in case of emergency. In addition, our task was to present a methodology that allows checking the stability of the building agains progressive collapse. By the technique nonlinear analysis on special (emergency regulations combination of loads and impacts is performed, including permanent and long-term regulatory burden and the impact of hypothetical local fractures bearing structures. This study was carried out on the high rise apartment complex with underground parking. In the empirical part of the study the main concern was to find out the reasons of progressive collapse of structures, taking into account stepwise assembly, building inspection performed rollover. Also the existing building retail and office complex “Gulliver” with public facilities and parking is considered, where computation was made on the progressive collapse of the upper slab technical floor. The calculation was carried out on plates or emergency landing helicopter crash on the floor slab. Analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions. To assess the real vitality of the building in an emergency situation, and resistance to progressive collapse it is recommended to count design taking into account physical and geometric nonlinearity and process modeling lifecycle.

  20. In vitro blood flow model with physiological wall shear stress for hemocompatibility testing-An example of coronary stent testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; Blok, Sjoerd Leendert Johannes; van Oeveren, Willem

    2016-09-18

    Hemocompatibility of blood contacting medical devices has to be evaluated before their intended application. To assess hemocompatibility, blood flow models are often used and can either consist of in vivo animal models or in vitro blood flow models. Given the disadvantages of animal models, in vitro blood flow models are an attractive alternative. The in vitro blood flow models available nowadays mostly focus on generating continuous flow instead of generating a pulsatile flow with certain wall shear stress, which has shown to be more relevant in maintaining hemostasis. To address this issue, the authors introduce a blood flow model that is able to generate a pulsatile flow and wall shear stress resembling the physiological situation, which the authors have coined the "Haemobile." The authors have validated the model by performing Doppler flow measurements to calculate velocity profiles and (wall) shear stress profiles. As an example, the authors evaluated the thrombogenicity of two drug eluting stents, one that was already on the market and one that was still under development. After identifying proper conditions resembling the wall shear stress in coronary arteries, the authors compared the stents with each other and often used reference materials. These experiments resulted in high contrast between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, showing the exceptional testing capabilities of the Haemobile. In conclusion, the authors have developed an in vitro blood flow model which is capable of mimicking physiological conditions of blood flow as close as possible. The model is convenient in use and is able to clearly discriminate between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, making it suitable for evaluating the hemocompatible properties of medical devices.

  1. [Accuracy analysis of computer tomography imaging for medical modeling purposes on the example of Siemens Sensation 10 scanner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miechowicz, Sławomir; Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert; Grochowska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Medical model is a material model of human body part, used for better visualization or surgery planning. It may be produced by Rapid Prototyping method, based on data obtained during medical imaging (computer tomography--CT, magnetic resonance--MR). Important problem is to provide proper spatial accuracy of the model, influenced by imaging accuracy of CT and MR scanners. The aim of the study is the accuracy analysis of CT imaging for medical modeling purposes on the example of Siemens Sensation 10 scanner. Using stereolithography technique a physical pattern--phantom in the form of grating was produced. The phantom was measured by a Coordinate Measuring Machine Leitz PMM 12106 to consider production process inaccuracy. Then the phantom was examined using CT scanner Siemens Sensation 10. Phantom measurement error distribution was determined, based on the data obtained. Maximal measurement error, considering both phantom production inaccuracy and CT imaging inaccuracy was +/- 0.87 mm, while considering only CT imaging inaccuracy was not exceeding 0.28 mm. CT acquisition process is by itself the source of measurement errors. So to provide high quality of medical models produced by Rapid Prototyping methods, it is necessary to perform accuracy measurements for every CT scanner used for obtaing data serving as the base for model production.

  2. Developing Terrestrial Trophic Models for Petroleum and Natural Gas Exploration and Production Sites: The Oklahoma Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, M; Coty, J; Stewart, J; Carlsen, T; Callaham, M

    2001-01-26

    This document details procedures to be used when constructing a conceptual terrestrial trophic model for natural gas and oil exploration and production sites. A site conceptual trophic model is intended for use in evaluating ecological impacts of oil and brine releases at E&P sites from a landscape or ecosystem perspective. The terrestrial trophic model protocol was developed using an example site, the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (TPP) in Oklahoma. The procedure focuses on developing a terrestrial trophic model using information found in the primary literature, and augmented using site-specific research where available. Although the TPP has been the subject of considerable research and public interest since the high-profile reintroduction of bison (Bison bison) in 1993, little formal work has been done to develop a food web for the plant and animal communities found at the preserve. We describe how to divide species into guilds using explicit criteria on the basis of resource use and spatial distribution. For the TPP, sixteen guilds were developed for use in the trophic model, and the relationships among these guilds were analyzed. A brief discussion of the results of this model is provided, along with considerations for its use and areas for further study.

  3. A game dynamic model for vaccine skeptics and vaccine believers: measles as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eunha; Grefenstette, John J; Albert, Steven M; Cakouros, Brigid E; Burke, Donald S

    2012-02-21

    Widespread avoidance of Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccination (MMR), with a consequent increase in the incidence of major measles outbreaks, demonstrates that the effectiveness of vaccination programs can be thwarted by the public misperceptions of vaccine risk. By coupling game theory and epidemic models, we examine vaccination choice among populations stratified into two behavioral groups: vaccine skeptics and vaccine believers. The two behavioral groups are assumed to be heterogeneous with respect to their perceptions of vaccine and infection risks. We demonstrate that the pursuit of self-interest among vaccine skeptics often leads to vaccination levels that are suboptimal for a population, even if complete coverage is achieved among vaccine believers. The demand for measles vaccine across populations driven by individual self-interest was found to be more sensitive to the proportion of vaccine skeptics than to the extent to which vaccine skeptics misperceive the risk of vaccine. Furthermore, as the number of vaccine skeptics increases, the probability of infection among vaccine skeptics increases initially, but it decreases once the vaccine skeptics begin receiving the vaccination, if both behavioral groups are vaccinated according to individual self-interest. Our results show that the discrepancy between the coverages of measles vaccine that are driven by self-interest and those driven by population interest becomes larger when the cost of vaccination increases. This research illustrates the importance of public education on vaccine safety and infection risk in order to maintain vaccination levels that are sufficient to maintain herd immunity.

  4. Examples of model-free implant restorations using Cerec inLab 4.0 software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, S; Schley, J; Kern, T; Fiedler, K; Wolfart, S

    2012-01-01

    This case report demonstrates two ways to fabricate model-free implant restorations with the Cerec inLab 4.0 software. Because the patient, a woman with a history of periodontal disease, did not wish to have a removable partial denture, implant therapy was planned for the restoration of her edentulous areas 14/15 and 24/25. In addition, the restoration was to provide functional relief of the natural maxillary anterior teeth. The two implants for the first quadrant were planned as single-tooth restorations. Each was designed as a full contour implant supra-structure using the Cerec Biogeneric abutment design technique. After completing the design phase, each restoration proposal was split into two parts: a zirconia abutment and a lithium disilicate crown. For the restoration of the second quadrant, custom 20-degree-angled abutments were individualized and acquired with the Cerec camera. A block crown was then designed, milled in burn-out acrylic resin, and fabricated from a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic ingot according to the press ceramic technique. Additionally methods of provisional restorations are discussed.

  5. Multiwavelength modelling the SED of supersoft X-ray sources. I. The method and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Skopal, Augustin

    2014-01-01

    Radiation of supersoft X-ray sources (SSS) dominates both the supersof X-ray and the far-UV domain. A fraction of their radiation can be reprocessed into the thermal nebular emission, seen in the spectrum from the near-UV to longer wavelengths. In the case of symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) a strong contribution from their cool giants is indicated in the optical/near-IR. In this paper I introduce a method of multiwavelength modelling the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SSSs from the supersoft X-rays to the near-IR with the aim to determine the physical parameters of their composite spectra. The method is demonstrated on two extragalactic SSSs, the SyXB RX J0059.1-7505 (LIN 358) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), RX J0439.8-6809 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and two Galactic SSSs, the classical nova RX J2030.5+5237 (V1974 Cyg) during its supersoft phase and the classical symbiotic star RX J1601.6+6648 (AG Dra) during its quiescent phase. The multiwavelength approach overcomes the problem of the ...

  6. A model for reliability analysis and calculation applied in an example from chemical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović Branko B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper is reliability design in polymerization processes that occur in reactors of a chemical industry. The designed model is used to determine the characteristics and indicators of reliability, which enabled the determination of basic factors that result in a poor development of a process. This would reduce the anticipated losses through the ability to control them, as well as enabling the improvement of the quality of production, which is the major goal of the paper. The reliability analysis and calculation uses the deductive method based on designing of a scheme for fault tree analysis of a system based on inductive conclusions. It involves the use standard logical symbols and rules of Boolean algebra and mathematical logic. The paper eventually gives the results of the work in the form of quantitative and qualitative reliability analysis of the observed process, which served to obtain complete information on the probability of top event in the process, as well as objective decision making and alternative solutions.

  7. Modelling water use efficiency in a dynamic environment: An example using Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialet-Chabrand, S; Matthews, J S A; Brendel, O; Blatt, M R; Wang, Y; Hills, A; Griffiths, H; Rogers, S; Lawson, T

    2016-10-01

    Intrinsic water use efficiency (Wi), the ratio of net CO2 assimilation (A) over stomatal conductance to water vapour (gs), is a complex trait used to assess plant performance. Improving Wi could lead in theory to higher productivity or reduced water usage by the plant, but the physiological traits for improvement and their combined effects on Wi have not been clearly identified. Under fluctuating light intensity, the temporal response of gs is an order of magnitude slower than A, which results in rapid variations in Wi. Compared to traditional approaches, our new model scales stoma behaviour at the leaf level to predict gs and A during a diurnal period, reproducing natural fluctuations of light intensity, in order to dissect Wi into traits of interest. The results confirmed the importance of stomatal density and photosynthetic capacity on Wi but also revealed the importance of incomplete stomatal closure under dark conditions as well as stomatal sensitivity to light intensity. The observed continuous decrease of A and gs over the diurnal period was successfully described by negative feedback of the accumulation of photosynthetic products. Investigation into the impact of leaf anatomy on temporal responses of A, gs and Wi revealed that a high density of stomata produces the most rapid response of gs but may result in lower Wi. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Modelling carbon and water flows in terrestrial ecosystems in the boreal zone - examples from Oskarshamn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlberg, Louise [Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), Stockholm (Sweden); Gu stafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    Carbon budgets and mean residence times were estimated in four hypothetical ecosystems. The greatest uncertainties in the estimations lie in the calculation of fluxes to and from the field layer. A parametrisation method based on multiple criteria, synthesising a wide range of empirical knowledge on ecosystem behaviour, proved to be useful both in the estimation of unknown parameters, to demonstrate model sensitivity, and to identify processes where our current knowledge is limited. The parameterizations derived from the study of the hypothetical systems were used to estimate site-specific carbon and water budgets for four ecosystems located within the Oskarshamn study-area. Measured soil respiration was used to calibrate the simulations. An analysis of the simulated carbon fluxes indicated that two of the ecosystems, namely the grassland and the spruce forest, were net sources of carbon dioxide, while the alder and the pine forest were net sinks of CO{sub 2}. In the former case, this was interpreted as a result of recent drainage of the organogenic soils and the concurrent increase in decomposition. The results from the study conformed rather well with results from a previous study on carbon budgets from the Oskarshamn study area.

  9. How to apply case reports in clinical practice using surrogate models via example of the trigeminocardiac reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Nora; Chowdhury, Tumul; Schaller, Bernhard J

    2016-04-06

    Case reports are an increasing source of evidence in clinical medicine. Until a few years ago, such case reports were emerged into systematic reviews and nowadays they are often fitted to the development of clinical (thinking) models. We describe this modern progress of knowledge creation by the example of the trigeminocardiac reflex that was first described in 1999 by a case series and was developed over the cause-and-effect relationship, triangulation to systematic reviews and finally to thinking models. Therefore, this editorial not only underlines the increasing and outstanding importance of (unique) case reports in current science, but also in current clinical decision-making and therefore also that of specific journals like the Journal of Medical Case Reports.

  10. Increasing vertical resolution in US models to improve track forecasts of Hurricane Joaquin with HWRF as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Banglin; Lindzen, Richard S.; Tallapragada, Vijay; Weng, Fuzhong; Liu, Qingfu; Sippel, Jason A.; Ma, Zaizhong; Bender, Morris A.

    2016-10-01

    The atmosphere-ocean coupled Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast model (HWRF) developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is used as an example to illustrate the impact of model vertical resolution on track forecasts of tropical cyclones. A number of HWRF forecasting experiments were carried out at different vertical resolutions for Hurricane Joaquin, which occurred from September 27 to October 8, 2015, in the Atlantic Basin. The results show that the track prediction for Hurricane Joaquin is much more accurate with higher vertical resolution. The positive impacts of higher vertical resolution on hurricane track forecasts suggest that National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/NCEP should upgrade both HWRF and the Global Forecast System to have more vertical levels.

  11. Increasing vertical resolution in US models to improve track forecasts of Hurricane Joaquin with HWRF as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Banglin; Lindzen, Richard S; Tallapragada, Vijay; Weng, Fuzhong; Liu, Qingfu; Sippel, Jason A; Ma, Zaizhong; Bender, Morris A

    2016-10-18

    The atmosphere-ocean coupled Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast model (HWRF) developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is used as an example to illustrate the impact of model vertical resolution on track forecasts of tropical cyclones. A number of HWRF forecasting experiments were carried out at different vertical resolutions for Hurricane Joaquin, which occurred from September 27 to October 8, 2015, in the Atlantic Basin. The results show that the track prediction for Hurricane Joaquin is much more accurate with higher vertical resolution. The positive impacts of higher vertical resolution on hurricane track forecasts suggest that National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/NCEP should upgrade both HWRF and the Global Forecast System to have more vertical levels.

  12. Challenges for measuring and modeling carbon cycling in degraded tropical forests: Examples from the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M. M.; Longo, M.; Morton, D. C.; Leitold, V.; Pinagé, E. R.; dos-Santos, M. N.; Scaranello, M. A., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    Deforestation has cleared almost 20% of the forest in the Brazilian Amazon region. Logging, and understory forest fires may have degraded a similar area of forest. Despite the significant reduction of deforestation over the past decade, forest degradation through logging and understory fire continues to affect carbon stocks and fluxes. Recent studies using atmospheric data show that uptake by Amazon ecosystems balances or exceeds the carbon dioxide release by deforestation in normal (non-drought) years. However, old growth forest carbon dioxide uptake appears to be declining. Therefore, regeneration of degraded and secondary forests may be playing an ever more important role in the carbon balance of the world's largest extent of tropical forest. There are multiple challenges for understanding the role of degraded forests in regional and global carbon cycling. First, to date, no reliable estimates of the total area of degraded forest or the carbon losses associated with degradation exist in the Amazon. Remote sensing detection of forest degradation is far more difficult than detection of deforestation because changes in canopy characteristics are subtler. Second, forests may be subject to multiple degradation events and forest structure and species composition resulting from degradation is highly variable. Third, the structure of forests that result from degradation can be radically different from more commonly studied old-growth and secondary forests. Finally, there are few measurements that quantify degraded forest function. We will demonstrate pathways to resolving these challenges including (i) multi-temporal remote sensing studies of forest degradation dynamics on the Amazon frontier; (ii) forest structure and biomass estimates using airborne lidar data; (iii) changes in species composition based on forest inventory; and (iv) approaches for incorporating lidar data into a demographic modeling framework.

  13. MODELING OF THE BASIC PARAMETERS OF ECONOMIC STABILITY (BY THE EXAMPLE OF JSC “BOGUCHAROVO”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Serebriakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The article describes the author's vision of the process of management of economic stability of the enterprise by means of simulation of the main parameters of its activity and justified the relevance of the theme of the study. Studied theoretical and methodical bases of economic stability of the enterprise in accordance with the Russian development of a market economy, as well as practical recommendations on modeling of the main parameters of the economic sustainability of the organization. Currently, management of economic stability is one of the most important factors of functioning and development of the enterprises in conditions of the global financial crisis. The relevance of this trend is increasing in line with the increasing complexity of economic ties, changing external environment. A comprehensive approach to the development of the most appropriate variants of the mechanism of management of economic sustainability taking into account the experience of developed countries, industry and sector of factors of external environment can become the basis for developing a common long-term economic development strategy of the enterprise. Problems of economic stability of enterprises caused by the fact that normally carried out in a changing environment operational measures allow for a short time to keep the state of the enterprise is stable, but not change the situation radically. That is, they are associated, on the one hand, with a lack of vision of development of the enterprises, with another - the narrowness of the approach applied to the diagnosis of the existing situation and forecasting of changes in external factors.

  14. The first example of a nitrile hydratase model complex that reversibly binds nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jason; Jackson, Henry L; Schweitzer, Dirk; Rittenberg, Durrell K; Leavy, Tanya M; Kaminsky, Werner; Scarrow, Robert C; Kovacs, Julie A

    2002-09-25

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) is an iron-containing metalloenzyme that converts nitriles to amides. The mechanism by which this biochemical reaction occurs is unknown. One mechanism that has been proposed involves nucleophilic attack of an Fe-bound nitrile by water (or hydroxide). Reported herein is a five-coordinate model compound ([Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+)) containing Fe(III) in an environment resembling that of NHase, which reversibly binds a variety of nitriles, alcohols, amines, and thiocyanate. XAS shows that five-coordinate [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+) reacts with both methanol and acetonitrile to afford a six-coordinate solvent-bound complex. Competitive binding studies demonstrate that MeCN preferentially binds over ROH, suggesting that nitriles would be capable of displacing the H(2)O coordinated to the iron site of NHase. Thermodynamic parameters were determined for acetonitrile (DeltaH = -6.2(+/-0.2) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -29.4(+/-0.8) eu), benzonitrile (-4.2(+/-0.6) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -18(+/-3) eu), and pyridine (DeltaH = -8(+/-1) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -41(+/-6) eu) binding to [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+) using variable-temperature electronic absorption spectroscopy. Ligand exchange kinetics were examined for acetonitrile, iso-propylnitrile, benzonitrile, and 4-tert-butylpyridine using (13)C NMR line-broadening analysis, at a variety of temperatures. Activation parameters for ligand exchange were determined to be DeltaH(+ +) = 7.1(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -10(+/-1) eu (acetonitrile), DeltaH(+ +) = 5.4(+/-0.6) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -17(+/-2) eu (iso-propionitrile), DeltaH(+ +) = 4.9(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -20(+/-3) eu (benzonitrile), and DeltaH(+ +) = 4.7(+/-1.4) kcal/mol DeltaS(+ +) = -18(+/-2) eu (4-tert-butylpyridine). The thermodynamic parameters for pyridine binding to a related complex, [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Pr,Pr))](+) (DeltaH = -5.9(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -24(+/-3) eu), are also reported, as well as kinetic

  15. The First Example of a Nitrile Hydratase Model Complex that Reversibly Binds Nitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jason; Jackson, Henry L.; Schweitzer, Dirk; Rittenberg, Durrell K.; Leavy, Tanya M.; Kaminsky, Werner; Scarrow, Robert C.; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) is an iron-containing metalloenzyme that converts nitriles to amides. The mechanism by which this biochemical reaction occurs is unknown. One mechanism that has been proposed involves nucleophilic attack of an Fe-bound nitrile by water (or hydroxide). Reported herein is a five-coordinate model compound ([FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+) containing Fe(III) in an environment resembling that of NHase, which reversibly binds a variety of nitriles, alcohols, amines, and thiocyanate. XAS shows that five-coordinate [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+ reacts with both methanol and acetonitrile to afford a six-coordinate solvent-bound complex. Competitive binding studies demonstrate that MeCN preferentially binds over ROH, suggesting that nitriles would be capable of displacing the H2O coordinated to the iron site of NHase. Thermodynamic parameters were determined for acetonitrile (ΔH = −6.2(±0.2) kcal/mol, ΔS = −29.4(±0.8) eu), benzonitrile (−4.2(±0.6) kcal/mol, ΔS = −18(±3) eu), and pyridine (ΔH = −8(±1) kcal/mol, ΔS = −41(±6) eu) binding to [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+ using variable-temperature electronic absorption spectroscopy. Ligand exchange kinetics were examined for acetonitrile, iso-propylnitrile, benzonitrile, and 4-tert-butylpyridine using 13C NMR line-broadening analysis, at a variety of temperatures. Activation parameters for ligand exchange were determined to be ΔH‡ = 7.1(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −10(±1) eu (acetonitrile), ΔH‡ = 5.4(±0.6) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −17(±2) eu (iso-propionitrile), ΔH‡ = 4.9(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −20(±3) eu (benzonitrile), and ΔH‡ = 4.7(±1.4) kcal/mol ΔS‡ = −18(±2) eu (4-tert-butylpyridine). The thermodynamic parameters for pyridine binding to a related complex, [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Pr,Pr))]+ (ΔH = −5.9(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS = −24(±3) eu), are also reported, as well as kinetic parameters for 4-tert-butylpyridine exchange (ΔH‡ = 3.1(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡)−25(±3) eu

  16. Corruption of parameter behavior and regionalization by model and forcing data errors: A Bayesian example using the SNOW17 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Minxue; Hogue, Terri S.; Franz, Kristie J.; Margulis, Steven A.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2011-07-01

    The current study evaluates the impacts of various sources of uncertainty involved in hydrologic modeling on parameter behavior and regionalization utilizing different Bayesian likelihood functions and the Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm. The developed likelihood functions differ in their underlying assumptions and treatment of error sources. We apply the developed method to a snow accumulation and ablation model (National Weather Service SNOW17) and generate parameter ensembles to predict snow water equivalent (SWE). Observational data include precipitation and air temperature forcing along with SWE measurements from 24 sites with diverse hydroclimatic characteristics. A multiple linear regression model is used to construct regionalization relationships between model parameters and site characteristics. Results indicate that model structural uncertainty has the largest influence on SNOW17 parameter behavior. Precipitation uncertainty is the second largest source of uncertainty, showing greater impact at wetter sites. Measurement uncertainty in SWE tends to have little impact on the final model parameters and resulting SWE predictions. Considering all sources of uncertainty, parameters related to air temperature and snowfall fraction exhibit the strongest correlations to site characteristics. Parameters related to the length of the melting period also show high correlation to site characteristics. Finally, model structural uncertainty and precipitation uncertainty dramatically alter parameter regionalization relationships in comparison to cases where only uncertainty in model parameters or output measurements is considered. Our results demonstrate that accurate treatment of forcing, parameter, model structural, and calibration data errors is critical for deriving robust regionalization relationships.

  17. Modelling of road traffic for traffic flow optimization of modern regional center as an example of Odessa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Myronenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available At present sharply there is a problem of traffic management especially in big cities. The increase in the number of vehicles, both personal and public, led to congestion of city roads, many hours of traffic jams, difficulty of movement of pedestrians, increase the number of accidents, etc. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility of using simulation models to solve problems of analysis and optimization of traffic flows. To achieve this goal in a simulation environment the data base of the transport network will be developed. Materials and Methods: The problem of analysis and optimization of traffic flow is considered by the example of the city of Odessa (Ukraine, the results and recommendations can be easily adapted for other cities of Ukraine, and for the cities of most countries of the former socialist bloc. Features of transport systems make it impossible to build an adequate analytical model to explore options for the management of the system and its characteristic in different conditions. At the same time simulation modelling as a method to study such objects is a promising for the solution to this problem. As a simulation environment an OmniTRANS package as a universal tool for modeling of discrete, continuous and hybrid systems. Results: With OmniTRANS programs the model of traffic in Odessa was derived and the intensity of the traffic flow. B first approximation the transport network of the central district of the city was considered and built; without calibration and simulation it was developed a database of elements of the transport network and shown how it can be used to solve problems of analysis and optimization of traffic flows. Models constructed from elements of created database, allows you to change the level of detail of the simulated objects and phenomena, thereby obtaining models as macro and micro level.

  18. Modelling of karst structures by geophysical methods. An example: the doline of S. Pietro dei Monti (Western Liguria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gambetta

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Integrated geophysical investigations of karst structures were carried out in Liguria and Piedmont (NW Italy; this paper refers to the S. Pietro dei Monti doline, in the karst area of Mt. Carmo (Savona. The techniques used in the integrated study were magnetics, electromagnetics and seismic refraction. The target was to identify, without drilling, the nature of the doline, for example if it is of dissolution or collapse type. A preliminary susceptibility sampling of the outcrop and topsoil and the diffuse fractures with a probable water seepage suggested magnetics and VLF electromagnetics. Such methods applied in an area with an extremely low cultural noise allowed modelling of the buried structure of the doline.

  19. Food Quality Safety Evaluation Model in College Canteens Based on the Improved AHP-taking Bengbu College as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxi Chen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of investigation and the suggestion from the experts, the factors influencing the college canteen food quality and safety are found and assessment system for university cafeteria food quality and safety is constructed. With the improved Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP to the various indexes for the empowerment and the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method, the university canteen food quality and safety evaluation method is created. Then based on the example from Bengbu College, the solution of the model is provided, thus it is concluded that the process management factors, food factors and environmental factors, make the biggest influence on the canteen food quality and safety. Meanwhile, the extent of the influence of the second level factor on the canteen food quality and safety is identified and further it should be paid a greater attention to the several factors in order to improve the status of the food quality and safety condition.

  20. The case for NetCDF as a groundwater model output format using R: Example using USGS MODFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, K. M.; Barnes, M.; Barnes, D.

    2011-12-01

    The USGS MODFLOW code has become the most widely used groundwater flow code throughout the world since its release in 1989. Because MODFLOW is a plain FORTRAN code with no graphical user interface (GUI) or visualization capabilities, model results visualization and analysis is usually done with commercial or open-source packages, and self-made FORTRAN snippets. The output format of MODFLOW is a FORTRAN binary which may vary depending on compilers and platforms. NetCDF, on the other hand, is a standardized, sharable and compact format which can be read and visualized with numerous free and commercial packages including R. It is also possible to embed useful geospatial information like coordinates, projection and grid discretization in the NetCDF which are absent in the FORTRAN binary. Using NetCDF as a standard model output format would allow modelers and non-modelers to easily share, visualize and plot model results using readily available software (R, ArcGIS, MS Excel, Paraview, GRASS GIS, SAGA GIS...etc). NetCDF is a particularly good format for storing large, multidimensional datasets. Many NetCDF tools were designed for the climate community, whose datasets are often orders of magnitude larger than datasets typically used in groundwater modeling. In this study R was used to generate a NetCDF file from a MODFLOW binary output and example analyses and visualizations were implemented. R has extensive statistical and plotting capabilities which are available to the user once MODFLOW outputs are available in NetCDF format.

  1. A relational metric, its application to domain analysis, and an example analysis and model of a remote sensing domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    An objective and quantitative method has been developed for deriving models of complex and specialized spheres of activity (domains) from domain-generated verbal data. The method was developed for analysis of interview transcripts, incident reports, and other text documents whose original source is people who are knowledgeable about, and participate in, the domain in question. To test the method, it is applied here to a report describing a remote sensing project within the scope of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The method has the potential to improve the designs of domain-related computer systems and software by quickly providing developers with explicit and objective models of the domain in a form which is useful for design. Results of the analysis include a network model of the domain, and an object-oriented relational analysis report which describes the nodes and relationships in the network model. Other products include a database of relationships in the domain, and an interactive concordance. The analysis method utilizes a newly developed relational metric, a proximity-weighted frequency of co-occurrence. The metric is applied to relations between the most frequently occurring terms (words or multiword entities) in the domain text, and the terms found within the contexts of these terms. Contextual scope is selectable. Because of the discriminating power of the metric, data reduction from the association matrix to the network is simple. In addition to their value for design. the models produced by the method are also useful for understanding the domains themselves. They can, for example, be interpreted as models of presence in the domain.

  2. UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MJ Fayer

    2000-06-12

    The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

  3. Modelling of pathologies of the nervous system by the example of computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumilov, V. N., E-mail: vnshumilov@rambler.ru; Syryamkin, V. I., E-mail: maximus70sir@gmail.com; Syryamkin, M. V., E-mail: maximus70sir@gmail.com [National Research Tomsk State University, 634050, Tomsk, Lenin Avenue, 36 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The paper puts forward principles of action of devices operating similarly to the nervous system and the brain of biological systems. We propose an alternative method of studying diseases of the nervous system, which may significantly influence prevention, medical treatment, or at least retardation of development of these diseases. This alternative is to use computational and electronic models of the nervous system. Within this approach, we represent the brain in the form of a huge electrical circuit composed of active units, namely, neuron-like units and connections between them. As a result, we created computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems, which are based on the principles of functioning of biological nervous systems that we have put forward. Our models demonstrate reactions to external stimuli and their change similarly to the behavior of simplest biological organisms. The models possess the ability of self-training and retraining in real time without human intervention and switching operation/training modes. In our models, training and memorization take place constantly under the influence of stimuli on the organism. Training is without any interruption and switching operation modes. Training and formation of new reflexes occur by means of formation of new connections between excited neurons, between which formation of connections is physically possible. Connections are formed without external influence. They are formed under the influence of local causes. Connections are formed between outputs and inputs of two neurons, when the difference between output and input potentials of excited neurons exceeds a value sufficient to form a new connection. On these grounds, we suggest that the proposed principles truly reflect mechanisms of functioning of biological nervous systems and the brain. In order to confirm the correspondence of the proposed principles to biological nature, we carry out experiments for the study of processes of

  4. Modelling of pathologies of the nervous system by the example of computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, V. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Syryamkin, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper puts forward principles of action of devices operating similarly to the nervous system and the brain of biological systems. We propose an alternative method of studying diseases of the nervous system, which may significantly influence prevention, medical treatment, or at least retardation of development of these diseases. This alternative is to use computational and electronic models of the nervous system. Within this approach, we represent the brain in the form of a huge electrical circuit composed of active units, namely, neuron-like units and connections between them. As a result, we created computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems, which are based on the principles of functioning of biological nervous systems that we have put forward. Our models demonstrate reactions to external stimuli and their change similarly to the behavior of simplest biological organisms. The models possess the ability of self-training and retraining in real time without human intervention and switching operation/training modes. In our models, training and memorization take place constantly under the influence of stimuli on the organism. Training is without any interruption and switching operation modes. Training and formation of new reflexes occur by means of formation of new connections between excited neurons, between which formation of connections is physically possible. Connections are formed without external influence. They are formed under the influence of local causes. Connections are formed between outputs and inputs of two neurons, when the difference between output and input potentials of excited neurons exceeds a value sufficient to form a new connection. On these grounds, we suggest that the proposed principles truly reflect mechanisms of functioning of biological nervous systems and the brain. In order to confirm the correspondence of the proposed principles to biological nature, we carry out experiments for the study of processes of

  5. Outcome Inelasticity and Outcome Variability in Behaviour-Incidence Models: An Example from an SEIR Infection on a Dynamic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce Morsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavior-incidence models have been used to model phenomena such as free-riding vaccinating behavior, where nonvaccinators free ride on herd immunity generated by vaccinators. Here, we develop and analyze a simulation model of voluntary ring vaccination on an evolving social contact network. Individuals make vaccination decisions by examining their expected payoffs, which are influenced by the infection status of their neighbors. We find that stochasticity can make outcomes extremely variable (near critical thresholds and thus unpredictable: some stochastic realizations result in rapid control through ring vaccination while others result in widespread transmission. We also explore the phenomenon of outcome inelasticity, wherein behavioral responses result in certain outcome measures remaining relatively unchanged. Finally, we explore examples where ineffective or risky vaccines are more widely adopted than safe, effective vaccines. This occurs when such a vaccine is unattractive to a sufficient number of contacts of an index case to cause failure of ring vaccination. As a result, the infection percolates through the entire network, causing the final epidemic size and vaccine coverage to be higher than would otherwise occur. Effects such as extreme outcome variability and outcome inelasticity have implications for vaccination policies that depend on individual choice for their success and predictability.

