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Sample records for modeling effective dose

  1. Normal tissue dose-effect models in biological dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alber, M.

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated radiotherapy techniques like intensity modulated radiotherapy with photons and protons rely on numerical dose optimisation. The evaluation of normal tissue dose distributions that deviate significantly from the common clinical routine and also the mathematical expression of desirable properties of a dose distribution is difficult. In essence, a dose evaluation model for normal tissues has to express the tissue specific volume effect. A formalism of local dose effect measures is presented, which can be applied to serial and parallel responding tissues as well as target volumes and physical dose penalties. These models allow a transparent description of the volume effect and an efficient control over the optimum dose distribution. They can be linked to normal tissue complication probability models and the equivalent uniform dose concept. In clinical applications, they provide a means to standardize normal tissue doses in the face of inevitable anatomical differences between patients and a vastly increased freedom to shape the dose, without being overly limiting like sets of dose-volume constraints. (orig.)

  2. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  3. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Use of nonlinear dose-effect models to predict consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The linear dose-effect relationship was introduced as a model for the induction of cancer from exposure to nuclear radiation. Subsequently, it has been used by analogy to assess the risk of chemical carcinogens also. Recently, however, the model for radiation carcinogenesis has come increasingly under attack because its calculations contradict the epidemiological data, such as cancer in atomic bomb survivors. Even so, its proponents vigorously defend it, often using arguments that are not so much scientific as a mix of scientific, societal, and often political arguments. At least in part, the resilience of the linear model is due to two convenient properties that are exclusive to linearity: First, the risk of an event is determined solely by the event dose; second, the total risk of a population group depends only on the total population dose. In reality, the linear model has been conclusively falsified; i.e., it has been shown to make wrong predictions, and once this fact is generally realized, the scientific method calls for a new paradigm model. As all alternative models are by necessity nonlinear, all the convenient properties of the linear model are invalid, and calculational procedures have to be used that are appropriate for nonlinear models

  5. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only under the

  6. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  7. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  8. Estimating dose painting effects in radiotherapy: a mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos López Alfonso

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity is widely considered to be a determinant factor in tumor progression and in particular in its recurrence after therapy. Unfortunately, current medical techniques are unable to deduce clinically relevant information about tumor heterogeneity by means of non-invasive methods. As a consequence, when radiotherapy is used as a treatment of choice, radiation dosimetries are prescribed under the assumption that the malignancy targeted is of a homogeneous nature. In this work we discuss the effects of different radiation dose distributions on heterogeneous tumors by means of an individual cell-based model. To that end, a case is considered where two tumor cell phenotypes are present, which we assume to strongly differ in their respective cell cycle duration and radiosensitivity properties. We show herein that, as a result of such differences, the spatial distribution of the corresponding phenotypes, whence the resulting tumor heterogeneity can be predicted as growth proceeds. In particular, we show that if we start from a situation where a majority of ordinary cancer cells (CCs and a minority of cancer stem cells (CSCs are randomly distributed, and we assume that the length of CSC cycle is significantly longer than that of CCs, then CSCs become concentrated at an inner region as tumor grows. As a consequence we obtain that if CSCs are assumed to be more resistant to radiation than CCs, heterogeneous dosimetries can be selected to enhance tumor control by boosting radiation in the region occupied by the more radioresistant tumor cell phenotype. It is also shown that, when compared with homogeneous dose distributions as those being currently delivered in clinical practice, such heterogeneous radiation dosimetries fare always better than their homogeneous counterparts. Finally, limitations to our assumptions and their resulting clinical implications will be discussed.

  9. Comparison of two dose and three dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules: cost effectiveness analysis based on transmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Brisson, Marc; Laprise, Jean-François; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2015-01-06

    To investigate the incremental cost effectiveness of two dose human papillomavirus vaccination and of additionally giving a third dose. Cost effectiveness study based on a transmission dynamic model of human papillomavirus vaccination. Two dose schedules for bivalent or quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines were assumed to provide 10, 20, or 30 years' vaccine type protection and cross protection or lifelong vaccine type protection without cross protection. Three dose schedules were assumed to give lifelong vaccine type and cross protection. United Kingdom. Males and females aged 12-74 years. No, two, or three doses of human papillomavirus vaccine given routinely to 12 year old girls, with an initial catch-up campaign to 18 years. Costs (from the healthcare provider's perspective), health related utilities, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios. Giving at least two doses of vaccine seems to be highly cost effective across the entire range of scenarios considered at the quadrivalent vaccine list price of £86.50 (€109.23; $136.00) per dose. If two doses give only 10 years' protection but adding a third dose extends this to lifetime protection, then the third dose also seems to be cost effective at £86.50 per dose (median incremental cost effectiveness ratio £17,000, interquartile range £11,700-£25,800). If two doses protect for more than 20 years, then the third dose will have to be priced substantially lower (median threshold price £31, interquartile range £28-£35) to be cost effective. Results are similar for a bivalent vaccine priced at £80.50 per dose and when the same scenarios are explored by parameterising a Canadian model (HPV-ADVISE) with economic data from the United Kingdom. Two dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules are likely to be the most cost effective option provided protection lasts for at least 20 years. As the precise duration of two dose schedules may not be known for decades, cohorts given two doses should be closely

  10. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  11. Dose rate effect models for biological reaction to ionizing radiation in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Because of biological responses to ionizing radiation are dependent on irradiation time or dose rate as well as dose, simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose rates. We previously published a novel statistical model for dose rate effect, modified exponential (MOE) model, which predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response to low dose rate ionizing radiation, by analyzing micronucleus formation and growth inhibition in a human osteosarcoma cell line, exposed to wide range of doses and dose rates of gamma-rays. MOE model demonstrates that logarithm of median effective dose exponentially increases in low dose rates, and thus suggests that the risk approaches to zero at infinitely low dose rate. In this paper, we extend the analysis in various kinds of human cell lines exposed to ionizing radiation for more than a year. We measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H]thymidine uptake in human cell lines including an osteosarcoma, a DNA-dependent protein kinase-deficient glioma, a SV40-transformed fibroblast derived from an ataxia telangiectasia patient, a normal fibroblast, and leukemia cell lines. Cells were exposed to gamma-rays in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci of cobalt-60. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a fluorescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [ 3 H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk. While dose and dose rate relationship cultured within one month followed MOE model in cell lines holding wild-type DNA repair system, dose rate effect was greatly impaired in DNA repair-deficient cell lines

  12. The Potential Neurotoxic Effects of Low-Dose Sarin Exposure in a Guinea Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    1 THE POTENTIAL NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF LOW-DOSE SARIN EXPOSURE IN A GUINEA PIG MODEL Melinda R. Roberson, PhD, Michelle B. Schmidt...Proving Ground, MD 21010 USA ABSTRACT This study is assessing the effects in guinea pigs of repeated low-dose exposure to the nerve...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Potential Neurotoxic Effects Of Low-Dose Sarin Exposure In A Guinea Pig Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  13. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  14. The fitting parameters extraction of conversion model of the low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakerenkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS) in bipolar devices consists of in base current degradation of NPN and PNP transistors increase as the dose rate is decreased. As a result of almost 20-year studying, the some physical models of effect are developed, being described in detail. Accelerated test methods, based on these models use in standards. The conversion model of the effect, that allows to describe the inverse S-shaped excess base current dependence versus dose rate, was proposed. This paper presents the problem of conversion model fitting parameters extraction.

  15. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  16. Activity measurement and effective dose modelling of natural radionuclides in building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.; Baumgartner, A.; Rechberger, F.; Seidel, C.; Stietka, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the assessment of natural radionuclides' activity concentration in building materials, calibration requirements and related indoor exposure dose models is presented. Particular attention is turned to specific improvements in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the activity concentration of necessary natural radionuclides in building materials with adequate measurement uncertainties. Different approaches for the modelling of the effective dose indoor due to external radiation resulted from natural radionuclides in building material and results of actual building material assessments are shown. - Highlights: • Dose models for indoor radiation exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials. • Strategies and methods in radionuclide metrology, activity measurement and dose modelling. • Selection of appropriate parameters in radiation protection standards for building materials. • Scientific-based limitations of indoor exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials

  17. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  18. Linear-quadratic model underestimates sparing effect of small doses per fraction in rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shun Wong, C.; Toronto University; Minkin, S.; Hill, R.P.; Toronto University

    1993-01-01

    The application of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe iso-effective fractionation schedules for dose fraction sizes less than 2 Gy has been controversial. Experiments are described in which the effect of daily fractionated irradiation given with a wide range of fraction sizes was assessed in rat cervical spine cord. The first group of rats was given doses in 1, 2, 4, 8 and 40 fractions/day. The second group received 3 initial 'top-up'doses of 9 Gy given once daily, representing 3/4 tolerance, followed by doses in 1, 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 fractions/day. The fractionated portion of the irradiation schedule therefore constituted only the final quarter of the tolerance dose. The endpoint of the experiments was paralysis of forelimbs secondary to white matter necrosis. Direct analysis of data from experiments with full course fractionation up to 40 fractions/day (25.0-1.98 Gy/fraction) indicated consistency with the LQ model yielding an α/β value of 2.41 Gy. Analysis of data from experiments in which the 3 'top-up' doses were followed by up to 10 fractions (10.0-1.64 Gy/fraction) gave an α/β value of 3.41 Gy. However, data from 'top-up' experiments with 20, 30 and 40 fractions (1.60-0.55 Gy/fraction) were inconsistent with LQ model and gave a very small α/β of 0.48 Gy. It is concluded that LQ model based on data from large doses/fraction underestimates the sparing effect of small doses/fraction, provided sufficient time is allowed between each fraction for repair of sublethal damage. (author). 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Effect of dose reduction on the detection of mammographic lesions: A mathematical observer model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert; Abbey, Craig; Delong, David

    2007-01-01

    The effect of reduction in dose levels normally used in mammographic screening procedures on the detection of breast lesions were analyzed. Four types of breast lesions were simulated and inserted into clinically-acquired digital mammograms. Dose reduction by 50% and 75% of the original clinically-relevant exposure levels were simulated by adding corresponding simulated noise into the original mammograms. The mammograms were converted into luminance values corresponding to those displayed on a clinical soft-copy display station and subsequently analyzed by Laguerre-Gauss and Gabor channelized Hotelling observer models for differences in detectability performance with reduction in radiation dose. Performance was measured under a signal known exactly but variable detection task paradigm in terms of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curves. The results suggested that luminance mapping of digital mammograms affects performance of model observers. Reduction in dose levels by 50% lowered the detectability of masses with borderline statistical significance. Dose reduction did not have a statistically significant effect on detection of microcalcifications. The model results indicate that there is room for optimization of dose level in mammographic screening procedures

  20. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-06-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable.

  1. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Sheppard, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the background radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable

  2. Dose-rate dependent stochastic effects in radiation cell-survival models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.K.; Hlatky, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    When cells are subjected to ionizing radiation the specific energy rate (microscopic analog of dose-rate) varies from cell to cell. Within one cell, this rate fluctuates during the course of time; a crossing of a sensitive cellular site by a high energy charged particle produces many ionizations almost simultaneously, but during the interval between events no ionizations occur. In any cell-survival model one can incorporate the effect of such fluctuations without changing the basic biological assumptions. Using stochastic differential equations and Monte Carlo methods to take into account stochastic effects we calculated the dose-survival rfelationships in a number of current cell survival models. Some of the models assume quadratic misrepair; others assume saturable repair enzyme systems. It was found that a significant effect of random fluctuations is to decrease the theoretically predicted amount of dose-rate sparing. In the limit of low dose-rates neglecting the stochastic nature of specific energy rates often leads to qualitatively misleading results by overestimating the surviving fraction drastically. In the opposite limit of acute irradiation, analyzing the fluctuations in rates merely amounts to analyzing fluctuations in total specific energy via the usual microdosimetric specific energy distribution function, and neglecting fluctuations usually underestimates the surviving fraction. The Monte Carlo methods interpolate systematically between the low dose-rate and high dose-rate limits. As in other approaches, the slope of the survival curve at low dose-rates is virtually independent of dose and equals the initial slope of the survival curve for acute radiation. (orig.)

  3. Biologically effective dose distribution based on the linear quadratic model and its clinical relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Steve P.; Leu, Min Y.; Smathers, James B.; McBride, William H.; Parker, Robert G.; Withers, H. Rodney

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plans based on physical dose distributions do not necessarily entirely reflect the biological effects under various fractionation schemes. Over the past decade, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has emerged as a convenient tool to quantify biological effects for radiotherapy. In this work, we set out to construct a mechanism to display biologically oriented dose distribution based on the LQ model. Methods and Materials: A computer program that converts a physical dose distribution calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system to a biologically effective dose (BED) distribution has been developed and verified against theoretical calculations. This software accepts a user's input of biological parameters for each structure of interest (linear and quadratic dose-response and repopulation kinetic parameters), as well as treatment scheme factors (number of fractions, fractional dose, and treatment time). It then presents a two-dimensional BED display in conjunction with anatomical structures. Furthermore, to facilitate clinicians' intuitive comparison with conventional fractionation regimen, a conversion of BED to normalized isoeffective dose (NID) is also allowed. Results: Two sample cases serve to illustrate the application of our tool in clinical practice. (a) For an orthogonal wedged pair of x-ray beams treating a maxillary sinus tumor, the biological effect at the ipsilateral mandible can be quantified, thus illustrates the so-called 'double-trouble' effects very well. (b) For a typical four-field, evenly weighted prostate treatment using 10 MV x-rays, physical dosimetry predicts a comparable dose at the femoral necks between an alternate two-fields/day and four-fields/day schups. However, our BED display reveals an approximate 21% higher BED for the two-fields/day scheme. This excessive dose to the femoral necks can be eliminated if the treatment is delivered with a 3:2 (anterio-posterior/posterio-anterior (AP

  4. Activity measurement and effective dose modelling of natural radionuclides in building material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maringer, F J; Baumgartner, A; Rechberger, F; Seidel, C; Stietka, M

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the assessment of natural radionuclides' activity concentration in building materials, calibration requirements and related indoor exposure dose models is presented. Particular attention is turned to specific improvements in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the activity concentration of necessary natural radionuclides in building materials with adequate measurement uncertainties. Different approaches for the modelling of the effective dose indoor due to external radiation resulted from natural radionuclides in building material and results of actual building material assessments are shown. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A kinematic model to estimate effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-05-01

    The great earthquake occurred in the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. Facility system to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following giant tsunami. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure became a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplifying the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a sophisticated model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that ICRP method is fine, it is rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional tank model in hydrology. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of the present method is to estimate the energy radiated in the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of β decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this model are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no operational parameters or coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to ICRP. Figure shows the time-varying effective dose with ingestion duration, and we can confirm the validity of our model. The time-varying effective dose with

  6. Dose-effective investigation of intraarterial r-Sak in canine model with acute cerebral infarctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Sheng; Shi Haibin; Zhang Peng; Wang Chenghu; Zhou Chunguo; Li Linsun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect and complications of intraarterial thrombolysis with different doses of recombinant-staphylokinase (r-Sak) in canine model with acute cerebral infarction, and then to find out the most properly appropriate effective dose. Methods: The model with left cerebral embolism was established with interventional technique in 24 beagle adult dogs. They were randomly divided into 4 groups including control group(saline, 10 ml), group of low dose(r-Sak, 5 000 u/kg), middle dose(r-Sak, 10 000 u/kg) and high dose(r-Sak, 20 000 u/kg). Angiography and intraarterial thrombolysis were performed within 30 minutes after the embolization. Microcatheter was superselectively inserted into left carotid artery. Five hour's later with a repeated angiography at half, 1 and 2 hours after thrombolysis to observe the recanalization. Blood samples were collected at a series of time pre-and post-thrombolysis to test the plasma levels of PT, APTT and D-dimer. These canines were sacrificed, and their cerebri were taken out for pathologic study by the end of 24 hours. Results: The rates of efficacy within 2 hours after thrombolysis were 10.0% (1/10) in control group, 40.0% (4/10) in low dose group, 90.9% (10/11) in middle dose group and 100% (9/9) in high dose group. The rates of complete recanalization were 0, 10% (1/10), 36.4% (4/11) and 66.7% (6/9), correspondingly and respectively. There were statistically obvious differences between the 3 groups (P 0.05). Death occurred in 1 canine(high dose group) within 24 hours after thrombolysis with hemorrhagic lesion in parietal lobe of brain. No other severe complications ocurred. Conclusions: (1) Intraarterial thrombolysis with r-Sak within 5 hours after onset of thrombosis is effective and feasible. Intraarterial r-Sak shows strong thrombolytic effect for white thrombus including a few platelets. There is relative high rate of recanalization with no less than 10 000U/kg of r-Sak but accompanied with high risk of

  7. Dose-stochastic radiobiological effect relationship in model of two reactions and estimation of radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The model of dose-stochastic effect relationship for biological systems capable of self-defence under danger factor effect is developed. A defence system is realized in two forms of organism reaction, which determine innate μ n and adaptive μ a radiosensitivities. The significances of μ n are determined by host (inner) factors; and the significances of μ a , by external factors. The possibilities of adaptive reaction are determined by the coefficient of capabilities of the defence system. The formulas of the dose-effect relationship are the solutions of differential equations of assumed process in the defence system of organism. The model and formulas have been checked both at cell and at human levels. Based on the model and personal monitoring data, the estimation of radiation risk at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research is done

  8. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  9. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  10. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-15

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group.

  11. Models for Total-Dose Radiation Effects in Non-Volatile Memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Philip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this work is to develop models to predict radiation effects in non- volatile memory: flash memory and ferroelectric RAM. In flash memory experiments have found that the internal high-voltage generators (charge pumps) are the most sensitive to radiation damage. Models are presented for radiation effects in charge pumps that demonstrate the experimental results. Floating gate models are developed for the memory cell in two types of flash memory devices by Intel and Samsung. These models utilize Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and hot electron injection to charge and erase the floating gate. Erase times are calculated from the models and compared with experimental results for different radiation doses. FRAM is less sensitive to radiation than flash memory, but measurements show that above 100 Krad FRAM suffers from a large increase in leakage current. A model for this effect is developed which compares closely with the measurements.

  12. The mass effect model of the survival rate's dose effect of organism irradiated with low energy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Gui Qifu; Yu Zengliang

    1995-01-01

    The main characteristic of the low energy ions mutation is its mass deposition effect. Basing on the theory of 'double strand breaking' and the 'mass deposition effect', the authors suggests that the mass deposition products can repair or further damage the double strand breaking of DNA. According to this consideration the dose effect model of the survival rate of organism irradiated by low energy of N + ion beam is deduced as: S exp{-p[αφ + βφ 2 -Rφ 2 exp(-kφ)-Lφ 3 exp(-kφ)]}, which can be called 'mass effect model'. In the low energy ion beam mutation, the dose effects of many survival rates that can not be imitated by previous models are successfully imitated by this model. The suitable application fields of the model are also discussed

  13. Reasons between effective doses for tomographic and mathematical models due to external exposition by photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Yoriyaz, H.; Lima, F.R.A.; Loureiro, E.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of Monte Carlo codes and new and sophisticated tomographic human models, or based on voxel, motivated the ICRP to propose a revision of the traditional exposition models, which have been used to calculate doses on organs and tissues using mathematical phantoms MIRD-type 5. This article presents calculations made with tomographic phantoms MAX (Male Adult voXel) and FAX (Female Adult voXel), recently developed and also, for comparison, with ADAM and Eve mathematician phantoms. All models were coupled to the EGS4 and MCNP4 codes for full body external irradiation by photons. It were simulated expositions AP, PA and rotational for energies varying between 10 keV and 10 MeV. The effective calculated doses were compared separately to evaluate: the replacement of the Monte Carlo code; the composition of the tissues and the replacement of tomographic phantoms by mathematical ones. Effective doses calculated results indicate that for external exposures by photons to introduce models based on voxels can cause a reduction of about 10% to the energies considered in this study

  14. Ratios between effective doses for tomographic and mathematician models due to internal exposure of photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Santos, A.M.; Loureiro, E.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of new and sophisticated Monte Carlo codes and tomographic human phantoms or voxels motivated the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to revise the traditional models of exposure, which have been used to calculate effective dose coefficients for organs and tissues based on mathematician phantoms known as MIRD5. This paper shows the results of calculations using tomographic phantoms MAX (Male Adult voXel) and FAX (Female Adult voXel), recently developed by the authors as well as with the phantoms ADAM and EVA, of specific genres, type MIRD5, coupled to the EGS4 Monte Carlo and MCNP4C codes, for internal exposure with photons of energies between 10 keV and 4 MeV to several organs sources. Effective Doses for both models, tomographic and mathematician, will be compared separately as a function of the Monte Carlo code replacement, of compositions of human tissues and the anatomy reproduced through tomographs. The results indicate that for photon internal exposure, the use of models of exposure based in voxel, increases the values of effective doses up to 70% for some organs sources considered in this study, when compared with the corresponding results obtained with phantoms of MIRD-5 type

  15. Study on the estimation of probabilistic effective dose. Committed effective dose from intake of marine products using Oceanic General Circulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masanao

    2007-01-01

    The worldwide environmental protection is required by the public. A long-term environmental assessment from nuclear fuel cycle facilities to the aquatic environment also becomes more important to utilize nuclear energy more efficiently. Evaluation of long-term risk including not only in Japan but also in neighboring countries is considered to be necessary in order to develop nuclear power industry. The author successfully simulated the distribution of radionuclides in seawater and seabed sediment produced by atmospheric nuclear tests using LAMER (Long-term Assessment ModEl for Radioactivity in the oceans). A part of the LAMER calculated the advection- diffusion-scavenging processes for radionuclides in the oceans and the Japan Sea in cooperate with Oceanic General Circulation Model (OGCM) and was validated. The author is challenging to calculate probabilistic effective dose suggested by ICRP from intake of marine products due to atmospheric nuclear tests using the Monte Carlo method in the other part of LAMER. Depending on the deviation of each parameter, the 95th percentile of the probabilistic effective dose was calculated about half of the 95th percentile of the deterministic effective dose in proforma calculation. The probabilistic assessment gives realistic value for the dose assessment of a nuclear fuel cycle facility. (author)

  16. SOILD: A computer model for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.; Yu, C.; Schafetz, S.; Mehta, P.

    1991-01-01

    The SOLID computer model was developed for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil. It is designed to assess external doses under various exposure scenarios that may be encountered in environmental restoration programs. The models four major functional features address (1) dose versus source depth in soil, (2) shielding of clean cover soil, (3) area of contamination, and (4) nonuniform distribution of sources. The model is also capable of adjusting doses when there are variations in soil densities for both source and cover soils. The model is supported by a data base of approximately 500 radionuclides. 4 refs

  17. Effect of variable consumption habits in the Nordic populations on ECOSYS model predictions of ingestion dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Sven P.; Andersson, Kasper G.; Hansen, Hanne S.; Thoerring, Haavard; Joensen, Hans P.; Isaksson, Mats; Kostiainen, Eila; Suolanen, Vesa; Sigurgeirsson, Magnus A.; Palsson, Sigurour E.

    2008-01-01

    the northernmost areas used for grain crops, the crops are entirely spring grain crops, whereas in Denmark and Germany, winter crops are dominant. This gives large deviations in growth periods and development stages of the crops, particularly in the spring. This implies that first year doses from the same contaminant plume can be very different in different Nordic countries. Thus we conclude that the food habits of the population in the Nordic countries affected the calculated ingestion dose significantly. Also it is important to ascertain the use of state-of-the-art data for the more generic model parameters and to test the effect of other parameters to improve the decision support system used in the Nordic countries. (author)

  18. General extrapolation model for an important chemical dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1984-12-01

    In order to extrapolate material accelerated aging data, methodologies must be developed based on sufficient understanding of the processes leading to material degradation. One of the most important mechanisms leading to chemical dose-rate effects in polymers involves the breakdown of intermediate hydroperoxide species. A general model for this mechanism is derived based on the underlying chemical steps. The results lead to a general formalism for understanding dose rate and sequential aging effects when hydroperoxide breakdown is important. We apply the model to combined radiation/temperature aging data for a PVC material and show that this data is consistent with the model and that model extrapolations are in excellent agreement with 12-year real-time aging results from an actual nuclear plant. This model and other techniques discussed in this report can aid in the selection of appropriate accelerated aging methods and can also be used to compare and select materials for use in safety-related components. This will result in increased assurance that equipment qualification procedures are adequate

  19. Numerical model for atmospheric diffusion analysis and evaluation of effective dose for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sada, Koichi; Michioka, Takenobu; Ichikawa, Yoichi; Komiyama, Sumito

    2009-01-01

    A numerical simulation method has been developed to predict atmospheric flow and stack gas diffusion, considering the buildings and complex terrain located near and relatively far from a stack, respectively. The turbulence closure technique was used for flow calculation, some calculation grids on the ground near a stack were treated as buildings, and stack gas diffusion was predicted using the Lagrangian particle model. The calculated flow and stack gas diffusion results were compared with those obtained by wind tunnel experiments under actual terrain containing buildings. Effective stack height was estimated by comparing the surface concentration along the plume axis with those under a flat-plate condition, and it was apparent that the effective stack heights estimated by calculations were almost the same as those obtained by the wind tunnel experiment. Then, the effective dose and relative concentration of stack gas were calculated using the effective stack heights obtained by a numerical model. Almost the same effective dose and relative concentration were obtained when compared with those using the effective stack height obtained by wind tunnel experiment. (author)

  20. The individual tolerance concept is not the sole explanation for the probit dose-effect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, M.C.; McCloskey, J.T.

    2000-02-01

    Predominant methods for analyzing dose- or concentration-effect data (i.e., probit analysis) are based on the concept of individual tolerance or individual effective dose (IED, the smallest characteristic dose needed to kill an individual). An alternative explanation (stochasticity hypothesis) is that individuals do not have unique tolerances: death results from stochastic processes occurring similarly in all individuals. These opposing hypotheses were tested with two types of experiments. First, time to stupefaction (TTS) was measured for zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) exposed to benzocaine. The same 40 fish were exposed during five trials to test if the same order for TTS was maintained among trials. The IED hypothesis was supported with a minor stochastic component being present. Second, eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) were exposed to sublethal or lethal NaCl concentrations until a large portion of the lethally exposed fish died. After sufficient time for recovery, fish sublethally exposed and fish surviving lethal exposure were exposed simultaneously to lethal NaCl concentrations. No statistically significant effect was found of previous exposure on survival time but a large stochastic component to the survival dynamics was obvious. Repetition of this second type of test with pentachlorophenol also provided no support for the IED hypothesis. The authors conclude that neither hypothesis alone was the sole or dominant explanation for the lognormal (probit) model. Determination of the correct explanation (IED or stochastic) or the relative contributions of each is crucial to predicting consequences to populations after repeated or chronic exposures to any particular toxicant.

  1. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  2. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  3. Sludge reduction by ozone: Insights and modeling of the dose-response effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C; Silva-Hernández, B C; Hooijmans, C M; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Esparza-Soto, M; Lucero-Chávez, M; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2018-01-15

    Applying ozone to the return flow in an activated sludge (AS) process is a way for reducing the residual solids production. To be able to extend the activated sludge models to the ozone-AS process, adequate prediction of the tri-atoms effects on the particulate COD fractions is needed. In this study, the biomass inactivation, COD mineralization, and solids dissolution were quantified in batch tests and dose-response models were developed as a function of the reacted ozone doses (ROD). Three kinds of model-sludge were used. S1 was a lab-cultivated synthetic sludge with two components (heterotrophs X H and X P ). S2 was a digestate of S1 almost made by the endogenous residues, X P . S3 was from a municipal activated sludge plant. The specific ozone uptake rate (SO 3 UR, mgO 3 /gCOD.h) was determined as a tool for characterizing the reactivity of the sludges. SO 3 UR increased with the X H fraction and decreased with more X P . Biomass inactivation was exponential (e -β.ROD ) as a function of the ROD doses. The percentage of solids reduction was predictable through a linear model (C Miner  + Y sol ROD), with a fixed part due to mineralization (C Miner ) and a variable part from the solubilization process. The parameters of the models, i.e. the inactivation and the dissolution yields (β, 0.008-0.029 (mgO 3 /mgCOD ini ) -1 vs Y sol , 0.5-2.8 mg COD sol /mgO 3 ) varied in magnitude, depending on the intensity of the scavenging reactions and potentially the compactness of the flocs for each sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Model predictions and analysis of enhanced biological effectiveness at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.; Sykes, C.E.; Younis, A.-R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A severe challenge to all models purporting to describe the biological effects of ionizing radiation has arisen with the discovery of two phenomena: the anomalous trend with dose rate of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of mammalian cells and the apparent excessive damaging power of electron-capture radionuclides when incorporated into cell nuclei. A new model is proposed which predicts and enables interpretation of these phenomena. Radiation effectiveness is found to be expressible absolutely in terms of the geometrical cross-sectional area of the radiosensitive sites. The duration of the irradiation, the mean free path for ionization, the influence of particles in the slowing-down spectrum perrtaining in the medium and two collective time factors determining the mean repair rate and the mean lifetime of unidentified reactive chemical species [pt

  5. A meta-analysis of the abscopal effect in preclinical models: Is the biologically effective dose a relevant physical trigger?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Marconi

    Full Text Available Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are considered crucial in translational cancer research and clinical implementation of novel treatments. This is of paramount relevance in radiobiology, especially for any technological developments permitted to deliver high doses in single or oligo-fractionated regimens, such as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR. In this context, clinical success in cancer treatment needs to be guaranteed, sparing normal tissue and preventing the potential spread of disease or local recurrence. In this work we introduce a new dose-response relationship based on relevant publications concerning preclinical models with regard to delivered dose, fractionation schedule and occurrence of biological effects on non-irradiated tissue, abscopal effects.We reviewed relevant publications on murine models and the abscopal effect in radiation cancer research following PRISMA methodology. In particular, through a log-likelihood method, we evaluated whether the occurrence of abscopal effects may be related to the biologically effective dose (BED. To this aim, studies accomplished with different tumor histotypes were considered in our analysis including breast, colon, lung, fibrosarcoma, pancreas, melanoma and head and neck cancer. For all the tumors, the α / β ratio was assumed to be 10 Gy, as generally adopted for neoplastic cells.Our results support the hypothesis that the occurrence rate of abscopal effects in preclinical models increases with BED. In particular, the probability of revealing abscopal effects is 50% when a BED of 60 Gy is generated.Our study provides evidence that SABR treatments associated with high BEDs could be considered an effective strategy in triggering the abscopal effect, thus shedding light on the promising outcomes revealed in clinical practice.

  6. Modeling low-dose-rate effects in irradiated bipolar-base oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, R.J.; Cirba, C.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Michez, A.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Witczak, S.C.

    1997-02-01

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in BJTs. Simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for the low-dose-rate enhancement

  7. Evaluation of gamma dose effect on PIN photodiode using analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Boorboor, S.

    2018-03-01

    The PIN silicon photodiodes are widely used in the applications which may be found in radiation environment such as space mission, medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Radiation-induced damage in these devices causes to degrade the photodiode parameters. In this work, we have used new approach to evaluate gamma dose effects on a commercial PIN photodiode (BPX65) based on an analytical model. In this approach, the NIEL parameter has been calculated for gamma rays from a 60Co source by GEANT4. The radiation damage mechanisms have been considered by solving numerically the Poisson and continuity equations with the appropriate boundary conditions, parameters and physical models. Defects caused by radiation in silicon have been formulated in terms of the damage coefficient for the minority carriers' lifetime. The gamma induced degradation parameters of the silicon PIN photodiode have been analyzed in detail and the results were compared with experimental measurements and as well as the results of ATLAS semiconductor simulator to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. The results showed reasonable agreement between them for BPX65 silicon photodiode irradiated by 60Co gamma source at total doses up to 5 kGy under different reverse voltages.

  8. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  9. Dose modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; O'Hare, Neil John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is widely used in the treatment of numerous skin conditions. This treatment is well established and largely beneficial to patients on both physical and psychological levels; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can have detrimental effects, such as erythemal responses and ocular damage in addition to the potentially carcinogenic nature of UVR. For these reasons, it is essential to control and quantify the radiation dose incident upon the patient to ensure that it is both biologically effective and has the minimal possible impact on the surrounding unaffected tissue. Methods: To date, there has been little work on dose modeling, and the output of artificial UVR sources is an area where research has been recommended. This work characterizes these sources by formalizing an approach from first principles and experimentally examining this model. Results: An implementation of a line source model is found to give impressive accuracy and quantifies the output radiation well. Conclusions: This method could potentially serve as a basis for a full computational dose model for quantifying patient dose.

  10. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on life span prolongation of human premature-aging syndrome model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2006-01-01

    We previously showed that Type II diabetes model mice prolonged of their life span by life long low dose rate irradiation. We also found that antioxidant function in variety tissues of some strain of mice were enhancement after low dose/low dose rate irradiation. The prolongation of life span might depend on certain damaged level of reactive oxygen species. We thought the effect of the prolongation was due to the enhancement of the antioxidant activities after irradiation. We investigated whether the enhancement of antioxidant activities after low dose rate irradiation had an effect on life span prolongation. Four-week-old female human premature-aging syndrome model mice, kl/kl (klotho) mice, which the life span of this model mouse is about 65 days, were irradiated with gamma rays at 0.35, 0.70 or 1.2 mGy/hr. The 0.70 mGy/hr-irradiated group remarkably effected on the prolongation of their life span. Some mice of the group were extremely survived for about and more 100 days. Antioxidant activities in the irradiated groups were enhancement by low dose rate irradiation, however the dependence of the dose rates were not clearly difference. These results suggest that the antioxidant activities in this model mouse were enhanced by the low dose rate irradiation, and may make it possible to prolong the life span of this mouse. (author)

  11. Effect of Nordic ciets on ECOSYS model predictions of ingestion doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne S.; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Andersson, Kasper Grann

    2010-01-01

    The ECOSYS model is used to estimate ingestion dose in the ARGOS and RODOS decision support systems for nuclear emergency management. It is recommended that nation-specific values for several parameters are used in the model. However, this is generally overlooked when the systems are used in prac...

  12. Agreement of quadratic and CRE models in predicting the late effects of continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    These letters discuss the problems associated with the fact that the normal tissue isoeffect formulae based on the Ellis equation (1969) do not correctly account for the late-occurring effects of fractionated radiotherapy, and with the extension of the linear quadratic model to include continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy with constant or decaying sources by R.G. Dale (1985). J.A. O'Donoghue points out that the 'late effects' and CRE curves correspond closely, whilst the 'acute effects; and CRE curves are in obvious disagreement. For continuous low-dose-rate radiotherapy, the CRE and late effects quadratic model are in agreement. Useful bibliography. (U.K.)

  13. Experimental data and dose-response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response relationships for radiation carcinogenesis have been of interest to biologists, modelers, and statisticians for many years. Despite his interest there are few instances in which there are sufficient experimental data to allow the fitting of various dose-response models. In those experimental systems for which data are available the dose-response curves for tumor induction for the various systems cannot be described by a single model. Dose-response models which have been observed following acute exposures to gamma rays include threshold, quadratic, and linear models. Data on sex, age, and environmental influences of dose suggest a strong role of host factors on the dose response. With decreasing dose rate the effectiveness of gamma ray irradiation tends to decrease in essentially every instance. In those cases in which the high dose rate dose response could be described by a quadratic model, the effect of dose rate is consistent with predictions based on radiation effects on the induction of initial events. Whether the underlying reasons for the observed dose-rate effect is a result of effects on the induction of initial events or is due to effects on the subsequent steps in the carcinogenic process is unknown. Information on the dose response for tumor induction for high LET (linear energy transfer) radiations such as neutrons is even more limited. The observed dose and dose rate data for tumor induction following neutron exposure are complex and do not appear to be consistent with predictions based on models for the induction of initial events

  14. Model of organ dose combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valley, J.-F.; Lerch, P.

    1977-01-01

    The ICRP recommendations are based on the limitation of the dose to each organ. In the application and for a unique source the critical organ concept allows to limit the calculation and represents the irradiation status of an individuum. When several sources of radiation are involved the derivation of the dose contribution of each source to each organ is necessary. In order to represent the irradiation status a new parameter is to be defined. Propositions have been made by some authors, in particular by Jacobi introducing at this level biological parameters like the incidence rate of detriment and its severity. The new concept is certainly richer than a simple dose notion. However, in the actual situation of knowledge about radiation effects an intermediate parameter, using only physical concepts and the maximum permissible doses to the organs, seems more appropriate. The model, which is a generalization of the critical organ concept and shall be extended in the future to take the biological effects into account, will be presented [fr

  15. Modeling of transient ionizing radiation effects in bipolar devices at high dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FJELDLY, T.A.; DENG, Y.; SHUR, M.S.; HJALMARSON, HAROLD P.; MUYSHONDT, ARNOLDO

    2000-01-01

    To optimally design circuits for operation at high intensities of ionizing radiation, and to accurately predict their a behavior under radiation, precise device models are needed that include both stationary and dynamic effects of such radiation. Depending on the type and intensity of the ionizing radiation, different degradation mechanisms, such as photoelectric effect, total dose effect, or single even upset might be dominant. In this paper, the authors consider the photoelectric effect associated with the generation of electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor. The effects of low radiation intensity on p-II diodes and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) were described by low-injection theory in the classical paper by Wirth and Rogers. However, in BJTs compatible with modem integrated circuit technology, high-resistivity regions are often used to enhance device performance, either as a substrate or as an epitaxial layer such as the low-doped n-type collector region of the device. Using low-injection theory, the transient response of epitaxial BJTs was discussed by Florian et al., who mainly concentrated on the effects of the Hi-Lo (high doping - low doping) epilayer/substrate junction of the collector, and on geometrical effects of realistic devices. For devices with highly resistive regions, the assumption of low-level injection is often inappropriate, even at moderate radiation intensities, and a more complete theory for high-injection levels was needed. In the dynamic photocurrent model by Enlow and Alexander. p-n junctions exposed to high-intensity radiation were considered. In their work, the variation of the minority carrier lifetime with excess carrier density, and the effects of the ohmic electric field in the quasi-neutral (q-n) regions were included in a simplified manner. Later, Wunsch and Axness presented a more comprehensive model for the transient radiation response of p-n and p-i-n diode geometries. A stationary model for high-level injection in p

  16. Biostatistical approaches for modeling U-shaped dose-response curves and study design considerations in assessing the biological effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, T.

    1992-01-01

    The demonstration of hormetic effects is rendered difficult for a number of reasons: The spontaneous rate must be large enough for a difference to be detectable. In contrast with detrimental effects, there is a limited range of doses over which beneficial effects are likely to be found. Publication bias hampers publication of low-dose beneficial effects and discourages research in the area. Some scientists actually believe that hormetic effects are contary to reason. All these factors contribute to lessen the chances of detecting hormetic effects through synthesis of the scientific literature. The extra statistical power obtained from mathematical modeling is not available for hormetic studies when appropriate models are not available. Even a simple statistical device such as a test for linear trend does not work well for U-shaped data. The first part of this two-part chapter deals with the probabilities of determining qualitatively what kinds of health effects may result from exposures to substances, and the second part with characterizing quantitative relationships between such health effects and exposures. The health effects may be beneficial in some situations, and detrimental in others

  17. Urban contamination and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, E.; Barry, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear power reactors and other nuclear facilities are being built near or even within urban centres. Accidental releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere in built-up areas result in radiological exposure pathways that differ from those caused by releases in rural environments. Other than inhalation, exposure pathways involve external radiation from the plume while it passes and from radioactivity deposited onto the many and varied surfaces after it has passed. Radiation fields inside buildings are attenuated but many people are potentially exposed so while individual doses may be relatively low, population integrated doses may be high enough to cause concern. It is important, therefore, to assess the potential exposures and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of dose reduction measures in urban environments. This report describes a model developed to carry out such assessments. The model draws heavily on experience gained in European cities after their contamination fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Input is time integrated concentrations of specific radionuclides in urban air, obtained either by direct measurement or by prediction using an atmospheric dispersion model. The code includes default values for site specific variables and transfer parameters but the user is invited if desired to enter other values from the keyboard. Output is the time integrated dose rates for individuals selected because of the characteristic living, working and recreational habits. An accompanying manual documents the technical background on which the model is based and leads a first-time suer through various steps and operations encountered while the model is running. (author). 60 refs., 10 tabs., 1 fig

  18. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubeck, Claere von [German Cancer Consortium DKTK partner site Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Geniza, Matthew J. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 (United States); Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, R. Joe; Chrisler, William B. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B., E-mail: marianne.sowa@pnnl.gov [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Low doses of high LET radiation influence skin homeostasis. • Effects on proliferation and differentiation profiles are LET dependent. • Skin barrier function is not compromised following low dose exposure. - Abstract: Outside the protection of Earth's atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin's barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  19. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry; Effets sanitaires des faibles doses a faibles debits de dose: modelisation de la relation dose-reponse dans une cohorte de travailleurs du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-09-19

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  20. Evaluation of indoor radon equilibrium factor using CFD modeling and resulting annual effective dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2018-04-01

    The equilibrium factor is an important parameter for reasonably estimating the population dose from radon. However, the equilibrium factor value depended mainly on the ventilation rate and the meteorological factors. Therefore, this study focuses on investigating numerically the influence of the ventilation rate, temperature and humidity on equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny. The numerical results showed that ventilation rate, temperature and humidity have significant impacts on indoor equilibrium factor. The variations of equilibrium factor with the ventilation, temperature and relative humidity are discussed. Moreover, the committed equivalent doses due to 218Po and 214Po radon short-lived progeny were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of the members of the public from the inhalation of indoor air. The annual effective dose due to radon short lived progeny from the inhalation of indoor air by the members of the public was investigated.

  1. Co-administration of morphine and gabapentin leads to dose dependent synergistic effects in a rat model of postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papathanasiou, Theodoros; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    dose combinations and investigate whether co-administration leads to synergistic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The pharmacodynamic effects of morphine (1, 3 and 7 mg/kg), gabapentin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) or their combination (9 combinations in total) were evaluated in the rat...... plantar incision model using an electronic von Frey device. The percentage of maximum possible effect (%MPE) and the area under the response curve (AUC) were used for evaluation of the antihyperalgesic effects of the drugs. Identification of synergistic interactions was based on Loewe additivity response...... surface analyses. The combination of morphine and gabapentin resulted in synergistic antihyperalgesic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The synergistic interactions were found to be dose dependent and the increase in observed response compared to the theoretical additive response...

