WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling diffractive optics

  1. Diffraction coherence in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  2. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  3. Konference Diffractive Optics 2007 Barcelona

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pala, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2008), s. 63-64 ISSN 0447-6441 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP102/06/P448 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : diffraction * holographic optical elements * laser beams Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers

  4. Optics of diffractive multifocal IOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatahi B

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available The diffractive multifocal IOL provides simultaneous bifocal imaging by utilizing both diffractive and refractive optics. In both distant and near vision, there is a clear highly focused image on the retina. The second image is highly defocused, providing only faint background illumination. A small amount of the light goes to the higher orders of diffraction which are not perceptible by eyes. The bright spot produced by a zone plate is so intense that the plate acts much like a converging lens. There are also fainter images corresponding to focal lengths f/3, f/5, f/7, ...

  5. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  6. Polycapillary optics for powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huapeng; MacDonald, Carolyn A.; Gibson, Walter M.; Chik, John; Parsegian, Adrian; Ponomarev, Igor Y.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a low power system using Polycapillary collimating and focusing optics that were designed to collect Cu Ka radiation from an Oxford Ultra-Bright micro-focus source for X-ray powder diffraction measurements. The characterizations of the source and polycapillary optics are presented. A collimator with two apertures was used to block high energy X-rays. An optic alignment system was designed to optimize coupling between the optics and the source, taking into account the maximum radiation direction from the source. Several powder sample data sets were collected with this system and their qualities are compared with data sets from the same samples taken with an Enraf-Nonius FR590 sealed-tube source system. Discussion is also presented for further improving the performance of this low power system.

  7. Flatland optics. III. Achromatic diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, A W; Pe'er, A; Wang, D; Friesem, A A

    2001-09-01

    In the previous two sections of "Flatland optics" [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 1755 (2000); 18, 1056 (2001)] we described the basic principles of two-dimensional (2D) optics and showed that a wavelength lambda in three-dimensional (3D) space (x, y, z) may appear in Flatland (x, z) as a wave with another wavelength Lambda=lambda/cos alpha. The tilt angle alpha can be modified by a 3D-Spaceland individual, who then is able to influence the 2D optics in a way that must appear to be magical to 2D-Flatland individuals-in the spirit of E. A. Abbott's science fiction story of 1884 [Flatland, a Romance of Many Dimensions, 6th ed. (Dover, New York, 1952)]. Here we show how the light from a white source can be perceived in Flatland as perfectly monochromatic, so diffraction with white light will be free of color blurring and the contrast of interference fringes can be 100%. The basic considerations for perfectly achromatic diffraction are presented, along with experimental illustration of Talbot self-imaging performed with broadband illumination.

  8. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  9. Diffractive optics: design, fabrication, and test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Shea, Donald C

    2004-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the broad range of materials that were discussed in a series of short courses presented at Georgia Tech on the design, fabrication, and testing of diffractive optical elements (DOEs...

  10. Diffraction method for recording optical wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukachev, S. E.; Kozhevatov, I. E.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a method for recording an optical wave field that is based on diffraction of the optical wave field by two screens that are complementary to each other. We show that the new method ensures the measurement of the phase of the wave field with a high accuracy and spatial resolution. An optical scheme for implementing the diffraction method and an algorithm for reconstructing the phase of the wave field from the measurement data are developed. We perform a computer simulation of the experiment on recording the optical wave field based on the method proposed.

  11. Optical electromagnetic vector-field modeling for the accurate analysis of finite diffractive structures of high complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dridi, Kim; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    An electromagnetic vector-field modle for design of optical components based on the finite-difference-time-domain method and radiation integrals in presented. Its ability to predict the optical electromagnetic dynamics in structures with complex material distribution is demonstrated. Theoretical...... and numerical investigations of finite-length surface-relief structures embedded in polymer dielectric waveguiding materials are presented. The importance of several geometric parameter dependencies is indicated as far-field power distributions are rearranged between diffraction orders. The influences...

  12. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  13. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  14. Bragg diffraction optics in neutron diffractometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav; Furusaka, M.; Wagner, Vladimír; Choi, YN.; Moon, MK.; Em, V.; Lee, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 529, č. 1 (2004), s. 138-147 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0891; GA AV ČR IAA1048003; GA MŠk OC P7.003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : neuron diffracton * Bragg diffraction optics * Bent perfect crystal Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.349, year: 2004

  15. Bragg diffraction optics in neutron diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikula, Pavol; Vrana, Miroslav; Furusaka, Michihiro; Wagner, Volker; Choi, Yong-Nam; Moon, Myung-Kook; Em, Vjaceslav; Lee, Chang-Hee

    2004-01-01

    A review of recent practical applications of Bragg diffraction optics in neutron diffractometry is presented. Besides examples of a direct comparison of the flat Ge-mosaic and a bent perfect Si crystals for neutron monochromatization, the results of new tests of dispersive monochromator, multiple reflection monochromator and curved TOF analyzer for high- and ultra-high resolution studies as received within a wide collaboration are introduced

  16. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect

  17. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  18. Diffractive optical elements written by photodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baal-Zedaka, I.; Hava, S.; Mirchin, N.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Azoulay, J.; Peled, A

    2003-03-15

    In this work direct laser writing of diffractive optical elements (DOE) by photodeposition (PD) of amorphous selenium (a-Se) from colloid solutions has been investigated. We used a computer controlled laser scanner for patterning thin film micro-profiles creating thus planar optical elements by direct beam writing on surfaces immersed in a liquid phase PD cell. The laser employed was an argon ion laser at 488 nm wavelength, with powers up to 55 mW, for writing typically 25-250 {mu}m wide lines of 200 nm thickness at rates of about 150 {mu}m/s. Various elements made of photodeposited thin films on polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) substrates were produced for prototyping microlenses, linear grating arrays, cylindrical and circular profiled DOE patterns.

  19. Amplitude image processing by diffractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J; Canales, V F

    2016-02-22

    In contrast to the standard digital image processing, which operates over the detected image intensity, we propose to perform amplitude image processing. Amplitude processing, like low pass or high pass filtering, is carried out using diffractive optics elements (DOE) since it allows to operate over the field complex amplitude before it has been detected. We show the procedure for designing the DOE that corresponds to each operation. Furthermore, we accomplish an analysis of amplitude image processing performances. In particular, a DOE Laplacian filter is applied to simulated astronomical images for detecting two stars one Airy ring apart. We also check by numerical simulations that the use of a Laplacian amplitude filter produces less noisy images than the standard digital image processing.

  20. An amplitude and phase hybrid modulation Fresnel diffractive optical element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Cheng, Jiangao; Wang, Mengyu; Jin, Xueying; Wang, Keyi

    2018-04-01

    An Amplitude and Phase Hybrid Modulation Fresnel Diffractive Optical Element (APHMFDOE) is proposed here. We have studied the theory of APHMFDOE and simulated the focusing properties of it along the optical axis, which show that the focus can be blazed to other positions with changing the quadratic phase factor. Moreover, we design a Composite Fresnel Diffraction Optical Element (CFDOE) based on the characteristics of APHMFDOE. It greatly increases the outermost zone width without changing the F-number, which brings a lot of benefits to the design and processing of diffraction device. More importantly, the diffraction efficiency of the CFDOE is almost unchanged compared with AFZP at the same focus.

  1. A pseudospectral collocation time-domain method for diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, P.G.; Hesthaven, J.S.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2000-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method for the analysis of diffractive optical elements. The method computes a direct time-domain solution of Maxwell's equations and is applied to solving wave propagation in 2D diffractive optical elements. (C) 2000 IMACS. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights...

  2. Bragg diffraction optics in neutron diffractometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Kulda, Jiří; Lukáš, Petr; Ono, M.; Šaroun, Jan; Vrána, Miroslav; Wagner, Vladimír

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 283, - (2000), s. 289-294 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : neutron diffraction * bragg diffraction * focusing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.893, year: 2000

  3. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  4. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2015-11-23

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  5. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornung, Thorsten; Nitz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements

  6. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-09-16

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  7. Diffractive-refractive optics: X-ray collimator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Oberta, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 7 (2008), 073105/1-073105/4 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : x-ray collimator * diffractive-refractive optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.738, year: 2008

  8. Diffractive Optics for Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunkowski, A; Burmeister, O; Clausnitzer, T; Kley, E-B; Tuennermann, A; Danzmann, K; Schnabel, R

    2006-01-01

    All-reflective interferometry based on nano-structured diffraction gratings offers new possibilities for gravitational wave detection. We investigate an all-reflective Fabry-Perot interferometer concept in 2nd order Littrow mount. The input-output relations for such a resonator are derived treating the grating coupler by means of a scattering matrix formalism. A low loss dielectric reflection grating has been designed and manufactured to test the properties of such a grating cavity

  9. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-02

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc.

  10. ADVANTAGES OF DIFFRACTIVE OPTICAL ELEMENTS APPLICATION IN SIMPLE OPTICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Zoric

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the influence of diffractive optical elements on the optical aberrations. The correction of optical aberrations was investigated in the simple optical systems with one and two lenses (singlet and doublet. The advantages of diffractive optical elements are their ability to generate arbitrary complex wave fronts from a piece of optical material that is essentially flat. The optical systems consisting of the standard surfaces were designed and optimized by using the same starting points. Further, the diffractive and aspheric surfaces were introduced into the developed systems. The resulting hybrid systems were optimized. To compare the complicity of the development of narrow field systems and wide field optical systems, the optimization has been done separately for these two types of the instruments. The optical systems were designed by using special Optical Design Software. Тhe characteristics of designed diffractive surfaces were controlled in Software DIFSYS 2.30. Due to the application of diffractive optical elements the longitudinal chromatic aberration was 5 times reduced for the narrow field systems. The absolute value of Seidel coefficient related to the spherical aberration was reduced in the range of 0.03. Considering that diffractive optical elements have the known disadvantages, like possible parasitic diffraction orders and probable decrease of the transmission, we also developed and analyzed the optical systems with combined aspheric and diffractive surfaces. A combination of the aspheric and diffractive surfaces in the optical disk system of the disk reading lens, gave cutting down of the longitudinal color aberrations almost 15 times on-axis, comparing to the lens consisting of the aspherical and standard surfaces. All of the designed diffractive optical elements possess the parameters within the fabrication limits.

  11. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found ...

  12. Multiphoton multifocal microscopy exploiting a diffractive optical element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacconi, L.; Froner, E.; Antolini, R.; Taghizadeh, M. R.; Choudhury, A.; Pavone, F. S.

    2003-10-01

    Multiphoton multifocal microscopy (MMM) usually has been achieved through a combination of galvo scanners with microlens arrays, with rotating disks of microlens arrays, and cascaded beam splitters with asynchronous rastering of scanning mirrors. Here we describe the achievement of a neat and compact MMM by use of a high-diffraction-efficiency diffractive-optic element that generates a multiple-spot grid of uniform intensity to achieve higher fidelity in imaging of live cells at adequate speeds.

  13. Bragg diffraction optics in neutron diffractometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Kulda, Jiří; Lukáš, Petr; Ono, M.; Šaroun, Jan; Vrána, Miroslav; Wagner, V.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 283, - (2000), s. 289-294 ISSN 0921-4526. [NOP99 Workshop "Neutron Optics in the Next Millenium 99". Villigen, 25.11.1999-27.11.1999] R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/97/K038; GA AV ČR IAA1048003; GA AV ČR KSK1048601 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.893, year: 2000

  14. Generation of arbitrary complex quasi-non-diffracting optical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ambriz, Antonio; Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Petrov, Dmitri; Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C; Torner, Lluis

    2013-09-23

    Due to their unique ability to maintain an intensity distribution upon propagation, non-diffracting light fields are used extensively in various areas of science, including optical tweezers, nonlinear optics and quantum optics, in applications where complex transverse field distributions are required. However, the number and type of rigorously non-diffracting beams is severely limited because their symmetry is dictated by one of the coordinate system where the Helmholtz equation governing beam propagation is separable. Here, we demonstrate a powerful technique that allows the generation of a rich variety of quasi-non-diffracting optical beams featuring nearly arbitrary intensity distributions in the transverse plane. These can be readily engineered via modifications of the angular spectrum of the beam in order to meet the requirements of particular applications. Such beams are not rigorously non-diffracting but they maintain their shape over large distances, which may be tuned by varying the width of the angular spectrum. We report the generation of unique spiral patterns and patterns involving arbitrary combinations of truncated harmonic, Bessel, Mathieu, or parabolic beams occupying different spatial domains. Optical trapping experiments illustrate the opto-mechanical properties of such beams.

  15. Diffractive-refractive optics: X-ray splitter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2010), s. 129-131 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412; GA AV ČR IAA100100716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : x-ray splitter * diffractive-refractive optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2010

  16. Photodeposited diffractive optical elements of computer generated masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirchin, N.; Peled, A.; Baal-Zedaka, I.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Verdyan, A.; Azoulay, J.

    2005-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) were synthesized on plastic substrates using the photodeposition (PD) technique by depositing amorphous selenium (a-Se) films with argon lasers and UV spectra light. The thin films were deposited typically onto polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates at room temperature. Scanned beam and contact mask modes were employed using computer-designed DOE lenses. Optical and electron micrographs characterize the surface details. The films were typically 200 nm thick

  17. Photodeposited diffractive optical elements of computer generated masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirchin, N. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel)]. E-mail: mirchin@hait.ac.il; Peled, A. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Baal-Zedaka, I. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Margolin, R. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Zagon, M. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Lapsker, I. [Physics Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Verdyan, A. [Physics Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Physics Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel)

    2005-07-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) were synthesized on plastic substrates using the photodeposition (PD) technique by depositing amorphous selenium (a-Se) films with argon lasers and UV spectra light. The thin films were deposited typically onto polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates at room temperature. Scanned beam and contact mask modes were employed using computer-designed DOE lenses. Optical and electron micrographs characterize the surface details. The films were typically 200 nm thick.