  6. Opportunities to enhance contribution of model forests in the sustainable forest resources management (example from Yalova Model Forest).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiroğlu, Sultan; Özdemir, Mehmet; Özyürek, Ercan; Arslan, Avni

    2016-10-01

    Model forests are nongovernmental organizations at local, regional and international level which are mainly focused on reconciling the conflicts between the stakeholders. This is an innovative approach to organization, which has been receiving more and more attraction from increasing number of countries, which gradually increased the number of model forests for the last 25 years. If these organizations reach desired levels of structure, medium, impacts and assets their contribution in sustainable forest resources management will increase ipso facto. The very first model forest of Turkey was created in Yalova Province in 2010. Yalova Province has certain fundamental problems including but not limited to; population growth and unplanned urbanization caused by industrialization, uncontrolled increase in demand for fire wood and non-wooden products of forestry resources, questionable resource management decisions adopted in the past and low-income levels of the people especially those in the rural areas. The main objective of present case study is to analyze Yalova Model Forest (YMF) so as to determine the possible problems that may occur during implementation of sustainable management for forestry resources through a planning approach with multiple stakeholders. As a result of research, it has been revealed that YMF has certain significant structural, environmental and impact-related problems. In order to ensure continuity of YMF's contribution to sustainable forestry resources management, these problems need to be addressed promptly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A hidden Markov model to identify and adjust for selection bias: an example involving mixed migration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieberg, John R; Conn, Paul B

    2014-05-01

    An important assumption in observational studies is that sampled individuals are representative of some larger study population. Yet, this assumption is often unrealistic. Notable examples include online public-opinion polls, publication biases associated with statistically significant results, and in ecology, telemetry studies with significant habitat-induced probabilities of missed locations. This problem can be overcome by modeling selection probabilities simultaneously with other predictor-response relationships or by weighting observations by inverse selection probabilities. We illustrate the problem and a solution when modeling mixed migration strategies of northern white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Captures occur on winter yards where deer migrate in response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, not all deer migrate in all years, and captures during mild years are more likely to target deer that migrate every year (i.e., obligate migrators). Characterizing deer as conditional or obligate migrators is also challenging unless deer are observed for many years and under a variety of winter conditions. We developed a hidden Markov model where the probability of capture depends on each individual's migration strategy (conditional versus obligate migrator), a partially latent variable that depends on winter severity in the year of capture. In a 15-year study, involving 168 white-tailed deer, the estimated probability of migrating for conditional migrators increased nonlinearly with an index of winter severity. We estimated a higher proportion of obligates in the study cohort than in the population, except during a span of 3 years surrounding back-to-back severe winters. These results support the hypothesis that selection biases occur as a result of capturing deer on winter yards, with the magnitude of bias depending on the severity of winter weather. Hidden Markov models offer an attractive framework for addressing selection biases due to their

  8. Validate Tomography with Broadband Waveform Modeling: An Example at La Ristra Transect in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, T. A.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2005-12-01

    Travel time tomography has been the main tool for seismologists in developing mantle structure and studying regional tectonics. Standard practice for geodynamists is to convert the velocity anomalies into temperature and density and fit geophysical observables such as topography and gravity. However, tomographic models produced by smooth, damped inversions usually underestimate the amplitude and sharpness of the velocity structure. To validate these tomographic models, it is important to propagate seismic waves through them and compare synthetic waveforms with obvervations directly, which enable us to enhance and sharpen these models. Here we illustrate an example using the Rio Grande Rift PASSCAL observations in the southwestern US. The La Ristra passive experiment was designed to cross the Rio Grande Rift system and study the tranition in mantle structure from Great Plain to Colorado Plateau (e.g. Gao et al. 2004; West et al. 2004, Wilson et al. 2005). Ray-based body wave travel time tomography (Gao et al. 2004) indicated a linear, south-east dipping slab-like fast velocity anomaly under the western edge of the Great Plain. They interpreted it as a downwelling lithosphere produced by a small scale convection. We take advantages of the dense linear array and examine data from two deep events in south America. After deconvolving the source wavelet from the raw data, deconvolved waveforms of both events consistently show that P and S waveforms are severely distorted at stations across the slab boundary by a factor of 2-3. The waveform amplitude also diminishs in proportional to the wavefrom broadening. The waveform shape becomes simple again for stations near the center of the rift. We implement the tomography model into the 2-D finite difference scheme (Vidale, 1985; Helmberger and Vidale, 1988). Preliminary result shows that amplifying the tomography model by a factor of 3 starts to produce the waveform distortions observed.

  9. Geodynamics of divergent double subduction: 3-D numerical modeling of a Cenozoic example in the Molucca Sea region, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingwen; Guo, Feng; Zhao, Liang; Wu, Yangming

    2017-05-01

    Geological observations reveal existence of a unique form of plate subduction featuring subduction on both sides of one single oceanic plate, which is termed divergent double subduction (DDS). DDS may play an important role in facilitating tectonic processes like closure of oceanic basins, accretion and amalgamation of magmatic arcs, and growth of continents. However, this type of subduction has been largely a conceptual model and the geodynamics behind DDS are still poorly constrained. The Molucca Sea subduction zone in SE Asia has been considered as a Cenozoic example of DDS based on geophysical and geological data and provides an opportunity for detailed assessment of how DDS occurs. Here we present 3-D numerical modeling with aims to reproduce the geodynamic processes of DDS. Several factors that may have important influences on the evolution of DDS are evaluated, including the geometry of the subducting plate, the order of subduction initiation on both sides, the far-field boundary conditions and thickness of the overriding plates, and the negative buoyancy of the subducting plate. Our results reproduce the observed asymmetrical shape of the subducting Molucca Sea plate and the bending of Halmahera and Sangihe arcs and suggest that DDS is possible if effective escape of the slab-trapped upper mantle overcomes the space problem, otherwise the slab-trapped mantle may hinder the sustainability of subduction. We therefore conclude that DDS is associated with closure of narrow and short oceanic plate, and large-scale double subduction is rare in nature probably owing to space problem.

  10. Structural equation models using partial least squares: an example of the application of SmartPLS® in accounting research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Hipólito Bernardes do Nascimento

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In view of the Accounting academy’s increasing in the investigation of latent phenomena, researchers have used robust multivariate techniques. Although Structural Equation Models are frequently used in the international literature, however, the Accounting academy has made little use of the variant based on Partial Least Squares (PLS-SEM, mostly due to lack of knowledge on the applicability and benefits of its use for Accounting research. Even if the PLS-SEM approach is regularly used in surveys, this method is appropriate to model complex relations with multiple relationships of dependence and independence between latent variables. In that sense, it is very useful for application in experiments and file data. In that sense, a literature review is presented of Accounting studies that used the PLS-SEM technique. Next, as no specific publications were observed that exemplified the application of the technique in Accounting, a PLS-SEM application is developed to encourage exploratory research by means of the software SmartPLS®, being particularly useful to graduate students. Therefore, the main contribution of this article is methodological, given its objective to clearly identify the guidelines for the appropriate use of PLS. By presenting an example of how to conduct an exploratory research using PLS-SEM, the intention is to contribute to researchers’ enhanced understanding of how to use and report on the technique in their research.

  11. A comparison between the example reference biosphere model ERB 2B and a process-based model: simulation of a natural release scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahayni, T

    2014-12-01

    The BIOMASS methodology was developed with the objective of constructing defensible assessment biospheres for assessing potential radiological impacts of radioactive waste repositories. To this end, a set of Example Reference Biospheres were developed to demonstrate the use of the methodology and to provide an international point of reference. In this paper, the performance of the Example Reference Biosphere model ERB 2B associated with the natural release scenario, discharge of contaminated groundwater to the surface environment, was evaluated by comparing its long-term projections of radionuclide dynamics and distribution in a soil-plant system to those of a process-based, transient advection-dispersion model (AD). The models were parametrised with data characteristic of a typical rainfed winter wheat crop grown on a sandy loam soil under temperate climate conditions. Three safety-relevant radionuclides, (99)Tc, (129)I and (237)Np with different degree of sorption were selected for the study. Although the models were driven by the same hydraulic (soil moisture content and water fluxes) and radiological (Kds) input data, their projections were remarkably different. On one hand, both models were able to capture short and long-term variation in activity concentration in the subsoil compartment. On the other hand, the Reference Biosphere model did not project any radionuclide accumulation in the topsoil and crop compartments. This behaviour would underestimate the radiological exposure under natural release scenarios. The results highlight the potential role deep roots play in soil-to-plant transfer under a natural release scenario where radionuclides are released into the subsoil. When considering the relative activity and root depth profiles within the soil column, much of the radioactivity was taken up into the crop from the subsoil compartment. Further improvements were suggested to address the limitations of the Reference Biosphere model presented in this paper.

  12. IMPROVING THE FOREIGN POLICY OF RUSSIA ON THE BASIS OF THE GRAVITY MODELING (ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE BRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Degtereva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the features of construction of gravity models, the results of the use of which will allow to identify eff ective ways of Russian foreign policy improvements.Purpose of the article: multigravitatsion development model of Russia's foreign trade, which will identify forward the development of export-import relations in the framework of inter-regional trade area of the Russian Federation, including integration associations such as the EU, BRICS, CIS.Methodology: methodological basis of the study make up scientific methods of cognition, namely, methods of theoretical generalization and comparison; method of integrated and structural analysis.Results: During the studied analyzed Russia's foreign trade turnover, the results of which revealed that for the country's economic development is important as a variety of trade fl ows and capital fl ows, which in turn updates the problem of formation and development of the national foreign trade potential, finding the optimal proportion of commodity structure diversification and the introduction of eff ective mechanisms of regulation of export-import operations. The solution of the problem determined the conduct of the study articles Russian contemporary maps of foreign cooperation in the conditions of existing sanctions and embargoes, as well as the identification of targeted country markets for Russia's non-oil exports with a separate allocation problem area that emerged as a result of external challenges of political and economic nature faced by Russia because of the military confl ict in Ukraine. Special attention is paid to the distribution of Russian imports by partner countries.Significance: the example of EU integration associations of the CIS and the BRICS, which make up multiregional commercial space of Russia, multigravitatsionnaya model is constructed in order to assess the impact of Russia's cooperation with the EU member countries, CIS countries and the BRICS, as well as

  13. Modeling complex and multi-component food systems in molecular dynamics simulations on the example of chocolate conching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Maximilian; Sonnleitner, Bettina; Mailänder, Markus; Briesen, Heiko

    2014-02-01

    Additional benefits of foods are an increasing factor in the consumer's purchase. To produce foods with the properties the consumer demands, understanding the micro- and nanostructure is becoming more important in food research today. We present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a tool to study complex and multi-component food systems on the example of chocolate conching. The process of conching is chosen because of the interesting challenges it provides: the components (fats, emulsifiers and carbohydrates) contain diverse functional groups, are naturally fluctuating in their chemical composition, and have a high number of internal degrees of freedom. Further, slow diffusion in the non-aqueous medium is expected. All of these challenges are typical to food systems in general. Simulation results show the suitability of present force fields to correctly model the liquid and crystal density of cocoa butter and sucrose, respectively. Amphiphilic properties of emulsifiers are observed by micelle formation in water. For non-aqueous media, pulling simulations reveal high energy barriers for motion in the viscous cocoa butter. The work for detachment of an emulsifier from the sucrose crystal is calculated and matched with detachment of the head and tail groups separately. Hydrogen bonding is shown to be the dominant interaction between the emulsifier and the crystal surface. Thus, MD simulations are suited to model the interaction between the emulsifier and sugar crystal interface in non-aqueous media, revealing detailed information about the structuring and interactions on a molecular level. With interaction parameters being available for a wide variety of chemical groups, MD simulations are a valuable tool to understand complex and multi-component food systems in general. MD simulations provide a substantial benefit to researchers to verify their hypothesis in dynamic simulations with an atomistic resolution. Rapid rise of computational resources successively

  14. Analysis of the possibility of applying a condition-based maintenance model on an example of tank weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor J. Epler

    2013-12-01

    maintenance, -      preventive maintenance, -      combined maintenance.   Some developed condition-based maintenance models Condition-based maintenance models can be classified in two groups as: -      models of technical change in the current situation (with a use of condition inspection, -      models of technical change in the situation (with a use of condition diagnostics.   Some developed condition-based maintenance models The  models of condition-based maintenance  include: -      condition-based maintenance model with parameters control, -      condition-based maintenance model with the control of reliability levels.   Condition-based maintenance model with parameters control Condition-based maintenance model with parameters control can be with: -      periodic diagnostic controls (“the constant date”, -      economic setting of the intervals of diagnostic controls, -      continous diagnostic controls.   Condition-based maintenance model with the reliability level control The essence of the condition-based maintenance model with the control of reliability levels is to use resources between two repairs without limitation, with execution of maintenance activities necessary to fix the failure occurred, while the actual reliability level is within the boundaries of the set (permissible norms. If deviations from these norms occur,  the causes of deviations are analysed and measures taken to increase the reliability level of individual components and the system.   The possibilities of the application of the condition-based maintenance model on the example of tank weapons The application of the condition-based maintenance model with parameters control is hard to realize in tank weapons, except for a tank cannon barrel. In this case,  the intensity of the stress in the material on the critical barrel sections can be measured during operation, using electrical extensiometers. Voltage intensity can be used to determine

  15. Modelling study on buffering pH and retaining U using a simplified uranium mill tailings pile example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Diederik; Simunek, Jirka

    2014-05-01

    compared to one with a low exchange capacity. This is the result of a complex interplay between different aqueous components (U, H, C, Ca), sorption sites, and minerals and processes such as aqueous complexation and acidity buffering. Especially, higher buffering capacity in the scenario with a high sorption capacity produces alkaline pHs for longer times compared to scenarios with low sorption capacities, and consequently, a higher mobility of U-C complexes and lower Kd values, at least for some time. This example shows possible effects of interacting geochemical processes such as aqueous complexation, proton exchange (and related acidity buffering), and U sorption. It highlights the importance of both pH (and the pH buffering mechanism) and specific sorption sites on the mobility of U in a ground water system subject to acidification in a uranium mill tailings pile. Jacques, D., Šimůnek, J., Mallants, D., van Genuchten, M.T., 2008. Modeling Coupled Hydrologic and Chemical Processes: Long-Term Uranium Transport following Phosphorus Fertilization. Vadose Zone Journal 7, 698-711.

  16. Trials and tribulations of 'omics data analysis: assessing quality of SIMCA-based multivariate models using examples from pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Åsa M; Wheelock, Craig E

    2013-11-01

    Respiratory diseases are multifactorial heterogeneous diseases that have proved recalcitrant to understanding using focused molecular techniques. This trend has led to the rise of 'omics approaches (e.g., transcriptomics, proteomics) and subsequent acquisition of large-scale datasets consisting of multiple variables. In 'omics technology-based investigations, discrepancies between the number of variables analyzed (e.g., mRNA, proteins, metabolites) and the number of study subjects constitutes a major statistical challenge. The application of traditional univariate statistical methods (e.g., t-test) to these "short-and-wide" datasets may result in high numbers of false positives, while the predominant approach of p-value correction to account for these high false positive rates (e.g., FDR, Bonferroni) are associated with significant losses in statistical power. In other words, the benefit in decreased false positives must be counterbalanced with a concomitant loss in true positives. As an alternative, multivariate statistical analysis (MVA) is increasingly being employed to cope with 'omics-based data structures. When properly applied, MVA approaches can be powerful tools for integration and interpretation of complex 'omics-based datasets towards the goal of identifying biomarkers and/or subphenotypes. However, MVA methods are also prone to over-interpretation and misuse. A common software used in biomedical research to perform MVA-based analyses is the SIMCA package, which includes multiple MVA methods. In this opinion piece, we propose guidelines for minimum reporting standards for a SIMCA-based workflow, in terms of data preprocessing (e.g., normalization, scaling) and model statistics (number of components, R2, Q2, and CV-ANOVA p-value). Examples of these applications in recent COPD and asthma studies are provided. It is expected that readers will gain an increased understanding of the power and utility of MVA methods for applications in biomedical research.

  17. Multinomial model and zero-inflated gamma model to study time spent on leisure time physical activity: an example of ELSA-Brasil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Aline Araújo; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Griep, Rosane Härter; Fonseca, Maria de Jesus Mendes da; Melo, Enirtes Caetano Prates; Santos, Itamar de Souza; Chor, Dora

    2017-08-17

    To compare two methodological approaches: the multinomial model and the zero-inflated gamma model, evaluating the factors associated with the practice and amount of time spent on leisure time physical activity. Data collected from 14,823 baseline participants in the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil - Estudo Longitudinal de Saúde do Adulto ) have been analysed. Regular leisure time physical activity has been measured using the leisure time physical activity module of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The explanatory variables considered were gender, age, education level, and annual per capita family income. The main advantage of the zero-inflated gamma model over the multinomial model is that it estimates mean time (minutes per week) spent on leisure time physical activity. For example, on average, men spent 28 minutes/week longer on leisure time physical activity than women did. The most sedentary groups were young women with low education level and income. The zero-inflated gamma model, which is rarely used in epidemiological studies, can give more appropriate answers in several situations. In our case, we have obtained important information on the main determinants of the duration of leisure time physical activity. This information can help guide efforts towards the most vulnerable groups since physical inactivity is associated with different diseases and even premature death.

  18. [The bio-psycho-social model and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health : Examples of using the model, its parts and the items].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Tobias-Raphael; Morfeld, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be used in practice in a variety of ways. The aim of this work is to illustrate some of the most important ways of using the ICF and some aspects of their theoretical concepts. Database searches (PubMed, Rehadat, and Google Scholar) were conducted for studies concerning the use of the ICF in practice. For all aspects of the ICF, and many of the intended ways of using it, there are concrete developments and examples or indications for their implementation into practice in different contexts. In particular, the common language and the bio-psycho-social model is widely accepted and applied in practice. At the level of chapters, there are a few developments and examples of practical applications of the ICF. When using the ICF based on Items, however, diverse developments of different theoretical and methodological quality are available. The multitude of different adaptations of the ICF for practice illustrates the great effort to the implementation in practice. However, this also shows that no comprehensive solution to the satisfaction of concerned protagonists was found. Research is needed on the theoretical foundations of the ICF, capturing the current practice of using the ICF and in the creation of specific instructions for ways to use the ICF in practice.

  19. Improving the Hadron Physics of Non-Standard-Model Decays: Example Bounds on R-parity Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Daub, J T; Hanhart, C; Kubis, B; Meißner, U -G

    2012-01-01

    Using the example of selected decays driven by R-parity-violating supersymmetric operators, we demonstrate how strong final-state interactions can be controlled quantitatively with high precision, thus allowing for a more accurate extraction of effective parameters from data. In our examples we focus on the lepton-flavor-violating decays tau --> mu pi+ pi-. In R-parity violation these can arise due to the product of two couplings. We find bounds that are an order of magnitude stronger than previous ones.

  20. Historical analysis and modeling of the forest carbon dynamics using the Carbon Budget Model: an example for the Trento Province (NE, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilli R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Historical analysis and modeling of the forest carbon dynamics using the Carbon Budget Model: an example for the Trento Province (NE, Italy. The Carbon Budget Model (CBM-CFS3 developed by the Canadian Forest Service was applied to data collected by the last Italian National Forest Inventory (INFC for the Trento Province (NE, Italy. CBM was modified and adapted to the different management types (i.e., even-aged high forests, uneven-aged high forests and coppices and silvicultural systems (including clear cuts, single tree selection systems and thinning applied in this province. The aim of this study was to provide an example of down-scaling of this model from a national to a regional scale, providing (i an historical analysis, from 1995 to 2011, and (ii a projection, from 2012 to 2020, of the forest biomass and the carbon stock evolution. The analysis was based on the harvest rate reported by the Italian National Institute of Statistics (from 1995 to 2011, corrected according to the last INFC data and distinguished between timber and fuel woods and between conifers and broadleaves. Since 2012, we applied a constant harvest rate, equal to about 1300 Mm3 yr-1, estimated from the average harvest rate for the period 2006-2011. Model results were consistent with similar data reported in the literature. The average biomass C stock was 90 Mg C ha-1 and the biomass C stock change was 0.97 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 and 0.87 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, for the period 1995 -2011 and 2012-2020, respectively. The C stock cumulated by the timber products since 1995 was 96 Gg C yr-1, i.e., about 28% of the average annual C stock change of the forests, equal to 345 Gg C yr-1. CBM also provided estimates on the evolution of the age class distribution of the even-aged forests and on the C stock of the DOM forest pools (litter, dead wood and soil. This study demonstrates the utility of CBM to provide estimates at a regional or local scale, using not only the data provided by the forest

  1. Surface-subsurface flow modeling: an example of large-scale research at the new NEON user facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, H.; McKnight, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to alter surface-subsurface interactions in freshwater ecosystems. These interactions are hypothesized to control nutrient release at diel and seasonal time scales, which may then exert control over epilithic algal growth rates. The mechanisms underlying shifts in complex physical-chemical-biological patterns can be elucidated by long-term observations at sites that span hydrologic and climate gradients across the continent. Development of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will provide researchers the opportunity to investigate continental-scale patterns by combining investigator-driven measurements with Observatory data. NEON is a national-scale research platform for analyzing and understanding the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON features sensor networks and experiments, linked by advanced cyberinfrastructure to record and archive ecological data for at least 30 years. NEON partitions the United States into 20 ecoclimatic domains. Each domain hosts one fully instrumented Core Aquatic site in a wildland area and one Relocatable site, which aims to capture ecologically significant gradients (e.g. landuse, nitrogen deposition, urbanization). In the current definition of NEON there are 36 Aquatic sites: 30 streams/rivers and 6 ponds/lakes. Each site includes automated, in-situ sensors for groundwater elevation and temperature; stream flow (discharge and stage); pond water elevation; atmospheric chemistry (Tair, barometric pressure, PAR, radiation); and surface water chemistry (DO, Twater, conductivity, pH, turbidity, cDOM, nutrients). Groundwater and surface water sites shall be regularly sampled for selected chemical and isotopic parameters. The hydrologic and geochemical monitoring design provides basic information on water and chemical fluxes in streams and ponds and between groundwater and surface water, which is intended to support investigator-driven modeling studies

  2. Study on the application of 3D modeling based on UAV photography in urban planning — Taking Yi Jiequ area in Du Jiangyan as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingshuang; Zhang, Lingqing

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposed a new technique combining UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) with 3D (three-dimension) modeling to integrate and analyze a large amount of information and to guide urban planning. This paper expounded the status and methods of UAV applying to 3D modeling, verified the practical values of this technique and summarized the future development trend by taking Yi Jiequ area in Du Jiangyan as an example.

  3. Using multi-year data to evaluate performance of one-layer and multi-layer models in snow hydrology: an example from Col De Porte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Francesco; De Michele, Carlo; Morin, Samuel; Carmagnola, Carlo Maria; Ghezzi, Antonio; Lejeune, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Snow mass dynamics prediction represents an important task for snow hydrologists, since snow on the ground influences local/global water availability and streamflow timing and amount. Different modeling tools have been formulated for decades to predict snowmelt runoff dynamics and therefore to integrate snow mass dynamics in watershed hydrology modeling. Typical variables of interest include snow depth, snow bulk density, snow water equivalent (SWE) and snowmelt runoff. All these variables have been monitored at several locations worldwide for several decades in order to evaluate model performance. As a result, several multi-year datasets are now available to perform extensive evaluation tests. In this presentation, we report an example of these evaluations by discussing the performance of two models of different complexity in reproducing observed data of snow dynamics at a site in French Alps (Col De Porte, 1325 m AMSL), where 18 continuous-time years of observations are available. We consider Crocus as an example of multi-layer physically-based complex models and HyS (De Michele et al. 2013) as an example of a one-layer temperature-index models. Using multi-year data allows us to compare models performance over long periods of time, thus considering different climatic and snow conditions. Moreover, the use of continuous-time data allows to evaluate models performance at different temporal resolutions. De Michele, C., Avanzi, F., Ghezzi, A., and Jommi, C.: Investigating the dynamics of bulk snow density in dry and wet conditions using a one-dimensional model, The Cryosphere, 7, 433-444, doi:10.5194/tc-7-433-2013, 2013.

  4. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    , EGU2014-2424, Vienna, Austria, 1-5. Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Y.I., 2014b. First Maps of Mesozoic and Cenozoic Structural-Sedimentation Floors of the Easternmost Mediterranean and their Relationship with the Deep Geophysical-Geological Zonation. Proceed. of the 19th Intern. Congress of Sedimentologists, Geneva, Switzerland, 1-3. Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Yu.I., 2015a. Newly Developed Paleomagnetic Map of the Easternmost Mediterranean Unmasks Geodynamic History of this Region. Central European Jour. of Geosciences, 6, No. 4 (in Press). Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Yu.I., 2015b. Application of Integrated Geological-Geophysical Analysis for Development of Paleomagnetic Maps of the Easternmost Mediterranean. In: (Eppelbaum L., Ed.), New Developments in Paleomagnetism Research, Nova Publisher, NY (in Press). Eppelbaum, L.V. and Khesin, B.E., 2004. Advanced 3-D modelling of gravity field unmasks reserves of a pyrite-polymetallic deposit: A case study from the Greater Caucasus. First Break, 22, No. 11, 53-56. Eppelbaum, L.V., Nikolaev, A.V. and Katz, Y.I., 2014. Space location of the Kiama paleomagnetic hyperzone of inverse polarity in the crust of the eastern Mediterranean. Doklady Earth Sciences (Springer), 457, No. 6, 710-714. Haase, J.S., Park, C.H., Nowack, R.L. and Hill, J.R., 2010. Probabilistic seismic hazard estimates incorporating site effects - An example from Indiana, U.S.A. Environmental and Engineering Geoscience, 16, No. 4, 369-388. Hough, S.E., Borcherdt, R. D., Friberg, P. A., Busby, R., Field, E. and Jacob, K. N., 1990. The role of sediment-induced amplification in the collapse of the Nimitz freeway. Nature, 344, 853-855. Khesin, B.E. Alexeyev, V.V. and Eppelbaum, L.V., 1996. Interpretation of Geophysical Fields in Complicated Environments. Kluwer Academic Publ., Ser.: Advanced Appr. in Geophysics, Dordrecht - London - Boston. Klokočník, J., Kostelecký, J., Eppelbaum, L. and Bezděk, A., 2014. Gravity Disturbances, the Marussi Tensor, Invariants and

  5. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making : An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease pro

  6. Effect of Bayesian Student Modeling on Academic Achievement in Foreign Language Teaching (University Level English Preparatory School Example)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Burak Galip; Öztürk, Özlem; Inceoglu, Mustafa Murat

    2014-01-01

    Considering the increasing importance of adaptive approaches in CALL systems, this study implemented a machine learning based student modeling middleware with Bayesian networks. The profiling approach of the student modeling system is based on Felder and Silverman's Learning Styles Model and Felder and Soloman's Index of Learning Styles…

  7. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making: An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease progression can often be obtained by assuming that the future state transitions do not depend only on the present state (Markov assumption) but also on the past through time since entry in the present state. Despite that these so-called semi-Markov models are still relatively straightforward to specify and implement, they are not yet routinely applied in health economic evaluation to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions. To facilitate a better understanding of this type of model among applied health economic analysts, the first part of this article provides a detailed discussion of what the semi-Markov model entails and how such models can be specified in an intuitive way by adopting an approach called vertical modeling. In the second part of the article, we use this approach to construct a semi-Markov model for assessing the long-term cost-effectiveness of 3 disease management programs for heart failure. Compared with a standard Markov model with the same disease states, our proposed semi-Markov model fitted the observed data much better. When subsequently extrapolating beyond the clinical trial period, these relatively large differences in goodness-of-fit translated into almost a doubling in mean total cost and a 60-d decrease in mean survival time when using the Markov model instead of the semi-Markov model. For the disease process considered in our case study, the semi-Markov model thus provided a sensible balance between model parsimoniousness and computational complexity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Modelling and predicting of commercial property attendance basing on the estimation of its attraction for consumers (by example of shopping malls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara Sergeyevna Spirina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to research and elaborate an economicmathematical model of predicting of commercial property attendance by the example of shopping malls based on the estimation of its attraction for consumers. Methods the methodological and theoretical basis for the work was composed of the rules and techniques of elaborating the qualimetry and matrix mechanisms of complex estimation necessary for the estimation and aggregation of factors influencing the choice of a consumersrsquo group among many alternative property venues. Results two mechanisms are elaborated for the complex estimation of commercial property which is necessary to evaluate their attraction for consumers and to predict attendance. By the example of two large shopping malls in Perm Russia it is shown that using both mechanisms in the economicmathematical model of commercial property attendance increases the accuracy of its predictions compared to the traditional Huff model. The reliability of the results is confirmed by the coincidence of the results of calculation and the actual poll data on the shopping malls attendance. Scientific novelty a multifactor model of commercial property attraction for consumers was elaborated by the example of shopping malls parameters of complex estimation mechanisms are defined namely eight parameters influencing the choice of a shopping mall by consumers. The model differs from the traditional Huff model by the number of factors influencing the choice of a shopping mall by consumers and by the higher accuracy of predicting its attendance. Practical significance the economicmathematical models able to predict commercial property attendance can be used for efficient planning of measures to attract consumers to preserve and develop competitive advantages of commercial property. nbsp

  9. Impulse Purchasing Behaviors of the Turkish Consumers in Websites as a Dynamic Consumer Model: Technology Products Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bünyamin Atici

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the concept of impulse purchasing behavior online basically. The phenomenon of impulse purchasing has been researched in consumer research as well as for example in psychology and economics since the 1950s. A detailed review and analysis of the literature asserts that there are some unsolved issues regarding the state of knowledge on impulse purchasing behavior. Furthermore, nowadays consumers buy an increasing amount of purchases on the Internet. The current conceptualizations of impulse purchase behavior do not adequately capture impulse purchase behavior over the Internet. Today several researchers have claimed that the phenomenon of impulse purchasing should be examined also in the context of online shopping environment. This article aims to reveal that what attitudes of the customers are the points in question while purchasing on internet in terms of impulse buying. The results of our exploratory research are consistent with our conceptualization, and present a strong base for future research.

  10. Computing the temperature dependence of effective CP violation in the standard model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauner, Tomas; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    CP violation in the standard model originates from the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix. Upon integrating all fermions out of the theory, its effects are captured by a series of effective nonrenormalizable operators for the bosonic gauge and Higgs fields. We compute the CP-violating part...

  11. A comparative analysis of predictive models of morbidity in intensive care unit after cardiac surgery – Part II: an illustrative example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giomarelli Pierpaolo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Popular predictive models for estimating morbidity probability after heart surgery are compared critically in a unitary framework. The study is divided into two parts. In the first part modelling techniques and intrinsic strengths and weaknesses of different approaches were discussed from a theoretical point of view. In this second part the performances of the same models are evaluated in an illustrative example. Methods Eight models were developed: Bayes linear and quadratic models, k-nearest neighbour model, logistic regression model, Higgins and direct scoring systems and two feed-forward artificial neural networks with one and two layers. Cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, renal, infectious and hemorrhagic complications were defined as morbidity. Training and testing sets each of 545 cases were used. The optimal set of predictors was chosen among a collection of 78 preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative variables by a stepwise procedure. Discrimination and calibration were evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, respectively. Results Scoring systems and the logistic regression model required the largest set of predictors, while Bayesian and k-nearest neighbour models were much more parsimonious. In testing data, all models showed acceptable discrimination capacities, however the Bayes quadratic model, using only three predictors, provided the best performance. All models showed satisfactory generalization ability: again the Bayes quadratic model exhibited the best generalization, while artificial neural networks and scoring systems gave the worst results. Finally, poor calibration was obtained when using scoring systems, k-nearest neighbour model and artificial neural networks, while Bayes (after recalibration and logistic regression models gave adequate results. Conclusion Although all the predictive models showed acceptable

  12. On the Pitfalls and Limitations of Applying Petrophysical Models to Geophysical Tomograms: Examples in Cross-Borehole Radar and Electrical-Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Binley, A. M.

    2004-05-01

    Geophysical field data have traditionally provided qualitative information on aquifer structure for hydrogeologic characterization; however, there is increasing interest in the application of petrophysical models to convert geophysical tomograms of electrical resistivity or radar velocity, for example, to hydrologic parameters, such as permeability, porosity, water content, and (or) salinity. Unfortunately, application of theoretical or empirical petrophysical models may be inappropriate in many situations, given the limited and variable resolution of tomographic estimates. The resolution of tomograms is a function of (1) the measurement physics, for example, electrical conduction or electromagnetic wave propagation; (2) the parameterization and regularization used for inversion; (3) measurement error; and (4) the length scale of heterogeneity. We present a framework to predict how core-scale relations between geophysical properties and hydrologic parameters break down in the inversion, which produces smoothly-varying pixel-scale estimates. Our approach upscales the core-scale relationship to the pixel-scale based on the model resolution matrix from the inversion, random field averaging, and spatial statistics of the geophysical property. In synthetic examples, we use the approach to evaluate the utility of tomograms for quantitative hydrologic estimation, in light of their resolution-dependent limitations. Comparison of examples for cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography and radar tomography demonstrates the role of the measurement physics on the spatially-variable pixel-scale relationships between geophysical estimates and hydrologic parameters of interest. The goals of this work are to (1) raise awareness of the limitations of geophysical data, (2) provide a framework to improve survey design and assess tomograms for hydrologic estimation, and (3) promote additional research to improve the links between geophysical and hydrogeologic characterization.

  13. Study on the Control Model of Rural Non-point Source Pollution——Taking Ninghe County in Tianjin as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the control model of rural non-point source pollution.[Method] Taking Ninghe County(a typical agricultural county in Tianjin) as an example,the current development of local economy and society and characteristics of rural non-point source pollution were studied firstly,then the control model of rural non-point source pollution suitable for Ninghe County was constructed,and its environmental and economic benefits were analyzed finally.[Result] According to the sources of non-...

  14. Using ComBase Predictor and Pathogen Modeling Program as support tools in outbreak investigation: an example from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cleide; Hansen, Tina Beck; Andersen, Jens Kirk

    of salt to the batter. A deterministic model was constructed in Microsoft Excel using information on the production of the implicated sausage. This model predicted the level of Y. enterocolitica to increase 2.3, 4.2 and 7.8 log-units during fermentation, drying and storage, respectively. At the point...

  15. Using ComBase Predictor and Pathogen Modeling Program as support tools in outbreak investigation: an example from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cleide; Hansen, Tina Beck; Andersen, Jens Kirk

    2009-01-01

    of salt to the batter. A deterministic model was constructed in Microsoft Excel using information on the production of the implicated sausage. This model predicted the level of Y. enterocolitica to increase 2.3, 4.2 and 7.8 log-units during fermentation, drying and storage, respectively. At the point...

  16. A CFBPN Artificial Neural Network Model for Educational Qualitative Data Analyses: Example of Students' Attitudes Based on Kellerts' Typologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorek, Nurettin; Ugulu, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks are suggested as a model that can be "trained" to yield qualitative results out of a huge amount of categorical data. It can be said that this is a new approach applied in educational qualitative data analysis. In this direction, a cascade-forward back-propagation neural network (CFBPN) model was…

  17. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.

    2006-01-01

    in these model biofilms develop characteristic multicellular structures through a series of distinct steps where cellular migration plays an important role. Despite the appearance of these characteristic developmental patterns in the model biofilms the available evidence suggest that the biofilm forming...