  2. Effects of body habitus on internal radiation dose calculations using the 5-year-old anthropomorphic male models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    Xtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code and calculated the absorbed dose and effective dose of five 18F-labelled radiotracers for children of various habitus. For most organs, the S-value of F-18 presents stronger statistical correlations with body weight, standing height and sitting height than BMI...... and SSR. The self-absorbed fraction and self-absorbed S-values of F-18 and the absorbed dose and effective dose of 18F-labelled radiotracers present with the strongest statistical correlations with body weight. For 18F-Amino acids, 18F-Brain receptor substances, 18F-FDG, 18F-L-DOPA and 18F-FBPA, the mean...... absolute effective dose differences between phantoms of different habitus and fixed reference models are 11.4%, 11.3%, 10.8%, 13.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Total body weight, standing height and sitting height have considerable effects on human internal dosimetry. Radiation dose calculations...

  3. Cumulative Training Dose's Effects on Interrelationships Between Common Training-Load Models During Basketball Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Fox, Jordan L; Borges, Nattai R; Dascombe, Ben J; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2017-02-01

    The influence of various factors on training-load (TL) responses in basketball has received limited attention. This study aimed to examine the temporal changes and influence of cumulative training dose on TL responses and interrelationships during basketball activity. Ten state-level Australian male junior basketball players completed 4 × 10-min standardized bouts of simulated basketball activity using a circuit-based protocol. Internal TL was quantified using the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE), summated heart-rate zones (SHRZ), Banister training impulse (TRIMP), and Lucia TRIMP models. External TL was assessed via measurement of mean sprint and circuit speeds. Temporal TL comparisons were performed between 10-min bouts, while Pearson correlation analyses were conducted across cumulative training doses (0-10, 0-20, 0-30, and 0-40 min). sRPE TL increased (P basketball activity. sRPE TL was only significantly related to Lucia TRIMP (r = .66-.69; P basketball training doses lasting beyond 20 min. Thus, the interchangeability of commonly used internal and external TL approaches appears dose-dependent during basketball activity, with various psychophysiological mediators likely underpinning temporal changes.

  4. Modeling the effects of ion dose and crystallographic symmetry on the morphological evolution of embedded precipitates under thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kun-Dar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We model the faceted precipitates formation by post-implantation annealing. •The anisotropic interfacial energy and diffusion kinetics play crucial roles. •The evolutions of faceted precipitates, including Ostwald ripening, are revealed. •The mechanism of the nucleation and growth is based on the atomic diffusion. •The effects of ion dose and crystallographic symmetry are also investigated. -- Abstract: Thermal annealing is one of the most common techniques to synthesize embedded precipitates by ion implantation process. In this study, an anisotropic phase field model is presented to investigate the effects of ion dose and crystallographic symmetry on the morphological formation and evolution of embedded precipitates during post-implantation thermal annealing process. This theoretical model provides an efficient numerical approach to understand the phenomenon of faceted precipitates formation by ion implantation. As a theoretical analysis, the interfacial energy and diffusion kinetics play prominent roles in the mechanism of atomic diffusion for the precipitates formation. With a low ion dose, faceted precipitates are developed by virtue of the anisotropic interfacial energy. As an increase of ion dose, connected precipitates with crystallographic characters on the edge are appeared. For a high ion dose, labyrinth-like nanostructures of precipitates are produced and the characteristic morphology of crystallographic symmetry becomes faint. These simulation results for the morphological evolutions of embedded precipitates by ion implantation are corresponded with many experimental observations in the literatures. The quantitative analyses of the simulations are also well described the consequence of precipitates formation under different conditions

  5. MODELS SELECTED FOR CALCULATION OF DOSES, HEALTH EFFECTS AND ECONOMIC COSTS DUE TO ACCIDENTAL RADIONUCLIDE RELEASES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D L; Baker, D A; Droppo, J G; McPherson, R B; Napier, B A; Nieves, L A; Soldat, J K

    1980-05-01

    Models are described for use in site-specific environmental consequence analysis of nuclear reactor accidents of Classes 3 through 9. The models presented relate radioactivity released to resulting doses, health effects, and costs of remedial actions. Specific models are presented for the major exposure pathways of airborne releases, waterborne releases and direct irradiation from activity within the facility buildings, such as the containment. Time-dependent atmospheric dispersion parameters, crop production parameters and other variable parameters are used in the models. The environmental effects are analyzed for several accident start times during the year.

  6. Dose-rate and oxygen effects in models of lipid membranes: linoleic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raleigh, J A; Kremers, W; Gaboury, B [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba. Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1977-03-01

    Cellular membranes have been suggested as possible loci for the development of the oxygen effect in radiobiology. Unsaturated lipids from membranes are subject to very efficient radiation-induced peroxidation, and the deleterious effects generally associated with lipid autoxidation could be initiated by ionizing radiation. Oxidative damage in lipids was characterized not only by high yields but also by a profound dose-rate effect. At dose-rates of x irradiation below 100 rad/min, a very sharp rise occurred in oxidative damage. This damage has been quantified spectrophotometrically in terms of diene conjugation (O.D. 234 mm) and chromatographically in terms of specific 9- and 13-hydroperoxide formation in linoleic acid micelles. Radical scavenging experiments indicated that hydroxyl radical attack initiated the oxidative damage. Dimethyl sulphoxide is exceptional in that it did not protect, but sensitized, linoleic acid to radiation-induced peroxidation. The yields of hydroperoxides were substantial (G = 10 to 40) and could be related to biological changes known to be effected by autoxidizing lipids.

  7. Effects of body habitus on internal radiation dose calculations using the 5-year-old anthropomorphic male models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-08-01

    Computational phantoms are commonly used in internal radiation dosimetry to assess the amount and distribution pattern of energy deposited in various parts of the human body from different internal radiation sources. Radiation dose assessments are commonly performed on predetermined reference computational phantoms while the argument for individualized patient-specific radiation dosimetry exists. This study aims to evaluate the influence of body habitus on internal dosimetry and to quantify the uncertainties in dose estimation correlated with the use of fixed reference models. The 5-year-old IT’IS male phantom was modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body weight, body height and sitting height/stature ratio (SSR), determined from reference databases, thus enabling the creation of 125 5-year-old habitus-dependent male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile body morphometries. We evaluated the absorbed fractions and the mean absorbed dose to the target region per unit cumulative activity in the source region (S-values) of F-18 in 46 source regions for the generated 125 anthropomorphic 5-year-old hybrid male phantoms using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code and calculated the absorbed dose and effective dose of five 18F-labelled radiotracers for children of various habitus. For most organs, the S-value of F-18 presents stronger statistical correlations with body weight, standing height and sitting height than BMI and SSR. The self-absorbed fraction and self-absorbed S-values of F-18 and the absorbed dose and effective dose of 18F-labelled radiotracers present with the strongest statistical correlations with body weight. For 18F-Amino acids, 18F-Brain receptor substances, 18F-FDG, 18F-L-DOPA and 18F-FBPA, the mean absolute effective dose differences between phantoms of different habitus and fixed reference models are 11.4%, 11.3%, 10.8%, 13.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Total body

  8. Dose related risk and effect assessment model (DREAM) -- A more realistic approach to risk assessment of offshore discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, S.; Furuholt, E.

    1995-01-01

    Risk assessment of discharges from offshore oil and gas production to the marine environment features determination of potential environmental concentration (PEC) levels and no observed effect concentration (NOEC) levels. The PEC values are normally based on dilution of chemical components in the actual discharge source in the recipient, while the NOEC values are determined by applying a safety factor to acute toxic effects from laboratory tests. The DREAM concept focuses on realistic exposure doses as function of contact time and dilution, rather than fixed exposure concentrations of chemicals in long time exposure regimes. In its present state, the DREAM model is based on a number of assumptions with respect to the link between real life exposure doses and effects observed in laboratory tests. A research project has recently been initiated to develop the concept further, with special focus on chronic effects of different chemical compounds on the marine ecosystem. One of the questions that will be addressed is the link between exposure time, dose, concentration and effect. Validation of the safety factors applied for transforming acute toxic data into NOEC values will also be included. The DREAM model has been used by Statoil for risk assessment of discharges from new and existing offshore oil and gas production fields, and has been found to give a much more realistic results than conventional risk assessment tools. The presentation outlines the background for the DREAM approach, describes the model in its present state, discusses further developments and applications, and shows a number of examples on the performance of DREAM

  9. Dose assessment models. Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The models presented in this chapter have been separated into 2 general categories: environmental transport models which describe the movement of radioactive materials through all sectors of the environment after their release, and dosimetric models to calculate the absorbed dose following an intake of radioactive materials or exposure to external irradiation. Various sections of this chapter also deal with atmospheric transport models, terrestrial models, and aquatic models.

  10. Effects of low-dose gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, N.; McFarlane, N.M.; Lemon, J.; Boreham, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Using a successful new automation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) scoring, the effects of low-dose (< 1.0 Gy) gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes (RET) in a mouse model were investigated. Gamma and neutron irradiation induced significant (p<0.001) increases in the levels of %MN-RET and decreases in the levels of %RET (p<0.001) as the dose level increased. Increasing dose levels showed that gamma radiation induced significantly (p<0.05) more %MN-RET and more %RET than neutron radiation. The results suggest that neutron irradiation may be more cytotoxic (less %RET) than gamma irradiation; however, gamma irradiation may be producing cells with more chromosomal aberrations (more %MN-RET) than neutron irradiation. (author)

  11. Effects of low-dose gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan, N.; McFarlane, N.M.; Lemon, J.; Boreham, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Using a successful new automation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) scoring, the effects of low-dose (< 1.0 Gy) gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes (RET) in a mouse model were investigated. Gamma and neutron irradiation induced significant (p<0.001) increases in the levels of %MN-RET and decreases in the levels of %RET (p<0.001) as the dose level increased. Increasing dose levels showed that gamma radiation induced significantly (p<0.05) more %MN-RET and more %RET than neutron radiation. The results suggest that neutron irradiation may be more cytotoxic (less %RET) than gamma irradiation; however, gamma irradiation may be producing cells with more chromosomal aberrations (more %MN-RET) than neutron irradiation. (author)

  12. A model for inverse dose-rate effects - low dose-rate hyper-sensibility in response to targeted radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, I.; Mather, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival, developed for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), could be extended to targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) in order to predict dose-response relationships in a cell line exhibiting low dose hypersensitivity (LDH). Methods: aliquots of the PC-3 cancer cell line were treated with either EBRT or an in-vitro model of TRT (Irradiation of cell culture with Y-90 EDTA over 24, 48, 72 or 96 hours). Dosimetry for the TRT was calculated using radiation transport simulations with the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code. Clonogenic as well as functional biological assays were used to assess cell response. An extension of the LQ model was developed which incorporated a dose-rate threshold for activation of repair mechanisms. Results: accurate dosimetry for in-vitro exposures of cell cultures to radioactivity was established. LQ parameters of cell survival were established for the PC-3 cell line in response to EBRT. The standard LQ model did not predict survival in PC-3 cells exposed to Y 90 irradiation over periods of up to 96 hours. In fact cells were more sensitive to the same dose when irradiation was carried out over 96 hours than 24 hours. I.e. at a lower dose-rate. Deviations from the LQ predictions were most pronounced below a threshold dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/hr. These results led to an extension of the LQ model based upon a dose-rate dependent sigmoid model of single strand DNA repair. This extension to the model resulted in predicted cell survival curves that closely matched the experimental data. Conclusion: the LQ model of cell survival to radiation has been shown to be largely predictive of response to low dose-rate irradiation. However, in cells displaying LDH, further adaptation of the model was required. (authors)

  13. Effects of low-dose rate irradiation on two types of type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaji; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated in two mouse strains - C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db mouse) and AKITA (AKITA mouse)-for type II diabetes mellitus. Both strains develop the developed type II diabetes by about 8 weeks of age due to dysfunction of the insulin/insulin receptor. The db Mouse' shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism, and the onset of Type II diabetes like resembles that for Westerners. On the other hand, the AKITA mouse has exhibits disordered insulin secretion, and the diabetes such as resembles that of Asians. Ten-week old female mice, in groups of 8 or 12, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of urine glucose was measured with test slips. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were highly elevated the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group of db mice, three mice showed decrease in glucose level compare to the level of non-irradiated diabetes mice after 35, 52 or 80 weeks of irradiation. All had maintained a normal level thereafter. No such improvement in diabetes was ever observed in the 12 mice of in the non-irradiated control group. The AKITA mice, however, did not decrease the glucose level regardless of the irradiation. Both the db mice and AKITA mice had their lives prolonged their life by the irradiation. The survival rate of db mice at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, but 50% in the non-irradiated group. The average life span was 104 weeks in the irradiated group and 87 weeks in the control group. Furthermore, a marked difference was furthermore observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; appearances were well preserved in the irradiated group. The average life span in the irradiated AKITA mice was also longer than that for the non-irradiated mice, 51 weeks and 41 weeks in the irradiated and non-irradiated group respectively. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation

  14. Bone and marrow dose modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine therapy is being used increasingly in the treatment of cancer (thyroid, leukemia/lymphoma with RIT, primary and secondary bone malignancies, and neuroblastomas). In all cases it is marrow toxicity that limits the amount of treatment that can be administered safely. Marrow dose calculations are more difficult than for many major organs because of the intricate association of bone and soft tissue elements. In RIT, there appears to be no consensus on how to calculate that dose accurately, or of individual patients ability to tolerate planned therapy. Available dose models are designed after an idealized average, healthy individual. Patient-specific methods are applied in evaluation of biokinetic data, and need to be developed for treatment of the physical data (dose conversion factors) as well: age, prior patient therapy, disease status. Contributors to marrow dose: electrons and photons

  15. Recovery Effect and Life Prolong Effect of Long Term Low-Dose Rate Irradiation on Type II Diabetes Model Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Suzuki, I.; Sakai, K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated on model mice for type II diabetes mellitus, C57BL/KsJ-db/db. The mice develop the type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age due to obesity and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. Female 10-week old mice, a group of 12 mice, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr from 137-Cs (370 GBq). The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, the decrease in the glucose level was observed in 3 mice. Such recovery from the diabetes was never observed in 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There is no systematic difference in the change of body weight, food assumption, and amount of drinking water, between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. The survival was better in the irradiated group: the surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, while 40% in the non-irradiated. Marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; better condition was kept in the irradiated group. In the irradiated mice mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20 ? 30 weeks compared with the non-irradiated mice. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, which lead not only to the recovery of the diabetes, but also to the suppression of the aging process. (Author)

  16. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  17. Limitations of a convolution method for modeling geometric uncertainties in radiation therapy: the radiobiological dose-per-fraction effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, William; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    The convolution method can be used to model the effect of random geometric uncertainties into planned dose distributions used in radiation treatment planning. This is effectively done by linearly adding infinitesimally small doses, each with a particular geometric offset, over an assumed infinite number of fractions. However, this process inherently ignores the radiobiological dose-per-fraction effect since only the summed physical dose distribution is generated. The resultant potential error on predicted radiobiological outcome [quantified in this work with tumor control probability (TCP), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)] has yet to be thoroughly quantified. In this work, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of geometric displacements are compared to those of the convolution method for random geometric uncertainties of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm (standard deviation). The α/β CTV ratios of 0.8, 1.5, 3, 5, and 10 Gy are used to represent the range of radiation responses for different tumors, whereas a single α/β OAR ratio of 3 Gy is used to represent all the organs at risk (OAR). The analysis is performed on a four-field prostate treatment plan of 18 MV x rays. The fraction numbers are varied from 1-50, with isoeffective adjustments of the corresponding dose-per-fractions to maintain a constant tumor control, using the linear-quadratic cell survival model. The average differences in TCP and EUD of the target, and in NTCP and gEUD of the OAR calculated from the convolution and Monte Carlo methods reduced asymptotically as the total fraction number increased, with the differences reaching negligible levels beyond the treatment fraction number of ≥20. The convolution method generally overestimates the radiobiological indices, as compared to the Monte Carlo method, for the target volume, and underestimates those for the OAR. These effects are interconnected and attributed

  18. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  19. Bio-physical effects of scanned proton beams: measurements and models for discrete high dose rates scanning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Marzi, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop and optimize algorithms for intensity modulated proton therapy, taking into account the physical and biological pencil beam properties. A model based on the summation and fluence weighted division of the pencil beams has been used. A new parameterization of the lateral dose distribution has been developed using a combination of three Gaussian functions. The algorithms have been implemented into a treatment planning system, then experimentally validated and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Some approximations have been made and validated in order to achieve reasonable calculation times for clinical purposes. In a second phase, a collaboration with Institut Curie radiobiological teams has been started in order to implement radiobiological parameters and results into the optimization loop of the treatment planning process. Indeed, scanned pencil beams are pulsed and delivered at high dose rates (from 10 to 100 Gy/s), and the relative biological efficiency of protons is still relatively unknown given the wide diversity of use of these beams: the different models available and their dependence with linear energy transfers have been studied. A good agreement between dose calculations and measurements (deviations lower than 3 % and 2 mm) has been obtained. An experimental protocol has been set in order to qualify pulsed high dose rate effects and preliminary results obtained on one cell line suggested variations of the biological efficiency up to 10 %, though with large uncertainties. (author) [fr

  20. Comparison of Nordic dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1978-04-01

    A comparison is made between the models used in the four Nordic countries, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark, for calculation of concentrations and doses from releases of radioactive material to the atmosphere. The comparison is limited to the near-zone models, i.e. the models for calculation of concentrations and doses within 50 km from the release point, and it comprises the following types of calculation: a. Concentrations of airborne material, b. External gamma doses from a plume, c. External gamma doses from radioactive material deposited on the ground. All models are based on the gaussian dispersion model (the gaussian plume model). Unit releases of specific isotopes under specific meteorological conditions are assumed. On the basis of the calculation results from the models, it is concluded that there are no essential differences. The difference between the calculation results only exceeds a factor of 3 in special cases. It thus lies within the known limits of uncertainty for the gaussian plume model. (author)

  1. Alkaline earth metabolism: a model useful in calculating organ burdens, excretion rates and committed effective dose equivalent conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Myers, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Two mathematical models of alkaline earth metabolism in man have been developed from the postulates given in ICRP Publication 20. Both models have recycling between the organs and blood included explicitly, and the first one retains the power function used by the ICRP for diminution in mineral bone from being available for resorption by blood. In the second model, this diminution is represented by secondary compartments in mineral bone. Both models give good agreement with the retention functions developed in ICRP Publication 20. The second one has been incorporated into a larger model which includes the lung and G.I. tract. This overall model has been used to calculate organ burdens excretion rates, and committed effective dose equivalent factors for the more important radioisotopes of the alkaline earth elements for inhalation and ingestion exposures. (author)

  2. A kinematic model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive isotopes in the human body for radiological protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure becomes a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplified the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed an exact model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that the above method accord too much with the actual mechanism of metabolism in human bodies, it becomes rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional hydrological tank model. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of this method is to estimate the energy radiated from the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of E. Fermi of beta decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this study are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no intentional and operational parameters of coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to observation of ICRP. Figure.1 compares time

  3. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S J; Pozzi, E C C; Monti Hughes, A; Provenzano, L; Koivunoro, H; Carando, D G; Thorp, S I; Casal, M R; Bortolussi, S; Trivillin, V A; Garabalino, M A; Curotto, P; Heber, E M; Santa Cruz, G A; Kankaanranta, L; Joensuu, H; Schwint, A E

    2017-10-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  4. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S. J.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Monti Hughes, A.; Provenzano, L.; Koivunoro, H.; Carando, D. G.; Thorp, S. I.; Casal, M. R.; Bortolussi, S.; Trivillin, V. A.; Garabalino, M. A.; Curotto, P.; Heber, E. M.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Kankaanranta, L.; Joensuu, H.; Schwint, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  5. Model of cancer growth affected by irradiation. Effect of fluctuating intensity of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of a biological model system which describes the growth of a cancer cell population in the presence of external irradiation is studied. The effect of randomly fluctuating source of radiation is analysed and its influence on cancer cell extinction is presented. The main stress is put on the biological significance of random fluctuations which seem to favour rejection of a tumor. (author)

  6. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  7. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  8. Model-based Iterative Reconstruction: Effect on Patient Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Pediatric Body CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Jonathan R.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G.; Keshavarzi, Nahid; Strouse, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively compare image quality and radiation dose between a reduced-dose computed tomographic (CT) protocol that uses model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and a standard-dose CT protocol that uses 30% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained. Clinical CT images of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis obtained with a reduced-dose protocol were identified. Images were reconstructed with two algorithms: MBIR and 100% ASIR. All subjects had undergone standard-dose CT within the prior year, and the images were reconstructed with 30% ASIR. Reduced- and standard-dose images were evaluated objectively and subjectively. Reduced-dose images were evaluated for lesion detectability. Spatial resolution was assessed in a phantom. Radiation dose was estimated by using volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol) and calculated size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). A combination of descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and t tests was used for statistical analysis. Results In the 25 patients who underwent the reduced-dose protocol, mean decrease in CTDIvol was 46% (range, 19%–65%) and mean decrease in SSDE was 44% (range, 19%–64%). Reduced-dose MBIR images had less noise (P > .004). Spatial resolution was superior for reduced-dose MBIR images. Reduced-dose MBIR images were equivalent to standard-dose images for lungs and soft tissues (P > .05) but were inferior for bones (P = .004). Reduced-dose 100% ASIR images were inferior for soft tissues (P ASIR. Conclusion CT performed with a reduced-dose protocol and MBIR is feasible in the pediatric population, and it maintains diagnostic quality. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24091359

  9. HUMTRN and EFFECTS: Age and sex specific dosimetric and physiological human population dynamics models for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    A human simulation model called HUMTRN and a population risk assessment model called EFFECTS were developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a major component of the BIOTRAN environmental risk assessment model. HUMTRN simulates growth using dietary and physiological characteristics and kinetics of radionuclides to predict radiation doses to selected organs of both sexes in different age groups. The model called EFFECTS was interfaced with output from HUMTRN to predict cancer risks in a dynamic human population. EFFECTS is based on the National Research Council Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR)-III radiation cancer mortality estimates from the U.S. population mortality and natality estimates for both sexes between the ages of 1 and 70. These models track radiation intake from air, water, and food, calculate uptake in major growing organs, and estimate cancer mortality risks. This report documents the use of an IBM Personal Computer AT to run HUMTRN and EFFECTS. Air, water, and food contaminant concentrations are provided as input to HUMTRN, which then provides input for EFFECTS. The limitations of this approach are also discussed

  10. Effect of radiation dose rate and cyclophosphamide on pulmonary toxicity after total body irradiation in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, Akmal; Nielsen, Ole S.; El-Badawy, Samy; Overgaard, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is still a major complication after total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). It is difficult to determine the exact role of radiation in this multifactorial complication, especially because most of the experimental work on lung damage was done using localized lung irradiation and not TBI. We have thus tested the effect of radiation dose rate and combining cyclophosphamide (CTX) with single fraction TBI on lung damage in a mouse model for BMT. Methods and Materials: TBI was given as a single fraction at a high dose rate (HDR, 0.71 Gy/min) or a low dose rate (LDR, 0.08 Gy/min). CTX (250 mg/kg) was given 24 h before TBI. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed 4-6 h after the last treatment. Lung damage was assessed using ventilation rate (VR) and lethality between 28 and 180 days (LD (50(28))-180 ). Results: The LD 50 for lung damage, ± standard error (SE), increased from 12.0 (± 0.2) Gy using single fraction HDR to 15.8 (± 0.6) Gy using LDR. Adding CTX shifted the dose-response curves towards lower doses. The LD 50 values for the combined treatment were 5.3 (± 0.2) and 3.5 (± 0.2) Gy for HDR and LDR, respectively. This indicates that the combined effect of CTX and LDR was more toxic than that of combined CTX and HDR. Lung damage evaluated by VR demonstrated two waves of VR increase. The first wave of VR increase occurred after 6 weeks using TBI only and after 3 weeks in the combined CTX-TBI treatment, irrespective of total dose or dose rate. The second wave of VR elevation resembled the IP that follows localized thoracic irradiation in its time of occurrence. Conclusions: Lung damage following TBI could be spared using LDR. However, CTX markedly enhances TBI-induced lung damage. The combination of CTX and LDR is more toxic to the lungs than combining CTX and HDR

  11. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El-Shanshoury

    2016-07-01

    The present findings suggest that damage from IR causes a significant reduction in blood cell counts in a dose-dependent manner, which may be considered a potential health risk during exposure to irradiation. Much effort must be done and focused on establishment of protocols for medical management of radiation injuries based on hematopoietic changes for biodosimetry.

  12. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  13. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  14. Plutonium dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Osamu

    1976-01-01

    Dose in internal exposure to Pu was investigated, and dose-effect relationship was discussed. Dose-effect relationship in internal exposure was investigated by means of two methods, which were relationship between dose and its effect (relationship between μ Ci/Kg and its effect), and exposure dose and its effects (rad-effect), and merits and demerits of two methods were mentioned. Problems in a indication method such as mean dose were discussed with respect to the dose in skeleton, the liver and the lung. Pu-induced osteosarcoma in mice rats, and beagles was described, and differences in its induction between animals were discussed. Pulmonary neoplasma induced by 239 PuO 2 inhalation in beagles was reported, and description was made as to differences in induction of lung cancer between animals when Pu was inhaled and was taken into the lung. A theoretical and experimental study of a extrapolation of the results of the animal experiment using Pu to human cases is necessary. (Serizawa, K.)

  15. Monte Carlo dose calculations and radiobiological modelling: analysis of the effect of the statistical noise of the dose distribution on the probability of tumour control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffa, Francesca M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of the statistical fluctuations of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions on the dose volume histograms (DVHs) and radiobiological models, in particular the Poisson model for tumour control probability (tcp). The MC matrix is characterized by a mean dose in each scoring voxel, d, and a statistical error on the mean dose, σ d ; whilst the quantities d and σ d depend on many statistical and physical parameters, here we consider only their dependence on the phantom voxel size and the number of histories from the radiation source. Dose distributions from high-energy photon beams have been analysed. It has been found that the DVH broadens when increasing the statistical noise of the dose distribution, and the tcp calculation systematically underestimates the real tumour control value, defined here as the value of tumour control when the statistical error of the dose distribution tends to zero. When increasing the number of energy deposition events, either by increasing the voxel dimensions or increasing the number of histories from the source, the DVH broadening decreases and tcp converges to the 'correct' value. It is shown that the underestimation of the tcp due to the noise in the dose distribution depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the radiobiological parameters over the population; in particular this error decreases with increasing the biological heterogeneity, whereas it becomes significant in the hypothesis of a radiosensitivity assay for single patients, or for subgroups of patients. It has been found, for example, that when the voxel dimension is changed from a cube with sides of 0.5 cm to a cube with sides of 0.25 cm (with a fixed number of histories of 10 8 from the source), the systematic error in the tcp calculation is about 75% in the homogeneous hypothesis, and it decreases to a minimum value of about 15% in a case of high radiobiological heterogeneity. The possibility of using the error on the

  16. Effective doses in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, Olga; Diaconescu, Cornelia; Roca, Antoaneta

    2001-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study is to assess in terms of effective doses the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses to the patient. Effective doses have been derived from measurements of dose-area product (DAP) carried out on over 900 patients undergoing X-ray examinations, in five paediatric units. The conversion coefficients for estimating effective doses are those calculated by the NRPB using Monte-Carlo technique on a series of 5 mathematical phantoms representing 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old children. The annual frequency of X-ray examinations necessary for collective dose calculation are those reported in our last national study on medical exposure, conducted in 1995. The annual effective doses from all medical examinations for the average paediatric patient are as follows: 1.05 mSv for 0 year old, 0.98 mSv for 1 year old, 0.53 mSv for 5 year old, 0.65 mSv for 10 year old and 0.70 mSv for 15 year old. The resulting annual collective effective dose was evaluated at 625 man Sv with the largest contribution of pelvis and hip examinations (34%). The annual collective effective associated with paediatric radiology in Romania represent 5% of the annual value resulting from all diagnostic radiology. Examination of the chest is by far the most frequent procedure for children, accounting for about 60 per cent of all annually performed X-ray conventional examinations. Knowledge of real level of patient dose is an essential component of quality assurance programs in paediatric radiology. (authors)

  17. Synergistic Effects of Ad-Libitum Low-Dose Fructose Drinking and Low-Dose Streptozotocin Treatment in Wistar Rats: A Mild Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asie Sadeghi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To develop a convenient animal model of T2D by pretreatment with low-dose 10% w/v fructose (FRC solution followed by the injection of low doses of streptozotocin (STZ in Wistar rats. For this 8-week experimental study; rats were first fed a standard chow ad-libitum diet and either tap water (n=40 or 10% w/v FRC solution (n=40 for 4 weeks. Next, rats in each category were randomly allocated to 4 subgroups (n=10 each of low-dose STZ (25,35, and 45 mg/kg. The final mean fasting blood sugar (FBG of FRC+STZ45 (197±55.87 mg/dl were significantly higher than that of the STZ45 (P=0.015 and FRC (P=0.019 groups. FRC+STZ45 showed the highest insulin resistance demonstrated by insulin tolerance test [area under the curve (AUC of insulin tolerance test; P<0.05]. AUC was not significantly different between the STZ45 and non-STZ groups and between FRC and non-FRC fed groups. Furthermore, FBG levels did not differ between FRC and non-FRC groups. Body weight measurement showed that the FRC+STZ45 group had the lowest body weight compared to all other groups. Our data provide the evidence that FRC and STZ45 synergistically could induce hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in Wistar rats. Here we presented a feasible model for initial forms of T2D by employing pretreatment with low-dose FRC solution and treatment with low-dose STZ.

  18. Radiobiological evaluation of the radiation dose as used in high-precision radiotherapy. Effect of prolonged delivery time and applicability of the linear-quadratic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Otsuka, Shinya; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Sugie, Chikao; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Natsuo

    2012-01-01

    Since the dose delivery pattern in high-precision radiotherapy is different from that in conventional radiation, radiobiological assessment of the physical dose used in stereotactic irradiation and intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become necessary. In these treatments, the daily dose is usually given intermittently over a time longer than that used in conventional radiotherapy. During prolonged radiation delivery, sublethal damage repair takes place, leading to the decreased effect of radiation. This phenomenon is almost universarily observed in vitro. In in vivo tumors, however, this decrease in effect can be counterbalanced by rapid reoxygenation, which has been demonstrated in a laboratory study. Studies on reoxygenation in human tumors are warranted to better evaluate the influence of prolonged radiation delivery. Another issue related to radiosurgery and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is the mathematical model for dose evaluation and conversion. Many clinicians use the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) to estimate the effects of various radiation schedules, but it has been suggested that the LQ model is not applicable to high doses per fraction. Recent experimental studies verified the inadequacy of the LQ model in converting hypofractionated doses into single doses. The LQ model overestimates the effect of high fractional doses of radiation. BED is particularly incorrect when it is used for tumor responses in vivo, since it does not take reoxygenation into account. For normal tissue responses, improved models have been proposed, but, for in vivo tumor responses, the currently available models are not satisfactory, and better ones should be proposed in future studies. (author)

  19. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@areva.com [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Fournier, Lionel [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Barbu, Alain [Alain Barbu Consultant, 6 Avenue Pasteur Martin Luther King, 78230 Le Pecq (France)

    2016-01-15

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium. - Highlights: • Irradiation of steels with helium is studied through a new cluster dynamics model. • There is only a small effect of helium on cavity distributions in PWR conditions. • An increase in helium production causes an increase in cavity density over 500 °C. • The role of helium is to stabilize cavities via reduced emission of vacancies.

  20. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  1. The ratio of ICRP103 to ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT: Monte Carlo calculations with the ADELAIDE voxel paediatric model and comparisons with published values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ADELAIDE voxel model of paediatric anatomy was used with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to compare effective dose from computed tomography (CT) calculated with both the ICRP103 and ICRP60 definitions which are different in their tissue weighting factors and in the included tissues. The new tissue weighting factors resulted in a lower effective dose for pelvis CT (than if calculated using ICRP60 tissue weighting factors), by 6.5 % but higher effective doses for all other examinations. ICRP103 calculated effective dose for CT abdomen + pelvis was higher by 4.6 %, for CT abdomen (by 9.5 %), for CT chest + abdomen + pelvis (by 6 %), for CT chest + abdomen (by 9.6 %), for CT chest (by 10.1 %) and for cardiac CT (by 11.5 %). These values, along with published values of effective dose from CT that were calculated for both sets of tissue weighting factors were used to determine single values for the ratio ICRP103:ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT, for seven CT examinations. The following values for ICRP103:ICRP60 are suggested for use to convert ICRP60 calculated effective dose to ICRP103 calculated effective dose for the following CT examinations: Pelvis CT, 0.75; for abdomen CT, abdomen + pelvis CT, chest + abdomen + pelvis CT, 1.00; for chest + abdomen CT, and for chest CT. 1.15; for cardiac CT 1.25.

  2. Modeling of Body Weight Metrics for Effective and Cost-Efficient Conventional Factor VIII Dosing in Hemophilia A Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanna McEneny-King

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The total body weight-based dosing strategy currently used in the prophylactic treatment of hemophilia A may not be appropriate for all populations. The assumptions that guide weight-based dosing are not valid in overweight and obese populations, resulting in overdosing and ineffective resource utilization. We explored different weight metrics including lean body weight, ideal body weight, and adjusted body weight to determine an alternative dosing strategy that is both safe and resource-efficient in normal and overweight/obese adult patients. Using a validated population pharmacokinetic model, we simulated a variety of dosing regimens using different doses, weight metrics, and frequencies; we also investigated the implications of assuming various levels of endogenous factor production. Ideal body weight performed the best across all of the regimens explored, maintaining safety while moderating resource consumption for overweight and obese patients.

  3. The effects of simulating a realistic eye model on the eye dose of an adult male undergoing head computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Ebrahimi-Khankook, Atiyeh; Vejdani-Noghreiyan, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    In head computed tomography, radiation upon the eye lens (as an organ with high radiosensitivity) may cause lenticular opacity and cataracts. Therefore, quantitative dose assessment due to exposure of the eye lens and surrounding tissue is a matter of concern. For this purpose, an accurate eye model with realistic geometry and shape, in which different eye substructures are considered, is needed. To calculate the absorbed radiation dose of visual organs during head computed tomography scans, in this study, an existing sophisticated eye model was inserted at the related location in the head of the reference adult male phantom recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Then absorbed doses and distributions of energy deposition in different parts of this eye model were calculated and compared with those based on a previous simple eye model. All calculations were done using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C for tube voltages of 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp. In spite of the similarity of total dose to the eye lens for both eye models, the dose delivered to the sensitive zone, which plays an important role in the induction of cataracts, was on average 3% higher for the sophisticated model as compared to the simple model. By increasing the tube voltage, differences between the total dose to the eye lens between the two phantoms decrease to 1%. Due to this level of agreement, use of the sophisticated eye model for patient dosimetry is not necessary. However, it still helps for an estimation of doses received by different eye substructures separately.

  4. Study of Different Tissue Density Effects on the Dose Distribution of a 103Pd Brachytherapy Source Model MED3633

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical application of encapsulated radioactive brachytherapy sources has a major role in cancer treatment. In the present research, the effects of different tissue densities on the dose distribution of a 103Pd brachytherapy source in a spherical phantom of 50 cm radius have been studied. Material and Methods: As is well known, absorbed dose in tissue depends to its density, but this difference is not clear in measurements. Therefore, we applied the MCNP code to evaluate the effect of density on the dose distribution. 103Pd brachytherapy sources are used to treat prostate, breast and other cancers. Results: Absorbed dose has been calculated and presented around a source placed in the center of the phantom for different tissue densities. Also, we derived anisotropy and radial dose functions and compared our Monte Carlo results with experimental results of Rivard and Li et al. for F(1, θ and g(r in 1.040 g/cm3 tissue. Conclusion: The results of this study show that relative dose variations around the source center are very considerable at different densities, because of the presence of a photoabsorber (Au-Cu alloy in the source core. Dose variation exceeds 80% at the point (Z = 2.4 mm, Y = 0 mm. Computed values of anisotropy and radial dose functions are in good agreement with the experimental results of Rivard and Li et al.

  5. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  6. Radiation. Doses, effect, risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapirev, E.; Todorov, P.

    1994-12-01

    This book outlines in a popular form the topic of ionizing radiation impacts on living organisms. It contains data gathered by ICRP for a period of 35 years. The essential dosimetry terms and units are presented. Natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation are described. Possible biological radiation effects and diseases as a consequence of external and internal irradiation at normal and accidental conditions are considered. An assessment of genetic risk for human populations is presented and the concept of 'acceptable risk' is discussed

  7. Psychotomimetic effects of different doses of MK-801 and the underlying mechanisms in a selective memory impairment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiqing; Wang, Dong; Hong, Wenjuan; Yu, Yi; Tang, Jinsong; Wang, Jicai; Liu, Fang; Xu, Xiufeng; Tan, Liwen; Chen, Xiaogang

    2017-03-01

    Although N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists-induced hypoglutamate rodent models are the most well-established models for preclinical studies of schizophrenia-related deficits, they also evoke a wide spectrum of psychotomimetic side effects. It is significant to increase the specificity of hypoglutamate rodent models. In this study, the recognition memory was evaluated in rats by object recognition test (ORT), sensorimotor gating was evaluated by prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI), and locomotor activity was measured using open field test. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure neurotransmitters content in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and thalamus (THA). Total Akt and phospho-Akt protein was measured by Western blots. Results showed that 0.3mg/kg of MK-801 was most effective in inducing locomotion. 0.3mg/kg of MK-801 was most effective in decreasing PPI. 0.03mg/kg of MK-801 was most effective in decreasing object memory while not affecting exploration manners in the training session. 0.03mg/kg of MK-801 significantly increased HVA and Glu content in the mPFC. 0.1mg/kg of MK-801 significantly decreased GABA content in the THA. 0.03mg/kg of MK-801 significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation in the mPFC, which was related to the ORT index. In conclusion, a dose of 0.03mg/kg MK-801 can establish a "pure" memory impairment model without contaminations of sensorimotor gating and locomotor activity. MK-801-induced cognitive deficits is associated with increased DA metabolites and glutamate content in the mPFC and decreased GABA content in the THA as well as decrease in Akt phosphorylation in the mPFC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Comparison of Acuros (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for dose calculation in treatment of oesophageal cancer: effects on modelling tumour control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanaban, Sriram; Warren, Samantha; Walsh, Anthony; Partridge, Mike; Hawkins, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    To investigate systematic changes in dose arising when treatment plans optimised using the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) are recalculated using Acuros XB (AXB) in patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) for locally advanced oesophageal cancers. We have compared treatment plans created using AAA with those recalculated using AXB. Although the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) is currently more widely used in clinical routine, Acuros XB (AXB) has been shown to more accurately calculate the dose distribution, particularly in heterogeneous regions. Studies to predict clinical outcome should be based on modelling the dose delivered to the patient as accurately as possible. CT datasets from ten patients were selected for this retrospective study. VMAT (Volumetric modulated arc therapy) plans with 2 arcs, collimator rotation ± 5-10° and dose prescription 50 Gy / 25 fractions were created using Varian Eclipse (v10.0). The initial dose calculation was performed with AAA, and AXB plans were created by re-calculating the dose distribution using the same number of monitor units (MU) and multileaf collimator (MLC) files as the original plan. The difference in calculated dose to organs at risk (OAR) was compared using dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics and p values were calculated using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The potential clinical effect of dosimetric differences in the gross tumour volume (GTV) was evaluated using three different TCP models from the literature. PTV Median dose was apparently 0.9 Gy lower (range: 0.5 Gy - 1.3 Gy; p < 0.05) for VMAT AAA plans re-calculated with AXB and GTV mean dose was reduced by on average 1.0 Gy (0.3 Gy −1.5 Gy; p < 0.05). An apparent difference in TCP of between 1.2% and 3.1% was found depending on the choice of TCP model. OAR mean dose was lower in the AXB recalculated plan than the AAA plan (on average, dose reduction: lung 1.7%, heart 2.4%). Similar trends were seen for CRT plans

  9. Single toxin dose-response models revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidenko, Eugene, E-mail: eugened@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biomedical Data Science, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH03756 (United States); Glaholt, SP, E-mail: sglaholt@indiana.edu [Indiana University, School of Public & Environmental Affairs, Bloomington, IN47405 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH03755 (United States); Kyker-Snowman, E, E-mail: ek2002@wildcats.unh.edu [Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH03824 (United States); Shaw, JR, E-mail: joeshaw@indiana.edu [Indiana University, School of Public & Environmental Affairs, Bloomington, IN47405 (United States); Chen, CY, E-mail: Celia.Y.Chen@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH03755 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to offer a rigorous analysis of the sigmoid shape single toxin dose-response relationship. The toxin efficacy function is introduced and four special points, including maximum toxin efficacy and inflection points, on the dose-response curve are defined. The special points define three phases of the toxin effect on mortality: (1) toxin concentrations smaller than the first inflection point or (2) larger then the second inflection point imply low mortality rate, and (3) concentrations between the first and the second inflection points imply high mortality rate. Probabilistic interpretation and mathematical analysis for each of the four models, Hill, logit, probit, and Weibull is provided. Two general model extensions are introduced: (1) the multi-target hit model that accounts for the existence of several vital receptors affected by the toxin, and (2) model with a nonzero mortality at zero concentration to account for natural mortality. Special attention is given to statistical estimation in the framework of the generalized linear model with the binomial dependent variable as the mortality count in each experiment, contrary to the widespread nonlinear regression treating the mortality rate as continuous variable. The models are illustrated using standard EPA Daphnia acute (48 h) toxicity tests with mortality as a function of NiCl or CuSO{sub 4} toxin. - Highlights: • The paper offers a rigorous study of a sigmoid dose-response relationship. • The concentration with highest mortality rate is rigorously defined. • A table with four special points for five morality curves is presented. • Two new sigmoid dose-response models have been introduced. • The generalized linear model is advocated for estimation of sigmoid dose-response relationship.