  18. Koch fractals in physical optics and their Fraunhofer diffraction patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, P.; Šmíd, Petr; Vašková, I.; Hrabovský, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 2 (2010), s. 206-2134 ISSN 0030-4026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Koch fractal s * Fraunhofer diffraction patterns Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.454, year: 2010

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  20. Teaching Diffraction with Hands-On Optical Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic…

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  2. Large Aperture Multiplexed Diffractive Lidar Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallison, Richard D.; Schwemmer, Geary K. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We have delivered only 2 or 3 UV Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) thus far and have fallen short of the intended goal in size and in dual wavelength function. Looking back, it has been fortuitous that we even made anything work in the UV region. It was our good fortune to discover that the material we work with daily was adequate for use at 355 nm, if well rinsed during processing. If we had stuck to our original plan of etching in small pieces of fused silica, we would still be trying to make the first small section in our ion mill, which is not yet operational. The original plan was far too ambitious and would take another 2 years to complete beginning where we left off this time. In order to make a HOE for the IR as well as the UV we will likely have to learn to sensitize some film to the 1064 line and we have obtained sensitizer that is reported to work in that region already. That work would also take an additional year to complete.

  3. Refractive/diffractive optics: promise for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, John L.

    1995-08-01

    Today's optical designers face new corporate cultures whose priorities include product performance as only one criteria for success. Designers must also address cost constraints, new and unfamiliar skill requirements, overhead containment, maintenance of profit margins, and staff reductions. Old skills must be applied in new ways. New diamond-turning machine technology has made it possible to construct injection molding tools which combine refraction and diffraction into a single lens element. New polymer materials render the designs to be technically and commercially feasible. The significance of combining refraction and diffraction in a single lens element should not be underestimated, as it will expand the capability of polymer optics beyond its refractive limitations. Use of this technology can restructure domestic optical manufacturing.

  4. Iterative deconvolution technique for measurements of diffraction-limited images on optical microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenlong; Chang, Ming; Chen, Po-Cheng; Luo, Wun-Mao

    2014-12-12

    Diffraction limit is usually a thorny problem in an optical inspection system. In this investigation, a model-based deconvolution technique was developed to recover diffraction-limited images, where images with sizes smaller than the diffraction limit could be recognized. Experiments were carried out with a traditional microscope at 200× magnification coupled with a halogen light source for a series of line width samples. The point spread function of the imaging optics was first obtained from an estimated model and then combined with a nonlinear deconvolution algorithm to calculate the full width at half maximum and reconstruct the line widths. Experimental results indicate that a measurement error below one pixel size of the measurement system is achievable. Accordingly, the target of nanoscale line width inspection based on a low cost and real-time image processing technique can be fulfilled, which greatly increases the ability of nanoscaling on optical microscopes.

  5. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  6. Feasibility of optical diffraction radiation for a non-invasive low-emittance beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Urakawa, J; Kubo, K; Kuroda, S; Terunuma, N; Kuriki, M; Okugi, T; Naito, T; Araki, S; Potylitsin, A P; Naumenko, G A; Karataev, P; Potylitsyna, N A; Vnukov, I; Hirose, T; Hamatsu, R; Muto, T; Ikezawa, M; Shibata, Y

    2001-01-01

    A 'proof-of-principle' experiment on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as a single-pulse beam profile monitor is planned using an electron beam extracted from the KEK-ATF damping ring. The main goals of this experiment are the following: (i) To measure the yield and the angular distributions of the optical diffraction radiation from a large-size target at different wavelengths, impact parameters and beam characteristics for a comparison with analogous characteristics of optical transition radiation from a foil with identical optical parameters and for a verification of the model assumption (perfectly conducting semi-infinite target). (ii) To investigate the ODR angular distributions from a tilted target with a slit for observing the interference effects. (iii) To compare the results obtained by simulations based on classical approaches, taking into account the optical characteristics of the equipment and the beam parameters. (iv) To estimate the prospects of using ODR as a new non-invasive tool for ultr...

  7. Refractive and diffractive neutron optics with reduced chromatic aberration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Bentley, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    by the use of optics for focusing and imaging. Refractive and diffractive optical elements, e.g. compound refractive lenses and Fresnel zone plates, are attractive due to their low cost, and simple alignment. These optical elements, however, suffer from chromatic aberration, which limit their effectiveness......Thermal neutron beams are an indispensable tool in physics research. The spatial and the temporal resolution attainable in experiments are dependent on the flux and collimation of the neutron beam which remain relatively poor, even for modern neutron sources. These difficulties may be mitigated...... to highly monochromatic beams. This paper presents two novel concepts for focusing and imaging non-monochromatic thermal neutron beams with well-known optical elements: (1) a fast mechanical transfocator based on a compound refractive lens, which actively varies the number of individual lenses in the beam...

  8. Diffractive-refractive optics in the Laue case: first experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mocella, V.; Oberta, Peter; Peverini, L.; Potlovskiy, K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2006), s. 392-396 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC P7.001; GA MŠk(CZ) LA 049; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : asymmetric Laue diffraction * sagittal focusing * Laue crystal * X-ray monochromator Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.377, year: 2006

  9. Nanofabrication of Diffractive Soft X-ray Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Lindblom, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    This thesis summarizes the present status of the nanofabrication of diffractive optics, i.e. zone plates, and test objects for soft x-ray microscopy at KTH. The emphasis is on new and improved fabrication processes for nickel and germanium zone plates. A new concept in which nickel and germanium are combined in a zone plate is also presented. The main techniques used in the fabrication are electron beam lithography for the patterning, followed by plasma etching and electroplating for the stru...

  10. Acceleration of diffraction calculations in cylindrically symmetrical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jeremy S; Shirley, Eric L; Levine, Zachary H

    2018-02-01

    We have significantly accelerated diffraction calculations using three independent acceleration devices. These innovations are restricted to cylindrically symmetrical systems. In the first case, we consider Wolf's formula for integrated flux in a circular region following diffraction of light from a point source by a circular aperture or a circular lens. Although the formula involves a double sum, we evaluate it with the effort of a single sum by use of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) to perform convolutions. In the second case, we exploit properties of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff propagator in the Gaussian, paraxial optics approximation to achieve the propagation of a partial wave from one optical element to the next. Ordinarily, this would involve a double loop over the radial variables on each element, but we have reduced the computational cost by a factor approximately equal to the smaller number of radius values. In the third case, we reduce the number of partial waves, for which the propagation needs to be calculated, to determine the throughput of an optical system of interest in radiometry when at least one element is very small, such as a pinhole aperture. As a demonstration of the benefits of the second case, we analyze intricate diffraction effects that occur in a satellite-based solar radiometry instrument.

  11. Diffraction-based optical filtering: Theory and implementation with MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    An important functionality in many optical systems is to manipulate the spectral content of light. Diffractive optics has been used widely for this purpose. Typically, in such systems a diffractive element essentially acts as an optical filter on the incident beam of light. However, no comprehensive theory of this type of filtering existed. Furthermore, recent advances in MEMS technology have enabled reconfigurable diffractive optical elements, which make it possible to create programmable spectral filters. Such devices can lead to significant advances in many applications and enable new classes of optical instruments and systems. Hence, a need arose to develop an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of such devices. The theory presented in this work answers three main questions: (1) how does one synthesize a diffractive optical element (DOE) for a desired filter; (2) what are the capabilities and limitations on such filters; and (3) what is the best device to use? We present two analytical algorithms to compute the DOE for any complex-valued linear filter, and thus answer question 1. The theory also leads to an understanding that there are fundamental trade-offs between filter complexity, power, error, and spectral range, which answers question 2. We then show that a fully arbitrary DOE is very redundant as a filter, and that we can maintain full functionality by a much simpler device, answering question 3. We then apply the theory to existing devices, which leads to the understanding of their capabilites and limitations. Furthermore, the theory led to the discovery that some well-known MEMS devices, such as the Texas Instruments DMD array, can be used as arbitrary spectral filters. Using the DMD, we demonstrate three applications that can benefit from this technology: correlation spectroscopy, femtosecond pulseshaping, and tunable lasers. In all three applications, we enable functionality never achieved before. The most significant achievement is our

  12. Advanced Simulations of Optical Transition and Diffraction Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078350; Bobb, Lorraine Marie; Bolzon, B; Bravin, Enrico; Karataev, Pavel; Kruchinin, Konstantin; Lefevre, Thibaut; Mazzoni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the “eyes” of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  13. MERTIS: geometrical calibration of thermal infrared optical system by applying diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M.; Baumbach, D.; Buder, M.; Börner, A.; Grießbach, D.; Peter, G.; Santier, E.; Säuberlich, T.; Schischmanow, A.; Schrader, S.; Walter, I.

    2015-09-01

    Geometrical sensor calibration is essential for space applications based on high accuracy optical measurements, in this case for the thermal infrared push-broom imaging spectrometer MERTIS. The goal is the determination of the interior sensor orientation. A conventional method is to measure the line of sight for a subset of pixels by single pixel illumination with collimated light. To adjust angles, which define the line of sight of a pixel, a manipulator construction is used. A new method for geometrical sensor calibration is using Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) in connection with laser beam equipment. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) are optical microstructures, which are used to split an incoming laser beam with a dedicated wavelength into a number of beams with well-known propagation directions. As the virtual sources of the diffracted beams are points at infinity, the resulting image is invariant against translation. This particular characteristic allows a complete geometrical sensor calibration with only one taken image avoiding complex adjustment procedures, resulting in a significant reduction of calibration effort. We present a new method for geometrical calibration of a thermal infrared optical system, including an thermal infrared test optics and the MERTIS spectrometer bolometer detector. The fundamentals of this new approach for geometrical infrared optical systems calibration by applying diffractive optical elements and the test equipment are shown.

  14. Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Madaan, Nitesh; Bagley, Jacob; Diwan, Anubhav [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Liu, Yiqun [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Davis, Robert C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lunt, Barry M. [Department of Information Technology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Smith, Stacey J., E-mail: ssmith@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The

  15. Breaking the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy by optical shelving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, Stefan; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W

    2007-05-25

    We report the breaking of the diffraction resolution barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy by transiently shelving the fluorophore in a metastable dark state. Using a relatively modest light intensity of several kW/cm(2) in a focal distribution featuring a local zero, we confine the fluorescence emission to a spot whose diameter is a fraction of the wavelength of light. Nanoscale far-field optical resolution down to 50 nm is demonstrated by imaging microtubules in a mammalian cell and proteins on the plasma membrane of a neuron. The presence of dark states in virtually any fluorescent molecule opens up a new venue for far-field microscopy with resolution that is no longer limited by diffraction.

  16. Diffractive optical elements as raster-image generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, M

    2001-11-10

    The use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) to generate complex raster images for a primarily artistic purpose is dealt with. Aspects of human vision that are relevant for the design of such elements are discussed. A design method based on an iterative Fourier transform algorithm and extended with elements from the direct-binary-search and the simulated-annealing algorithms is described. The proposed method provides a large set of parameters that can be adjusted freely to optimize it for any given design task. For demonstration a phase-only DOE was designed that generates an image of a Chinese dragon as a diffraction pattern. It was realized as a surface-relief element on a planar substrate through multilevel binary lithography and reactive-ion etching. Experimental tests confirm the usefulness of the design and the fabrication procedures to achieve excellent image quality.

  17. Discussion of the finite element method in optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobera, Julia; Coupland, Jeremy

    2006-04-01

    In Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT) the refractive index is reconstructed from images with different illuminating wavefronts. In most cases the Born approximation is assumed, although this limits the applicability of the technique to weak-scattering problems. In this work we examine the scattering problem from first principles beginning from the Helmholtz equation that governs scalar diffraction and wave propagation. We demonstrate the use of the Born approximation and show typical errors when it is applied in practice. Solution of the Helmholtz equation using a Finite Element Method (FEM) with an appropriate Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is described, and a non-linear optimization technique, the Conjugate Gradient Method (CGM), previously proposed for microwave imaging, is applied to the inverse problem.

  18. A Study of Simple Diffraction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn

    In this paper two simple methods for cabinet edge diffraction are examined. Calculations with both models are compared with more sophisticated theoretical models and with measured data. The parameters involved are studied and their importance for normal loudspeaker box designs is examined....

  19. Diffraction from nonperiodic models of cellulose crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powder and fiber diffraction patterns were calculated for model cellulose crystallites with chains 20 glucose units long. Model sizes ranged from four chains to 169 chains, based on cellulose I' coordinates, and were subjected to various combinations of energy minimization and molecular dynamics (M...

  20. Low aberration monolithic diffraction gratings for high performance optical spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebel, Peter; Moeller, Tobias; Diehl, Torsten; Gatto, Alexandre; Pesch, Alexander; Erdmann, Lars E.; Burkhardt, Matthias; Kalies, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Gratings are the core element of the spectrometer. For imaging spectrometers beside the polarization sensitivity and efficiency the imaging quality of the diffraction grating is essential. Lenses and mirrors can be produced with lowest wavefront aberrations. Low aberration imaging quality of the grating is required not to limit the overall imaging quality of the instrument. Different types of spectrometers will lead to different requirements on the wavefront aberrations for their specific diffraction gratings. The wavefront aberration of an optical grating is a combination of the substrate wavefront and the grating wavefront. During the manufacturing process of the grating substrate different processes can be applied in order to minimize the wavefront aberrations. The imaging performance of the grating is also optimized due to the recording setup of the holography. This technology of holographically manufactured gratings is used for transmission and reflection gratings on different types of substrates like prisms, convex and concave spherical and aspherical surface shapes, free-form elements. All the manufactured gratings are monolithic and can be coated with high reflection and anti-reflection coatings. Prism substrates were used to manufacture monolithic GRISM elements for the UV to IR spectral range preferably working in transmission. Besides of transmission gratings, numerous spectrometer setups (e.g. Offner, Rowland circle, Czerny-Turner system layout) working on the optical design principles of reflection gratings. The present approach can be applied to manufacture high quality reflection gratings for the EUV to the IR. In this paper we report our latest results on manufacturing lowest wavefront aberration gratings based on holographic processes in order to enable at least diffraction limited complex spectrometric setups over certain wavelength ranges. Beside the results of low aberration gratings the latest achievements on improving efficiency together with

  1. Optical diffraction tomography: accuracy of an off-axis reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography is an increasingly popular method that allows for reconstruction of three-dimensional refractive index distribution of semi-transparent samples using multiple measurements of an optical field transmitted through the sample for various illumination directions. The process of assembly of the angular measurements is usually performed with one of two methods: filtered backprojection (FBPJ) or filtered backpropagation (FBPP) tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The former approach, although conceptually very simple, provides an accurate reconstruction for the object regions located close to the plane of focus. However, since FBPJ ignores diffraction, its use for spatially extended structures is arguable. According to the theory of scattering, more precise restoration of a 3D structure shall be achieved with the FBPP algorithm, which unlike the former approach incorporates diffraction. It is believed that with this method one is allowed to obtain a high accuracy reconstruction in a large measurement volume exceeding depth of focus of an imaging system. However, some studies have suggested that a considerable improvement of the FBPP results can be achieved with prior propagation of the transmitted fields back to the centre of the object. This, supposedly, enables reduction of errors due to approximated diffraction formulas used in FBPP. In our view this finding casts doubt on quality of the FBPP reconstruction in the regions far from the rotation axis. The objective of this paper is to investigate limitation of the FBPP algorithm in terms of an off-axis reconstruction and compare its performance with the FBPJ approach. Moreover, in this work we propose some modifications to the FBPP algorithm that allow for more precise restoration of a sample structure in off-axis locations. The research is based on extensive numerical simulations supported with wave-propagation method.