  18. Gaussian Process Regression for Predictive But Interpretable Machine Learning Models: An Example of Predicting Mental Workload across Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caywood, Matthew S; Roberts, Daniel M; Colombe, Jeffrey B; Greenwald, Hal S; Weiland, Monica Z

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in real-time brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for the passive monitoring of human cognitive state, including cognitive workload. Too often, however, effective BCIs based on machine learning techniques may function as "black boxes" that are difficult to analyze or interpret. In an effort toward more interpretable BCIs, we studied a family of N-back working memory tasks using a machine learning model, Gaussian Process Regression (GPR), which was both powerful and amenable to analysis. Participants performed the N-back task with three stimulus variants, auditory-verbal, visual-spatial, and visual-numeric, each at three working memory loads. GPR models were trained and tested on EEG data from all three task variants combined, in an effort to identify a model that could be predictive of mental workload demand regardless of stimulus modality. To provide a comparison for GPR performance, a model was additionally trained using multiple linear regression (MLR). The GPR model was effective when trained on individual participant EEG data, resulting in an average standardized mean squared error (sMSE) between true and predicted N-back levels of 0.44. In comparison, the MLR model using the same data resulted in an average sMSE of 0.55. We additionally demonstrate how GPR can be used to identify which EEG features are relevant for prediction of cognitive workload in an individual participant. A fraction of EEG features accounted for the majority of the model's predictive power; using only the top 25% of features performed nearly as well as using 100% of features. Subsets of features identified by linear models (ANOVA) were not as efficient as subsets identified by GPR. This raises the possibility of BCIs that require fewer model features while capturing all of the information needed to achieve high predictive accuracy.

  19. Implementing a generic method for bias correction in statistical models using random effects, with spatial and population dynamics examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorson, James T.; Kristensen, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Statistical models play an important role in fisheries science when reconciling ecological theory with available data for wild populations or experimental studies. Ecological models increasingly include both fixed and random effects, and are often estimated using maximum likelihood techniques...... abundance relative to the conventional plug-in estimator, and also gives essentially identical estimates to a sample-based bias-correction estimator. The epsilon-method has been implemented by us as a generic option in the open-source Template Model Builder software, and could be adapted within other....... Quantities of biological or management interest ("derived quantities") are then often calculated as nonlinear functions of fixed and random effect estimates. However, the conventional "plug-in" estimator for a derived quantity in a maximum likelihood mixed-effects model will be biased whenever the estimator...

  20. Imaging geochemical heterogeneities using inverse reactive transport modeling: An example relevant for characterizing arsenic mobilization and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhreddine, Sarah; Lee, Jonghyun; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    -bearing reactive minerals as aquifer contaminants. We use synthetic applications to demonstrate the ability of inverse modeling techniques combined with mechanistic reactive transport models to image reactive mineral lenses in the subsurface and quantify estimation error using indirect, commonly measured...... such as managed aquifer recharge and recovery operations. The modeling investigation is carried out at various scales and considers different flow-through domains including (i) a ID lab-scale column (SO cm), (ii) a 2D lab-scale setup (60 cm x 30 cm) and (iii) a 2D field scale domain (20 nix 4 m). In these setups......, synthetic dissolved oxygen data and forward reactive transport simulations are used to image the spatial distribution of As-bearing pyrite using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) for inverse modeling. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Duality in the non-relativistic harmonic oscillator quark model in the Shifman-Voloshin limit a pedagogical example

    CERN Document Server

    Le Yaouanc, A; Morénas, V; Oliver, L; Pène, O; Raynal, J C

    2000-01-01

    The detailed way in which duality between sum of exclusive states and the free quark model description operates in semileptonic total decay widths, is analysed. It is made very explicit by the use of the non relativistic harmonic oscillator quark model in the SV limit, and a simple interaction current with the lepton pair. In particular, the Voloshin sum rule is found to eliminate the mismatches of order $\\delta m/m_b^2$.

  2. Gaussian Process Regression for Predictive But Interpretable Machine Learning Models: An Example of Predicting Mental Workload across Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caywood, Matthew S.; Roberts, Daniel M.; Colombe, Jeffrey B.; Greenwald, Hal S.; Weiland, Monica Z.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in real-time brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for the passive monitoring of human cognitive state, including cognitive workload. Too often, however, effective BCIs based on machine learning techniques may function as “black boxes” that are difficult to analyze or interpret. In an effort toward more interpretable BCIs, we studied a family of N-back working memory tasks using a machine learning model, Gaussian Process Regression (GPR), which was both powerful and amenable to analysis. Participants performed the N-back task with three stimulus variants, auditory-verbal, visual-spatial, and visual-numeric, each at three working memory loads. GPR models were trained and tested on EEG data from all three task variants combined, in an effort to identify a model that could be predictive of mental workload demand regardless of stimulus modality. To provide a comparison for GPR performance, a model was additionally trained using multiple linear regression (MLR). The GPR model was effective when trained on individual participant EEG data, resulting in an average standardized mean squared error (sMSE) between true and predicted N-back levels of 0.44. In comparison, the MLR model using the same data resulted in an average sMSE of 0.55. We additionally demonstrate how GPR can be used to identify which EEG features are relevant for prediction of cognitive workload in an individual participant. A fraction of EEG features accounted for the majority of the model’s predictive power; using only the top 25% of features performed nearly as well as using 100% of features. Subsets of features identified by linear models (ANOVA) were not as efficient as subsets identified by GPR. This raises the possibility of BCIs that require fewer model features while capturing all of the information needed to achieve high predictive accuracy. PMID:28123359

  3. CMS-Wave Model: Part 3: Grid Nesting and Application Example for Rhode Island South Shore Regional Sediment Management Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    grid nesting capability of the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) wave model CMS -Wave availa- ble in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Surface-water...Martin, 2004). The motivation behind RISRSM is to identify the sediment pathways in a system at a regional scale for management of sediment based on...a system approach. The RISRSM is developing a management plan for sediments along the project study area that consists of a 38 km stretch of

  4. The Economic Evaluation Model of the Use of the Intangible Resources Potential on the Example of Russian Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Mikhalkina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the problem of assessing the potential use of intangible resources. The relevance of the research is determined by the necessity of innovation-based economy, the growing role of intangible resources (human, social, organizational, intellectual and other kinds of capital in promoting economic development of individual regions and the country as a whole. The paper proposes a verification method of the factors that characterize the potential use of intangible resources, affecting productivity. For a description of dependencies linear regression model was selected, also there was carried out an assessment of its parameters and performed Quality check of model. In the course of a capacity assessment intangible resource model constructing at the regional level was used regression analysis (the choice of indicator system, data collection and analysis, the calculation of the correlation coefficient, the choice of models and numerical estimation of its parameters, quality control model, assessment of the certain factors impact on the basis of the model. Also the factor analysis is used (matrix of factor loadings, and the classification on the basis of the factors selected regions is carried out. The regional clusterization of the intangible resources capacity will allow to make correct management decisions in the future.

  5. Can dispersion modeling of air pollution be improved by land-use regression? An example from Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korek, Michal; Johansson, Christer; Svensson, Nina; Lind, Tomas; Beelen, Rob; Hoek, Gerard; Pershagen, Göran; Bellander, Tom

    2016-08-03

    Both dispersion modeling (DM) and land-use regression modeling (LUR) are often used for assessment of long-term air pollution exposure in epidemiological studies, but seldom in combination. We developed a hybrid DM-LUR model using 93 biweekly observations of NOx at 31 sites in greater Stockholm (Sweden). The DM was based on spatially resolved topographic, physiographic and emission data, and hourly meteorological data from a diagnostic wind model. Other data were from land use, meteorology and routine monitoring of NOx. We built a linear regression model for NOx, using a stepwise forward selection of covariates. The resulting model predicted observed NOx (R(2)=0.89) better than the DM without covariates (R(2)=0.68, P-interaction pollutant concentrations based on DM, by incorporating further spatial characteristics of the immediate surroundings, possibly accounting for imperfections in the emission data.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 3 August 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.40.

  6. Modelling of tidally affected river reaches with data assimilation for flood warning purposes: An example on the River Dee, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. J.; Beven, K.; Horsburgh, K.; Cullen, J.

    2012-04-01

    On rivers where the flow regime is influenced by a tidal signal the provision of accurate forecasts requires the careful coupling of predictive models for both the tidal signal and the rainfall driven river system. This paper discusses such a coupled modelling system constructed for the River Dee (UK). A series of parsimonious, physically interpretable time series models are used to represent the dynamics of the river water level at several gauging sites on the flood plain. These gauges are used operationally to help in determining the issuing of flood warnings. The simplified models are coupled and cast into a state space form. The assimilation of the observed water levels at the gauge sites to inform future forecasts is then a non-linear filter a solution to which is readily approximated. Assessment of the model forecasts against the observed data is carried out using a number of existing metrics. These suggest the model forecasts are a useful guide to the future water level. The representation of the forecast and its uncertainty to the operational staff is considered. A prototype of the sequential decision making process; based on the relative cost of 'true' or 'false' warnings; and designed to help guide the catchment manager in issuing warnings is presented.

  7. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus. This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3−, and POx (representing the sum of PO43−, HPO42−, and H2PO4− and five potential competitors (plant roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces. The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos. The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive followed this order: (1 for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2 for NO3−, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3 for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest

  8. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3- and POx; representing the sum of PO43-, HPO42- and H2PO4-) and five potential competitors (plant roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus and NH4+ pools at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results also imply that under strong nutrient limitation, relative competitiveness depends strongly on the competitor functional traits (affinity and nutrient carrier enzyme abundance). We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed competition among

  9. Are spontaneous fractures possible? An example of clinical application for personalised, multiscale neuro-musculo-skeletal modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconti, Marco; Taddei, Fulvia; Cristofolini, Luca; Martelli, Saulo; Falcinelli, Cristina; Schileo, Enrico

    2012-02-02

    Elderly frequently present variable degrees of osteopenia, sarcopenia, and neuromotor control degradation. Severely osteoporotic patients sometime fracture their femoral neck when falling. Is it possible that such fractures might occur without any fall, but rather spontaneously while the patient is performing normal movements such as level walking? The aim of this study was to verify if such spontaneous fractures are biomechanically possible, and in such case, which conditions of osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and neuromotor degradation could produce them. To the purpose, a probabilistic multiscale body-organ model validated against controlled experiments was used to predict the risk of spontaneous fractures in a population of 80-years old women, with normal weight and musculoskeletal anatomy, and variable degree of osteopenia, sarcopenia, and neuromotor control degradation. A multi-body inverse dynamics sub-model, coupled to a probabilistic neuromuscular sub-model, and to a femur finite element sub-model, formed the multiscale model, which was run within a Monte Carlo stochastic scheme, where the various parameters were varied randomly according to well defined distributions. The model predicted that neither extreme osteoporosis, nor extreme neuromotor degradation alone are sufficient to predict spontaneous fractures. However, when the two factors are combined an incidence of 0.4% of spontaneous fractures is predicted for the simulated population, which is consistent with clinical reports. When the model represented only severely osteoporotic patients, the incidence of spontaneous fractures increased to 29%. Thus, is biomechanically possible that spontaneous femoral neck fractures occur during level walking, due to a combination of severe osteoporosis and severe neuromotor degradation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The standard model and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    In these lectures, my aim is to present a status report on the standard model and some key tests of electroweak unification. Within that context, I also discuss how and where hints of new physics may emerge. To accomplish those goals, I have organized my presentation as follows. I survey the standard model parameters with particular emphasis on the gauge coupling constants and vector boson masses. Examples of new physics appendages are also commented on. In addition, I have included an appendix on dimensional regularization and a simple example which employs that technique. I focus on weak charged current phenomenology. Precision tests of the standard model are described and up-to-date values for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing matrix parameters are presented. Constraints implied by those tests for a 4th generation, extra Z' bosons, and compositeness are discussed. An overview of the physics of tau decays is also included. I discuss weak neutral current phenomenology and the extraction of sin/sup 2//theta/W from experiment. The results presented there are based on a global analysis of all existing data. I have chosen to concentrate that discussion on radiative corrections, the effect of a heavy top quark mass, implications for grand unified theories (GUTS), extra Z' gauge bosons, and atomic parity violation. The potential for further experimental progress is also commented on. Finally, I depart from the narrowest version of the standard model and discuss effects of neutrino masses, mixings, and electromagnetic moments. 32 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Tevatron Combination of Single-Top-Quark Cross Sections and Determination of the Magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element V_{tb}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; 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    2015-10-09

    We present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb^{-1} per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σ_{t}=2.25_{-0.31}^{+0.29} pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σ_{s+t}=3.30_{-0.40}^{+0.52} pb, without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σ_{s}/σ_{t}. The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |V_{tb}|=1.02_{-0.05}^{+0.06}, corresponding to |V_{tb}|>0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  12. Tevatron combination of single-top-quark cross sections and determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $\\bf V_{tb}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurisano, Adam J; Avila, Carlos A; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badaud, Frederique; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bartos, Pavol; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bauce, Matteo; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Bedeschi, Franco; Begalli, Marcia; Behari, Satyajit; Bellantoni, Leo; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortoletto, Daniela; Borysova, Maryna; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brigliadori, Luca; Brock, Raymond L; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Brucken, Erik; Bu, Xue-Bing; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Buszello, Claus Peter; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; 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Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Fuess, Stuart C; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Gershtein, Yuri S; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Ginther, George E; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gogota, Olga; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Hahn, Stephen R; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Ji-Yeon; Han, Liang; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harder, Kristian; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harel, Amnon; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Christopher Paul; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinrich, Joel G; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ito, Albert S; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jones, Matthew T; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Joshi, Jyoti; Jun, Soon Yung; Jung, Andreas Werner; Junk, Thomas R; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyun-Su; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Limosani, Antonio; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lipton, Ronald J; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansour, Jason; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Mesropian, Christina; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miao, Ting; Miconi, Florian; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Mondal, Naba K; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Mulhearn, Michael James; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nagy, Elemer; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Orduna, Jose de Jesus Hernandez; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Pal, Arnab; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Parker, William Chesluk; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Pondrom, Lee G; Popov, Alexey V; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Gene Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Ristori, Luciano; Rizatdinova, Flera; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sajot, Gerard; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santi, Lorenzo; Santos, Angelo Souza; Sato, Koji; Savage, David G; Saveliev, Valeri; Savitskyi, Mykola; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwarz, Thomas A; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Sekaric, Jadranka; Semenov, Alexei; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simak, Vladislav J; Simonenko, Alexander V; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Song, Hao; Sonnenschein, Lars; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Soustruznik, Karel; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stark, Jan; Stentz, Dale James; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Titov, Maxim; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vernieri, Caterina; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilanova, Didier; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wahl, Horst D; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Michael HLS; Wang, Song-Ming; Warchol, Jadwiga; Waters, David S; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wobisch, Markus; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wood, Darien Robert; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Siqi; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Yu, Jiaming; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ per experiment. The $t$-channel cross section is measured to be $\\sigma_t = 2.25^{+0.29}_{-0.31}$ pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the $s$- vs. $t$-channel cross sections and of the $s+t$ channel cross section measurement resulting in $\\sigma_{s+t} = 3.30^{+0.52}_{-0.40}$ pb, without assuming the standard-model value for the ratio $\\sigma_s/\\sigma_t$. The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is $|V_{tb}|$ = $1.02^{+0.06}_{-0.05}$, corresponding to $|V_{tb}| > 0.92$ at the 95% C.L.

  13. Tevatron Combination of Single-Top-Quark Cross Sections and Determination of the Magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element Vt b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Borysova, M.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gogota, O.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savitskyi, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t -channel cross section is measured to be σt=2.2 5-0.31+0.29 pb . We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s - vs t -channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s +t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs +t=3.3 0-0.40+0.52 pb , without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σs/σt . The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vt b|=1.0 2-0.05+0.06 , corresponding to |Vt b|>0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  14. Tevatron combination of single-top-quark cross sections and determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $\\bf V_{tb}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurisano, Adam J; Avila, Carlos A; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badaud, Frederique; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bartos, Pavol; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bauce, Matteo; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Bedeschi, Franco; Begalli, Marcia; Behari, Satyajit; Bellantoni, Leo; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortoletto, Daniela; Borysova, Maryna; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brigliadori, Luca; Brock, Raymond L; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Brucken, Erik; Bu, Xue-Bing; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Buszello, Claus Peter; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Chokheli, Davit; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Clutter, Justace Randall; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corbo, Matteo; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Cordelli, Marco; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; Davies, Gavin John; de Barbaro, Pawel; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; D'Errico, Maria; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Dominguez, DAaron M; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edmunds, Daniel L; Elagin, Andrey L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Fiedler, Frank; Field, Richard D; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Fuess, Stuart C; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Gershtein, Yuri S; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Ginther, George E; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gogota, Olga; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Hahn, Stephen R; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Ji-Yeon; Han, Liang; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harder, Kristian; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harel, Amnon; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Christopher Paul; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinrich, Joel G; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ito, Albert S; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jones, Matthew T; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Joshi, Jyoti; Jun, Soon Yung; Jung, Andreas Werner; Junk, Thomas R; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Limosani, Antonio; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lipton, Ronald J; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansour, Jason; Marchese, Luigi; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Mesropian, Christina; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miao, Ting; Miconi, Florian; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Mondal, Naba K; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Mulhearn, Michael James; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nagy, Elemer; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Pal, Arnab; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Parker, William Chesluk; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Pondrom, Lee G; Popov, Alexey V; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Gene Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Ristori, Luciano; Rizatdinova, Flera; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sajot, Gerard; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santi, Lorenzo; Santos, Angelo Souza; Sato, Koji; Savage, David G; Saveliev, Valeri; Savitskyi, Mykola; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwarz, Thomas A; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Sekaric, Jadranka; Semenov, Alexei; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simak, Vladislav J; Simonenko, Alexander V; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Song, Hao; Sonnenschein, Lars; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Soustruznik, Karel; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stark, Jan; Stentz, Dale James; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Titov, Maxim; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vernieri, Caterina; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilanova, Didier; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wahl, Horst D; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Michael HLS; Wang, Song-Ming; Warchol, Jadwiga; Waters, David S; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wobisch, Markus; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wood, Darien Robert; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Siqi; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Yu, Jiaming; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-10-07

    We present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ per experiment. The $t$-channel cross section is measured to be $\\sigma_t = 2.25^{+0.29}_{-0.31}$ pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the $s$- vs. $t$-channel cross sections and of the $s+t$ channel cross section measurement resulting in $\\sigma_{s+t} = 3.30^{+0.52}_{-0.40}$ pb, without assuming the standard-model value for the ratio $\\sigma_s/\\sigma_t$. The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is $|V_{tb}|$ = $1.02^{+0.06}_{-0.05}$, corresponding to $|V_{tb}| > 0.92$ at the 95% C.L.

  15. Dynamic Modeling of Learning in Emerging Energy Industries: The Example of Advanced Biofuels in the United States: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura J.; Bush, Brian W.; Peterson, Steven O.

    2015-09-03

    This paper (and its supplemental model) presents novel approaches to modeling interactions and related policies among investment, production, and learning in an emerging competitive industry. New biomass-to-biofuels pathways are being developed and commercialized to support goals for U.S. advanced biofuel use, such as those in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We explore the impact of learning rates and techno-economics in a learning model excerpted from the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to explore the impact of biofuel policy on the evolution of the biofuels industry. The BSM integrates investment, production, and learning among competing biofuel conversion options that are at different stages of industrial development. We explain the novel methods used to simulate the impact of differing assumptions about mature industry techno-economics and about learning rates while accounting for the different maturity levels of various conversion pathways. A sensitivity study shows that the parameters studied (fixed capital investment, process yield, progress ratios, and pre-commercial investment) exhibit highly interactive effects, and the system, as modeled, tends toward market dominance of a single pathway due to competition and learning dynamics.

  16. Dynamic Modeling of Learning in Emerging Energy Industries: The Example of Advanced Biofuels in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura; Peterson, Steve; Bush, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This paper (and its supplemental model) presents novel approaches to modeling interactions and related policies among investment, production, and learning in an emerging competitive industry. New biomass-to-biofuels pathways are being developed and commercialized to support goals for U.S. advanced biofuel use, such as those in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We explore the impact of learning rates and techno-economics in a learning model excerpted from the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to explore the impact of biofuel policy on the evolution of the biofuels industry. The BSM integrates investment, production, and learning among competing biofuel conversion options that are at different stages of industrial development. We explain the novel methods used to simulate the impact of differing assumptions about mature industry techno-economics and about learning rates while accounting for the different maturity levels of various conversion pathways. A sensitivity study shows that the parameters studied (fixed capital investment, process yield, progress ratios, and pre-commercial investment) exhibit highly interactive effects, and the system, as modeled, tends toward market dominance of a single pathway due to competition and learning dynamics.

  17. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  18. Testing quantitative pollen dispersal models in animal-pollinated vegetation mosaics: An example from temperate Tasmania, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, M.; Connor, S. E.; Theuerkauf, M.; Kuneš, P.; Fletcher, M.-S.

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructing past vegetation abundance and land-cover changes through time has important implications in land management and climate modelling. To date palaeovegetation reconstructions in Australia have been limited to qualitative or semi-quantitative inferences from pollen data. Testing pollen dispersal models constitutes a crucial step in developing quantitative past vegetation and land cover reconstructions. Thus far, the application of quantitative pollen dispersal models has been restricted to regions dominated by wind-pollinated plants (e.g. Europe) and their performance in a landscape dominated by animal-pollinated plant taxa is still unexplored. Here we test, for the first time in Australia, two well-known pollen dispersal models to assess their performance in the wind- and animal-pollinated vegetation mosaics of western Tasmania. We focus on a mix of wind- (6 taxa) and animal- (7 taxa) pollinated species that comprise the most common pollen types and key representatives of the dominant vegetation formations. Pollen Productivity Estimates and Relevant Source Area of Pollen obtained using Lagrangian Stochastic turbulent simulations appear to be more realistic when compared to the results from the widely used Gaussian Plume Model.

  19. A model for incorporating computation without changing the course: An example from middle-division classical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2014-03-01

    Although much of the research done by modern physicists would be impossible without the use of computers, today's physics curricula do not generally reflect their importance and utility. To more tightly connect undergraduate preparation with professional practice, we integrated computational instruction into middle-division classical mechanics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Our model for integration works with the constraints of faculty who do not specialize in computation by placing a strong emphasis on an adaptable curriculum. It also includes the construction of learning goals and the design of activities consistent with those goals, including assessment of student computational fluency. We present critiques of our model as we work to develop an effective and sustainable model for computational instruction in the undergraduate curriculum.

  20. Modeling prices of wholesale market of electric energy and power by the example of the UPS of the Ural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhov V.G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article oversees forecasting model for deviations of the balancing market index and day-ahead market index according to the maximum similarity sample for different levels of approximation in the context of positive and negative time-series value. The model was being tested on the factual data of the Integrated Power system of the Ural, Wholesale market for electricity and power of Russian Federation. Describes the price formation on the day-ahead market and the balancing market index. The necessity to use accurate forecasting methods consumption and prices of electrical energy and power to reduce penalties when the electric power industry entities on the energy exchange. The testing of mathematical models to predict the balancing market index deviations and day-ahead market based on a sample of maximum similarity with certain approximation equations for positive and negative values gave the prediction error of 3.3%.

  1. Suspended sediment flux modeling with artificial neural network: An example of the Longchuanjiang River in the Upper Yangtze Catchment, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun-Mei; Lu, X. X.; Zhou, Yue

    2007-02-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) was used to model the monthly suspended sediment flux in the Longchuanjiang River, the Upper Yangtze Catchment, China. The suspended sediment flux was related to the average rainfall, temperature, rainfall intensity and water discharge. It is demonstrated that ANN is capable of modeling the monthly suspended sediment flux with fairly good accuracy when proper variables and their lag effect on the suspended sediment flux are used as inputs. Compared with multiple linear regression and power relation models, ANN can generate a better fit under the same data requirement. In addition, ANN can provide more reasonable predictions for extremely high or low values, because of the distributed information processing system and the nonlinear transformation involved. Compared with the ANNs that use the values of the dependent variable at previous time steps as inputs, the ANNs established in this research with only climate variables have an advantage because it can be used to assess hydrological responses to climate change.

  2. A model-based evaluation of Marine Protected Areas: the example of eastern Baltic cod (Gadus morhua callarias L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Gerd; Pelletier, Dominique; Dubreuil, Julien;

    2009-01-01

    The eastern Baltic cod stock collapsed as a consequence of climate-driven adverse hydrographic conditions and over fishing and has remained at historically low levels. Spatio-temporal fishing closures [Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)] have been implemented since 1995, to protect and restore...... the spawning stock. However, no signs of recovery have been observed yet, either suggesting that MPAs are an inappropriate management measure or pointing towards suboptimal closure design. We used the spatially explicit fishery simulation model ISIS-Fish to evaluate proposed and implemented fishery closures......, combining an age-structured population module with a multifleet exploitation module and a management module in a single model environment. The model is parameterized based on (i) the large amount of biological knowledge available for cod and (ii) an analysis of existing spatially disaggregated fishery data...

  3. Evolving MCDM Applications Using Hybrid Expert-Based ISM and DEMATEL Models: An Example of Sustainable Ecotourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Ming Chuang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological degradation is an escalating global threat. Increasingly, people are expressing awareness and priority for concerns about environmental problems surrounding them. Environmental protection issues are highlighted. An appropriate information technology tool, the growing popular social network system (virtual community, VC, facilitates public education and engagement with applications for existent problems effectively. Particularly, the exploration of related involvement behavior of VC member engagement is an interesting topic. Nevertheless, member engagement processes comprise interrelated sub-processes that reflect an interactive experience within VCs as well as the value co-creation model. To address the top-focused ecotourism VCs, this study presents an application of a hybrid expert-based ISM model and DEMATEL model based on multi-criteria decision making tools to investigate the complex multidimensional and dynamic nature of member engagement. Our research findings provide insightful managerial implications and suggest that the viral marketing of ecotourism protection is concerned with practitioners and academicians alike.

  4. Evolving MCDM applications using hybrid expert-based ISM and DEMATEL models: an example of sustainable ecotourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Huan-Ming; Lin, Chien-Ku; Chen, Da-Ren; Chen, You-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Ecological degradation is an escalating global threat. Increasingly, people are expressing awareness and priority for concerns about environmental problems surrounding them. Environmental protection issues are highlighted. An appropriate information technology tool, the growing popular social network system (virtual community, VC), facilitates public education and engagement with applications for existent problems effectively. Particularly, the exploration of related involvement behavior of VC member engagement is an interesting topic. Nevertheless, member engagement processes comprise interrelated sub-processes that reflect an interactive experience within VCs as well as the value co-creation model. To address the top-focused ecotourism VCs, this study presents an application of a hybrid expert-based ISM model and DEMATEL model based on multi-criteria decision making tools to investigate the complex multidimensional and dynamic nature of member engagement. Our research findings provide insightful managerial implications and suggest that the viral marketing of ecotourism protection is concerned with practitioners and academicians alike.

  5. The model of the first-year students’ adaptation to vocational training: the example of foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galishninkova Elena M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of adaptation of the first-year students to professional activity by means of foreign language. To design the adaptation model, we developed four-block questionnaires to determine students’ readiness for adaptation. The experiment resulted in the three groups of students with high, average and low levels of adaptation. Students with low level of adaptation become the target of our research. To remove the difficulties in studying a foreign language by the third group of students, an adaptation model was elaborated. Further, we identified the conditions for the effective implementation of the adaptation model of students to vocational training. In our view, these pedagogical conditions promote a more “sparing” transition of students to their main function as first-year students and increase the level of foreign language learning as well as improve the educational indicators.

  6. Modelling for Maritime Spatial Planning: Concepts, tools and practical examples from the BaltSeaPlan project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohn, Christian; Kotta, J.; Dahl, Karsten;

    This study summarizes the most important aspects of integrating modelling into Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) and Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEA). The results are part of an evaluation carried out in the framework of the EU BaltSeaPlan (BSP) project. The findings are based on a multi......-disciplinary assessment carried out by a working group composed of spatial planners, managers and environmental scientists under participation of the BSP community through a number of workshops and group discussions. The overall goal of the study was to identify the most important planning questions and the modelling...

  7. A Learning Design Worked Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Tattersall, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Gorissen, P. & Tattersall, C. (2005). A Learning Design Worked Example. In: Koper, R. & Tattersall, C., Learning Design: A Handbook on Modelling and Delivering Networked Education and Training (pp. 3-20). Berlin-Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

  8. Improving environmental assessments by integrating Species Sensitivity Distributions into environmental modeling: examples with two hypothetical oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Adriana C; Mearns, Alan J

    2015-04-15

    A three dimensional (3D) trajectory model was used to simulate oil mass balance and environmental concentrations of two 795,000 L hypothetical oil spills modeled under physical and chemical dispersion scenarios. Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSD) for Total Hydrocarbon Concentrations (THCs) were developed, and Hazard Concentrations (HC) used as levels of concern. Potential consequences to entrained water column organisms were characterized by comparing model outputs with SSDs, and obtaining the proportion of species affected (PSA) and areas with oil concentrations exceeding HC5s (Area ⩾ HC5). Under the physically-dispersed oil scenario ⩽ 77% of the oil remains on the water surface and strands on shorelines, while with the chemically-dispersed oil scenario ⩽ 67% of the oil is entrained in the water column. For every 10% increase in chemical dispersion effectiveness, the average PSA and Area ⩾ HC5 increases (range: 0.01-0.06 and 0.50-2.9 km(2), respectively), while shoreline oiling decreases (⩽ 2919 L/km). Integrating SSDs into modeling may improve understanding of scales of potential impacts to water column organisms, while providing net environmental benefit comparison of oil spill response options.

  9. The Development of an Implementation Model for ICT in Education: An Example of the Interaction of Affordances and Multimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Mark; Jopling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a model targeted at non-specialist practitioners implementing innovations that involve information and communication technology (ICT) in education. It is based on data from a national evaluation of ICT-based projects in initial teacher education, which included a large-scale questionnaire survey and six…

  10. Using plant volatile traps to develop phenology models for natural enemies: an example using Chrysopa nigricornis (Burmeister) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model predicting phenology of adult Chrysopa nigricornis (Burmeister) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) in orchards was developed from field (trapping) data supplemented with developmental data collected under laboratory conditions. Lower and upper thresholds of 10.1°C and 29.9 °C, respectively, were es...

  11. Using Data From Seed-Dispersal Modelling to Manage Invasive Tree Species: The Example of Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedel, Doreen; Huth, Franka; Wagner, Sven

    2013-10-01

    Management strategies to control invasive species need information about dispersal distances to predict establishment potential. Fraxinus pennsylvanica is a North American anemochorous tree species that is invasive in many Central European floodplain forests. To predict seed-dispersal potential, the stochastic model WaldStat was used, which enables different options for directionality (isotropic and anisotropic) to be simulated. In this article, we (1) show empirical results of fructification and seed dispersal for this tree species. The model predicts approximately 250,000 seeds for one F. pennsylvanica tree. These results were used to (2) calculate species-specific dispersal distances and effects of wind direction. To consider the influence of wind on dispersal potential of the tree species, long-distance dispersal (LDD [95th percentile dispersal distance]) was calculated. Mean dispersal distances varied between 47 and 66 m. LDD values modelled along the main wind direction ranged from 60 to 150 m. Seed production, dispersal distance, and direction data were (3) incorporated into theoretical management scenarios for forest ecosystems. Finally (4), we discuss management options and the practical relevance of model scenarios in relation to the accuracy of spatial dispersal predictions. Further analyses should be focused on possible, well-adapted management concepts at stand level that could restrict the potential spread of invasive species.

  12. Modelling discontinuous well log signal to identify lithological boundaries via wavelet analysis: An example from KTB borehole data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amrita Singh; Saumen Maiti; R K Tiwar

    2016-06-01

    Identification of sharp and discontinuous lithological boundaries from well log signal stemming fromheterogeneous subsurface structures assumes a special significance in geo-exploration studies. Well logdata acquired from various geological settings generally display nonstationary/nonlinear characteristicswith varying wavelengths and frequencies. Modelling of such complex well-log signals using the conventionalsignal processing techniques either fails to catch-up abrupt boundaries or at the best, do notprovide precise information on insidious lithological discontinuities. In this paper, we have proposed anew wavelet transform-based algorithm to model the abrupt discontinuous changes from well log databy taking care of nonstationary characteristics of the signal. Prior to applying the algorithm on thegeophysical well data, we analyzed the distribution of wavelet coefficients using synthetic signal generatedby the first order nonstationary auto-regressive model and then applied the method on actual welllog dataset obtained from the KTB bore hole, Germany. Besides identifying the formation of layeredboundaries, the underlying method also maps some additional formation boundaries, which were hithertoundetected at the KTB site. The results match well with known geological lithostratigraphy andwill be useful for constraining the future model of KTB bore hole data.