  10. Effects of irradiation at different dose rates on the onset of type I diabetes in model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takashi; Sakai, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that low-dose irradiation (0.5 Gy) increased the level of antioxidants and decreased the level of lipid peroxide in normal mice. We also found that 0.5 Gy-irradiation of NOD mice suppressed the onset of type I diabetes. These results were obtained by the irradiation at high dose rate. The aim of the present study is to examine the effects at the low dose rate. The mice were acutely irradiated with 0.5 Gy of X-rays (300 kVp) at 94.2 Gy/hr at 10, 11, 12, 13 or 14 weeks of age, or chronically irradiated with 0.5 Gy of 137 Cs γ-rays at 0.95 mGy/hr starting at 10,11,12,13 or 14 weeks of age. When irradiated at 12th week with the high dose rate X-rays, the onset of diabetes suppressed, and the increase in the specific activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in pancreas was observed. On the other hand, the low dose rate γ-rays delivered from 12th week of age to 14th was less effective in the suppression of the incidence of diabetes than the high dose rate X-rays at the 12-14 weeks of age. Furthermore, the significant increase in pancreatic SOD activity was not observed after the low dose irradiation. Splenic macrophage activities of superoxide generation were not affected by the high dose rate irradiation nor the low dose rate irradiation. (author)

  11. Determination of organ doses and effective doses in radiooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Martinez, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: With an increasing chance of success in radiooncology, it is necessary to estimate the risk from radiation scatter to areas outside the target volume. The cancer risk from a radiation treatment can be estimated from the organ doses, allowing a somewhat limited effective dose to be estimated and compared. Material and Methods: The doses of the radiation-sensitive organs outside the target volume can be estimated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE developed by van der Giessen. The effective doses are determined according to the concept of ICRP, whereby the target volume and the associated organs related to it are not taken into consideration. Results: Organ doses outside the target volume are generally < 1% of the dose in the target volume. In some cases, however, they can be as high as 3%. The effective doses during radiotherapy are between 60 and 900 mSv, depending upon the specific target volume, the applied treatment technique, and the given dose in the ICRU point. Conclusion: For the estimation of the radiation risk, organ doses in radiooncology can be calculated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE. While evaluating the radiation risk after ICRP, for the calculation of the effective dose, the advanced age of many patients has to be considered to prevent that, e.g., the high gonad doses do not overestimate the effective dose. (orig.)

  12. An explanation for the multiplicative and the additive dose-effect relationship with the single-hit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottbauer, M.M.; Fleck, C.M.; Schoellnberger, H.

    1997-01-01

    For solid tumors and for leukemia the excess cancer rate after a single radiation dose D is different. The multiplicative model describes the excess solid tumor probability rate which is proportional to the background rate of cancer and dependent on dose D. The additive model describes the excess probability rate for leukaemia which is proportional to the dose D but unrelated to the spontaneous rate of cancer. A second great difference between the two models is the duration of the increased cancer probability rate. The multiplicative mode predicts that the additional cancer risk persist the whole lifetime after exposure and the additive model predicts excess risk over a period of time. With the Single-hit model (SHM) which is a multistage cancer model both dose-response relationships can be described. It will be shown that only small differences in the derivation will lead to the different relationships. We then analyze the incidence data of leukemia (1950-1987) and of all solid tumors (1958-1987) of the atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  13. A repository released-dose model for the evaluation of long-lived fission product transmutation effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology has been developed to quantify the total integrated dose due to a radionuclide species i emplaced in a geologic repository; the focus is on the seven long-lived fission products (LLFPs). The methodology assumes continuous exposure water contaminated with species i at the accessible environment (i.e., just beyond the geologic barrier afforded by the geologic repository). The dose integration is performed out to a reference post-release time. The integrated dose is a function of the total initial inventory of radionuclide i the repository, the time at which complete and instantaneous failure of the engineered barrier (e.g., waste canister) in, a geologic repository occurs, the fractional dissolution rate (from waste solid form) of radionuclide i in ground water, the ground water travel time to the accessible environment, the retardation factor (sorption on the geologic media) for radionuclide i, the time after radionuclide begins to enter the biosphere. In order to assess relative dose, the ratio of total integrated dose to that for a reference LLFP species j (e.g., 99 Tc) was defined. This ratio is a measure of the relative benefit of transmutation of other LLFPs compared to 99 Tc. This methodology was further developed in order to quantify the integrated dose reduction per neutron utilized for LLFP transmutation in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT). This measure of effectiveness is a function of the integrated dose due to LLFP species i, the number of total captures in LLFP species i chain per LLFP nuclide fed to the chain at equilibrium, and the number of total captures in related transmutation product (TP) chains per capture in the LLFP species i chain. To assess relative transmutation effectiveness, the ratio of integrated dose reduction per neutron utilization to that for a reference LLFP species j (e.g., 99 Tc) was defined. This relative measure of effectiveness was evaluated LLFP transmutation strategy

  14. Comparison of Acuros (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for dose calculation in treatment of oesophageal cancer: effects on modelling tumour control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Sriram; Warren, Samantha; Walsh, Anthony; Partridge, Mike; Hawkins, Maria A

    2014-12-23

    To investigate systematic changes in dose arising when treatment plans optimised using the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) are recalculated using Acuros XB (AXB) in patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) for locally advanced oesophageal cancers. We have compared treatment plans created using AAA with those recalculated using AXB. Although the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) is currently more widely used in clinical routine, Acuros XB (AXB) has been shown to more accurately calculate the dose distribution, particularly in heterogeneous regions. Studies to predict clinical outcome should be based on modelling the dose delivered to the patient as accurately as possible. CT datasets from ten patients were selected for this retrospective study. VMAT (Volumetric modulated arc therapy) plans with 2 arcs, collimator rotation ± 5-10° and dose prescription 50 Gy / 25 fractions were created using Varian Eclipse (v10.0). The initial dose calculation was performed with AAA, and AXB plans were created by re-calculating the dose distribution using the same number of monitor units (MU) and multileaf collimator (MLC) files as the original plan. The difference in calculated dose to organs at risk (OAR) was compared using dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics and p values were calculated using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The potential clinical effect of dosimetric differences in the gross tumour volume (GTV) was evaluated using three different TCP models from the literature. PTV Median dose was apparently 0.9 Gy lower (range: 0.5 Gy - 1.3 Gy; p AAA plans re-calculated with AXB and GTV mean dose was reduced by on average 1.0 Gy (0.3 Gy -1.5 Gy; p AAA plan (on average, dose reduction: lung 1.7%, heart 2.4%). Similar trends were seen for CRT plans. Differences in dose distribution are observed with VMAT and CRT plans recalculated with AXB particularly within soft tissue at the tumour/lung interface, where AXB has been shown to more

  15. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  16. Effect of combined doses of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) on acute and anticipatory nausea using rat (Sprague- Dawley) models of conditioned gaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Erin M; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Parker, Linda A

    2015-12-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) found in cannabis both reduce the distressing symptom of nausea, but their combined effects are not understood. The potential of combined doses of THC and CBDA to reduce acute nausea and anticipatory nausea in rodent models was assessed. For acute nausea, the potential of cannabinoid pretreatment(s) to reduce LiCl-induced nausea paired with saccharin was evaluated in a subsequent drug free taste reactivity test, followed by a taste avoidance test. For anticipatory nausea, the potential of the cannabinoid pretreatment(s) to reduce the expression of LiCl-induced contextually elicited conditioned gaping was evaluated. Combined subthreshold doses of THC (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) and CBDA (0.01 and 0.1 μg/kg) reduced acute nausea. Higher doses of THC (1.0, 10 mg/kg) or CBDA (1.0, 10 μg/kg) alone, as well as these combined doses also reduced acute nausea. THC (10 mg/kg) interfered with conditioned taste avoidance, an effect attenuated by CBDA (10 μg/kg). On the other hand, combined subthreshold doses of THC (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) and CBDA (0.01 and 0.1 μg/kg) did not suppress contextually elicited conditioned gaping in a test for anticipatory nausea. However, higher doses of THC (1.0, 10 mg/kg) or CBDA (1.0, 10 μg/kg) alone, as well as these combined doses, also reduced anticipatory nausea. Only at the highest dose (10 mg/kg) did THC impair locomotor activity, but CBDA did not at any dose. Combined subthreshold doses of THC:CBDA are particularly effective as a treatment for acute nausea. At higher doses, CBDA may attenuate THC-induced interference with learning.

  17. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  18. Differential effects of low and high dose folic acid on endothelial dysfunction in a murine model of mild hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Zoe L; Moat, Stuart J; Miller, Alastair L; Randall, Michael D; Lewis, Malcolm J; Lang, Derek

    2006-12-03

    The exact mechanism(s) by which hyperhomocysteinaemia promotes vascular disease remains unclear. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that the beneficial effect of folic acid on endothelial function is independent of homocysteine-lowering. In the present study the effect of a low (400 microg/70 kg/day) and high (5 mg/70 kg/day) dose folic acid supplement on endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated perfused mesenteric bed of heterozygous cystathionine beta-synthase deficient mice was investigated. Elevated total plasma homocysteine and impaired relaxation responses to methacholine were observed in heterozygous mice. In the presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester relaxation responses in wild-type tissues were reduced, but in heterozygous tissues were abolished. Clotrimazole and 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid, both inhibitors of non-nitric oxide/non-prostanoid-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, reduced responses to methacholine in wild-type but not heterozygous tissues. The combination of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and either clotrimazole or 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid completely inhibited relaxation responses in wild-type tissues. Both low and high dose folic acid increased plasma folate, reduced total plasma homocysteine and reversed endothelial dysfunction in heterozygous mice. A greater increase in plasma folate in the high dose group was accompanied by a more significant effect on endothelial function. In the presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a significant residual relaxation response was evident in tissues from low and high dose folic acid treated heterozygous mice. These data suggest that the impaired mesenteric relaxation in heterozygous mice is largely due to loss of the non-nitric oxide/non-prostanoid component. While low dose folic acid may restore this response in a homocysteine-dependent manner, the higher dose has an additional effect on nitric oxide-mediated relaxation that would appear to be independent of

  19. A recalculation of the dose-effect-relationship of the ''life span study'' of Hiroshima and Nagasaki with the ''single-hit model''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottbauer, M.M.; Fleck, C.M.; Schoellnberger, H.

    1996-01-01

    The basis of this new model is the multistage process of carcinogeneses. The Single-Hit Model is a further development of the Armitage-Doll Model [1] for the special case of a short exposure. It provides simultaneously the age-dependent mortality-rate (incidence-rate) of the spontaneous and radiation induced solid tumors and dose-effect relationships at any age after exposure. The model results in a biologically based dose-effect relationship, which is similar to the Relativ-Risk-Model suggested by the ICRP 60 [2]. The present model is able to describe the increased mortality rate of the bomb survivors more accurate than the Relativ-Risk-Model. (orig.) [de

  20. Effective dose and dose to crystalline lens during angiographic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, J.

    1998-01-01

    The highest radiation doses levels received by radiologists are observed during interventional procedures. Doses to forehead and neck received by a radiologist executing angiographic examinations at the department of radiology at the academic hospital (AZ-VUB) have been measured for a group of 34 examinations. The doses to crystalline lens and the effective doses for a period of one year have been estimated. For the crystalline lens the maximum dose approaches the ICRP limit, that indicates the necessity for the radiologist to use leaded glasses. (N.C.)

  1. Time and Dose-Dependent Effects of Labisia pumila on Bone Oxidative Status of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mohd Effendy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal osteoporosis can be associated with oxidative stress and deterioration of antioxidant enzymes. It is mainly treated with estrogen replacement therapy (ERT. Although effective, ERT may cause adverse effects such as breast cancer and pulmonary embolism. Labisia pumila var. alata (LP, a herb used traditionally for women’s health was found to protect against estrogen-deficient osteoporosis. An extensive study was conducted in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model using several LP doses and duration of treatments to determine if anti-oxidative mechanisms were involved in its bone protective effects. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups; baseline group (BL, sham-operated (Sham, ovariectomised control (OVXC, ovariectomised (OVX and given 64.5 μg/kg of Premarin (ERT, ovariectomised and given 20 mg/kg of LP (LP20 and ovariectomised and given 100 mg/kg of LP (LP100. The groups were further subdivided to receive their respective treatments via daily oral gavages for three, six or nine weeks of treatment periods. Following euthanization, the femora were dissected out for bone oxidative measurements which include superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and malondialdehyde (MDA levels. Results: The SOD levels of the sham-operated and all the treatment groups were significantly higher than the OVX groups at all treatment periods. The GPx level of ERT and LP100 groups at the 9th week of treatment were significantly higher than the baseline and OVX groups. MDA level of the OVX group was significantly higher than all the other groups at weeks 6 and 9. The LP20 and LP100 groups at the 9th week of treatment had significantly lower MDA levels than the ERT group. There were no significant differences between LP20 and LP100 for all parameters. Thus, LP supplementations at both doses, which showed the best results at 9 weeks, may reduce oxidative stress which in turn may prevent bone loss via its

  2. Total dose and dose rate models for bipolar transistors in circuit simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a model for total dose effects in bipolar junction transistors for use in circuit simulation. The components of the model are an electrical model of device performance that includes the effects of trapped charge on device behavior, and a model that calculates the trapped charge densities in a specific device structure as a function of radiation dose and dose rate. Simulations based on this model are found to agree well with measurements on a number of devices for which data are available.

  3. Comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the ICRP 30 and ICRP 60 models for a repeated incorporation by inhalation of I-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreno P, A.L.; Cortes C, A.; Alonso V, G.; Serrano P, F.

    2005-01-01

    Presently work, a comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the models of the ICRP 30 and those of the ICRP 60 for the analysis of internal dose due to repeated incorporation of I-125 is shown. The estimations of incorporated activity are obtained starting from the proportionate data for an exercise of inter comparison, with which it should be determined the internal dose later on. For to estimate the initial activity incorporated by repeated dose was assumed that this it was given through of multiple individual incorporations which happened in the middle points of the monitoring periods. The results using the models of the ICRP 30 and of the ICRP 60 are compared and the causes of the differences are analyzed. (Author)

  4. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  5. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed

  7. Use of the VIP-Man model to calculate energy imparted and effective dose for x-ray examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Mark; Huda, Walter; Xu, X George; Chao, T C; Shi, C Y; Ogden, Kent M; Scalzetti, Ernest M

    2004-02-01

    A male human tomographic model was used to calculate values of energy imparted (epsilon) and effective dose (E) for monoenergetic photons (30-150 keV) in radiographic examinations. Energy deposition in the organs and tissues of the human phantom were obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. Values of E/epsilon were obtained for three common projections [anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), and lateral (LAT)] of the head, cervical spine, chest, and abdomen, respectively. For head radiographs, all three projections yielded similar E/epsilon values. At 30 keV, the value of E/epsilon was approximately 1.6 mSv J(-1), which is increased to approximately 7 mSv J(-1) for 150 keV photons. The AP cervical spine was the only projection investigated where the value of E/epsilon decreased with increasing photon energy. Above 70 keV, cervical spine E/epsilon values showed little energy dependence and ranged between approximately 8.5 mSv J(-1) for PA projections and approximately 17 mSv J(-1) for AP projections. The values of E/epsilon for AP chest examinations showed very little variation with photon energy, and had values of approximately 23 mSv J(-1). Values of E/epsilon for PA and LAT chest projections were substantially lower than the AP projections and increased with increasing photon energy. For abdominal radiographs, differences between the PA and LAT projections were very small. All abdomen projections showed an increase in the E/epsilon ratio with increasing photon energy, and reached a maximum value of approximately 13.5 mSv J(-1) for AP projections, and approximately 9.5 mSv J(-1) for PA/lateral projections. These monoenergetic E/epsilon values can generate values of E/epsilon for any x-ray spectrum, and can be used to convert values of energy imparted into effective dose for patients undergoing common head and body radiological examinations.

  8. Effect of Linezolid on the 50% Lethal Dose and 50% Protective Dose in Treatment of Infections by Gram-Negative Pathogens in Naive and Immunosuppressed Mice and on the Efficacy of Ciprofloxacin in an Acute Murine Model of Septicemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Andrea; Lamb, Lucinda; Medina, Ivette; George, David; Gibson, Glenn; Hardink, Joel; Rugg, Jady; Van Deusen, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Murine models of infection were used to study the effect of linezolid on the virulence of Gram-negative bacteria and to assess potential pharmacodynamic interactions with ciprofloxacin in the treatment of these infections, prompted by observations from a recent clinical trial. Naive and immunosuppressed mice were challenged with Klebsiella pneumoniae 53A1109, K. pneumoniae GC6658, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa UC12120 in acute sepsis and pulmonary infection models, using different serial dilutions of these pathogens (groups of 8 animals each). Linezolid (100 mg/kg/dose) was administered orally at 0.5 and 4.0 h postchallenge in the sepsis model and at 4 h postchallenge followed by 2 days of twice-daily treatment in the pulmonary model. Further, ciprofloxacin alone and in combination with oral linezolid was investigated in the sepsis model. Survival was assessed for 4 and 10 days postchallenge in the systemic and respiratory models, respectively. The data were fitted to a nonlinear regression analysis to determine 50% lethal doses (LD50s) and 50% protective doses (PD50s). A clinically relevant, high-dose regimen of linezolid had no significant effect on LD50 in these models. This lack of effect was independent of immune status. A combination of oral ciprofloxacin with linezolid yielded lower PD50s than oral ciprofloxacin alone (ciprofloxacin in combination, 8.4 to 32.7 mg/kg; oral ciprofloxacin, 39.4 to 88.3 mg/kg). Linezolid did not improve the efficacy of subcutaneous ciprofloxacin (ciprofloxacin in combination, 2.0 to 2.4 mg/kg; subcutaneous ciprofloxacin, 2.0 to 2.8 mg/kg). In conclusion, linezolid does not seem to potentiate infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens or to interact antagonistically with ciprofloxacin. PMID:22710118

  9. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  10. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  11. Notes on the effect of dose uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent dose-response relationship between amount of exposure to acute radiation and level of mortality in humans is affected by uncertainties in the dose values. It is apparent that one of the greatest concerns regarding the human data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki is the unexpectedly shallow slope of the dose response curve. This may be partially explained by uncertainty in the dose estimates. Some potential effects of dose uncertainty on the apparent dose-response relationship are demonstrated

  12. Models selected for calculation of doses, health effects and economic costs due to accidental radionuclide releases from nuclear power plants. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Acharya, S.; Baker, D.A.; Droppo, J.G.; McPherson, R.B.

    1980-05-01

    Models are described for use in site-specific environmental consequence analysis of nuclear reactor accidents of Classes 3 through 9. The models presented relate radioactivity released to resulting doses, health effects, and costs of remedial actions. Specific models are presented for the major exposure pathways of airborne releases, waterborne releases and direct irradiation from activity within the facility buildings, such as the containment. Time-dependent atmospheric dispersion parameters, crop production parameters, and other variable parameters are used in the models. The environmental effects are analyzed for several accident start times during the year. Several remedial actions are considered

  13. Nonlinear mixed effects dose response modeling in high throughput drug screens: application to melanoma cell line analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kuan-Fu; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Finlay, Darren; Yin, Hongwei; Hendricks, William P D; Sereduk, Chris; Kiefer, Jeffrey; Sekulic, Aleksandar; LoRusso, Patricia M; Vuori, Kristiina; Trent, Jeffrey M; Schork, Nicholas J

    2018-01-12

    Cancer cell lines are often used in high throughput drug screens (HTS) to explore the relationship between cell line characteristics and responsiveness to different therapies. Many current analysis methods infer relationships by focusing on one aspect of cell line drug-specific dose-response curves (DRCs), the concentration causing 50% inhibition of a phenotypic endpoint (IC 50 ). Such methods may overlook DRC features and do not simultaneously leverage information about drug response patterns across cell lines, potentially increasing false positive and negative rates in drug response associations. We consider the application of two methods, each rooted in nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) models, that test the relationship relationships between estimated cell line DRCs and factors that might mitigate response. Both methods leverage estimation and testing techniques that consider the simultaneous analysis of different cell lines to draw inferences about any one cell line. One of the methods is designed to provide an omnibus test of the differences between cell line DRCs that is not focused on any one aspect of the DRC (such as the IC 50 value). We simulated different settings and compared the different methods on the simulated data. We also compared the proposed methods against traditional IC 50 -based methods using 40 melanoma cell lines whose transcriptomes, proteomes, and, importantly, BRAF and related mutation profiles were available. Ultimately, we find that the NLME-based methods are more robust, powerful and, for the omnibus test, more flexible, than traditional methods. Their application to the melanoma cell lines reveals insights into factors that may be clinically useful.

  14. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit

    2017-02-01

    To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD 2 ) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD 2 verification with pair t -test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D 90% , 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D 2cc , and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD 2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p -values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  15. Effect of postnatal low-dose exposure to environmental chemicals on the gut microbiome in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhong; Raikhel, Vincent; Gopalakrishnan, Kalpana; Fernandez-Hernandez, Heriberto; Lambertini, Luca; Manservisi, Fabiana; Falcioni, Laura; Bua, Luciano; Belpoggi, Fiorella; L Teitelbaum, Susan; Chen, Jia

    2016-06-14

    This proof-of-principle study examines whether postnatal, low-dose exposure to environmental chemicals modifies the composition of gut microbiome. Three chemicals that are widely used in personal care products-diethyl phthalate (DEP), methylparaben (MPB), triclosan (TCS)-and their mixture (MIX) were administered at doses comparable to human exposure to Sprague-Dawley rats from birth through adulthood. Fecal samples were collected at two time points: postnatal day (PND) 62 (adolescence) and PND 181 (adulthood). The gut microbiome was profiled by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, taxonomically assigned and assessed for diversity. Metagenomic profiling revealed that the low-dose chemical exposure resulted in significant changes in the overall bacterial composition, but in adolescent rats only. Specifically, the individual taxon relative abundance for Bacteroidetes (Prevotella) was increased while the relative abundance of Firmicutes (Bacilli) was reduced in all treated rats compared to controls. Increased abundance was observed for Elusimicrobia in DEP and MPB groups, Betaproteobacteria in MPB and MIX groups, and Deltaproteobacteria in TCS group. Surprisingly, these differences diminished by adulthood (PND 181) despite continuous exposure, suggesting that exposure to the environmental chemicals produced a more profound effect on the gut microbiome in adolescents. We also observed a small but consistent reduction in the bodyweight of exposed rats in adolescence, especially with DEP and MPB treatment (p gut microbiota in adolescent rats; whether these changes lead to downstream health effects requires further investigation.

  16. Effects of a higher dose of near-infrared light on clinical signs and neuroprotection in a monkey model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Cécile; El Massri, Nabil; Darlot, Fannie; Torres, Napoleon; Chabrol, Claude; Agay, Diane; Auboiroux, Vincent; Johnstone, Daniel M; Stone, Jonathan; Mitrofanis, John; Benabid, Alim-Louis

    2016-10-01

    We have reported previously that intracranial application of near-infrared light (NIr) - when delivered at the lower doses of 25J and 35J - reduces clinical signs and offers neuroprotection in a subacute MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) monkey model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we explored whether a higher NIr dose (125J) generated beneficial effects in the same MPTP monkey model (n=15). We implanted an NIr (670nm) optical fibre device within a midline region of the midbrain in macaque monkeys, close to the substantia nigra of both sides. MPTP injections (1.8-2.1mg/kg) were made over a five day period, during which time the NIr device was turned on and left on continuously throughout the ensuing three week survival period. Monkeys were evaluated clinically and their brains processed for immunohistochemistry and stereology. Our results showed that the higher NIr dose did not have any toxic impact on cells at the midbrain implant site. Further, this NIr dose resulted in a higher number of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive cells when compared to the MPTP group. However, the higher NIr dose monkeys showed little evidence for an increase in mean clinical score, number of nigral Nissl-stained cells and density of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase terminations. In summary, the higher NIr dose of 125J was not as beneficial to MPTP-treated monkeys as compared to the lower doses of 25J and 35J, boding well for strategies of NIr dose delivery and device energy consumption in a future clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects on the glucose metabolism in type II diabetes model mice treated with dose-rates irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation on the type II diabetes mellitus were investigated in C57BL/KsJ-ab/db (db mouse). This mouse develops the type II diabetes within 8 weeks of the birth due to a dysfunction of the insulin receptors. As a result the db mouse shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism. Ten-week old female mice (12 mice in each group) were irradiated with gamma-rays at 0.35 mGy/hr, 0.65 mGy/hr or 1.2 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of plasma glucose and insulin was measured. After 2 weeks irradiation, the glucose level slightly increased, however the difference between the irradiated mice and non-irradiated groups was not significant. The plasma insulin concentration decreased in the non-irradiated group to half of the initial level. In the irradiated group, it also decreased but in the group of 0.65 mGy/hr and 0.35 mGy/hr, it was significantly differed from that in the non-irradiated group. In the glucose tolerance test, plasma glucose level increased shortly after 0.1 mg/head glucose injection by mouth and reached to a peak at 90-120 min after the injection. The glucose level of the non-irradiated mice was slightly higher than that of irradiated mice. The plasma insulin level of non-irradiated group was enhanced after the injection and maintained the level during the test. However the levels of irradiated mice were decreased at 30-60 min after the injection. Both the level of non-irradiated an irradiated was almost same but the non-irradiated one was a little high. In all of mice, the plasma insulin level was highly elevated right after the 0.05 units/head insulin injection by i.p. and the levels were also gradually decreased. The level of the non-irradiated group was slowly decreased and was higher than the irradiated mice. The plasma glucose levels of all mice did not change after the test; however, the levels of irradiated mice were slightly lower than that of non

  18. The effect of CT dose on glenohumeral joint congruency measurements using 3D reconstructed patient-specific bone models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalone, Emily A; Fox, Anne-Marie V; Jenkyn, Thomas R; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A; Peters, Terry M; Kedgley, Angela E; Athwal, George S

    2011-01-01

    The study of joint congruency at the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder using computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of joint surfaces is an area of significant clinical interest. However, ionizing radiation delivered to patients during CT examinations is much higher than other types of radiological imaging. The shoulder represents a significant challenge for this modality as it is adjacent to the thyroid gland and breast tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning techniques that would minimize radiation dose while accurately quantifying joint congruency of the shoulder. The results suggest that only one-tenth of the standard applied total current (mA) and a pitch ratio of 1.375:1 was necessary to produce joint congruency values consistent with that of the higher dose scans. Using the CT scanning techniques examined in this study, the effective dose applied to the shoulder to quantify joint congruency was reduced by 88.9% compared to standard clinical CT imaging techniques.

  19. Gamma dose rate effect on JFET transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of Gamma dose rate on JFET transistors is presented. The irradiation was accomplished at the following available dose rates: 1, 2.38, 5, 10 , 17 and 19 kGy/h at a constant dose of 600 kGy. A non proportional relationship between the noise and dose rate in the medium range (between 2.38 and 5 kGy/h) was observed. While in the low and high ranges, the noise was proportional to the dose rate as the case of the dose effect. This may be explained as follows: the obtained result is considered as the yield of a competition between many reactions and events which are dependent on the dose rate. At a given values of that events parameters, a proportional or a non proportional dose rate effects are generated. No dependence effects between the dose rate and thermal annealing recovery after irradiation was observed . (author)

  20. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-01-01

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  1. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  2. Committed effective dose from thoron daughters inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, M.P.; Pecequilo, B.R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Mankind's interest in natural radiation exposure levels has increased over the past fifty years and it is now recognized that the most significant contributors to human irradiation by natural sources are the short-lived decay products of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn). Despite the thoron short half-life of 55 s, effective dose from inhalation of thoron an its progeny ( 212 Pb and 212 Bi) must be considered, owing to the high thorium background in countries like Brazil, China and India, for example. The indoor committed effective dose was assessed by air sampling at the thorium purification plant and the nuclear materials storage site of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares; Sao Paulo, Brazil. A total of 21 glass fiber filter samples was analyzed by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry in order to obtain the 212 Pb and 212 Bi activities. The equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) varied from 0.3 Bq/m 3 to 6.8 Bq/m 3 for the storage site air samples and from 9.9 Bq/m 3 to 249.8 Bq/m 3 for the thorium purification plant air samples. As retention studies indicate a biological half-life of a few hours inhaled thoron progeny in the human lungs, the main fraction of the potential alpha energy (PAEC) deposited is absorbed in the lungs, meaning negligible to the effective dose the contribution of the dose in other times. The committed effective dose due thoron progeny was performed by compartimental analysis following the ICRP 66 lung compartimental model and ICRP 67 lead compartimental model. The values obtained varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a for the storage site air samples and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.00 mSv/a for the thorium purification plant air samples. (author)

  3. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions. (paper)

  4. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  5. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  6. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  7. Modelling simple helically delivered dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kissick, Michael W; Mackie, T Rock

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we described quality assurance procedures for Hi-Art helical tomotherapy machines. Here, we develop further some ideas discussed briefly in that paper. Simple helically generated dose distributions are modelled, and relationships between these dose distributions and underlying characteristics of Hi-Art treatment systems are elucidated. In particular, we describe the dependence of dose levels along the central axis of a cylinder aligned coaxially with a Hi-Art machine on fan beam width, couch velocity and helical delivery lengths. The impact on these dose levels of angular variations in gantry speed or output per linear accelerator pulse is also explored

  8. Effect of combined oral doses of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) on acute and anticipatory nausea in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Erin M; Connolly, Cassidy; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Parker, Linda A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of oral combined cannabis constituents to reduce nausea. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of combining subthreshold oral doses of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) on acute and anticipatory nausea in rat models of conditioned gaping. The potential of intragastric (i.g.) administration of THC, CBDA, or combined doses, to interfere with acute nausea-induced conditioned gaping (acute nausea) or the expression of contextually elicited conditioned gaping (anticipatory nausea), was evaluated. For acute nausea, i.g. administration of subthreshold doses of THC (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) or CBDA (0.5 and 1 μg/kg) significantly suppressed acute nausea-induced gaping, whereas higher individual doses of both THC and CBDA were maximally effective. Combined i.g. administration of higher doses of THC and CBDA (2.5 mg/kg THC-2.5 μg/kg CBDA; 10 mg/kg THC-10 μg/kg CBDA; 20 mg/kg THC-20 μg/kg CBDA) also enhanced positive hedonic reactions elicited by saccharin solution during conditioning. For anticipatory nausea, combined subthreshold i.g. doses of THC (0.1 mg/kg) and CBDA (0.1 μg/kg) suppressed contextually elicited conditioned gaping. When administered i.g., THC was effective on its own at doses ranging from 1 to 10 mg/kg, but CBDA was only effective at 10 μg/kg. THC alone was equally effective by intraperitoneal (i.p.) and i.g. administration, whereas CBDA alone was more effective by i.p. administration (Rock et al. in Psychopharmacol (Berl) 232:4445-4454, 2015) than by i.g. administration. Oral administration of subthreshold doses of THC and CBDA may be an effective new treatment for acute nausea and anticipatory nausea and appetite enhancement in chemotherapy patients.

  9. Proposal of a probabilistic dose-response model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.

    1997-01-01

    A biologically updated dose-response model is presented as an alternative to the linear-quadratic model currently in use for cancer risk assessment. The new model is based on the probability functions for misrepair and/or unrepair of DNA lesions, in terms of the radiation damage production rate in the cell (supposedly, a stem cell) and its repair-rate constant. The model makes use, interpreting it on the basis of misrepair probabilities, of the ''dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor'' of ICRP, and provides the way for a continuous extrapolation between the high and low dose-rate regions, ratifying the ''linear non-threshold hypothesis'' as the main option. Anyhow, the model throws some doubts about the additive property of the dose. (author)

  10. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa, E-mail: clarissa.gillmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schlampp, Ingmar [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  11. Model for dose-response with alternative change of sign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osovets, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    A new mathematical model of dose-response relationships is proposed, suitable for calculating stochastic effects of low level exposure. The corresponding differential equations are presented as well as their solution. (A.K.)

  12. Comparison between linear quadratic and early time dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, A.A.; Supe, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    During the 70s, much interest was focused on fractionation in radiotherapy with the aim of improving tumor control rate without producing unacceptable normal tissue damage. To compare the radiobiological effectiveness of various fractionation schedules, empirical formulae such as Nominal Standard Dose, Time Dose Factor, Cumulative Radiation Effect and Tumour Significant Dose, were introduced and were used despite many shortcomings. It has been claimed that a recent linear quadratic model is able to predict the radiobiological responses of tumours as well as normal tissues more accurately. We compared Time Dose Factor and Tumour Significant Dose models with the linear quadratic model for tumour regression in patients with carcinomas of the cervix. It was observed that the prediction of tumour regression estimated by the Tumour Significant Dose and Time Dose factor concepts varied by 1.6% from that of the linear quadratic model prediction. In view of the lack of knowledge of the precise values of the parameters of the linear quadratic model, it should be applied with caution. One can continue to use the Time Dose Factor concept which has been in use for more than a decade as its results are within ±2% as compared to that predicted by the linear quadratic model. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Bayesian estimation of dose rate effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnish, J.J.; Groer, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    A Bayesian statistical method was used to quantify the effectiveness of high dose rate 137 Cs gamma radiation at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice. The Bayesian approach considers both the temporal and dose dependence of radiation carcinogenesis and total mortality. This paper provides the first direct estimation of dose rate effectiveness using Bayesian statistics. This statistical approach provides a quantitative description of the uncertainty of the factor characterising the dose rate in terms of a probability density function. The results show that a fixed dose from 137 Cs gamma radiation delivered at a high dose rate is more effective at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice than the same dose delivered at a low dose rate. (author)

  14. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  15. Effects of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G.

    1986-01-01

    The term 'small radiation dosis' means doses of about (1 rem), fractions of one rem as well as doses of a few rem. Doses like these are encountered in various practical fields, e.g. in X-ray diagnosis, in the environment and in radiation protection rules. The knowledge about small doses is derived from the same two forces, on which the radiobiology of human beings nearly is based: interpretation of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data, as well as the experience from radiotherapy. Careful interpretation of Hiroshima dates do not provide any evidence that small doses can induce cancer, fetal malformations or genetic damage. Yet in radiotherapy of various diseases, e.g. inflammations, doses of about 1 Gy (100 rad) do no harm to the patients. According to a widespread hypothesis even very small doses may induce some types of radiation damage ('no threshold'). Nevertheless an alternative view is justified. At present no decision can be made between these two alternatives, but the usefullness of radiology is definitely better established than any damage calculated by theories or extrapolations. Based on experience any exaggerated fear of radiations can be met. (author)

  16. Stimulation effects of low dose-rate irradiation on pancreatic antioxidant activity in type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of low dose-rate gamma irradiation on the type II diabetes mellitus were investigated in BKS.Cg-+Lepr db /+Lepr db /Jcl (DB mice). Ten-week-old female DB mice (5 mice in each group) were irradiated with gamma ray at 0.35, 0.70, or 1.2 mGy/hr. During the course of the 12 weeks the glucose level slightly increased with little difference between the irradiated and the non-irradiated groups. The plasma insulin concentration decreased within the first 4 weeks in all groups. The level was kept low in the non-irradiated mice; while the insulin level in the irradiated groups showed a tendency to increase. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group the increase was statistically significant after 12 weeks of irradiation. Total activity of SOD, one of antioxidative enzymes, decreased both in non-irradiated and irradiated groups; however the decrease was less in the irradiated groups, especially 0.70 mGy/hr group. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group Mn-SOD activity, one of the components of total SOD activity, increased after 12-week irradiation. A pathological examination of the pancreas revealed that damage to β cells responsible for the secretion of insulin was much less in the 0.70 mGy/hr group compared to that in the non-irradiated group. These results indicated that the low dose-rate irradiation increase the antioxidative capacity in the pancreas to protect β cells from oxidative damage, and the to increase the insulin level. This mechanism would lead the mice to the recovery from the disease and the prolongation of the life span as is demonstrated in our previous report. (author)

  17. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  18. Organ or tissue doses, effective dose and collective effective dose from X-ray diagnosis, in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Noda, Yutaka; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1996-01-01

    Effective doses and collective effective doses from X-ray diagnostic examinations were calculated on the basis of the frequency of examinations estimated by a nationwide survey and the organ or tissue doses experimentally determined. The average organ or tissue doses were determined with thermoluminescence dosimeters put at various sites of organs or tissues in an adult and a child phantom. Effective doses (effective dose equivalents) were calculated as the sum of the weighted equivalent doses in all the organs or tissues of the body. As the examples of results, the effective doses per radiographic examination were approximately 7 mGy for male, and 9 mGy for female angiocardiography, and about 3 mGy for barium meal. Annual collective effective dose from X-ray diagnostic examinations in 1986 were about 104 x 10 3 person Sv from radiography and 118 x 10 3 person Sv from fluoroscopy, with the total of 222 x 10 3 person Sv. (author)

  19. Radiation transport modeling and assessment to better predict radiation exposure, dose, and toxicological effects to human organs on long duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, Pamela; Badhwar, Gautam; Obot, Victor; Wilson, Bobby; Jejelewo, Olufisayo

    2001-08-01

    NASA is very interested in improving its ability to monitor and forecast the radiation levels that pose a health risk to space-walking astronauts as they construct the International Space Station and astronauts that will participate in long-term and deep-space missions. Human exploratory missions to the moon and Mars within the next quarter century, will expose crews to transient radiation from solar particle events which include high-energy galactic cosmic rays and high-energy protons. Because the radiation levels in space are high and solar activity is presently unpredictable, adequate shielding is needed to minimize the deleterious health effects of exposure to radiation. Today, numerous models have been developed and used to predict radiation exposure. Such a model is the Space Environment Information Systems (SPENVIS) modeling program, developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronautics. SPENVIS, which has been assessed to be an excellent tool in characterizing the radiation environment for microelectronics and investigating orbital debris, is being evaluated for its usefulness with determining the dose and dose-equivalent for human exposure. Thus far, the calculations for dose-depth relations under varying shielding conditions have been in agreement with calculations done using HZETRN and PDOSE, which are well-known and widely used models for characterizing the environments for human exploratory missions. There is disagreement when assessing the impact of secondary radiation particles since SPENVIS does a crude estimation of the secondary radiation particles when calculating LET versus Flux. SPENVIS was used to model dose-depth relations for the blood-forming organs. Radiation sickness and cancer are life-threatening consequences resulting from radiation exposure. In space, exposure to radiation generally includes all of the critical organs. Biological and toxicological impacts have been included for discussion along with alternative risk mitigation

  20. Radiation transport modeling and assessment to better predict radiation exposure, dose, and toxicological effects to human organs on long duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, P.; Badhwar, G.; Obot, V.; Wilson, B.; Jejelewo, O.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is very interested in improving its ability to monitor and forecast the radiation levels that pose a health risk to space-walking astronauts as they construct the International Space Station and astronauts that will participate in long-term and deep-space missions. Human exploratory missions to the moon and Mars within the next quarter century, will expose crews to transient radiation from solar particle events which include high-energy galactic cosmic rays and high-energy protons. Because the radiation levels in space are high and solar activity is presently unpredictable, adequate shielding is needed to minimize the deleterious health effects of exposure to radiation. Today, numerous models have been developed and used to predict radiation exposure. Such a model is the Space Environment Information Systems (SPENVIS) modeling program, developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronautics. SPENVIS, which has been assessed to be an excellent tool in characterizing the radiation environment for microelectronics and investigating orbital debris, is being evaluated for its usefulness with determining the dose and dose-equivalent for human exposure. Thus far. the calculations for dose-depth relations under varying shielding conditions have been in agreement with calculations done using HZETRN and PDOSE, which are well-known and widely used models for characterizing the environments for human exploratory missions. There is disagreement when assessing the impact of secondary radiation particles since SPENVIS does a crude estimation of the secondary radiation particles when calculating LET versus Flux. SPENVIS was used to model dose-depth relations for the blood-forming organs. Radiation sickness and cancer are life-threatening consequences resulting from radiation exposure. In space. exposure to radiation generally includes all of the critical organs. Biological and toxicological impacts have been included for discussion along with alternative risk mitigation

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiotherapy in an experimental model of systemic inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Gil, Felix B.A.; Gironella, Meritxell; Hernandez, Victor; Jorcano, Sandra; Biete, Albert; Pique, Josep M.; Panes, Julian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) on the inflammatory response and to characterize the potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 Gy, or sham radiation before lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in intestinal venules were assessed using intravital microscopy. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was determined using radiolabeled antibodies 5 h after irradiation. Production of transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β 1 ) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and its in vivo functional relevance by immunoneutralization. Results: Compared with vehicle treated animals, LPS induced a marked increase in leukocyte adhesion (0.13 ± 0.59 vs. 5.89 ± 1.03, p 1 were significantly increased in response to LD-RT in controls and LPS challenged animals. Neutralization of TGF-β 1 partially restored LPS-induced adhesion (4.83 ± 1.41, p 1 production and is not related to modulation of ICAM-1 expression

  2. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Shiri, Isaac; Salimi, Yazdan; Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi; Sohrabi, Ahmad; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  3. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: Hamid_rbp@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiri, Isaac [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Yazdan [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Deevband, Mohammad Reza [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Biology Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, Ahmad [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad, E-mail: bitarafan@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  4. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  5. Effect of equipotent doses of bupivacaine and ropivacaine in high-fat diet fed neonatal rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Ying-Dong; Chen, Zong-Xiang; Zhu, Kang-Ru; Sun, Shu-Yin; Zhu, Li-Ping

    The increase in the prevalence of obesity presents a significant health and economic problem. Obesity has been reported to be a major contributor to variety of chronic diseases. Childhood obesity has been rising over the past decades leading to various complications in health. Millions of infants and children undergo surgery every year on various health grounds. The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of spinal anesthesia of equipotent doses of ropivacaine and bupivacaine on over-weight neonatal rats. The Sprague-Dawley rat pups were overfed on high fat diet to induce obesity. Behavioral assessments for sensory and motor blockade was made by evaluating thermal and mechanical withdrawal latencies at various time intervals following intrathecal injections of bupivacaine (5.0mg·kg -1 ) and ropivacaine (7.5mg·kg -1 ) in P14 rats. Spinal tissue was analyzed for apoptosis by determination of activated caspase-3 using monoclonal anti-activated caspase-3 and Fluoro-Jade C staining. Long-term spinal function in P30 rat pups was evaluated. Exposure to intrathecal anesthesia in P14 increased thermal and mechanical latencies and was observed to increase apoptosis as presented by increase in activated caspase-3 and Fluro-Jade C positive cells. Significant alterations in spinal function were observed in high fat diet-fed pups as against non-obese control pups that were on standard diet. Bupivacaine produced more pronounced apoptotic effects on P14 pups; ropivacaine however produced long lasting effects as evidenced in motor function tests at P30. Ropivacaine and bupivacaine induced spinal toxicity that was more pronounced in over-fed rat pups as against normal controls. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of equipotent doses of bupivacaine and ropivacaine in high-fat diet fed neonatal rodent model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Dong Lian

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: The increase in the prevalence of obesity presents a significant health and economic problem. Obesity has been reported to be a major contributor to variety of chronic diseases. Childhood obesity has been rising over the past decades leading to various complications in health. Millions of infants and children undergo surgery every year on various health grounds. The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of spinal anesthesia of equipotent doses of ropivacaine and bupivacaine on over-weight neonatal rats. Methods: The Sprague-Dawley rat pups were overfed on high fat diet to induce obesity. Behavioral assessments for sensory and motor blockade was made by evaluating thermal and mechanical withdrawal latencies at various time intervals following intrathecal injections of bupivacaine (5.0 mg·kg-1 and ropivacaine (7.5 mg·kg-1 in P14 rats. Spinal tissue was analyzed for apoptosis by determination of activated caspase-3 using monoclonal anti-activated caspase-3 and Fluoro-Jade C staining. Long-term spinal function in P30 rat pups was evaluated. Results: Exposure to intrathecal anesthesia in P14 increased thermal and mechanical latencies and was observed to increase apoptosis as presented by increase in activated caspase-3 and Fluro-Jade C positive cells. Significant alterations in spinal function were observed in high fat diet-fed pups as against non-obese control pups that were on standard diet. Bupivacaine produced more pronounced apoptotic effects on P14 pups; ropivacaine however produced long lasting effects as evidenced in motor function tests at P30. Conclusion: Ropivacaine and bupivacaine induced spinal toxicity that was more pronounced in over-fed rat pups as against normal controls.