  2. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R., E-mail: g.chabrol@ecam-strasbourg.eu [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Ciceron, Adline [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Télécom Physique Strasbourg – Pôle API – 300 Bd Sébastien Brant – CS 10413, Illkirch Graffenstaden F 67400 (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • A method for rapid manufacturing of optical diffractive element in BK7 is proposed. • A binary grating in BK7 was successfully machined by femtosecond laser pulses. • Process relying on nonlinear absorption in the dielectric due to photoionization. • The binary grating was analysed by SEM and interferometric microscopy. • Simulations by Fourier modal method supported the measured diffractive efficiency. - Abstract: This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  3. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B. R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov; Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Teruya, A.; Hunt, D.; Hahn, D.; Cradick, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Morgan, D. V. [National Security Technologies LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 7} molybdenum Kα photons.

  4. Effect of environmental temperature on diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optical elements in Mid-wave infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of environmental temperature change on multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is evaluated from the viewpoint of the diffraction efficiency and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE). As environmental temperature changes, the microstructure heights of MLDOEs expand or contract, and refractive indices of substrate materials also change. Based on the changes in microstructure height and substrate material index with environmental temperature, the theoretical relation between diffraction efficiency of MLDOEs and environmental temperature is deduced. A practical 3-5μm Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) optical system designed with a MLDOE, which made of ZNSE and GE, is discussed to illustrate the influence of environmental temperature change. The result shows that diffraction efficiency reduction is no more than 85% and PIDE reduction is less than 50% when environmental temperature ranges from -20°C to 60°C. According to the calculated diffraction efficiency in different environmental temperatures, the MTF of hybrid optical system is modified and the modified MTF curve is compared with the original MTF curve. Although the hybrid optical system achieved passive athermalization in above environmental temperature range, the modified MTF curve also remarkably decline in environmental temperature extremes after the consideration of diffraction efficiency change of MLDOE. It is indicated that the image quality of hybrid optical system with ZNSE-GE MLDOE is significantly sensitive to environmental temperature change. The analysis result can be used for optical engineering design with MLDOEs in MWIR.

  5. Diffraction model analysis of pion-12C elastic scattering at 800 MeV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elastic scattering of 800 MeV/c pions by 12C has been studied in the diffraction model with a view to determine pion optical potential by the method of inversion. Finding an earlier diffraction model analysis to be deficient in some respects, we propose a Glauber model based parametrization for the elastic -matrix and show ...

  6. A Study of Simple Diffraction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn

    1997-01-01

    Three different models for calculating edge diffraction are examined. The methods of Vanderkooy, Terai and Biot & Tolstoy are compared with measurements. Although a good agreement is obtained, the measurements also show that none of the methods work completely satisfactorily. The desired properties...

  7. Diffractive optics for reduction of hot cracking in pulsed mode Nd:YAG laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olesen, Søren; Roos, Sven-Olov

    2001-01-01

    of systematic tests, the applicability of this system is tested on an industrial 1 kW Nd:YAG laser. Three separate series of tests are conducted, one with the diffractive optical system at 500 W and two without the diffractive system at 400 W and 500 W, respectively. In principle the diffractive, optical system...

  8. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    The term open-quote Variable-Metricclose quotes (V-M) when applied to diffraction crystals refers to a crystal in which the spacing between crystalline planes varies with the position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes. The variation in the crystalline spacing of a V-M crystal can be produced by introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal. This approach works well when the over-all percentage change in the lattice spacing is small (less than 0.1 %). For V-M crystals where the over-all change in spacing is the order of 0.1 percent or larger, it is more practical to produce the change in crystal spacing by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. One of the simplest applications of this type of crystal diffraction optics is to use V-M crystals to increase the number of photon per unit bandwidth in a diffracted x-ray beam. Typical enhancement factors of 3 to 20 are possible with wiggler sources. For near perfect silicon crystals the rocking curve for (111) planes is typically 8.5 arc seconds at 8 keV and 2.6 arc seconds at 20 keV. If one changes the crystalline spacing to match the change in the incident angle of the beam on the crystalline planes, then the full surface of the diffraction crystal will diffract the same wavelength x-ray. The increase in flux per unit bandwidth in the diffracted beam is 6 to 1 and 20 to 1 for the 8 keV and 20 keV x-rays, respectively, for the NSLS example. In most of the experiments the changes in crystalline spacings were generated with thermal gradients. One set of experiments used a V-M crystal grown with a variable percentage of germanium and silicon. This crystal had a 0.1 percent change in crystal spacing in 1 mm of distance in the crystal

  9. Large Diffractive Optics for GEo-Based Earth Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R A

    2003-09-11

    -based telescope is only 10 meters in diameter, building ten-fold larger ones for GEO applications (let alone delivering and operating them there) presents major difficulties. However, since the challenges of fielding large platforms in GEO are matched by the benefits of continuous coverage, we propose a program to develop such optical platforms. In this section, we will examine a particular form of large aperture optic, using a flat diffractive lens instead of the more conventional curved reflectors considered elsewhere in this report. We will discuss both the development of this type of large aperture optics, as well as the steps necessary to use it for GEO-based Earth surveillance. In a later section of this report we will discuss another use for large diffractive optics, their application for global-reach laser weapons.

  10. Toward multi-Gbps indoor optical wireless multicasting system employing passive diffractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, C W; Huijskens, F M; Cao, Z; Tangdiongga, E; Koonen, A M J

    2014-05-01

    This Letter presents the evaluation and demonstration of an optical free-space (FS) multicasting system for multi-Gigabits-per-second (multi-Gbps) indoor transmission. These simultaneous line-of-sight links are formed by infrared beams and are beam-steered using a passive diffraction grating. The experiment has resulted in error-free links (bit error rate optical wireless communication and can be seamlessly integrated in in-building fiber networks.

  11. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    KAUST Repository

    Stegenburgs, Edgars

    2017-01-08

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  12. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths

  13. Influence of analyzed signals fiber-optic transmission system on spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Vasily I.; Moskaletz, Oleg D.; Paraskun, Arthur S.; Zhdanov, Arseny Yu.

    2017-08-01

    Fiber-optic transmission system of analyzed signal is considered to allow signals transmission from optical sources with either impossible or undesirable contact. Diffraction grating spectral device is chosen as investigation system. It should be noted that diffraction grating operates with transmitted light but not reflected. Influence of optical fiber consists in the distortion of wave front incident on the spectral device. Front distortion leads to a broadening of the device spread function in all diffraction orders, and as a consequence, to a deterioration in the device resolution. In this case, the complex spread function is a reaction of the device to the homogeneous plane monochromatic wave which clearly links the input-output of spectral device. Fiber-optic system influence is determined by introducing a fictitious transparency located directly in front of the diffraction grating. Research of the effect the fiber-optic system has on the spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device is made in two ways. On one hand, mathematical model is proposed to describe the influence of a single-mode optical fiber to a spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device. We performed computer simulations of the analyzed signal transmission from the end of the optical fiber to the photodetector based on the proposed model. The calculations are performed for a single-mode optical fiber with a core diameter of 8 microns. On the other hand, experimental laboratory set up of the diffraction grating spectral device with a fiber optic transmission system is created. Theoretical calculations are compared with the experimental results.

  14. STUDY ON HIGH RESOLUTION MEMBRANE-BASED DIFFRACTIVE OPTICAL IMAGING ON GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jiao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffractive optical imaging technology provides a new way to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. There are a lot of benefits to use the membrane-based diffractive optical element in ultra-large aperture optical imaging system, including loose tolerance, light weight, easy folding and unfolding, which make it easy to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. The implementation of this technology also faces some challenges, including the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the development of high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical elements, and the correction of the chromatic aberration of the diffractive optical elements. Aiming at the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the “6+1” petal-type unfold scheme is proposed, which consider the compression ratio, the blocking rate and the development complexity. For high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical element, a self-collimating method is proposed. The diffraction efficiency is more than 90 % of the theoretical value. For the chromatic aberration correction problem, an optimization method based on schupmann is proposed to make the imaging spectral bandwidth in visible light band reach 100 nm. The above conclusions have reference significance for the development of ultra-large aperture diffractive optical imaging system.

  15. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limited short-wavelength optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman, Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli, Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-01-01

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-(angstrom) and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date

  16. Design of infrared multilayer diffractive optical elements with low temperature sensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi

    2018-01-01

    An optimal method was presented to prevent the decrease of diffraction efficiency when the infrared diffractive optical elements working in a wide temperature range. The method can lower the cost of thermal infrared diffractive lenses by decreasing the microstructure height and volume of multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs). The diffraction efficiency of the results was compared to the previous methods with wavelengths between long wave infrared and middle wave infrared. Those comparisons show the better temperature stability of MLDOEs when the elements working in a wide temperature range.

  17. Theoretical and numerical investigations of sub-wavelength diffractive optical structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    finite-difference time domain method and exact radiation integrals is implemented for the polarization where the electric field vector is perpendicular to the two dimentional plane of symmetry. The computational model solves the full vectorial time domain Maxwell equations with general sources...... of illumination. Maxwell's equations are solved numerically in complex geometries and radiation integrals are applied in homogeneous regions, thus minimizing the computational time. Analysis of finte length surface relief structures embedded in polymer dielectric waveguides are presented. The importance......The work in this thesis concerns theoretical and numerical investigations of sub-wavelength diffractive optical structures, relying on advanced two-dimensional vectorial numerical models that have applications in Optics and Electromagnetics. Integrated Optics is predicted to play a major role...

  18. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  19. Improved Resolution Optical Time Stretch Imaging Based on High Efficiency In-Fiber Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Yan, Zhijun; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Chao

    2018-01-12

    Most overlooked challenges in ultrafast optical time stretch imaging (OTSI) are sacrificed spatial resolution and higher optical loss. These challenges are originated from optical diffraction devices used in OTSI, which encode image into spectra of ultrashort optical pulses. Conventional free-space diffraction gratings, as widely used in existing OTSI systems, suffer from several inherent drawbacks: limited diffraction efficiency in a non-Littrow configuration due to inherent zeroth-order reflection, high coupling loss between free-space gratings and optical fibers, bulky footprint, and more importantly, sacrificed imaging resolution due to non-full-aperture illumination for individual wavelengths. Here we report resolution-improved and diffraction-efficient OTSI using in-fiber diffraction for the first time to our knowledge. The key to overcome the existing challenges is a 45° tilted fiber grating (TFG), which serves as a compact in-fiber diffraction device offering improved diffraction efficiency (up to 97%), inherent compatibility with optical fibers, and improved imaging resolution owning to almost full-aperture illumination for all illumination wavelengths. 50 million frames per second imaging of fast moving object at 46 m/s with improved imaging resolution has been demonstrated. This conceptually new in-fiber diffraction design opens the way towards cost-effective, compact and high-resolution OTSI systems for image-based high-throughput detection and measurement.

  20. A novel automotive headlight system based on digital micro-mirror devices and diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Song, Yuming; Ma, Jianshe

    2018-01-01

    The DMD (Digital Micro-mirror Device) has the advantages of high refresh rate and high diffraction efficiency, and these make it become an ideal loader of multiple modes illumination. DOEs (Diffractive Optical Element) have the advantages of high degree of freedom, light weight, easy to copy, low cost etc., and can be used to reduce the weight, complexity, cost of optical system. A novel automotive headlamp system using DMD as the light distribution element and a DOE as the light field modulation device is proposed in this paper. The pure phase DOE is obtained by the GS algorithm using Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral model. Based on the standard automotive headlamp light intensity distribution in the target plane, the amplitude distribution of DMD is obtained by numerical simulation, and the grayscale diagram loaded on the DMD can be obtained accordingly. Finally, according to simulation result, the light intensity distribution in the target plane is proportional to the national standard, hence verifies the validity of the novel system. The novel illumination system proposed in this paper provides a reliable hardware platform for the intelligent headlamps.

  1. Diffractive interface theory: nonlocal susceptibility approach to the optics of metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christopher M; Inampudi, Sandeep; Podolskiy, Viktor A

    2015-02-09

    We present a formalism for understanding the electromagnetism of metasurfaces, optically thin composite films with engineered diffraction. The technique, diffractive interface theory (DIT), takes explicit advantage of the small optical thickness of a metasurface, eliminating the need for solving for light propagation inside the film and providing a direct link between the spatial profile of a metasurface and its diffractive properties. Predictions of DIT are compared with full-wave numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations, demonstrating DIT's validity and computational advantages for optically thin structures. Applications of the DIT range from understanding of fundamentals of light-matter interaction in metasurfaces to efficient analysis of generalized refraction to metasurface optimization.

  2. Physical optics-based diffraction coefficient for a wedge with different face impedances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umul, Yusuf Ziya

    2018-03-20

    A new diffraction field expression is introduced with the aid of the modified theory of physical optics for a wedge with different face impedances. First, the scattered geometrical optics fields are determined when both faces of the wedge are illuminated by the incident wave. The geometrical optics waves are then expressed in terms of the sum of two different fields that occur for different impedance wedges. The diffracted fields are determined for the two cases separately, and the total diffracted field is obtained as a sum of these waves. Lastly, the uniform field expressions are obtained, and the resultant fields are numerically compared with the solution of Maliuzhinets.