  13. Knowledge Management in Sustainability Research Projects: Concepts, Effective Models, and Examples in a Multi-Stakeholder Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, David Brian; Köhler, Thomas; Weith, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to sketch a conceptual design for an information and knowledge management system in sustainability research projects. The suitable frameworks to implement knowledge transfer models constitute social communities, because the mutual exchange and learning processes among all stakeholders promote key sustainable developments through…

  14. Development of a spinodal decomposition model for the example of a heterostructure based on silicon carbide polytypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, S. Yu.; Lebedev, A. A.; Lebedev, S. P.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Sorokin, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    The transition region of a 3C-SiC/4 H-SiC heterostructure constituted by layers of the 3 C and 4 H polytypes has been studied. A previously proposed spinodal decomposition model was used to estimate the thickness ratio of 4 H and 3 C layers in comparison with the image furnished by transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Knowledge Management in Sustainability Research Projects: Concepts, Effective Models, and Examples in a Multi-Stakeholder Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, David Brian; Köhler, Thomas; Weith, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to sketch a conceptual design for an information and knowledge management system in sustainability research projects. The suitable frameworks to implement knowledge transfer models constitute social communities, because the mutual exchange and learning processes among all stakeholders promote key sustainable developments through…

  16. Using statistical models to explore ensemble uncertainty in climate impact studies: the example of air pollution in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Vincent E. P.; Colette, Augustin; Menut, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Because of its sensitivity to unfavorable weather patterns, air pollution is sensitive to climate change so that, in the future, a climate penalty could jeopardize the expected efficiency of air pollution mitigation measures. A common method to assess the impact of climate on air quality consists in implementing chemistry-transport models forced by climate projections. However, the computing cost of such methods requires optimizing ensemble exploration techniques. By using a training data set from a deterministic projection of climate and air quality over Europe, we identified the main meteorological drivers of air quality for eight regions in Europe and developed statistical models that could be used to predict air pollutant concentrations. The evolution of the key climate variables driving either particulate or gaseous pollution allows selecting the members of the EuroCordex ensemble of regional climate projections that should be used in priority for future air quality projections (CanESM2/RCA4; CNRM-CM5-LR/RCA4 and CSIRO-Mk3-6-0/RCA4 and MPI-ESM-LR/CCLM following the EuroCordex terminology). After having tested the validity of the statistical model in predictive mode, we can provide ranges of uncertainty attributed to the spread of the regional climate projection ensemble by the end of the century (2071-2100) for the RCP8.5. In the three regions where the statistical model of the impact of climate change on PM2.5 offers satisfactory performances, we find a climate benefit (a decrease of PM2.5 concentrations under future climate) of -1.08 (±0.21), -1.03 (±0.32), -0.83 (±0.14) µg m-3, for respectively Eastern Europe, Mid-Europe and Northern Italy. In the British-Irish Isles, Scandinavia, France, the Iberian Peninsula and the Mediterranean, the statistical model is not considered skillful enough to draw any conclusion for PM2.5. In Eastern Europe, France, the Iberian Peninsula, Mid-Europe and Northern Italy, the statistical model of the impact of climate change

  17. Estimability of recharge through groundwater model calibration: Insights from a field-scale steady-state example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowling, Matthew J.; Werner, Adrian D.

    2016-09-01

    The ability of groundwater models to inform recharge through calibration is hampered by the correlation between recharge and aquifer parameters such as hydraulic conductivity (K), and the insufficient information content of observation datasets. These factors collectively result in non-uniqueness of parameter estimates. Previous studies that jointly estimate spatially distributed recharge and hydraulic parameters are limited to synthetic test cases and/or do not evaluate the effect of non-uniqueness. The extent to which recharge can be informed by calibration is largely unknown for practical situations, in which complexities such as parameter heterogeneities are inherent. In this study, a systematic investigation of recharge, inferred through model calibration, is undertaken using a series of numerical experiments that include varying degrees of hydraulic parameter information. The analysis involves the use of a synthetic reality, based on a regional-scale, highly parameterised, steady-state groundwater model of Uley South Basin, South Australia. Parameter identifiability is assessed to evaluate the ability of parameters to be estimated uniquely. Results show that a reasonable inference of recharge (average recharge error 100 K values across the 129 km2 study area). The introduction of pumping data into the calibration reduces error in both the average recharge and its spatial variability, whereas submarine groundwater discharge (as a calibration target) reduces average recharge error only. Nonetheless, the estimation of steady-state recharge through inverse modelling may be impractical for real-world settings, limited by the need for unrealistic amounts of hydraulic parameter and groundwater level data. This study provides a useful benchmark for evaluating the extent to which field-scale groundwater models can be used to inform recharge subject to practical data-availability limitations.

  18. A geographical information system model for creating bioclimatic maps - examples from a high, mid-latitude city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Marie K; Thorsson, Sofia; Lindqvist, Sven

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents a method for creating large-scale bioclimatic maps with the aid of a geographical information system, GIS. Meteorological data are linked with geographical information about land use, elevation and distance to the coast, in order to generate spatial distributions of physiological equivalent temperature, PET. The model combines an air temperature map and a wind map in order to create different zones for which the thermal component is to be calculated. The advantage of the model presented is that it uses generally available information about land use, altitude and distance to the coast. Further, the model uses a GIS application, which makes it non-static. Compared to most other models, a wide range of observations are used as input. Few biometeorological studies have been performed in high-latitude areas. This paper presents bioclimatic maps for the Göteborg urban area, in Sweden, for the month of July. The results show large variations in PET during a clear, calm day at 1200 hours (Delta T 13.4 degrees C) and during average conditions in July (Delta T 6.8 degrees C), which gives an indication of the magnitude and the spatial variations within high, midlatitude, urban area in summer. The highest PET values were found in the central built-up areas and the lowest PET values in the coastal and green areas. The model generates valuable information for urban planners and decision makers when planning and constructing new areas for outdoor activities etc. This information is also useful in the fields of health and energy.

  19. Estimating the cost-effectiveness of lifestyle intervention programmes to prevent diabetes based on an example from Germany: Markov modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann Anne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D poses a large worldwide burden for health care systems. One possible tool to decrease this burden is primary prevention. As it is unethical to wait until perfect data are available to conclude whether T2D primary prevention intervention programmes are cost-effective, we need a model that simulates the effect of prevention initiatives. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the long-term cost-effectiveness of lifestyle intervention programmes for the prevention of T2D using a Markov model. As decision makers often face difficulties in applying health economic results, we visualise our results with health economic tools. Methods We use four-state Markov modelling with a probabilistic cohort analysis to calculate the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained. A one-year cycle length and a lifetime time horizon are applied. Best available evidence supplies the model with data on transition probabilities between glycaemic states, mortality risks, utility weights, and disease costs. The costs are calculated from a societal perspective. A 3% discount rate is used for costs and QALYs. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves are presented to assist decision makers. Results The model indicates that diabetes prevention interventions have the potential to be cost-effective, but the outcome reveals a high level of uncertainty. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs were negative for the intervention, ie, the intervention leads to a cost reduction for men and women aged 30 or 50 years at initiation of the intervention. For men and women aged 70 at initiation of the intervention, the ICER was EUR27,546/QALY gained and EUR19,433/QALY gained, respectively. In all cases, the QALYs gained were low. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves show that the higher the willingness-to-pay threshold value, the higher the probability that the intervention is cost-effective. Nonetheless, all curves are

  20. Determining the Suitability of Different Digital Elevation Models and Satellite Images for Fancy Maps. An Example of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachal, J.; Kawel, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the possibility of developing an overall map of the selected area on the basis of publicly available data. Such a map would take the form designed by the author with the colors that meets his expectations and a content, which he considers to be appropriate. Among the data available it was considered the use of satellite images of the terrain in real colors and, in the form of shaded relief, digital terrain models with different resolutions of the terrain mesh. Specifically the considered data were: MODIS, Landsat 8, GTOPO-30, SRTM-30, SRTM-1, SRTM-3, ASTER. For the test area the island of Cyprus was chosen because of the importance in tourism, a relatively small area and a clearly defined boundary. In the paper there are shown and discussed various options of the Cyprus terrain image obtained synthetically from variants of Modis, Landsat and digital elevation models of different resolutions.

  1. An example of population-level risk assessments for small mammals using individual-based population models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Walter; Auteri, Domenica; Bastiansen, Finn

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study demonstrating the application of 3 individual-based, spatially explicit population models (IBMs, also known as agent-based models) in ecological risk assessments to predict long-term effects of a pesticide to populations of small mammals. The 3 IBMs each used...... and structural complexity. The toxicological profile of FungicideX was defined so that the deterministic long-term first tier risk assessment would result in high risk to small mammals, thus providing the opportunity to use the IBMs for risk assessment refinement (i.e., higher tier risk assessment). Despite...... assessments for small mammals, including consistent and transparent direct links to specific protection goals, and the consideration of more realistic scenarios....

  2. Transdiciplinary Research as the Peace Prospective for Community Based Village Tourism: An Example of Machhapuchhre Model Trek in Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhayaya Pranil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is a composite multifaceted product-service with the overlapping roles of interdependent sub-sectors. The dual faces (various problems for causing conflict and potentials for building-peace of tourism have compelled its actors to try for innovative models by crossing the disciplinary boundary. On this conceptual foundation of the structural reality, this paper presents the case study of a Machhapuchhre Model Trek (MMT, a community based tourism model situated in the northern part of Pokhara in Western Nepal. Going beyond disciplinary research, the MMT is developed on the basis of the transdiciplinary approach which has brought scientific researchers [e.g. PhD and senior researchers of Kathmandu University and the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR North-South], tourism industry practitioners (e.g. trekking agencies in Pokhara, local communities (e.g. represented by seven villages in MMT area and local government together for common aim and coordinated partnership actions. The transdisciplinary research process helps grasp lessons on triggering societal learning, appreciating differences, boosting concerted actions, mitigating syndromes of unsustainable development, lessening conflict, and thereby supporting to build peace. This paper adds knowledge on the potential value of transdisciplinary research on tourism.

  3. A method for improving predictive modeling by taking into account lag time: Example of selenium bioaccumulation in a flowing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckon, William N., E-mail: William_Beckon@fws.gov

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A method for estimating response time in cause-effect relationships is demonstrated. • Predictive modeling is appreciably improved by taking into account this lag time. • Bioaccumulation lag is greater for organisms at higher trophic levels. • This methodology may be widely applicable in disparate disciplines. - Abstract: For bioaccumulative substances, efforts to predict concentrations in organisms at upper trophic levels, based on measurements of environmental exposure, have been confounded by the appreciable but hitherto unknown amount of time it may take for bioaccumulation to occur through various pathways and across several trophic transfers. The study summarized here demonstrates an objective method of estimating this lag time by testing a large array of potential lag times for selenium bioaccumulation, selecting the lag that provides the best regression between environmental exposure (concentration in ambient water) and concentration in the tissue of the target organism. Bioaccumulation lag is generally greater for organisms at higher trophic levels, reaching times of more than a year in piscivorous fish. Predictive modeling of bioaccumulation is improved appreciably by taking into account this lag. More generally, the method demonstrated here may improve the accuracy of predictive modeling in a wide variety of other cause-effect relationships in which lag time is substantial but inadequately known, in disciplines as diverse as climatology (e.g., the effect of greenhouse gases on sea levels) and economics (e.g., the effects of fiscal stimulus on employment).

  4. 3-D modelling of a fossil tufa outcrop. The example of La Peña del Manto (Soria, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Pedro; Armenteros, Ildefonso; Merino Tomé, Oscar; Rodríguez Gonzálvez, Pablo; Silva, Pablo G.; González-Aguilera, Diego; Carrasco-García, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Classical studies of tufas lack quantitative outcrop descriptions and facies models, and normally do not integrate data from subsurface in the stratigraphic and evolutive analysis. This paper describes the methodology followed to construct one of the first digital outcrop models of fossil tufas. This model incorporates 3-D lines and surfaces obtained from a terrestrial laser scanner, electric resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles, and stratigraphic and sedimentologic data from 18 measured sections. This study has identified seven sedimentary units (from SU-1 to SU-7) which are composed of tufa carbonates (SU-1; 3; 5; 6) and clastics (SU-2; 4; 7). Facies identified occur in different proportions: phytoherm limestones of bryophytes represent 43% of tufa volume, bioclastic limestones 20%, phytoherm limestones of stems 12%, oncolitic limestones 8%, and clastics 15%. Three main architectural elements have been identified: 1) Steeply dipping strata dominated by phytoherm limestones of bryophytes; 2) gently dipping strata dominated by phytoherm limestones of stems; and 3) horizontal strata dominated by bioclastic and oncoid limestones. The alternation of tufa growth and clastic input stages is interpreted as the result of climatic changes during Mid-Late Pleistocene.

  5. First-principles model potentials for lattice-dynamical studies: general methodology and example of application to ferroic perovskite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdeł, Jacek C; Hermet, Patrick; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ghosez, Philippe; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2013-07-31

    We present a scheme to construct model potentials, with parameters computed from first principles, for large-scale lattice-dynamical simulations of materials. We mimic the traditional solid-state approach to the investigation of vibrational spectra, i.e., we start from a suitably chosen reference configuration of the compound and describe its energy as a function of arbitrary atomic distortions by means of a Taylor series. Such a form of the potential-energy surface is general, trivial to formulate for any material, and physically transparent. Further, such models involve clear-cut approximations, their precision can be improved in a systematic fashion, and their simplicity allows for convenient and practical strategies to compute/fit the potential parameters. We illustrate our scheme with two challenging cases in which the model potential is strongly anharmonic, namely, the ferroic perovskite oxides PbTiO3 and SrTiO3. Studying these compounds allows us to better describe the connection between the so-called effective-Hamiltonian method and ours (which may be seen as an extension of the former), and to show the physical insight and predictive power provided by our approach-e.g., we present new results regarding the factors controlling phase-transition temperatures, novel phase transitions under elastic constraints, an improved treatment of thermal expansion, etc.

  6. Models of care for late-life depression of the medically ill: examples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avari, Jimmy N; Alexopoulos, George S

    2015-05-01

    Depression worsens most treatment outcomes in medically ill older adults. Chronic medical illnesses weaken and demoralize patients and compromise their ability to adhere to treatments requiring consistency and effort. Acute medical illnesses create a psychosocial storm that finds patients and their ecosystem unprepared. We describe two intervention models that can be used to target and personalize treatment in depressed, chronically, or acutely medically ill older adults. The Personalized Adherence Intervention for Depression and COPD (PID-C) is a model intervention for depressed patients with chronic medical illnesses. It targets patient-specific barriers to treatment engagement and aims to shift the balance in favor of treatment participation. PID-C led to higher remission rates of depression, reduction in depressive symptoms, and reduction in dyspnea-related disability. The addition of problem-solving training enables patients to use resources available to them and hopefully improve their outcomes. Ecosystem-focused therapy (EFT) is a model intervention for depression developing in the context of an acute medical event. It was developed for patients with poststroke depression (PSD) and targets five areas, part of the "psychosocial storm" originating from the patient's sudden disability and the resulting change in the patient's needs and family's life. A preliminary study suggests that EFT is feasible and efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms and signs and disability in PSD.

  7. A Model for Sustainable Development of Child Mental Health Infrastructure in the LMIC World: Vietnam as a Case Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Bahr; Ngo, Victoria Khanh; Dang, Hoang-Minh; Pollack, Amie; Trung, Lam T.; Tran, Cong V.; Tran, Nam T.; Sang, David; Do, Khanh N.

    2012-01-01

    Children and adolescents are among the highest need populations in regards to mental health support, especially in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Yet resources in LMIC for prevention and treatment of mental health problems are limited, in particular for children and adolescents. In this paper, we discuss a model for development of child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) resources in LMIC that has guided a ten year initiative focused on development of CAMH treatment and research infrastructure in Vietnam. We first review the need for development of mental health resources for children and adolescents in general, and then in Vietnam. We next present the model that guided our program as it developed, focused on the twin Capacity Development Goals of efficacy and sustainability, and the Capacity Development Targets used to move towards these goals. Finally we discuss our CAMH development initiative in Vietnam, the center of which has been development of a graduate program in clinical psychology at Vietnam National University, linking program activities to this model. PMID:24701368

  8. Climate change in a Point-Over-Threshold model: an example on ocean-wave-storm hazard in NE Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosana-Delgado, R.; Ortego, M. I.; Egozcue, J. J.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2009-09-01

    Climatic change is a problem of general concern. When dealing with hazardous events such as wind-storms, heavy rainfall or ocean-wave storms this concern is even more serious. Climate change might imply an increase of human and material losses, and it is worth devoting efforts to detect it. Hazard assessment of such events is often carried out with a point-over-threshold (POT) model. Time-occurrence of events is assumed to be Poisson distributed, and the magnitude of each event is modelled as an arbitrary random variable, which upper tail is described by a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). Independence between this magnitude and occurrence in time is assumed, as well as independence from event to event. The GPD models excesses over a threshold. If X is the magnitude of an event and x0 a value of the support of X, the excess over the threshold x0 is Y = X - x0, conditioned to X > x0. Therefore, the support of Y is (a segment of) the positive real line. The GPD model has a scale and a shape parameter. The scale parameter of the distribution is β > 0. The shape parameter, ? is real-valued, and it defines three different sub-families of distributions. GPD distributions with ? 0, distributions have infinite heavy tails (ysup = +? ), and for ? = 0 we obtain the exponential distribution, which has an infinite support but a well-behaved tail. The GPD distribution function is ( ? )- 1 ? FY(y|β,?) = 1- 1+ β-y , 0 ? y issue as well. A handful of phenomena are better described by a relative scale (e.g. positive data where the null value is unattainable) and are thus suitably treated in a logarithmic scale. This has been already used successfully for daily rainfall data and ocean-wave-height. How to assess impact of climate change on hazardous events? In a climate change scenario, we can consider the model for description of the variable as stable, while its parameters may be taken as a function of time. Thus, magnitudes are taken in a log-scale. Excesses over a

  9. Can theory be embedded in visual interventions to promote self-management? A proposed model and worked example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B; Anderson, A S; Barton, K; McGhee, J

    2012-12-01

    Nurses are increasingly involved in a range of strategies to encourage patient behaviours that improve self-management. If nurses are to be involved in, or indeed lead, the development of such interventions then processes that enhance the likelihood that they will lead to evidence that is both robust and usable in practice are required. Although behavioural interventions have been predominantly based on written text or the spoken word increasing numbers are now drawing on visual media to communicate their message, despite only a growing evidence base to support it. The use of such media in health interventions is likely to increase due to technological advances enabling easier and cheaper production, and an increasing social preference for visual forms of communication. However, the development of such media is often highly pragmatic and developed intuitively rather than with theory and evidence informing their content and form. Such a process may be at best inefficient and at worst potentially harmful. This paper performs two functions. Firstly, it discusses and argues why visual based interventions may be a powerful media for behaviour change; and secondly, it proposes a model, developed from the MRC Framework for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions, to guide the creation of theory informed visual interventions. It employs a case study of the development of an intervention to motivate involvement in a lifestyle intervention among people with increased cardiovascular risk. In doing this we argue for a step-wise model which includes: (1) the identification of a theoretical basis and associated concepts; (2) the development of visual narrative to establish structure; (3) the visual rendering of narrative and concepts; and (4) the assessment of interpretation and impact among the intended patient group. We go on to discuss the theoretical and methodological limitations of the model.

  10. Modeling phytosanitary risk of unintended commodity use: the example of U.S. potato exports to Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Glenn; Erikson, Lottie; Caton, Barney; Gutierrez, Walter; Griffin, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Diversion of commodities from their intended use to an unintended use, e.g., when commodities intended for consumption are used as seed for planting, is an important issue in agricultural trade that has implications for the establishment of pests and pathogens in an importing country and for the appropriate strength of plant health measures. Consequently, understanding and accurately characterizing the risk of diversion from intended use is highly relevant to policymakers, trading partners, and in trade dispute arbitration. To our knowledge, no risk assessments have ever accounted for the likelihood of diversion from intended use. Here we present an approach to analyzing this risk using diversion of U.S. table stock potatoes to seed for planting by Mexican potato producers as a case study. We use probabilistic pathway models to characterize the movement of white, yellow, and russet potatoes from the United States into Mexico at current and double export volumes. We then model the likelihood of these potatoes being diverted for seed and the subsequent establishment of bacteria, nematode, and virus pests in Mexico. Our approach demonstrates how diversion from intended use can be quantified in one scenario and, in particular, how it can be analyzed to estimate the magnitude of diversion required to produce a high risk of pest establishment.

  11. The Model of Higher School Students’ Research Competence in Multilevel Training (Taking as the Example the Mathematical Disciplines Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Lukashenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to developing the research competence in the process of student multilevel training. Upgrading the student’s ability for research ac- tivity is an important task of higher education that should be continually emphasized at all levels. The author suggests the model developing the research competence in the context of mathematical disciplines studies at bachelor level of different educational profiles: mathematical, natural sciences, vocational. The model in question represents the hierarchical tree of goals based on the principals of expansion, subordination and correlative importance – all of them reflecting the links between the goals and the edu- cational levels ( bachelor or master level - which facilitates the plan systematization for achieving the main goal of students’ research competence development. The essential content, criteria, indices and development levels of the compe- tence in question are defined. The given approach provides the continuity in mastering the competencies at different levels in a sequential advancing from the theoretical to practical knowledge and makes it possible to avoid the formal approach to teaching the undergraduates. 

  12. The Model of Higher School Students’ Research Competence in Multilevel Training (Taking as the Example the Mathematical Disciplines Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Lukashenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to developing the research competence in the process of student multilevel training. Upgrading the student’s ability for research ac- tivity is an important task of higher education that should be continually emphasized at all levels. The author suggests the model developing the research competence in the context of mathematical disciplines studies at bachelor level of different educational profiles: mathematical, natural sciences, vocational. The model in question represents the hierarchical tree of goals based on the principals of expansion, subordination and correlative importance – all of them reflecting the links between the goals and the edu- cational levels ( bachelor or master level - which facilitates the plan systematization for achieving the main goal of students’ research competence development. The essential content, criteria, indices and development levels of the compe- tence in question are defined. The given approach provides the continuity in mastering the competencies at different levels in a sequential advancing from the theoretical to practical knowledge and makes it possible to avoid the formal approach to teaching the undergraduates. 

  13. A method for improving predictive modeling by taking into account lag time: Example of selenium bioaccumulation in a flowing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckon, William N

    2016-07-01

    For bioaccumulative substances, efforts to predict concentrations in organisms at upper trophic levels, based on measurements of environmental exposure, have been confounded by the appreciable but hitherto unknown amount of time it may take for bioaccumulation to occur through various pathways and across several trophic transfers. The study summarized here demonstrates an objective method of estimating this lag time by testing a large array of potential lag times for selenium bioaccumulation, selecting the lag that provides the best regression between environmental exposure (concentration in ambient water) and concentration in the tissue of the target organism. Bioaccumulation lag is generally greater for organisms at higher trophic levels, reaching times of more than a year in piscivorous fish. Predictive modeling of bioaccumulation is improved appreciably by taking into account this lag. More generally, the method demonstrated here may improve the accuracy of predictive modeling in a wide variety of other cause-effect relationships in which lag time is substantial but inadequately known, in disciplines as diverse as climatology (e.g., the effect of greenhouse gases on sea levels) and economics (e.g., the effects of fiscal stimulus on employment).

  14. Incorporating hysteresis in a multi-phase multi-component NAPL modelling framework; a multi-component LNAPL gasoline example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookhak Lari, Kaveh; Davis, Greg B.; Johnston, Colin D.

    2016-10-01

    The longevity of chemicals in subsurface NAPL releases is a function of their partitioning into different phases. Hysteresis can affect distribution and partitioning of compounds in the vadose zone. We separated and modified hysteresis code from NAPL Simulator (which include hysteresis caused by fluid entrapment and capillary effects) and embedded it into TMVOC. For the first time, the resulting framework is used to model multi-component and multi-phase NAPL release, partitioning and transport. We then applied the verified framework to model effects of hysteresis on partitioning of BTEX, TMB and short and long chain alkanes from a typical gasoline spill. Excluding hysteresis resulted in an expanded LNAPL plume and underestimated the compounds longevity. Hysteresis altered the spatial distribution of LNAPL molar fractions as well as gas flow path and contaminants distribution compared to the non-hysteretic case. The amplifying effect of hysteresis on the longevity of mixtures (and associated risks) should be considered if non-hysteretic relationships are applied.

  15. Modeling the Roles of Precipitation Increasing in Glacier Systems Responding to Climate Warming - Taking Xinjiang Glaciated Region as Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; XIE Zichu; LIU Shiyin; TAO Jianjun; HAN Yongshun; YANG Yuelong

    2005-01-01

    The studies on prediction of climate in Xinjiang almost show that the precipitation would increase in the coming 50 years, although there were surely some uncertainties in precipitation predictions.On the basis of the structure of glacier system and nature of equilibrium line altitude at steady state (ELAo), a functional model of the glacier system responding to climate changes was established, and it simultaneously involved the rising of summer mean temperature and increasing of mean precipitation.The results from the functional model under the climatic scenarios with temperature increasing rates of 0.01, 0.03 and 0.05 K/year indicated that the precipitation increasing would play an evident role in glacier system responding to climate change: if temperature become 1℃ higher, the precipitation would be increased by 10%, which can slow down the glaciers retreating rate in the area by 4%, accelerate runoff increasing rate by 8% and depress the ELAo rising gradient by 24 m in northern Xinjiang glacier system where semi-continental glaciers dominate,while it has corresponding values of only 1%, 5 % and 18m respectively in southern Xinjiang glacier system,where extremely continental glaciers dominate.

  16. Modeling retrospective attribution of responsibility to hazard-managing institutions: an example involving a food contamination incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Branden B; Hallman, William K; Cuite, Cara L

    2015-03-01

    Perceptions of institutions that manage hazards are important because they can affect how the public responds to hazard events. Antecedents of trust judgments have received far more attention than antecedents of attributions of responsibility for hazard events. We build upon a model of retrospective attribution of responsibility to individuals to examine these relationships regarding five classes of institutions that bear responsibility for food safety: producers (e.g., farmers), processors (e.g., packaging firms), watchdogs (e.g., government agencies), sellers (e.g., supermarkets), and preparers (e.g., restaurants). A nationally representative sample of 1,200 American adults completed an Internet-based survey in which a hypothetical scenario involving contamination of diverse foods with Salmonella served as the stimulus event. Perceived competence and good intentions of the institution moderately decreased attributions of responsibility. A stronger factor was whether an institution was deemed (potentially) aware of the contamination and free to act to prevent or mitigate it. Responsibility was rated higher the more aware and free the institution. This initial model for attributions of responsibility to impersonal institutions (as opposed to individual responsibility) merits further development. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. The Family-centered Action Model of Intervention Layout and Implementation (FAMILI): the example of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Kirsten K; Lawson, Hal A; Coatsworth, J Douglas

    2012-07-01

    Parents play a fundamental role in shaping children's development, including their dietary and physical activity behaviors. Yet family-centered interventions are rarely used in obesity prevention research. Less than half of childhood obesity prevention programs include parents, and those that do include parents or a family component seldom focus on sustainable change at the level of the family. The general absence of a family-centered approach may be explained by persistent challenges in engaging parents and families and the absence of an intervention framework explicitly designed to foster family-centered programs. The Family-centered Action Model of Intervention Layout and Implementation, or FAMILI, was developed to address these needs. FAMILI draws on theories of family development to frame research and intervention design, uses a mixed-methods approach to conduct ecologically valid research, and positions family members as active participants in the development, implementation, and evaluation of family-centered obesity prevention programs. FAMILI is intended to facilitate the development of culturally responsive and sustainable prevention programs with the potential to improve outcomes. Although childhood obesity was used to illustrate the application of FAMILI, this model can be used to address a range of child health problems.

  18. Magni Reproducibility Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set.......An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set....

  19. Data Ellipses, HE Plots and Reduced-Rank Displays for Multivariate Linear Models: SAS Software and Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Friendly

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes graphical methods for multiple-response data within the framework of the multivariate linear model (MLM, aimed at understanding what is being tested in a multivariate test, and how factor/predictor effects are expressed across multiple response measures. In particular, we describe and illustrate a collection of SAS macro programs for: (a Data ellipses and low-rank biplots for multivariate data, (b HE plots, showing the hypothesis and error covariance matrices for a given pair of responses, and a given effect, (c HE plot matrices, showing all pairwise HE plots, and (d low-rank analogs of HE plots, showing all observations, group means, and their relations to the response variables.

  20. Construction of mass-age curves for the continental crust: An empirical model and an example from the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaolo, D. J.; Schubert, G. S.; Linn, Ann

    1988-01-01

    The methodology of determining crustal mass-age curves is discussed. Problems in doing this include determination of model ages and accounting for mixing of materials of different ages during crust forming processes. These difficulties can be overcome with some reasonable assumptions and estimates of rock volumes based on areal proportions. This technique was used to construct a reasonably well constrained mass-age curve for the southwestern U.S. based on isotopic measurements on over 100 samples. The results imply that the crust in this area grew episodically at 2.8, 1.8, and 0.1 Ga. It is estimated that it would take on the order of 10000 to 100000 individual Sm-Nd isotopic measurements to carry out a similar exercise for continental crust world wide.

  1. A free-knot spline modeling framework for piecewise linear logistic regression in complex samples with body mass index and mortality as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W. Keith

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the design, evaluation, and implementation of a framework for detecting and modeling nonlinearity between a binary outcome and a continuous predictor variable adjusted for covariates in complex samples. The framework provides familiar-looking parameterizations of output in terms of linear slope coefficients and odds ratios. Estimation methods focus on maximum likelihood optimization of piecewise linear free-knot splines formulated as B-splines. Correctly specifying the optimal number and positions of the knots improves the model, but is marked by computational intensity and numerical instability. Our inference methods utilize both parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping. Unlike other nonlinear modeling packages, this framework is designed to incorporate multistage survey sample designs common to nationally representative datasets. We illustrate the approach and evaluate its performance in specifying the correct number of knots under various conditions with an example using body mass index (BMI; kg/m2 and the complex multi-stage sampling design from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to simulate binary mortality outcomes data having realistic nonlinear sample-weighted risk associations with BMI. BMI and mortality data provide a particularly apt example and area of application since BMI is commonly recorded in large health surveys with complex designs, often categorized for modeling, and nonlinearly related to mortality. When complex sample design considerations were ignored, our method was generally similar to or more accurate than two common model selection procedures, Schwarz’s Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC and Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC, in terms of correctly selecting the correct number of knots. Our approach provided accurate knot selections when complex sampling weights were incorporated, while AIC and BIC were not effective under these conditions.

  2. Using occupancy models to investigate the prevalence of ectoparasitic vectors on hosts: an example with fleas on prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A.; Biggins, Dean E.; Doherty, Paul F.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Huyvaert, Kathryn P.; Long, Dustin H.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites are often difficult to detect in the field. We developed a method that can be used with occupancy models to estimate the prevalence of ectoparasites on hosts, and to investigate factors that influence rates of ectoparasite occupancy while accounting for imperfect detection. We describe the approach using a study of fleas (Siphonaptera) on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). During each primary occasion (monthly trapping events), we combed a prairie dog three consecutive times to detect fleas (15 s/combing). We used robust design occupancy modeling to evaluate hypotheses for factors that might correlate with the occurrence of fleas on prairie dogs, and factors that might influence the rate at which prairie dogs are colonized by fleas. Our combing method was highly effective; dislodged fleas fell into a tub of water and could not escape, and there was an estimated 99.3% probability of detecting a flea on an occupied host when using three combings. While overall detection was high, the probability of detection was always dogs, flea occupancy was heightened in old/natural colonies of prairie dogs, and on hosts that were in poor condition. Occupancy was initially low in plots with high densities of prairie dogs, but, as the study progressed, the rate of flea colonization increased in plots with high densities of prairie dogs in particular. Our methodology can be used to improve studies of ectoparasites, especially when the probability of detection is low. Moreover, the method can be modified to investigate the co-occurrence of ectoparasite species, and community level factors such as species richness and interspecific interactions.

  3. Thomas Kuhn's 'Structure of Scientific Revolutions' applied to exercise science paradigm shifts: example including the Central Governor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Flávio de Oliveira; de Oliveira Pires, Flávio

    2013-07-01

    According to Thomas Kuhn, the scientific progress of any discipline could be distinguished by a pre-paradigm phase, a normal science phase and a revolution phase. The science advances when a scientific revolution takes place after silent period of normal science and the scientific community moves ahead to a paradigm shift. I suggest there has been a recent change of course in the direction of the exercise science. According to the 'current paradigm', exercise would be probably limited by alterations in either central command or peripheral skeletal muscles, and fatigue would be developed in a task-dependent manner. Instead, the central governor model (GCM) has proposed that all forms of exercise are centrally-regulated, the central nervous system would calculate the metabolic cost required to complete a task in order to avoid catastrophic body failure. Some have criticized the CGM and supported the traditional interpretation, but recently the scientific community appears to have begun an intellectual trajectory to accept this theory. First, the increased number of citations of articles that have supported the CGM could indicate that the community has changed the focus. Second, relevant journals have devoted special editions to promote the debate on subjects challenged by the CGM. Finally, scientists from different fields have recognized mechanisms included in the CGM to understand the exercise limits. Given the importance of the scientific community in demarcating a Kuhnian paradigm shift, I suggest that these three aspects could indicate an increased acceptance of a centrally-regulated effort model, to understand the limits of exercise.

  4. Wall-Less Flow Phantoms With Tortuous Vascular Geometries: Design Principles and a Patient-Specific Model Fabrication Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chung Kit; Chee, Adrian J Y; Yiu, Billy Y S; Tsang, Anderson C O; Chow, Kwok Wing; Yu, Alfred C H

    2017-01-01

    Flow phantoms with anatomically realistic geometry and high acoustic compatibility are valuable investigative tools in vascular ultrasound studies. Here, we present a new framework to fabricate ultrasound-compatible flow phantoms to replicate human vasculature that is tortuous, nonplanar, and branching in nature. This framework is based upon the integration of rapid prototyping and investment casting principles. A pedagogical walkthrough of our engineering protocol is presented in this paper using a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm model as an exemplar demonstration. The procedure for constructing the flow circuit component of the phantoms is also presented, including the design of a programmable flow pump system, the fabrication of blood mimicking fluid, and flow rate calibration. Using polyvinyl alcohol cryogel as the tissue mimicking material, phantoms developed with the presented protocol exhibited physiologically relevant acoustic properties [attenuation coefficient: 0.229±0.032 dB/( [Formula: see text]) and acoustic speed: 1535±2.4 m/s], and their pulsatile flow dynamics closely resembled the flow profile input. As a first application of our developed phantoms, the flow pattern of the patient-specific aneurysm model was visualized by performing high-frame-rate color-encoded speckle imaging over multiple time-synchronized scan planes. Persistent recirculation was observed, and the vortex center was found to shift in position over a cardiac cycle, indicating the 3-D nature of flow recirculation inside an aneurysm. These findings suggest that phantoms produced from our reported protocol can serve well as acoustically compatible test beds for vascular ultrasound studies, including 3-D flow imaging.