  7. Prevention of MHC-alloimmunization by UV-B irradiation in a murine model: effects of UV dose and number of transfused cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grijzenhout, M.A.; Claas, F.H.J.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal dose of UV-B radiation for prevention of in vivo alloimmunization (AI) against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens was investigated in a murine transfusion model. Two groups with five C57BL/6 mice (H-2 b ) each were transfused at weekly intervals with 1 x 10 5 or 1 x 10 6 DBA/2 (H-2 d ) leucocytes. Both suspensions induced anti-H-2 d antibodies in all mice after the second transfusion. The minimal UV-B dose required for abolition of alloreactivity in the mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) was 0.6 J/cm 2 . This dose completely prevented the onset of MHC-AI in all five mice transfused with six suspensions containing 1 x 10 5 leucocytes. In contrast, suspensions with 1 x 10 6 leucocytes and exposed to 0.6 J/cm 2 induced immunization in 4/5 mice. Further increase of the dose to 1.8 or 5.4 J/cm 2 did not prevent the onset of MHC-AI. We conclude that the number of leucocytes per transfusion determines the efficacy of UV irradiation for the prevention of MHC-AI. For UV irradiation of human platelet concentrates (PCs) we propose to reduce the number of leucocytes by centrifugation prior to UV exposure. UV-B irradiation of PCs with high numbers of leucocytes may not be effective for prevention of alloimmunization. (Author)

  8. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  9. The concept of the effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiation of the human body by external or internal sources leads mostly to a simultaneous exposure of several organs. However, so far no clear and consistent recommendations for the combination of organ doses and the assessment of an exposure limit under such irradiation conditions are available. Following a proposal described in ICRP-publication 14 one possible concept for the combination of organ doses is discussed in this paper. This concept is based on the assumption that at low doses the total radiation detriment to the exposed person is given by the sum of radiation detriments to the single organs. Taking into account a linear dose-risk relationship, the sum of weighted organ doses leads to the definition of an 'Effective Dose'. The applicability and consequences of this 'Effective Dose Concept' are discussed especially with regard to the assessment of the maximum permissible intake of radionuclides into the human body and the combination of external and internal exposure. (orig.) [de

  10. Immune modulating effects of NKT cells in a physiologically low dose Leishmania major infection model after αGalCer analog PBS57 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griewank, Klaus G; Lorenz, Beate; Fischer, Michael R; Boon, Louis; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; von Stebut, Esther

    2014-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection affecting ∼12 million people worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Treatment options are limited and no effective vaccines exist to date. Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a conserved innate-like lymphocyte population with immunomodulating effects in various settings. A number of reports state a role of NKT cells in different models of Leishmania infection. Here, we investigated the effect of NKT cells in a physiologically relevant, intradermal low dose infection model. After inoculation of 103 infectious-stage L. major, comparable numbers of skin-immigrating NKT cells in both susceptible BALB/c mice and resistant C57BL/6 mice were noted. Compared to their wild type counterparts, NKT cell-deficient mice on a C57BL/6 background were better able to contain infection with L. major and showed decreased IL-4 production in cytokine analysis performed 5 and 8 weeks after infection. Low doses of the NKT cell stimulating αGalCer analog PBS57 applied at the time of infection led to disease exacerbation in C57BL/6 wild-type, but not NKT-deficient mice. The effect was dependent both on the timing and amount of PBS57 administered. The effect of NKT cell stimulation by PBS57 proved to be IL-4 dependent, as it was neutralized in IL-4-deficient C57BL/6 or anti-IL-4 antibody-treated wild-type mice. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, administration of PBS57 in susceptible BALB/c mice resulted in an improved course of disease. Our results reveal a strain- and cytokine-dependent regulatory role of NKT cells in the development of immunity to low dose L. major infections. These effects, probably masked in previous studies using higher parasite inocula, should be considered in future therapy and immunization approaches.

  11. Nonlinear model of high-dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilyuk, A.

    2001-01-01

    The models of high-dose implantation, using the distribution functions, are relatively simple. However, they must take into account the variation of the function of distribution of the implanted ions with increasing dose [1-4]. This variation takes place owing to the fact that the increase of the concentration of the implanted ions results in a change of the properties of the target. High-dose implantation is accompanied by sputtering, volume growth, diffusion, generation of defects, formation of new phases, etc. The variation of the distribution function is determined by many factors and is not known in advance. The variation within the framework of these models [1-4] is taken into account in advance by the introduction of intuitive assumptions on the basis of implicit considerations. Therefore, these attempts should be regarded as incorrect. The model prepared here makes it possible to take into account the sputtering of the target, volume growth and additional declaration on the implanted ions. Without any assumptions in relation to the variation of the distribution function with increasing dose. In our model it is assumed that the type of distribution function for small doses in a pure target substance is the same as in substances with implanted ions. A second assumption relates to the type of the distribution function valid for small doses in the given substances. These functions are determined as a result of a large number of theoretical and experimental investigations and are well-known at the present time. They include the symmetric and nonsymmetric Gauss distribution, the Pearson distribution, and others. We examine implantation with small doses of up to 10 14 - 10 15 cm -2 when the accurately known distribution is valid

  12. The dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents calculations that illustrate two conclusions; for any particular cell type there will be a critical radius at which tumor control breaks down, and the radius at which this occurs is strongly dependent upon the low-dose-rate radiosensitivity of the cells

  13. Modeling the dose effects of soybean oil in salad dressing on carotenoid and fat-soluble vitamin bioavailability in salad vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Wendy S; Zhou, Yang; Crane, Agatha; Dixon, Philip; Quadt, Frits; Flendrig, Leonard M

    2017-10-01

    Background: Previously, we showed that vegetable oil is necessary for carotenoid absorption from salad vegetables. Research is needed to better define the dose effect and its interindividual variation for carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins. Objective: The objective was to model the dose-response relation between the amount of soybean oil in salad dressing and the absorption of 1 ) carotenoids, phylloquinone, and tocopherols in salad vegetables and 2 ) retinyl palmitate formed from the provitamin A carotenoids. Design: Women ( n = 12) each consumed 5 vegetable salads with salad dressings containing 0, 2, 4, 8, or 32 g soybean oil. Blood was collected at selected time points. The outcome variables were the chylomicron carotenoid and fat-soluble vitamin area under the curve (AUC) and maximum content in the plasma chylomicron fraction ( C max ). The individual-specific and group-average dose-response relations were investigated by fitting linear mixed-effects random coefficient models. Results: Across the entire 0-32-g range, soybean oil was linearly related to the chylomicron AUC and C max values for α-carotene, lycopene, phylloquinone, and retinyl palmitate. Across 0-8 g of soybean oil, there was a linear increase in the chylomicron AUC and C max values for β-carotene. Across a more limited 0-4-g range of soybean oil, there were minor linear increases in the chylomicron AUC for lutein and α- and total tocopherol. Absorption of all carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins was highest with 32 g oil ( P vitamins ( P vitamins could be largely predicted by the soybean oil effect. However, the effect varied widely, and some individuals showed a negligible response. There was a global soybean oil effect such that those who absorbed more of one carotenoid and fat-soluble vitamin also tended to absorb more of the others. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02867488. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Meier, Matthias M.; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests

  15. Clinical implications of alternative TCP models for nonuniform dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, J. O.

    1995-01-01

    Several tumor control probability (TCP) models for nonuniform dose distributions were compared, including: (a) a logistic/inter-patient-heterogeneity model, (b) a probit/inter-patient-heterogeneity model, (c) a Poisson/radioresistant-strain/identical-patients model, (d) a Poisson/inter-patient-heterogeneity model and (e) a Poisson/intra-tumor- and inter-patient-heterogeneity model. The models were analyzed in terms of the probability of controlling a single tumor voxel (the voxel control probability, or VCP), as a function of voxel volume and dose. Alternatively, the VCP surface can be thought of as the effect of a small cold spot. The models based on the Poisson equation which include inter-patient heterogeneity ((d) and (e)) have VCP surfaces (VCP as a function of dose and volume) which have a threshold 'waterfall' shape: below the waterfall (in dose), VCP is nearly zero. The threshold dose decreases with decreasing voxel volume. However, models (a), (b), and (c) all show a high probability of controlling a voxel (VCP>50%) with very low dose (e.g., 1 Gy) if the voxel is small (smaller than about 10 -3 of the tumor volume). Model (c) does not have the waterfall shape at low volumes due to the assumption of patient uniformity and a neglect of the effect of the clonogens which are more radiosensitive (and more numerous). Models (a) and (b) deviate from the waterfall shape at low volumes due to numerical differences between the functions used and the Poisson function. Hence, the Possion models which include inter-patient heterogeneities ((d) and (e)) are more sensitive to the effects of small cold spots than the other models considered

  16. Standard effective doses for proliferative tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.C.; Hoban, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the treatment schedules used clinically for highly proliferative tumours, particularly with reference to the effects of fraction size, fraction number and treatment duration. The linear quadratic model (with time component) is used here to compare non-standard treatment regimens (e.g. accelerated and hyperfractionated schedules), currently the focus of randomized trials, with each other and some common 'standard regimens'. To ensure easy interpretation of results, two parameters known as proliferative standard effective dose one (PSED 1 ) and proliferative standard effective dose two (PSED 2 ) have been calculated for each regimen. Graphs of PSED 1 and PSED 2 versus potential doubling time (T p ) have been generated for a range of fractionation regimens which are currently under trial in various randomized studies. From these graphs it can be seen that the highly accelerated schedules (such as CHART) only show advantages for tumours with very short potential doubling times. Calculations for most of the schedules considered showed at least equivalent tumour control expected for the trial schedule compared with the control arm used and these values agree quite well with clinical results. These calculations are in good agreement with clinical results available at present. The greater the PSED 1 or PSED 2 for the schedule considered the greater the tumour control, which can be expected. However, as has been seen with clinical trials, this higher cell kill also results in higher acute effects which have proved too great for some accelerated schedules to continue. (author)

  17. Dosimetry in Interventional Radiology - Effective Dose Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Jarvinen, H.; Nikodemova, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiological procedures can lead to significant radiation doses to patients and to staff members. In order to evaluate the personal doses with respect to the regulatory dose limits, doses measured by dosimeters have to be converted to effective doses (E). Measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using a single unshielded dosimeter above the lead apron can lead to significant overestimation of the effective dose, while the measurement with dosimeter under the apron can lead to underestimation. To improve the accuracy, measurements with two dosimeters, one above and the other under the apron have been suggested ( d ouble dosimetry ) . The ICRP has recommended that interventional radiology departments develop a policy that staff should wear two dosimeters. The aim of this study was to review the double dosimetry algorithms for the calculation of effective dose in high dose interventional radiology procedures. The results will be used to develop general guidelines for personal dosimetry in interventional radiology procedures. This work has been carried out by Working Group 9 (Radiation protection dosimetry of medical staff) of the CONRAD project, which is a Coordination Action supported by the European Commission within its 6th Framework Program.(author)

  18. The MESORAD dose assessment model: Computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Bander, T.J.; Scherpelz, R.I.

    1988-10-01

    MESORAD is a dose equivalent model for emergency response applications that is designed to be run on minicomputers. It has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use as part of the Intermediate Dose Assessment System in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Operations Center in Washington, DC, and the Emergency Management System in the US Department of Energy Unified Dose Assessment Center in Richland, Washington. This volume describes the MESORAD computer code and contains a listing of the code. The technical basis for MESORAD is described in the first volume of this report (Scherpelz et al. 1986). A third volume of the documentation planned. That volume will contain utility programs and input and output files that can be used to check the implementation of MESORAD. 18 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Dose-dependent effect of homoeopathic drug Zinc sulphate on plant growth using Bacopa monnieri as model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zinc is one of the essential micronutrients in plants required in very low quantity for plant growth and development. In higher concentration, it is known to to reduce the rate of photosynthesis, So homoeopathic preparations tested to see it role on plan growth. Objective: To analyse the effect of homoeopathic preparation of Zinc sulphate on plants through in-vitro assay using Bacopa monnieri as a model plant system. Materials and Methods: Six homoeopathic potencies (1X to 6X of Zinc sulphate were used on a decimal scale along with the control (MS basal agar medium. The samples were evaluated by adding fixed amount (100 μl in the media as well as by dipping the explants in the test sample overnight. At the completion of the incubation period (14 days the fresh and dry weight, number and length of the roots, number and length of the shoots and the number of leaves were analysed. Results: It was observed that Zinc sulphate showed growth inhibition at potencies from 1X to 5X, whereas at potency 6X, it exhibited growth promotion effect, when compared with the control. Conclusion: Homoeopathic drug (Zinc sulphate exhibited growth promotion at higher potency (6X and growth inhibition at lower potencies (1X to 5X on Bacopa monneiri.

  20. A model for homeopathic remedy effects: low dose nanoparticles, allostatic cross-adaptation, and time-dependent sensitization in a complex adaptive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Iris R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper proposes a novel model for homeopathic remedy action on living systems. Research indicates that homeopathic remedies (a contain measurable source and silica nanoparticles heterogeneously dispersed in colloidal solution; (b act by modulating biological function of the allostatic stress response network (c evoke biphasic actions on living systems via organism-dependent adaptive and endogenously amplified effects; (d improve systemic resilience. Discussion The proposed active components of homeopathic remedies are nanoparticles of source substance in water-based colloidal solution, not bulk-form drugs. Nanoparticles have unique biological and physico-chemical properties, including increased catalytic reactivity, protein and DNA adsorption, bioavailability, dose-sparing, electromagnetic, and quantum effects different from bulk-form materials. Trituration and/or liquid succussions during classical remedy preparation create “top-down” nanostructures. Plants can biosynthesize remedy-templated silica nanostructures. Nanoparticles stimulate hormesis, a beneficial low-dose adaptive response. Homeopathic remedies prescribed in low doses spaced intermittently over time act as biological signals that stimulate the organism’s allostatic biological stress response network, evoking nonlinear modulatory, self-organizing change. Potential mechanisms include time-dependent sensitization (TDS, a type of adaptive plasticity/metaplasticity involving progressive amplification of host responses, which reverse direction and oscillate at physiological limits. To mobilize hormesis and TDS, the remedy must be appraised as a salient, but low level, novel threat, stressor, or homeostatic disruption for the whole organism. Silica nanoparticles adsorb remedy source and amplify effects. Properly-timed remedy dosing elicits disease-primed compensatory reversal in direction of maladaptive dynamics of the allostatic network, thus promoting

  1. Some hybrid models applicable to dose-response relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    A new type of models of dose-response relationships has been studied as an initial stage to explore a reliable extrapolation of the relationships decided by high dose data to the range of low dose covered by radiation protection. The approach is to use a 'hybrid scale' of linear and logarithmic scales; the first model is that the normalized surviving fraction (ρ S > 0) in a hybrid scale decreases linearly with dose in a linear scale, and the second is that the induction in a log scale increases linearly with the normalized dose (τ D > 0) in a hybrid scale. The hybrid scale may reflect an overall effectiveness of a complex system against adverse events caused by various agents. Some data of leukemia in the atomic bomb survivors and of rodent experiments were used to show the applicability of hybrid scale models. The results proved that proposed models fit these data not less than the popular linear-quadratic models, providing the possible interpretation of shapes of dose-response curves, e.g. shouldered survival curves varied by recovery time. (author)

  2. Effects of small doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, R.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainty remains about the quantitative effects of doses of ionising radiation less than 0.2 Sv. Estimates of hereditary effects, based on the atomic bomb survivors, suggest that the mutation doubling dose is about 2 Sv for acute low LET radiation, but the confidence limits are wide. The idea that paternal gonadal irradiation might explain the Seascale cluster of childhood leukaemia has been disproved. Fetal irradiation may lead to a reduction in IQ and an increase in seizures in childhood proportional to dose. Estimates that doses to a whole population cause a risk of cancer proportional to dose, with 0.1 Sv given acutely causing a risk of 1%, will need to be modified as more information is obtained, but the idea that there is a threshold for risk above this level is not supported by observations on the irradiated fetus or the effect of fallout. The idea, based on ecological observations, that small doses protect against the development of cancer is refuted by the effect of radon in houses. New observations on the atomic bomb survivors have raised afresh the possibility that small doses may also have other somatic effects. (author)

  3. Differential effects of repeated low dose treatment with the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in experimental models of bone cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Ding, Ming; Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme

    2008-01-01

    Pain due to bone malignancies is one of the most difficult types of cancer pain to fully control and may further decrease the patients' quality of life. Animal models of chronic pain conditions resulting from peripheral inflammatory reactions or nerve injuries are responsive to treatment with can......Pain due to bone malignancies is one of the most difficult types of cancer pain to fully control and may further decrease the patients' quality of life. Animal models of chronic pain conditions resulting from peripheral inflammatory reactions or nerve injuries are responsive to treatment...... with cannabinoid agonists. However, the use of cannabinoid agonists in humans may be hampered by CNS related side effects and development of tolerance. In the present study, we investigated the effect of repeated low dose administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 on bone cancer pain...... and neuropathic pain in mice. In addition, we investigated the development of CNS related side effects and tolerance. We found that 0.5 mg/kg/day for 18 days reduced pain related behavior and expression of spinal glial fibrillary acidic protein in the bone cancer pain model but not in the neuropathic pain model...

  4. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  5. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  6. Effect of low doses of cannabidiolic acid and ondansetron on LiCl-induced conditioned gaping (a model of nausea-induced behaviour) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, E M; Parker, L A

    2013-06-01

    To determine the minimally effective dose of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) that effectively reduces lithium chloride (LiCl)-induced conditioned gaping reactions (nausea-induced behaviour) in rats and to determine if these low systemic doses of CBDA (5-0.1 μg·kg⁻¹) relative to those of CBD could potentiate the anti-nausea effects of the classic 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT₃) receptor antagonist, ondansetron (OND). We investigated the efficacy of low doses of CBDA to suppress acute nausea, assessed by the establishment of conditioned gaping to a LiCl-paired flavour in rats. The potential of threshold and subthreshold doses of CBDA to enhance the reduction of nausea-induced conditioned gaping by OND were then determined. CBDA (at doses as low as 0.5 μg·kg⁻¹) suppressed nausea-induced conditioned gaping to a flavour. A low dose of OND (1.0 μg·kg⁻¹) alone reduced nausea-induced conditioned gaping, but when it was combined with a subthreshold dose of CBDA (0.1 μg·kg⁻¹) there was an enhancement in the suppression of LiCl-induced conditioned gaping. CBDA potently reduced conditioned gaping in rats, even at low doses and enhanced the anti-nausea effect of a low dose of OND. These findings suggest that combining low doses of CBDA and OND will more effectively treat acute nausea in chemotherapy patients. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Investigation of the effects of cell model and subcellular location of gold nanoparticles on nuclear dose enhancement factors using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zhongli; Chattopadhyay, Niladri; Kwon, Yongkyu Luke [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3M2 (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Lechtman, Eli [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The authors’ aims were to model how various factors influence radiation dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and to propose a new modeling approach to the dose enhancement factor (DEF).Methods: The authors used Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP 5) computer code to simulate photon and electron transport in cells. The authors modeled human breast cancer cells as a single cell, a monolayer, or a cluster of cells. Different numbers of 5, 30, or 50 nm AuNPs were placed in the extracellular space, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Photon sources examined in the simulation included nine monoenergetic x-rays (10–100 keV), an x-ray beam (100 kVp), and {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds. Both nuclear and cellular dose enhancement factors (NDEFs, CDEFs) were calculated. The ability of these metrics to predict the experimental DEF based on the clonogenic survival of MDA-MB-361 human breast cancer cells exposed to AuNPs and x-rays were compared.Results: NDEFs show a strong dependence on photon energies with peaks at 15, 30/40, and 90 keV. Cell model and subcellular location of AuNPs influence the peak position and value of NDEF. NDEFs decrease in the order of AuNPs in the nucleus, cytoplasm, cell membrane, and extracellular space. NDEFs also decrease in the order of AuNPs in a cell cluster, monolayer, and single cell if the photon energy is larger than 20 keV. NDEFs depend linearly on the number of AuNPs per cell. Similar trends were observed for CDEFs. NDEFs using the monolayer cell model were more predictive than either single cell or cluster cell models of the DEFs experimentally derived from the clonogenic survival of cells cultured as a monolayer. The amount of AuNPs required to double the prescribed dose in terms of mg Au/g tissue decreases as the size of AuNPs increases, especially when AuNPs are in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. For 40 keV x-rays and a cluster of cells, to double the prescribed x-ray dose (NDEF = 2

  8. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Model for Chemoimmunotherapy Options in Patients with Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Unsuitable for Full-Dose Fludarabine-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ursula; Briggs, Andrew H; Moreno, Santiago G; Ray, Joshua A; Ngo, Phuong; Samanta, Kunal

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil (GClb) in untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia unsuitable for full-dose fludarabine-based therapy. A Markov model was used to assess the cost-effectiveness of GClb versus other chemoimmunotherapy options. The model comprised three mutually exclusive health states: "progression-free survival (with/without therapy)", "progression (refractory/relapsed lines)", and "death". Each state was assigned a health utility value representing patients' quality of life and a specific cost value. Comparisons between GClb and rituximab plus chlorambucil or only chlorambucil were performed using patient-level clinical trial data; other comparisons were performed via a network meta-analysis using information gathered in a systematic literature review. To support the model, a utility elicitation study was conducted from the perspective of the UK National Health Service. There was good agreement between the model-predicted progression-free and overall survival and that from the CLL11 trial. On incorporating data from the indirect treatment comparisons, it was found that GClb was cost-effective with a range of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios below a threshold of £30,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained, and remained so during deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses under various scenarios. GClb was estimated to increase both quality-adjusted life expectancy and treatment costs compared with several commonly used therapies, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios below commonly referenced UK thresholds. This article offers a real example of how to combine direct and indirect evidence in a cost-effectiveness analysis of oncology drugs. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: Applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marklund, Mette [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: mm@frh.regionh.dk; Christensen, Robin [Parker Institute: Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: robin.christensen@frh.regionh.dk; Torp-Pedersen, Soren [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: stp@frh.regionh.dk; Thomsen, Carsten [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk; Nolsoe, Christian P. [Department of Radiology, Koge Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: cnolsoe@dadlnet.dk

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. Materials and methods: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were obtained. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers (median age: 24 years (range: 21-37 years) and median bodyweight: 65 kg (51-80 kg)) completed two dynamic MRM examinations on a 0.6 T open scanner. The inter-examination time was 24 h (23.5-25 h). The following sequences were applied: axial T2W TSE and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. Results: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose, respectively (P < 0.0001); corresponding to a 65% (95% CI: 37-99%) SI increase, indicating a moderate saturation. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), the results indicated a tendency, towards lower maximal SI in the breast parenchyma of ECOC users compared to non-ECOC users. Conclusion: We conclude that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed to determine the impact of ECOC on the relative enhancement ratio, and further studies are needed to determine if a possible use of ECOC should be considered a compromising

  11. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: Applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, Mette; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Soren; Thomsen, Carsten; Nolsoe, Christian P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. Materials and methods: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were obtained. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers (median age: 24 years (range: 21-37 years) and median bodyweight: 65 kg (51-80 kg)) completed two dynamic MRM examinations on a 0.6 T open scanner. The inter-examination time was 24 h (23.5-25 h). The following sequences were applied: axial T2W TSE and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. Results: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose, respectively (P < 0.0001); corresponding to a 65% (95% CI: 37-99%) SI increase, indicating a moderate saturation. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), the results indicated a tendency, towards lower maximal SI in the breast parenchyma of ECOC users compared to non-ECOC users. Conclusion: We conclude that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed to determine the impact of ECOC on the relative enhancement ratio, and further studies are needed to determine if a possible use of ECOC should be considered a compromising

  12. Dose-rate effects in external beam radiotherapy redux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C. Clifton; Gerweck, Leo E.; Zaider, Marco; Yorke, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in external beam radiotherapy, both in technical advances and in clinical approaches, have prompted renewed discussions on the potential influence of dose-rate on radio-response in certain treatment scenarios. We consider the multiple factors that influence the dose-rate effect, e.g. radical recombination, the kinetics of sublethal damage repair for tumors and normal tissues, the difference in α/β ratio for early and late reacting tissues, and perform a comprehensive literature review. Based on radiobiological considerations and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model we estimate the influence of overall treatment time on radio-response for specific clinical situations. As the influence of dose-rate applies to both the tumor and normal tissues, in oligo-fractionated treatment using large doses per fraction, the influence of delivery prolongation is likely important, with late reacting normal tissues being generally more sensitive to the dose-rate effect than tumors and early reacting tissues. In conventional fractionated treatment using 1.8-2 Gy per fraction and treatment times of 2-10 min, the influence of dose-rate is relatively small. Lastly, the dose-rate effect in external beam radiotherapy is governed by the overall beam-on-time, not by the average linac dose-rate, nor by the instantaneous dose-rate within individual linac pulses which could be as high as 3 x 10 6 MU/min.

  13. Intravascular brachytherapy: a model for the calculation of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, Rosana; Martin, Gabriela; Rivera, Elena; Cricco, Graciela; Cocca, Claudia; Gutierrez, Alicia; Nunez, Mariel; Bergoc, Rosa; Guzman, Luis; Belardi, Diego

    2002-01-01

    In this study we present the radiation dose distribution for a theoretical model with Montecarlo simulation, and based on an experimental model developed for the study of the prevention of restenosis post-angioplasty employing intravascular brachytherapy. In the experimental in vivo model, the atherosclerotic plaques were induced in femoral arteries of male New Zealand rabbits through surgical intervention and later administration of cholesterol enriched diet. For the intravascular irradiation we employed a 32P source contained within the balloon used for the angioplasty. The radiation dose distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B according to a segment of a simulated artery. We studied the radiation dose distribution in the axial and radial directions for different thickness of the atherosclerotic plaques. The results will be correlated with the biologic effects observed by means of histological analysis of the irradiated arteries (Au)

  14. Building shielding effects on radiation doses from routine radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    In calculating population doses from the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere, it is usually assumed that man spends all of his time outdoors standing on a smooth infinite plane. Realistically, however, man spends most of the time indoors, so that substantial reductions in radiation doses may result compared with the usual estimates. Calculational models were developed to study the effects of building structures on radiation doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Both internal dose from inhaled radionuclides and external photon dose from airborne and surface-deposited radionuclides are considered. The effect of building structures is described quantitatively by a dose reduction factor, which is the ratio of the dose inside a structure to the corresponding dose with no structure present. The internal dose from inhaled radionuclides is proportional to the radionuclide concentration in the air. Assuming that the outdoor airborne concentration is constant with time, the time-dependence of the indoor airborne concentration in terms of the structure air ventilation rate, the deposition velocities for radionuclides on the inside floor, walls, and ceiling, and the radioactive decay constant, were calculated

  15. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-01: Effect of Iodine Contrast Agent Concentration On Cerebrovascular Dose for Synchrotron Radiation Microangiography Based On a Simple Mouse Head Model and a Voxel Mouse Head Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Jing, J; Xie, C [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei (China); Lu, Y [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To find effective setting methods to mitigate the irradiation injure in synchrotron radiation microangiography(SRA) by Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: A mouse 1-D head model and a segmented voxel mouse head phantom were simulated by EGSnrc/Dosxyznrc code to investigate the dose enhancement effect of the iodine contrast agent irradiated by a monochromatic synchrotron radiation(SR) source. The influence of, like iodine concentration (IC), vessel width and depth, with and without skull layer protection and the various incident X ray energies, were simulated. The dose enhancement effect and the absolute dose based on the segmented voxel mouse head phantom were evaluated. Results: The dose enhancement ratio depends little on the irradiation depth, but strongly on the IC, which is linearly increases with IC. The skull layer protection cannot be ignored in SRA, the 700µm thick skull could decrease 10% of the dose. The incident X-ray energy can significantly affact the dose. E.g. compared to the dose of 33.2keV for 50mgI/ml, the 32.7keV dose decreases 38%, whereas the dose of 33.7 keV increases 69.2%, and the variation will strengthen more with enhanced IC. The segmented voxel mouse head phantom also showed that the average dose enhancement effect and the maximal voxel dose per photon depends little on the iodine voxel volume ratio, but strongly on IC. Conclusion: To decrease dose damage in SRA, the high-Z contrast agent should be used as little as possible, and try to avoid radiating locally the injected position immediately after the contrast agent injection. The fragile vessel containing iodine should avoid closely irradiating. Avoiding irradiating through the no or thin skull region, or appending thin equivalent material from outside to protect is also a better method. As long as SRA image quality is ensured, using incident X-ray energy as low as possible.

  16. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J; Meier, Matthias M; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    [1] The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis

  17. Radiation dose effects, hardening of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont-Nivet, E.

    1991-01-01

    This course reviews the mechanism of interaction between ionizing radiation and a silicon oxide type dielectric, in particular the effect of electron-hole pairs creation in the material. Then effects of cumulated dose on electronic components and especially in MOS technology are examined. Finally methods hardening of these components are exposed. 93 refs

  18. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  19. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  20. Effects of single-dose atorvastatin on interleukin-6, interferon gamma, and myocardial no-reflow in a rabbit model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.J.; Liu, X.L.; He, G.X.; Xu, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of statins relieving the no-reflow phenomenon and the effects of single-dose statins on it are not well known. This study sought to investigate the effects of inflammation on the no-reflow phenomenon in a rabbit model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion (AMI/R) and to evaluate the effects of single-dose atorvastatin on inflammation and myocardial no-reflow. Twenty-four New Zealand white male rabbits (5-6 months old) were randomized to three groups of eight: a sham-operated group, an AMI/R group, and an atorvastatin-treated group (10 mg/kg). Animals in the latter two groups were subjected to 4 h of coronary occlusion followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in normal and infarcted (reflow and no-reflow) myocardial tissue was determined by immunohistochemical methods. The area of no-reflow and necrosis was evaluated pathologically. Levels of serum IL-6 were significantly lower in the atorvastatin group than in the AMI/R group (P<0.01). Expression of IFN-γ in infarcted reflow and no-reflow myocardial tissue was also significantly lower in the atorvastatin group than in the AMI/R group. The mean area of no-reflow [47.01% of ligation area (LA)] was significantly smaller in the atorvastatin group than in the AMI/R group (85.67% of LA; P<0.01). The necrosis area was also significantly smaller in the atorvastatin group (85.94% of LA) than in the AMI/R group (96.56% of LA; P<0.01). In a secondary analysis, rabbits in the atorvastatin and AMI/R groups were divided into two groups based on necrosis area (90% of LA): a small group (<90% of LA) and a large group (>90% of LA). There was no significant difference in the area of no-reflow between the small (61.40% of LA) and large groups (69.87% of LA; P>0.05). Single-dose atorvastatin protected against inflammation and myocardial no-reflow and reduced infarct size during AMI/R in

  1. Effects of single-dose atorvastatin on interleukin-6, interferon gamma, and myocardial no-reflow in a rabbit model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X. J. [Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Binzhou, China, Department of Cardiology, Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou (China); Liu, X. L. [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Department of Cardiology, Jinan, China, Department of Cardiology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan (China); He, G. X. [Third Military Medical University, Southwest Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Chongqing, China, Department of Cardiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xu, H. P. [Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Binzhou, China, Department of Cardiology, Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou (China)

    2014-03-03

    The mechanisms of statins relieving the no-reflow phenomenon and the effects of single-dose statins on it are not well known. This study sought to investigate the effects of inflammation on the no-reflow phenomenon in a rabbit model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion (AMI/R) and to evaluate the effects of single-dose atorvastatin on inflammation and myocardial no-reflow. Twenty-four New Zealand white male rabbits (5-6 months old) were randomized to three groups of eight: a sham-operated group, an AMI/R group, and an atorvastatin-treated group (10 mg/kg). Animals in the latter two groups were subjected to 4 h of coronary occlusion followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in normal and infarcted (reflow and no-reflow) myocardial tissue was determined by immunohistochemical methods. The area of no-reflow and necrosis was evaluated pathologically. Levels of serum IL-6 were significantly lower in the atorvastatin group than in the AMI/R group (P<0.01). Expression of IFN-γ in infarcted reflow and no-reflow myocardial tissue was also significantly lower in the atorvastatin group than in the AMI/R group. The mean area of no-reflow [47.01% of ligation area (LA)] was significantly smaller in the atorvastatin group than in the AMI/R group (85.67% of LA; P<0.01). The necrosis area was also significantly smaller in the atorvastatin group (85.94% of LA) than in the AMI/R group (96.56% of LA; P<0.01). In a secondary analysis, rabbits in the atorvastatin and AMI/R groups were divided into two groups based on necrosis area (90% of LA): a small group (<90% of LA) and a large group (>90% of LA). There was no significant difference in the area of no-reflow between the small (61.40% of LA) and large groups (69.87% of LA; P>0.05). Single-dose atorvastatin protected against inflammation and myocardial no-reflow and reduced infarct size during AMI/R in

  2. Low-dose-rate high-let radiation cytogenetic effects on mice in vivo as model of space radiation action on mammalian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Rozanova, Olga; Aptikaeva, Gella; Romanchenko, Sergei; Smirnova, Helene; Dyukina, Alsu; Peleshko, Vladimir

    At present time little is known concerning the biological effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation exposure in space. The currently available experimental data on the biological effect of low doses of chronic radiation with high-LET values, which occur under the conditions of aircraft and space flights, have been primarily obtained in the examinations of pilots and astronauts after flights. Another way of obtaining this kind of evidence is the simulation of irradiation conditions during aircraft and space flights on high-energy accelerators and the conduction of large-scale experiments on animals under these conditions on Earth. In the present work, we investigated the cytogenetic effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation in the dose ranges of 0.2-30 cGy (1 cGy/day) and 0.5-16 cGy (0.43 cGy/day) in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the Serpukhov accelerator of 70 GeV protons that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on SHK mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response (AR) and the growth of solid tumor were examined. For induction of AR, two groups of mice were exposed to adapting doses of 0.2-30 cGy and the doses of 0.5-16 cGy of high-LET radiation. For comparison, third group of mice from unirradiated males was chronically irradiated with X-rays at adapting doses of 10 cGy (1 cGy/day). After a day, the mice of all groups were exposed to a challenging dose of 1.5 Gy of X-rays (1 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed by the method of cervical dislocation. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared by a conventional method with minor modifications. The influence of adapting dose of 16 cGy on the growth of solid tumor of Ehrlich ascite carcinoma was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells s.c. into the femur. It was

  3. Effects of low-dose cyclophosphamide with piroxicam on tumour neovascularization in a canine oral malignant melanoma-xenografted mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choisunirachon, N; Jaroensong, T; Yoshida, K; Saeki, K; Mochizuki, M; Nishimura, R; Sasaki, N; Nakagawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Low-dose cyclophosphamide (CyLD) has shown promise in the treatment of several cancers; however, the effect of CyLD on canine oral malignant melanoma has never been explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of CyLD with or without piroxicam (Px) on tumour neovascularization and vascular normalization in a canine oral malignant melanoma-xenografted mice model. After treatment with CyLD, Px or a combination of both (CyPx), the growth of the tumour in the treatment groups was significantly suppressed compared to the control group at 30 days of treatment. Proliferation index was also significantly reduced by all treatments, only CyPx significantly lowered microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Additionally, CyLD significantly reduced the proportion of normal vessels and caused an imbalance between VEGF and thrombospondin-1. These results suggested that CyPx has potent anti-angiogenic effects in terms of both the number and quality of blood vessels in xenografted canine oral malignant melanoma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Object-oriented process dose modeling for glovebox operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerigter, S.T.; Fasel, J.H.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory supports several defense and nondefense-related missions for the country by performing fabrication, surveillance, and research and development for materials and components that contain plutonium. Most operations occur in rooms with one or more arrays of gloveboxes connected to each other via trolley gloveboxes. Minimizing the effective dose equivalent (EDE) is a growing concern as a result of steadily declining allowable dose limits being imposed and a growing general awareness of safety in the workplace. In general, the authors discriminate three components of a worker's total EDE: the primary EDE, the secondary EDE, and background EDE. A particular background source of interest is the nuclear materials vault. The distinction between sources inside and outside of a particular room is arbitrary with the underlying assumption that building walls and floors provide significant shielding to justify including sources in other rooms in the background category. Los Alamos has developed the Process Modeling System (ProMoS) primarily for performing process analyses of nuclear operations. ProMoS is an object-oriented, discrete-event simulation package that has been used to analyze operations at Los Alamos and proposed facilities such as the new fabrication facilities for the Complex-21 effort. In the past, crude estimates of the process dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred), room dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in a given room), and facility dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in the facility) were used to obtain an integrated EDE for a given process. Modifications to the ProMoS package were made to utilize secondary dose information to use dose modeling to enhance the process modeling efforts

  5. Adult head CT scans: the uncertainties of effective dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Kent J.; Bibbo, Giovanni; Pattison, John E.

    2008-01-01

    sizes and positions within patients, and advances in CT scanner design that have not been taken into account by the effective dose estimation methods. The analysis excludes uncertainties due to variation in patient head size and the size of the model heads. For each of the four dose estimation methods analysed, the smallest and largest uncertainties (stated at the 95% confidence interval) were; 20-31% (Nagel), 14-28% (ImpaCT), 20-36% (Wellhoefer) and 21-32% (DLP). In each case, the smallest dose estimate uncertainties apply when the CT Dose Index for the scanner has been measured. In general, each of the four methods provide reasonable estimates of effective dose from head CT scans, with the ImpaCT method having the marginally smaller uncertainties. This uncertainty analysis method may be applied to other types of CT scans, such as chest, abdomen and pelvis studies, and may reveal where improvements can be made to reduce the uncertainty of those effective dose estimates. As identified in the BEIR VII report (2006), improvement in the uncertainty of effective dose estimates for individuals is expected to lead to a greater understanding of the hazards posed by diagnostic radiation exposures. (author)

  6. A novel dose uncertainty model and its application for dose verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hosang; Chung Heetaek; Liu Chihray; Palta, Jatinder; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Siyong

    2005-01-01

    Based on statistical approach, a novel dose uncertainty model was introduced considering both nonspatial and spatial dose deviations. Non-space-oriented uncertainty is mainly caused by dosimetric uncertainties, and space-oriented dose uncertainty is the uncertainty caused by all spatial displacements. Assuming these two parts are independent, dose difference between measurement and calculation is a linear combination of nonspatial and spatial dose uncertainties. Two assumptions were made: (1) the relative standard deviation of nonspatial dose uncertainty is inversely proportional to the dose standard deviation σ, and (2) the spatial dose uncertainty is proportional to the gradient of dose. The total dose uncertainty is a quadratic sum of the nonspatial and spatial uncertainties. The uncertainty model provides the tolerance dose bound for comparison between calculation and measurement. In the statistical uncertainty model based on a Gaussian distribution, a confidence level of 3σ theoretically confines 99.74% of measurements within the bound. By setting the confidence limit, the tolerance bound for dose comparison can be made analogous to that of existing dose comparison methods (e.g., a composite distribution analysis, a γ test, a χ evaluation, and a normalized agreement test method). However, the model considers the inherent dose uncertainty characteristics of the test points by taking into account the space-specific history of dose accumulation, while the previous methods apply a single tolerance criterion to the points, although dose uncertainty at each point is significantly different from others. Three types of one-dimensional test dose distributions (a single large field, a composite flat field made by two identical beams, and three-beam intensity-modulated fields) were made to verify the robustness of the model. For each test distribution, the dose bound predicted by the uncertainty model was compared with simulated measurements. The simulated

  7. Estimation of effective dose during hysterosalpingography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzimamil, K.; Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.; Alsafi, K.; Omer, H.

    2014-08-01

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is the most frequently used diagnostic tool to evaluate the endometrial cavity and fallopian tube by using conventional x-ray or fluoroscopy. Determination of the patient radiation doses values from x-ray examinations provides useful guidance on where best to concentrate efforts on patient dose reduction in order to optimize the protection of the patients. The aims of this study were to measure the patients entrance surface air kerma doses (ESA K), effective doses and to compare practices between different hospitals in Sudan. ESA K were measured for patient using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters (TLDs, Gr-200A). Effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. This study was conducted in five radiological departments: Two Teaching Hospitals (A and D), two private hospitals (B and C) and one University Hospital (E). The mean ESD was 20.1 mGy, 28.9 mGy, 13.6 mGy, 58.65 mGy, 35.7, 22.4 and 19.6 mGy for hospitals A,B,C,D, and E), respectively. The mean effective dose was 2.4 mSv, 3.5 mSv, 1.6 mSv, 7.1 mSv and 4.3 mSv in the same order. The study showed wide variations in the ESDs with three of the hospitals having values above the internationally reported values. Number of x-ray images, fluoroscopy time, operator skills x-ray machine type and clinical complexity of the procedures were shown to be major contributors to the variations reported. Results demonstrated the need for standardization of technique throughout the hospital. The results also suggest that there is a need to optimize the procedures. Local DRLs were proposed for the entire procedures. (author)

  8. Application of a sitting MIRD phantom for effective dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R. H.; Van Riper, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    In typical realistic scenarios, dose factors due to 60 Co contaminated steel, used in consumer products, cannot be approximated by standard exposure geometries. It is then necessary to calculate the effective dose using an appropriate anthropomorphic phantom. MCNP calculations were performed using a MIRD human model in two settings. In the first, a male office worker is sitting in a chair containing contaminated steel, surrounded by contaminated furniture. In the second, a male driver is seated inside an automobile, the steel of which is uniformly contaminated. To accurately calculate the dose to lower body organs, especially the gonads, it was essential to modify the MIRD model to simulate two sitting postures: chair and driving position. The phantom modifications are described, and the results of the calculations are presented. In the case of the automobile scenarios, results are compared to those obtained using an isotropic fluence-to-dose conversion function. (authors)

  9. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  10. A swinging seesaw as a novel model mechanism for time-dependent hormesis under dose-dependent stimulatory and inhibitory effects: A case study on the toxicity of antibacterial chemicals to Aliivibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haoyu; Calabrese, Edward J; Zheng, Min; Wang, Dali; Pan, Yongzheng; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying

    2018-08-01

    Hormesis occurs frequently in broadly ranging biological areas (e.g. plant biology, microbiology, biogerontology), toxicology, pharmacology and medicine. While numerous mechanisms (e.g. receptor and pathway mediated pathway responses) account for stimulatory and inhibitory features of hormetic dose responses, the vast majority emphasizes the inclusion of many doses but only one timepoint or use of a single optimized dose that is assessed over a broad range of timepoints. In this paper, a toxicity study was designed using a large number of properly spaced doses with responses determined over a large number of timepoints, which could help us reveal the underlying mechanism of hormesis. We present the results of a dose-time-response study on hormesis using five antibacterial chemicals on the bioluminescence of Aliivibrio fischeri, measuring expression of protein mRNA based on quorum sensing, simulating bioluminescent reaction and analyzing toxic actions of test chemicals. The findings show dose-time-dependent responses conforming to the hormetic dose-response model, while revealing unique response dynamics between agent induced stimulatory and inhibitory effects within bacterial growth phase dynamics. These dynamic dose-time features reveal a type of biological seesaw model that integrates stimulatory and inhibitory responses within unique growth phase, dose and time features, which has faultlessly explained the time-dependent hormetic phenomenon induced by five antibacterial chemicals (characterized by low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition). This study offers advances in understanding cellular dynamics, the biological integration of diverse and opposing responses and their role in evolutionary adaptive strategies to chemicals, which can provide new insight into the mechanistic investigation of hormesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis and modeling of electronic portal imaging exit dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistorius, S.; Yeboah, C.