  3. Design and fabrication of diffractive optical elements with MATLAB

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharya, Shanti (Professor in Optics); Vijayakumar, Anand

    2017-01-01

    ... their diffraction patterns using MATLAB. The fundamentals of fabrication techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography with basic instructions for the beginner are presented...

  4. Bragg diffraction of light by ultrasonic waves in planargyrotrophic optical waveguides in an external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, G.V. [Mozyr` State Pedagogical Institute (Belarus)

    1995-09-01

    Features of Bragg diffraction of light by two-partial surface ultrasonic waves in planar gyrotropic optical waveguides placed in an external electric field are considered. General expressions for complex vector amplitudes of diffracted fields are presented. It is shown that the diffracted waves have elliptic polarization, the ellipticity being determined by the linear anisotropy of the waveguide structure, the anisotropy induced by an external electric field, the anisotropy of photoelasticity, and the crystal gyrotropy. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Optical double-image cryptography based on diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we propose a method using structured-illumination-based diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating for optical double-image cryptography. An optical cryptosystem is designed, and multiple random phase-only masks are placed in the optical path. When a phase grating is laterally translated just before the plaintexts, several diffraction intensity patterns (i.e., ciphertexts) can be correspondingly obtained. During image decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is developed to extract plaintexts from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed method are analyzed. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical simulation results. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  6. Color dynamics of diffraction gratings: evaluation and applications in optical security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Paulo; Rebordo, Jose Manuel

    1999-12-01

    We looked for design methodologies that cope with optical specifications described in terms of trajectories in the CIE (Commission Internationale de l Eclairage) 1976 chromaticity diagram in the context of low-cost mass-reproduction processes that inevitably introduce changes in the design of a diffractive device for security applications. The mathematics of the design process can be strongly simplified if the theory of planar waveguides (in integrated optics) is used to estimate, with sufficient accuracy, the position of Wood singularities, responsible for the more-interesting visual features of a grating. We show how to use such a model to assess color dynamics variations that are due to production and to estimate domains within the space of grating parameters that enable both first- and second-level security features to be implemented simultaneously. All the results are compared with the values obtained by rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

  7. Review of near-field optics and superlenses for sub-diffraction-limited nano-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Adams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Near-field optics and superlenses for imaging beyond Abbe’s diffraction limit are reviewed. A comprehensive and contemporary background is given on scanning near-field microscopy and superlensing. Attention is brought to recent research leveraging scanning near-field optical microscopy with superlenses for new nano-imaging capabilities. Future research directions are explored for realizing the goal of low-cost and high-performance sub-diffraction-limited imaging systems.

  8. Diffraction enhanced imaging: a simple model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Peiping; Yuan Qingxi; Huang Wanxia; Wang Junyue; Shu Hang; Chen Bo; Liu Yijin; Li Enrong; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    Based on pinhole imaging and conventional x-ray projection imaging, a more general DEI (diffraction enhanced imaging) equation is derived using simple concepts in this paper. Not only can the new DEI equation explain all the same problems as with the DEI equation proposed by Chapman, but also some problems that cannot be explained with the old DEI equation, such as the noise background caused by small angle scattering diffracted by the analyser

  9. Diffraction enhanced imaging: a simple model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Peiping; Yuan Qingxi; Huang Wanxia; Wang Junyue; Shu Hang; Chen Bo; Liu Yijin; Li Enrong; Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2006-10-07

    Based on pinhole imaging and conventional x-ray projection imaging, a more general DEI (diffraction enhanced imaging) equation is derived using simple concepts in this paper. Not only can the new DEI equation explain all the same problems as with the DEI equation proposed by Chapman, but also some problems that cannot be explained with the old DEI equation, such as the noise background caused by small angle scattering diffracted by the analyser.

  10. Performance improvements of MOEMS-based diffractive arrays: address isolation and optical switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaman, Ganesh; Madison, Seth; Sano, Michael; Castracane, James

    2005-01-01

    Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) have found a variety of applications in fields such as telecommunications, spectroscopy and display technology. MOEMS-based optical switching is currently under investigation for the increased flexibility that such devices provide for reconfiguration of the I/O network for inter-chip communication applications. This potential not only adds an additional degree of freedom for adjustment of transmitter/receiver links but also allows for fine alignment of individual channels in the network link. Further, this use of diffractive arrays for specific applications combines beam steering/adjustment capabilities with the inherent wavelength dependence of the diffractive approach for channel separation and de-multiplexing. Research and development has been concentrated on the progression from single MOEMS components to parallel arrays integrated with optical source arrays for a successful feasibility demonstration. Successful development of such an approach will have a major impact of the next generation communication protocols. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program for Free Space Optical inter-chip communication at the College of NanoScale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY (CNSE). New versions of diffractive arrays stemming from the basic MEMS Compound Grating (MCG; patent #5,999,319) have been produced through various fabrication methods including the MUMPs process1. Most MEMS components relying on electrostatic actuation tend to require high actuation voltages (>20V) compared to the typical 5V levels prevalent in conventional integrated circuits. The specific goal is to yield improved performance while minimizing the power consumption of the components. Structural modifications through the variation in the ruling/electrode spacing distance and array wiring layout through individually addressable gratings have been studied to understand effects on the actuation voltage and

  11. Tunable protein harmonic diffractive micro-optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yun-Lu; Liu, Dong-Xu; Dong, Wen-Fei; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2012-07-15

    Herein, tunable protein harmonic diffractive microlenses (PHDMs) have been constructed by femtosecond laser direct writing from bovine serum albumin. With excellent three-dimensional topography, PHDMs show distinct harmonic diffractive features, such as similarly good imaging performance with smaller thickness than refractive lenses and well controlled minus chromatic dispersion compared with simple diffractive lenses (∼5% focal length shift against ∼21% of the protein Fresnel zone plate with the same radius under light with wavelength 450-659 nm). Owing to the nature of protein molecules as "building blocks," the focal length of the PHDM can be facilely tuned within seconds by changing the pH value (focal length tunability of up to ∼20%).

  12. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part I - progress in the patent landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2013-12-01

    In the last 20 years, diffractive optics experienced a strong research interest and was in the center of many development projects in applied optics. To offer a side view for optical engineers, here, we discuss selected, business-related aspects of the current status of the transfer process to bring diffractive optics into commercial products. The contribution is divided into two parts. Here, in part I, we focus on the patent landscape of diffractive optics with a closer look on the temporal development and the distribution over main players. As an important result, currently, new strong patent activities are observed especially in the context of imaging systems. In the second part, the business volumes of selected market segments are discussed.

  13. Optical cryptography topology based on a three-dimensional particle-like distribution and diffractive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-05-09

    In recent years, coherent diffractive imaging has been considered as a promising alternative for information retrieval instead of conventional interference methods. Coherent diffractive imaging using the X-ray light source has opened up a new research perspective for the measurement of non-crystalline and biological specimens, and can achieve unprecedentedly high resolutions. In this paper, we show how a three-dimensional (3D) particle-like distribution and coherent diffractive imaging can be applied for a study of optical cryptography. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding approach is used, and the plaintext is considered as a series of particles distributed in a 3D space. A topology concept is also introduced into the proposed optical cryptosystem. During image decryption, a retrieval algorithm is developed to extract the plaintext from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed optical cryptography topology are also analyzed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Role of photonic angular momentum states in nonreciprocal diffraction from magneto-optical cylinder arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Jing Guo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical eigenstates in a concentrically symmetric resonator are photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs with quantized optical orbital angular momentums (OAMs. Nonreciprocal optical phenomena can be obtained if we lift the degeneracy of PAMSs. In this article, we provide a comprehensive study of nonreciprocal optical diffraction of various orders from a magneto-optical cylinder array. We show that nonreciprocal diffraction can be obtained only for these nonzero orders. Role of PAMSs, the excitation of which is sensitive to the directions of incidence, applied magnetic field, and arrangement of the cylinders, are studied. Some interesting phenomena such as a dispersionless quasi-omnidirectional nonreciprocal diffraction and spikes associated with high-OAM PAMSs are present and discussed.

  15. Diffraction model analysis of pion-12C elastic scattering at 800 MeV/c

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sections. Despite some of its limitations which are to be discussed shortly, the study of Choudhary and Scura [9] suggests that the diffraction model is capable of describing the pion–12C data with lesser number of parameters than the phenom- enological optical model. Moreover, at the energy of our interest the high-energy.

  16. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly...... optimization of the input aperture parameters according to desired output characteristics. For wavefront sensing, the achieved aperture control opens a new degree of freedom for improving the accuracy of quantitative phase imaging. Diffractive GPC input modulation also fits well with grating-based optical...... security applications and can be used to create phasebased information channels for enhanced information security....

  17. Pattern formation without diffraction matching in optical parametric oscillators with a metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, Philippe; Van der Sande, Guy; Veretennicoff, Irina; Kockaert, Pascal; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2009-05-25

    We consider a degenerate optical parametric oscillator containing a left-handed material. We show that the inclusion of a left-handed material layer allows for controlling the strength and sign of the diffraction coefficient at either the pump or the signal frequency. Subsequently, we demonstrate the existence of stable dissipative structures without diffraction matching, i.e., without the usual relationship between the diffraction coefficients of the signal and pump fields. Finally, we investigate the size scaling of these light structures with decreasing diffraction strength.

  18. Development and applications of diffractive optical security devices for banknotes and high value documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, John K.; Holmes, Brian W.; Jones, Keith A.

    2000-04-01

    Embossed holograms and othe rdiffractive optically variable devices are increasingly familiar security items on plastic cards, banknotes, securyt documetns and on branded gods and media to protect against counterfeit, protect copyright and to evidence tamper. This paper outlines some of the diffractive optical seuryt and printed security develoepd for this rapidly growing field and provides examles of some current security applications.

  19. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G

    2001-01-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm sup 2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100-150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  20. Hybrid diffractive-refractive optical system design of head-mounted display for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan

    2005-02-01

    An optical see-through head-mounted display for augmented reality is designed in this paper. Considering the factors, such as the optical performance, the utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world, the feelings of users when he wears it and etc., a structure of the optical see-through is adopted. With the characteristics of the particular negative dispersive and the power of realizing random-phase modulation, the diffractive surface is helpful for optical system of reducing weight, simplifying structure and etc., and a diffractive surface is introduced in our optical system. The optical system with 25 mm eye relief, 12 mm exit pupil and 20° (H)x15.4° (V) field-of-view is designed. The utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world are 1/4 and 1/2, respectively. The angular resolution of display is 0.27 mrad and it less than that of the minimum of human eyes. The diameter of this system is less than 46mm, and it applies the binocular. This diffractive-refractive optical system of see-through head-mounted display not only satisfies the demands of user"s factors in structure, but also with high resolution, very small chromatic aberration and distortion, and satisfies the need of augmented reality. In the end, the parameters of the diffractive surface are discussed.

  1. Diffraction model analysis of pion-12C elastic scattering at 800 MeV/c

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moreover, these phenomenological analyses show that pion–12C optical potential at 800 MeV/c is attractive whereas the first-order microscopic theories strongly suggest that it should be repulsive [2,4,5]. In the diffraction model an appropriate form for the elastic S-matrix Sl is chosen and its parameters are varied to obtain ...

  2. Quantum Optics, Diffraction Theory, and Elementary Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Physical optics has expanded greatly in recent years. Though it remains part of the ancestry of elementary particle physics, there are once again lessons to be learned from it. I shall discuss several of these, including some that have emerged at CERN and Brookhaven.

  3. Optical characterization and x-ray diffraction studies of synthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... lime and the resulting calcium chloride solution was reacted with dilute sulphuric acid. Calcinations were done at a constant o temperature of 120 C for a period of four hours. The choice of the production parameters was guided by the findings of previous studies. Optical absorption spectra of the samples were measured ...

  4. X-ray diffraction microscopy based on refractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis; Jakobsen, A. C.; Simons, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    A formalism is presented for dark‐field X‐ray microscopy using refractive optics. The new technique can produce three‐dimensional maps of lattice orientation and axial strain within millimetre‐sized sampling volumes and is particularly suited to in situ studies of materials at hard X‐ray energies...

  5. Theoretical model of a polarization diffractive elements for the light beams conversion holographic formation in PDLCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharangovich, Sergey N.; Semkin, Artem O.

    2017-12-01

    In this work a theoretical model of the holographic formation of the polarization diffractive optical elements for the transformation of Gaussian light beams into Bessel-like ones in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) is developed. The model is based on solving the equations of photo-induced Fredericks transition processes for polarization diffractive elements formation by orthogonally polarized light beams with inhomogeneous amplitude and phase profiles. The results of numerical simulation of the material's dielectric tensor changing due to the structure's formation process are presented for various recording beams' polarization states. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the ability to form the diffractive optical elements for light beams transformation by the polarization holography methods is shown.

  6. Diffractive Optics in the Infrared (DiOptIR) LDRD 67109 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alford, Charles Fred; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Samora, Sally; Carter, Tony Ray; Peters, David William; Shields, Eric A.

    2005-10-01

    This diffractive optical element (DOE) LDRD is divided into two tasks. In Task 1, we develop two new DOE technologies: (1) a broad wavelength band effective anti-reflection (AR) structure and (2) a design tool to encode dispersion and polarization information into a unique diffraction pattern. In Task 2, we model, design, and fabricate a subwavelength polarization splitter. The first technology is an anti-reflective (AR) layer that may be etched into the DOE surface. For many wavelengths of interest, transmissive silicon DOEs are ideal. However, a significant portion of light (30% from each surface) is lost due to Fresnel reflection. To address this issue, we investigate a subwavelength, surface relief structure that acts as an effective AR coating. The second DOE component technology in Task 1 is a design tool to determine the optimal DOE surface relief structure that can encode the light's degree of dispersion and polarization into a unique spatial pattern. Many signals of interest have unique spatial, temporal, spectral, and polarization signatures. The ability to disperse the signal into a unique diffraction pattern would result in improved signal detection sensitivity with a simultaneous reduction in false alarm. Task 2 of this LDRD project is to investigate the modeling, design, and fabrication of subwavelength birefringent devices for polarimetric spectral sensing and imaging applications. Polarimetric spectral sensing measures the spectrum of the light and polarization state of light at each wavelength simultaneously. The capability to obtain both polarization and spectral information can help develop target/object signature and identify the target/object for several applications in NP&MC and national security.