  5. A Collision Risk Model to Predict Avian Fatalities at Wind Facilities: An Example Using Golden Eagles, Aquila chrysaetos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie New

    Full Text Available Wind power is a major candidate in the search for clean, renewable energy. Beyond the technical and economic challenges of wind energy development are environmental issues that may restrict its growth. Avian fatalities due to collisions with rotating turbine blades are a leading concern and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding avian collision risk at wind facilities. This uncertainty is not reflected in many models currently used to predict the avian fatalities that would result from proposed wind developments. We introduce a method to predict fatalities at wind facilities, based on pre-construction monitoring. Our method can directly incorporate uncertainty into the estimates of avian fatalities and can be updated if information on the true number of fatalities becomes available from post-construction carcass monitoring. Our model considers only three parameters: hazardous footprint, bird exposure to turbines and collision probability. By using a Bayesian analytical framework we account for uncertainties in these values, which are then reflected in our predictions and can be reduced through subsequent data collection. The simplicity of our approach makes it accessible to ecologists concerned with the impact of wind development, as well as to managers, policy makers and industry interested in its implementation in real-world decision contexts. We demonstrate the utility of our method by predicting golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos fatalities at a wind installation in the United States. Using pre-construction data, we predicted 7.48 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.1, 19.81. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the 80th quantile (11.0 eagle fatalities year-1 in their permitting process to ensure there is only a 20% chance a wind facility exceeds the authorized fatalities. Once data were available from two-years of post-construction monitoring, we updated the fatality estimate to 4.8 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.76, 9.4; 80th

  6. Assessing the carbon sink of afforestation with the Carbon Budget Model at the country level: an example for Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilli R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the Kyoto Protocol, the mandatory accounting of Afforestation and Reforestation (AR activities requires estimating the forest carbon (C stock changes for any direct human-induced expansion of forest since 1990. We used the Carbon Budget Model (CBM to estimate C stock changes and emissions from fires on AR lands at country level. Italy was chosen because it has one of the highest annual rates of AR in Europe and the same model was recently applied to Italy’s forest management area. We considered the time period 1990-2020 with two case studies reflecting different average annual rates of AR: 78 kha yr-1, based on the 2013 Italian National Inventory Report (NIR, official estimates, and 28 kha yr-1, based on the Italian Land Use Inventory System (IUTI estimates. We compared these two different AR rates with eight regional forest inventories and three independent local studies. The average annual C stock change estimated by CBM, excluding harvest or natural disturbances, was equal to 1738 Gg C yr-1 (official estimates and 630 Gg C yr-1 (IUTI estimates. Results for the official estimates are consistent with the estimates reported by Italy to the KP for the period 2008-2010; for 2011 our estimates are about 20% higher than the country’s data, probably due to different assumptions on the fire disturbances, the AR rate and the dead wood and litter pools. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that: (i the impact on the AR sink of different assumptions of species composition is small; (ii the amount of harvest provided by AR has been negligible for the past (< 3% and is expected to be small in the near future (up to 8% in 2020; (iii forest fires up to 2011 had a small impact on the AR sink (on average, < 100 Gg C yr-1. Finally the comparison of the historical AR rates reported by NIR and IUTI with other independent sources gives mixed results: the regional inventories support the AR rates reported by the NIR, while some local studies

  7. Enhanced NURBS modeling and visualization for large 3D geoengineering applications: An example from the Jinping first-level hydropower engineering project, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Deng-Hua; Li, Ming-Chao; Song, Ling-Guang; Wang, Gang

    2006-11-01

    Large engineering projects with complex underlying geologic structures require 3D geological integration and analysis. Presented is an example of a large hydroelectric dam, highlighting the need for 3D visualization and modeling as a requirement for the engineering design and construction process. Due to the complex nature of these projects, geological analysis using 3D modeling is commonly necessary. In this paper we present an integrated 3D geological modeling methodology for the analysis of large amounts of exploration data, and subsequent geological interpretation based on the non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) technique, the triangulated irregular network (TIN) algorithm and boundary representation. The procedural details and application of the proposed approach are demonstrated with reference to an actual hydropower engineering project. The new approach offered a good scheme to solve the inconsistencies among storage, accuracy and operational speed of the model. A 3D model was developed and validated using testing data from the engineering project. Visual analysis of the 3D model helps engineers to comprehend the complexity of geological structures, and enables arbitrary cutting, rock-mass quality classification, and digital drilling.

  8. Influence of model parameters on a simulation of x-ray irradiated materials: example of XTANT code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Nikita; Lipp, Vladimir

    2017-05-01

    In this contribution an analysis of influence of model parameters on the results of simulations of material properties under free-electron laser irradiation is presented. It is based on the in-house hybrid code XTANT (X-ray-induced Thermal And Nonthermal Transition; N. Medvedev et. al, Phys. Rev. B 91 (2015) 054113), which combines tight binding molecular dynamics for atoms with Monte Carlo treatment of high-energy electrons and core-holes, and Boltzmann collision integrals for nonadiabatic (electron-phonon) coupling. Different parameterizations of transferable tight binding method for silicon are analyzed, namely basis sets sp3 and sp3s*. The sp3 parameterization seems to provide a better agreement of the silicon damage threshold with experimental data. Further, the influence of different schemes of molecular dynamics periodic boundaries simulation is compared: constant volume vs Parrinello-Rahman constant pressure. Constant-volume scheme gives a better agreement with experimental transient properties, as could be expected. Parameters entering the calculations of optical properties are analyzed, showing virtually no effect on the outcome beyond trivial broadening of the peaks of the optical coefficients.

  9. Geographic Information Systems (GIS Based Village Roads Management Model For Monitoring, Maintenance And Repairing Purposes: Example Of Denizli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yetiş Şazi Murat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Geographic information systems has become a tool that is often used in many fields especially in developed countries, yet in Turkey while it's been recognized and acknowledged by central and local authorities, its use in public services is still in only the crawling stages.Within the borders of Denizli Provincial Administration Roads and Transportation Services Directorship, a GIS-supported study has been undertaken in order to update information on all village roads in the related area of responsibility and service and to aid the Directorship's country infrastructure service with modern and technical methods over different analysis results obtained. In this study, executed with the Strategy Development Directorship, through using developed layers, topographic maps, satellite photos, etc. devised in fact for different purposes, it was aimed to ensure that the service concerning village roads are based on correct and update data. In line with the fast and sensitive analysis results obtained in this study as an attempt to ensure that public resources are used efficiently, it was aimed to put forth a pilot project to be used later on as a product which is thought to serve as a model to help re-plan village road constructions, determine lacking and incomplete cases, thereby establish a complete and integrated management plan.

  10. Getting it right before transplantation: example of a stem cell model with regenerative potential for the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Cedric; Forostyak, Oksana; Sykova, Eva; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2014-01-01

    The burden of neurodegenerative disorders in an aging population has become a challenge for the modern world. While the biomarkers available and the methods of diagnosis have improved to detect the onset of these diseases at early stages, the question of adapted and efficient therapies is still a major issue. The prospect of replacing the loss of functional neural cells remains an attractive but still audacious approach. A huge progress has been made in the generation of neurons derived from human stem cell lines and transplantation assays are tested in animals for a wide range of pathologies of the central nervous system. Here we take one step back and examine neuronal differentiation and the characterization of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells. We gather results from our previous studies and present a cell model that was successfully used in functional analyses and engraftment experiments. These neuronal precursors exhibit spontaneous and evoked activity, indicating that their electrophysiological and calcium handling properties are similar to those of matured neurons. Hence this summarized information will serve as a basis to design better stem cell-based therapies to improve neural regeneration.

  11. Integrated geological-engineering model of Patrick Draw field and examples of similarities and differences among various shoreline barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Szpakiewicz, M.J.; Jackson, S.R.; Chang, M.M.; Sharma, B.; Tham, M.K.; Cheng, A.M.

    1992-04-01

    The Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program at NIPER employs an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on the high priority reservoir class of shoreline barrier deposits to: (1) determine the problems specific to this class of reservoirs by identifying the reservoir heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of fluids; and (2) develop methods to characterize effectively this class of reservoirs to predict residual oil saturation (ROS) on interwell scales and improve prediction of the flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of critical reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability, porosity, pore geometry, mineralogy, and oil saturation) are essential for designing and implementing processes to improve sweep efficiency and thereby increase oil recovery. The methodologies and models developed in this program will, in the near- to mid-term, assist producers in the implementation of effective reservoir management strategies such as location of infill wells and selection of optimum enhanced oil recovery methods to maximize oil production from their reservoirs.

  12. Communication in production animal medicine: modelling a complex interaction with the example of dairy herd health medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleen, Joachim L; Atkinson, Owen; Noordhuizen, Jos Ptm

    2011-07-20

    The importance of communication skills in veterinary medicine is increasingly recognised. Appropriate communication skills towards the client are of utmost importance in both companion animal practice and production animal field and consultancy work. The need for building a relationship with the client, alongside developing a structure for the consultation is widely recognised and applies to both types of veterinary practice. Veterinary advisory practice in production animal medicine is, however, characterised by a more complex communication on different levels. While the person-orientated communication is a permanent process between veterinarian and client with a rather personal perspective and defines the roles of interaction, the problem-orientated communication deals with emerging difficulties; the objective is to solve an acute health problem. The solution - orientated communication is a form of communication in which both veterinarian and client address longstanding situations or problems with the objective to improve herd health and subsequently productivity performance. All three forms of communication overlap. Based on this model, it appears useful for a veterinary practice to offer both a curative and an advisory service, but to keep these two separated when deemed appropriate. In veterinary education, the strategies and techniques necessary for solution orientated communication should be included in the teaching of communication skills.

  13. Hamiltonian Dynamics in Extended Phase Space for Gravity and its Consistency with Lagrangian Formalism: a Generalized Spherically Symmetric Model as AN Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakova, Tatyana P.

    2015-01-01

    Among theoretical issues in General Relativity the problem of constructing its Hamiltonian formulation is still of interest. The most of attempts to quantize Gravity are based upon Dirac generalization of Hamiltonian dynamics for system with constraints. At the same time there exists another way to formulate Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems guided by the idea of extended phase space. We have already considered some features of this approach in the previous MG12 Meeting by the example of a simple isotropic model. Now we apply the approach to a generalized spherically symmetric model which imitates the structure of General Relativity much better. In particular, making use of a global BRST symmetry and the Noether theorem, we construct the BRST charge that generates correct gauge transformations for all gravitational degrees of freedom.

  14. Hamiltonian dynamics in extended phase space for gravity and its consistency with Lagrangian formalism: a generalized spherically symmetric model as an example

    CERN Document Server

    Shestakova, T P

    2013-01-01

    Among theoretical issues in General Relativity the problem of constructing its Hamiltonian formulation is still of interest. The most of attempts to quantize Gravity are based upon Dirac generalization of Hamiltonian dynamics for system with constraints. At the same time there exists another way to formulate Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems guided by the idea of extended phase space. We have already considered some features of this approach in the previous MG12 Meeting by the example of a simple isotropic model. Now we apply the approach to a generalized spherically symmetric model which imitates the structure of General Relativity much better. In particular, making use of a global BRST symmetry and the Noether theorem, we construct the BRST charge that generates correct gauge transformations for all gravitational degrees of freedom.

  15. A Study of the Driving Force Model Revealing Changes in Land Utilization Level Based on 3S Technologies--The Example of Yuanmou, Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jin-feng; CHEN Guo-jie; YANG Zhong

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduced the theory and approaches of building driving force models revealing the changes in land utilization level by integrating RS, GPS, and GIS technologies based on the example of Yuanmou County of Yunnan Province. We first created the land utilization type database, natural driving forces for land utilization database, and human driving forces for land utilization database. Then we obtained the dependent and the independent variables of changes in land utilization level by exploring various data. Lastly we screened major factors affecting changes in land utilization level by using the po- werful spatial correlation analysis and main component analysis module of GIS and obtained a multivariable linear regression model of the changes in land utilization level by using GIS spatial regression analysis module.

  16. An example of groundwater modeling to predict impact of climate change and to support optimization of a new intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polomcic, D.; Stevanovic, Z.; Ristic Vakanjac, V.; Dokmanovic, P.; Milanovic, S.

    2012-04-01

    For the purposes of forecasting the effects of climate change in the Pirot basin and surrounding karst massifs in South-East Serbia hydrodynamic analysis of groundwater regime has been carried out. The analysis comprises the two steps: 1. Forecasting discharge of the karst springs along the edge of the karst massifs currently tapped for drinking water supply; and 2. Forecasting effects of possible new intake consists of 10 operational wells which could be placed in deeper aquifer parts to compensate reduced groundwater flow. For the late the finite differences method and software package MODFLOW have been used, while calculations were conducted by Groundwater Vistas 5.51 (Environmental Simulations International, Ltd). The study area consists of three main hydrogeological units: 1. Central unit: Intergranular aquifer of Pliocene and Quaternary sand and gravel deposited in the Pirot basin, covered by recent alluvial sediments of the Nišava and Jerma Rivers 2. Karstic aquifer in massif of Stara Planina in the eastern basin's margin also extending in the basin' bedrock; and 3. Fissured aquifer of the southern slopes of Vla\\vska Mountain made of Jurassic and Lower Creatceous limestones and clastic rocks. The corresponding aquifers are mostly unconfined, with exception of confined aquifer layers in Pliocene-Quaternary sediments. A basic dimension of the matrix, which includes the research area, is 31.4 km x 24 km, which covers an area of 753.6 km2. The flow field in the plan is made with the basic cell size of 400 m x 400 m, which is in the zone of karst springs refined with square mesh of 25 m x 25 m. The calibration model was utilized in unsteady flow conditions, with a time step of one month for the time period January 2000 - December 2010 (total of 132 time steps), which is at a lower level of iterations divided into 10 parts of unequal length (factor 1.2). Prediction calculations include four representative periods: 2020, 2050, 2070 and 2100 and seven different

  17. Interpretation of thermochronological cooling ages using thermal modelling: an example from shallow magma intrusions from the Kerguelen archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Floriane; Delpech, Guillaume; Gautheron, Cécile; Nomade, Sébastien; Zeyen, Hermann; Guillaume, Damien

    2017-04-01

    much younger and range from 1.4 ± 0.7 Ma to 0.8 ± 0.1 Ma. Combined with the thermochronological approach, the thermal structure of the crust beneath the Kerguelen Plateau was established by inverse modelling of gravity, geoid and topography data. The results suggest a mean current thermal gradient of ˜40°/km for the Kerguelen Plateau. Moreover, thermal modelling allows reconstructing heat diffusion in 1D after successive sill intrusions (vertically and horizontally) in order to confirm AHe data can be interpreted as exhumation ages in both complexes. In this case, the mean thermal gradient can be considered to convert the cooling rates in erosion rates.

  18. Distilling Common History and Practice Elements to Inform Dissemination: Hanf-Model BPT Programs as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, Laura A; Jacobs, Mary; Jones, Deborah J

    2016-09-01

    (IY; (Webster-Stratton in Behav Ther 12:634-642, 1981. doi:10.1016/S0005-7894(81)80135-9; Webster-Stratton in J Pediatr Psychol 7:279-294, 1982. doi:10.1093/jpepsy/7.3.279; Webster-Stratton in The incredible years: parents and children series. Leader's guide: preschool version of BASIC (ages 3-6 years, The Incredible Years, Seattle, 2008). Our goal is not to provide an exhaustive review of the evidence base for the Hanf-Model programs, rather our intention is to provide a template of sorts from which agencies and clinicians can make informed choices about how and why they are using one program versus another, as well as how to make inform flexible use one program or combination of practice elements across programs, to best meet the needs of child clients and their families. Clinical implications and directions for future work are discussed.

  19. Analog Models of Flanking Structures and a Natural Example in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLINE J.S. GOMES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study is to present analog models of flanking structures and to analyze the Fábrica Nova synform, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Minas Gerais, from a geometric point of view. We set up seven models using a linear viscous silicone and produced flanking structures with a shear velocity of 2 cm h-1. At different initial orientations with respect to the shear zone boundary, a rigid cross-cutting element with lubricated boundaries was deformed via sinistral bulk flow at a shear strain of γ = 1.28. The most interesting features of our experiments are the geometries of the different marker lines, which are heterogeneous and resulted from thickening and thinning of the silicone at the cross-cutting element terminations. To compare our analog models and the Fábrica Nova synform, we analyzed the outermost marker line of the analog models and the top surface of the Cauê Formation in the Paleoproterozoic metasediments. The best comparisons between the experiments and the natural example were obtained by our CIS90 model in terms of the flexure shape near the cross-cutting element and the cross-cutting element orientation. Thus, we suggest that the cross-cutting elements in both situations act as obstacles and consequently produce local perturbations in laminar flow.

  20. MODEL-DRIVEN REVERSE ENGINEERING AND PROGRAM COMPREHENSION: AN EXAMPLE INGENIERÍA REVERSA Y COMPRENSIÓN DE PROGRAMAS DIRIGIDA POR MODELOS: UN EJEMPLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio G Scalise P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an example of how Model-Driven Engineering (MDE can be applied to the development of tools for reverse engineering and program comprehension. The tool CodeCrawler was selected as an example; in particular, the polymetric view feature was computed using MDE techniques. To this end, two metamodels were proposed (source and target and meta-level transformations that were used to deduce the information of a polymetric view associated to any software project (source code. The technologies selected to develop the example were those related with the Eclipse Modeling Project, specifically the ATL and the KM3 languages. The approach used in this paper to obtain the implementation can be used to develop all the features of a MDE-oriented software comprehension tool, obtaining a domain-oriented implementation.En este artículo se presenta un ejemplo que describe cómo la Ingeniería Dirigida por Modelos (IDM puede ser aplicada al desarrollo de herramientas para la ingeniería reversa y comprensión de programas. Se seleccionó como caso de estudio la herramienta CodeCrawler, específicamente la funcionalidad denominada polymetric view, desarrollada mediante tecnologías y técnicas de la IDM. Para ello, se emplearon dos metamodelos (entrada y salida y transformaciones a nivel de los metamodelos que permiten generar la información de un polymetric view asociado a un proyecto de software, utilizando la información extraída del código fuente. Las tecnologías utilizadas para el desarrollo del ejemplo, las relacionadas con el Eclipse Modeling Project, específicamente el lenguaje de transformación ATL y el lenguaje KM3. El enfoque seguido para obtener la implementación resultante puede ser utilizado para desarrollar una herramienta de ingeniería reversa y comprensión de software mediante técnicas de la IDM, incorporando el vocabulario del dominio en la implementación.

  1. Practical application of the vanishing tetrad test for causal indicator measurement models: an example from health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Kenneth A; Lennox, Richard D; Dahly, Darren L

    2009-05-01

    Researchers are often faced with the task of trying to measure abstract concepts. The most common approach is to use multiple indicators that reflect an underlying latent variable. However, this 'effect indicator' measurement model is not always appropriate; sometimes the indicators instead cause the construct of interest. While the notion of 'causal indicators' has been known for some time, it is still too often ignored. However, there are limited means to determine whether a possible indicator should be treated as a cause or an effect of the latent construct of interest. Perhaps the best empirical way is to use the vanishing tetrad test (VTT), yet this method is still often overlooked. We speculate that one reason for this is the lack of published examples of its use in practice, written for an audience without extensive statistical training. The goal of this paper was to help fill this gap in the literature-to provide a basic example of how to use the VTT. We illustrated the VTT by looking at multiple items from a health related quality of life instrument that seem more likely to cause the latent variable rather than the other way around.

  2. Barriers and opportunities for evidence-based health service planning: the example of developing a Decision Analytic Model to plan services for sexually transmitted infections in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aicken Catherine R H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision Analytic Models (DAMs are established means of evidence-synthesis to differentiate between health interventions. They have mainly been used to inform clinical decisions and health technology assessment at the national level, yet could also inform local health service planning. For this, a DAM must take into account the needs of the local population, but also the needs of those planning its services. Drawing on our experiences from stakeholder consultations, where we presented the potential utility of a DAM for planning local health services for sexually transmitted infections (STIs in the UK, and the evidence it could use to inform decisions regarding different combinations of service provision, in terms of their costs, cost-effectiveness, and public health outcomes, we discuss the barriers perceived by stakeholders to the use of DAMs to inform service planning for local populations, including (1 a tension between individual and population perspectives; (2 reductionism; and (3 a lack of transparency regarding models, their assumptions, and the motivations of those generating models. Discussion Technological advances, including improvements in computing capability, are facilitating the development and use of models such as DAMs for health service planning. However, given the current scepticism among many stakeholders, encouraging informed critique and promoting trust in models to aid health service planning is vital, for example by making available and explicit the methods and assumptions underlying each model, associated limitations, and the process of validation. This can be achieved by consultation and training with the intended users, and by allowing access to the workings of the models, and their underlying assumptions (e.g. via the internet, to show how they actually work. Summary Constructive discussion and education will help build a consensus on the purposes of STI services, the need for service planning to

  3. Integrating Pharmacophore into Membrane Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Improve Homology Modeling of G Protein-coupled Receptors with Ligand Selectivity: A2A Adenosine Receptor as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingxiao; Guan, Mengxin; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-12-01

    Homology modeling has been applied to fill in the gap in experimental G protein-coupled receptors structure determination. However, achievement of G protein-coupled receptors homology models with ligand selectivity remains challenging due to structural diversity of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work, we propose a novel strategy by integrating pharmacophore and membrane molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to improve homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors with ligand selectivity. To validate this integrated strategy, the A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR), whose structures in both active and inactive states have been established, has been chosen as an example. We performed blind predictions of the active-state A2A AR structure based on the inactive-state structure and compared the performance of different refinement strategies. The blind prediction model combined with the integrated strategy identified ligand-receptor interactions and conformational changes of key structural elements related to the activation of A2 A AR, including (i) the movements of intracellular ends of TM3 and TM5/TM6; (ii) the opening of ionic lock; (iii) the movements of binding site residues. The integrated strategy of pharmacophore with molecular dynamics simulations can aid in the optimization in the identification of side chain conformations in receptor models. This strategy can be further investigated in homology modeling and expand its applicability to other G protein-coupled receptor modeling, which should aid in the discovery of more effective and selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Exploiting Human Resource Requirements to Infer Human Movement Patterns for Use in Modelling Disease Transmission Systems: An Example from Eastern Province, Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Alderton

    Full Text Available In this research, an agent-based model (ABM was developed to generate human movement routes between homes and water resources in a rural setting, given commonly available geospatial datasets on population distribution, land cover and landscape resources. ABMs are an object-oriented computational approach to modelling a system, focusing on the interactions of autonomous agents, and aiming to assess the impact of these agents and their interactions on the system as a whole. An A* pathfinding algorithm was implemented to produce walking routes, given data on the terrain in the area. A* is an extension of Dijkstra's algorithm with an enhanced time performance through the use of heuristics. In this example, it was possible to impute daily activity movement patterns to the water resource for all villages in a 75 km long study transect across the Luangwa Valley, Zambia, and the simulated human movements were statistically similar to empirical observations on travel times to the water resource (Chi-squared, 95% confidence interval. This indicates that it is possible to produce realistic data regarding human movements without costly measurement as is commonly achieved, for example, through GPS, or retrospective or real-time diaries. The approach is transferable between different geographical locations, and the product can be useful in providing an insight into human movement patterns, and therefore has use in many human exposure-related applications, specifically epidemiological research in rural areas, where spatial heterogeneity in the disease landscape, and space-time proximity of individuals, can play a crucial role in disease spread.

  5. A Finite Difference, Semi-implicit, Equation-of-State Efficient Algorithm for the Compositional Flow Modeling in the Subsurface: Numerical Examples

    KAUST Repository

    Saavedra, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    The mathematical model that has been recognized to have the more accurate approximation to the physical laws govern subsurface hydrocarbon flow in reservoirs is the Compositional Model. The features of this model are adequate to describe not only the performance of a multiphase system but also to represent the transport of chemical species in a porous medium. Its importance relies not only on its current relevance to simulate petroleum extraction processes, such as, Primary, Secondary, and Enhanced Oil Recovery Process (EOR) processes but also, in the recent years, carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the subsurface compositional flow under isothermal conditions for several oil well cases. While simultaneously addressing computational implementation finesses to contribute to the efficiency of the algorithm. This study provides the theoretical framework and computational implementation subtleties of an IMplicit Pressure Explicit Composition (IMPEC)-Volume-balance (VB), two-phase, equation-of-state, approach to model isothermal compositional flow based on the finite difference scheme. The developed model neglects capillary effects and diffusion. From the phase equilibrium premise, the model accounts for volumetric performances of the phases, compressibility of the phases, and composition-dependent viscosities. The Equation of State (EoS) employed to approximate the hydrocarbons behaviour is the Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR-EOS). Various numerical examples were simulated. The numerical results captured the complex physics involved, i.e., compositional, gravitational, phase-splitting, viscosity and relative permeability effects. Regarding the numerical scheme, a phase-volumetric-flux estimation eases the calculation of phase velocities by naturally fitting to phase-upstream-upwinding. And contributes to a faster computation and an efficient programming development.

  6. Operational modelling to guide implementation and scale-up of diagnostic tests within the health system: exploring opportunities for parasitic disease diagnostics based on example application for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Ivor; Adams, Emily; Doulla, Basra; Squire, S Bertel

    2014-12-01

    Research and innovation in the diagnosis of infectious and parasitic diseases has led to the development of several promising diagnostic tools, for example in malaria there is extensive literature concerning the use of rapid diagnostic tests. This means policymakers in many low and middle income countries need to make difficult decisions about which of the recommended tools and approaches to implement and scale-up. The test characteristics (e.g. sensitivity and specificity) of the tools alone are not a sufficient basis on which to make these decisions as policymakers need to also consider the best combination of tools, whether the new tools should complement or replace existing diagnostics and who should be tested. Diagnostic strategies need dovetailing to different epidemiology and structural resource constraints (e.g. existing diagnostic pathways, human resources and laboratory capacity). We propose operational modelling to assist with these complex decisions. Projections of patient, health system and cost impacts are essential and operational modelling of the relevant elements of the health system could provide these projections and support rational decisions. We demonstrate how the technique of operational modelling applied in the developing world to support decisions on diagnostics for tuberculosis, could in a parallel way, provide useful insights to support implementation of appropriate diagnostic innovations for parasitic diseases.

  7. A fully-stochasticized, age-structured population model for population viability analysis of fish: Lower Missouri River endangered pallid sturgeon example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Albers, Janice; Green, Nicholas; Moran, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a fully-stochasticized, age-structured population model suitable for population viability analysis (PVA) of fish and demonstrate its use with the endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) of the Lower Missouri River as an example. The model incorporates three levels of variance: parameter variance (uncertainty about the value of a parameter itself) applied at the iteration level, temporal variance (uncertainty caused by random environmental fluctuations over time) applied at the time-step level, and implicit individual variance (uncertainty caused by differences between individuals) applied within the time-step level. We found that population dynamics were most sensitive to survival rates, particularly age-2+ survival, and to fecundity-at-length. The inclusion of variance (unpartitioned or partitioned), stocking, or both generally decreased the influence of individual parameters on population growth rate. The partitioning of variance into parameter and temporal components had a strong influence on the importance of individual parameters, uncertainty of model predictions, and quasiextinction risk (i.e., pallid sturgeon population size falling below 50 age-1+ individuals). Our findings show that appropriately applying variance in PVA is important when evaluating the relative importance of parameters, and reinforce the need for better and more precise estimates of crucial life-history parameters for pallid sturgeon.

  8. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyeshmerni, Daniel; Froehlich, James B; Lewin, Jack; Eagle, Kim A

    2014-07-01

    Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act.

  9. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alyeshmerni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA, and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act.

  10. Model of converting tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge on the example of R&D department of the manufacturing company, including evaluation of knowledge workers' usefulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Śliwa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to create a model of converting tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge with Bayes algorithm for the research and development department in a manufacturing company. Based on the reference works, there have been proposed the characteristics of knowledge conversion process, with the focus on the factors supporting sharing tacit knowledge. The sources of tacit knowledge in the research and development department in a manufacturing company were identified, and then mechanisms of its collection were proposed. As a result, Bayes algorithm was implemented to perform the conversion process of the collected tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge. By stimulating knowledge workers to share tacit knowledge, the organisation increases its know-how value, by formalized specialist knowledge available for other procedures. The model is illustrated by the example of business practice. As a result, it is assumed to receive measurable benefits, i.e. reductions of cost, corrections, complaints and faster completion of a similar project, optimal selection of workers. It presents directions for further work, including the IT implementation of the presented model and its verification.

  11. Hierarchical stochastic modeling of large river ecosystems and fish growth across spatio-temporal scales and climate models: the Missouri River endangered pallid sturgeon example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Wikle, Christopher K.; Moran, Edward H.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Franz, Kristie J.; Dey, Rima

    2017-01-01

    We present a hierarchical series of spatially decreasing and temporally increasing models to evaluate the uncertainty in the atmosphere – ocean global climate model (AOGCM) and the regional climate model (RCM) relative to the uncertainty in the somatic growth of the endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). For effects on fish populations of riverine ecosystems, cli- mate output simulated by coarse-resolution AOGCMs and RCMs must be downscaled to basins to river hydrology to population response. One needs to transfer the information from these climate simulations down to the individual scale in a way that minimizes extrapolation and can account for spatio-temporal variability in the intervening stages. The goal is a framework to determine whether, given uncertainties in the climate models and the biological response, meaningful inference can still be made. The non-linear downscaling of climate information to the river scale requires that one realistically account for spatial and temporal variability across scale. Our down- scaling procedure includes the use of fixed/calibrated hydrological flow and temperature models coupled with a stochastically parameterized sturgeon bioenergetics model. We show that, although there is a large amount of uncertainty associated with both the climate model output and the fish growth process, one can establish significant differences in fish growth distributions between models, and between future and current climates for a given model.

  12. A simple geometric validation approach to assess the basic behaviour of space- and time- distributed models of epidemic spread - an example using the Ontario rabies model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, A; Berthiaume, P; Richer, J; Tinline, R; Bigras-Poulin, M

    2014-04-01

    Dynamic mathematical modelling and stochastic simulation of disease-host systems for the purpose of epidemiological analysis offer great opportunities for testing hypotheses, especially when field experiments are impractical or when there is a need to evaluate multiple experimental scenarios. This, combined with the ever increasing computer power available to researchers, has contributed to the development of many mathematical models for epidemic simulations, such as the individual-based model (IBM). Nevertheless, few of these models undergo extensive validation and proper assessment of intrinsic variability. The Ontario rabies model (ORM) will be used here to exemplify some advantages of appropriate model behaviour validation and to illustrate the use of a simple geometric procedure for testing directional bias in distributed stochastic dynamic model of spread of diseases. Results were obtained through the comparison of 10 000 epizootics resulting from 100 epidemic simulations started using 100 distinct base populations. The analysis results demonstrated a significant directional bias in epidemic dispersion, which prompted further verification of the model code and the identification of a coding error, which was then corrected. Subsequent testing of the corrected code showed that the directional bias could no longer be detected. These results illustrate the importance of proper validation and the importance of sufficient knowledge of the model behaviour to ensure the results will not confound the objectives of the end-users.

  13. Scenario tree model for animal disease freedom framed in the OIE context using the example of a generic swine model for Aujeszky's disease in commercial swine in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jette; Vallières, André

    2016-01-01

    "Freedom from animal disease" is an ambiguous concept that may have a different meaning in trade and science. For trade alone, there are different levels of freedom from OIE listed diseases. A country can: be recognized by OIE to be "officially free"; self-declare freedom, with no official recognition by the OIE; or report animal disease as absent (no occurrence) in six-monthly reports. In science, we apply scenario tree models to calculate the probability of a population being free from disease at a given prevalence to provide evidence of freedom from animal disease. Here, we link science with application by describing how a scenario tree model may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease. We combine the idea of a standardized presentation of scenario tree models for disease freedom and having a similar model for two different animal diseases to suggest that a simple generic model may help veterinary authorities to build and evaluate scenario tree models for disease freedom. Here, we aim to develop a generic scenario tree model for disease freedom that is: animal species specific, population specific, and has a simple structure. The specific objectives were: to explore the levels of freedom described in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code; to describe how scenario tree models may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease; and to present a generic swine scenario tree model for disease freedom in Canada's domestic (commercial) swine applied to Aujeszky's disease (AD). In particular, to explore how historical survey data, and data mining may affect the probability of freedom and to explore different sampling strategies. Finally, to frame the generic scenario tree model in the context of Canada's claim of freedom from AD. We found that scenario tree models are useful to support a country's claim of freedom either as "recognized officially free" or as part of a self-declaration but the models should not stand alone in a

  14. Automating calibration, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of complex models using the R package Flexible Modeling Environment (FME): SWAT as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, S.