    1995-01-01

    In spite of the technical advances in treatment planning and delivery in recent years, it is still unclear whether the recommended accuracy in dose delivery is being achieved. Electronic portal imaging devices, now in routine use in many centres, have the potential for quantitative dosimetry. As part of a project which aims to develop an expert-system based On-line Dosimetric Verification (ODV) system we have investigated and modelled the dose deposited in the detector of a video based portal imaging system. Monte Carlo techniques were used to simulate gamma and x-ray beams in homogeneous slab phantom geometries. Exit doses and energy spectra were scored as a function of (i) slab thickness, (ii) field size and (iii) the air gap between the exit surface and the detector. The results confirm that in order to accurately calculate the dose in the high atomic number Gd 2 O 2 S detector for a range of air gaps, field sizes and slab thicknesses both the magnitude of the primary and scattered components and their effective energy need to be considered. An analytic, convolution based model which attempts to do this is proposed. The results of the simulation and the ability of the model to represent these data will be presented and discussed. This model is used to show that, after training, a back-propagation feed-forward cascade correlation neural network has the ability to identify and recognise the cause of, significant dosimetric errors

  12. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-01-01

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters (α=0.15 Gy -1 and α/β=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD 2 ) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for 125 I and 103 Pd implants. The EUD 2 analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V 100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D 90 (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for 125 I and 103 Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for 125 I and 1.3-1.6 for 103 Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies

  13. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  14. The Effect of Low‑Dose Ketamine (Preemptive Dose) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Average dosage of diclofenac suppository and mean time for taking the first dosage of opioids have not statistical difference too (respectively; P = 0.76, P = 0.87). Average dose of pethidine was lesser than placebo statistically. It means, the case group did not take pethidine but this amount was 6 (20%) in the control one (P ...

  15. Modeling of radiation doses from chronic aqueous releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    A general model and corresponding computer code were developed to calculate personnel dose estimates from chronic releases via aqueous pathways. Potential internal dose pathways are consumption of water, fish, crustacean, and mollusk. Dose prediction from consumption of fish, crustacean, or mollusk is based on the calculated radionuclide content of the water and applicable bioaccumulation factor. 70-year dose commitments are calculated for whole body, bone, lower large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract, and six internal organs. In addition, the code identifies the largest dose contributor and the dose percentages for each organ-radionuclide combination in the source term. The 1974 radionuclide release data from the Savannah River Plant were used to evaluate the dose models. The dose predicted from the model was compared to the dose calculated from radiometric analysis of water and fish samples. The whole body dose from water consumption was 0.45 mrem calculated from monitoring data and 0.61 mrem predicted from the model. Tritium contributed 99 percent of this dose. The whole body dose from fish consumption was 0.20 mrem calculated from monitoring data and 0.14 mrem from the model. Cesium-134,137 was the principal contributor to the 70-year whole body dose from fish consumption

  16. A comparison of the angular dependence of effective dose and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, M.A.; Gierga, D.P.; Xu, X.G.

    1996-01-01

    In ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) Publication 60, the set of critical organs and their weighing factors were changed, defining the quantity effective dose, E. This quantity replaced the effective dose equivalent, H E , as defined by ICRP 26. Most notably, the esophagus was added to the list of critical organs. The Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code MCNP was used to determine the effective dose to sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms, developed in previous research, were modified to include the esophagus. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for monoenergetic photon beams of energies 0.08 MeV, 0.3 MeV, and 1.0 MeV for various azimuthal and polar angles. Separate organ equivalent doses were determined for male and female phantoms. The resulting organ equivalent doses were calculated from arithmetic mean averages. The angular dependence of effective dose was compared with that of effective dose equivalent reported in previous research. The differences between the two definitions and possible implications to regulatory agencies were summarized

  17. Recommendations on dose buildup factors used in models for calculating gamma doses for a plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1980-09-01

    Calculations of external γ-doses from radioactivity released to the atmosphere have been made using different dose buildup factor formulas. Some of the dose buildup factor formulas are used by the Nordic countries in their respective γ-dose models. A comparison of calculated γ-doses using these dose buildup factors shows that the γ-doses can be significantly dependent on the buildup factor formula used in the calculation. Increasing differences occur for increasing plume height, crosswind distance, and atmospheric stability and also for decreasing downwind distance. It is concluded that the most accurate γ-dose can be calculated by use of Capo's polynomial buildup factor formula. Capo-coefficients have been calculated and shown in this report for γ-energies below the original lower limit given by Capo. (author)

  18. Targeted nanoparticle delivery of therapeutic antisense microRNAs presensitizes glioblastoma cells to lower effective doses of temozolomide in vitro and in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Meenakshi; Sekar, Thillai Veerapazham; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Devulapally, Rammohan; Afjei, Rayhaneh; Babikir, Husam A; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Massoud, Tarik F

    2018-04-20

    Temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy for glioblastoma (GBM) is generally well tolerated at standard doses but it can cause side effects. GBMs overexpress microRNA-21 and microRNA-10b, two known oncomiRs that promote cancer development, progression and resistance to drug treatment. We hypothesized that systemic injection of antisense microRNAs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) encapsulated in cRGD-tagged PEG-PLGA nanoparticles would result in high cellular delivery of intact functional antagomiRs, with consequent efficient therapeutic response and increased sensitivity of GBM cells to lower doses of TMZ. We synthesized both targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles, and characterized them for size, surface charge and encapsulation efficiency of antagomiRs. When using targeted nanoparticles in U87MG and Ln229 GBM cells, we showed higher uptake-associated improvement in sensitivity of these cells to lower concentrations of TMZ in medium. Co-inhibition of microRNA-21 and microRNA-10b reduced the number of viable cells and increased cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase upon TMZ treatment. We found a significant increase in expression of key target genes for microRNA-21 and microRNA-10b upon using targeted versus non-targeted nanoparticles. There was also significant reduction in tumor volume when using TMZ after pre-treatment with loaded nanoparticles in human GBM cell xenografts in mice. In vivo targeted nanoparticles plus different doses of TMZ showed a significant therapeutic response even at the lowest dose of TMZ, indicating that preloading cells with antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b increases cellular chemosensitivity towards lower TMZ doses. Future clinical applications of this combination therapy may result in improved GBM response by using lower doses of TMZ and reducing nonspecific treatment side effects.

  19. Modifying effect of low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalendo, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that irradiation of Hela cells with stimulating doses of 0,1 Gy changes the cells' response to the subsequent radiation effect of greater value: instead of DNA synthesis inhibition stimulation takes place. Modifying effect of preliminary irradiation with 0,1 Gy manifests it self only in case if there is a certain time interval not less than 3 minutes and not more than 10 minutes (3-5 minutes is optimal interval). Data on modifying effect with 0,1 Gy at subcellular and cellular-population levels are presented. 21 refs.; 6 figs

  20. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of Silicon. We obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, we study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates.

  1. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    The authors combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of silicon. They obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, the authors study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates

  2. Absorbed dose in fibrotic microenvironment models employing Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano Ramírez, O.D.; Rojas Calderón, E.L.; Azorín Vega, E.P.; Ferro Flores, G.; Martínez Caballero, E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence or absence of fibrosis and yet more, the multimeric and multivalent nature of the radiopharmaceutical have recently been reported to have an effect on the radiation absorbed dose in tumor microenvironment models. Fibroblast and myofibroblast cells produce the extracellular matrix by the secretion of proteins which provide structural and biochemical support to cells. The reactive and reparative mechanisms triggered during the inflammatory process causes the production and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, the abnormal excessive growth of the connective tissue leads to fibrosis. In this work, microenvironment (either not fibrotic or fibrotic) models composed of seven spheres representing cancer cells of 10 μm in diameter each with a 5 μm diameter inner sphere (cell nucleus) were created in two distinct radiation transport codes (PENELOPE and MCNP). The purpose of creating these models was to determine the radiation absorbed dose in the nucleus of cancer cells, based on previously reported radiopharmaceutical retain (by HeLa cells) percentages of the 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate (monomeric) and 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate-AuNP (multimeric) radiopharmaceuticals. A comparison in the results between the PENELOPE and MCNP was done. We found a good agreement in the results of the codes. The percent difference between the increase percentages of the absorbed dose in the not fibrotic model with respect to the fibrotic model of the codes PENELOPE and MCNP was found to be under 1% for both radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  3. Effective dose to radon considering people's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, M.; Seki, K.; Kikuchi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The tidal volume was estimated for evaluating the effective dose due to radon concentration in the atmosphere. In this study regional population was separated to vocation and non-vocation. The occupancy time and the breathing rate for both vocation and non-vocation groups were estimated, and the annual tidal volume for both groups were calculated. Human actions were separated to 18 activities in the process for estimating the breathing rate. It was clear that the breathing rate depended on human activity and that the human activity changed with its age, so the breathing rate varied with age. Finally the effective doses due to radon and radon progeny indoors and outdoors were evaluated. The maximum annual effective dose was estimated to be 1.2 mSv, minimum 0.2 mSv, and mean 0.51 mSv for vocation. For non-vocation, the male maximum value 0.43 mSv was obtained at the 16 age and the minimum 0.12 mSv at the 70 age, whereas female maximum 0.26 mSv was obtained at the 12 age and the minimum 0.11 mSv at the 70 age. In addition in this study objective areas are Aichi, Gifu, and Mie prefectures for vocation and only Aichi prefecture for non-vocation. (author)

  4. TSD-DOSE: A radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingston, M.; Arnish, J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.

    1998-01-01

    Past practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) field facilities resulted in the presence of trace amounts of radioactive materials in some hazardous chemical wastes shipped from these facilities. In May 1991, the DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping all hazardous waste until procedures could be established to ensure that only nonradioactive hazardous waste would be shipped from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. To aid in assessing the potential impacts of shipments of mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes, a radiological assessment computer model (or code) was developed on the basis of detailed assessments of potential radiological exposures and doses for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. The model, called TSD-DOSE, is designed to incorporate waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste-handling operations at a TSD facility. The code is intended to provide both DOE and commercial TSD facilities with a rapid and cost-effective method for assessing potential human radiation exposures from the processing of chemical wastes contaminated with trace amounts of radionuclides

  5. Implications of effects ''adaptive response'', ''low-dose hypersensitivity'' und ''bystander effect'' for cancer risk at low doses and low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P

    2006-01-01

    A model for carcinogenesis (the TSCE model) was applied in order to examine the effects of ''Low-dose hypersensitivity (LDH)'' and the ''Bystander effect (BE)'' on the derivation of radiation related cancer mortality risks. LDH has been discovered to occur in the inactivation of cells after acute exposure to low LET radiation. A corresponding version of the TSCE model was applied to the mortality data on the Abomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The BE has been mainly observed in cells after exposure to high LET radiation. A Version of the TSCE model which included the BE was applied to the data on lung cancer mortality from the workers at the Mayak nuclear facilities who were exposed to Plutonium. In general an equally good description of the A-bomb survivor mortality data (for all solid, stomach and lung tumours) was found for the TSCE model and the (conventional) empirical models but fewer parameters were necessary for the TSCE model. The TSCE model which included the effects of radiation induced cell killing resulted in non-linear dose response curves with excess relative risks after exposure at young ages that were generally lower than in the models without cell killing. The main results from TSCE models which included cell killing described by either conventional survival curves or LDH were very similar. A sub multiplicative effect from the interaction of smoking and exposure to plutonium was found to result from the analysis of the Mayak lung cancer mortality data. All models examined resulted in the predominant number of Mayak lung cancer deaths being ascribed to smoking. The interaction between smoking and plutonium exposures was found to be the second largest effect. The TSCE model resulted in lower estimates for the lung cancer excess relative risk per unit plutonium dose than the empirical risk model, but this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The excess relative risk dose responses were linear in the empirical model and

  6. Cost-effectiveness of reduction of off-site dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, J.J.; Macphee, R.; Arbeau, N.; Miskin, J.; Scott, C.K.; Winters, E.

    1988-03-01

    Since the early 1970's, nuclear power plants have been designed and operated with a target of not releasing more than one percent of the licensed limits (derived emission limits) in liquid and gaseous effluents. The AECB initiated this study of the cost-effectiveness of the reduction of off-site doses as part of a review to determine if further measures to reduce off-site doses might be reasonably achievable. Atlantic Nuclear has estimated the cost of existing technology options that can be applied for a further reduction of radioactive effluents from future CANDU nuclear power plants. Detritiation, filtration, ion exchange and evaporation are included in the assessment. The costs are presented in 1987 Canadian dollars, and include capital and operating costs for a reference 50 year plant life. Darlington NGS and Point Lepreau NGS are the reference nuclear power plant types and locations. The effect resulting from the hypothetical application of each technology has been calculated as the resulting reduction in world collective radiation dose detriment. The CSA N288.1 procedure was used for local pathway analysis and the global dispersion model developed by the NEA (OECD) group of experts was used for dose calculations. The reduction in the 'collective effective dose equivalent commitment' was assumed to exist for 10,000 years, the expected life-span of solid waste repositories. No attempt was made to model world population dynamics. The collective dose reductions were calculated for a nominal world population of 10 billion persons. The estimated cost and effect of applying the technology options are summarized in a tabular form for input to further consideration of 'reasonably achievable off-site dose levels'

  7. Do non-targeted effects increase or decrease low dose risk in relation to the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review the evidence for departure from linearity for malignant and non-malignant disease and in the light of this assess likely mechanisms, and in particular the potential role for non-targeted effects. Excess cancer risks observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in many medically and occupationally exposed groups exposed at low or moderate doses are generally statistically compatible. For most cancer sites the dose-response in these groups is compatible with linearity over the range observed. The available data on biological mechanisms do not provide general support for the idea of a low dose threshold or hormesis. This large body of evidence does not suggest, indeed is not statistically compatible with, any very large threshold in dose for cancer, or with possible hormetic effects, and there is little evidence of the sorts of non-linearity in response implied by non-DNA-targeted effects. There are also excess risks of various types of non-malignant disease in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in other groups. In particular, elevated risks of cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and digestive disease are observed in the A-bomb data. In contrast with cancer, there is much less consistency in the patterns of risk between the various exposed groups; for example, radiation-associated respiratory and digestive diseases have not been seen in these other (non-A-bomb) groups. Cardiovascular risks have been seen in many exposed populations, particularly in medically exposed groups, but in contrast with cancer there is much less consistency in risk between studies: risks per unit dose in epidemiological studies vary over at least two orders of magnitude, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well known (but unobserved) risk factors. In the absence of a convincing mechanistic explanation of epidemiological evidence that is, at present, less than persuasive, a cause-and-effect interpretation of the reported

  8. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  9. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  10. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor control probability

  11. Review of time-dose effects in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E.; Fischer, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A historical review of conventional fractionation offers little confidence that such treatment is optimal for all tumors. Thus manipulation of time-dose schedules may provide a relatively inexpensive yet potentially useful technique for improving therapeutic results in radiation therapy. Consideration of basic radiobiological principles and animal model data illustrates the complex and heterogeneous nature of normal tissue and tumor response to time-dose effects and supports the hypothesis that better time-dose prescriptions can be found in clinical practice. The number of possible time-dose prescriptions is very large, and a review of the clinical trials using nonconventional fractionation demonstrates that the sampled portion of the total three-dimensional space of time, fraction number, and dose has been very small. Only carefully designed clinical trials can establish the therapeutic advantage of a new treatment schedule, and methods for selecting the most promising schedules are discussed. The use of simple data reduction formulas for time-dose effects should be discarded since they ignore the very complexity and heterogeneity of tissues and tumors which may form the basis of improved clinical results

  12. Comprehensive fluence model for absolute portal dose image prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytyk, K.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) continue to be investigated as treatment verification tools, with a particular focus on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This verification could be accomplished through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images. A general fluence determination tailored to portal dose image prediction would be a great asset in order to model the complex modulation of IMRT. A proposed physics-based parameter fluence model was commissioned by matching predicted EPID images to corresponding measured EPID images of multileaf collimator (MLC) defined fields. The two-source fluence model was composed of a focal Gaussian and an extrafocal Gaussian-like source. Specific aspects of the MLC and secondary collimators were also modeled (e.g., jaw and MLC transmission factors, MLC rounded leaf tips, tongue and groove effect, interleaf leakage, and leaf offsets). Several unique aspects of the model were developed based on the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator including (1) use of a non-Gaussian extrafocal fluence source function, (2) separate energy spectra used for focal and extrafocal fluence, and (3) different off-axis energy spectra softening used for focal and extrafocal fluences. The predicted energy fluence was then convolved with Monte Carlo generated, EPID-specific dose kernels to convert incident fluence to dose delivered to the EPID. Measured EPID data were obtained with an a-Si EPID for various MLC-defined fields (from 1x1 to 20x20 cm 2 ) over a range of source-to-detector distances. These measured profiles were used to determine the fluence model parameters in a process analogous to the commissioning of a treatment planning system. The resulting model was tested on 20 clinical IMRT plans, including ten prostate and ten oropharyngeal cases. The model predicted the open-field profiles within 2%, 2 mm, while a mean of 96.6% of pixels over all

  13. Time improvement of photoelectric effect calculation for absorbed dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J M; Wainschenker, R S; Doorn, J H; Caselli, E E

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy is a very useful tool in cancer treatment. It is very important to determine absorbed dose in human tissue to accomplish an effective treatment. A mathematical model based on affected areas is the most suitable tool to estimate the absorbed dose. Lately, Monte Carlo based techniques have become the most reliable, but they are time expensive. Absorbed dose calculating programs using different strategies have to choose between estimation quality and calculating time. This paper describes an optimized method for the photoelectron polar angle calculation in photoelectric effect, which is significant to estimate deposited energy in human tissue. In the case studies, time cost reduction nearly reached 86%, meaning that the time needed to do the calculation is approximately 1/7 th of the non optimized approach. This has been done keeping precision invariant

  14. A Monte Carlo estimation of effective dose in chest tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabol, John M.

    2009-01-01

    calculated to be 0.124 mSv (ICRP60) [0.134 mSv (ICRP103)]. This is less than 75% of that predicted by scaling of the PA mA s ratio. This lower dose was due to changes in the focal-spot-to-skin distance, effective changes in collimation with projection angle, rounding down of the mA s step, and variations in organ exposure to the primary x-ray beam for each view. Large errors in dose estimation can occur if these factors are not accurately modeled. Conclusions: The effective dose of a chest examination with this chest tomosynthesis system is about twice that of a two-view chest examination and less than 2% of the published average values for thoracic CT. It is shown that complete consideration of the tomosynthesis acquisition technique and geometry is required for accurate determination of the effective dose to the patient. Tomosynthesis provides three-dimensional imaging at a dose level comparable to a two-view chest x-ray examination and may provide a low dose alternative to thoracic CT for obtaining depth information in chest imaging.

  15. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  16. Age-dependent conversion coefficients for organ doses and effective doses for external neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Chihiro; Endo, Akira; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-06-01

    To utilize dose assessment of the public for external neutron irradiation, conversion coefficients of absorbed doses of organs and effective doses were calculated using the numerical simulation technique for six different ages (adult, 15, 10, 5 and 1 years and newborn), which represent the member of the public. Calculations were performed using six age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for two irradiation geometries, anterior-posterior and rotational geometries, for 20 incident energies from thermal to 20 MeV. Effective doses defined by the 1990 Recommendation of ICRP were calculated from the absorbed doses in 21 organs. The calculated results were tabulated in the form of absorbed doses and effective doses per unit neutron fluence. The calculated conversion coefficients are used for dose assessment of the public around nuclear facilities and accelerator facilities. (author)

  17. Analytical dose modeling for preclinical proton irradiation of millimetric targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstalle, Marie; Constanzo, Julie; Karakaya, Yusuf; Finck, Christian; Rousseau, Marc; Brasse, David

    2018-01-01

    Due to the considerable development of proton radiotherapy, several proton platforms have emerged to irradiate small animals in order to study the biological effectiveness of proton radiation. A dedicated analytical treatment planning tool was developed in this study to accurately calculate the delivered dose given the specific constraints imposed by the small dimensions of the irradiated areas. The treatment planning system (TPS) developed in this study is based on an analytical formulation of the Bragg peak and uses experimental range values of protons. The method was validated after comparison with experimental data from the literature and then compared to Monte Carlo simulations conducted using Geant4. Three examples of treatment planning, performed with phantoms made of water targets and bone-slab insert, were generated with the analytical formulation and Geant4. Each treatment planning was evaluated using dose-volume histograms and gamma index maps. We demonstrate the value of the analytical function for mouse irradiation, which requires a targeting accuracy of 0.1 mm. Using the appropriate database, the analytical modeling limits the errors caused by misestimating the stopping power. For example, 99% of a 1-mm tumor irradiated with a 24-MeV beam receives the prescribed dose. The analytical dose deviations from the prescribed dose remain within the dose tolerances stated by report 62 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements for all tested configurations. In addition, the gamma index maps show that the highly constrained targeting accuracy of 0.1 mm for mouse irradiation leads to a significant disagreement between Geant4 and the reference. This simulated treatment planning is nevertheless compatible with a targeting accuracy exceeding 0.2 mm, corresponding to rat and rabbit irradiations. Good dose accuracy for millimetric tumors is achieved with the analytical calculation used in this work. These volume sizes are typical in mouse

  18. Development of the model MAAP5-DOSE for dose analysis in Cofrentes NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Diaz, P.; Ibanez, L.; Lamela, B.; Serrano, C.

    2013-01-01

    Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion has developed a model of Cofrentes NPP with code MAAP5-DOSE in order to be able to assess in realistic conditions the the expected dose in points and radiological consequences of severe accident of local action.

  19. Modeling gamma radiation dose in dwellings due to building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Peter; van Dijk, Willem

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that calculates the absorbed dose rate in air of gamma radiation emitted by building materials in a rectangular body construction. The basis for these calculations is formed by a fixed set of specific absorbed dose rates (the dose rate per Bq kg(-1) 238U, 232Th, and 40K), as determined for a standard geometry with the dimensions 4 x 5 x 2.8 m3. Using the computer codes Marmer and MicroShield, correction factors are assessed that quantify the influence of several room and material related parameters on the specific absorbed dose rates. The investigated parameters are the position in the construction; the thickness, density, and dimensions of the construction parts; the contribution from the outer leave; the presence of doors and windows; the attenuation by internal partition walls; the contribution from building materials present in adjacent rooms; and the effect of non-equilibrium due to 222Rn exhalation. To verify the precision, the proposed method is applied to three Dutch reference dwellings, i.e., a row house, a coupled house, and a gallery apartment. The averaged difference with MCNP calculations is found to be 4%.

  20. Mathematical modelling for dose deposition in photon-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichard, Teddy

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatments consists in irradiating the patient with beams of energetic particles (typically photons) targeting the tumor. Such particles are transported through the medium and deposit energy in the medium. This deposited energy is the so called dose, responsible for the biological effect of the radiations. The present work aim to develop numerical methods for dose computation and optimization that are competitive in terms of computational cost and accuracy compared to reference method. The motion of particles is first studied through a system of linear transport equations at the kinetic level. However, solving directly such systems is numerically too costly for medical application. Instead, the moment method is used with a special focus on the Mn models. Those moment equations are non-linear and valid under a condition called realizability. Standard numerical schemes for moment equations are constrained by stability conditions which happen to be very restrictive when the medium contains low density regions. Inconditionally stable numerical schemes adapted to moment equations (preserving the realizability property) are developed. Those schemes are shown to be competitive in terms of computational costs compared to reference approaches. Finally they are applied to in an optimization procedure aiming to maximize the dose in the tumor and to minimize the dose in healthy tissues. (author) [fr

  1. Bayesian Dose-Response Modeling in Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Steven B.

    This book discusses Bayesian dose-response modeling in small samples applied to two different settings. The first setting is early phase clinical trials, and the second setting is toxicology studies in cancer risk assessment. In early phase clinical trials, experimental units are humans who are actual patients. Prior to a clinical trial, opinions from multiple subject area experts are generally more informative than the opinion of a single expert, but we may face a dilemma when they have disagreeing prior opinions. In this regard, we consider compromising the disagreement and compare two different approaches for making a decision. In addition to combining multiple opinions, we also address balancing two levels of ethics in early phase clinical trials. The first level is individual-level ethics which reflects the perspective of trial participants. The second level is population-level ethics which reflects the perspective of future patients. We extensively compare two existing statistical methods which focus on each perspective and propose a new method which balances the two conflicting perspectives. In toxicology studies, experimental units are living animals. Here we focus on a potential non-monotonic dose-response relationship which is known as hormesis. Briefly, hormesis is a phenomenon which can be characterized by a beneficial effect at low doses and a harmful effect at high doses. In cancer risk assessments, the estimation of a parameter, which is known as a benchmark dose, can be highly sensitive to a class of assumptions, monotonicity or hormesis. In this regard, we propose a robust approach which considers both monotonicity and hormesis as a possibility. In addition, We discuss statistical hypothesis testing for hormesis and consider various experimental designs for detecting hormesis based on Bayesian decision theory. Past experiments have not been optimally designed for testing for hormesis, and some Bayesian optimal designs may not be optimal under a

  2. True dose from incorporated activities. Models for internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breustedt, B.; Eschner, W.; Nosske, D.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of doses after incorporation of radionuclides cannot use direct measurements of the doses, as for example dosimetry in external radiation fields. The only observables are activities in the body or in excretions. Models are used to calculate the doses based on the measured activities. The incorporated activities and the resulting doses can vary by more than seven orders of magnitude between occupational and medical exposures. Nevertheless the models and calculations applied in both cases are similar. Since the models for the different applications have been developed independently by ICRP and MIRD different terminologies have been used. A unified terminology is being developed. (orig.)

  3. Predicted effects of countermeasures on radiation doses from contaminated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Nielsen, S.P.; Nielsen, F.

    1993-02-01

    Quantitative assessments of the effects on radiation-dose reductions from nine typical countermeasures against accidental fod contamination have been carried out with dynamic radioecological models. The foodstuffs are assumed to be contaminated with iodine-131, caesium-134 and caesium-137 after a release of radioactive materials from the Ringhals nuclear power station in Sweden resulting from a hypothetical core melt accident. The release of activity of these radionuclides is assumed at 0.07% of the core inventory of the unit 1 reactor (1600 TBq of I-131, 220 TBq of Cs-134 and 190 TBq of Cs-137). Radiation doses are estimated for the 55,000 affected inhabitants along the south-eastern coast of Sweden eating locally produced foodstuffs. The average effective dose equivalent to an individual in the critical group is predicted to be 2.9 mSv from food consumption contaminated with I-131. An accident occurring during winter is estimated to cause average individual doses of 0.32 mSv from Cs-134 and 0.47 mSv from Cs-137, and 9.4 mSv and 6.8 mSv from Cs-134 and Cs-137, respectively, for an accident occurring during summer. Doses from the intake of radioiodine may be reduced by up to a factor of 60 by rejecting contaminated food for 30 days. For the doses from radiocaesium, the largest effect is found form deep ploughing which may reduce the dose by up to a factor of 80. (au) (12 tabs., 6 ills., 19 refs.)

  4. Mesorad dose assessment model. Volume 1. Technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Bander, T.J.; Athey, G.F.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-03-01

    MESORAD is a dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Using release data for as many as 50 radionuclides, the model calculates: (1) external doses resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides contained in elevated or deposited material; (2) internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation; and (3) total whole-body doses. External doses from airborne material are calculated using semi-infinite and finite cloud approximations. At each stage in model execution, the appropriate approximation is selected after considering the cloud dimensions. Atmospheric processes are represented in MESORAD by a combination of Lagrangian puff and Gaussian plume dispersion models, a source depletion (deposition velocity) dry deposition model, and a wet deposition model using washout coefficients based on precipitation rates

  5. The Effect of Aquaplast on Surface Dose of Photon Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoon Sik

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effect on surface dose due to Aquaplast used for immobilizing the patients with head and neck cancers in photon beam radiotherapy. Materials and Methods : To assess surface and buildup region dose for 6MV X-ray from linear accelerator(Siemens Mevatron 6740), we measured percent ionization value with the Markus chamber model 30-329 manufactured by PTW Frieburg and Capintec electrometer, model WK92. For measurement of surface ionization value, the chamber was embedded in 25 X 25 X 3 cm 3 acrylic phantom and set on 25 X 25 X 5 cm 3 , polystyrene phantom to allow adequate scattering. The measurements of percent depth ionization were made by placing the polystyrene layers of appropriate thickness over the chamber. The measurements were taken at 10 cm SSD for 5 X 5 cm 2 , 10 X 10 cm 2 , and 15 X 15 cm 2 field sizes, respectively. Placing the layer of Aquaplast over the chamber, the same procedures were repeated. We evaluated two types o Aquaplast: 1.6mm layer of original Aquaplast(manufactured by WFR Aquaplast Corp.) and transformed Aquaplast similar to moulded one for immobilizing the patients practically. We also measured surface ionization values with blocking tray in presence or absence of transformed Aquaplast. In calculating percent depth dose, we used the formula suggested by Gerbi and khan to correct over response of the Markus chamber. Results : The surface doses for open fields of 5 X 5 cm 2 , 10 X 10 cm 2 , 15 X 15 cm 2 were 7.9%, 13.6%, and 18.7% respectively. He original Aquaplast increased the surface doses upto 38.4%, 43.6% and 47.4% respectively. There were little differences in percent depth dose values beyond the depth of Dmax. Increasing field size, the blocking tray caused increase of the surface dose by 0.2%, 1.7%, 3.0% without Aquaplast, 0.2%, 1.9%, 3.7% with transformed Aquaplast, respectively. Conclusion : The original and transformed Aquaplast increased the surface dose moderately. The percent depth doses beyond Dmax

  6. Use of normalized total dose to represent the biological effect of fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, J.C.; Kalend, A.

    1990-01-01

    There are currently a number of radiobiological models to account for the effects of dose fractionation and time. Normalized total dose (NTD) is not another new model but is a previously reported, clinically useful form in which to represent the biological effect, determined by any specific radiobiological dose-fractionation model, of a course of radiation using a single set of standardized, easily understood terminology. The generalized form of NTD reviewed in this paper describes the effect of a course of radiotherapy administered with nonstandard fractionation as the total dose of radiation in Gy that could be administered with a given reference fractionation such as 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week that would produce an equivalent biological effect (probability of complications or tumor control) as predicted by a given dose-fractionation formula. The use of normalized total dose with several different exponential and linear-quadratic dose-fraction formulas is presented. (author). 51 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  7. Use of normalized total dose to represent the biological effect of fractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, J C; Kalend, A [Pittsburgh University School of Medicine (USA). Department of Radiation Oncology Pittsburg Cancer Institute (USA)

    1990-03-01

    There are currently a number of radiobiological models to account for the effects of dose fractionation and time. Normalized total dose (NTD) is not another new model but is a previously reported, clinically useful form in which to represent the biological effect, determined by any specific radiobiological dose-fractionation model, of a course of radiation using a single set of standardized, easily understood terminology. The generalized form of NTD reviewed in this paper describes the effect of a course of radiotherapy administered with nonstandard fractionation as the total dose of radiation in Gy that could be administered with a given reference fractionation such as 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week that would produce an equivalent biological effect (probability of complications or tumor control) as predicted by a given dose-fractionation formula. The use of normalized total dose with several different exponential and linear-quadratic dose-fraction formulas is presented. (author). 51 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab.

  8. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-01-01

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced

  9. Bioeffect modeling and equieffective dose concepts in radiation oncology – Terminology, quantities and units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, Søren M.; Dörr, Wolfgang; Gahbauer, Reinhard; Howell, Roger W.; Joiner, Michael C.; Jones, Bleddyn; Jones, Dan T.L.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Wambersie, André; Whitmore, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report Committee on “Bioeffect Modeling and Biologically Equivalent Dose Concepts in Radiation Therapy” is currently developing a comprehensive and consistent framework for radiobiological effect modeling based on the equieffective dose, EQDX α/β , a concept encompassing BED and EQD2 as special cases.

  10. Late effects of various dose-fractionation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.; Notter, G.

    1983-01-01

    These clinical investigations of various dose-fractionation regimens on human skin show that: The late reactions cannot be predicted from the early reactions; The dose-response curves for late reactions are much steeper than for early reactions; Equivalent doses for various fractionation schedules concerning late effects can be calculated by means of a corrected CRE (NSD) formula; the correction must be considered preliminary because further follow-up is needed. A clinical fractionation study of this type requires: Extremely careful dosimetry; Study of the same anatomical region; Very long follow-up; Studies at different effect levels; Skin reaction is the only end point we have studied systematically for different fractionation regimens. Experience with the CRE formula as a model for calculating isoeffect doses for different fractionation schedules in routine clinical use can be summarized as follows: The CRE formula has been used prospectively since 1972 in all patients; CRE-equivalent weekly doses to 5 x 2.0 Gy per week has been used. (Although the fractionation schedule is changed, the overall treatment time is still the same); The CRE range was 18 to 21 for curative radiotherapy on carcinomas; No irradiation was applied during pronounced acute reactions. No unexpected complications have been observed under these conditions

  11. Effects of wildland fire smoke on a tree-roosting bat: integrating a plume model, field measurements, and mammalian dose-response relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.B. Dickinson; J.C. Norris; A.S. Bova; R.L. Kremens; V. Young; M.J. Lacki

    2010-01-01

    Faunal injury and mortality in wildland fires is a concern for wildlife and fire management although little work has been done on the mechanisms by which exposures cause their effects. In this paper, we use an integral plume model, field measurements, and models of carbon monoxide and heat effects to explore risk to tree-roosting bats during prescribed fires in mixed-...

  12. Effective radiation dose and eye lens dose in dental cone beam CT: effect of field of view and angle of rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, R; Zhang, G; Theodorakou, C; Walker, A; Bosmans, H; Jacobs, R; Bogaerts, R; Horner, K

    2014-10-01

    To quantify the effect of field of view (FOV) and angle of rotation on radiation dose in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and to define a preliminary volume-dose model. Organ and effective doses were estimated using 148 thermoluminescent dosemeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Dose measurements were undertaken on a 3D Accuitomo 170 dental CBCT unit (J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) using six FOVs as well as full-rotation (360°) and half-rotation (180°) protocols. For the 360° rotation protocols, effective dose ranged between 54 µSv (4 × 4 cm, upper canine) and 303 µSv (17 × 12 cm, maxillofacial). An empirical relationship between FOV dimension and effective dose was derived. The use of a 180° rotation resulted in an average dose reduction of 45% compared with a 360° rotation. Eye lens doses ranged between 95 and 6861 µGy. Significant dose reduction can be achieved by reducing the FOV size, particularly the FOV height, of CBCT examinations to the actual region of interest. In some cases, a 180° rotation can be preferred, as it has the added value of reducing the scan time. Eye lens doses should be reduced by decreasing the height of the FOV rather than using inferior FOV positioning, as the latter would increase the effective dose considerably. The effect of the FOV and rotation angle on the effective dose in dental CBCT was quantified. The dominant effect of FOV height was demonstrated. A preliminary model has been proposed, which could be used to predict effective dose as a function of FOV size and position.

  13. On the influence of the exposure model on organ doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Eckerl, H.

    1988-01-01

    Based on the design characteristics of the MIRD-V phantom, two sex-specific adult phantoms, ADAM and EVA were introduced especially for the calculation of organ doses resulting from external irradiation. Although the body characteristics of all the phantoms are in good agreement with those of the reference man and woman, they have some disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and the form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and the form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages and to obtain more realistic phantoms, a technique based on computer tomographic data (voxel-phantom) was developed. This technique allows any physical phantom or real body to be converted into computer files. The improvements are of special importance with regard to the skeleton, because a better modeling of the bone surfaces and separation of hard bone and bone marrow can be achieved. For photon irradiation, the sensitivity of the model on organ doses or the effective dose equivalent is important for operational radiation protection

  14. We can do better than effective dose for estimating or comparing low-dose radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The effective dose concept was designed to compare the generic risks of exposure to different radiation fields. More commonly these days, it is used to estimate or compare radiation-induced cancer risks. For various reasons, effective dose represents flawed science: for instance, the tissue-specific weighting factors used to calculate effective dose are a subjective mix of different endpoints; and the marked and differing age and gender dependencies for different health detriment endpoints are not taken into account. This paper suggests that effective dose could be replaced with a new quantity, ‘effective risk’, which, like effective dose, is a weighted sum of equivalent doses to different tissues. Unlike effective dose, where the tissue-dependent weighting factors are a set of generic, subjective committee-defined numbers, the weighting factors for effective risk are simply evaluated tissue-specific lifetime cancer risks per unit equivalent dose. Effective risk, which has the potential to be age and gender specific if desired, would perform the same comparative role as effective dose, be just as easy to estimate, be less prone to misuse, be more directly understandable, and would be based on solid science. An added major advantage is that it gives the users some feel for the actual numerical values of the radiation risks they are trying to control.

  15. The relationships between radiation doses and their effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beau, P.G.; Nenot, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Dose-effect relationships have been developed both for the biological effects studied by Radiobiology and the long-term pathological effects (malignant diseases) studied by Radiation Protection. The former approach chiefly considers the primary biological injuries at the cellular level, and the relationship between the dependent variable characteristic of the effect and the dose -an independent variable- has an explanatory meaning. The parameters associated to the independent variable have a biophysical signification and fit into a model of the action of ionizing radiations. In the latter approach, the relationship is pragmatic and the previous parameters are just the results of a curve-fitting procedure realized on experimental or human data. The biophysical models have led to a general formulation associating a linear term to a quadratic term both of them weighted by an exponential term describing cellular killing at the highest doses. To a certain extent the curves obtained for leukemias, bronchopulmonary and breast cancers prove the validity of the pragmatic model [fr

  16. Effective doses to patients undergoing thoracic computed tomography examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, W; Scalzetti, E M; Roskopf, M

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how x-ray technique factors and effective doses vary with patient size in chest CT examinations. Technique factors (kVp, mAs, section thickness, and number of sections) were recorded for 44 patients who underwent a routine chest CT examination. Patient weights were recorded together with dimensions and mean Hounsfield unit values obtained from representative axial CT images. The total mass of directly irradiated patient was modeled as a cylinder of water to permit the computation of the mean patient dose and total energy imparted for each chest CT examination. Computed values of energy imparted during the chest CT examination were converted into effective doses taking into account the patient weight. Patient weights ranged from 4.5 to 127 kg, and half the patients in this study were children under 18 years of age. All scans were performed at 120 kVp with a 1 s scan time. The selected tube current showed no correlation with patient weight (r2=0.06), indicating that chest CT examination protocols do not take into account for the size of the patient. Energy imparted increased with increasing patient weight, with values of energy imparted for 10 and 70 kg patients being 85 and 310 mJ, respectively. The effective dose showed an inverse correlation with increasing patient weight, however, with values of effective dose for 10 and 70 kg patients being 9.6 and 5.4 mSv, respectively. Current CT technique factors (kVp/mAs) used to perform chest CT examinations result in relatively high patient doses, which could be reduced by adjusting technique factors based on patient size.

  17. Computational Modeling of Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Radiation Dose Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Daniel L.; Debeb, Bisrat G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thames, Howard D. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) involves giving radiation to the entire brain with the goals of reducing the incidence of brain metastasis and improving overall survival. Experimentally, we have demonstrated that PCI prevents brain metastases in a breast cancer mouse model. We developed a computational model to expand on and aid in the interpretation of our experimental results. Methods and Materials: MATLAB was used to develop a computational model of brain metastasis and PCI in mice. Model input parameters were optimized such that the model output would match the experimental number of metastases per mouse from the unirradiated group. An independent in vivo–limiting dilution experiment was performed to validate the model. The effect of whole brain irradiation at different measurement points after tumor cells were injected was evaluated in terms of the incidence, number of metastases, and tumor burden and was then compared with the corresponding experimental data. Results: In the optimized model, the correlation between the number of metastases per mouse and the experimental fits was >95. Our attempt to validate the model with a limiting dilution assay produced 99.9% correlation with respect to the incidence of metastases. The model accurately predicted the effect of whole-brain irradiation given 3 weeks after cell injection but substantially underestimated its effect when delivered 5 days after cell injection. The model further demonstrated that delaying whole-brain irradiation until the development of gross disease introduces a dose threshold that must be reached before a reduction in incidence can be realized. Conclusions: Our computational model of mouse brain metastasis and PCI correlated strongly with our experiments with unirradiated mice. The results further suggest that early treatment of subclinical disease is more effective than irradiating established disease.

  18. Residential radon in Finland: sources, variation, modelling and dose comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvela, H

    1995-09-01

    The study deals with sources of indoor radon in Finland, seasonal variations in radon concentration, the effect of house construction and ventilation and also with the radiation dose from indoor radon and terrestrial gamma radiation. The results are based on radon measurements in approximately 4000 dwellings and on air exchange measurements in 250 dwellings as well as on model calculations. The results confirm that convective soil air flow is by far the most important source of indoor radon in Finnish low-rise residential housing. (97 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs.).