  7. Single-pulse Conduction Limited Laser Welding Using A Diffractive Optical Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, C. Y.; Bolut, M.; Sundqvist, J.; Kaplan, A. F. H.; Assunção, E.; Quintino, L.; Blackburn, J.

    Conduction limited laser welding is commonly used in electronic and battery applications, where a high width-to-depth ratio weld is desirable. A laser beam with Gaussian or top-hat distributions is often used to produce conduction limited spot welds. Both these energy distributions result in a higher proportion of the laser beam energy being introduced towards the centre of the welded spot and consequently, a reduced penetration weld towards the circumference of the beam spot. The use of diffractive optical elements to tailor the energy distribution of the laser beam has been evaluated. An incident laser beam with an energy distribution in the shape of a ring or C-shape was projected onto the material, which results in heat propagating towards the centre, producing a shallow weld with a consistent depth of penetration across the entire overlapped joint. The results confirmed a corresponding thermal model which predicted an even distribution of heat at the joint interface.

  8. Neutron diffraction and optics in noncentrosymmetric crystals New feasibility of a search for neutron EDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.V.; Voronin, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    Recently strong electric fields (up to 10 9 V/cm) have been discovered, which affect the neutrons moving in noncentrosymmetric crystals. Such fields allow for new polarization phenomena in the neutron diffraction and in the optics and provide, for instance, a new method of a search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM). A strong interplanar electric field of the crystal and a sufficiently long time for the neutron passage through the crystal for Bragg angle close to π/2 in the case of Laue diffraction make it possible to exceed the sensitivity achieved with the magnetic resonance method using ultra cold neutrons (UCN method). The pilot setup has been created and mounted at the neutron beam at the WWR-M reactor in Gatchina. It allows to study the optics and the dynamical diffraction of polarized neutrons in thick (1-10 cm) crystals, using the direct diffraction beam and Bragg angles close to 90 deg. . The first experimental results are discussed on observing new effects in both the Laue diffraction and the optics of cold neutrons. These results confirm the opportunity to increase more than by an order of magnitude the sensitivity of the method to neutron EDM, using the diffraction angles close to 90 deg. and give a real prospect to exceed the sensitivity of the UCN method

  9. Diffractive open charm production from the dipole model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luszczak, A.; Golec-Biernat, K.

    2009-01-01

    The most promising QCD based approach to DIS diffraction is formulated in terms of dipole models. In this analysis, we consider two important parameterizations of the dipole scattering amplitude, called GBW and CGC in which parton saturation results are built in. We present a precise comparison of the results of the dipole models using these two parameterizations with the newest data from HERA. The comparison we performed prompt us to discuss some subtle points of the dipole models, mostly related to the qqg component, and connect them to the approach based on the diffractive parton distributions evolved with the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. Within the latter approach, the diffractive open charm production, which is the main goal of this analysis, is particularly interesting since it is sensitive to a diffractive gluon distribution. Thus, we extracted the diffractive gluon distribution from the dipole model formulae to use it for the computation of the charm contribution to F 2 D . We found good agreement with the HERA data on the diffractive open charm production both for the the gluon distributions from the considered dipole models and the DGLAP fits to HERA data from our earlier analysis for diffractive parton distributions with higher twist. (authors)

  10. Transverse energy circulation and the edge diffraction of an optical vortex beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr Ya; Mohammed, Kadhim A; Kurka, Ivan A

    2014-04-01

    Edge diffraction of a circular Laguerre-Gaussian beam represents an example of the optical vortex symmetry breakdown in which the hidden "vortex" energy circulation is partially transformed into the visible "asymmetry" form. The diffracted beam evolution is studied in terms of the irradiance moments and the moment-based parameters. In spite of the limited applicability of the moment-based formalism, we show that the "vortex" and "asymmetry" parts of the orbital angular momentum can still be reasonably defined for the hard-edge diffracted beams and retain their physical role of quantifying the corresponding forms of the transverse energy circulation.

  11. In-plane diffraction loss free optical cavity using coated optical fiber and silicon micromachined spherical mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Yasser; Bourouina, Tarik; Saadany, Bassam; Khalil, Diaa

    2013-03-01

    Light trapping in optical cavities has many applications in optical telecommunications, biomedical optics, atomic studies, and chemical analysis. Efficient optical coupling in these cavities is an important engineering problem that affects greatly the cavity performance. One interesting way to form an optical cavity, while simultaneously connected to the rest of the optical systems, is to use an optical fiber surface as one of the cavity mirrors while the second mirror is fabricated by MEMS technology. In this way, cavity tuning with a MEMS actuator is a simple achievable task with low cost in mass production. The main problem in this solution is the high diffraction loss associated with the small spot size at the output of the standard single-mode fiber (SMF). Diffraction loss in the cavity is usually overcome by using an expensive lensed fiber or by inserting a coated lens in the cavity leading to a long cavity with small free spectral range (FSR). In this work, we report a Fabry-Perot cavity formed by a multilayer-coated cleaved-surface SMF inserted into a grove while facing a spherical micromirror; both are fabricated by silicon micromachining. The light is trapped inside the cavity while propagating in-plane of the wafer substrate. The light is injected in and collected from a Corning SMF-28 optical fiber with a coated surface reflectivity of about 98% at 1330 nm (O-band). The silicon mirror surface is aluminum metalized with a reflectivity of about 92%. The measured cavity has a line width of 0.45 nm around 1330 nm with a FSR of 26 nm. The obtained results indicate an almost diffraction-loss free optical cavity with a quality factor close to 3000, limited by the optical surfaces reflectivity that can be improved in future by an optimized mirror fabrication process and better matching of the fiber multilayer coating.

  12. Focusing Optics for High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinert, U.; Schulze, C.; Honkimäki, V.

    1998-01-01

    Novel focusing optical devices have been developed for synchrotron radiation in the energy range 40-100 keV. Firstly, a narrow-band-pass focusing energy-tuneable fixed-exit monochromator was constructed by combining meridionally bent Laue and Bragg crystals. Dispersion compensation was applied...... to retain the high momentum resolution despite the beam divergence caused by the focusing. Next, microfocusing was achieved by a bent multilayer arranged behind the crystal monochromator and alternatively by a bent Laue crystal. A 1.2 mu m-high line focus was obtained at 90 keV. The properties...... of the different set-ups are described and potential applications are discussed. First experiments were performed, investigating with high spatial resolution the residual strain gradients in layered polycrystalline materials. The results underline that focused high-energy synchrotron radiation can provide unique...

  13. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, P.; Oberta, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2011), s. 299-301 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : diffractive-refractive optics * x-ray synchrotron radiation monochromator * x-ray crystal monochromator * harmonics separation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2011

  14. Experiment of optical axis angle of electro-optic crystal by conoscopic interference and x-ray diffraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Xu; Jiang, Hongzhen; Zheng, Fanglan

    2017-10-01

    Owing to the advantages of low loss, high spatial uniformity and high damage threshold, plasma electrode pockels cell (PEPC) is the key element of multi-pass amplifying technology in large laser facilities. Properties of PEPC is directly affected by the optical axis angle of the electro-optic crystal. Therefore, high precision measurement of the optical axis angle is indispensable. X-ray diffraction analysis method is a traditional way to determine the direction of optical axis of crystal, which is presented. By using conoscopic interference technique, a measurement system for optical axis angle of electro-optic crystal is introduced. The principle of conoscopic interference method is described in detail, and a series of techniques are implied in this measurement system to improve the accuracy. The optical axis angle two different electro-optic crystal is measured by X-ray diffraction analysis method and our conoscopic interference measurement system, respectively. The absolute error is less than 0.01mrad, while the relative error is nearly 2%.

  15. Bragg diffraction of fermions at optical potentials; Braggbeugung von Fermionen an optischen Potentialen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deh, Benjamin

    2008-10-27

    This thesis describes the Bragg diffraction of ultracold fermions at an optical potential. A moving optical lattice was created, by overlaying two slightly detuned lasers. Atoms can be diffracted at this lattice if the detuning fulfills the Bragg condition for resting atoms. This Bragg diffraction is analyzed systematically in this thesis. To this end Rabi oscillations between the diffraction states were driven, as well in the weakly interacting Bragg regime, as in the strongly interacting Kapitza-Dirac regime. Simulations, based on a driven two-, respectively multilevel-system describe the observed effects rather well. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the diffracted states in the magnetic trapping potential was studied. The anharmonicity of the trap in use and the scattering cross section for p-wave collisions in a {sup 6}Li system was determined from the movement of these states. Moreover the momentum distribution of the fermions was measured with Bragg spectroscopy and first signs of Fermi degeneracy were found. Finally an interferometer with fermions was build, exhibiting a coherence time of more than 100 {mu}s. With this, the possibility for measurement and manipulation of ultracold fermions with Bragg diffraction could bee shown. (orig.)

  16. Evanescent Properties of Optical Diffraction from 2-Dimensional Hexagonal Photonic Crystals and Their Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Yang; Chen, Yung-Tsan; Chen, Chien-Chun; Huang, Jian-Jang

    2018-04-03

    The sensitivity of traditional diffraction grating sensors is limited by the spatial resolution of the measurement setup. Thus, a large space is required to improve sensor performance. Here, we demonstrate a compact hexagonal photonic crystal (PhC) optical sensor with high sensitivity. PhCs are able to diffract optical beams to various angles in azimuthal space. The critical wavelength that satisfies the phase matching or becomes evanescent was used to benchmark the refractive index of a target analyte applied on a PhC sensor. Using a glucose solution as an example, our sensor demonstrated very high sensitivity and a low limit of detection. This shows that the diffraction mechanism of hexagonal photonic crystals can be used for sensors when compact size is a concern.

  17. Rosalind Franklin's X-ray photo of DNA as an undergraduate optical diffraction experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J.; Braun, G.; Tierney, D.; Wessels, L.; Schmitzer, H.; Rossa, B.; Wagner, H. P.; Dultz, W.

    2018-02-01

    Rosalind Franklin's X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA molecules rendered the important clue that DNA has the structure of a double helix. The most famous X-ray photograph, Photo 51, is still printed in most Biology textbooks. We suggest two optical experiments for undergraduates that make this historic achievement comprehensible for students by using macromodels of DNA and visible light to recreate a diffraction pattern similar to Photo 51. In these macromodels, we replace the double helix both mathematically and experimentally with its two-dimensional (flat) projection and explain why this is permissible. Basic optical concepts are used to infer certain well-known characteristics of DNA from the diffraction pattern.

  18. Optical necklaces generated by the diffraction on a stack of dielectric wedges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izdebskaya, Yana [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, V.I. Vernandsky Taurida National University, Simferopol 95007, Crimea (Ukraine)], E-mail: yvi124@rsphysse.anu.edu.au

    2008-05-19

    We demonstrate that the regular ring-shaped arrays of Gaussian beams, or optical necklaces, can be generated using diffraction on a stack of dielectric wedges. A condition for self-similarity and structural stability of the beams has been derived and shows good comparison with experimental data.

  19. Phase-sensitive detection of optical resonances by using an acousto-optic modulator in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, V N; Domnin, Yu S; Kopylov, L N

    2007-01-01

    A new method for frequency control of an external cavity diode laser without direct modulation of the injection current is proposed. The Pound - Drever optical heterodyne technique or the method of frequency control by frequency-modulated sidebands, in which an acousto-optic modulator operating in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode is used as an external phase modulator, can be employed to obtain error signals upon automatic frequency locking of the diode laser to the saturated absorption resonances within the D 2 line of cesium atoms or to the optical cavity resonances. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  20. Ray optics for diffraction: a useful paradox in a path integral context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    Geometrical diffraction theory uses ray tracing techniques to calculate diffraction and other properties of the electromagnetic field generally considered characteristically wave like. The author studies this dualism of the classical electromagnetic field so as to distinguish those aspects of quantum dualism that arise simply as properties of oscillatory integrals and those that may have deeper origins. By a series of transformations the solutions of certain optics problems are reduced to the evaluation of a Feynman path integral and the known semiclassical approximations for the path integral provide a justification for the geometrical diffraction theory. Particular attention is paid to the problem of edge diffraction and for a half plane barrier a closed form solution is obtained. A classical variational principle for barrier penetration is also presented. (Auth.)

  1. New metrology techniques improve the production of silicon diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Cynthia B.; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Grigas, Michelle; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Silicon immersion gratings and grisms offer significant advantages in compactness and performance over frontsurface gratings and over grisms made from lower-index materials. At the same time, the high refractive index of Si (3.4) leads to very stringent constraints on the allowable groove position errors, typically rms silicon using photolithography, plasma etching, and wet etching. To date, producers have used contact photolithography to pattern UV sensitive photoresist as the initial processing step, then transferred this pattern to a layer of silicon nitride that, in turn, serves as a hard mask during the wet etching of grooves into silicon. For each step of the groove production, we have used new and sensitive techniques to determine the contribution of that step to the phase non-uniformity. Armed with an understanding of the errors and their origins, we could then implement process controls for each step. The plasma uniformity was improved for the silicon nitride mask etch process and the phase contribution of the plasma etch step was measured. We then used grayscale lithography, a technique in which the photoresist is deliberately underexposed, to measure large-scale nonuniformities in the UV exposure system to an accuracy of 3-5%, allowing us to make corrections to the optical alignment. Additionally, we used a new multiple-exposure technique combined with laser interferometry to measure the relationship between UV exposure dose and line edge shift. From these data we predict the contribution of the etching and photolithographic steps to phase error of the grating surface. These measurements indicate that the errors introduced during the exposure step dominate the contributions of all the other processing steps. This paper presents the techniques used to quantify individual process contributions to phase errors and steps that were taken to improve overall phase uniformity.

  2. Computer modeling of electromagnetic problems using the geometrical theory of diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Some applications of the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD), a high frequency ray optical solution to electromagnetic problems, are presented. GTD extends geometric optics, which does not take into account the diffractions occurring at edges, vertices, and various other discontinuities. Diffraction solutions, analysis of basic structures, construction of more complex structures, and coupling using GTD are discussed.