    2012-01-01

    Parameter optimization and uncertainty issues are a great challenge for the application of large environmental models like the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which is a physically-based hydrological model for simulating water and nutrient cycles at the watershed scale. In this study, we present a comprehensive modeling environment for SWAT, including automated calibration, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities through integration with the R package Flexible Modeling Environment (FME). To address challenges (e.g., calling the model in R and transferring variables between Fortran and R) in developing such a two-language coupling framework, 1) we converted the Fortran-based SWAT model to an R function (R-SWAT) using the RFortran platform, and alternatively 2) we compiled SWAT as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL). We then wrapped SWAT (via R-SWAT) with FME to perform complex applications including parameter identifiability, inverse modeling, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in the R environment. The final R-SWAT-FME framework has the following key functionalities: automatic initialization of R, running Fortran-based SWAT and R commands in parallel, transferring parameters and model output between SWAT and R, and inverse modeling with visualization. To examine this framework and demonstrate how it works, a case study simulating streamflow in the Cedar River Basin in Iowa in the United Sates was used, and we compared it with the built-in auto-calibration tool of SWAT in parameter optimization. Results indicate that both methods performed well and similarly in searching a set of optimal parameters. Nonetheless, the R-SWAT-FME is more attractive due to its instant visualization, and potential to take advantage of other R packages (e.g., inverse modeling and statistical graphics). The methods presented in the paper are readily adaptable to other model applications that require capability for automated calibration, and sensitivity and uncertainty

  15. Evaluating litter decomposition in earth system models with long-term litterbag experiments: an example using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Gordon B; Hartman, Melannie D; Parton, William J; Wieder, William R

    2013-03-01

    Decomposition is a large term in the global carbon budget, but models of the earth system that simulate carbon cycle-climate feedbacks are largely untested with respect to litter decomposition. We tested the litter decomposition parameterization of the community land model version 4 (CLM4), the terrestrial component of the community earth system model, with data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET). The LIDET dataset is a 10-year study of litter decomposition at multiple sites across North America and Central America. We performed 10-year litter decomposition simulations comparable with LIDET for 9 litter types and 20 sites in tundra, grassland, and boreal, conifer, deciduous, and tropical forest biomes using the LIDET-provided climatic decomposition index to constrain temperature and moisture effects on decomposition. We performed additional simulations with DAYCENT, a version of the CENTURY model, to ask how well an established ecosystem model matches the observations. The results show large discrepancy between the laboratory microcosm studies used to parameterize the CLM4 litter decomposition and the LIDET field study. Simulated carbon loss is more rapid than the observations across all sites, and nitrogen immobilization is biased high. Closer agreement with the observations requires much lower decomposition rates, obtained with the assumption that soil mineral nitrogen severely limits decomposition. DAYCENT better replicates the observations, for both carbon mass remaining and nitrogen, independent of nitrogen limitation. CLM4 has low soil carbon in global earth system simulations. These results suggest that this bias arises, in part, from too rapid litter decomposition. More broadly, the terrestrial biogeochemistry of earth system models must be critically tested with observations, and the consequences of particular model choices must be documented. Long-term litter decomposition experiments such as LIDET provide a real

  16. Modelagua, a new interactive program of inverse mass-balance model for hydrogeochemical studies -- an example of its application in Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, P.; Fagundo, J.; Fagundo, R.; Suárez, M.; Melian, C.; Cortes, A.; Ramos, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    The geochemical models consists on the application of physical-chemical principles to the interpretation of hydrogeochemical systems. This methodology has been developed according to two approaches: a) the inverse one, mass-balance, that uses a well-known data of the chemical composition of the water and the rock with the objective of identifying in a quantitative way the geochemical reactions that give origin to this composition, and b) the direct one that in the basis of some well-known initial conditions of the water-rock system, it predicts the characteristics of the resulting solution of the performance of hypothetical chemical reactions. With the reference of interactive programs such as BALANCE and NETPATH, for modelling net geochemical mass-balance reactions between an initial and final water along a hydrologic flow path, which also computes the mixing proportion of two initial waters and net geochemical reactions that can account for the observed composition of a final water, an interactive program of inverse model has been developed (MODELAGUA) that not only allow starting from well-known data of the chemical composition of the water and the rock to identify in a quantitative way the geochemical reactions that give origin to this composition, but allow to do analysis of mixture of waters and net geochemical reactions that can account for the observed composition of a final water, making use of natural tracer whose geochemical behavior allows them to be used as conservative ions. In this work is presented MODELAGUA, as a new interactive program of inverse model mass-balance and an example in Aguascalientes, Mexico of its application.

  17. THE APPLICATION OF TYPOLOGY METHOD IN HISTORICAL BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING (HBIM TAKING THE INFORMATION SURVEYING AND MAPPING OF JIAYUGUAN FORTRESS TOWN AS AN EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the promotion of fine degree of the heritage building surveying and mapping, building information modelling technology(BIM begins to be used in surveying and mapping, renovation, recording and research of heritage building, called historical building information modelling(HBIM. The hierarchical frameworks of parametric component library of BIM, belonging to the same type with the same parameters, has the same internal logic with archaeological typology which is more and more popular in the age identification of ancient buildings. Compared with the common materials, 2D drawings and photos, typology with HBIM has two advantages — (1 comprehensive building information both in collection and representation and (2 uniform and reasonable classification criteria This paper will take the information surveying and mapping of Jiayuguan Fortress Town as an example to introduce the field work method of information surveying and mapping based on HBIM technology and the construction of Revit family library.And then in order to prove the feasibility and advantage of HBIM technology used in typology method, this paper will identify the age of Guanghua gate tower, Rouyuan gate tower, Wenchang pavilion and the theater building of Jiayuguan Fortress Town with HBIM technology and typology method.

  18. Social stress in tree shrews as an animal model of depression: an example of a behavioral model of a CNS disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Eberhard

    2005-03-01

    Animal models are invaluable in preclinical research on human psychopathology. Valid animal models to study the pathophysiology of depression and specific biological and behavioral responses to antidepressant drug treatments are of prime interest. In order to improve our knowledge of the causal mechanisms of stress-related disorders such as depression, we need animal models that mirror the situation seen in patients. One promising model is the chronic psychosocial stress paradigm in male tree shrews. Coexistence of two males in visual and olfactory contact leads to a stable dominant/subordinate relationship, with the subordinates showing obvious changes in behavioral, neuroendocrine, and central nervous activity that are similar to the signs and symptoms observed during episodes of depression in patients. To discover whether this model, besides its "face validity" for depression, also has "predictive validity," we treated subordinate animals with the tricyclic antidepressant clomipramine and found a time-dependent recovery of both endocrine function and normal behavior. In contrast, the anxiolytic diazepam was ineffective. Chronic psychosocial stress in male tree shrews significantly decreased hippocampal volume and the proliferation rate of the granule precursor cells in the dentate gyrus. These stress-induced changes can be prevented by treating the animals with clomipramine, tianeptine, or the selective neurokinin receptor antagonist L-760,735. In addition to its apparent face and predictive validity, the tree shrew model also has a "molecular validity" due to the degradation routes of psychotropic compounds and gene sequences of receptors are very similar to those in humans. Although further research is required to validate this model fully, it provides an adequate and interesting non-rodent experimental paradigm for preclinical research on depression.

  19. On the representation of IAGOS/MOZAIC vertical profiles in chemical transport models: contribution of different error sources in the example of carbon monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Boschetti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Utilising a fleet of commercial airliners, MOZAIC/IAGOS provides atmospheric composition data on a regular basis that are widely used for modelling applications. Due to the specific operational context of the platforms, such observations are collected close to international airports and hence in an environment characterised by high anthropogenic emissions. This provides opportunities for assessing emission inventories of major metropolitan areas around the world, but also challenges in representing the observations in typical chemical transport models. We assess here the contribution of different sources of error to overall model–data mismatch using the example of MOZAIC/IAGOS carbon monoxide (CO profiles collected over the European regional domain in a time window of 5 yr (2006–2011. The different sources of error addressed in the present study are: 1 mismatch in modelled and observed mixed layer height; 2 bias in emission fluxes and 3 spatial representation error (related to unresolved spatial variations in emissions. The modelling framework combines a regional Lagrangian transport model (STILT with EDGARv4.3 emission inventory and lateral boundary conditions from the MACC reanalysis. The representation error was derived by coupling STILT with emission fluxes aggregated to different spatial resolutions. We also use the MACC reanalysis to assess uncertainty related to uncertainty sources 2 and 3. We treat the random and the bias components of the uncertainty separately and found that 1 and 3 have a comparable impact on the random component for both models, while 2 is far less important. On the other hand, the bias component shows comparable impacts from each source of uncertainty, despite both models being affected by a low bias of a factor of 2–2.5 in the emission fluxes. In addition, we suggested methods to correct for biases in emission fluxes and in mixing heights. Lastly, the evaluation of the spatial representation error against

  20. Example based painting generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan-wen; YU Jin-hui; XU Xiao-dong; WANG Jin; PENG Qun-sheng

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach for generating paintings on photographic images with the style encoded by the example paintings and adopt representative brushes extracted from the example paintings as the painting primitives. Our system first divides the given photographic image into several regions on which we synthesize a grounding layer with texture patches extracted from the example paintings. Then, we paint those regions using brushes stochastically chosen from the brush library, with further brush color and shape perturbations. The brush direction is determined by a direction field either constructed by a convenient user interactive manner or synthesized from the examples. Our approach offers flexible and intuitive user control over the painting process and style.

  1. Modeling planetary seismic data for icy worlds and terrestrial planets with AxiSEM/Instaseis: Example data and a model for the Europa noise environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panning, Mark Paul; Stähler, Simon; Kedar, Sharon; van Driel, Martin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Vance, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Seismology is one of our best tools for detailing interior structure of planetary bodies, and seismometers are likely to be considered for future lander missions to other planetary bodies after the planned landing of InSight on Mars in 2018. In order to guide instrument design and mission requirements, however, it is essential to model likely seismic signals in advance to determine the most promising data needed to meet science goals. Seismic data for multiple planetary bodies can now be simulated rapidly for arbitrary source-receiver configurations to frequencies of 1 Hz and above using the numerical wave propagation codes AxiSEM and Instaseis (van Driel et al., 2015) using 1D models derived from thermodynamic constraints (e.g. Cammarano et al., 2006). We present simulations for terrestrial planets and icy worlds to demonstrate the types of seismic signals we may expect to retrieve. We also show an application that takes advantage of the computational strengths of this method to construct a model of the thermal cracking noise environment for Europa under a range of assumptions of activity levels and elastic and anelastic structure.M. van Driel, L. Krischer, S.C. Stähler, K. Hosseini, and T. Nissen-Meyer (2015), "Instaseis: instant global seismograms based on a broadband waveform database," Solid Earth, 6, 701-717, doi: 10.5194/se-6-701-2015.F. Cammarano, V. Lekic, M. Manga, M.P. Panning, and B.A. Romanowicz (2006), "Long-period seismology on Europa: 1. Physically consistent interior models," J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12009, doi: 10.1029/2006JE002710.

  2. A Transcultural Model of the Centrality of "Thinking a Lot" in Psychopathologies Across the Globe and the Process of Localization: A Cambodian Refugee Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Barlow, David H; Reis, Ria; de Jong, Joop

    2016-12-01

    We present a general model of why "thinking a lot" is a key presentation of distress in many cultures and examine how "thinking a lot" plays out in the Cambodian cultural context. We argue that the complaint of "thinking a lot" indicates the presence of a certain causal network of psychopathology that is found across cultures, but that this causal network is localized in profound ways. We show, using a Cambodian example, that examining "thinking a lot" in a cultural context is a key way of investigating the local bio-cultural ontology of psychopathology. Among Cambodian refugees, a typical episode of "thinking a lot" begins with ruminative-type negative cognitions, in particular worry and depressive thoughts. Next these negative cognitions may induce mental symptoms (e.g., poor concentration, forgetfulness, and "zoning out") and somatic symptoms (e.g., migraine headache, migraine-like blurry vision such as scintillating scotomas, dizziness, palpitations). Subsequently the very fact of "thinking a lot" and the induced symptoms may give rise to multiple catastrophic cognitions. Soon, as distress escalates, in a kind of looping, other negative cognitions such as trauma memories may be triggered. All these processes are highly shaped by the Cambodian socio-cultural context. The article shows that Cambodian trauma survivors have a locally specific illness reality that centers on dynamic episodes of "thinking a lot," or on what might be called the "thinking a lot" causal network.

  3. Mixed and Penalty Finite Element Models for the Nonlinear Behavior of Biphasic Soft Tissues in Finite Deformation: Part II - Nonlinear Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, EDGARD S.; Spilker, ROBERT L.

    1998-01-01

    This two-part paper addresses finite element-based computational models for the three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear analysis of soft hydrated tissues, such as articular cartilage in diarthrodial joints, under physiologically relevant loading conditions. A biphasic continuum description is used to represent the soft tissue as a two-phase mixture of incompressible inviscid fluid and a hyperelastic, transversely isotropic solid. Alternate mixed-penalty and velocity-pressure finite element formulations are used to solve the nonlinear biphasic governing equations, including the effects of strain-dependent permeability and a hyperelastic solid phase under finite deformation. The resulting first-order, nonlinear system of equations is discretized in time using an implicit finite difference scheme, and solved using the Newton-Raphson method. Details of the formulations were presented in Part I [1]. In Part II, the two formulations are used to develop two-dimensional (2-D) quadrilateral and triangular elements and three-dimensional (3-D) hexahedral and tetrahedral elements. Numerical examples, including those representative of soft tissue material testing and simple human joints, are used to validate the formulations and to illustrate their applications. A focus of this work is the comparison of the alternate formulations for nonlinear problems. While it is demonstrated that both formulations produce a range of converging elements, the velocity-pressure formulation is found to be more efficient computationally.

  4. Geomatic 3d Modeling of a Statue (also) for Structural Analysis and Risk Evaluation: the Example of San Giovannino Martelli in Florence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangher, A.; Visintini, D.; Tucci, G.; Bonora, V.

    2017-05-01

    This work has been developed among the researches of a PhD thesis in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture of the University of Udine in cooperation with the GECO Laboratory of the University of Florence. It focuses on the interaction between Geomatics and Structural Analysis, both applied to cultural heritage, and expressly to artefacts and structures in stone materials, like the case study of this paper, the marble statue called "San Giovannino Martelli" (Saint John the Baptist) conserved in Florence. At the beginning, some interesting examples of surveying and structural analyses on statues are reported, in order to remind the complementary tasks and requirements of geomatics and structural analysis. Current laser scanning systems can accurately survey the geometry of a statue or any cultural heritage artefact, essential to understand their structural behaviour and resilience capability. Afterwards, following the few Italian regulations in this field, the possible risks of museum goods are described: topics of this part are more familiar for structural engineers as object classification, seismic reactions, damage mechanisms, possible movements (adherent, slipping and oscillation), dynamic domains, anyway necessary steps to evaluate the risk and so to define eventual interventions. The artistic description of the statue, its debated attribution to Donatello or/and to Desiderio da Settignano and its history is later recalled, remembering that the surveying has been done for the idea to 3D print a replica and to place it in the original place. Having used a close range laser scanner, the obtained 3D model has an impressive geometrical Level of Detail (LoD), whose geometric features are explained in the paper, underlying that such extremely detailed mesh is directly given as output from the laser scanner software. The model simplifications by four decimation are therefore explained and also changes to geometry, like shifts on centre of the mass or

  5. GEOMATIC 3D MODELING OF A STATUE (ALSO FOR STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AND RISK EVALUATION: THE EXAMPLE OF SAN GIOVANNINO MARTELLI IN FLORENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spangher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work has been developed among the researches of a PhD thesis in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture of the University of Udine in cooperation with the GECO Laboratory of the University of Florence. It focuses on the interaction between Geomatics and Structural Analysis, both applied to cultural heritage, and expressly to artefacts and structures in stone materials, like the case study of this paper, the marble statue called “San Giovannino Martelli” (Saint John the Baptist conserved in Florence. At the beginning, some interesting examples of surveying and structural analyses on statues are reported, in order to remind the complementary tasks and requirements of geomatics and structural analysis. Current laser scanning systems can accurately survey the geometry of a statue or any cultural heritage artefact, essential to understand their structural behaviour and resilience capability. Afterwards, following the few Italian regulations in this field, the possible risks of museum goods are described: topics of this part are more familiar for structural engineers as object classification, seismic reactions, damage mechanisms, possible movements (adherent, slipping and oscillation, dynamic domains, anyway necessary steps to evaluate the risk and so to define eventual interventions. The artistic description of the statue, its debated attribution to Donatello or/and to Desiderio da Settignano and its history is later recalled, remembering that the surveying has been done for the idea to 3D print a replica and to place it in the original place. Having used a close range laser scanner, the obtained 3D model has an impressive geometrical Level of Detail (LoD, whose geometric features are explained in the paper, underlying that such extremely detailed mesh is directly given as output from the laser scanner software. The model simplifications by four decimation are therefore explained and also changes to geometry, like shifts on

  6. Standard model parameters and the search for new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1988-04-01

    In these lectures, my aim is to present an up-to-date status report on the standard model and some key tests of electroweak unification. Within that context, I also discuss how and where hints of new physics may emerge. To accomplish those goals, I have organized my presentation as follows: I discuss the standard model parameters with particular emphasis on the gauge coupling constants and vector boson masses. Examples of new physics appendages are also briefly commented on. In addition, because these lectures are intended for students and thus somewhat pedagogical, I have included an appendix on dimensional regularization and a simple computational example that employs that technique. Next, I focus on weak charged current phenomenology. Precision tests of the standard model are described and up-to-date values for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing matrix parameters are presented. Constraints implied by those tests for a 4th generation, supersymmetry, extra Z/prime/ bosons, and compositeness are also discussed. I discuss weak neutral current phenomenology and the extraction of sin/sup 2/ /theta//sub W/ from experiment. The results presented there are based on a recently completed global analysis of all existing data. I have chosen to concentrate that discussion on radiative corrections, the effect of a heavy top quark mass, and implications for grand unified theories (GUTS). The potential for further experimental progress is also commented on. I depart from the narrowest version of the standard model and discuss effects of neutrino masses and mixings. I have chosen to concentrate on oscillations, the Mikheyev-Smirnov- Wolfenstein (MSW) effect, and electromagnetic properties of neutrinos. On the latter topic, I will describe some recent work on resonant spin-flavor precession. Finally, I conclude with a prospectus on hopes for the future. 76 refs.

  7. Time Series Analysis and Forecasting by Example

    CERN Document Server

    Bisgaard, Soren

    2011-01-01

    An intuition-based approach enables you to master time series analysis with ease Time Series Analysis and Forecasting by Example provides the fundamental techniques in time series analysis using various examples. By introducing necessary theory through examples that showcase the discussed topics, the authors successfully help readers develop an intuitive understanding of seemingly complicated time series models and their implications. The book presents methodologies for time series analysis in a simplified, example-based approach. Using graphics, the authors discuss each presented example in

  8. Debris-flow susceptibility assessment through cellular automata modeling: an example from 15–16 December 1999 disaster at Cervinara and San Martino Valle Caudina (Campania, southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Iovine

    2003-01-01

    volume for these new cases has been estimated by considering the actual statistics of the 1999 landslides. Finally, by merging the results of simulations, a deterministic susceptibility zonation of the considered area has been obtained. In this paper, aiming at illustrating the potential for debris-flow hazard analyses of the model SCIDDICA S3–hex, a methodological example of susceptibility zonation of the Vallicelle HR-zone is presented.

  9. Debris-flow susceptibility assessment through cellular automata modeling: an example from 15Â 16 December 1999 disaster at Cervinara and San Martino Valle Caudina (Campania, southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, G.; di Gregorio, S.; Lupiano, V.

    has been estimated by considering the actual statistics of the 1999 landslides. Finally, by merging the results of simulations, a deterministic susceptibility zonation of the considered area has been obtained. In this paper, aiming at illustrating the potential for debris-flow hazard analyses of the model SCIDDICA S3-hex, a methodological example of susceptibility zonation of the Vallicelle HR-zone is presented.

  10. DOAS evaluation of volcanic SO2 using a modeled background spectrum: Examples from the NOVAC stations at Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) and Tungurahua (Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübcke, Peter; Lampel, Johannes; Bobrowski, Nicole; Arellano, Santiago; Galle, Bo; Garzón, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Silvana; Vogel, Leif; Warnach, Simon; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    SO2 emission rates are monitored using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV at an increasing number of volcano observatories. The Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) has currently installed 80 scanning DOAS instruments at 30 volcanoes world-wide. One important question for the evaluation of spectra using DOAS is the availability of background spectra that are not influenced by volcanic gas emissions. An SO2 contaminated background spectrum would lead to a negative offset of the retrieved SO2 column densities, and thus to an underestimation of the volcanic SO2 emission rate. In NOVAC this problem is approached by performing a scan, e.g. through a plane from one horizon to the other horizon, and defining the average of the 20% spectra with the lowest SO2 content as the zero-baseline value, which is assumed to be gas free. To verify this assumption we revisit the idea of evaluating spectra using the DOAS method with a modeled background spectrum based on a high-resolution solar atlas. One challenge when evaluating spectra with a modeled background spectrum is properly accounting for instrumental effects that are usually removed when calculating the measured optical density relative to a measured background spectrum. We present our approach to handle these instrumental effects, showing that we gain a similar fit quality to the method using a measured reference spectrum. For example, wavelength dependent structures in the spectrum due to the spectrometer (e.g., quantum efficiency of the detector and grating efficiency) were identified with help of a principal component analysis of an SO2 free subset of the residual spectra. These structures were included in a second iteration of the fit in order to improve the evaluation. We further discuss influences like strong ozone absorption and the instrument temperature on the quality of the SO2 fit using a modeled background spectrum. The new evaluation scheme was applied

  11. Regression analysis by example

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Samprit

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Fourth Edition: ""This book is . . . an excellent source of examples for regression analysis. It has been and still is readily readable and understandable."" -Journal of the American Statistical Association Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition has been expanded

  12. Code query by example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  13. Ramada, A Successful Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>After entry into the WTO, China’s hotels are being challenged by the global economy and overseas counterparts. They should seek creation and development to fight against the fierce competition. Ramada Pudong Hotel, managed by the Shanghai Airport Group Civil Aviation Property Company Ltd, has become a successful example in creative management.

  14. Infrared design examples

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, William L

    1999-01-01

    This tutorial covers infrared design examples in considerable detail, building on principles presented in an earlier text, 'Introduction to Infrared System Design' (SPIE PRESS Vol. TT24). The text explores a range of problems illustrating several design issues, with applications in military, industry, aeronautics, space, and medicine, among others.

  15. Example based style classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of analysis of families of shapes which can be classified according to two categories: the main one corresponding usually to the coarse shape which we call the function and the more subtle one which we call the style. The style and the function both contribute to the overall...... shape which makes the general analysis and retrieval of such shapes more challenging. Also there is no single way of defining the style as this depends much on the context of the family of shapes used for the analysis. That is why the definition needs to be given through the examples. The straight...... this similarity should be reflected across different functions. We show the usability of our methods first on the example of a number of chess sets which our method helps sort. Next, we investigate the problem of finding a replacement for a missing tooth given a database of teeth....

  16. Neutrosophic Examples in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuhua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophy can be widely applied in physics and the like. For example, one of the reasons for 2011 Nobel Prize for physics is "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae", but according to neutrosophy, there exist seven or nine states of accelerating expansion and contraction and the neutrosophic state in the universe. Another two examples are "a revision to Gödel's incompleteness theorem by neutrosophy" and "six neutral (neutrosophic fundamental interactions". In addition, the "partial and temporary unified theory so far" is discussed (including "partial and temporary unified electromagnetic theory so far", "partial and temporary unified gravitational theory so far", "partial and temporary unified theory of four fundamental interactions so far", and "partial and temporary unified theory of natural science so far".

  17. PAC-Learning from General Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Hoeffgen, K.- U.; Lefmann, H.

    1997-01-01

    We study a novel view on the PAC learning model in which the examples are more complicated than in the standard model. There, an example usually is an element of the learning domain and its label indicates whether it belongs to the target concept. Here, the examples can be subsets and their labels...... or bounding the relative dimension leads to interesting combinatorial problems even for simple target and sample classes. Sometimes the analysis is easier if one represents the concepts as unions or intersections of simpler ones. We present sharp bounds on the relative and the Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension...

  18. Procedure and Program Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britz, Dieter

    Here some modules, procedures and whole programs are described, that may be useful to the reader, as they have been, to the author. They are all in Fortran 90/95 and start with a generally useful module, that will be used in most procedures and programs in the examples, and another module useful for programs using a Rosenbrock variant. The source texts (except for the two modules) are not reproduced here, but can be downloaded from the web site www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=issue &issn=1616-6361&volume=666 (the two lines form one contiguous URL!).

  19. Atomic force microscopy and cells: Indentation profiles around the AFM tip, cell shape changes, and other examples of experimental factors affecting modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzak, Kathryn A; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-07-01

    We use atomic force microscopy in conjunction with a fluorescence microscope capable of optical sectioning to acquire images of white blood cells while force is applied with the AFM tip. The indentation profile within the cell is compared to the profile of the AFM tip: examples are shown for indentations at the center of the cell which are reasonable matches to the tip profile, and an additional example is shown for an indentation that is on the tilted side of a highly rounded cell and that differs from the tip shape. We also demonstrate that the AFM tip can interact with internal cell structures, we show that the contact area between the cell and the substrate can increase under applied pressure, that the main body of the cell can fuse with the extended lamellipodium, and that the cell can be displaced laterally by the AFM tip. The features illustrated here are relevant to the interpretation of indentation experiments that measure cell elasticity properties, as is discussed briefly.

  20. Performance Assessment and Translation of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models from acslX™ to Berkeley Madonna™, MATLAB®, and R language: Oxytetracycline and Gold Nanoparticles as Case Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; He, Chunla; Jin, Shiqiang; Yang, Raymond S H; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-04-08

    Many physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for environmental chemicals, drugs, and nanomaterials have been developed to aid risk and safety assessments using acslXTM. However, acslXTM has been rendered sunset since November 2015. Alternative modeling tools and tutorials are needed for future PBPK applications. This forum article aimed to: (1) demonstrate the performance of four PBPK modeling software packages (acslXTM, Berkeley MadonnaTM, MATLAB®, and R language) tested using two existing models (oxytetracycline and gold nanoparticles); (2) provide a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion from acslXTM to Berkeley MadonnaTM, MATLAB®, and R language; (3) discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each software package in the implementation of PBPK models in toxicology, and (4) share our perspective about future direction in this field. Simulation results of plasma/tissue concentrations/amounts of oxytetracycline and gold from different models were compared visually and statistically with linear regression analyses. Simulation results from the original models were correlated well with results from the recoded models, with time-concentration/amount curves nearly superimposable and determination coefficients of 0.86-1.00. Step-by-step explanations of the recoding of the models in different software programs are provided in the Supplementary Data. In summary, this article presents a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion for a small molecule and a nanoparticle among four software packages, and a performance comparison of these software packages in PBPK model implementation. This tutorial helps beginners learn PBPK modeling, provides suggestions for selecting a suitable tool for future projects, and may lead to the transition from acslXTM to alternative modeling tools. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Investigation of the photochemical changes of chlorogenic acids induced by ultraviolet light in model systems and in agricultural practice with Stevia rebaudiana cultivation as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaköse, Hande; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Deshpande, Sagar; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2015-04-08

    Mono- and diacyl chlorogenic acids undergo photochemical trans-cis isomerization under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photochemical equilibrium composition was established for eight selected derivatives. In contrast to all other dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid) undergoes a [2 + 2] photochemical cycloaddition reaction, constituting a first example of Schmidt's law in a natural product family. The relevance of photochemical isomerization in agricultural practice was investigated using 120 samples of Stevia rebaudiana leave samples grown under defined cultivation conditions. Ratios of cis to trans chlorogenic acids were determined in leaf samples and correlated with climatic and harvesting conditions. The data indicate a clear correlation between the formation of cis-caffeoyl derivatives and sunshine hours prior to harvesting and illustrate the relevance of UV exposure to plant material affecting its phytochemical composition.

  2. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH) stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial) and anthropogenic (climate change) forcing. Our models focus on the interval b...

  3. Business models and leadership styles in small medical device and bio-science businesses--examples in a region and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D J; Hourd, P C

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the leadership styles and business models found in small technologically based businesses operating in the healthcare sector within one of the UK regions, the East Midlands. The most frequently encountered business model strands were 1) mixed economies: that fund development with service income; cross-sectoral product portfolios; and decoupled business portfolios led by a single entrepreneur and 2) scale sensitive "stay small" models including the avoidance of venture capital; "early exit"; and virtual business strands. There was found to be little correlation between leadership style and business model for the small number of businesses surveyed. The avoidance of venture capital is in direct contrast to adjacent regions.

  4. Application of geologic-mathematical 3D modeling for complex structure deposits by the example of Lower- Cretaceous period depositions in Western Ust - Balykh oil field (Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous District)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevertailo, T.; Nedolivko, N.; Prisyazhnyuk, O.; Dolgaya, T.

    2015-11-01

    The complex structure of the Lower-Cretaceous formation by the example of the reservoir BC101 in Western Ust - Balykh Oil Field (Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous District) has been studied. Reservoir range relationships have been identified. 3D geologic- mathematical modeling technique considering the heterogeneity and variability of a natural reservoir structure has been suggested. To improve the deposit geological structure integrity methods of mathematical statistics were applied, which, in its turn, made it possible to obtain equal probability models with similar input data and to consider the formation conditions of reservoir rocks and cap rocks.

  5. Performance driven expression mapping based on segmented examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Shuang; ZHANG Qiang; ZHO U Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    We present a method that combines performance-driven method with segmented 3D blendshape models to animate a face. First we prepare key sample examples and corresponding key target examples. Next we segment the whole face into two regions, for each region we reduce dimensionality of source examples using PAC into abstract space which is defined by truncated PCA eigen- vectors. Then for each example we fix the cardinal base function, which can determine the weight of the target example. Finally, in the animation stage we compute the weight of each example for each frame and add the weighted displacement vectors of each re- gion on the general face model.

  6. Statistical properties of fluctuations of time series representing appearances of words in nationwide blog data and their applications: An example of modeling fluctuation scalings of nonstationary time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hayafumi; Sano, Yukie; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2016-11-01

    To elucidate the nontrivial empirical statistical properties of fluctuations of a typical nonsteady time series representing the appearance of words in blogs, we investigated approximately 3 ×109 Japanese blog articles over a period of six years and analyze some corresponding mathematical models. First, we introduce a solvable nonsteady extension of the random diffusion model, which can be deduced by modeling the behavior of heterogeneous random bloggers. Next, we deduce theoretical expressions for both the temporal and ensemble fluctuation scalings of this model, and demonstrate that these expressions can reproduce all empirical scalings over eight orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we show that the model can reproduce other statistical properties of time series representing the appearance of words in blogs, such as functional forms of the probability density and correlations in the total number of blogs. As an application, we quantify the abnormality of special nationwide events by measuring the fluctuation scalings of 1771 basic adjectives.

  7. The Advantages of Parametric Modeling for the Reconstruction of Historic Buildings. The Example of the in War Destroyed Church of ST. Catherine (katharinenkirche) in Nuremberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, M.; Herbst, G.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rutishauser, S.; Zellweger, A.

    2013-02-01

    Consecrated in 1297 as the monastery church of the four years earlier founded St. Catherine's monastery, the Gothic Church of St. Catherine was largely destroyed in a devastating bombing raid on January 2nd 1945. To counteract the process of disintegration, the departments of geo-information and lower monument protection authority of the City of Nuremburg decided to getting done a three dimensional building model of the Church of St. Catherine's. A heterogeneous set of data was used for preparation of a parametric architectural model. In effect the modeling of historic buildings can profit from the so called BIM method (Building Information Modeling), as the necessary structuring of the basic data renders it into very sustainable information. The resulting model is perfectly suited to deliver a vivid impression of the interior and exterior of this former mendicant orders' church to present observers.

  8. Use and impact of usual intake models on dietary exposure estimate and risk assessment of chemical substances: a practical example for cadmium, acrylamide and sulphites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Francesca Romana; Sirot, Véronique; Busani, Luca; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Hulin, Marion

    2015-01-01

    To estimate of food and nutrient intakes, 24-h recalls are frequently used in dietary assessment. However intake data collected for a short period are a limited estimator of long-term usual intake. An important limitation of such data is that the within-person variability tends to inflate the intake distribution leading to a biased estimation of extreme percentiles. Statistical models, named usual-intake models, that separate the within-person variability from the between-persons variability, have lately been implemented. The main objectives of this study were to highlight the potential impact that usual-intake models can have on exposure estimate and risk assessment and to point out which are the key aspects to be considered in order to run these models properly and be sure to interpret the output correctly. To achieve the goal we used the consumption data obtained by the French dietary survey INCA2 and the concentration data collected during the French TDS2, using Monte Carlo Risk Assessment (MCRA) software, release 8.0. For the three substances included in this study (cadmium, acrylamide and sulphites), the exposure of the upper percentiles was significantly reduced when using usual-intake models in comparison with the results obtained in the observed individual mean models, even if in terms of risk assessment the impact of using usual-intake models was limited. From the results it appears that the key aspects to consider when using usual-intake models are: (1) the normality of the log-transformed intake distribution, (2) the contribution per single food group to the total exposure, and (3) the independency of food consumption data on multiple days. In conclusion, usual-intake models may have an impact on exposure estimates although, referring to the results, it did not bring any changes in terms of risk assessment, but further investigations are needed.

  9. Can a deterministic spatial microsimulation model provide reliable small-area estimates of health behaviours? An example of smoking prevalence in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dianna M; Pearce, Jamie R; Harland, Kirk

    2011-03-01

    Models created to estimate neighbourhood level health outcomes and behaviours can be difficult to validate as prevalence is often unknown at the local level. This paper tests the reliability of a spatial microsimulation model, using a deterministic reweighting method, to predict smoking prevalence in small areas across New Zealand. The difference in the prevalence of smoking between those estimated by the model and those calculated from census data is less than 20% in 1745 out of 1760 areas. The accuracy of these results provides users with greater confidence to utilize similar approaches in countries where local-level smoking prevalence is unknown.

  10. Towards multiple hazard resilient bridges: a methodology for modeling frequent and infrequent time-varying loads Part II, Examples for live and earthquake load effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zach; Lee, George C.

    2012-09-01

    The current AASHTO load and resistance factor design (LRFD) guidelines are formulated based on bridge reliability, which interprets traditional design safety factors into more rigorously deduced factors based on the theory of probability. This is a major advancement in bridge design specifications. However, LRFD is only calibrated for dead and live loads. In cases when extreme loads are significant, they need to be individually assessed. Combining regular loads with extreme loads has been a major challenge, mainly because the extreme loads are time variable and cannot be directly combined with time invariant loads to formulate the probability of structural failure. To overcome these difficulties, this paper suggests a methodology of comprehensive reliability, by introducing the concept of partial failure probability to separate the loads so that each individual load combination under a certain condition can be approximated as time invariant. Based on these conditions, the extreme loads (also referred to as multiple hazard or MH loads) can be broken down into single effects. In this paper, a further breakdown of these conditional occurrence probabilities into pure conditions is discussed by using a live truck and earthquake loads on a bridge as an example.