  19. Residential radon in Finland: sources, variation, modelling and dose comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.

    1995-09-01

    The study deals with sources of indoor radon in Finland, seasonal variations in radon concentration, the effect of house construction and ventilation and also with the radiation dose from indoor radon and terrestrial gamma radiation. The results are based on radon measurements in approximately 4000 dwellings and on air exchange measurements in 250 dwellings as well as on model calculations. The results confirm that convective soil air flow is by far the most important source of indoor radon in Finnish low-rise residential housing. (97 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs.)

  20. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  1. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  2. Comparison of 2-Dose and 3-Dose 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Schedules in the United States: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprise, Jean-François; Markowitz, Lauri E; Chesson, Harrell W; Drolet, Mélanie; Brisson, Marc

    2016-09-01

    A recent clinical trial using the 9-valent human papillomavirus virus (HPV) vaccine has shown that antibody responses after 2 doses are noninferior to those after 3 doses, suggesting that 2 and 3 doses may have comparable vaccine efficacy. We used an individual-based transmission-dynamic model to compare the population-level effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 2- and 3-dose schedules of 9-valent HPV vaccine in the United States. Our model predicts that if 2 doses of 9-valent vaccine protect for ≥20 years, the additional benefits of a 3-dose schedule are small as compared to those of 2-dose schedules, and 2-dose schedules are likely much more cost-efficient than 3-dose schedules. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Boehringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique

  4. Effective dose in abdominal digital radiography: Patient factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Sung; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung Hoon; Cho, Young Chul; Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medical Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To identify independent patient factors associated with an increased radiation dose, and to evaluate the effect of patient position on the effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. We retrospectively evaluated the effective dose for abdominal digital radiography in 222 patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on the cut-off dose value of 0.311 mSv (the upper third quartile of dose distribution): group A (n = 166) and group B (n = 56). Through logistic regression, independent factors associated with a larger effective dose were identified. The effect of patient position on the effective dose was evaluated using a paired t-test. High body mass index (BMI) (≥ 23 kg/m2), presence of ascites, and spinal metallic instrumentation were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high BMI [odds ratio (OR), 25.201; p < 0.001] and ascites (OR, 25.132; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. The effective dose was significantly lesser (22.6%) in the supine position than in the standing position (p < 0.001). High BMI and ascites were independent factors associated with a larger effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. Significant dose reduction in patients with these factors may be achieved by placing the patient in the supine position during abdominal digital radiography.

  5. Inverse modeling of FIB milling by dose profile optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, S.; Waid, S.; Hobler, G.; Wanzenböck, H.D.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2014-01-01

    FIB technologies possess a unique ability to form topographies that are difficult or impossible to generate with binary etching through typical photo-lithography. The ability to arbitrarily vary the spatial dose distribution and therefore the amount of milling opens possibilities for the production of a wide range of functional structures with applications in biology, chemistry, and optics. However in practice, the realization of these goals is made difficult by the angular dependence of the sputtering yield and redeposition effects that vary as the topography evolves. An inverse modeling algorithm that optimizes dose profiles, defined as the superposition of time invariant pixel dose profiles (determined from the beam parameters and pixel dwell times), is presented. The response of the target to a set of pixel dwell times in modeled by numerical continuum simulations utilizing 1st and 2nd order sputtering and redeposition, the resulting surfaces are evaluated with respect to a target topography in an error minimization routine. Two algorithms for the parameterization of pixel dwell times are presented, a direct pixel dwell time method, and an abstracted method that uses a refineable piecewise linear cage function to generate pixel dwell times from a minimal number of parameters. The cage function method demonstrates great flexibility and efficiency as compared to the direct fitting method with performance enhancements exceeding ∼10× as compared to direct fitting for medium to large simulation sets. Furthermore, the refineable nature of the cage function enables solutions to adapt to the desired target function. The optimization algorithm, although working with stationary dose profiles, is demonstrated to be applicable also outside the quasi-static approximation. Experimental data confirms the viability of the solutions for 5 × 7 μm deep lens like structures defined by 90 pixel dwell times

  6. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  7. Calculations radiobiological using the quadratic lineal model in the use of the medium dose rate absorbed in brachytherapy. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Calculations with the quadratic lineal model for medium rate using the equation dose-effect. Several calculations for system of low dose rate brachytherapy plus teletherapy, calculations for brachytherapy with medium dose rate together with teletherapy, dose for fraction and the one numbers of fractions in medium rate

  8. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  9. Effects of building structures on radiation doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Realistic assessments of radiation doses to the population from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere require consideration of man's largely indoor environment. The effect of a building structure on radiation doses is described quantitatively by a dose reduction factor, which is the ratio of the dose to a reference individual inside a structure to the corresponding dose with no structure present. We have implemented models to estimate dose reduction factors for internal dose from inhaled radionuclides and for external photon dose from airborne and surface-deposited radionuclides. The models are particularly useful in radiological assessment applications, since dose reduction factors may readily be estimated for arbitrary mixtures and concentrations of radionuclides in the atmosphere and on the ground. The model for inhalation dose reduction factors accounts for radioactive decay, air ventilation into and out of the structure, and deposition of radionuclides on inside surfaces of the structure. External dose reduction factors are estimated using the point-kernel integration method including consideration of buildup in air and the walls of the building. The potential importance of deposition of radionuclides on inside surfaces of a structure on both inhalation and external dose reduction factors has been demonstrated. Model formulation and the assumptions used in the calculations are discussed. Results of model-parameter sensitivity studies and estimates of dose reduction factors for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from an LWR fuel reprocessing plant are presented. (author)

  10. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to use reproducible and stable indicators to evaluate biological responses to long term irradiation at low dose-rate. They should be simple and quantitative enough to produce the results statistically accurate, because we have to analyze the subtle changes of biological responses around background level at low dose. For these purposes we chose micronucleus formation of U2OS, a human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological responses. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation rom bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide, respectively. the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was counted under a fluorescence microscope. Dose rate in the irradiation room was measured with PLD. Dose response of PLD is linear between 1 mGy to 10 Gy, and standard deviation of triplicate count was several percent of mean value. We fitted statistically dose response curves to the data, and they were plotted on the coordinate of linearly scale response and dose. The results followed to the straight line passing through the origin of the coordinate axes between 0.1-5 Gy, and dose and does rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) was less than 2 when cells were irradiated for 1-10 min. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose above 0.1 Gy when 5,000 binuclear cells were analyzed. In contrast, dose response curves never followed LNT, when cells were irradiated for 7 to 124 days. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose below 6 Gy, when cells were continuously irradiated for 124 days. These results suggest that dose response curve of biological reaction is remarkably affected by exposure

  11. ESTIMATION OF THE CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FROM DOSE-AREA PRODUCT TO EFFECTIVE DOSE FOR BARIUM MEAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ADULT PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vodovatov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroscopic examinations of the upper gastro-intestinal tract and, especially, barium meal examinations, are commonly performed in a majority of hospitals. These examinations are associated both with substantial individual patient doses and contribution to the collective dose from medical exposure. Effective dose estimation for this type of examinations is complicated due to: 1 the necessity to simulate the moving X-ray irradiation field; 2 differences in study structure for the individual patients; 3 subjectivity of the operators; and 4 differences in the X-ray equipment. The aim of the current study was to estimate conversion coefficients from dose-area product to effective dose for barium meal examinations for the over couch and under couch exposure conditions. The study was based on data collected in the X-ray unit of the surgical department of the St-Petersburg Mariinsky hospital. A model of patient exposure during barium meal examination was developed based on the collected data on fluoroscopy protocols and adult patient irradiation geometry. Conversion coefficients were calculated using PCXMC 2.0 software. Complete examinations were converted into a set of typical fluoroscopy phases and X-ray images, specified by the examined anatomical region and the projection of patient exposure. Conversion coefficients from dose-area product to effective dose were calculated for each phase of the examination and for the complete examination. The resulting values of the conversion coefficients are comparable with published data. Variations in the absolute values of the conversion coefficients can be explained by differences in clinical protocols, models for the estimation of the effective dose and parameters of barium meal examinations. The proposed approach for estimation of effective dose considers such important features of fluoroscopic examinations as: 1 non-uniform structure of examination, 2 significant movement of the X-ray tube within a single

  12. Integration of models for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The objective of phase 1 of the project was to demonstrate through calculations that adequate models and support data exist or could be developed to allow realistic estimations of doses to individuals from releases of radionuclides to the environment that occurred as long as 45 years ago. Much of the data used in phase 1 was preliminary; therefore, the doses calculated must be considered preliminary approximations. This paper describes the integration of various models that was implemented for initial computer calculations. Models were required for estimating the quantity of radioactive material released, for evaluating its transport through the environment, for estimating human exposure, and for evaluating resultant doses

  13. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from indoor and outdoor gamma dose rate of university of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State. ... Therefore, the management of University of Port Harcourt teaching hospital ...

  14. Characteristics of natural background external radiation and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1989-01-01

    The two sources of natural radiation - cosmic rays and primordial radionuclides - are described. The factors affecting radiation doses received from natural radiation and the calculation of effective dose equivalent due to natural radiation are discussed. 10 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Simplification of an MCNP model designed for dose rate estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptev, Alexander; Perry, Robert

    2017-09-01

    A study was made to investigate the methods of building a simplified MCNP model for radiological dose estimation. The research was done using an example of a complicated glovebox with extra shielding. The paper presents several different calculations for neutron and photon dose evaluations where glovebox elements were consecutively excluded from the MCNP model. The analysis indicated that to obtain a fast and reasonable estimation of dose, the model should be realistic in details that are close to the tally. Other details may be omitted.

  16. Simplification of an MCNP model designed for dose rate estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laptev Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was made to investigate the methods of building a simplified MCNP model for radiological dose estimation. The research was done using an example of a complicated glovebox with extra shielding. The paper presents several different calculations for neutron and photon dose evaluations where glovebox elements were consecutively excluded from the MCNP model. The analysis indicated that to obtain a fast and reasonable estimation of dose, the model should be realistic in details that are close to the tally. Other details may be omitted.

  17. Attributability of health effects at low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A controversy still persists on whether health effects can be alleged from radiation exposure situations involving low radiation doses (e.g. below the international dose limits for the public). Arguments have evolved around the validity of the dose-response representation that is internationally used for radiation protection purposes, namely the so-called linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. The debate has been masked by the intrinsic randomness of radiation interaction at the cellular level and also by gaps in the relevant scientific knowledge on the development and expression of health effects. There has also been a vague use, abuse, and misuse of radiation-related risk concepts and quantities and their associated uncertainties. As a result, there is some ambiguity in the interpretation of the phenomena and a general lack of awareness of the implications for a number of risk-causation qualities, namely its attributes and characteristics. In particular, the LNT model has been used not only for protection purposes but also for blindly attributing actual effects to specific exposure situations. The latter has been discouraged as being a misuse of the model, but the supposed incorrectness has not been clearly proven. The paper will endeavour to demonstrate unambiguously the following thesis in relation to health effects due to low radiation doses: 1) Their existence is highly plausible. A number of epidemiological statistical assessments of sufficiently large exposed populations show that, under certain conditions, the prevalence of the effects increases with dose. From these assessments, it can be hypothesized that the occurrence of the effects at any dose, however small, appears decidedly worthy of belief. While strictly the evidence does not allow to conclude that a threshold dose level does not exist either. In fact, a formal quantitative uncertainty analysis, combining the different uncertain components of estimated radiation-related risk, with and

  18. Attributability of Health Effects at Low Radiation Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A controversy still persists on whether health effects can be alleged from radiation exposure situations involving low radiation doses (e.g. below the international dose limits for the public). Arguments have evolved around the validity of the dose response representation that is internationally used for radiation protection purposes, namely the so-called linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. The debate has been masked by the intrinsic randomness of radiation interaction at the cellular level and also by gaps in the relevant scientific knowledge on the development and expression of health effects. There has also been a vague use, abuse, and misuse of radiation-related risk concepts and quantities and their associated uncertainties. As a result, there is some ambiguity in the interpretation of the phenomena and a general lack of awareness of the implications for a number of risk-causation qualities, namely its attributes and characteristics. In particular, the LNT model has been used not only for protection purposes but also for blindly attributing actual effects to specific exposure situations. The latter has been discouraged as being a misuse of the model, but the supposed incorrectness has not been clearly proven. The paper will endeavour to demonstrate unambiguously the following thesis in relation to health effects due to low radiation doses: (i) Their existence is highly plausible. A number of epidemiological statistical assessments of sufficiently large exposed populations show that, under certain conditions, the prevalence of the effects increases with dose. From these assessments, it can be hypothesized that the occurrence of the effects at any dose, however small, appears decidedly worthy of belief. While strictly the evidence does not allow to conclude that a threshold dose level does not exist either In fact, a formal quantitative uncertainty analysis, combining the different uncertain components of estimated radiation-related risk, with and

  19. Collective effective dose equivalent, population doses and risk estimates from occupational exposures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo; Mase, Naomichi.

    1993-01-01

    Collective dose equivalent and population dose from occupational exposures in Japan, 1988 were estimated on the basis of a nationwide survey. The survey was conducted on annual collective dose equivalents by sex, age group and type of radiation work for about 0.21 million workers except for the workers in nuclear power stations. The data on the workers in nuclear power stations were obtained from the official report of the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. The total number of workers including nuclear power stations was estimated to be about 0.26 million. Radiation works were subdivided as follows: medical works including dental; non-atomic energy industry; research and education; atomic energy industry and nuclear power station. For the determination of effective dose equivalent and population dose, organ or tissue doses were measured with a phantom experiment. The resultant doses were compared with the doses previously calculated using a chord length technique and with data from ICRP publications. The annual collective effective dose equivalent were estimated to be about 21.94 person·Sv for medical workers, 7.73 person·Sv for industrial workers, 0.75 person·Sv for research and educational workers, 2.48 person·Sv for atomic energy industry and 84.4 person ·Sv for workers in nuclear power station. The population doses were calculated to be about 1.07 Sv for genetically significant dose, 0.89 Sv for leukemia significant dose and 0.42 Sv for malignant significant dose. The population risks were estimated using these population doses. (author)

  20. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  1. A Generalized QMRA Beta-Poisson Dose-Response Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Gang; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Lemckert, Charles; Dunn, Peter K; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is widely accepted for characterizing the microbial risks associated with food, water, and wastewater. Single-hit dose-response models are the most commonly used dose-response models in QMRA. Denoting PI(d) as the probability of infection at a given mean dose d, a three-parameter generalized QMRA beta-Poisson dose-response model, PI(d|α,β,r*), is proposed in which the minimum number of organisms required for causing infection, K min , is not fixed, but a random variable following a geometric distribution with parameter 0Poisson model, PI(d|α,β), is a special case of the generalized model with K min = 1 (which implies r*=1). The generalized beta-Poisson model is based on a conceptual model with greater detail in the dose-response mechanism. Since a maximum likelihood solution is not easily available, a likelihood-free approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) algorithm is employed for parameter estimation. By fitting the generalized model to four experimental data sets from the literature, this study reveals that the posterior median r* estimates produced fall short of meeting the required condition of r* = 1 for single-hit assumption. However, three out of four data sets fitted by the generalized models could not achieve an improvement in goodness of fit. These combined results imply that, at least in some cases, a single-hit assumption for characterizing the dose-response process may not be appropriate, but that the more complex models may be difficult to support especially if the sample size is small. The three-parameter generalized model provides a possibility to investigate the mechanism of a dose-response process in greater detail than is possible under a single-hit model. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. Toward a unified approach to dose-response modeling in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews dose-response models that are used in ecotoxicology. The focus lies on clarification of differences and similarities between models, and as a side effect, their different guises in ecotoxicology are unravelled. A look at frequently used dose-response models reveals major discrepancies, among other things in naming conventions. Therefore, there is a need for a unified view on dose-response modeling in order to improve the understanding of it and to facilitate communication and comparison of findings across studies, thus realizing its full potential. This study attempts to establish a general framework that encompasses most dose-response models that are of interest to ecotoxicologists in practice. The framework includes commonly used models such as the log-logistic and Weibull models, but also features entire suites of models as found in various guidance documents. An outline on how the proposed framework can be implemented in statistical software systems is also provided.

  3. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Single Doses up to 800 mg of E-52862 Do Not Prolong the QTc Interval--A Retrospective Validation by Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Electrocardiography Data Utilising the Effects of a Meal on QTc to Demonstrate ECG Assay Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täubel, Jörg; Ferber, Georg; Lorch, Ulrike; Wang, Duolao; Sust, Mariano; Camm, A John

    2015-01-01

    E-52862 is a Sigma-1 receptor antagonist (S1RA) currently under investigation as a potential analgesic medicine. We successfully applied a concentration-effect model retrospectively to a four-way crossover Phase I single ascending dose study and utilized the QTc shortening effects of a meal to demonstrate assay sensitivity by establishing the time course effects from baseline in all four periods, independently from any potential drug effects. Thirty two healthy male and female subjects were included in four treatment periods to receive single ascending doses of 500 mg, 600 mg or 800 mg of E-52862 or placebo. PK was linear over the dose range investigated and doses up to 600 mg were well tolerated. The baseline electrocardiography (ECG) measurements on Day-1 were time-matched with ECG and pharmacokinetic (PK) samples on Day 1 (dosing day). In this conventional mean change to time-matched placebo analysis, the largest time-matched difference to placebo QTcI was 1.44 ms (90% CI: -4.04, 6.93 ms) for 500 mg; -0.39 ms (90% CI: -3.91, 3.13 ms) for 600 mg and 1.32 ms (90% CI: -1.89, 4.53 ms) for 800 mg of E-52862, thereby showing the absence of any QTc prolonging effect at the doses tested. In addition concentration-effect models, one based on the placebo corrected change from baseline and one for the change of QTcI from average baseline with time as fixed effect were fitted to the data confirming the results of the time course analysis. The sensitivity of this study to detect small changes in the QTc interval was confirmed by demonstrating a shortening of QTcF of -8.1 (90% CI: -10.4, -5.9) one hour and -7.2 (90% CI: -9.4, -5.0) three hours after a standardised meal. EU Clinical Trials Register EudraCT 2010 020343 13.

  5. Cooperative binding mitigates the high-dose hook effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ranjita Dutta; Rosenmund, Christian; Stefan, Melanie I

    2017-08-14

    The high-dose hook effect (also called prozone effect) refers to the observation that if a multivalent protein acts as a linker between two parts of a protein complex, then increasing the amount of linker protein in the mixture does not always increase the amount of fully formed complex. On the contrary, at a high enough concentration range the amount of fully formed complex actually decreases. It has been observed that allosterically regulated proteins seem less susceptible to this effect. The aim of this study was two-fold: First, to investigate the mathematical basis of how allostery mitigates the prozone effect. And second, to explore the consequences of allostery and the high-dose hook effect using the example of calmodulin, a calcium-sensing protein that regulates the switch between long-term potentiation and long-term depression in neurons. We use a combinatorial model of a "perfect linker protein" (with infinite binding affinity) to mathematically describe the hook effect and its behaviour under allosteric conditions. We show that allosteric regulation does indeed mitigate the high-dose hook effect. We then turn to calmodulin as a real-life example of an allosteric protein. Using kinetic simulations, we show that calmodulin is indeed subject to a hook effect. We also show that this effect is stronger in the presence of the allosteric activator Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), because it reduces the overall cooperativity of the calcium-calmodulin system. It follows that, surprisingly, there are conditions where increased amounts of allosteric activator actually decrease the activity of a protein. We show that cooperative binding can indeed act as a protective mechanism against the hook effect. This will have implications in vivo where the extent of cooperativity of a protein can be modulated, for instance, by allosteric activators or inhibitors. This can result in counterintuitive effects of decreased activity with increased concentrations of

  6. Internal dose-effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in gonadotropin-primed weanling rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirota, Mariko [Food and Drug Safety Center, Hatano Research Institute, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaneko, Toyozo [National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Okuyama, Mitsunobu [Food and Drug Safety Center, Hatano Research Institute, Kanagawa (Japan); TEIZO Medical Co., Ltd., Kawasaki (Japan); Sakurada, Yosuke; Shirota, Kinji [Azabu University, Research Institute of Biosciences, Kanagawa (Japan); Matsuki, Yasuhiko [Food and Drug Safety Center, Hatano Research Institute, Kanagawa (Japan); Japan Food Hygiene Association, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Single sc injection of 5 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) induces ovulation in weanling female rats 3 days later. It has been shown that treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 24 h before eCG injection reduces eCG-stimulated ovarian hypertrophy and inhibits ovulation. The present study intended to compare internal dose-effects of TCDD between these endpoints and representative endpoints for TCDD toxicity, such as weights of the liver and thymus, in weanling female rats given orally 0, 1, 4 or 16 {mu}g/kg TCDD 24 h before eCG injection on postnatal day 25. Measurement of plasma TCDD concentrations by ELISA at 6, 72 and 96 h after TCDD revealed that significant levels of TCDD were maintained in systemic circulation until 96 h (on the day of induced ovulation) with the highest level at 6 h after TCDD treatment. Ovarian TCDD concentrations varied similarly and tended to be higher than those in the thymus at all time points, whereas hepatic concentrations of TCDD were the highest among the tissues. Although {>=} 4 {mu}g/kg TCDD affected the weights of the thymus and liver, no differences were observed in ovarian weights at any time point or in ovulation between corn oil-treated and TCDD-treated groups. Furthermore, ovarian levels of representative mRNAs in follicles were not affected by TCDD treatment. Since TCDD increased the amount of cytochrome P450 1A1 mRNA in the ovary, the administered TCDD stimulated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-signaling pathway. From these results, we concluded that thymus weights of weanling female rats responded to TCDD at a lower internal dose as compared with that ovarian hypertrophy and follicular growth from early antral stage to ovulation would respond to. (orig.)

  7. Proof of concept and dose estimation with binary responses under model uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenberg, B

    2009-01-30

    This article suggests a unified framework for testing Proof of Concept (PoC) and estimating a target dose for the benefit of a more comprehensive, robust and powerful analysis in phase II or similar clinical trials. From a pre-specified set of candidate models, we choose the ones that best describe the observed dose-response. To decide which models, if any, significantly pick up a dose effect, we construct the permutation distribution of the minimum P-value over the candidate set. This allows us to find critical values and multiplicity adjusted P-values that control the familywise error rate of declaring any spurious effect in the candidate set as significant. Model averaging is then used to estimate a target dose. Popular single or multiple contrast tests for PoC, such as the Cochran-Armitage, Dunnett or Williams tests, are only optimal for specific dose-response shapes and do not provide target dose estimates with confidence limits. A thorough evaluation and comparison of our approach to these tests reveal that its power is as good or better in detecting a dose-response under various shapes with many more additional benefits: It incorporates model uncertainty in PoC decisions and target dose estimation, yields confidence intervals for target dose estimates and extends to more complicated data structures. We illustrate our method with the analysis of a Phase II clinical trial. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Neural Plasticity Associated with Hippocampal PKA-CREB and NMDA Signaling Is Involved in the Antidepressant Effect of Repeated Low Dose of Yueju Pill on Chronic Mouse Model of Learned Helplessness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilu Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yueju pill is a traditional Chinese medicine formulated to treat syndromes of mood disorders. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effect of repeated low dose of Yueju in the animal model mimicking clinical long-term depression condition and the role of neural plasticity associated with PKA- (protein kinase A- CREB (cAMP response element binding protein and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate signaling. We showed that a single low dose of Yueju demonstrated antidepressant effects in tests of tail suspension, forced swim, and novelty-suppressed feeding. A chronic learned helplessness (LH protocol resulted in a long-term depressive-like condition. Repeated administration of Yueju following chronic LH remarkably alleviated all of depressive-like symptoms measured, whereas conventional antidepressant fluoxetine only showed a minor improvement. In the hippocampus, Yueju and fluoxetine both normalized brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and PKA level. Only Yueju, not fluoxetine, rescued the deficits in CREB signaling. The chronic LH upregulated the expression of NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B, which were all attenuated by Yueju. Furthermore, intracerebraventricular administration of NMDA blunted the antidepressant effect of Yueju. These findings supported the antidepressant efficacy of repeated routine low dose of Yueju in a long-term depression model and the critical role of CREB and NMDA signaling.

  9. Neural Plasticity Associated with Hippocampal PKA-CREB and NMDA Signaling Is Involved in the Antidepressant Effect of Repeated Low Dose of Yueju Pill on Chronic Mouse Model of Learned Helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhilu; Chen, Yin; Shen, Qinqin; Guo, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yuxuan; Chen, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Yueju pill is a traditional Chinese medicine formulated to treat syndromes of mood disorders. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effect of repeated low dose of Yueju in the animal model mimicking clinical long-term depression condition and the role of neural plasticity associated with PKA- (protein kinase A-) CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) signaling. We showed that a single low dose of Yueju demonstrated antidepressant effects in tests of tail suspension, forced swim, and novelty-suppressed feeding. A chronic learned helplessness (LH) protocol resulted in a long-term depressive-like condition. Repeated administration of Yueju following chronic LH remarkably alleviated all of depressive-like symptoms measured, whereas conventional antidepressant fluoxetine only showed a minor improvement. In the hippocampus, Yueju and fluoxetine both normalized brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and PKA level. Only Yueju, not fluoxetine, rescued the deficits in CREB signaling. The chronic LH upregulated the expression of NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B, which were all attenuated by Yueju. Furthermore, intracerebraventricular administration of NMDA blunted the antidepressant effect of Yueju. These findings supported the antidepressant efficacy of repeated routine low dose of Yueju in a long-term depression model and the critical role of CREB and NMDA signaling.

  10. Dose Assessment Model for Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Huifang; Yao Rentai

    2010-01-01

    An improved dose assessment model for chronic atmospheric releases of tritium was proposed. The proposed model explicitly considered two chemical forms of tritium.It was based on conservative assumption of transfer of tritiated water (HTO) from air to concentration of HTO and organic beam tritium (OBT) in vegetable and animal products.The concentration of tritium in plant products was calculated based on considering dividedly leafy plant and not leafy plant, meanwhile the concentration contribution of tritium in the different plants from the tritium in soil was taken into account.Calculating the concentration of HTO in animal products, average water fraction of animal products and the average weighted tritium concentration of ingested water based on the fraction of water supplied by each source were considered,including skin absorption, inhalation, drinking water and food.Calculating the annual doses, the ingestion doses were considered, at the same time the contribution of inhalation and skin absorption to the dose was considered. Concentrations in foodstuffs and dose of annual adult calculated with the specific activity model, NEWTRI model and the model proposed by the paper were compared. The results indicate that the model proposed by the paper can predict accurately tritium doses through the food chain from chronic atmospheric releases. (authors)

  11. Dose enhancement effects of X ray radiation in bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Panxun

    1997-01-01

    The author has presented behaviour degradation and dose enhancement effects of bipolar transistors in X ray irradiation environment. The relative dose enhancement factors of X ray radiation were measured in bipolar transistors by the experiment methods. The mechanism of bipolar device dose enhancement was investigated

  12. Alternate day treatment and late effects: The concept of an effective dose per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Hery, M.; Gabillat, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Although most institutions treat all fields each day, some radiotherapists continue to adopt an alternate day schedule. The resulting daily variations of the dose per fraction in laterally located targets have been analyzed using the linear-quadratic model. Patients with breast carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy in 1974-1975 with one field a day were studied. An effective dose per fraction was derived, with a value higher than the average dose per fraction received by the reference point. The greater the fluctuations between the doses per fraction on successive days, the higher the effective dose per fraction. The corresponding cell survival due to alternate treatment as compared to survival with daily treatment depends on the alpha/beta ratio. For a late effect with low alpha/beta ratio, an alternate treatment may lead to almost 10-fold increase in cell kill in these lateral targets such as those responsible for subcutaneous sclerosis as compared to daily treatment of all fields with the same total dose. Taking the average effective dose per fraction in our series, the increase in cell kill was 4-fold. Acute effects would suffer less damage due to alternate treatment because of a high alpha/beta ratio. Treatment on an alternate schedule should be restricted to palliative radiotherapy

  13. Annual effective dose due to residential radon progeny in Sweden: Evaluations based on current risk projections models and on risk estimates from a nation-wide Swedish epidemiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, M [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Lagarde, F [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Medicine; Falk, R; Swedjemark, G A [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Effective dose per unit radon progeny exposure to Swedish population in 1992 is estimated by the risk projection model based on the Swedish epidemiological study of radon and lung cancer. The resulting values range from 1.29 - 3.00 mSv/WLM and 2.58 - 5.99 mSv/WLM, respectively. Assuming a radon concentration of 100 Bq/m{sup 3}, an equilibrium factor of 0.4 and an occupancy factor of 0.6 in Swedish houses, the annual effective dose for the Swedish population is estimated to be 0.43 - 1.98 mSv/year, which should be compared to the value of 1.9 mSv/year, according to the UNSCEAR 1993 report. 27 refs, tabs, figs.

  14. Annual effective dose due to residential radon progeny in Sweden: Evaluations based on current risk projections models and on risk estimates from a nation-wide Swedish epidemiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, M.; Lagarde, F.

    1996-12-01

    Effective dose per unit radon progeny exposure to Swedish population in 1992 is estimated by the risk projection model based on the Swedish epidemiological study of radon and lung cancer. The resulting values range from 1.29 - 3.00 mSv/WLM and 2.58 - 5.99 mSv/WLM, respectively. Assuming a radon concentration of 100 Bq/m 3 , an equilibrium factor of 0.4 and an occupancy factor of 0.6 in Swedish houses, the annual effective dose for the Swedish population is estimated to be 0.43 - 1.98 mSv/year, which should be compared to the value of 1.9 mSv/year, according to the UNSCEAR 1993 report. 27 refs, tabs, figs

  15. Determination of effective dose of antimalarial from Cassia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, further investigation is required to determine an effective dose of the administered extract for a higher inhibitory effect and increasing effectiveness of the extract. Material and Methods: To determine the effective dose of ethanol extract of C. spectabilis leaves, a "4-day suppressive test"of Peter was performed with ...

  16. Development on Dose Assessment Model of Northeast Asia Nuclear Accident Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Yub; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Suk Hoon; Lee, Seung Hee; Yoon, Tae Bin [FNC Techology, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to support the emergency response system, the simulator for overseas nuclear accident is under development including source-term estimation, atmospheric dispersion modeling and dose assessment. The simulator is named NANAS (Northeast Asia Nuclear Accident Simulator). For the source-term estimation, design characteristics of each reactor type should be reflected into the model. Since there are a lot of reactor types in neighboring countries, the representative reactors of China, Japan and Taiwan have been selected and the source-term estimation models for each reactor have been developed, respectively. For the atmospheric dispersion modeling, Lagrangian particle model will be integrated into the simulator for the long range dispersion modeling in Northeast Asia region. In this study, the dose assessment model has been developed considering external and internal exposure. The dose assessment model has been developed as a part of the overseas nuclear accidents simulator which is named NANAS. It addresses external and internal pathways including cloudshine, groundshine and inhalation. Also, it uses the output of atmospheric dispersion model (i.e. the average concentrations of radionuclides in air and ground) and various coefficients (e.g. dose conversion factor and breathing rate) as an input. Effective dose and thyroid dose for each grid in the Korean Peninsula region are printed out as a format of map projection and chart. Verification and validation on the dose assessment model will be conducted in further study by benchmarking with the measured data of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident.

  17. Effective dose equivalents from external radiation due to Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkin, V.G.; Debedev, O.V.; Balonov, M.I.; Parkhomenko, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized data on measurements of individual dose of external γ-sources in 1987-1990 of population of western areas of Bryansk region were presented. Type of distribution of effective dose equivalent, its significance for various professional and social groups of population depending on the type of the house was discussed. Dependences connecting surface soil activity in the populated locality with average dose of external radiation sources were presented. Tendency of dose variation in 1987-1990 was shown

  18. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  19. A PC program for estimating organ dose and effective dose values in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, W.A.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, M.; Zankl, M.

    1999-01-01

    Dose values in CT are specified by the manufacturers for all CT systems and operating conditions in phantoms. It is not trivial, however, to derive dose values in patients from this information. Therefore, we have developed a PC-based program which calculates organ dose and effective dose values for arbitrary scan parameters and anatomical ranges. Values for primary radiation are derived from measurements or manufacturer specifications; values for scattered radiation are derived from Monte Carlo calculations tabulated for standard anthropomorphic phantoms. Based on these values, organ doses can be computed by the program for arbitrary scan protocols in conventional and in spiral CT. Effective dose values are also provided, both with ICRP 26 and ICRP 60 tissue-weighting coefficients. Results for several standard CT protocols are presented in tabular form in this paper. In addition, potential for dose reduction is demonstrated, for example, in spiral CT and in quantitative CT. Providing realistic patient dose estimates for arbitrary CT protocols is relevant both for the physician and the patient, and it is particularly useful for educational and training purposes. The program, called WinDose, is now in use at the Erlangen University hospitals (Germany) as an information tool for radiologists and patients. Further extensions are planned. (orig.)

  20. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1991-08-01

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60 Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  1. Embracing model-based designs for dose-finding trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sharon B; Brown, Sarah; Weir, Christopher J; Harbron, Chris; Yap, Christina; Gaschler-Markefski, Birgit; Matcham, James; Caffrey, Louise; McKevitt, Christopher; Clive, Sally; Craddock, Charlie; Spicer, James; Cornelius, Victoria

    2017-07-25

    Dose-finding trials are essential to drug development as they establish recommended doses for later-phase testing. We aim to motivate wider use of model-based designs for dose finding, such as the continual reassessment method (CRM). We carried out a literature review of dose-finding designs and conducted a survey to identify perceived barriers to their implementation. We describe the benefits of model-based designs (flexibility, superior operating characteristics, extended scope), their current uptake, and existing resources. The most prominent barriers to implementation of a model-based design were lack of suitable training, chief investigators' preference for algorithm-based designs (e.g., 3+3), and limited resources for study design before funding. We use a real-world example to illustrate how these barriers can be overcome. There is overwhelming evidence for the benefits of CRM. Many leading pharmaceutical companies routinely implement model-based designs. Our analysis identified barriers for academic statisticians and clinical academics in mirroring the progress industry has made in trial design. Unified support from funders, regulators, and journal editors could result in more accurate doses for later-phase testing, and increase the efficiency and success of clinical drug development. We give recommendations for increasing the uptake of model-based designs for dose-finding trials in academia.

  2. Dose reconstruction in deforming lung anatomy: Dose grid size effects and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosu, Mihaela; Chetty, Indrin J.; Balter, James M.; Kessler, Marc L.; McShan, Daniel L.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigated the accumulation of dose to a deforming anatomy (such as lung) based on voxel tracking and by using time weighting factors derived from a breathing probability distribution function (p.d.f.). A mutual information registration scheme (using thin-plate spline warping) provided a transformation that allows the tracking of points between exhale and inhale treatment planning datasets (and/or intermediate state scans). The dose distributions were computed at the same resolution on each dataset using the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo code. Two accumulation/interpolation approaches were assessed. The first maps exhale dose grid points onto the inhale scan, estimates the doses at the 'tracked' locations by trilinear interpolation and scores the accumulated doses (via the p.d.f.) on the original exhale data set. In the second approach, the 'volume' associated with each exhale dose grid point (exhale dose voxel) is first subdivided into octants, the center of each octant is mapped to locations on the inhale dose grid and doses are estimated by trilinear interpolation. The octant doses are then averaged to form the inhale voxel dose and scored at the original exhale dose grid point location. Differences between the interpolation schemes are voxel size and tissue density dependent, but in general appear primarily only in regions with steep dose gradients (e.g., penumbra). Their magnitude (small regions of few percent differences) is less than the alterations in dose due to positional and shape changes from breathing in the first place. Thus, for sufficiently small dose grid point spacing, and relative to organ motion and deformation, differences due solely to the interpolation are unlikely to result in clinically significant differences to volume-based evaluation metrics such as mean lung dose (MLD) and tumor equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). The overall effects of deformation vary among patients. They depend on the tumor location, field

  3. Categorical regression dose-response modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this training is to provide participants with training on the use of the U.S. EPA’s Categorical Regression soft¬ware (CatReg) and its application to risk assessment. Categorical regression fits mathematical models to toxicity data that have been assigned ord...

  4. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  5. Why we need new approaches to low-dose risk modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.; Seiler, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    The linear no-threshold model for radiation effects was introduced as a conservative model for the design of radiation protection programs. The model has persisted not only as the basis for such programs, but has come to be treated as a dogma and is often confused with scientific fact. In this examination a number of serious problems with the linear no-threshold model of radiation carcinogenesis were demonstrated, many of them invalidating the hypothesis. It was shown that the relative risk formalism did not approach 1 as the dose approaches zero. When morality ratios were used instead, the data in the region below 0.3 Sv were systematically below the predictions of the linear model. It was also shown that the data above 0.3 Sv were of little use in formulating a model at low doses. In addition, these data are valid only for doses accumulated at high dose rates, and there is no scientific justification for using the model in low-dose, low-dose-rate extrapolations for purposes of radiation protection. Further examination of model fits to the Japanese survivor data were attempted. Several such models were fit to the data including an unconstrained linear, linear-square root, and Weibull, all of which fit the data better than the relative risk, linear no-threshold model. These fits were used to demonstrate that the linear model systematically over estimates the risk at low doses in the Japanese survivor data set. It is recommended here that an unbiased re-analysis of the data be undertaken and the results used to construct a new model, based on all pertinent data. This model could then form the basis for managing radiation risks in the appropriate regions of dose and dose rate

  6. Monte Carlo-based dose reconstruction in a rat model for scattered ionizing radiation investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Anna; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-09-01

    In radiation biology, rats are often irradiated, but the precise dose distributions are often lacking, particularly in areas that receive scatter radiation. We used a non-dedicated set of resources to calculate detailed dose distributions, including doses to peripheral organs well outside of the primary field, in common rat exposure settings. We conducted a detailed dose reconstruction in a rat through an analog to the conventional human treatment planning process. The process consisted of: (i) Characterizing source properties of an X-ray irradiator system, (ii) acquiring a computed tomography (CT) scan of a rat model, and (iii) using a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine to generate the dose distribution within the rat model. We considered cranial and liver irradiation scenarios where the rest of the body was protected by a lead shield. Organs of interest were the brain, liver and gonads. The study also included paired scenarios where the dose to adjacent, shielded rats was determined as a potential control for analysis of bystander effects. We established the precise doses and dose distributions delivered to the peripheral organs in single and paired rats. Mean doses to non-targeted organs in irradiated rats ranged from 0.03-0.1% of the reference platform dose. Mean doses to the adjacent rat peripheral organs were consistent to within 10% those of the directly irradiated rat. This work provided details of dose distributions in rat models under common irradiation conditions and established an effective scenario for delivering only scattered radiation consistent with that in a directly irradiated rat.

  7. Recent developments in biokinetic models and the calculation of internal dose coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, T.P.; Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Stradling, G.N.