  3. Measurement of 3D refractive index distribution by optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Weining; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie; Rong, Lu; Yuan, Yuanyuan

    2018-01-01

    Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT), as a novel 3D imaging technique, can obtain a 3D refractive index (RI) distribution to reveal the important optical properties of transparent samples. According to the theory of ODT, an optical diffraction tomography setup is built based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The propagation direction of object beam is controlled by a 2D translation stage, and 121 holograms based on different illumination angles are recorded by a Charge-coupled Device (CCD). In order to prove the validity and accuracy of the ODT, the 3D RI profile of microsphere with a known RI is firstly measured. An iterative constraint algorithm is employed to improve the imaging accuracy effectively. The 3D morphology and average RI of the microsphere are consistent with that of the actual situation, and the RI error is less than 0.0033. Then, an optical element fabricated by laser with a non-uniform RI is taken as the sample. Its 3D RI profile is obtained by the optical diffraction tomography system.

  4. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  5. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Diffractive beam shaping, tracking and coupling for wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). The full strength of this structure-mediated paradigm can be harnessed by addressing multiple WOWs and manipulating them to work in tandem. We propose the use of diffractive...... techniques to create multiple focal spots that can be coupled into light manipulated WOWs. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to project the necessary phase to generate the multiple coupling light spots. We incorporate a diffractive setup in our Biophotonics Workstation (BWS) and demonstrate...... holographic shaping, tracking of light in 3D with the purpose of coupling light in the WOWs....

  7. Time-multiplexed structured illumination using a DMD for optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, KyeoReh; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Geon; Shin, Seungwoo; Park, YongKeun

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel illumination control technique for optical diffraction tomography (ODT). Various spatial frequencies of beam illumination were controlled by displaying time-averaged sinusoidal patterns using a digital micromirror device (DMD). Compared to the previous method using binary Lee holograms, the present method eliminates unwanted diffracted beams which may deteriorate the image quality of the ODT. We demonstrated the capability of the present method by reconstructing three-dimensional refractive index (RI) distributions of various samples, with high RI sensitivity (\\sigma_\\Delta n = 3.15 +/- 10-4), and reconstructing 3-D RI tomograms of biological samples, which provided quantitative biochemical and morphological information about the samples.

  8. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans.

  9. Optical pendulum effect in one-dimensional diffraction-thick porous silicon based photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, V. B., E-mail: vb.novikov@physics.msu.ru; Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.; Murzina, T. V.; Mantsyzov, B. I. [Department of Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-21

    We present the realization of the multiperiodic optical pendulum effect in 1D porous silicon photonic crystals (PhCs) under dynamical Bragg diffraction in the Laue scheme. The diffraction-thick PhC contained 360 spatial periods with a large variation of the refractive index of adjacent layers of 0.4. The experiments reveal switching of the light leaving the PhC between the two spatial directions, which correspond to Laue diffraction maxima, as the fundamental wavelength or polarization of the incident light is varied. A similar effect can be achieved when the temperature of the sample or the intensity of the additional laser beam illuminating the crystal are changed. We show that in our PhC structures, the spectral period of the pendulum effect is down to 5 nm, while the thermal period is about 10 °C.

  10. Diffraction of a Gaussian laser beam by a straight edge leading to the formation of optical vortices and elliptical diffraction fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeylikovich, Iosif; Nikitin, Aleksandr

    2018-04-01

    The diffraction of a Gaussian laser beam by a straight edge has been studied theoretically and experimentally for many years. In this paper, we have experimentally observed for the first time the formation of the cusped caustic (for the Fresnel number F ≈ 100) in the shadow region of the straight edge, with the cusp placed near the center of the circular laser beam(λ = 0 . 65 μm) overlapped with the elliptical diffraction fringes. These fringes are originated at the region near the cusp of the caustic where light intensity is zero and the wave phase is singular (the optical vortex). We interpret observed diffraction fringes as a result of interference between the helical wave created by the optical vortex and cylindrical wave diffracted at the straight edge. We have theoretically revealed that the number of high contrast diffraction fringes observable in a shadow region is determined by the square of the diffracted angles in the range of spatial frequencies of the scattered light field in excellent agreement with experiments. The extra phase singularities with opposite charges are also observed along the shadow boundary as the fork-like diffraction fringes.

  11. Modeling Optical Lithography Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neureuther, Andrew R.; Rubinstein, Juliet; Chin, Eric; Wang, Lynn; Miller, Marshal; Clifford, Chris; Yamazoe, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Key physical phenomena associated with resists, illumination, lenses and masks are used to show the progress in models and algorithms for modeling optical projection printing as well as current simulation challenges in managing process complexity for manufacturing. The amazing current capability and challenges for projection printing are discussed using the 22 nm device generation. A fundamental foundation for modeling resist exposure, partial coherent imaging and defect printability is given. The technology innovations of resolution enhancement and chemically amplified resist systems and their modeling challenges are overviewed. Automated chip-level applications in pattern pre-compensation and design-anticipation of residual process variations require new simulation approaches.

  12. Design of a diffractive optical element for pattern formation in a bilingual virtual keyboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouchehri, Sohrab; Rahimi, Mojtaba; Oboudiat, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Pattern formation is one of the many applications of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for display. Since DOEs have lightweight and slim nature compared to other optical devices, using them as image projection device in virtual keyboards is suggested. In this paper, we present an approach to designing elements that produce distinct intensity patterns, in the far field, for two wavelengths. These two patterns are images of bilingual virtual keyboard. To achieve this with DOEs is not simple, as they are inherently wavelength specific. Our technique is based on phase periodic characteristic of wavefront using iterative algorithm to design the phase profiles.

  13. Nano-fabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nano-structuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condenser-monochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing free-standing nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented. (author)

  14. Some Novel Bragg Diffraction Optics Elements for Neutron Scattering at Steady State Neutrons Sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Pavol; Lukáš, Petr; Šaroun, Jan; Vrána, Miroslav; Wagner, V.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, - (2001), s. 477-479 ISSN 0031-9015. [Proceedings of the 1st International Symposium on Advanced Science Research (ASR-2000). Tokai, 31.10.2000-02.11.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/97/K038; GA AV ČR IAA1048003 Keywords : bragg diffraction * neutron optics * bent crystals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.628, year: 2001

  15. Diffraction scattering and the parton model in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.

    1985-01-01

    Arguments are presented that the validity of the parton model for hadron scattering in QCD is directly related to the occurrence of the Critical Pomeron description of diffraction scattering. An attractive route suggested for Electroweak and Grand Unification is also briefly described

  16. Diffraction Scattering in the Ericson Model for the S-Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Shebeko, A V

    2000-01-01

    Elastic spinless charge particle scattering on nuclei has been considered by using the strong absorption model put forward by Ericson for the S-matrix in the angular momentum representation. Our analytical method for summation of the partial amplitudes is based upon an extension of the Abel-Plana formula, that enables us to account for contributions from possible singularities of the S-matrix in the right l-halfplane. A uniform asymptotics for the scattering amplitude, derived here, offers a fresh sight at origin of diffractive patterns in the elastic heavy-ion angular distributions. Special attention has been paid to the Coulomb-nuclear interference (particularly, refractive phenomena) for the scattering inside the classically - allowed region (the "illuminated" region) and the classically - forbidden region (the "shadow" region). Unlike the existing analytical results, our solutions of the diffraction problem give no reasons for drawing any deep parallels neither with the Fresnel diffraction in optics nor w...

  17. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.; Forcherio, Gregory T.; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-08-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer-Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP-PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP-PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner-Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner-Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner-Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs.

  18. Rotating and standing waves in a diffractive nonlinear optical system with delayed feedback under O(2) Hopf bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskiy, S. S.; Razgulin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we study one-dimensional rotating and standing waves in a model of an O(2)-symmetric nonlinear optical system with diffraction and delay in the feedback loop whose dynamics is governed by a system of coupled delayed parabolic equation and linear Schrodinger-type equation. We elaborate a two-step approach: transition to a rotating coordinate system to obtain the profiles of the waves as small parameter expansions and the normal form technique to study their qualitative dynamic behavior and stability. Theoretical results stand in a good agreement with direct computer simulations presented.

  19. Wave-guided Optical Waveguides tracked and coupled using dynamic diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro......-actuation requires the optimization of optical forces and optical torques that, in turn, requires the optimization of the underlying light-matter interaction [1]. We have previously proposed and demonstrated micro-targeted light-delivery and the opto-mechanical capabilities of so-called wave-guided optical...

  20. Reducing aberration effect of Fourier transform lens by modifying Fourier spectrum of diffractive optical element in beam shaping optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Song, Qiang; Yue, Weirui; Liu, Jingdan; Wang, Jian; Situ, Guohai; Huang, Huijie

    2015-10-20

    In general, Fourier transform lenses are considered as ideal in the design algorithms of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). However, the inherent aberrations of a real Fourier transform lens disturb the far field pattern. The difference between the generated pattern and the expected design will impact the system performance. Therefore, a method for modifying the Fourier spectrum of DOEs without introducing other optical elements to reduce the aberration effect of the Fourier transform lens is proposed. By applying this method, beam shaping performance is improved markedly for the optical system with a real Fourier transform lens. The experiments carried out with a commercial Fourier transform lens give evidence for this method. The method is capable of reducing the system complexity as well as improving its performance.

  1. Advances in thin film diffraction instrumentation by X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, A.

    1996-01-01

    The structural characterisation of thin films requires a parallel X-ray beam of high intensity. Parallel beam geometry is commonly used in high resolution and single crystal experiments, but also in the field of X-ray diffraction for polycrystalline material (e.g. in phase, texture and stress analysis). For grazing incidence diffraction (GID), the use of small slits on the primary side and of long soller slits with a flat monochromator on the secondary side is standard. New optical elements have been introduced with polychromatic or monochromatic radiation. By means of different applications the results are compared with those of classical beam optics. X-ray fiber optics utilize total external reflection of X-rays on smooth surfaces. Effects of monochromatization are presented. In many fields of application, fiber optics may replace conventional collimators. The use of primary and secondary channel cut crystals can also produce a high parallel monochromatic X-ray beam. A parabolically bent graded multilayer produces a monochromatic parallel beam of high intensity. Compared with classical Bragg-Brentano (focussing) geometry, excellent results have been obtained, especially for samples with an irregular shape. In combination with a channel cut monochromator there is a substantial gain in intensity leading to an increase of the dynamic intensity range of rocking curves

  2. Advances in thin film diffraction instrumentation by X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A. [Rich. Seifert and Co., Analytical X-ray Systems, Ahrensburg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    The structural characterisation of thin films requires a parallel X-ray beam of high intensity. Parallel beam geometry is commonly used in high resolution and single crystal experiments, but also in the field of X-ray diffraction for polycrystalline material (e.g. in phase, texture and stress analysis). For grazing incidence diffraction (GID), the use of small slits on the primary side and of long soller slits with a flat monochromator on the secondary side is standard. New optical elements have been introduced with polychromatic or monochromatic radiation. By means of different applications the results are compared with those of classical beam optics. X-ray fiber optics utilize total external reflection of X-rays on smooth surfaces. Effects of monochromatization are presented. In many fields of application, fiber optics may replace conventional collimators. The use of primary and secondary channel cut crystals can also produce a high parallel monochromatic X-ray beam. A parabolically bent graded multilayer produces a monochromatic parallel beam of high intensity. Compared with classical Bragg-Brentano (focussing) geometry, excellent results have been obtained, especially for samples with an irregular shape. In combination with a channel cut monochromator there is a substantial gain in intensity leading to an increase of the dynamic intensity range of rocking curves.

  3. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-02

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions.

  4. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubec, Adam; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi 2 /Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi 2 forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  5. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubec, Adam, E-mail: adam.kubec@iws.fraunhofer.de; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas [Fraunhofer IWS Dresden, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-27

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi{sub 2}/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi{sub 2} forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  6. Large Optical Telescope Based on High Efficiency Thin Film Planar Diffractive Optics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In future ground-based receivers for deep-space optical communications with spacecraft, aperture diameters of the order of 10 meters are required even with the most...

  7. Diffracted field distributions from the HE sub 1 sub 1 mode in a hollow optical fibre for an atomic funnel

    CERN Document Server

    Ni Yun; Yin Jian Ping

    2003-01-01

    The diffracted near field distribution from an LP sub 0 sub 1 mode in a hollow optical fibre was recently calculated using a scalar model based on the weakly waveguiding approximation (Yoo et al 1999 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 1 364). It showed a dominant Gaussian-like distribution with an increased axial intensity in the central region (not a doughnut-like distribution), so the diffracted output beam from the hollow fibre cannot be used to form an atomic funnel. Using exact solutions of the Maxwell equations based on a vector model, however, we calculate the electric field and intensity distributions of the HE sub 1 sub 1 mode in the same hollow fibre and study the diffracted near- and far-field distributions of the HE sub 1 sub 1 -mode output beam under the Fresnel approximation. We analyse and compare the differences between the output beams from the HE sub 1 sub 1 and LP sub 0 sub 1 modes. Our study shows that both the near- and far-field intensity distributions of the HE sub 1 sub 1 -mode output ...

  8. Propagation analysis of phase-induced amplitude apodization optics based on boundary wave diffraction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Meng, Qingyu; Zheng, Yuetao

    2017-10-16

    Phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) is a promising technique in high contrast coronagraphs due to the characteristics of high efficiency and small inner working angle. In this letter, we present a new method for calculating the diffraction effects in PIAA coronagraphs based on boundary wave diffraction theory. We propose a numerical propagator in an azimuth boundary integral form, and then delve into its analytical propagator using stationary phase approximation. This propagator has straightforward physical meaning and obvious advantage on calculating efficiency, compared with former methods based on numerical integral or angular spectrum propagation method. Using this propagator, we can make a more direct explanation to the significant impact of pre-apodizer. This propagator can also be used to calculate the aberration propagation properties of PIAA optics. The calculating is also simplified since the decomposing procedure is not needed regardless of the form of the aberration.