  11. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model - An example from Arabian Sea and Equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.

    in the ocean isopycnal general circulation model (OPYC). A higher abundance of chlorophyll increases absorption of solar irradiance and heating rate in the upper ocean, resulting in decreasing the mixed layer thickness than they would be under clear waer...

  12. Uranium transport around the reactor zone at Bangombé and Okélobondo (Oklo): examples of hydrogeological and geochemical model integration and data evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurban, I.; Laaksoharju, M.; Madé, B.; Ledoux, E.

    2003-03-01

    The sites at Bangombé and Okélobondo (Oklo) in Gabon provide a unique opportunity to study the behaviour of products from natural nuclear reactions in the vicinity of reactor zones which were active around two billion years ago. The Commission of the European Communities initiated the Oklo Natural Analogue Programme. One of the principal aims was to study indications of present time migration of elements from the reactor zones under ambient conditions. The hydrogeological and hydrochemical data from the Oklo sites were modelled in order to better understand the geochemical behaviour of radionuclides in the natural system, by using independent models and by comparing the modelling outcome. Two modelling approaches were used: M3 code (hydrochemical mixing and mass balance model), developed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and HYTEC (reactive transport model) developed by Ecole des Mines de Paris. Two different reactor zones were studied: Bangombé, a shallow site, the reactor being at 11 m depth, and OK84 at Okélobondo, situated at about 450 m depth, more comparable with a real repository location. This allowed the validation of modelling tools in two different sedimentary environments: one shallow, with a more homogeneous layering situated in an area of meteoric alteration, and the other offering the opportunity to study radionuclide migration from the reaction zone over a distance of 450 m through very heterogeneous sedimentary layers. The modeling results indicate that the chemical reactions retarding radionuclide transport are very different at the two sites. At Bangombé, the decomposition of organic material consumes oxygen and at Okélobondo the oxygen is consumed by inorganic reactions resulting, in both cases, in uranium retardation. Both modelling approaches (statistic with M3 code and deterministic with HYTEC code) could describe this situation. The goal of this exercise is to test codes which can help to describe and

  13. Errors and uncertainties introduced by a regional climate model in climate impact assessments: example of crop yield simulations in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramarohetra, Johanna; Pohl, Benjamin; Sultan, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The challenge of estimating the potential impacts of climate change has led to an increasing use of dynamical downscaling to produce fine spatial-scale climate projections for impact assessments. In this work, we analyze if and to what extent the bias in the simulated crop yield can be reduced by using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model to downscale ERA-Interim (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis) rainfall and radiation data. Then, we evaluate the uncertainties resulting from both the choice of the physical parameterizations of the WRF model and its internal variability. Impact assessments were performed at two sites in Sub-Saharan Africa and by using two crop models to simulate Niger pearl millet and Benin maize yields. We find that the use of the WRF model to downscale ERA-Interim climate data generally reduces the bias in the simulated crop yield, yet this reduction in bias strongly depends on the choices in the model setup. Among the physical parameterizations considered, we show that the choice of the land surface model (LSM) is of primary importance. When there is no coupling with a LSM, or when the LSM is too simplistic, the simulated precipitation and then the simulated yield are null, or respectively very low; therefore, coupling with a LSM is necessary. The convective scheme is the second most influential scheme for yield simulation, followed by the shortwave radiation scheme. The uncertainties related to the internal variability of the WRF model are also significant and reach up to 30% of the simulated yields. These results suggest that regional models need to be used more carefully in order to improve the reliability of impact assessments.

  14. Solving the problem of building models of crosslinked polymers: an example focussing on validation of the properties of crosslinked epoxy resins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Hall

    Full Text Available The construction of molecular models of crosslinked polymers is an area of some difficulty and considerable interest. We report here a new method of constructing these models and validate the method by modelling three epoxy systems based on the epoxy monomers bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE and triglycidyl-p-amino phenol (TGAP with the curing agent diamino diphenyl sulphone (DDS. The main emphasis of the work concerns the improvement of the techniques for the molecular simulation of these epoxies and specific attention is paid towards model construction techniques, including automated model building and prediction of glass transition temperatures (T(g. Typical models comprise some 4200-4600 atoms (ca. 120-130 monomers. In a parallel empirical study, these systems have been cast, cured and analysed by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA to measure T(g. Results for the three epoxy systems yield good agreement with experimental T(g ranges of 200-220°C, 270-285°C and 285-290°C with corresponding simulated ranges of 210-230°C, 250-300°C, and 250-300°C respectively.

  15. Solving the problem of building models of crosslinked polymers: an example focussing on validation of the properties of crosslinked epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stephen A; Howlin, Brendan J; Hamerton, Ian; Baidak, Alex; Billaud, Claude; Ward, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The construction of molecular models of crosslinked polymers is an area of some difficulty and considerable interest. We report here a new method of constructing these models and validate the method by modelling three epoxy systems based on the epoxy monomers bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE) and triglycidyl-p-amino phenol (TGAP) with the curing agent diamino diphenyl sulphone (DDS). The main emphasis of the work concerns the improvement of the techniques for the molecular simulation of these epoxies and specific attention is paid towards model construction techniques, including automated model building and prediction of glass transition temperatures (T(g)). Typical models comprise some 4200-4600 atoms (ca. 120-130 monomers). In a parallel empirical study, these systems have been cast, cured and analysed by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) to measure T(g). Results for the three epoxy systems yield good agreement with experimental T(g) ranges of 200-220°C, 270-285°C and 285-290°C with corresponding simulated ranges of 210-230°C, 250-300°C, and 250-300°C respectively.

  16. On the Use of Hydrological Models and Satellite Data to Study the Water Budget of River Basins Affected by Human Activities: Examples from the Garonne Basin of France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Eric; Gascoin, Simon; Grusson, Youen; Murgue, Clément; Bardeau, Mélanie; Anctil, François; Ferrant, Sylvain; Lardy, Romain; Le Moigne, Patrick; Leenhardt, Delphine; Rivalland, Vincent; Sánchez Pérez, José-Miguel; Sauvage, Sabine; Therond, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Natural and anthropogenic forcing factors and their changes significantly impact water resources in many river basins around the world. Information on such changes can be derived from fine scale in situ and satellite observations, used in combination with hydrological models. The latter need to account for hydrological changes caused by human activities to correctly estimate the actual water resource. In this study, we consider the catchment area of the Garonne river (in France) to investigate the capabilities of space-based observations and up-to-date hydrological modeling in estimating water resources of a river basin modified by human activities and a changing climate. Using the ISBA-MODCOU and SWAT hydrological models, we find that the water resources of the Garonne basin display a negative climate trend since 1960. The snow component of the two models is validated using the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer snow cover extent climatology. Crop sowing dates based on remote sensing studies are also considered in the validation procedure. Use of this dataset improves the simulated evapotranspiration and river discharge amounts when compared to conventional data. Finally, we investigate the benefit of using the MAELIA multi-agent model that accounts for a realistic agricultural and management scenario. Among other results, we find that changes in crop systems have significant impacts on water uptake for agriculture. This work constitutes a basis for the construction of a future modeling framework of the sociological and hydrological system of the Garonne river region.

  17. Development of a high resolution modeling tool for prediction of waterflows through complex mires: Example of the Mukhrino bog complex in West Siberian middle Taiga Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarov, Evgeny A.; Schmitz, Oliver; Bleuten, Wladimir

    2015-04-01

    Water flow through peat bogs differ substantially from mineral soil landscapes. Permeability of the peatlayers decrease dramatically with depth within the permanently watersaturated peat layers (Catotelm), whereas the 10-60 cm thick superficial layer (Acrotelm) has a very high conductivity. Water flows predominantly in this acrotelm layer where an open structure of stems of mosses and few plants hardly limit water flow. By omitting this superficial flow infrastructures in many places block the waterflow. Moreover, the different bog types within a complex bog have different hydrological conductivities. Without considering the typical water-flow of bogs the construction of roads and platforms for oil and gas production threatens downhill mire ecosystems by partly drainage. The objective of our study was to develop a modeling tool which can be used to predict quantitatively spatially distributed water-flow of a bog complex. A part of the extensive bog complex "Mukhrino bog complex" located at the left bank of Irtysh river near the West Siberian town Khanty-Mansiysk' was chosen as modeling area. Water discharge from this bog catchment occurs by "waterfalls" at the East margin where a scarp with ca. 8 m elevation difference has been developed by backward erosion into the bog by the Mukhrino river. From field observations it was proven that no discharge of groundwater occurred at the margin of the bog catchment area. We used PCRaster-MODFLOW as modeling environment. The model area size was 3.8 km2, cell size 5 m and the model included 3 Acrotelm layers and 3 Catotelm layers. Thickness of Acrotelm and Catotelm have been measured by coring in transects. Input data of rain, snow have been recorded in the study area. Evapotranspiration was measured with small lysimeters and crop factors for different land unit types (open water, raised bog, patterned bog, poor fens) were elaborated by water balance modeling (1-D). Land unit types have been mapped by supervised classification

  18. Dynamic Modeling of Learning in Emerging Energy Industries: The Example of Advanced Biofuels in the United States; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Steve; Bush, Brian; Vimmerstedt, Laura

    2015-07-19

    This paper (and its supplemental model) presents novel approaches to modeling interactions and related policies among investment, production, and learning in an emerging competitive industry. New biomass-to-biofuels pathways are being developed and commercialized to support goals for U.S. advanced biofuel use, such as those in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We explore the impact of learning rates and techno-economics in a learning model excerpted from the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to explore the impact of biofuel policy on the evolution of the biofuels industry. The BSM integrates investment, production, and learning among competing biofuel conversion options that are at different stages of industrial development. We explain the novel methods used to simulate the impact of differing assumptions about mature industry techno-economics and about learning rates while accounting for the different maturity levels of various conversion pathways. A sensitivity study shows that the parameters studied (fixed capital investment, process yield, progress ratios, and pre-commercial investment) exhibit highly interactive effects, and the system, as modeled, tends toward market dominance of a single pathway due to competition and learning dynamics.

  19. Statics learning from engineering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Emri, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This textbook introduces and explains the basic concepts on which statics is based utilizing real engineering examples. The authors emphasize the learning process by showing a real problem, analyzing it, simplifying it, and developing a way to solve it. This feature teaches students intuitive thinking in solving real engineering problems using the fundamentals of Newton’s laws. This book also: · Stresses representation of physical reality in ways that allow students to solve problems and obtain meaningful results · Emphasizes identification of important features of the structure that should be included in a model and which features may be omitted · Facilitates students' understanding and mastery of the "flow of thinking" practiced by professional engineers.

  20. Multiple-scenario spatial modeling of Holocene anthropogenic land cover changes and evaluation against archaeological, palynological and geomorphological records: an example for the Dijle catchment (Belgian loess belt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brue, Hanne; Verstraeten, Gert; Broothaerts, Nils; Notebaert, Bastiaan; Van Rompaey, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Holocene anthropogenic land cover reconstructions have recently been created at a variety of spatial scales and resolutions and using different methodologies and proxies. However, considerable discrepancies among these reconstructions, as well as their often limited levels of spatial and thematic detail and the uncertainties resulting from equifinality in proxy records, restrict the potential for application in other research fields. There is thus a need for new methodological approaches that integrate different sources of data at a high spatial resolution. This study presents the methodological framework and first results of a multiple-scenario and multi-proxy land cover allocation model that is applied to the Belgian Dijle catchment (ca. 760 km²) and aims to contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of anthropogenic land use patterns and intensity in the NW European loess area throughout the Holocene. In the first part of the model, a series of hypothetical, time-independent land cover patterns is modeled based on a multi-objective allocation algorithm, including natural vegetation, cropland and pasture, and taking into account the land's natural suitability for agricultural land use and conservative ranges of values for input parameters such as settlement density, minimum inter-settlement distance, deforestation rates, and the specialization towards arable land or pasture. This results in a few tens of thousands of land cover maps, which are assumed to cover virtually every possible anthropogenic land cover pattern for the Holocene Dijle catchment. Subsequently, to arrive at realistic land cover scenarios in the Dijle catchment for distinct cultural periods from the Neolithic onwards, the modeled scenarios are evaluated against three sources of time-differentiated, empirical data: 1. archaeological records serve to validate modeled settlement densities and patterns; 2. application of the modeled land cover maps in a pollen dispersal and deposition

  1. Comparison of Four Models of Radiative Heat Transfer Between Flat Surface to Evaluate the Temperature Field Based on Example of the Continuous Casting Mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rywotycki M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research concerning the influence of radiative heat transfer on the strand and mould interface. The four models for determining the heat transfer boundary conditions within the primary cooling zone for the continuous casting process of steel have been presented. A cast slab - with dimensions of 1280×220 mm - has been analysed. Models describing the heat transfer by radiation have been specified and applied in the numerical calculations. The problem has been solved by applying the finite element method and the self-developed software. The simulation results, along with their analysis, have been presented. The developed models have been verified based on the data obtained from the measurements at the industrial facility.

  2. Path-specific, dispersion-based velocity models and moment tensors of moderate events recorded at few distant stations: Examples from Brazil and Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fabio; Zahradník, Jiří; Assumpção, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    Centroid moment tensor (CMT) determination in intraplate regions like Brazil can be very difficult, because earthquakes are often recorded just at few and distant stations. This paper introduces a methodology for datasets like that. The methodology is based on waveform inversion in which each source-station path has its own velocity model. The 1-D path-specific velocity models are derived from the Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves. The waveform inversion is accompanied by posterior check of numerous P-wave first-motion polarities. An important innovation is the use of so-called frequency range test. The test basically consists in calculating CMT's for many different frequency ranges to assess the stability and uncertainty of the solution. The method is validated on two Brazilian earthquakes and a well-known Greek event. An offshore event (mb 5.2) in SE Brazil is inverted with four stations, at epicentral distances 300-400 km. The other Brazilian earthquake (mb 4.8 in Central Brazil) is even more challenging - only two broadband stations at 800-1300 km are at disposal for waveform inversion. The paper unambiguously demonstrates that the path-specific velocity models significantly increase the reliability of the CMT's. While standard models (e.g. IASP91) typically allow waveform modeling up to epicentral distances of the order of a few (∼10) minimum shear wavelengths (MSW), using the path-specific velocity models we successfully inverted waveforms up to > 20 MSW. Single-station waveform inversions are thoroughly tested, but multi-station joint inversions are shown to be preferable. The new methodology of this paper, providing a reasonable estimate of focal mechanisms and their uncertainties in case of highly limited waveform data, may find broad applicability in Brazil and elsewhere.

  3. Using Transformative Models of Adult Literacy in Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding Processes at Community Level: Examples from Guinea, Sierra Leone and Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffery, Juliet

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws on the experience in Guinea, Sierra Leone and South Sudan, to explore how the methodology and modalities of community based participatory literacy can interrelate and combine with those of conflict resolution and peacebuilding. The paper considers how transformative models of literacy, such as those of Freire, REFLECT, the…

  4. A stochastic bioenergetics model based approach to translating large river flow and temperature in to fish population responses: the pallid sturgeon example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Dey, Rima; Wikle, Christopher K.; Moran, Edward H.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Franz, Kristie J.

    2015-01-01

    In managing fish populations, especially at-risk species, realistic mathematical models are needed to help predict population response to potential management actions in the context of environmental conditions and changing climate while effectively incorporating the stochastic nature of real world conditions. We provide a key component of such a model for the endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) in the form of an individual-based bioenergetics model influenced not only by temperature but also by flow. This component is based on modification of a known individual-based bioenergetics model through incorporation of: the observed ontogenetic shift in pallid sturgeon diet from marcroinvertebrates to fish; the energetic costs of swimming under flowing-water conditions; and stochasticity. We provide an assessment of how differences in environmental conditions could potentially alter pallid sturgeon growth estimates, using observed temperature and velocity from channelized portions of the Lower Missouri River mainstem. We do this using separate relationships between the proportion of maximum consumption and fork length and swimming cost standard error estimates for fish captured above and below the Kansas River in the Lower Missouri River. Critical to our matching observed growth in the field with predicted growth based on observed environmental conditions was a two-step shift in diet from macroinvertebrates to fish.

  5. Methodological comparison of marginal structural model, time-varying Cox regression, and propensity score methods : the example of antidepressant use and the risk of hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, M Sanni; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Belitser, S.; Souverein, Patrick C; Martín, Elisa; Gatto, Nicolle M; Huerta, Consuelo; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Roes, Kit C B; Hoes, Arno W; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies including time-varying treatments are prone to confounding. We compared time-varying Cox regression analysis, propensity score (PS) methods, and marginal structural models (MSMs) in a study of antidepressant [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)] use and

  6. Investigating Experimental Effects within the Framework of Structural Equation Modeling: An Example with Effects on Both Error Scores and Reaction Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Structural equation modeling provides the framework for investigating experimental effects on the basis of variances and covariances in repeated measurements. A special type of confirmatory factor analysis as part of this framework enables the appropriate representation of the experimental effect and the separation of experimental and…

  7. A method for the stochastic modeling of karstic systems accounting for geophysical data: an example of application in the region of Tulum, Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuilleumier, C.; Borghi, A.; Renard, P.; Ottowitz, D.; Schiller, A.; Supper, R.; Cornaton, F.

    2013-05-01

    The eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, contains one of the most developed karst systems in the world. This natural wonder is undergoing increasing pollution threat due to rapid economic development in the region of Tulum, together with a lack of wastewater treatment facilities. A preliminary numerical model has been developed to assess the vulnerability of the resource. Maps of explored caves have been completed using data from two airborne geophysical campaigns. These electromagnetic measurements allow for the mapping of unexplored karstic conduits. The completion of the network map is achieved through a stochastic pseudo-genetic karst simulator, previously developed but adapted as part of this study to account for the geophysical data. Together with the cave mapping by speleologists, the simulated networks are integrated into the finite-element flow-model mesh as pipe networks where turbulent flow is modeled. The calibration of the karstic network parameters (density, radius of the conduits) is conducted through a comparison with measured piezometric levels. Although the proposed model shows great uncertainty, it reproduces realistically the heterogeneous flow of the aquifer. Simulated velocities in conduits are greater than 1 cm s-1, suggesting that the reinjection of Tulum wastewater constitutes a pollution risk for the nearby ecosystems.

  8. A multiobjective optimization model for dam removal: an example trading off salmon passage with hydropower and water storage in the Willamette basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Michael J.; Fagan, William F.; ReVelle, Charles S.; Graf, William L.

    2005-08-01

    We introduce the use of systematic, combinatorial, multiobjective optimization models to analyse ecological-economic tradeoffs and to support complex decision-making associated with dam removal in a river system. The model's ecological objective enhances salmonid migration and spawning by maximizing drainage area reconnected to the sea. The economic objective minimizes loss of hydropower and storage capacity. We present a proof-of-concept demonstration for the Willamette River watershed (Oregon, USA). The case study shows a dramatic tradeoff in which removing twelve dams reconnects 52% of the basin while sacrificing only 1.6% of hydropower and water-storage capacity. Additional ecological gains, however, come with increasingly steeper economic costs. A second model incorporates existing fish-passage systems. Because of data limitations and model simplifications, these results are intended solely for the purpose of illustrating a novel application of multiobjective programming to dam-removal issues. Far more work would be needed to make policy-relevant recommendations. Nevertheless, this research suggests that the current practice of analysing dam-removal decisions on a dam-by-dam basis be supplemented by evaluation on a river-system basis, trading off economic and ecological goals.

  9. On the representation of IAGOS/MOZAIC vertical profiles in chemical transport models : contribution of different error sources in the example of carbon monoxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschetti, Fabio; Chen, Huilin; Thouret, Valerie; Nedelec, Philippe; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Gerbig, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Utilising a fleet of commercial airliners, MOZAIC/IAGOS provides atmospheric composition data on a regular basis that are widely used for modelling applications. Due to the specific operational context of the platforms, such observations are collected close to international airports and hence in an

  10. A Primer for Analyzing Nested Data: Multilevel Modeling in SPSS Using an Example from a REL Study. REL 2015-046

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Laura M.; Parker, Caroline E.

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing data that possess some form of nesting is often challenging for applied researchers or district staff who are involved in or in charge of conducting data analyses. This report provides a description of the challenges for analyzing nested data and provides a primer of how multilevel regression modeling may be used to resolve these…

  11. Analysis of the implementation of a personalized care model in diabetes mellitus as an example of chronic disease with information and communication technology support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martínez, N; Segú, J L; Vázquez-Castro, J; Brosa, M; Bohigas, L; Comellas, M J; Kalfhaus, L

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects 13.8% of the adult population in Spain, representing some 8.2% of total Spanish health spending, which may be reduced by optimizing treatment and disease monitoring. Areas covered: This perspective article aims to evaluate the possible clinical and economic outcomes of implementing a theoretical personalized care model in diabetes supported by information and communications technology in Spain vs. conventional care. Moreover, we assessed the value of emminens® eConecta, a solution designed to support the operational implementation of this model, which enables the connection and participation of patients and health professionals, facilitates patient education, decision-making, access to information, and data analysis. We carried out a review of the available evidence, consultations with experts and a clinical and cost estimation. Expert commentary: The experts consulted considered that the proposed model is consistent with Spanish strategies on chronicity, supports the management of chronicity/diabetes, and may improve the most important aspects of disease management. In the literature, this type of care models improved or provided equal disease control compared with conventional care, potentiated self-management strategies and reduced the high use of resources. Cost estimation showed a reduction of -12% in total direct costs and around -34% in the costs of outpatient visits.

  12. Top-down and bottom-up excursions beyond the Standard Model: The example of left-right symmetries in supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Alloul, Adam

    2014-01-01

    In this Ph.D thesis three main projects are presented. In the first one the phenomenology associated with the neutralinos and charginos sector of the left-right symmetric supersymmetric model is explored. After a detailed motivation of the study and construction of such models, it is shown that these models can be easily discovered in multi-leptonic final states as they lead to signatures very different from those induced by the Standard Model or its supersymmetric version. In the second project, we concentrate on the phenomenology associated with doubly-charged particles. Starting from the hypothesis that such a particle is discovered at the LHC, we build several effective field theories depending on both the representation under SU(2)_L to which they belong the particle and their spin and perform a Monte Carlo analysis highlighting some key observables that would help to determine their quantum numbers. Another part of my thesis, complementary to the phenomenology work, has consisted in developping computer...

  13. A gap-filling model for eddy covariance latent heat flux: Estimating evapotranspiration of a subtropical seasonal evergreen broad-leaved forest as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ying; Chu, Chia-Ren; Li, Ming-Hsu

    2012-10-01

    SummaryIn this paper we present a semi-parametric multivariate gap-filling model for tower-based measurement of latent heat flux (LE). Two statistical techniques, the principal component analysis (PCA) and a nonlinear interpolation approach were integrated into this LE gap-filling model. The PCA was first used to resolve the multicollinearity relationships among various environmental variables, including radiation, soil moisture deficit, leaf area index, wind speed, etc. Two nonlinear interpolation methods, multiple regressions (MRS) and the K-nearest neighbors (KNNs) were examined with random selected flux gaps for both clear sky and nighttime/cloudy data to incorporate into this LE gap-filling model. Experimental results indicated that the KNN interpolation approach is able to provide consistent LE estimations while MRS presents over estimations during nighttime/cloudy. Rather than using empirical regression parameters, the KNN approach resolves the nonlinear relationship between the gap-filled LE flux and principal components with adaptive K values under different atmospheric states. The developed LE gap-filling model (PCA with KNN) works with a RMSE of 2.4 W m-2 (˜0.09 mm day-1) at a weekly time scale by adding 40% artificial flux gaps into original dataset. Annual evapotranspiration at this study site were estimated at 736 mm (1803 MJ) and 728 mm (1785 MJ) for year 2008 and 2009, respectively.

  14. Vector Autoregressive Models and Granger Causality in Time Series Analysis in Nursing Research: Dynamic Changes Among Vital Signs Prior to Cardiorespiratory Instability Events as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Eliezer; Hravnak, Marilyn; Sereika, Susan M

    Patients undergoing continuous vital sign monitoring (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], pulse oximetry [SpO2]) in real time display interrelated vital sign changes during situations of physiological stress. Patterns in this physiological cross-talk could portend impending cardiorespiratory instability (CRI). Vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling with Granger causality tests is one of the most flexible ways to elucidate underlying causal mechanisms in time series data. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the development of patient-specific VAR models using vital sign time series data in a sample of acutely ill, monitored, step-down unit patients and determine their Granger causal dynamics prior to onset of an incident CRI. CRI was defined as vital signs beyond stipulated normality thresholds (HR = 40-140/minute, RR = 8-36/minute, SpO2 time segment prior to onset of first CRI was chosen for time series modeling in 20 patients using a six-step procedure: (a) the uniform time series for each vital sign was assessed for stationarity, (b) appropriate lag was determined using a lag-length selection criteria, (c) the VAR model was constructed, (d) residual autocorrelation was assessed with the Lagrange Multiplier test, (e) stability of the VAR system was checked, and (f) Granger causality was evaluated in the final stable model. The primary cause of incident CRI was low SpO2 (60% of cases), followed by out-of-range RR (30%) and HR (10%). Granger causality testing revealed that change in RR caused change in HR (21%; i.e., RR changed before HR changed) more often than change in HR causing change in RR (15%). Similarly, changes in RR caused changes in SpO2 (15%) more often than changes in SpO2 caused changes in RR (9%). For HR and SpO2, changes in HR causing changes in SpO2 and changes in SpO2 causing changes in HR occurred with equal frequency (18%). Within this sample of acutely ill patients who experienced a CRI event, VAR modeling indicated that RR changes

  15. Utility of population models to reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in ecological risk assessments of pesticides: an example based on acute mortality data for daphnids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Niklas; Stark, John D

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, ecological risk assessments (ERA) of pesticides have been based on risk ratios, where the predicted concentration of the chemical is compared to the concentration that causes biological effects. The concentration that causes biological effect is mostly determined from laboratory experiments using endpoints on the level of the individual (e.g., mortality and reproduction). However, the protection goals are mostly defined at the population level. To deal with the uncertainty in the necessary extrapolations, safety factors are used. Major disadvantages with this simplified approach is that it is difficult to relate a risk ratio to the environmental protection goals, and that the use of fixed safety factors can result in over- as well as underprotective assessments. To reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in ERA, it has been argued that population models should be used more frequently. In the present study, we have used matrix population models for 3 daphnid species (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, and D. pulex) to reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in the ERA of a pesticide (spinosad). The survival rates in the models were reduced in accordance with data from traditional acute mortality tests. As no data on reproductive effects were available, the conservative assumption that no reproduction occurred during the exposure period was made. The models were used to calculate the minimum population size and the time to recovery. These endpoints can be related to the European Union (EU) protection goals for aquatic ecosystems in the vicinity of agricultural fields, which state that reversible population level effects are acceptable if there is recovery within an acceptable (undefined) time frame. The results of the population models were compared to the acceptable (according to EU documents) toxicity exposure ratio (TER) that was based on the same data. At the acceptable TER, which was based on the most sensitive species (C. dubia

  16. Linking land cover and species distribution models to project potential ranges of malaria vectors: an example using Anopheles arabiensis in Sudan and Upper Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Douglas O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles arabiensis is a particularly opportunistic feeder and efficient vector of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa and may invade areas outside its normal range, including areas separated by expanses of barren desert. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how spatial models can project future irrigated cropland and potential, new suitable habitat for vectors such as An. arabiensis. Methods Two different but complementary spatial models were linked to demonstrate their synergy for assessing re-invasion potential of An. arabiensis into Upper Egypt as a function of irrigated cropland expansion by 2050. The first model (The Land Change Modeler was used to simulate changes in irrigated cropland using a Markov Chain approach, while the second model (MaxEnt uses species occurrence points, land cover and other environmental layers to project probability of species presence. Two basic change scenarios were analysed, one involving a more conservative business-as-usual (BAU assumption and second with a high probability of desert-to-cropland transition (Green Nile to assess a broad range of potential outcomes by 2050. Results The results reveal a difference of 82,000 sq km in potential An. arabiensis range between the BAU and Green Nile scenarios. The BAU scenario revealed a highly fragmented set of small, potential habitat patches separated by relatively large distances (maximum distance = 64.02 km, mean = 12.72 km, SD = 9.92, while the Green Nile scenario produced a landscape characterized by large patches separated by relatively shorter gaps (maximum distance = 49.38, km, mean = 4.51 km, SD = 7.89 that may be bridged by the vector. Conclusions This study provides a first demonstration of how land change and species distribution models may be linked to project potential changes in vector habitat distribution and invasion potential. While gaps between potential habitat patches remained large in the

  17. PAC-Learning from General Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Hoeffgen, K.- U.; Lefmann, H.

    1997-01-01

    We study a novel view on the PAC learning model in which the examples are more complicated than in the standard model. There, an example usually is an element of the learning domain and its label indicates whether it belongs to the target concept. Here, the examples can be subsets and their labels...... indicate some relation to the target concept, e.g., whether they intersect it or not. We show how this setting can be easily transformed into the standard PAC model; however, for an analysis it is much more natural to stick to the original formulation. Then the central notion is that of the relative...... dimension of a target class with respect to a sample class, which replaces the Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension (V.N. Vapnik and A.Y. Chervonenkis, 1971). The investigation of structural aspects of the relative dimension is followed by its applications to learning environments. It turns out that computing...

  18. 光伏企业商业模式分析:以赛维为例%Business Model Analysis for PV Enterprise: LDK as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 张俊芳

    2012-01-01

    在前人现有研究的基础上总结出商业模式的构成要素,即价值体现、盈利模式、营销模式、市场机会、内部结构、顾客界面/关系、伙伴网络和利润屏障;以及商业模式有效性的主要判据,即整体性、动态适应性、他人不可复制性、前瞻性、自我可复制性。并以赛维太阳能公司为案例,通过此模型分析了企业的商业模式结构以及其与价值链、产业链、市场环境的关系,从而得到一些启示。%On the basis of our recent research, we summarized the key factors of business model, to wit: value proposition, revenue model, market opportunity, customer interface/relationship, marketing strategies, partner's net- work, internal structure and profit barrier. And to determine the effectiveness of the business model by examining the four characteristics including the holistic approach, the dynamic elements, characteristics which prevented oth- ers from replicating their business model and those have forward-looking approach which allowed for self-sustain- ability and replication. By using the method which mentioned above, we analyzed the business model of LDK So- lar Ltd, including it's composition and the relationship with it's value chain, industrial chain and the market envi- ronment, as well as getting the enlighten from the analysis.

  19. Projecting range limits with coupled thermal tolerance - climate change models: an example based on gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus along the U.S. east coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Hare

    Full Text Available We couple a species range limit hypothesis with the output of an ensemble of general circulation models to project the poleward range limit of gray snapper. Using laboratory-derived thermal limits and statistical downscaling from IPCC AR4 general circulation models, we project that gray snapper will shift northwards; the magnitude of this shift is dependent on the magnitude of climate change. We also evaluate the uncertainty in our projection and find that statistical uncertainty associated with the experimentally-derived thermal limits is the largest contributor (∼ 65% to overall quantified uncertainty. This finding argues for more experimental work aimed at understanding and parameterizing the effects of climate change and variability on marine species.

  20. Simulation of the energy-industry-environment system for limited economic regions, using the example of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Part 1. Data, model development adaptation 1960 to 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecker, K.H.; Unger, H.

    1979-10-01

    Following some general remarks on the task and function of systems analyses in society, on the project in the overall system energy-industry-environment, and on the goals of the project, model structure and methods are described. Part I of the final report gives an analysis of the past (1960 to 1974), and in particular of the structure and development of the Baden-Wuerttemberg power industry and compares these data with the data for West Germany. On the producer side, there are especially the electric power industry and the petroleum industry; on the consumer side, there are the usual sectors of private households and small consumers, industry and transportation. The development of the past power supply structure is analyzed, and the analysis is used as a basis for a forecast. Part II of this report will include development trends, scenarios, and model assumptions in forecasting the period 1975 to 2000.

  1. Modeling the Impact of Integration Processes on the Development of International Tourism (on the Example of the Central and Eastern European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yemets Mariia S.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The publication is aimed at identifying and studying the factors of influence on the development of international tourism in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE in the context of integration. The authors also search for ways to compile a system of indicators of integration in terms of tourism along with building mathematical models of the impact of integration processes on the development of international tourism. The study has identified the indicators of integration, which positively impact the value of the resulting variable, although not all built models have a high significance. In general, the publication confirms the hypothesis that factors, associated with integration processes, do influence on the development of tourism in the countries of the region, but the nature of such influence is not always unambiguous.

  2. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model - An example from Arabian Sea and equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    the exchange of trace gases including car- bon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere as well as chemical components and biological com- ponents in the ocean. The potential for feedback e ects on the earth system exists through both physical and bio... no interannual variability can develop when Newtonian feedbacks towards cli- matological data are present, it was su cient to take the restart conditions from the last year of this 50-year control-integration (A). The numerical model experiments with chlorophyll...