    1997-01-01

    In most cases the measurement of radioactivity in an environmental or biological sample will be followed by some estimation of dose and possibly risk, either to a population or an individual. This will normally involve the use of a dose coefficient (dose per unit intake value) taken from a compendium. In recent years the calculation of dose coefficients has seen many developments in both biokinetic modelling and computational capabilities. ICRP has recommended new models for the respiratory tract and for the systemic behavior of many of the more important elements. As well as this, a general age-dependent calculation method has been developed which involves an effectively continuous variation of both biokinetic and dosimetric parameters, facilitating more realistic estimation of doses to young people. These new developments were used in work for recent ICRP, IAEA and CEC compendia of dose coefficients for both members of the public (including children) and workers. This paper presents a general overview of the method of calculation of internal doses with particular reference to the actinides. Some of the implications for dose coefficients of the new models are discussed. For example it is shown that compared with data in ICRP Publications 30 and 54: the new respiratory tract model generally predicts lower deposition in systemic tissues per unit intake; the new biokinetic models for actinides allow for burial of material deposited on bone surfaces; age-dependent models generally feature faster turnover of material in young people. All of these factors can lead to substantially different estimates of dose and examples of the new dose coefficients are given to illustrate these differences. During the development of the new models for actinides, human bioassay data were used to validate the model. Thus, one would expect the new models to give reasonable predictions of bioassay quantities. Some examples of the bioassay applications, e.g., excretion data for the

  8. Noise and dose modeling for pediatric CT optimization: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller Clemente, Rafael A.; Perez Diaz, Marlen; Mora Reyes, Yudel; Rodriguez Garlobo, Maikel; Castillo Salazar, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A Multiple Linear Regression Model was developed to predict noise and dose in computed tomography pediatric imaging for head and abdominal examinations. Relative values of Noise and Volumetric Computed Tomography Dose Index was used to estimate de model respectively. 54 images of physical phantoms were performed. Independent variables considered included: phantom diameter, tube current and kilovolts, x ray beam collimation, reconstruction diameter and equipment's post processing filters. Predicted values show good agreement with measurements, which were better in noise model (R 2 adjusted =0.953) than the dose model (R 2 adjusted =0.744). Tube current, object diameter, beam collimation and reconstruction filter were identified as the most influencing factors in models. (author)

  9. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of low-dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.; Muehlensiepen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The question of health effects from small radiation doses remains open. Individual cells, when being hit by single elemental doses - in low-dose irradiation - react acutely and temporarily by altering control of enzyme activity, as is demonstrated for the case of thymidine kinase. This response is not constant in that it provides a temporary protection of enzyme activity against a second irradiation, by a mechanism likely to be via improved detoxification of intracellular radicals. It must be considered that in the low-dose region radiation may also exert protection against other challenges involving radicals, causing a net beneficial effect by temporarily shielding the hit cell against radicals produced by metabolism. Since molecular alterations leading to late effects are considered a consequence of the initial cellular response, late effects from small radiation doses do not necessarily adhere to a linear dose-effect relationship. The reality of the linear relationship between the risk of late effects from high doses to small doses is an assumption, for setting dose limits, but it must not be taken for predicting health detriment from low doses. (author)

  10. Biosphere model for assessing doses from nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.; Amiro, B.D.; Davis, P.A.; Sheppard, S.C.; Szekeley, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The biosphere model, BIOTRAC, for predicting long term nuclide concentrations and radiological doses from Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept of a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield is presented. This generic, boreal zone biosphere model is based on scenario analysis and systems variability analysis using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Conservatism is used to bridge uncertainties, even though this creates a small amount of extra nuclide mass. Environmental change over the very long assessment period is mainly handled through distributed parameter values. The dose receptors are a critical group of humans and four generic non-human target organisms. BIOTRAC includes six integrated submodels and it interfaces smoothly with a geosphere model. This interface includes a bedrock well. The geosphere model defines the discharge zones of deep groundwater where nuclides released from the vault enter the biosphere occupied by the dose receptors. The size of one of these zones is reduced when water is withdrawn from the bedrock well. Sensitivity analysis indicates 129 I is by far the most important radionuclide. Results also show bedrock-well water leads to higher doses to man than lake water, but the former doses decrease with the size of the critical group. Under comparable circumstances, doses to the non-human biota are greater than those for man

  11. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko; Lampinen, Anniina [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmu, Kirsi [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); School of Science, Aalto University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki (Finland); Reijonen, Vappu; Kortesniemi, Mika [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); Leikola, Junnu [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, Riku [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-15

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  12. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M; Thomson, R M

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with(125)I, (103)Pd, or (131)Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20-30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%-10% and 13%-14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%-17% and 29%-34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model

  13. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with 125 I, 103 Pd, or 131 Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up

  14. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  15. Effects of Low-Dose Microwave on Healing of Fractures with Titanium Alloy Internal Fixation: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Fu, Tengfei; Jiang, Lan; Bai, Yuehong

    2013-01-01

    Background Microwave is a method for improving fracture repair. However, one of the contraindications for microwave treatment listed in the literature is surgically implanted metal plates in the treatment field. The reason is that the reflection of electromagnetic waves and the eddy current stimulated by microwave would increase the temperature of magnetic implants and cause heat damage in tissues. Comparing with traditional medical stainless steel, titanium alloy is a kind of medical implants with low magnetic permeability and electric conductivity. But the effects of microwave treatment on fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation in vivo were not reported. The aim of this article was to evaluate the security and effects of microwave on healing of a fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation. Methods Titanium alloy internal fixation systems were implanted in New Zealand rabbits with a 3.0 mm bone defect in the middle of femur. We applied a 30-day microwave treatment (2,450MHz, 25W, 10 min per day) to the fracture 3 days after operation. Temperature changes of muscle tissues around implants were measured during the irradiation. Normalized radiographic density of the fracture gap was measured on the 10th day and 30th day of the microwave treatment. All of the animals were killed after 10 and 30 days microwave treatment with histologic and histomorphometric examinations performed on the harvested tissues. Findings The temperatures did not increase significantly in animals with titanium alloy implants. The security of microwave treatment was also supported by histology of muscles, nerve and bone around the implants. Radiographic assessment, histologic and histomorphometric examinations revealed significant improvement in the healing bone. Conclusion Our results suggest that, in the healing of fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation, a low dose of microwave treatment may be a promising method. PMID:24086626

  16. Effective dose and cancer risk in PET/CT exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Gabriella M.; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de

    2013-01-01

    Due to the use of radiopharmaceutical positron-emitting in PET exam and realization of tomography by x-ray transmission in CT examination, an increase of dose with hybrid PET/CT technology is expected. However, differences of doses have been reported in many countries for the same type of procedure. It is expected that the dose is an influent parameter to standardize the protocols of PET/CT. This study aimed to estimate the effective doses and absorbed in 65 patients submitted to oncological Protocol in a nuclear medicine clinic in Rio de Janeiro, considering the risk of induction of cancer from the scan. The CT exam-related doses were estimated with a simulator of PMMA and simulated on the lmPACT resistance, which for program effective dose, were considered the weight factors of the lCRP 103. The PET exam doses were estimated by multiplying the activity administered to the patient with the ICRP dose 80 factors. The radiological risk for cancer incidence were estimated according to the ICRP 103. The results showed that the effective dose from CT exam is responsible for 70% of the effective total in a PET/CT scan. values of effective dose for the PET/CT exam reached average values of up to 25 mSv leading to a risk of 2, 57 x 10 -4 . Considering that in staging of oncological diseases at least four tests are performed annually, the total risk comes to 1,03x 10 -3

  17. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from cephalometric radiography to critical organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Sook; Cho, Bon Hae; Kim, Hyun Ja

    1995-01-01

    In head and neck region, the critical organ and tissue doses were determined, and the risks were estimated from lateral, posteroanterial and basilar cephalometric radiography. For each cephalometric radiography, 31 TLDs were placed in selected sites (18 internal and 13 external sites) in a tissue-equivalent phantom and exposed, then read-out in the TLD reader. The following results were obtained; 1. From lateral cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the salivary gland (3.6 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the bone marrow (3 μSv). 2. From posteroanterial cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the salivary gland (2 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the bone marrow (1.8 μSv). 3. From basilar cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the thyroid gland (31.4 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the salivary gland (13.3 μSv). 4. The probabilities of stochastic effect from lateral, posteroanterial and basilar cephalometric radiography were 0.72 X 10 -6 , 0.49 X 10 -6 and 3.51 X 10 -6 , respectively.

  18. Effect of low dose radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-ray on apoptosis in mouse spleen. Methods: Time course changes and dose-effect relationship of apoptosis in mouse spleen induced by WBI were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) qualitatively and TUNEL method semi-quantitatively. Results: Many typical apoptotic lymphocytes were found by TEM in mouse spleen after WBI with 2 Gy. No marked alterations of ultrastructure were found following WBI with 0.075 Gy. It was observed by TUNEL that the apoptosis of splenocytes increased after high dose radiation and decreased following low dose radiation (LDR). The dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis showed a J-shaped curve. Conclusion: The effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen was distinct. And the decrease of apoptosis after LDR is considered a manifestation of radiation hormesis

  19. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This User's Guide provides instruction in the setup and operation of the equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Instructions are also given on how to load the magnetic disks and access the interactive part of the program. Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios

  20. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Tsutsumi, M.; Moriuchi, S.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1991-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  1. Dose rate modelled for the outdoors of a gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J

    2012-01-01

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach's the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation as far as 200 m is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on graphics (author)

  2. Dose and dose rate effects on coherent-to-incoherent transition of precipitates upon irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengchao

    2006-01-01

    A typical precipitation hardened alloy, Cu-Co dilute alloy was selected to study the precipitation behavior and irradiation effect on precipitates. It is found that the principal effect of ion irradiation on the coherent precipitates is loss of coherency, and TEM cross-section observations show that the fraction of the incoherent precipitates is dependent on dose but not on dose rate during heavy ion irradiation.

  3. Metoprolol Dose Equivalence in Adult Men and Women Based on Gender Differences: Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy R. Eugene

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent meta-analyses and publications over the past 15 years have provided evidence showing there are considerable gender differences in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol. Throughout this time, there have not been any research articles proposing a gender stratified dose-adjustment resulting in an equivalent total drug exposure. Metoprolol pharmacokinetic data was obtained from a previous publication. Data was modeled using nonlinear mixed effect modeling using the MONOLIX software package to quantify metoprolol concentration–time data. Gender-stratified dosing simulations were conducted to identify equivalent total drug exposure based on a 100 mg dose in adults. Based on the pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations, a 50 mg dose in adult women provides an approximately similar metoprolol drug exposure to a 100 mg dose in adult men.

  4. Dose loading mathematical modelling of moving through heterogeneous radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyij, Je.V.; Kotlyarov, V.T.

    2006-01-01

    Software component for management of data on gamma exposition dose spatial distribution was created in the frameworks of the Ukryttya information model creation. Availability of state-of-the-art programming technologies (NET., ObjectARX) for integration of different models of radiation-hazardous condition to digital engineer documentation system (AutoCAD) was shown on the basis of the component example

  5. A model to accumulate fractionated dose in a deforming organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Di; Jaffray, D.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists throughout the course of radiation treatment. However, a method of constructing the resultant dose delivered to the organ volume remains a difficult challenge. In this study, a model to quantify internal organ motion and a method to construct a cumulative dose in a deforming organ are introduced. Methods and Materials: A biomechanical model of an elastic body is used to quantify patient organ motion in the process of radiation therapy. Intertreatment displacements of volume elements in an organ of interest is calculated by applying an finite element method with boundary conditions, obtained from multiple daily computed tomography (CT) measurements. Therefore, by incorporating also the measurements of daily setup error, daily dose delivered to a deforming organ can be accumulated by tracking the position of volume elements in the organ. Furthermore, distribution of patient-specific organ motion is also predicted during the early phase of treatment delivery using the daily measurements, and the cumulative dose distribution in the organ can then be estimated. This dose distribution will be updated whenever a new measurement becomes available, and used to reoptimize the ongoing treatment. Results: An integrated process to accumulate dosage in a daily deforming organ was implemented. In this process, intertreatment organ motion and setup error were systematically quantified, and incorporated in the calculation of the cumulative dose. An example of the rectal wall motion in a prostate treatment was applied to test the model. The displacements of volume elements in the rectal wall, as well as the resultant doses, were calculated. Conclusion: This study is intended to provide a systematic framework to incorporate daily patient-specific organ motion and setup error in the reconstruction of the cumulative dose distribution in an organ of interest. The realistic dose

  6. Effective doses to family members of patients treated with radioiodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocovska, M Zdraveska; Vaskova, O; Majstorov, V; Kuzmanovska, S; Gjorceva, D Pop; Jokic, V Spasic

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose to family members of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine-131, and also to compare the results with dose constraints proposed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the estimation of the effective doses, sixty family members of sixty patients, treated with radioiodine-131, and thermoluminiscent dosimeters (Model TLD 100) were used. Thyroid cancer patients were hospitalized for three days, while hyperthyroid patients were treated on out-patient basis. The family members wore TLD in front of the torso for seven days. The radiation doses to family members of thyroid cancer patients were well below the recommended dose constraint of 1 mSv. The mean value of effective dose was 0.21 mSv (min 0.02 - max 0.51 mSv). Effective doses, higher than 1 mSv, were detected for 11 family members of hyperthyroid patients. The mean value of effective dose of family members of hyperthyroid patients was 0.87 mSv (min 0.12 - max 6.79). The estimated effective doses to family members of hyperthyroid patients were higher than the effective doses to family members of thyroid carcinoma patients. These findings may be considered when establishing new national guidelines concerning radiation protection and release of patients after a treatment with radioiodine therapy.

  7. uv keratoconjunctivitis vs. established dose effect relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulvady, N.U.

    1976-01-01

    A patient who received a uv dose to his eyes 11 times greater than the photokeratitic threshold of Pitts and 4 1 / 2 times the photokeratitic threshold as found by Leach. The patient had severe keratoconjunctivitis for 3 days and did not develop any keratitis

  8. Page 1 ~'----------------------------- Dose-dependent effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract We cOInpared the serwn levels of oestrogen and progesterone and the endoInetrial Inorphology of. nOrInal pregnant rats at 5,5 days' gestation ~th those of pregnant rats given either low (10 IU) or high (20 IU) doses of two gonadotrophins: follicle-. stiInulating hOrInone (FSH) and hwnan chorionic gonadotrophin ...

  9. Monte Carlo Calculated Effective Dose to Teenage Girls from Computed Tomography Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.; Bibbo, G.; Pattison, J.

    2000-01-01

    Effective doses from CT to paediatric patients are not common in the literature. This article reports some effective doses to teenage girls from CT examinations. The voxel computational model ADELAIDE, representative of a 14-year-old girl, was scaled in size by ±5% to represent also 11-12-year-old and 16-year-old girls. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the effective dose from chest, abdomen and whole torso CT examinations to the three version of ADELAIDE using a 120 kV spectrum. For the whole torso CT examination, in order of increasing model size, the effective doses were 9.0, 8.2 and 7.8 mSv per 100 mA.s. Data are presented that allow the estimation of effective dose from CT examinations of the torso for girls between the ages of 11 and 16. (author)

  10. Epidemiological methods for assessing dose-response and dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellström, Tord; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Selected Molecular Mechanisms of Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity General Considerations of Dose-Effect and Dose-Response Relationships Interactions in Metal Toxicology Epidemiological Methods for Assessing Dose-Response and Dose-Effect Relationships Essential Metals: Assessing Risks from Deficiency......Description Handbook of the Toxicology of Metals is the standard reference work for physicians, toxicologists and engineers in the field of environmental and occupational health. This new edition is a comprehensive review of the effects on biological systems from metallic elements...... access to a broad range of basic toxicological data and also gives a general introduction to the toxicology of metallic compounds. Audience Toxicologists, physicians, and engineers in the fields of environmental and occupational health as well as libraries in these disciplines. Will also be a useful...

  11. Radiation dose from Chernobyl forests: assessment using the 'forestpath' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, W.R.; Linkov, I.; Belinkaia, E.; Rimkevich, V.; Zmushko, Yu.; Lutsko, A.; Fifield, F.W.; Flowers, A.G.; Wells, G.

    1996-01-01

    Contaminated forests can contribute significantly to human radiation dose for a few decades after initial contamination. Exposure occurs through harvesting the trees, manufacture and use of forest products for construction materials and paper production, and the consumption of food harvested from forests. Certain groups of the population, such as wild animal hunters and harvesters of berries, herbs and mushrooms, can have particularly large intakes of radionuclides from natural food products. Forestry workers have been found to receive radiation doses several times higher than other groups in the same area. The generic radionuclide cycling model 'forestpath' is being applied to evaluate the human radiation dose and risks to population groups resulting from living and working near the contaminated forests. The model enables calculations to be made to predict the internal and external radiation doses at specific times following the accident. The model can be easily adjusted for dose calculations from other contamination scenarios (such as radionuclide deposition at a low and constant rate as well as complex deposition patterns). Experimental data collected in the forests of Southern Belarus are presented. These data, together with the results of epidemiological studies, are used for model calibration and validation

  12. Theory of thermoluminescence gamma dose response: The unified interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y.S.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the development of a comprehensive theory of thermoluminescence (TL) dose response, the unified interaction model (UNIM). The UNIM is based on both radiation absorption stage and recombination stage mechanisms and can describe dose response for heavy charged particles (in the framework of the extended track interaction model - ETIM) as well as for isotropically ionising gamma rays and electrons (in the framework of the TC/LC geminate recombination model) in a unified and self-consistent conceptual and mathematical formalism. A theory of optical absorption dose response is also incorporated in the UNIM to describe the radiation absorption stage. The UNIM is applied to the dose response supralinearity characteristics of LiF:Mg,Ti and is especially and uniquely successful in explaining the ionisation density dependence of the supralinearity of composite peak 5 in TLD-100. The UNIM is demonstrated to be capable of explaining either qualitatively or quantitatively all of the major features of TL dose response with many of the variable parameters of the model strongly constrained by ancilliary optical absorption and sensitisation measurements

  13. Biological effective dose studies in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of cervix is the second most common cancer worldwide among women. Several treatments related protocols of radiotherapy have been followed over few decades in its treatment for evaluating the response. These physical doses varying on the basics of fractionation size, dose rate and total dose needed to be indicated as biological effective dose (BED) to rationalize these treatments. The curative potential of radiation therapy in the management of carcinoma of the cervix is greatly enhanced by the use of intracavitary brachytherapy. Successful brachytherapy requires the high radiation dose to be delivered to the tumor where as minimum radiation dose reach to surrounding normal tissue. Present study is aimed to evaluate biologically effective dose in patients receiving high dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy based on tumor cell proliferation values in cancer of the cervix patients. The study includes 30 patients' data as a retrospective analysis. In addition determine extent of a dose-response relationship existing between the biological effective dose at Point A and the bladder and rectum and the clinical outcomes

  14. A model for radiological dose assessment in an urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Suh, Kyung Suk; Han, Moon Hee

    2007-01-01

    A model for radiological dose assessment in an urban environment, METRO-K has been developed. Characteristics of the model are as follows ; 1) mathematical structures are simple (i.e. simplified input parameters) and easy to understand due to get the results by analytical methods using experimental and empirical data, 2) complex urban environment can easily be made up using only 5 types of basic surfaces, 3) various remediation measures can be applied to different surfaces by evaluating the exposure doses contributing from each contamination surface. Exposure doses contributing from each contamination surface at a particular location of a receptor were evaluated using the data library of kerma values as a function of gamma energy and contamination surface. A kerma data library was prepared for 7 representative types of Korean urban building by extending those data given for 4 representative types of European urban buildings. Initial input data are daily radionuclide concentration in air and precipitation, and fraction of chemical type. Final outputs are absorbed dose rate in air contributing from the basic surfaces as a function of time following a radionuclide deposition, and exposure dose rate contributing from various surfaces constituting the urban environment at a particular location of a receptor. As the result of a contaminative scenario for an apartment built-up area, exposure dose rates show a distinct difference for surrounding environment as well as locations of a receptor

  15. A demonstration of dose modeling at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, T.B.; Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-11-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently revising the regulatory guidance for high-level nuclear waste disposal. In its draft form, the guidelines contain dose limits. Since this is likely to be the case in the final regulations, it is essential that the US Department of Energy be prepared to calculate site-specific doses for any potential repository location. This year, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has made a first attempt to estimate doses for the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada as part of a preliminary total-systems performance assessment. A set of transport scenarios was defined to assess the cumulative release of radionuclides over 10,000 years under undisturbed and disturbed conditions at Yucca Mountain. Dose estimates were provided for several of the transport scenarios modeled. The exposure scenarios used to estimate dose in this total-systems exercise should not, however, be considered a definitive set of scenarios for determining the risk of the potential repository. Exposure scenarios were defined for waterborne and surface contamination that result from both undisturbed and disturbed performance of the potential repository. The exposure scenarios used for this analysis were designed for the Hanford Site in Washington. The undisturbed performance scenarios for which exposures were modeled are gas-phase release of 14 C to the surface and natural breakdown of the waste containers with waterborne release. The disturbed performance scenario for which doses were estimated is exploratory drilling. Both surface and waterborne contamination were considered for the drilling intrusion scenario

  16. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  17. Determining effective radiation mutagen dose for garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taner, Y.; Kunter, B.

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to get database for future garlic mutation breeding studies. For this aim, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 Gy doses of Cs 137 (gamma-ray) were applied on garlic cloves as a physical mutagen. 50 cloves were used for each dose. Sixty days after treatment, germination rate and shoot development of cloves were determined. The Effective Mutagen Dose (ED 50 ) was calculated by regression analyses. According to the results, 4.455 Gy dose was found to be effective as ED 50 . (author)

  18. Comparison of three light doses in the photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis using mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Tylcz, Jean-Baptiste; Vermandel, Maximilien; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for cancer therapy. Although high efficacy is demonstrated for PDT using standardized protocols in nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses, alternative light doses expected to increase efficiency, to reduce adverse effects or to expand the use of PDT, are still being evaluated and refined. We propose a comparison of the three most common light doses in the treatment of actinic keratosis with 5-aminolevulinic acid PDT through mathematical modeling. The proposed model is based on an iterative procedure that involves determination of the local fluence rate, updating of the local optical properties, and estimation of the local damage induced by the therapy. This model was applied on a simplified skin sample model including an actinic keratosis lesion, with three different light doses (red light dose, 37 J/cm2, 75 mW/cm2, 500 s blue light dose, 10 J/cm2, 10 mW/cm2, 1000 s and daylight dose, 9000 s). Results analysis shows that the three studied light doses, although all efficient, lead to variable local damage. Defining reference damage enables the nonoptimal parameters for the current light doses to be refined and the treatment to be more suitable.

  19. Health effects and radiation dose from exposure to radon indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Radon exposure has been declared a health hazard by several organisations, for example the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the World Health Organisation (WHO). The basis for the risk estimate has been the results from epidemiological studies on miners exposed to radon, supported by the results of residential epidemiology. Only few of the many residential epidemiological studies carried out hitherto have a design applicable for a risk estimate. The largest is the Swedish national study but several large well designed studies are ongoing. An excess risk has also been found in animal research. The model describes smoking and radon exposure as between additive and multiplicative, found in both miners and residential studies. The relatively few non-smokers among the miners and also among the residents give a problem at estimating the radon risk for these groups. It would also be desirable to know more about the importance of the age and the time period at exposure. Lung dose calculations from radon exposure are not recommended by ICRP in their publication 66. For comparison with other radiation sources the ICRP recommends the concept 'dose conversion convention' obtained as the risk estimate divided by the detriment. Other effects of radon exposure than lung cancer have not been shown epidemiologically, but dose calculations indicate an excess risk of about 5% of the excess lung cancer risk. (author)

  20. Application of a Novel Dose-Uncertainty Model for Dose-Uncertainty Analysis in Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hosang; Palta, Jatinder R.; Kim, You-Hyun; Kim, Siyong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze dose uncertainty using a previously published dose-uncertainty model, and to assess potential dosimetric risks existing in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The dose-uncertainty model provides a three-dimensional (3D) dose-uncertainty distribution in a given confidence level. For 8 retrospectively selected patients, dose-uncertainty maps were constructed using the dose-uncertainty model at the 95% CL. In addition to uncertainties inherent to the radiation treatment planning system, four scenarios of spatial errors were considered: machine only (S1), S1 + intrafraction, S1 + interfraction, and S1 + both intrafraction and interfraction errors. To evaluate the potential risks of the IMRT plans, three dose-uncertainty-based plan evaluation tools were introduced: confidence-weighted dose-volume histogram, confidence-weighted dose distribution, and dose-uncertainty-volume histogram. Results: Dose uncertainty caused by interfraction setup error was more significant than that of intrafraction motion error. The maximum dose uncertainty (95% confidence) of the clinical target volume (CTV) was smaller than 5% of the prescribed dose in all but two cases (13.9% and 10.2%). The dose uncertainty for 95% of the CTV volume ranged from 1.3% to 2.9% of the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The dose uncertainty in prostate IMRT could be evaluated using the dose-uncertainty model. Prostate IMRT plans satisfying the same plan objectives could generate a significantly different dose uncertainty because a complex interplay of many uncertainty sources. The uncertainty-based plan evaluation contributes to generating reliable and error-resistant treatment plans.

  1. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 {mu}Sv and 37.8 {mu}Sv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 {mu}Sv, 27.6 {mu}Sv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 {mu}Sv, 15.9 {mu}Sv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  2. Effective dose to patients from thoracic spine examinations with tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus; Soederman, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to calculate the average effective dose to patients from lateral tomosynthesis examinations of the thoracic spine, compare the results with the corresponding conventional examination and to determine a conversion factor between dose-area product (DAP) and effective dose for the tomosynthesis examination. Thoracic spine examinations from 17 patients were included in the study. The registered DAP and information about the field size for each projection radiograph were, together with patient height and mass, used to calculate the effective dose for each projection radiograph. The total effective doses for the tomosynthesis examinations were obtained by adding the effective doses from the 60 projection radiographs included in the examination. The mean effective dose was 0.47 mSv (range 0.24-0.81 mSv) for the tomosynthesis examinations and 0.20 mSv (range 0.07-0.29 mSv) for the corresponding conventional examinations (anteroposterior + left lateral projection). For the tomosynthesis examinations, a conversion factor between total DAP and effective dose of 0.092 mSv Gycm -2 was obtained. (authors)

  3. EFFECTIVE DOSE TO PATIENTS FROM THORACIC SPINE EXAMINATIONS WITH TOMOSYNTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Söderman, Christina; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of the present work were to calculate the average effective dose to patients from lateral tomosynthesis examinations of the thoracic spine, compare the results with the corresponding conventional examination and to determine a conversion factor between dose-area product (DAP) and effective dose for the tomosynthesis examination. Thoracic spine examinations from 17 patients were included in the study. The registered DAP and information about the field size for each projection radiograph were, together with patient height and mass, used to calculate the effective dose for each projection radiograph. The total effective doses for the tomosynthesis examinations were obtained by adding the effective doses from the 60 projection radiographs included in the examination. The mean effective dose was 0.47 mSv (range 0.24-0.81 mSv) for the tomosynthesis examinations and 0.20 mSv (range 0.07-0.29 mSv) for the corresponding conventional examinations (anteroposterior + left lateral projection). For the tomosynthesis examinations, a conversion factor between total DAP and effective dose of 0.092 mSv Gycm(-2) was obtained. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Modelling synergistic effects of appetite regulating hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Julie Berg; Ritz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We briefly reviewed one definition of dose addition, which is applicable within the framework of generalized linear models. We established how this definition of dose addition corresponds to effect addition in case only two doses per compound are considered for evaluating synergistic effects. The....... The link between definitions was exemplified for an appetite study where two appetite hormones were studied....

  5. A model for automation of radioactive dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Carlos Henrique Calazans; Zambon, Jose Waldir; Bitelli, Ricardo; Honaiser, Eduardo Henrique Rangel

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a proposal for automation of the personnel dose control system to be used in nuclear medicine environments. The model has considered the Standards and rules of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) and of the Health Ministry. The advantages of the model is a robust management of the integrated dose and technicians qualification status. The software platform selected to be used was the Lotus Notes and an analysis of the advantages, disadvantages of the use of this platform is also presented. (author)

  6. A model for automation of radioactive dose control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Carlos Henrique Calazans; Zambon, Jose Waldir; Bitelli, Ricardo; Honaiser, Eduardo Henrique Rangel [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: calazans@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: zambon@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: bitelli@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: honaiser@ctmsp.mar.mil.br

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents a proposal for automation of the personnel dose control system to be used in nuclear medicine environments. The model has considered the Standards and rules of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) and of the Health Ministry. The advantages of the model is a robust management of the integrated dose and technicians qualification status. The software platform selected to be used was the Lotus Notes and an analysis of the advantages, disadvantages of the use of this platform is also presented. (author)

  7. Modification and validation of an analytical source model for external beam radiotherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Scott E., E-mail: sedavids@utmb.edu [Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 (United States); Cui, Jing [Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033 (United States); Kry, Stephen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Vicic, Milos [Department of Applied Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); White, R. Allen [Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A dose calculation tool, which combines the accuracy of the dose planning method (DPM) Monte Carlo code and the versatility of a practical analytical multisource model, which was previously reported has been improved and validated for the Varian 6 and 10 MV linear accelerators (linacs). The calculation tool can be used to calculate doses in advanced clinical application studies. One shortcoming of current clinical trials that report dose from patient plans is the lack of a standardized dose calculation methodology. Because commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) have their own dose calculation algorithms and the clinical trial participant who uses these systems is responsible for commissioning the beam model, variation exists in the reported calculated dose distributions. Today’s modern linac is manufactured to tight specifications so that variability within a linac model is quite low. The expectation is that a single dose calculation tool for a specific linac model can be used to accurately recalculate dose from patient plans that have been submitted to the clinical trial community from any institution. The calculation tool would provide for a more meaningful outcome analysis. Methods: The analytical source model was described by a primary point source, a secondary extra-focal source, and a contaminant electron source. Off-axis energy softening and fluence effects were also included. The additions of hyperbolic functions have been incorporated into the model to correct for the changes in output and in electron contamination with field size. A multileaf collimator (MLC) model is included to facilitate phantom and patient dose calculations. An offset to the MLC leaf positions was used to correct for the rudimentary assumed primary point source. Results: Dose calculations of the depth dose and profiles for field sizes 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm agree with measurement within 2% of the maximum dose or 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) for 95% of the data

  8. A comparison of newborn stylized and tomographic models for dose assessment in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staton, R J; Pazik, F D; Nipper, J C; Williams, J L; Bolch, W E

    2003-01-01

    Establishment of organ doses from diagnostic and interventional examinations is a key component to quantifying the radiation risks from medical exposures and for formulating corresponding dose-reduction strategies. Radiation transport models of human anatomy provide a convenient method for simulating radiological examinations. At present, two classes of models exist: stylized mathematical models and tomographic voxel models. In the present study, organ dose comparisons are made for projection radiographs of both a stylized and a tomographic model of the newborn patient. Sixteen separate radiographs were simulated for each model at x-ray technique factors typical of newborn examinations: chest, abdomen, thorax and head views in the AP, PA, left LAT and right LAT projection orientation. For AP and PA radiographs of the torso (chest, abdomen and thorax views), the effective dose assessed for the tomographic model exceeds that for the stylized model with per cent differences ranging from 19% (AP abdominal view) to 43% AP chest view. In contrast, the effective dose for the stylized model exceeds that for the tomographic model for all eight lateral views including those of the head, with per cent differences ranging from 9% (LLAT chest view) to 51% (RLAT thorax view). While organ positioning differences do exist between the models, a major factor contributing to differences in effective dose is the models' exterior trunk shape. In the tomographic model, a more elliptical shape is seen thus providing for less tissue shielding for internal organs in the AP and PA directions, with corresponding increased tissue shielding in the lateral directions. This observation is opposite of that seen in comparisons of stylized and tomographic models of the adult

  9. Effects of low dose mitomycin C on experimental tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianzheng; Liang Shuo; Qu Yaqin; Pu Chunji; Zhang Haiying; Wu Zhenfeng; Wang Xianli

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of low dose mitomycin C(MMC) as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. Methods: Change in tumor size tumor-bearing mice was measured. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine immune function of mice. Results: Low dose Mac's pretreatment reduced tumor size more markedly than did radiotherapy only. The immune function in mice given with low dose MMC 12h before radiotherapy was obviously higher than that in mice subjected to radiotherapy only (P<0.05), and was close to that in the tumor-bearing mice before radiotherapy. Conclusion: Low dose MMC could improve the radiotherapy effect. Pretreatment with low dose MMC could obviously improve the immune suppression state in mice caused by radiotherapy. The mechanism of its improvement of radiotherapeutic effect by low dose of MMC might be due to its enhancement of immune function and induction of adaptive response in tumor-bearing mice

  10. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  11. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  12. Reconstructing Organophosphorus Pesticide Doses Using the Reversed Dosimetry Approach in a Simple Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrated the development of a simple pharmacokinetic (SPK model aiming to estimate the absorbed chlorpyrifos doses using urinary biomarker data, 3,5,6-trichlorpyridinol as the model input. The effectiveness of the SPK model in the pesticide risk assessment was evaluated by comparing dose estimates using different urinary composite data. The dose estimates resulting from the first morning voids appeared to be lower than but not significantly different to those using before bedtime, lunch or dinner voids. We found similar trend for dose estimates using three different urinary composite data. However, the dose estimates using the SPK model for individual children were significantly higher than those from the conventional physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling using aggregate environmental measurements of chlorpyrifos as the model inputs. The use of urinary data in the SPK model intuitively provided a plausible alternative to the conventional PBPK model in reconstructing the absorbed chlorpyrifos dose.

  13. The effects of radiotherapy treatment uncertainties on the delivered dose distribution and tumour control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, J.T.; Zavgorodni, S.F.; Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in the precise quantity of radiation dose delivered to tumours in external beam radiotherapy is present due to many factors, and can result in either spatially uniform (Gaussian) or spatially non-uniform dose errors. These dose errors are incorporated into the calculation of tumour control probability (TCP) and produce a distribution of possible TCP values over a population. We also study the effect of inter-patient cell sensitivity heterogeneity on the population distribution of patient TCPs. This study aims to investigate the relative importance of these three uncertainties (spatially uniform dose uncertainty, spatially non-uniform dose uncertainty, and inter-patient cell sensitivity heterogeneity) on the delivered dose and TCP distribution following a typical course of fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose distributions used for patient treatments are modelled in one dimension. Geometric positioning uncertainties during and before treatment are considered as shifts of a pre-calculated dose distribution. Following the simulation of a population of patients, distributions of dose across the patient population are used to calculate mean treatment dose, standard deviation in mean treatment dose, mean TCP, standard deviation in TCP, and TCP mode. These parameters are calculated with each of the three uncertainties included separately. The calculations show that the dose errors in the tumour volume are dominated by the spatially uniform component of dose uncertainty. This could be related to machine specific parameters, such as linear accelerator calibration. TCP calculation is affected dramatically by inter-patient variation in the cell sensitivity and to a lesser extent by the spatially uniform dose errors. The positioning errors with the 1.5 cm margins used cause dose uncertainty outside the tumour volume and have a small effect on mean treatment dose (in the tumour volume) and tumour control. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of

  14. A Topographically and anatomically unified phantom model for organ dose determination in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Rannikko, S.; Ermakov, I.; Masarskyi, L.; Saltukova, L.

    1989-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent is used as a risk-related factor for assessing radiation impact on patients. In order to assess the effective dose equivalent, data on organ doses in several organs are needed. For calculation of the collective effective dose equivalent, data on the sex and size distribution of the exposed population are also needed. A realistic phantom model based on the Alderson-Rando anatomical phantom has been developed for these purposes. The phantom model includes 22 organs and takes into account the deflections due to sex, height, weight and other anatomical features. Coordinates of the outer contours of inner organs are given in different slabs of the phantom. The images of cross sections of different slabs realistically depict the distribution of the organs in the phantom. Statistics about height and weight distribution as a function of the age of the Finnish population are also given. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun

    2003-02-01

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  16. Dose rate-dependent marrow toxicity of TBI in dogs and marrow sparing effect at high dose rate by dose fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storb, R; Raff, R F; Graham, T; Appelbaum, F R; Deeg, H J; Schuening, F G; Sale, G; Seidel, K

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the marrow toxicity of 200 and 300 cGy total-body irradiation (TBI) delivered at 10 and 60 cGy/min, respectively, in dogs not rescued by marrow transplant. Additionally, we compared toxicities after 300 cGy fractionated TBI (100 cGy fractions) to that after single-dose TBI at 10 and 60 cGy/min. Marrow toxicities were assessed on the basis of peripheral blood cell count changes and mortality from radiation-induced pancytopenia. TBI doses studied were just below the dose at which all dogs die despite optimal support. Specifically, 18 dogs were given single doses of 200 cGy TBI, delivered at either 10 (n=13) or 60 (n=5) cGy/min. Thirty-one dogs received 300 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min, delivered as either single doses (n=21) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Seventeen dogs were given 300 cGy TBI at 60 cGy/min, administered either as single doses (n=5) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Within the limitations of the experimental design, three conclusions were drawn: 1) with 200 and 300 cGy single-dose TBI, an increase of dose rate from 10 to 60 cGy/min, respectively, caused significant increases in marrow toxicity; 2) at 60 cGy/min, dose fractionation resulted in a significant decrease in marrow toxicities, whereas such a protective effect was not seen at 10 cGy/min; and 3) with fractionated TBI, no significant differences in marrow toxicity were seen between dogs irradiated at 60 and 10 cGy/min. The reduced effectiveness of TBI when a dose of 300 cGy was divided into three fractions of 100 cGy or when dose rate was reduced from 60 cGy/min to 10 cGy/min was consistent with models of radiation toxicity that allow for repair of sublethal injury in DNA.

  17. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  18. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  19. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  20. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  1. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  2. TSD-DOSE : a radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingston, M.

    1998-01-01

    In May 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Operations, issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping slightly radioactive mixed waste from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. Studies were subsequently conducted to evaluate the radiological impacts associated with DOE's prior shipments through DOE's authorized release process under DOE Order 5400.5. To support this endeavor, a radiological assessment computer code--TSD-DOSE (Version 1.1)--was developed and issued by DOE in 1997. The code was developed on the basis of detailed radiological assessments performed for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. It was designed to utilize waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste handling operations at a TSD facility. The code has since been released for use by DOE field offices and was recently used by DOE to evaluate the release of septic waste containing residual radioactive material to a TSD facility licensed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Revisions to the code were initiated in 1997 to incorporate comments received from users and to increase TSD-DOSE's capability, accuracy, and flexibility. These updates included incorporation of the method used to estimate external radiation doses from DOE's RESRAD model and expansion of the source term to include 85 radionuclides. In addition, a detailed verification and benchmarking analysis was performed

  3. Cytogenetic effect of low dose gamma-radiation in Hordeum vulgare seedlings: non-linear dose-effect relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geras'kin, Stanislav A; Oudalova, Alla A; Kim, Jin Kyu; Dikarev, Vladimir G; Dikareva, Nina S

    2007-03-01

    The induction of chromosome aberrations in Hordeum vulgare germinated seeds was studied after ionizing irradiation with doses in the range of 10-1,000 mGy. The relationship between the frequency of aberrant cells and the absorbed dose was found to be nonlinear. A dose-independent plateau in the dose range from about 50 to 500 mGy was observed, where the level of cytogenetic damage was significantly different from the spontaneous level. The comparison of the goodness of the experimental data fitting with mathematical models of different complexity, using the most common quantitative criteria, demonstrated the advantage of a piecewise linear model over linear and polynomial models in approximating the frequency of cytogenetical disturbances. The results of the study support the hypothesis of indirect mechanisms of mutagenesis induced by low doses. Fundamental and applied implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Dose rate effect on the yield of radiation induced response with thermal fading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, V.; Rogalev, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-01-01

    A model describing the dependences of the accumulation of thermally unstable radiation induced defects on the dose and dose rate is proposed. The model directly takes into account the track nature of the ionizing radiation represented as accumulation processes of defects in tracks averaged over a crystal volume considering various degrees of overlapping in space and time. The accumulation of the defects in the tracks is phenomenologically described. General expressions are obtained that allows radiation yield simulation of defects involving known creation and transformation processes. The cases considered, of linear accumulation (constant increment of the defects in tracks) and accumulation with saturation (complete saturation of the defects in one track), lead to a set of linear dose dependences with saturation, which are routinely used in luminescence and ESR dating. The accumulation, with increase of sensitivity in regions overlapped by two or more tracks, gave a set of dose dependences, from linear-sublinear-linear-saturation, distinctive of quartz up to linear-supralinear-linear-saturation. It is shown that the effect of the dose rate on dose dependences is determined by a dimensionless parameter a=Pτ/D0, where P is the dose rate, τ is the defect lifetime and D0 is the track dose. At a-bar 1 the dose rate influences basically the accumulation of thermally unstable defects. In the reverse case the dose dependences did not seems to be influenced by the dose rate

  5. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana; Silva, Luanna R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of 60 Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD 50 obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  6. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  7. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  8. Radiation dose modeling using IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickers, D.S.; Davis, K.R.; Breazeal, N.L.; Watson, R.A.; Ford, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans in radiation environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO (Ergonomics) simulation software products. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide the radiation exposure information to and collect the radiation dose information from the workcell simulations. The emphasis of this paper is on the IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO parts of REMS, since that represents the extension to existing capabilities developed by the authors. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these database files to compute and accumulate dose to human devices (Deneb's ERGO human) during simulated operations around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. REMS was developed because the proposed reduction in the yearly radiation exposure limit will preclude or require changes in many of the manual operations currently being utilized in the Weapons Complex. This is particularly relevant in the area of dismantlement activities at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. Therefore, a capability was needed to be able to quantify the dose associated with certain manual processes so that the benefits of automation could be identified and understood

  9. Committed effective doses at various times after intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed effective doses at nine times after intake from intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu 1 AMAD particles by adults. Data are given for various chemical forms of 359 nuclides. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on committed equivalent doses to organs is given in NRPB-M288. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  10. Organ doses and effective doses in some medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavkumar, Biju

    2000-01-01

    The ICRP recommends radiation protection standards for the safe use of radiation and also prescribes the radiation protection quantities and periodically reviews them. In this context, the quantities like organ doses and effective doses are defined by ICRP. In this work we calculate these quantities and hence the conversion functions for the industrial radiation sources and those for CT and diagnostic X-ray exposures. Workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation are regularly monitored to evaluate the radiation dose received by them. It is quite possible that in an accident situation, the worker involved in the accident might not have worn a personal monitor, popularly known as the monitoring badge. In addition, even some non radiation workers (who are obviously not monitored) may also have received exposure. Under these circumstances, the persons involved are interviewed, the accident site inspected, and on the basis of realistic assumptions, the likely doses received by the exposed persons are estimated

  11. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  12. Aged Lewis rats exposed to low and moderate doses of rotenone are a good model for studying the process of protein aggregation and its effects upon central nervous system cell physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cell physiology is impaired before protein aggregation and this may be more relevant than inclusions themselves for neurodegeneration. The present study aimed to characterize an animal model to enable the analysis of the cell biology before and after protein aggregation. Ten-month-old Lewis rats were exposed either to 1 or 2 mg/kg/day of rotenone, delivered subcutaneously through mini-pumps, for one month. Hyperphosphorylated TAU, alpha-synuclein, amyloid-beta peptide and protein carbonylation (indicative of oxidative stress were evaluated in the hippocampus, substantia nigra and locus coeruleus through immunohistochemistry or western blot. It was found that 2 mg/kg/day rotenone increased amyloid-beta peptide, hyperphosphorylation of TAU and alpha-synuclein. Rotenone at 1mg/kg/day did not alter protein levels. Protein carbonylation remained unchanged. This study demonstrated that aged Lewis rats exposed to a low dose of rotenone is a useful model to study cellular processes before protein aggregation, while the higher dose makes a good model to study the effects of protein inclusions.