  9. Genetic local search algorithm for optimization design of diffractive optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G; Chen, Y; Wang, Z; Song, H

    1999-07-10

    We propose a genetic local search algorithm (GLSA) for the optimization design of diffractive optical elements (DOE's). This hybrid algorithm incorporates advantages of both genetic algorithm (GA) and local search techniques. It appears better able to locate the global minimum compared with a canonical GA. Sample cases investigated here include the optimization design of binary-phase Dammann gratings, continuous surface-relief grating array generators, and a uniform top-hat focal plane intensity profile generator. Two GLSA's whose incorporated local search techniques are the hill-climbing method and the simulated annealing algorithm are investigated. Numerical experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is highly efficient and robust. DOE's that have high diffraction efficiency and excellent uniformity can be achieved by use of the algorithm we propose.

  10. Peculiarities of Forming a Multiband Transmission Function Based on Multifrequency Acousto-Optic Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proklov, V. V.; Rezvov, Yu. G.

    2018-01-01

    An analytical solution for the transmission function of noncoherent wideband radiation is obtained under acousto-optic (AO) filtering using a discrete set of monochromatic AO waves with a small spectral overlap. We studied characteristics of the AO transformation of a continuous spectrum of noncoherent radiation into a given set of discrete narrow bands of spectral transmission by excitation of a discrete set of sound frequencies. We carried out the analysis of transmission functions of individual channels taking into account a partial overlap of their spectra and possible intermodulation distortions. It is shown that a stationary value of the root-mean-square light power is found at the electronic output due to the photoelectric transformation and detecting diffracted light. Based on this, a necessary stationary, multiband, and nearly equidistant transmission function of a device can be formed by using a relevant spectrum of acoustic excitation. Peculiarities of this way of forming the multiband transmission function are revealed: the limitation of diffraction efficiency for an individual channel, the possibility of decoupling side lobes of adjacent channels, etc. A multiband acousto-optic filter (MAOF) was simulated that was based on a paratellurite monocrystal (TeO2), which was previously used for experimental optical encoding. The theoretical and experimental results are in gratifying agreement.

  11. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  12. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  13. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuyu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-12-31

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  14. Laser technologies in micro-optics. Part 1. Fabrication of diffractive optical elements and photomasks with amplitude transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiko, V. P.; Korolkov, V. P.; Poleshchuk, A. G.; Sinev, D. A.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is a review of studies carried out by the staff of the National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University, Saint-Petersburg) and the Institute of Automation and Electrometry of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAE SB RAS, Novosibirsk) in the field of development of laser engineering processes for the formation of the structure of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) and photomasks with amplitude binary and grayscale transmission. This paper also describes the results of the study of laser thermochemical technology for fabricating chrome DOEs and technologies for the fabrication of grayscale DOEs and photomasks based on the use of amorphous silicon and LDW glass.

  15. Accurate Antenna Models in Ground Penetrating Radar Diffraction Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2002-01-01

    Linear inversion schemes based on the concept of diffraction tomography have proven successful for ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging. In many GPR surveys, the antennas of the GPR are located close to the air-soil interface and, therefore, it is important to incorporate the presence of this i......Linear inversion schemes based on the concept of diffraction tomography have proven successful for ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging. In many GPR surveys, the antennas of the GPR are located close to the air-soil interface and, therefore, it is important to incorporate the presence...... to investigate the validity of this model. We extend that formulation to hold for arbitrary antennas. For simplicity, the 2.5D case is considered, that is, it is assumed that the scattering object in the soil is invariant in one direction, which, for instance, is the case for a pipe. The arbitrary antennas...

  16. Backscatter analysis of dihedral corner reflectors using physical optics and the physical theory of diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, Timothy; Balanis, Constantine A.

    1987-01-01

    The backscatter cross-sections of dihedral corner reflectors in the azimuthal plane are presently determined by both physical optics (PO) and the physical theory of diffraction (PTD), yielding results for the vertical and horizontal polarizations. In the first analysis method used, geometrical optics is used in place of PO at initial reflections in order to maintain the planar character of the reflected wave and reduce the complexity of the analysis. In the second method, PO is used at almost every reflection in order to maximize the accuracy of the PTD solution at the expense of a rapid increase in complexity. Induced surface current densities and resulting cross section patterns are illustrated for the two methods.

  17. Optical Design of COATLI: A Diffraction-Limited Visible Imager with Fast Guiding and Active Optics Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Watson, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    We present the optical design of COATLI, a two channel visible imager for a comercial 50 cm robotic telescope. COATLI will deliver diffraction-limited images (approximately 0.3 arcsec FWHM) in the riz bands, inside a 4.2 arcmin field, and seeing limited images (approximately 0.6 arcsec FWHM) in the B and g bands, inside a 5 arcmin field, by means of a tip-tilt mirror for fast guiding, and a deformable mirror for active optics, both located on two optically transferred pupil planes. The optical design is based on two collimator-camera systems plus a pupil transfer relay, using achromatic doublets of CaF2 and S-FTM16 and one triplet of N-BK7 and CaF2. We discuss the effciency, tolerancing, thermal behavior and ghosts. COATLI will be installed at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, Mexico, in 2018.

  18. FDTD method and models in optical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Weng, Lingdong; Zhu, Hao; Du, Jihe

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been proposed as a pedagogical way in optical education. Meanwhile, FDTD solutions, a simulation software based on the FDTD algorithm, has been presented as a new tool which helps abecedarians to build optical models and to analyze optical problems. The core of FDTD algorithm is that the time-dependent Maxwell's equations are discretized to the space and time partial derivatives, and then, to simulate the response of the interaction between the electronic pulse and the ideal conductor or semiconductor. Because the solving of electromagnetic field is in time domain, the memory usage is reduced and the simulation consequence on broadband can be obtained easily. Thus, promoting FDTD algorithm in optical education is available and efficient. FDTD enables us to design, analyze and test modern passive and nonlinear photonic components (such as bio-particles, nanoparticle and so on) for wave propagation, scattering, reflection, diffraction, polarization and nonlinear phenomena. The different FDTD models can help teachers and students solve almost all of the optical problems in optical education. Additionally, the GUI of FDTD solutions is so friendly to abecedarians that learners can master it quickly.

  19. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  20. An optical super-microscope for far-field, real-time imaging beyond the diffraction limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex M H; Eleftheriades, George V

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy suffers from a fundamental resolution limitation arising from the diffractive nature of light. While current solutions to sub-diffraction optical microscopy involve combinations of near-field, non-linear and fine scanning operations, we hereby propose and demonstrate the optical super-microscope (OSM) - a superoscillation-based linear imaging system with far-field working and observation distances - which can image an object in real-time and with sub-diffraction resolution. With our proof-of-principle prototype we report a point spread function with a spot size clearly reduced from the diffraction limit, and demonstrate corresponding improvements in two-point resolution experiments. Harnessing a new understanding of superoscillations, based on antenna array theory, our OSM achieves far-field, sub-diffraction optical imaging of an object without the need for fine scanning, data post-processing or object pre-treatment. Hence the OSM can be used in a wide variety of imaging applications beyond the diffraction limit, including real-time imaging of moving objects.

  1. Correct interpretation of diffraction properties of quartz crystals for X-ray optics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xian-Rong; Gog, Thomas; Kim, Jungho; Kasman, Elina; Said, Ayman H.; Casa, Diego M.; Wieczorek, Michael; Hönnicke, Marcelo G.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2018-02-01

    Quartz has hundreds of strong Bragg reflections that may offer a great number of choices for making fixed-angle X-ray analyzers and polarizers at virtually any hard X-ray energies with selectable resolution. However, quartz crystals, unlike silicon and germanium, are chiral and may thus appear in two different forms of handedness that are mirror images. Furthermore, because of the threefold rotational symmetry along thecaxis, the {h1h2h3L} and {h2h1h3L} Bragg reflections may have quite different Darwin bandwidth, reflectivity and angular acceptance, although they have the same Bragg angle. The design of X-ray optics from quartz crystals therefore requires unambiguous determination of the orientation, handedness and polarity of the crystals. The Laue method and single-axis diffraction technique can provide such information, but the variety of conventions used in the literature to describe quartz structures has caused widespread confusion. The current studies give detailed guidelines for design and fabrication of quartz X-ray optics, with special emphasis on the correct interpretation of Laue patterns in terms of the crystallography and diffraction properties of quartz. Meanwhile, the quartz crystals examined were confirmed by X-ray topography to have acceptably low densities of dislocations and other defects, which is the foundation for developing high-resolution quartz-based X-ray optics.

  2. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  3. Diffraction-unlimited all-optical imaging and writing with a photochromic GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotjohann, Tim; Testa, Ilaria; Leutenegger, Marcel; Bock, Hannes; Urban, Nicolai T; Lavoie-Cardinal, Flavie; Willig, Katrin I; Eggeling, Christian; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W

    2011-09-11

    Lens-based optical microscopy failed to discern fluorescent features closer than 200 nm for decades, but the recent breaking of the diffraction resolution barrier by sequentially switching the fluorescence capability of adjacent features on and off is making nanoscale imaging routine. Reported fluorescence nanoscopy variants switch these features either with intense beams at defined positions or randomly, molecule by molecule. Here we demonstrate an optical nanoscopy that records raw data images from living cells and tissues with low levels of light. This advance has been facilitated by the generation of reversibly switchable enhanced green fluorescent protein (rsEGFP), a fluorescent protein that can be reversibly photoswitched more than a thousand times. Distributions of functional rsEGFP-fusion proteins in living bacteria and mammalian cells are imaged at <40-nanometre resolution. Dendritic spines in living brain slices are super-resolved with about a million times lower light intensities than before. The reversible switching also enables all-optical writing of features with subdiffraction size and spacings, which can be used for data storage.

  4. Advances in design and testing of limited angle optical diffraction tomographysystem for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuś, A.; Makowski, P.; Kujawińska, M.

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography has been steadily proving its potential to study one of the hot topics in modern cell biology -- 3D dynamic changes in cells' morphology represented with refractive index values. In this technique digital holography is combined with tomographic reconstruction and thus it is necessary to provide projections acquired at different viewing directions. Usually the Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration is used and while the object beam performs scanning, the reference beam is in most cases stationary. This approach either limits possible scanning strategies or requires additional mechanical movement to be introduced in the reference beam. On the other hand, spiral or grid scanning is possible in alternative common-path or Michelson configurations. However, in this case there is no guarantee that a specimen is sparse enough for the object to interfere with an object-free part of the beam. In this paper we present a modified version of Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based tomographic microscope, in which both object and reference beam are subject to scanning using one scanning device only thus making any scanning scenario possible. This concept is realized with a custom-built optical system in the reference beam and is appropriate for mechanical as well as optical scanning. Usually, the tomographic reconstruction setups and algorithms are verified using a microsphere phantom, which is not enough to test the influence of the distribution of the projections. In this work we propose a more complex calibration object created using two-photon polymerization.

  5. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using MathematicaTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. Diffraction-free, self-reconstructing Bessel beam generation using thermal nonlinear optical effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Cheng, X. M.; Chen, H. W.; He, B.; Ren, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Bai, J. T.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a method to generate a Bessel beam using cross-phase modulation based on the thermal nonlinear optical effect. The thermal nonlinear medium is shown to have the ability to vary a Gaussian beam (probe beam) into a hollow beam when the medium is illuminated with a counter-propagating Gaussian beam (pump beam). It is demonstrated that this method has no restriction to the probe beam wavelength. Moreover, the generated Bessel beam exhibits superior non-diffraction properties during propagation and self-healing after encountering an obstruction on the beam path. The parameters of the beam can be easily adjusted by both the pump beam power and the sample concentration. The merits of variable parameters, no requirement for input beam wavelengths, simple setup, and low-cost would make this method significant in a variety of applications, especially in those areas where the parameters of the Bessel beam need to be easily adjusted without changing the setup.

  7. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications.

  8. Beam shaping for multicolour light-emitting diodes with diffractive optical elements

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Chao

    2016-10-06

    An improved particle swarm optimization method is proposed for the design of ultra-thin diffractive optical elements (DOEs) enabling multicolour beam shaping functionality. We employ pre-optimized initial structures and adaptive weight strategy in the algorithm to achieve better and identical shaping performance for multiple colours. Accordingly, a DOE for shaping light from green and blue LEDs has been designed and fabricated. Both experiment and numerical simulations have been conducted and the results agree well with each other. 15.66% average root mean square error (RMSE) and 0.22% RMSE difference are achieved. In addition, the parameters closely related to the performance of the optimization are analysed, which can provide insights for future application designs.

  9. High resolution double-sided diffractive optics for hard X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Karvinen, Petri; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Müller, Elisabeth; Färm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko; Kewish, Cameron M; Somogyi, Andrea; David, Christian

    2015-01-26

    The fabrication of high aspect ratio metallic nanostructures is crucial for the production of efficient diffractive X-ray optics in the hard X-ray range. We present a novel method to increase their structure height via the double-sided patterning of the support membrane. In transmission, the two Fresnel zone plates on the two sides of the substrate will act as a single zone plate with added structure height. The presented double-sided zone plates with 30 nm smallest zone width offer up to 9.9% focusing efficiency at 9 keV, that results in a factor of two improvement over their previously demonstrated single-sided counterparts. The increase in efficiency paves the way to speed up X-ray microscopy measurements and allows the more efficient utilization of the flux in full-field X-ray microscopy.

  10. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future

  11. Optical enhancement of a printed organic tandem solar cell using diffractive nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jan A; Offermans, Ton; Chrapa, Marek; Pfannmöller, Martin; Bals, Sara; Ferrini, Rolando; Nisato, Giovanni

    2018-03-19

    Solution processable organic tandem solar cells offer a promising approach to achieve cost-effective, lightweight and flexible photovoltaics. In order to further enhance the efficiency of optimized organic tandem cells, diffractive light-management nanostructures were designed for an optimal redistribution of the light as function of both wavelength and propagation angles in both sub-cells. As the fabrication of these optical structures is compatible with roll-to-roll production techniques such as hot-embossing or UV NIL imprinting, they present an optimal cost-effective solution for printed photovoltaics. Tandem cells with power conversion efficiencies of 8-10% were fabricated in the ambient atmosphere by doctor blade coating, selected to approximate the conditions during roll-to-roll manufacturing. Application of the light management structure onto an 8.7% efficient encapsulated tandem cell boosted the conversion efficiency of the cell to 9.5%.