  3. Recent Advances in Characterizing Depositional Facies and Pore Network Modeling in Context of Carbon Capture Storage: An Example from the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone in the Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburg, J. T.; Nathan, W.; Best, J.; Reesink, A.; Ritzi, R. W., Jr.; Pendleton, J.; Dominic, D. F.; Tudek, J.; Kohanpur, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand subsurface flow dynamics, including CO2 plume migration and capillary trapping, a diverse set of geologic properties within the reservoir, from the pore scale to the basin scale, must be understood and quantified. The uncertainty about site-specific geology stems from the inherent variation in rock types, depositional environments, and diagenesis. In collaboration with geocellular and multiphase modeling, detailed characterization of the Lower Mt. Simon Sandstone (LMSS), a reservoir utilized for carbon capture storage, is supporting data-driven conceptual models to better understand reservoir heterogeneity and its relationship to reservoir properties. This includes characterization of sedimentary facies and pore scale modeling of the reservoir The Cambrian-age Lower Mt. Simon Sandstone (LMSS) is a reservoir utilized for two-different carbon capture storage projects in the Illinois Basin, USA. The LMSS is interpreted to have formed in a braided river environment comprising a hierarchy of stratification, with larger scale depositional facies comprising assemblages of smaller scale facies. The proportions, geometries, length scales, and petrophysical attributes of the depositional facies, and of the textural facies they comprise, are being quantified. Based on examination of core and analog outcrop in adjacent areas, the LMSS is comprised of five dominant depositional facies, the most abundant facies being planar to trough cross-bedded sandstones produced by subaqueous sand dunes. This facies has the best reservoir conditions with porosity up to 27% and permeability up to 470 mD. Three-dimensional pore network modeling via micro computed tomography of this facies shows well-connected and unobstructed pore throats and pore space. This presentation will outline the depositional heterogeneity of the LMSS, its relationship to diagenetic fabrics, and its influence on fluid movement within the reservoir.

  4. THE ADVANTAGES OF PARAMETRIC MODELING FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS. THE EXAMPLE OF THE IN WAR DESTROYED CHURCH OF ST. CATHERINE (KATHARINENKIRCHE) IN NUREMBERG

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, M.; Herbst, G.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; R. Rosenbauer; S. Rutishauser; Zellweger, A.

    2013-01-01

    Consecrated in 1297 as the monastery church of the four years earlier founded St. Catherine’s monastery, the Gothic Church of St. Catherine was largely destroyed in a devastating bombing raid on January 2nd 1945. To counteract the process of disintegration, the departments of geo-information and lower monument protection authority of the City of Nuremburg decided to getting done a three dimensional building model of the Church of St. Catherine’s. A heterogeneous set of data was used ...

  5. On the data integration of seismological observation and deep seismic exploration. The crustal modeling for the Messina Straits Area as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. FEDERICO

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Given an earth crust model having homogeneous layers and spherical
    symmetry, the travel-times equations of the direct and refracted longitudinal
    waves are first deduced. These linear equations are determined
    from the seismic ray parameter p, and from the known term a,. The
    parameter p, is connected with the velocity of the elastic waves that are
    refracted on the i-th layer; «, depends on the velocity of the layers crossed
    by the seismic ray and on their thickness.
    Subsequently, the equations of the first arrivals, observed in quite a
    number of stations surrounding the Straits of Messina during the seismic
    crisis of the Gulf of Patti (1978, are utilized for working out a crustal model
    for the Messina Straits area. Given the inadequatly of the passive seismology
    data both in number and in characteristics the most superficial layers
    of the model are defined using the results of deep seismic exploration
    carried out in areas contiguous to the Straits. The thickness and velocity
    of the longitudinal waves in the underlying layers are, instead, determined

  6. Intraguild Predation Dynamics in a Lake Ecosystem Based on a Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecological Model: The Example of Lake Kinneret (Israel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makler-Pick, Vardit; Hipsey, Matthew R; Zohary, Tamar; Carmel, Yohay; Gal, Gideon

    2017-03-29

    The food web of Lake Kinneret contains intraguild predation (IGP). Predatory invertebrates and planktivorous fish both feed on herbivorous zooplankton, while the planktivorous fish also feed on the predatory invertebrates. In this study, a complex mechanistic hydrodynamic-ecological model, coupled to a bioenergetics-based fish population model (DYCD-FISH), was employed with the aim of revealing IGP dynamics. The results indicate that the predation pressure of predatory zooplankton on herbivorous zooplankton varies widely, depending on the season. At the time of its annual peak, it is 10-20 times higher than the fish predation pressure. When the number of fish was significantly higher, as occurs in the lake after atypical meteorological years, the effect was a shift from a bottom-up controlled ecosystem, to the top-down control of planktivorous fish and a significant reduction of predatory and herbivorous zooplankton biomass. Yet, seasonally, the decrease in predatory-zooplankton biomass was followed by a decrease in their predation pressure on herbivorous zooplankton, leading to an increase of herbivorous zooplankton biomass to an extent similar to the base level. The analysis demonstrates the emergence of non-equilibrium IGP dynamics due to intra-annual and inter-annual changes in the physico-chemical characteristics of the lake, and suggests that IGP dynamics should be considered in food web models in order to more accurately capture mass transfer and trophic interactions.

  7. Application of sediment core modelling to understanding climates of the past: An example from glacial-interglacial changes in Southern Ocean silica cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ridgwell

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Paleoceanographic evidence from the Southern Ocean reveals an apparent stark meridional divide in biogeochemical dynamics associated with the glacial-interglacial cycles of the late Neogene. South of the present-day position of the Antarctic Polar Front biogenic opal is generally much more abundant in sediments during interglacials compared to glacials. To the north, an anti-phased relationship is observed, with maximum opal abundance instead occurring during glacials. This antagonistic response of sedimentary properties is an important model validation target for testing hypotheses of glacial-interglacial change, particularly with respect to understanding the causes of the variability in atmospheric CO2. Here, I illustrate a time-dependent modelling approach to helping understand past climatic change by means of the generation of synthetic sediment core records. I find a close match between model-predicted and observed down-core changes in sedimentary opal content is achieved when changes in seasonal sea-ice extent is imposed, suggesting that the cryosphere is probably the primary driver of the striking features exhibited by the paleoceanographic record of this region.

  8. The influence of variability of calculation grids on the results of numerical modeling of geothermal doublets - an example from the Choszczno area, north-western Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowicz-Pyzik, A.; Sowiżdżał, A.; Pająk, L.

    2016-09-01

    The numerical modeling enables us to reduce the risk related to the selection of best localization of wells. Moreover, at the stage of production, modeling is a suitable tool for optimization of well operational parameters, which guarantees the long life of doublets. The thorough selection of software together with relevant methodology applied to generation of numerical models significantly improve the quality of obtained results. In the following paper, we discuss the impact of density of calculation grid on the results of geothermal doublet simulation with the TOUGH2 code, which applies the finite-difference method. The study area is located between the Szczecin Trough and the Fore-sudetic Monocline, where the Choszczno IG-1 well has been completed. Our research was divided into the two stages. At the first stage, we examined the changes of density of polygon calculation grids used in computations of operational parameters of geothermal doublets. At the second stage, we analyzed the influence of distance between the production and the injection wells on variability in time of operational parameters. The results demonstrated that in both studied cases, the largest differences occurred in pressures measured in production and injection wells whereas the differences in temperatures were less pronounced.

  9. The global rock art database: developing a rock art reference model for the RADB system using the CIDOC CRM and Australian heritage examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubt, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    The Rock Art Database (RADB) is a virtual organisation that aims to build a global rock art community. It brings together rock art enthusiasts and professionals from around the world in one centralized location through the deployed publicly available RADB Management System. This online platform allows users to share, manage and discuss rock art information and offers a new look at rock art data through the use of new technologies in rich media formats. Full access to the growing platform is currently only available for a selected group of users but it already links over 200 rock art projects around the globe. This paper forms a part of the larger Rock Art Database (RADB) project. It discusses the design stage of the RADB System and the development of a conceptual RADB Reference Model (RARM) that is used to inform the design of the Rock Art Database Management System. It examines the success and failure of international and national systems and uses the Australian heritage sector and Australian rock art as a test model to develop a method for the RADB System design. The system aims to help improve rock art management by introducing the CIDOC CRM in conjunction with a rock art specific domain model. It seeks to improve data compatibility and data sharing to help with the integration of a variety of resources to create the global Rock Art Database Management System.

  10. Differentiating simple and composite tectonic landscapes using numerical fault slip modeling with an example from the south central Alborz Mountains, Iran

    KAUST Repository

    Landgraf, A.

    2013-09-01

    The tectonically driven growth of mountains reflects the characteristics of the underlying fault systems and the applied tectonic forces. Over time, fault networks might be relatively static, but stress conditions could change and result in variations in fault slip orientation. Such a tectonic landscape would transition from a “simple” to a “composite” state: the topography of simple landscapes is correlated with a single set of tectonic boundary conditions, while composite landscapes contain inherited topography due to earlier deformation under different boundary conditions. We use fault interaction modeling to compare vertical displacement fields with topographic metrics to differentiate the two types of landscapes. By successively rotating the axis of maximum horizontal stress, we produce a suite of vertical displacement fields for comparison with real landscapes. We apply this model to a transpressional duplex in the south central Alborz Mountains of Iran, where NW oriented compression was superseded by neotectonic NE compression. The consistency between the modeled displacement field and real landforms indicates that the duplex topography is mostly compatible with the modern boundary conditions, but might include a small remnant from the earlier deformation phase. Our approach is applicable for various tectonic settings and represents an approach to identify the changing boundary conditions that produce composite landscapes. It may be particularly useful for identifying changes that occurred in regions where river profiles may no longer record a signal of the change or where the spatial pattern of uplift is complex.

  11. From bench to bedside: utilization of an in vitro model to predict potential drug-drug interactions in the kidney: the digoxin-mifepristone example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Cindy; Koren, Gideon; Ito, Shinya

    2003-07-01

    Drug interactions are a common source of drug-induced toxicity. For drugs with narrow therapeutic windows, such as digoxin, an understanding of the potential mechanisms by which drugs might interact is essential to clinical practice. This article describes the utility of a renal tubular cell culture model in the prediction of drug interactions involving P-glycoprotein. Digoxin is a cardiac glycoside that undergoes active secretion in the renal tubules by the MDR1 (P-glycoprotein) drug efflux pump. Mifepristone (RU486) is a recently introduced abortifacient that is largely unstudied in terms of drug-drug interactions. The authors used an in vitro model to study the effects of mifepristone on the renal tubular secretion and cellular uptake of digoxin by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Mifepristone significantly inhibited the renal tubular secretion of digoxin (p = 0.0005), without interfering with its ability to enter the renal tubular cell. Similar results were found with the P-glycoprotein substrate vinblastine. The findings suggest that drug interactions may result if mifepristone is administered with P-glycoprotein substrates, highlighting the usefulness of this model in the study of not only common but also rare combinations of drugs.

  12. The power of example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliana Gheorghian, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    beginning of the XXI century" with the participation of several schools in the country in 2009 and 2011. The papers presented were diverse and gave examples of various teaching experiences and scientific information. Topics by the teachers: The impact of tourism on the environment, Tornadoes, Natural science and environmental education in school, Air Pollution and health, Ecological education of children from primary school, The effects of electromagnetic radiation, Formation of an ecological mentality using chemistry, Why should we protect water, Environmental education, Education for the future, SOS Nature, Science in the twenty-first century, etc. Topics by students: Nature- the palace of thermal phenomena, Life depends on heat, Water Mysteries, Global Heating, The Mysterious universe, etc. In March 2013 our school hosted an interesting exchange of ideas on environmental issues between our students and those from Bulgaria, Poland and Turkey, during a symposium of the Comenius multilateral project "Conserving Nature". In order to present the results of protecting nature in their communities, two projects "Citizen" qualified in the Program Civitas in the autumn of 2013. "The Battle" continues both in nature and in classrooms, in order to preserve the environment.

  13. Comparison of 2 models for gene-environment interactions: an example of simulated gene-medication interactions on systolic blood pressure in family-based data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Hodonsky, Chani J; Graff, Mariaelisa; Love, Shelly-Ann M; Howard, Annie Green; Seyerle, Amanda A; Avery, Christy L; Chittoor, Geetha; Franceschini, Nora; Voruganti, V Saroja; Young, Kristin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; North, Kari E; Justice, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of adults in the United States who are diagnosed with hypertension use blood-pressure-lowering medications. Yet there is a large interindividual variability in the response to these medications. Two complementary gene-environment interaction methods have been published and incorporated into publicly available software packages to examine interaction effects, including whether genetic variants modify the association between medication use and blood pressure. The first approach uses a gene-environment interaction term to measure the change in outcome when both the genetic marker and medication are present (the "interaction model"). The second approach tests for effect-size differences between strata of an environmental exposure (the "med-diff" approach). However, no studies have quantitatively compared how these methods perform with respect to 1 or 2 degree of freedom (DF) tests or in family-based data sets. We evaluated these 2 approaches using simulated genotype-medication response interactions at 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across a range of minor allele frequencies (MAFs 0.1-5.4 %) using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19 family sample. The estimated interaction effect sizes were on average larger in the interaction model approach compared to the med-diff approach. The true positive proportion was higher for the med-diff approach for SNPs less than 1 % MAF, but higher for the interaction model when common variants were evaluated (MAF >5 %). The interaction model produced lower false-positive proportions than expected (5 %) across a range of MAFs for both the 1DF and 2DF tests. In contrast, the med-diff approach produced higher but stable false-positive proportions around 5 % across MAFs for both tests. Although the 1DF tests both performed similarly for common variants, the interaction model estimated true interaction effects with less bias and higher true positive proportions than the med-diff approach. However, if rare variation (MAF

  14. Hidden radical reactivity of the [FeO]2+ group in the H-abstraction from methane: DFT and CASPT2 supported mechanism by the example of model iron (hydro)oxide species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalskii, V.; Shubin, A.; Chen, Y.; Ovchinnikov, D.; Ruzankin, S. Ph.; Hasegawa, J.; Zilberberg, I.; Parmon, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    Reactivity of the [FeO]2+ group in the abstraction of hydrogen from methane is determined by metastable oxyl state FeIIIsbnd Orad causing the negative spin polarization of the methyl moiety as was shown by quantum-chemical means with the use of model iron hydroxide species FeO(OH)2, Fe2O(OH)5, and Fe4O5(OH)3 as an example. The energy of the gap between the ground-state ferryl configuration FeIVdbnd O and the oxyl state correlates with the energy barrier of the H-abstraction from methane.

  15. Exploring example models of cross-sector, sessional employment of pharmacists to improve medication management and pharmacy support in rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amy Cw; Emmerton, Lynne M; Hattingh, Laetitia; La Caze, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Many rural hospitals in Australia are not large enough to sustain employment of a full-time pharmacist, or are unable to recruit or retain a full-time pharmacist. The absence of a pharmacist may result in hospital nurses undertaking medication-related roles outside their scope of practice. A potential solution to address rural hospitals' medication management needs is contracted part-time ('sessional') employment of a local pharmacist external to the hospital ('cross-sector'). The aim of this study was to explore the roles and experiences of pharmacists in their provision of sessional services to rural hospitals with no on-site pharmacist and explore how these roles could potentially address shortfalls in medication management in rural hospitals. A qualitative study was conducted to explore models with pharmacists who had provided sessional services to a rural hospital. A semi-structured interview guide was informed by a literature review, preliminary research and stakeholder consultation. Participants were recruited via advertisement and personal contacts. Consenting pharmacists were interviewed between August 2012 and January 2013 via telephone or Skype for 40-55 minutes. Thirteen pharmacists with previous or ongoing hospital sessional contracts in rural communities across Australia and New Zealand participated. Most commonly, the pharmacists provided weekly services to rural hospitals. All believed the sessional model was a practical solution to increase hospital access to pharmacist-mediated support and to address medication management gaps. Roles perceived to promote quality use of medicines were inpatient consultation services, medicines information/education to hospital staff, assistance with accreditation matters and system reviews, and input into pharmaceutical distribution activities. This study is the first to explore the concept of sessional rural hospital employment undertaken by pharmacists in Australia and New Zealand. Insights from participants

  16. Mouse models of genomic syndromes as tools for understanding the basis of complex traits: an example with the smith-magenis and the potocki-lupski syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Mora, P; Molina, J; Encina, C A; Walz, K

    2009-06-01

    Each human's genome is distinguished by extra and missing DNA that can be "benign" or powerfully impact everything from development to disease. In the case of genomic disorders DNA rearrangements, such as deletions or duplications, correlate with a clinical specific phenotype. The clinical presentations of genomic disorders were thought to result from altered gene copy number of physically linked dosage sensitive genes. Genomic disorders are frequent diseases (~1 per 1,000 births). Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are genomic disorders, associated with a deletion and a duplication, of 3.7 Mb respectively, within chromosome 17 band p11.2. This region includes 23 genes. Both syndromes have complex and distinctive phenotypes including multiple congenital and neurobehavioral abnormalities. Human chromosome 17p11.2 is syntenic to the 32-34 cM region of murine chromosome 11. The number and order of the genes are highly conserved. In this review, we will exemplify how genomic disorders can be modeled in mice and the advantages that such models can give in the study of genomic disorders in particular and gene copy number variation (CNV) in general. The contributions of the SMS and PTLS animal models in several aspects ranging from more specific ones, as the definition of the clinical aspects of the human clinical spectrum, the identification of dosage sensitive genes related to the human syndromes, to the more general contributions as the definition of genetic locus impacting obesity and behavior and the elucidation of general mechanisms related to the pathogenesis of gene CNV are discussed.

  17. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model - An example from Arabian Sea and equatorial Pacific

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Nakamoto; S Prasanna Kumar; J M Oberhuber; H Saito; K Muneyama; R Frouin

    2002-09-01

    Western tropical Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, and the equatorial Pacific are known as regions of intense bio-chemical-physical interactions: the Arabian Sea has the largest phytoplankton bloom with seasonal signal, while the equatorial Pacific bloom is perennial with quasi-permanent upwelling. Here, we studied three dimensional ocean thermodynamics comparing recent ocean observation with ocean general circulation model (OPYC) experiment combined with remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). Using solar radiation parameterization representing observations that a higher abundance of chlorophyll increases absorption of solar irradiance and heating rate in the upper ocean, we showed that the mixed layer thickness decreases more than they would be under clear water conditions. These changes in the model mixed layer were consistent with Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) observations during the 1994-1995 Arabian Sea experiment and epi-fluorescence microscopy (EFM) on samples collected during Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Study (EPOCS) in November, 1988. In the Arabian Sea, as the chlorophyll concentrations peak in October (3mg/m3) after the summer plankton bloom induced by coastal upwelling, the chlorophyll induced biological heating enhanced the sea surface temperature (SST) by as much as 0.6°C and sub-layer temperature decreases and sub-layer thickness increases. In the equatorial Pacific, modest concentrations of chlorophyll less than 0.3mg/m3 is enough to introduce a meridional differential heating, which results in reducing the equatorial mixed layer thickness to more than 20 m. The anomalous meridional tilting of the mixed layer bottom enhances off equatorial westward geostrophic currents. Consequently, the equatorial undercurrent transports more water from west to east. We proposed that these numerical model experiments with use of satellite and in situ ocean observations are consistent under three

  18. Statistical analysis and ANN modeling for predicting hydrological extremes under climate change scenarios: the example of a small Mediterranean agro-watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourgialas, Nektarios N; Dokou, Zoi; Karatzas, George P

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a modeling management tool for the simulation of extreme flow events under current and future climatic conditions. This tool is a combination of different components and can be applied in complex hydrogeological river basins, where frequent flood and drought phenomena occur. The first component is the statistical analysis of the available hydro-meteorological data. Specifically, principal components analysis was performed in order to quantify the importance of the hydro-meteorological parameters that affect the generation of extreme events. The second component is a prediction-forecasting artificial neural network (ANN) model that simulates, accurately and efficiently, river flow on an hourly basis. This model is based on a methodology that attempts to resolve a very difficult problem related to the accurate estimation of extreme flows. For this purpose, the available measurements (5 years of hourly data) were divided in two subsets: one for the dry and one for the wet periods of the hydrological year. This way, two ANNs were created, trained, tested and validated for a complex Mediterranean river basin in Crete, Greece. As part of the second management component a statistical downscaling tool was used for the creation of meteorological data according to the higher and lower emission climate change scenarios A2 and B1. These data are used as input in the ANN for the forecasting of river flow for the next two decades. The final component is the application of a meteorological index on the measured and forecasted precipitation and flow data, in order to assess the severity and duration of extreme events.

  19. Use of Anecdotal Occurrence Data in Species Distribution Models: An Example Based on the White-Nosed Coati (Nasua narica in the American Southwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Stuart

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Species distributions are usually inferred from occurrence records. However, these records are prone to errors in spatial precision and reliability. Although influence of spatial errors has been fairly well studied, there is little information on impacts of poor reliability. Reliability of an occurrence record can be influenced by characteristics of the species, conditions during the observation, and observer’s knowledge. Some studies have advocated use of anecdotal data, while others have advocated more stringent evidentiary standards such as only accepting records verified by physical evidence, at least for rare or elusive species. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of occurrence records with different reliability on species distribution models (SDMs of a unique mammal, the white-nosed coati (Nasua narica in the American Southwest. We compared SDMs developed using maximum entropy analysis of combined bioclimatic and biophysical variables and based on seven subsets of occurrence records that varied in reliability and spatial precision. We found that the predicted distribution of the coati based on datasets that included anecdotal occurrence records were similar to those based on datasets that only included physical evidence. Coati distribution in the American Southwest was predicted to occur in southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona and was defined primarily by evenness of climate and Madrean woodland and chaparral land-cover types. Coati distribution patterns in this region suggest a good model for understanding the biogeographic structure of range margins. We concluded that occurrence datasets that include anecdotal records can be used to infer species distributions, providing such data are used only for easily-identifiable species and based on robust modeling methods such as maximum entropy. Use of a reliability rating system is critical for using anecdotal data.

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Thermo-Elasto-Plastic Problems and the Solving Methodology on the Example of the Tubular Section Forming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalczyk J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical studies based on a mathematical model determined by the stress-strain state examination method. Numerical computations for two steel grades, namely H40 and C45, were made at similar strain and process rate parameters. As a result of the studies, the distribution of elastic and plastic zones was obtained, while the tube hollow drawing force was verified experimentally. The distribution of longitudinal, radial and circumferential stresses and, after the drawing operation, the distribution of residual stresses in the tube cross-section were also obtained.

  1. Critical multi-level governance issues of integrated modelling: An example of low-water management in the Adour-Garonne basin (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzega, Pierre; Therond, Olivier; Debril, Thomas; March, Hug; Sibertin-Blanc, Christophe; Lardy, Romain; Sant'ana, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the experience gained related to the development of an integrated simulation model of water policy. Within this context, we analyze particular difficulties raised by the inclusion of multi-level governance that assigns the responsibility of individual or collective decision-making to a variety of actors, regarding measures of which the implementation has significant effects toward the sustainability of socio-hydrosystems. Multi-level governance procedures are compared with the potential of model-based impact assessment. Our discussion is illustrated on the basis of the exploitation of the multi-agent platform MAELIA dedicated to the simulation of social, economic and environmental impacts of low-water management in a context of climate and regulatory changes. We focus on three major decision-making processes occurring in the Adour-Garonne basin, France: (i) the participatory development of the Master Scheme for Water Planning and Management (SDAGE) under the auspices of the Water Agency; (ii) the publication of water use restrictions in situations of water scarcity; and (iii) the determination of the abstraction volumes for irrigation and their allocation. The MAELIA platform explicitly takes into account the mode of decision-making when it is framed by a procedure set beforehand, focusing on the actors' participation and on the nature and parameters of the measures to be implemented. It is observed that in some water organizations decision-making follows patterns that can be represented as rule-based actions triggered by thresholds of resource states. When decisions are resulting from individual choice, endowing virtual agents with bounded rationality allows us to reproduce (in silico) their behavior and decisions in a reliable way. However, the negotiation processes taking place during the period of time simulated by the models in arenas of collective choices are not all reproducible. Outcomes of some collective decisions are very little or

  2. Viscous model of lithosphere rheology, stress distribution, integrated strength, and bulk failure: application to and implications from examples of intracratonic rifts and inversion structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, R. A.; Ershov, A.

    2001-12-01

    One way in which theoretical rheological models of the lithosphere can be constrained by geological data is through estimations of the lithosphere's integrated strength. When an applied force exceeds this, then the lithosphere should lose its integrity and undergo irreversible deformation (WLF - "whole lithosphere failure"). The geological expression of this kind of deformational regime is the development of rifts (in extension) and inverted structures (in compression). By considering intracratonic structures rather than marginal ones it is possible to exclude additional extraneous influences and infer the net effect of intraplate stresses. Here, actual intraplate structures are considered in terms of a rheological model in which the non-brittle part of the lithosphere deforms viscously (by creep) in response to applied forces. This is in contrast to conventional estimations of total lithosphere strength based on "yield stress envelopes" in which "ductile" deformation is taken to be time-invariant (plastic). Taking into account the implications of adopting a viscous rheology in place of a plastic one in evaluating the "strength" of the lithosphere, it is necessary to incorporate the time-dependence of stresses, strains and strain rates and also the dependence of the bulk strain rate on the total applied force. This means that the duration of loading of tectonic forces prior to eventual rifting or inversion is also an important model variable. The mechanism that controls strain rate and stress distribution in the lithosphere prior to WLF in the model is one of stress redistribution from ductile deformation zones into elastic ones, as determined by stress relaxation in the former and stress amplification in the latter given an assumed constant applied boundary force. A stable equilibrium regime of deformation occurs when, at each point within the lithosphere, the stress reduction effected by viscous relaxation equals the stress increase effected by the applied force

  3. Determination optimum technologists and models of selection of children on the initial stage of long-term improvement (on an example rowed on kayaks and canoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matviyenko I.S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of introduction of pedagogical technology of selection of children are lighted up. Optimum technology and model of selection is certain on the stage of initial preparation. Expedient is bringing in of maximal amount of children of optimum age to the system of school sport. Directions of transition of the selected contingent of capable children are rotined in the system child-youth sport. Specific gravity of training time a trainer is in a position to spare teaching a rational technique rowed, to forming of base of functional preparedness.

  4. On the Quality of Examples in Introductory Java Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borstler, Jurgen; Nordstrom, Marie; Paterson, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Example programs play an important role in the teaching and learning of programming. Students as well as teachers rank examples as the most important resources for learning to program. Example programs work as role models and must therefore always be consistent with the principles and rules we are teaching. However, it is difficult to find or…

  5. On the Quality of Examples in Introductory Java Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borstler, Jurgen; Nordstrom, Marie; Paterson, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Example programs play an important role in the teaching and learning of programming. Students as well as teachers rank examples as the most important resources for learning to program. Example programs work as role models and must therefore always be consistent with the principles and rules we are teaching. However, it is difficult to find or…

  6. A practical guide to build de-novo assemblies for single tissues of non-model organisms: the example of a Neotropical frog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Montero-Mendieta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing (WGS is a very valuable resource to understand the evolutionary history of poorly known species. However, in organisms with large genomes, as most amphibians, WGS is still excessively challenging and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq represents a cost-effective tool to explore genome-wide variability. Non-model organisms do not usually have a reference genome and the transcriptome must be assembled de-novo. We used RNA-seq to obtain the transcriptomic profile for Oreobates cruralis, a poorly known South American direct-developing frog. In total, 550,871 transcripts were assembled, corresponding to 422,999 putative genes. Of those, we identified 23,500, 37,349, 38,120 and 45,885 genes present in the Pfam, EggNOG, KEGG and GO databases, respectively. Interestingly, our results suggested that genes related to immune system and defense mechanisms are abundant in the transcriptome of O. cruralis. We also present a pipeline to assist with pre-processing, assembling, evaluating and functionally annotating a de-novo transcriptome from RNA-seq data of non-model organisms. Our pipeline guides the inexperienced user in an intuitive way through all the necessary steps to build de-novo transcriptome assemblies using readily available software and is freely available at: https://github.com/biomendi/TRANSCRIPTOME-ASSEMBLY-PIPELINE/wiki.

  7. Multi-technique approach for deriving a VLBI signal extra-path variation model induced by gravity: the example of Medicina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, P.; Abbondanza, C.; Negusini, M.; Vittuari, L.

    2009-09-01

    During the measurement sessions gravity might induce significant deformations in large VLBI telescopes. If neglected or mismodelled, these deformations might bias the phase of the incoming signal thus corrupting the estimate of some crucial geodetic parameters (e.g. the height component of VLBI Reference Point). This paper describes a multi-technique approach implemented for measuring and quantifying the gravity-dependent deformations experienced by the 32-m diameter VLBI antenna of Medicina (Northern Italy). Such an approach integrates three different methods: Terrestrial Triangulations and Trilaterations (TTT), Laser Scanning (LS) and a Finite Element Model (FEM) of the antenna. The combination of the observations performed with these methods allows to accurately define an elevation-dependent model of the signal path variation which appears to be, for the Medicina telescope, non negligible. In the range [0,90] deg the signal path increases monotonically by almost 2 cm. The effect of such a variation has not been introduced in actual VLBI analysis yet; nevertheless this is the task we are going to pursue in the very next future.

  8. An Example For The Effect of 5E Model on The Academic Success and Attitude of Students: “Projectile Motion”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet ERGİN

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research; during the Physics Education course in GATA Medical Noncommissioned Officer Preparatory School’s first grade, Projectile Motion has been applied to the students with the fundamental principles of 5E Model and the effectiveness of the Physics Education course on academic success and attitudes of the students has been searched. Morever, after presenting the outcomes, some suggestions have been presented. While chosing the course subject, since, the students to whom the course subject has been applied are cadets, Projectile Motion subjects are chosen since they are both complex and interesting. The researh has been carried out with 84 students who were in GATA Medical Noncommissioned Officer Preparatory School’s First Grade. In the researh, multiple choicesuccess tests have been applied for each subject. In the analysis made after the application, It has been observed that the experiment group students to when the 5E Model has been applied react much more beneficial attitudes and are more successful than the control group students to whom the tradetional teaching method has been applied. Some suggestions have been presented by the help of the outcomes that were gained after the researh.

  9. Deterministic modelling of the cumulative impacts of underground structures on urban groundwater flow and the definition of a potential state of urban groundwater flow: example of Lyon, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Guillaume; Rossier, Yvan; Winiarski, Thierry; Cuvillier, Loann; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Underground structures have been shown to have a great influence on subsoil resources in urban aquifers. A methodology to assess the actual and the potential state of the groundwater flow in an urban area is proposed. The study develops a three-dimensional modeling approach to understand the cumulative impacts of underground infrastructures on urban groundwater flow, using a case in the city of Lyon (France). All known underground structures were integrated in the numerical model. Several simulations were run: the actual state of groundwater flow, the potential state of groundwater flow (without underground structures), an intermediate state (without impervious structures), and a transient simulation of the actual state of groundwater flow. The results show that underground structures fragment groundwater flow systems leading to a modification of the aquifer regime. For the case studied, the flow systems are shown to be stable over time with a transient simulation. Structures with drainage systems are shown to have a major impact on flow systems. The barrier effect of impervious structures was negligible because of the small hydraulic gradient of the area. The study demonstrates that the definition of a potential urban groundwater flow and the depiction of urban flow systems, which involves understanding the impact of underground structures, are important issues with respect to urban underground planning.

  10. Limit distributions of scale-invariant probabilistic models of correlated random variables with the q-Gaussian as an explicit example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanel, R.; Thurner, S.; Tsallis, C.

    2009-11-01

    Extremization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) entropy S_{BG}=-kint dx p(x) ln p(x) under appropriate norm and width constraints yields the Gaussian distribution pG(x) ∝e-βx. Also, the basic solutions of the standard Fokker-Planck (FP) equation (related to the Langevin equation with additive noise), as well as the Central Limit Theorem attractors, are Gaussians. The simplest stochastic model with such features is N ↦∞ independent binary random variables, as first proved by de Moivre and Laplace. What happens for strongly correlated random variables? Such correlations are often present in physical situations as e.g. systems with long range interactions or memory. Frequently q-Gaussians, pq(x) ∝[1-(1-q)βx2]1/(1-q) [p1(x)=pG(x)] become observed. This is typically so if the Langevin equation includes multiplicative noise, or the FP equation to be nonlinear. Scale-invariance, e.g. exchangeable binary stochastic processes, allow a systematical analysis of the relation between correlations and non-Gaussian distributions. In particular, a generalized stochastic model yielding q-Gaussians for all (q ≠ 1) was missing. This is achieved here by using the Laplace-de Finetti representation theorem, which embodies strict scale-invariance of interchangeable random variables. We demonstrate that strict scale invariance together with q-Gaussianity mandates the associated extensive entropy to be BG.

  11. Analyzing Economic Attainment Patterns of Foreign Born Latin American Male Immigrants to The United States: an Example Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Gotcher

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research which examines and endeavors to account for variation in the economic attainments of immigrants to the United States from Latin America, through the use of Hierarchical Linear Modeling. When analyzing this variation, researchers typically choose between two competing explanations. Human capital theory contends that variation in economic attainment is a product of different characteristics of individuals. Social capital theory contends that variation in economic attainment is a product of differences in characteristics of the societies from which the workers come. The author's central thesis is that we need not choose between human and social capital theories, that we can rely on both theoretical approaches, that it is an empirical and not a theoretical question how much variation can be explained by one set of factors versus the other. The real problem then is to build an appropriate methodology that allows us to partition the variation in economic attainments, identifying how much is explained by individual and how much by group characteristics. Using a multi-level modeling technique, this research presents such a methodology.

  12. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Safanda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial and anthropogenic (climate change forcing. Our models focus on the interval beginning three million years ago (i.e., Late Pliocene-Holocene. They continue through the current interglacial and they are projected to its anticipated natural end. During the current interglacial the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ thickness in each region responded uniquely as a function of changes in water depth and sea bottom temperature influenced by ocean currents. In general, the GHSZ in the deeper parts of the Pacific and Atlantic margins (≥1316 m thinned primarily due to increased water bottom temperatures. The GHSZ is highly variable in the shallower settings on the same margins (~400–500 m. On the Pacific Margin shallow GH dissociated completely prior to nine thousand years ago but the effects of subsequent sea level rise reesta