  13. The Impact of a One-Dose versus Two-Dose Oral Cholera Vaccine Regimen in Outbreak Settings: A Modeling Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Azman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV was created for use in outbreak response, but vaccine availability remains severely limited. Innovative strategies are needed to maximize the health impact and minimize the logistical barriers to using available vaccine. Here we ask under what conditions the use of one dose rather than the internationally licensed two-dose protocol may do both.Using mathematical models we determined the minimum relative single-dose efficacy (MRSE at which single-dose reactive campaigns are expected to be as or more effective than two-dose campaigns with the same amount of vaccine. Average one- and two-dose OCV effectiveness was estimated from published literature and compared to the MRSE. Results were applied to recent outbreaks in Haiti, Zimbabwe, and Guinea using stochastic simulations to illustrate the potential impact of one- and two-dose campaigns. At the start of an epidemic, a single dose must be 35%-56% as efficacious as two doses to avert the same number of cases with a fixed amount of vaccine (i.e., MRSE between 35% and 56%. This threshold decreases as vaccination is delayed. Short-term OCV effectiveness is estimated to be 77% (95% CI 57%-88% for two doses and 44% (95% CI -27% to 76% for one dose. This results in a one-dose relative efficacy estimate of 57% (interquartile range 13%-88%, which is above conservative MRSE estimates. Using our best estimates of one- and two-dose efficacy, we projected that a single-dose reactive campaign could have prevented 70,584 (95% prediction interval [PI] 55,943-86,205 cases in Zimbabwe, 78,317 (95% PI 57,435-100,150 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and 2,826 (95% PI 2,490-3,170 cases in Conakry, Guinea: 1.1 to 1.2 times as many as a two-dose campaign. While extensive sensitivity analyses were performed, our projections of cases averted in past epidemics are based on severely limited single-dose efficacy data and may not fully capture uncertainty due to imperfect

  14. The Effect of NPP's Stack Height to Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandi, Liliana Yetta; Rohman, Budi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of dose calculation for accidents is to analyze the capability of NPP to maintain the safety of public and workers in case an accident occurs on the Plant in a site. This paper calculates the Loss of Coolant Accident in PWR plant. The calculation results shows that no risks of serious radiation exposure are given to the neighboring public even if such a large accident occurred, and the effect of stack height can be predicted by analysis of the calculation results. The whole dose is calculated for some location (100 m, 300 m, 500 m, 700 m, 900 m, 1500 m, and 2000 m) with three difference stack height i.e. 0 m, 40 m and 100 m. The result of the whole dose calculation is under permitted criteria for whole dose : 0.25 Sv and thyroid dose : 3.0 Sv. The calculation of radiation dose in this paper use EEDCDQ code

  15. The time factor in dose-effect relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, H.B.; Grendon, A.; White, M.R.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1976-01-01

    The assumption that carcinogenic risk is proportional to dose fails to consider that probable time of actual cancer incidence. The time lag between exposure and carcinogenic effect for radiation and chemical agents varies as Dosesup(-1/n), with napproximately3. A model is offered explaining that concentration of initially altered cells depends on dose, whereas their chance for development into tumours on their proximity, which varies as Dsup(-1/3). Because of biological variability, n has a range of values. The model implies that tumours resulting from a single exposure should be closely distributed in time, producing a pulse of cases and subsequently being essentially without effect. Testing of the Dsup(-1/3) rule was extended and its model, by further refinement of methods, applied to radiogenic leukaemia risk and to the effect of urethan in inducing lung tumours in mice with and without radiation exposure as a possible cocarcinogen. Radiation did not affect the tumour yield from urethan in mice. Radiogenic leukaemia and lung tumours induced by urethan both occur in proportion to exposure, but the time of their occurrence is limited to a short interval in relation to life span. Similarly, in murine or in human radiogenic leukaemia, leukaemia risk occurs in proportion to exposure, but the time of occurrences is limited to a short interval in relation to life span. In both sets of observations, as well as in other test systems of carcinogenesis, the peak of occurrence or the mean latent period is roughly inversely related to Dsup(-1/3). Applied to lung tumours and leukaemia, the spread of cases about the peak incidence was found to be typically less than a fifth of the life span. Exposure risks do not continue to act over life span. Neoplastic disease risk from carcinogens levels too low to be tested experimentally, theoretically usually lies beyond the life span. The social and economic consequences of a theoretically calculated number of deaths due to those

  16. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  17. Biological effect of Pulsed Dose Rate brachytherapy with stepping sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbergen, Erik F.M. van; Fowler, Jack F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR), for local tissue dose-rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. An earlier publication (Fowler and Mount 1992) had shown that, for dose rates (averaged for the duration of the pulse) up to 3 Gy/h, little change of isoeffect doses from continuous low dose rate (CLDR) are expected, unless larger doses per fraction than 1 Gy are used, and especially if components of very rapid repair are present with half-times of less than about 0.5 hours. However, local and transient dose rates close to stepping sources can be up to several Gy per minute. Methods: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to repair, at a constant exponential rate. The formula developed by Dale for fractionated low-dose-rate radiotherapy was used. A constant overall time of 140 hours and constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose-rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, and T (1(2)) from 4 minutes to 1.5 hours. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (> 1 Gy) at high instantaneous dose-rates if T (1(2)) in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in the tissue, and - when T (1(2)) is short - the instantaneous dose-rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR effect occur when the dose-rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) of repair. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR

  18. Development of internal dose calculation model and the data base updated IDES (Internal Dose Estimation System)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Shozo; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Hiroshi; Iwai, Satoshi.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program named IDES is developed by BASIC language for a personal computer and translated to C language of engineering work station. The IDES carries out internal dose calculations described in ICRP Publication 30 and it installs the program of transformation method which is an empirical method to estimate absorbed fractions of different physiques from ICRP Referenceman. The program consists of three tasks: productions of SAF for Japanese including children, productions of SEE, Specific Effective Energy, and calculation of effective dose equivalents. Each task and corresponding data file appear as a module so as to meet future requirement for revisions of the related data. Usefulness of IDES is discussed by exemplifying the case that 5 age groups of Japanese intake orally Co-60 or Mn-54. (author)

  19. Model for assessing alpha doses for a Reference Japanese Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hisao

    1993-01-01

    In view of the development of the nuclear fuel cycle in this country, it is urgently important to establish dose assessment models and related human and environmental parameters for long-lived radionuclides. In the current program, intake and body content of actinides (Pu, Th, U) and related alpha-emitting nuclides (Ra and daughters) have been studied as well as physiological aspects of Reference Japanese Man as the basic model of man for dosimetry. The ultimate object is to examine applicability of the existing models particularly recommended by the ICRP for workers to members of the public. The result of an interlaboratory intercomparison of 239 Pu + 240 Pu determination including our result was published. Alpha-spectrometric determinations of 226 Ra in bone yielded repesentative bone concentration level in Tokyo and Ra-Ca O.R. (bone-diet) which appear consistent with the literature value for Sapporo and Kyoto by Ohno using a Rn emanation method. Specific effective energies for alpha radiation from 226 Ra and daughters were calculated using the ICRP dosimetric model for bone incorporating masses of source and target organs of Reference Japanese Man. Reference Japanese data including the adult, adolescent, child and infant of both sexes was extensively and intensively studied by Tanaka as part of the activities of the ICRP Task Group on Reference Man Revision. Normal data for the physical measurements, mass and dimension of internal organs and body surfaces and some of the body composition were analysed viewing the nutritional data in the Japanese population. Some of the above works are to be continued. (author)

  20. Addressing model uncertainty in dose-response: The case of chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved in addressing model uncertainty in the analysis of dose-response relationships. A method for addressing model uncertainty is described and applied to characterize the uncertainty in estimates of the carcinogenic potency of chloroform. The approach, which is rooted in Bayesian concepts of subjective probability, uses probability trees and formally-elicited expert judgments to address model uncertainty. It is argued that a similar approach could be used to improve the characterization of model uncertainty in the dose-response relationships for health effects from ionizing radiation

  1. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Barakat, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D.

    2015-10-01

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  2. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  3. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  4. Interpretation of proton relative biological effectiveness using lesion induction, lesion repair, and cellular dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, H.

    2005-01-01

    Phenomenological biophysical models have been successfully used to estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ions. The predictive power of these models is limited because they require measured dose-response data that are not necessarily available for all clinically relevant end points. Furthermore, input parameters often lack mechanistic interpretation. In order to link RBE to more fundamental biological parameters we combine the concepts of two well-established biophysical models, i.e., the phenomenological 'track structure' model and the more mechanistic 'lethal lesion/potentially lethal lesion' (LPL) model. We parametrize a relation between RBE, dose homogeneity in the cell nucleus and induction rates for different lesion types. The macroscopic dose-response relationship is described in the LPL model and the microscopic, subcellular, relationship is determined by the local dose deposition pattern. The formalism provides a framework for a mechanistic interpretation of RBE values

  5. Towards a new dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF)? Some comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, K H

    2017-06-26

    The aim of this article is to offer a broader, mechanism-based, analytical tool than that used by (Rühm et al 2016 Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) for the interpretation of cancer induction relationships. The article explains the limitations of this broader analytical tool and the implications of its use in view of the publications by Leuraud et al 2015 (Lancet Haematol. 2 e276-81) and Richardson et al 2015 (Br. Med. J. 351 h5359). The publication by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79), which is clearly work in progress, reviews the current status of the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) as recommended by the ICRP. It also considers the issues which might influence a reassessment of both the value of the DDREF as well as its application in radiological protection. In this article, the problem is approached from a different perspective and starts by commenting on the limited scientific data used by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) to develop their analysis which ultimately leads them to use a linear-quadratic dose effect relationship to fit solid cancer mortality data from the Japanese life span study of atomic bomb survivors. The approach taken here includes more data on the induction of DNA double strand breaks and, using experimental data taken from the literature, directly relates the breaks to cell killing, chromosomal aberrations and somatic mutations. The relationships are expanded to describe the induction of cancer as arising from radiation induced cytological damage coupled to cell killing since the cancer mutated cell has to survive to express its malignant nature. Equations are derived for the induction of cancer after both acute and chronic exposure to sparsely ionising radiation. The equations are fitted to the induction of cancer in mice to illustrate a dose effect relationship over the total dose range. The 'DDREF' derived from the two equations varies with dose and the DDREF concept is called into question. Although the equation for

  6. Estimation of effective dose equivalente from external irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, T.

    1985-07-01

    A methodology for computing effective dose equivalent, derived from the computer code ALGAM: Monte Carlo Estimation of Internal Dose from Gamma-ray Sources in a Phantom Man, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is presented. The modified code was run for 12 different photon energy levels, from 0,010 Mev to 4.0 Mev, which provides computing the absorved dose, for these energy levels, in each one of the 97 organs of the original code. The code also was run for the principal energy levels used in the calibration of the dosimetric films. The results of the absorved doses per photon obtained for these levels of energy have been transformed in effective dose equivalents. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  8. Effective dose for patient in multimode panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasaki, Shiro; Daibo, Motoji

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, multimode panoramic radiography has had various functions, such as the auto exposure function, auto focus function (auto function), TMJ radiography and tomogram radiography functions. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective dose for patients in each mode of the new multimode panoramic radiography (J. MORITA MFG. CORP. Dental Panorama X-ray Apparatus: Veraview Scope X 600). The absorbed doses in important organs involved in the causation of stochastic effects were measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter using RANDO phantom. The effective doses were calculated using modified tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 1999. The mean field size over skin in typical panoramic and tomographic examinations was about 3% and 0.4% of the total body surface area of 15000 cm 2 . Assuming that the incidence of skin cancer is proportional to the area of skin exposed to ionizing radiation, the tissue weighting factor of skin can be estimated to be about 0.0003 and 0.00004. The estimate in effective dose was lower (5.3 μSv) in the panoramic auto function mode (an average exposure condition of 69 kV 7 mA) than that (6.5-13.8 μSv) in the linear tomogram modes. Since the linear tomogram mode requires a scout view, such as standard panoramic radiography, the dose in the linear tomogram mode becomes higher than other modes. A percentage of gonad doses in effective doses was negligible. (author)

  9. UV-radiation and skin cancer dose effect curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, T.; Dahlback, A.; Larsen, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Norwegian skin cancer data were used in an attempt to arrive at the dose effect relationship for UV-carcinogenesis. The Norwegian population is relatively homogenous with regard to skin type and live in a country where the annual effective UV-dose varies by approximately 40 percent. Four different regions of the country, each with a broadness of 1 o in latitude (approximately 111 km), were selected . The annual effective UV-doses for these regions were calculated assuming normal ozone conditions throughout the year. The incidence of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (mainly basal cell carcinoma) in these regions were considered and compared to the annual UV-doses. For both these types of cancer a quadratic dose effect curve seems to be valid. Depletions of the ozone layer results in larger UV-doses which in turn may yield more skin cancer. The dose effect curves suggest that the incidence rate will increase by an ''amplification factor'' of approximately 2

  10. Current modeling practice may lead to falsely high benchmark dose estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringblom, Joakim; Johanson, Gunnar; Öberg, Mattias

    2014-07-01

    Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling is increasingly used as the preferred approach to define the point-of-departure for health risk assessment of chemicals. As data are inherently variable, there is always a risk to select a model that defines a lower confidence bound of the BMD (BMDL) that, contrary to expected, exceeds the true BMD. The aim of this study was to investigate how often and under what circumstances such anomalies occur under current modeling practice. Continuous data were generated from a realistic dose-effect curve by Monte Carlo simulations using four dose groups and a set of five different dose placement scenarios, group sizes between 5 and 50 animals and coefficients of variations of 5-15%. The BMD calculations were conducted using nested exponential models, as most BMD software use nested approaches. "Non-protective" BMDLs (higher than true BMD) were frequently observed, in some scenarios reaching 80%. The phenomenon was mainly related to the selection of the non-sigmoidal exponential model (Effect=a·e(b)(·dose)). In conclusion, non-sigmoid models should be used with caution as it may underestimate the risk, illustrating that awareness of the model selection process and sound identification of the point-of-departure is vital for health risk assessment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-dose cyclophosphamide administered as daily or single dose enhances the antitumor effects of a therapeutic HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shiwen; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Akpeng, Belinda; Wu, Annie; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R.; Wu, T.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Although therapeutic HPV vaccines are able to elicit systemic HPV-specific immunity, clinical responses have not always correlated with levels of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells in human clinical trials. This observed discrepancy may be attributable to an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in which the CD8+ T cells are recruited. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are cells that can dampen cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell function. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is a systemic chemotherapeutic agent, which can eradicate immune cells, including inhibitory Tregs. The optimal dose and schedule of CTX administration in combination with immunotherapy to eliminate the Treg population without adversely affecting vaccine-induced T-cell responses is unknown. Therefore, we investigated various dosing and administration schedules of CTX in combination with a therapeutic HPV vaccine in a preclinical tumor model. HPV tumor-bearing mice received either a single preconditioning dose or a daily dose of CTX in combination with the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Both single and daily dosing of CTX in combination with vaccine had a synergistic anti-tumor effect as compared to monotherapy alone. The potent antitumor responses were attributed to the reduction in Treg frequency and increased infiltration of HPV16 E7-specific CD8+ T cells, which led to higher ratios of CD8+/Treg and CD8+/CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). There was an observed trend toward decreased vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell frequency with daily dosing of CTX. We recommend a single, preconditioning dose of CTX prior to vaccination due to its efficacy, ease of administration, and reduced cumulative adverse effect on vaccine-induced T cells. PMID:23011589

  12. Cost-effectiveness of two versus three or more doses of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria during pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa: a modelling study of meta-analysis and cost data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Silke; Sicuri, Elisa; Kayentao, Kassoum; van Eijk, Anne Maria; Hill, Jenny; Webster, Jayne; Were, Vincent; Akazili, James; Madanitsa, Mwayi; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Hanson, Kara

    2015-03-01

    In 2012, WHO changed its recommendation for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) from two doses to monthly doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine during the second and third trimesters, but noted the importance of a cost-effectiveness analysis to lend support to the decision of policy makers. We therefore estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness of IPTp with three or more (IPTp-SP3+) versus two doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP2). For this analysis, we used data from a 2013 meta-analysis of seven studies in sub-Saharan Africa. We developed a decision tree model with a lifetime horizon. We analysed the base case from a societal perspective. We did deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses with appropriate parameter ranges and distributions for settings with low, moderate, and high background risk of low birthweight, and did a separate analysis for HIV-negative women. Parameters in the model were obtained for all countries included in the original meta-analysis. We did simulations in hypothetical cohorts of 1000 pregnant women receiving either IPTp-SP3+ or IPTp-SP2. We calculated disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for low birthweight, severe to moderate anaemia, and clinical malaria. We calculated cost estimates from data obtained in observational studies, exit surveys, and from public procurement databases. We give financial and economic costs in constant 2012 US$. The main outcome measure was the incremental cost per DALY averted. The delivery of IPTp-SP3+ to 1000 pregnant women averted 113·4 DALYs at an incremental cost of $825·67 producing an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $7·28 per DALY averted. The results remained robust in the deterministic sensitivity analysis. In the probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the ICER was $7·7 per DALY averted for moderate risk of low birthweight, $19·4 per DALY averted for low risk, and $4·0 per DALY averted for high risk. The ICER for HIV

  13. Establishment and validation of a dose-effect curve for γ-rays by cytogenetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquinero, Joan F.; Caballin, Maria Rosa; Barrios, Leonardo; Ribas, Montserrat; Miro, Rosa; Egozcue, Josep

    1995-01-01

    A dose-effect curve obtained by analysis of dicentric chromosomes after irradiation of peripheral blood samples, from one donor, at 11 different doses of γ-rays is presented. For the elaboration of this curve, more than 18,000 first division metaphases have been analyzed. The results fit very well to the linear-quadratic model. To validate the curve, samples from six individuals (three controls and three occupationally exposed persons) were irradiated at 2 Gy. The results obtained, when compared with the curve, showed that in all cases the 95% confidence interval included the 2 Gy dose, with estimated dose ranges from 1.82 to 2.19 Gy

  14. Dual action of high estradiol doses on MNU-induced prostate neoplasms in a rodent model with high serum testosterone: Protective effect and emergence of unstable epithelial microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Bianca F; de Campos, Silvana G P; Góes, Rejane M; Scarano, Wellerson R; Taboga, Sebastião R; Vilamaior, Patricia S L

    2017-06-01

    Estrogens are critical players in prostate growth and disease. Estrogen therapy has been the standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer for several decades; however, it has currently been replaced by alternative anti-androgenic therapies. Additionally, studies of its action on prostate biology, resulting from an association between carcinogens and estrogen, at different stages of life are scarce or inconclusive about its protective and beneficial role on induced-carcinogenesis. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether estradiol exerts a protective and/or stimulatory role on N-methyl-N-nitrosurea-induced prostate neoplasms. We adopted a rodent model that has been used to study induced-prostate carcinogenesis: the Mongolian gerbil. We investigated the occurrence of neoplasms, karyometric patterns, androgen and estrogen receptors, basal cells, and global methylation status in ventral and dorsolateral prostate tissues. Histopathological analysis showed that estrogen was able to slow tumor growth in both lobes after prolonged treatment. However, a true neoplastic regression was observed only in the dorsolateral prostate. In addition to the protective effects against neoplastic progression, estrogen treatment resulted in an epithelium that exhibited features distinctive from a normal prostate, including increased androgen-insensitive basal cells, high androgens and estrogen receptor positivity, and changes in DNA methylation patterns. Estrogen was able to slow tumor growth, but the epithelium exhibited features distinct from a normal prostatic epithelium, and this unstable microenvironment could trigger lesion recurrence over time. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Modelling the Influence of Shielding on Physical and Biological Organ Doses

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Scannicchio, Domenico

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of "physical" and "biological" dose in different organs were calculated by coupling the FLUKA MC transport code with a geometrical human phantom inserted into a shielding box of variable shape, thickness and material. While the expression "physical dose" refers to the amount of deposited energy per unit mass (in Gy), "biological dose" was modelled with "Complex Lesions" (CL), clustered DNA strand breaks calculated in a previous work based on "event-by-event" track-structure simulations. The yields of complex lesions per cell and per unit dose were calculated for different radiation types and energies, and integrated into a version of FLUKA modified for this purpose, allowing us to estimate the effects of mixed fields. As an initial test simulation, the phantom was inserted into an aluminium parallelepiped and was isotropically irradiated with 500 MeV protons. Dose distributions were calculated for different values of the shielding thickness. The results were found to be organ-dependent. In most ...

  16. Effect of low dose radiation on somatic intrachromosomal recombination in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, A.M.; Cormack, J.; Morley, A.A.; Sykes, P.J.; Bhat, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: High doses of ionising radiation are mutagenic in a wide range of mutation assays. The majority of radiation exposure studies in in vivo mouse mutation assays have been performed at high doses, eg greater than 1 Gy. However, these doses are not relevant to the low doses of ionising radiation that the majority of the population might likely come into contact with. Radiation protection levels tend to be based on a simple linear no-threshold model which suggests that any radiation above zero is potentially harmful. The pKZ1 recombination mutagenesis mouse model has proven to be a sensitive assay for the detection of mutations caused by low doses of chemical agents. In pKZ1 mice, somatic intrachromosomal recombination (SICR) inversion events can be detected in cells using histochemistry for the E. coli LacZ transgene. We exposed pKZ1 mice to a single radiation dose ranging from 0.001 to 2 Gy. A significant increase in SICR was observed in spleen at the two highest doses of 0.1 and 2 Gy and a significant reduction in SICR below the endogenous frequency was observed at the two lowest doses of 0.01 and 0.001 Gy. After exposing a pKZ1 cell line to the same dose range, a similar J curve response was observed with significant increases in SICR observed at the 3 highest doses and a significant decrease below the endogenous frequency at the lowest dose (0.001 Gy). The next experiments will be to determine the dose where the SICR frequency returns to the endogenous level. The important question posed by these results is 'Is a reduction below the endogenous SICR level caused by low doses of ionising radiation anti-mutagenic?' Studies now need to be performed to investigate the effect of low doses of radiation on other mutation end-points, and the mechanism for the reduction in SICR

  17. Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is thought to result from direct stimulation of post-synaptic receptors and inhibition ..... optimal effect could be extensive with the use of nutritional supplements; therefore ... These studies support the theory that higher doses of PSE may result in.

  18. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  19. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  20. Study of total ionization dose effects in electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidhin, T.S.; Bhattacharyya, Anindya; Gour, Aditya; Behera, R.P.; Jayanthi, T.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation effects in electronic devices are a major challenge in the dependable application developments of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems. The main radiation effects are total ionization dose (TID) effects, displacement damage dose (DDD) effects and single event effects (SEE). In this study, we are concentrating on TID effects in electronic devices. The focus of the study is mainly on SRAM based field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) along with that the devices of our interest are voltage regulators, flash memory and optocoupler. The experiments are conducted by exposing the devices to gamma radiation in power off condition and the degradation in the performances are analysed

  1. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Nersissian, Denise Yanikian; Melo, Camila Souza, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-05-15

    The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose magnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation. (author)

  2. A system for environmental protection. Reference dose models for fauna and flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentreath, R.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    Ideas have already been published on how the current problems relating to environmental protection could be explicitly addressed. One of the basic cornerstones of the proposed system is that of the use of reference dose models for fauna and flora, in a manner analogous to those used for the human species. The concept is that, for a number of both aquatic and terrestrial fauna and flora types, 'reference' dose models, and dose per unit (internal and external) exposure tables, could be compiled. These would then be used to draw broad conclusions on the likely effects for such organisms in relation to three broad environment end points of concern: life shortening; impairment of reproductive capacity; and scorable, cytogenetic damage. The level of complexity of the dose models needs to be commensurate with the morphological complexity of the modelled organism, its size, and the data bases which are either available or could be reasonably obtained. The most basic models considered are either solid ellipsoids or spheres, with fixed dimensions. Secondary models contain internal, but relatively simple geometric features representative of those key organs or tissues for which more precise estimates of dose are required. Their level of complexity is also a function of different internal and external sources of radiation, and expected differences in radiosensitivities. Tertiary models -of greater complexity- are only considered to be of value for higher vertebrates. The potential derivation and use of all three sets of models is briefly discussed. (author)

  3. The role of dose inhomogeneity in biological models of dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford-Brown, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The paper focuses on the semi-empirical functions proposed by NAS (1980), ICRP (1977), in which terms for initiation and cell killing appear. The extent is not to produce a new model of carcinogenesis, or to reanalyse existing epidemiological data, but to explore whether an existing extrapolation function (proposed by the NAS) can be shown to have coherent theoretical support, while at the same time reproducing (however reasonably) the features of epidemiological data. Attention is restricted to irradiation by high LET radiations such as alpha particles, which may produce large inhomogeneities in both emission density and dose in cellular populations. Particular interest is directed towards epidemiological studies of uranium miners (Hornung and Meinhardt, 1987) and persons injected with 224 Ra (Spiess and Mays, 1970), although the results of the radium dial studies are included since they are discussed in the NAS report. Both populations are characterized by large uncertainties in dose estimation (mean organ dose) and by highly inhomogeneous patterns of irradiation within a single organ (Arnold and Jee, 1959; Diel, 1978; Singh, Bennettee and Wrenn, 1987; Rowland and Marshall, 1959). (author)

  4. In vivo tumor targeting of gold nanoparticles: effect of particle type and dosing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanakrishnan, Priyaveena; Park, Jaesook; Chatterjee, Deyali; Krishnan, Sunil; Tunnell, James W

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have gained significant interest as nanovectors for combined imaging and photothermal therapy of tumors. Delivered systemically, GNPs preferentially accumulate at the tumor site via the enhanced permeability and retention effect, and when irradiated with near infrared light, produce sufficient heat to treat tumor tissue. The efficacy of this process strongly depends on the targeting ability of the GNPs, which is a function of the particle's geometric properties (eg, size) and dosing strategy (eg, number and amount of injections). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of GNP type and dosing strategy on in vivo tumor targeting. Specifically, we investigated the in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of pegylated gold nanoshells (GNSs) and gold nanorods (GNRs) for single and multiple dosing. We used Swiss nu/nu mice with a subcutaneous tumor xenograft model that received intravenous administration for a single and multiple doses of GNS and GNR. We performed neutron activation analysis to quantify the gold present in the tumor and liver. We performed histology to determine if there was acute toxicity as a result of multiple dosing. Neutron activation analysis results showed that the smaller GNRs accumulated in higher concentrations in the tumor compared to the larger GNSs. We observed a significant increase in GNS and GNR accumulation in the liver for higher doses. However, multiple doses increased targeting efficiency with minimal effect beyond three doses of GNPs. These results suggest a significant effect of particle type and multiple doses on increasing particle accumulation and on tumor targeting ability.

  5. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  6. Effects of target-controlled infusion of high-dose naloxone on pain and hyperalgesia in a human thermal injury model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Anders D; Jensen, Elisabeth K; Taylor, Bradley K

    2016-01-01

    /kg, 4 mg/mL) or placebo (normal saline) intravenous. The primary outcome was SHA assessed by weighted-pin instrument (128 mN) 0, 1, 2, and 165 to 169 hours after the thermal injury (day 1-4). The secondary outcomes were pin-prick pain thresholds assessed by weighted-pin instrument (8-512 mN) at primary......Mu-opioid-receptor antagonists have been extensively studied in experimental research as pharmacological tools uncovering mechanisms of pain modulation by the endogenous opioid system. In rodents, administration of high doses of mu-opioid-receptor antagonists after the resolution of an inflammatory...... injury has demonstrated reinstatement of nociceptive hypersensitivity indicating unmasking of latent sensitization. In a recent human study, pain hypersensitivity assessed as secondary hyperalgesia area (SHA), was reinstated 7 days after a mild thermal injury, in 4 out of 12 subjects after a naloxone...

  7. An effective dose of ketamine for eliminating pain during injection of propofol: a dose response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Wang, Q; Yu, Y Y; Wang, W S

    2013-09-01

    Ketamine can completely eliminate pain associated with propofol injection. However, the effective dose of ketamine to eliminate propofol injection pain has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effective dose of ketamine needed to eliminate pain in 50% and 95% of patients (ED50 and ED95, respectively) during propofol injections. This study was conducted in a double-blinded fashion and included 50 patients scheduled for elective gynecological laparoscopy under general anesthesia. The initial dose of ketamine used in the first patient was 0.25mg/kg. The dosing modifications were in increments or decrements of 0.025 mg/kg. Ketamine was administered 15 seconds before injecting propofol (2.5mg/kg), which was injected at a rate of 1mL/s. Patients were asked to rate their pain during propofol injection every 5s econds using a 0-3 pain scale. The highest pain score was recorded. The ED50, ED95 and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined by probit analyses. The dose of ketamine ranged from 0.175 to 0.275 mg/kg. The ED50 and ED95 of ketamine for eliminating pain during propofol injection were 0.227 mg/kg and 0.283 mg/kg, respectively (95%CI: 0.211-0.243 mg/kg and 0.26-0.364 mg/kg, respectively). Ketamine at an approximate dose of 0.3mg/kg was effective in eliminating pain during propofol injection. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Lateral topography for reducing effective dose in low-dose chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dong-Ho; Lim, Daekeon; Hwang, Wi-Sub; Park, Seong-Hoon; Jeong, Ok-man; Kang, Kyung Wook; Kang, Hohyung

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess radiation exposure during low-dose chest CT by using lateral topography and to compare the lateral topographic findings with findings obtained with anteroposterior topography alone and anteroposterior and lateral topography combined. From November 2011 to February 2012, 210 male subjects were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, and height of the men were recorded. All subjects were placed into one of three subgroups based on the type of topographic image obtained: anteroposterior topography, lateral topography, and both anteroposterior and lateral topography. Imaging was performed with a 128-MDCT scanner. CT, except for topography, was the same for all subjects. A radiologist analyzed each image, recorded scan length, checked for any insufficiencies in the FOV, and calculated the effective radiation dose. One-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were used to compare the effective radiation exposure and scan length between groups. The mean scan length in the anteroposterior topography group was significantly greater than that of the lateral topography group and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (p topography group (0.735 ± 0.033 mSv) was significantly lower than that for the anteroposterior topography group (0.763 ± 0.038 mSv) and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (0.773 ± 0.038) (p < 0.001). Lateral topographic low-dose CT was associated with a lower effective radiation dose and scan length than either anteroposterior topographic low-dose chest CT or low-dose chest CT with both anteroposterior and lateral topograms.

  9. Alcohol and cirrhosis: dose--response or threshold effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Grønbaek, Morten; Tolstrup, Janne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: General population studies have shown a strong association between alcohol intake and death from alcoholic cirrhosis, but whether this is a dose-response or a threshold effect remains unknown, and the relation among alcohol misusers has not been studied. METHODS: A cohort of 6152...... alcohol misusing men and women aged 15-83 were interviewed about drinking pattern and social issues and followed for 84,257 person-years. Outcome was alcoholic cirrhosis mortality. Data was analyzed by means of Cox-regression models. RESULTS: In this large prospective cohort study of alcohol misusers...... there was a 27 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in men and a 35 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in women compared to the Danish population. Number of drinks per day was not significantly associated with death from alcoholic cirrhosis, since there was no additional risk of death...

  10. An efficient dose-compensation method for proximity effect correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Han Weihua; Yang Xiang; Zhang Yang; Yang Fuhua; Zhang Renping

    2010-01-01

    A novel simple dose-compensation method is developed for proximity effect correction in electron-beam lithography. The sizes of exposed patterns depend on dose factors while other exposure parameters (including accelerate voltage, resist thickness, exposing step size, substrate material, and so on) remain constant. This method is based on two reasonable assumptions in the evaluation of the compensated dose factor: one is that the relation between dose factors and circle-diameters is linear in the range under consideration; the other is that the compensated dose factor is only affected by the nearest neighbors for simplicity. Four-layer-hexagon photonic crystal structures were fabricated as test patterns to demonstrate this method. Compared to the uncorrected structures, the homogeneity of the corrected hole-size in photonic crystal structures was clearly improved. (semiconductor technology)

  11. Behaviour of polymers in radioactive environments: Effects of dose speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docters, A.S.; Gonzalez, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The scope of this research is to determine the degradation of mechanical properties of cable insulating PVC after irradiation in air at a Cobalt-60 (γ-ray) facility. Amongst the mechanical properties elongation at break and tensile strength were chosen as they are the most sensible to radiation. The samples were exposed to combined radiation-thermal environments with constant airflow in order to obtain accelerated aging data a doses up to 50-300 kGy, with dose rates ranging between 1.3 and 5.6 kGy/h at temperatures from 60 degrees C to 100 degrees C. At lower dose rates the degradation of mechanical properties increased after the same total dose: elongation at break decreases sharply while tensile strength decreases to a less extent, showing dose rate effects. A strong synergy between irradiation and thermal processes was also observed. (author)

  12. Generation of Composite Dose and Biological Effective Dose (BED) Over Multiple Treatment Modalities and Multistage Planning Using Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, T-C; Feygelman, Vladimir; Stevens, Craig; Forster, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are no commercially available tools to generate composite plans across different treatment modalities and/or different planning image sets. Without a composite plan, it may be difficult to perform a meaningful dosimetric evaluation of the overall treatment course. In this paper, we introduce a method to generate composite biological effective dose (BED) plans over multiple radiotherapy treatment modalities and/or multistage plans, using deformable image registration. Two cases were used to demonstrate the method. Case I was prostate cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a permanent seed implant. Case II involved lung cancer treated with two treatment plans generated on two separate computed tomography image sets. Thin-plate spline or optical flow methods were used as appropriate to generate deformation matrices. The deformation matrices were then applied to the dose matrices and the resulting physical doses were converted to BED and added to yield the composite plan. Cell proliferation and sublethal repair were considered in the BED calculations. The difference in BED between normal tissues and tumor volumes was accounted for by using different BED models, α/β values, and cell potential doubling times. The method to generate composite BED plans presented in this paper provides information not available with the traditional simple dose summation or physical dose summation. With the understanding of limitations and uncertainties of the algorithms involved, it may be valuable for the overall treatment plan evaluation.

  13. MLSOIL and DFSOIL - computer codes to estimate effective ground surface concentrations for dose computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoreen, A.L.; Kocher, D.C.; Killough, G.G.; Miller, C.W.

    1984-11-01

    This report is a user's manual for MLSOIL (Multiple Layer SOIL model) and DFSOIL (Dose Factors for MLSOIL) and a documentation of the computational methods used in those two computer codes. MLSOIL calculates an effective ground surface concentration to be used in computations of external doses. This effective ground surface concentration is equal to (the computed dose in air from the concentration in the soil layers)/(the dose factor for computing dose in air from a plane). MLSOIL implements a five compartment linear-transfer model to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in the soil following deposition on the ground surface from the atmosphere. The model considers leaching through the soil as well as radioactive decay and buildup. The element-specific transfer coefficients used in this model are a function of the k/sub d/ and environmental parameters. DFSOIL calculates the dose in air per unit concentration at 1 m above the ground from each of the five soil layers used in MLSOIL and the dose per unit concentration from an infinite plane source. MLSOIL and DFSOIL have been written to be part of the Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) which is designed for assessments of the health effects of airborne releases of radionuclides. 31 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  14. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  15. Effective doses to family members of patients treated with radioiodine 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocovska, Marina Zdravevska; Ristevska, Svetlana Micevska; Nikolovski, Sasho; Jokic, Vesna Spasic

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose to family members of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine 131; also to compare the results with dose constraints proposed by International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Material and methods: for estimation of effective doses at sixty family members of thirty thyroid cancer and thirty hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine 131, the thermoluminescent dosimeters, Model TLD 100, were used. Thyroid cancer patients were hospitalized for three days, while hyperthyroid patients were treated on out-patient basis. The family members wore thermoluminescent dosimeter in front of the torso for seven days. Results: The radiation doses to family members of thyroid cancer patients were well below recommended dose constraint of 1 mSv. The mean value of effective dose was 0.21 mSv (min 0.02 - max 0.51 mSv). Effective doses, higher than 1 mSv, were detected at 11 family members of hyperthyroid patients.. The mean value of effective dose at family members of hyperthyroid patients was 0.87 mSv (min 0.12 - max 6.79) Conclusion: After three days of hospitalization and detailed given oral and written instruction, thyroid carcinoma patients maintain not to exceed the proposed dose limits. Hyperthyroid patients present a greater radiation hazard than thyroid carcinoma patients. The estimated effective doses were higher than the effective doses at family members of thyroid carcinoma patients. These findings may be considered when establishing new national guidelines concerning radiation protection and release of patients after a treatment with radioiodine therapy.(Author)

  16. Estimates of effective dose in adult CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mustafa Awad Elhaj.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of study was to estimate effective dose (E) in adult CT examinations for Toshiba X64 slice using CT. Exp version 2.5 software in Sudan. Using of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. lack of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. In order to achieve these objectives, data of CT-scanner has been collected from three hospitals ( ANH, ZSH and MMH). Data collected included equipment information and scan parameters for individual patients, who were used to asses. 300 adult patients underwent head, chest, abdomen-pelvis and peivis CT examinations. The CT1_w , CTD1_vol, DLP, patient effective dos and organ doses were estimated, using CT exposure parameters and CT Exp version 2.5 software. A large variation of mean effective dose and organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scan length. The mean effective dose in this study in the Brain, PNS, Chest, pulmonary, Abdomen-pelvis, Pelvis, KUB and CTU were 3.2 mSv, 2.6 mSv, 18.9 mSv 17.6 mSv 27.1 mSv, 11.2 mSv, 9.6 mSv and 23.7 mSv respectively, and organ equivalent, doses presented in this study in this study for the eye lens (for head), lungs and thymus ( for chest) , liver, kidney and small intest ( for abdomen t-pelvis), bladder, uterus and gonads ( for pelvis), were 62.9 mSv, 39.5 mSv, 34.1 mSv, 53.9 mSv, 52.6 mSv, 58.1 mSv, 37 mSv, and 34.6 mSv, respectively. These values were mostly comparable to and slightly higher than the values of effective doses reported from similar studies the United Kingdom, Tanzania, Australia, Canada and Sudan. It was concluded that patient effective dose and organ doses could be substantially minimized through careful selection of scanning parameters based on clinical indications of study, patient size, and body

  17. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  18. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  19. Dose-dependent effects of atorvastatin on myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbarash O

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Olga Barbarash, Olga Gruzdeva, Evgenya Uchasova, Ekaterina Belik, Yulia Dyleva, Victoria KaretnikovaFederal State Budgetary Institution, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, the Russian Federation Background: Dyslipidemia is a key factor determining the development of both myocardial infarction (MI and its subsequent complications. Dyslipidemia is associated with endothelial dysfunction, activation of inflammation, thrombogenesis, and formation of insulin resistance. Statin therapy is thought to be effective for primary and secondary prevention of complications associated with atherosclerosis.Methods: This study examined 210 patients with Segment elevated MI (ST elevated MI who were treated with atorvastatin from the first 24 hours after MI. Group 1 (n=110 were given atorvastatin 20 mg/day. Group 2 (n=100 were given atorvastatin 40 mg/day. At days 1 and 12 after MI onset, insulin resistance levels determined by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, lipid profiles, and serum glucose, insulin, adipokine, and ghrelin levels were measured.Results: Free fatty acid levels showed a sharp increase during the acute phase of MI. Treatment with atorvastatin 20 mg/day, and especially with 40 mg/day, resulted in a decrease in free fatty acid levels. The positive effect of low-dose atorvastatin (20 mg/day is normalization of the adipokine status. Administration of atorvastatin 20 mg/day was accompanied with a statistically significant reduction in glucose levels (by 14% and C-peptide levels (by 38%, and a decrease in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index on day 12.Conclusion: Determination of atorvastatin dose and its use during the in-hospital period and subsequent periods should take into account changes in biochemical markers of insulin resistance and adipokine status in patients with MI.Keywords: myocardial infarction, statin, insulin resistance, adipokines

  20. Dose response curves for effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The linear dose-response model used by international committees to assess the genetic and carcinogenic hazards of low-level radiation appears to be the most reasonable interpretation of the available scientific data that are relevant to this topic. There are, of course, reasons to believe that this model may overestimate radiation hazards in certain instances, a fact acknowledged in recent reports of these committees. The linear model is now also being utilized to estimate the potential carcinogenic hazards of other agents such as asbestos and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This model implies that there is no safe dose for any of these agents and that potential health hazards will increase in direct proportion to total accumulated dose. The practical implication is the recommendation that all exposures should be kept 'as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account'. (auth)

  1. Validation and uncertainty analysis of a pre-treatment 2D dose prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Jose A.; Wolfs, Cecile J. A.; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M. J. J. G.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Independent verification of complex treatment delivery with megavolt photon beam radiotherapy (RT) has been effectively used to detect and prevent errors. This work presents the validation and uncertainty analysis of a model that predicts 2D portal dose images (PDIs) without a patient or phantom in the beam. The prediction model is based on an exponential point dose model with separable primary and secondary photon fluence components. The model includes a scatter kernel, off-axis ratio map, transmission values and penumbra kernels for beam-delimiting components. These parameters were derived through a model fitting procedure supplied with point dose and dose profile measurements of radiation fields. The model was validated against a treatment planning system (TPS; Eclipse) and radiochromic film measurements for complex clinical scenarios, including volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Confidence limits on fitted model parameters were calculated based on simulated measurements. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of the parameter uncertainties on the model output. For the maximum uncertainty, the maximum deviating measurement sets were propagated through the fitting procedure and the model. The overall uncertainty was assessed using all simulated measurements. The validation of the prediction model against the TPS and the film showed a good agreement, with on average 90.8% and 90.5% of pixels passing a (2%,2 mm) global gamma analysis respectively, with a low dose threshold of 10%. The maximum and overall uncertainty of the model is dependent on the type of clinical plan used as input. The results can be used to study the robustness of the model. A model for predicting accurate 2D pre-treatment PDIs in complex RT scenarios can be used clinically and its uncertainties can be taken into account.

  2. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Angel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Denham, James W. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  3. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Martin A.; Foo, Kerwyn; Haworth, Annette; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Kennedy, Angel; Joseph, David J.; Denham, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  4. Pediatric Obesity: Pharmacokinetic Alterations and Effects on Antimicrobial Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Stephanie; Bradley, John; Nguyen, William Huy; Tran, Tri; Ny, Pamela; La, Kirsten; Vivian, Eva; Le, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Limited data exist for appropriate drug dosing in obese children. This comprehensive review summarizes pharmacokinetic (PK) alterations that occur with age and obesity, and these effects on antimicrobial dosing. A thorough comparison of different measures of body weight and specific antimicrobial agents including cefazolin, cefepime, ceftazidime, daptomycin, doripenem, gentamicin, linezolid, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, tobramycin, vancomycin, and voriconazole is presented. PubMed (1966-July 2015) and Cochrane Library searches were performed using these key terms: children, pharmacokinetic, obesity, overweight, body mass index, ideal body weight, lean body weight, body composition, and specific antimicrobial drugs. PK studies in obese children and, if necessary, data from adult studies were summarized. Knowledge of PK alterations stemming from physiologic changes that occur with age from the neonate to adolescent, as well as those that result from increased body fat, become an essential first step toward optimizing drug dosing in obese children. Excessive amounts of adipose tissue contribute significantly to body size, total body water content, and organ size and function that may modify drug distribution and clearance. PK studies that evaluated antimicrobial dosing primarily used total (or actual) body weight (TBW) for loading doses and TBW or adjusted body weight for maintenance doses, depending on the drugs' properties and dosing units. PK studies in obese children are imperative to elucidate drug distribution, clearance, and, consequently, the dose required for effective therapy in these children. Future studies should evaluate the effects of both age and obesity on drug dosing because the incidence of obesity is increasing in pediatric patients. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  5. Low dose radiation enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation on human glioma cell U251

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chang; Wang Guanjun; Tan Yehui; Jiang Hongyu; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect on the growth of human glioma cell U251 induced by low dose irradiation and low dose irradiation combined with large dose irradiation. Methods: Human glioma cell line U251 and nude mice carried with human glioma were used. The tumor cells and the mice were treated with low dose, high dose, and low dose combined high dose radiation. Cells growth curve, MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells; and the tumor inhibition rate was used to assess the growth of tumor in vivo. Results: After low dose irradiation, there was no difference between experimental group and control group in cell count, MTT and flow cytometry. Single high dose group and low dose combined high dose group both show significantly the suppressing effect on tumor cells, the apoptosis increased and there was cell cycle blocked in G 2 period, but there was no difference between two groups. In vivo apparent anti-tumor effect in high dose radiation group and the combining group was observed, and that was more significant in the combining group; the prior low dose radiation alleviated the injury of hematological system. There was no difference between single low dose radiation group and control. Conclusions: There is no significant effect on human glioma cell induced by low