  12. Status and recent developments in diffractive neutron optics at the ILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, P.; Bigault, T.; Andersen, K. H.; Baudin-Cavallo, J.; Ben Saïdane, K.; Berneron, M.; El-Aazzouzzi, A.; Gorny, D.; Graf, W.; Guiblain, T.; Hehn, R.; Hetzler, E.; Menthonnex, C.; Mestrallet, B.; Dewhurst, C.

    2006-11-01

    We present the present status and recent advances in diffractive neutron optics at the ILL. Very high-quality copper crystals with intrinsic mosaics of the order of 1‧ can now be produced which is of interest for the reproducible production of higher-mosaic anisotropic crystals for neutron monochromators and potentially for a gamma-ray Laue lens for astrophysical applications. Recent progress in the growth of mosaic germanium crystals now allows us to produce high-quality crystals with a controllable and anisotropic mosaic of up to several degrees. Polarising supermirrors of Fe-Si can now be produced with critical angles of up to 4 times the critical angle of natural nickel. Recent applications include a solid-state S-bender, a transmission polariser for small-angle scattering and a polarising monochromator for 8.9 Å neutrons for the production of ultra-cold neutrons.

  13. Status and recent developments in diffractive neutron optics at the ILL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, P.; Bigault, T.; Andersen, K.H.; Baudin-Cavallo, J.; Ben Saidane, K.; Berneron, M.; El-Aazzouzzi, A.; Gorny, D.; Graf, W.; Guiblain, T.; Hehn, R.; Hetzler, E.; Menthonnex, C.; Mestrallet, B.; Dewhurst, C.

    2006-01-01

    We present the present status and recent advances in diffractive neutron optics at the ILL. Very high-quality copper crystals with intrinsic mosaics of the order of 1' can now be produced which is of interest for the reproducible production of higher-mosaic anisotropic crystals for neutron monochromators and potentially for a gamma-ray Laue lens for astrophysical applications. Recent progress in the growth of mosaic germanium crystals now allows us to produce high-quality crystals with a controllable and anisotropic mosaic of up to several degrees. Polarising supermirrors of Fe-Si can now be produced with critical angles of up to 4 times the critical angle of natural nickel. Recent applications include a solid-state S-bender, a transmission polariser for small-angle scattering and a polarising monochromator for 8.9 A neutrons for the production of ultra-cold neutrons

  14. Application of diffractive optical elements for inspection of complicated through holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugui, Yuri V.; Lemeshko, Yuri A.; Zav'yalov, Peter S.

    2008-10-01

    The inspection of geometrical parameters of through holes with different configurations is one of the urgent tasks in industry. The majority of the existing noncontact inspection methods doesn't allow measuring the holes of complicated (noncylindrical) configurations with good performances. Two simple developed methods based on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) make possible to inspect the through holes (with the diameter from 5 to 100 mm) both cylindrical and complicated configurations with acceptable lateral and axial (longitudinal) resolution. First method, based on the scanning of inner hole surface by light ring, takes a mechanical displacement of the inspected article along its axis. The second holes inspection method uses the DOE as the diffractive focuser, which generates N light rings simultaneously along the hole axis with ring spacing Δz. In this case no need for mechanical displacement of inspected articles, output image contains full measuring information about 3D article hole configuration. We have fabricated some binary DOEs using circular laser writing system CLWS-300, developed and produced at the TDI SIE SB RAS. The obtained results have been used under the development of universal automatic inspection system of nuclear reactors fuel assemblies spacer grids.

  15. Design and fabrication of a diffractive optical element as a spectrum-splitting solar concentrator for lateral multijunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingli; Wang, Jinze; Quan, Baogang; Zhang, Qiulin; Zhang, Dongxiang; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo; Pan, Li; Wang, Yanqin; Yang, Guozhen

    2013-04-10

    We have designed a single thin planar diffractive optical element (DOE) based on the principle of diffractive optics to simultaneously split and concentrate the incident light into several energy ranges for lateral multijunction solar cells. A prototype with the maximum thickness of 6.95 μm and 32 quantized levels in depth was fabricated by photolithographic technology. The spectrum-splitting and concentrating performance of the prototype, which were measured quantitatively, show good agreement with the simulation results. As mass production of a DOE can be produced by imprint technology, our design provides a feasible means for low-cost, large-scale, and high-efficiency photovoltaic applications.

  16. The Massive Yang-Mills Model and Diffractive Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Forshaw, J R; Parrinello, C

    1999-01-01

    We argue that the massive Yang-Mills model of Kunimasa and Goto, Slavnov, and Cornwall, in which massive gauge vector bosons are introduced in a gauge-invariant way without resorting to the Higgs mechanism, may be useful for studying diffractive scattering of strongly interacting particles. With this motivation, we perform in this model explicit calculations of S-matrix elements between quark states, at tree level, one loop, and two loops, and discuss issues of renormalisability and unitarity. In particular, it is shown that the S-matrix element for quark scattering is renormalisable at one-loop order and is only logarithmically non-renormalisable at two loops. The discrepancies in the ultraviolet regime between the one-loop predictions of this model and those of massless QCD are discussed in detail. In addition, some of the similarities and differences between the massive Yang-Mills model and theories with a Higgs mechanism are analysed at the level of the S-matrix. As an elementary application of the model ...

  17. Nonintercepting Electron Beam Diagnostics Based on Optical Diffraction Radiation for X-Ray FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Sereno, N S; Yang, B X; Yao, C

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of providing nonintercepting beam diagnostics that address transverse parameters such as beam size and divergence in a linear transport line has been met. We have successfully used near-field imaging of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) from a 7-GeV electron beam passing near a single edge of a conducting screen to obtain beam size for the first time [1]. In this case appreciable visible wavelength ODR is emitted for impact parameters of 1 to 2 mm, values that are close to gamma times the reduced observation wavelength. We have now upgraded our imaging system to include an intensified camera; selectable bandpass filters, neutral density filters, and polarizers; a steering mirror; and an optical lens setup that provides either near-field or far-field imaging. The ODR has been obtained in both the single-edge mode and aperture mode with a single pulse of 3.3 nC. Beam-size resolution in the 20-50 micron regime is projected while beam position resolution to 10 microns with a smaller beam and highe...

  18. Visual and optical performance with two different diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses compared to a monofocal lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Piñero, David P; Plaza-Puche, Ana B; Amparo, Francisco; Jiménez, Ramón; Rodríguez-Prats, Jose L; Javaloy, Jaime

    2011-08-01

    To compare the visual acuity outcomes as well as the ocular optical performance of eyes implanted with either a monofocal or one of two diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs). One hundred two consecutive eyes of 51 bilateral cataract patients (age 49 to 80 years) were divided into three groups: 22 eyes were implanted with a monofocal IOL (monofocal group), 40 eyes with the Acrysof ReSTOR SN6AD3 IOL (ReSTOR group), and 40 eyes with the Acri.Lisa 366D IOL (Acri.Lisa group). Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. Additionally, ocular optical quality and intraocular aberrations were evaluated postoperatively. Significant improvement after surgery in uncorrected and corrected distance and near visual acuity was observed in all three groups (P≤.05). Uncorrected near visual acuity was significantly better in eyes from the ReSTOR and Acri.Lisa groups compared to the monofocal group (P≤.01). Photopic contrast sensitivity was significantly better for the spatial frequency of 3 cycles/degree in the monofocal group (P<.01). Significantly higher values of the ocular Strehl ratio and cutoff modulation transfer function spatial frequency were also found in the Acri.Lisa group (P=.01). An acceptable range of vision between near and distance peaks was observed in the defocus curves of the ReSTOR and Acri.Lisa groups. The AcrySof ReSTOR and Acri.Lisa 366D IOLs are able to successfully restore near and intermediate visual function after cataract surgery; however, the Acri.Lisa design seems to provide better optical performance. These results need to be confirmed in a randomized, prospective trial. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Two-dimensional higher-diffraction-order optical beam splitter based on phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Dewei; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Liu, Hongpeng; Wang, Jian; Gao, Hongyue

    2009-06-01

    A two-dimensional optical beam splitter has been realized that uses the higher diffraction orders of a refractive-index grating. Gratings were recorded experimentally with light from a semiconductor laser incident at a small angle on phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer. The incident signal beam, which was made up of three different wavelengths (632.8, 532.0, and 488.0 nm), was split by the grating into multiple output beams with nearly equal size and separation. Results are given for when the sample grating was placed behind, in front of, and in the focal plane of a Fourier lens. The properties of higher-order-diffraction images have been discussed. The discussion shows that a two-dimensional higher-diffraction-order optical beam splitter provides a practical method for splitting a signal beam.

  20. High-power fiber laser with a polarizing diffraction grating milled on the facet of an optical fiber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, Martin; Vaniš, Jan; Baravets, Yauhen; Todorov, Filip; Čtyroký, Jiří; Honzátko, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 26 (2016), s. 30225-30233 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-07908S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Optical fibers * Polarization * Diffraction gratings Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  1. Extended ABCD matrix formalism for the description of femtosecond diffraction patterns; application to femtosecond digital in-line holography with anamorphic optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Marc; Shen, Huanhuan; Coetmellec, Sebastien; Lebrun, Denis

    2012-03-10

    We present a new model to predict diffraction patterns of femtosecond pulses through complex optical systems. The model is based on the extension of an ABCD matrix formalism combined with generalized Huygens-Fresnel transforms (already used in the CW regime) to the femtosecond regime. The model is tested to describe femtosecond digital in-line holography experiments realized in situ through a cylindrical Plexiglas pipe. The model allows us to establish analytical relations that link the holographic reconstruction process to the experimental parameters of the pipe and of the incident beam itself. Simulations and experimental results are in good concordance. Femtosecond digital in-line holography is shown to allow significant coherent noise reduction, and this model will be particularly efficient to describe a wide range of optical geometries. More generally, the model developed can be easily used in any experiment where the knowledge of the precise evolution of femtosecond transverse patterns is required.

  2. Phase recovery and lensless imaging by iterative methods in optical, X-ray and electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J C H; Weierstall, U; Howells, M

    2002-05-15

    Thomas Young's quantitative analysis of interference effects provided the confidence needed to revive the wave theory of light, and firmly established the concept of phase in optics. Phase plays a similarly fundamental role in matter-wave interferometry, for which the field-emission electron microscope provides ideal instrumentation. The wave-particle duality is vividly demonstrated by experimental 'Young's fringes' using coherent electron beams under conditions in which the flight time is less than the time between particle emission. A brief historical review is given of electron interferometry and holography, including the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the electron Sagnac interferometer. The simultaneous development of phase-contrast imaging at subnanometre spatial resolution has greatly deepened our understanding of atomic processes in biology, materials science and condensed-matter physics, while electron holography has become a routine tool for the mapping of electrostatic and magnetic fields in materials on a nanometre scale. The encoding of phase information in scattered farfield intensities is discussed, and non-interferometric, non-crystallographic methods for phase retrieval are reviewed in relationship to electron holography. Examples of phase measurement and diffraction-limited imaging using the hybrid input-output iterative algorithm are given, including simulations for soft X-ray imaging, and new experimental results for coherent electron and visible-light scattering. Image reconstruction is demonstrated from experimental electron and visible-light Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. The prospects this provides for lensless imaging using particles for which no lenses exist (such as neutrons, condensates, coherent atom beams and X-rays) are discussed. These new interactions can be expected to provide new information, perhaps, for example, in biology, with the advantage of less damage to samples.

  3. Sequential x-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM x-ray optics testing beamline at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Liu, Zunping; Lang, Keenan; Huang, Xianrong; Wieczorek, Michael; Kasman, Elina; Hammonds, John; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report progress on implementation and commissioning of sequential X-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM Optics Testing Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source to accommodate growing needs of strain characterization in diffractive crystal optics and other semiconductor single crystals. The setup enables evaluation of strain in single crystals in the nearly-nondispersive double-crystal geometry. Si asymmetric collimator crystals of different crystallographic orientations were designed, fabricated and characterized using in-house capabilities. Imaging the exit beam using digital area detectors permits rapid sequential acquisition of X-ray topographs at different angular positions on the rocking curve of a crystal under investigation. Results on sensitivity and spatial resolution are reported based on experiments with high-quality Si and diamond crystals. The new setup complements laboratory-based X-ray topography capabilities of the Optics group at the Advanced Photon Source.

  4. Optical diffraction tomography microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of ±37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ∼0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  5. Label-free identification of white blood cell using optical diffraction tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Min-hyeok; Kang, Suk-Jo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    White blood cells (WBC) have crucial roles in immune systems which defend the host against from disease conditions and harmful invaders. Various WBC subsets have been characterized and reported to be involved in many pathophysiologic conditions. It is crucial to isolate a specific WBC subset to study its pathophysiological roles in diseases. Identification methods for a specific WBC population are rely on invasive approaches, including Wright-Gimesa staining for observing cellular morphologies and fluorescence staining for specific protein markers. While these methods enable precise classification of WBC populations, they could disturb cellular viability or functions. In order to classify WBC populations in a non-invasive manner, we exploited optical diffraction tomography (ODT). ODT is a three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative phase imaging technique that measures 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions of individual WBCs. To test feasibility of label-free classification of WBC populations using ODT, we measured four subtypes of WBCs, including B cell, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, and natural killer (NK) cell. From measured 3-D RI tomograms of WBCs, we obtain quantitative structural and biochemical information and classify each WBC population using a machine learning algorithm.

  6. Optical diffraction tomography in fluid velocimetry: the use of a priori information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobera, J.; Coupland, J. M.

    2008-07-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) has been used successfully to make three-dimensional, three-component flow measurements from holographic recordings of seeded fluid. It is clear that measurements can only be made in regions that contain particles, but simply adding more seeding results in poor quality images due to the effects of multiple scattering. In this paper, we describe optical diffraction tomography (ODT) techniques and consider its use as a means to overcome the problems of multiple scattering in HPIV. We consider several approaches to tomographic reconstruction that are essentially based on linear and nonlinear combinations of holographic reconstructions of the scattered fields observed under varied illuminating conditions. We show that linear reconstruction provides images of highest fidelity, but none of the methods properly accounts for the effects of multiple scattering. We go on to consider nonlinear optimization methods in ODT that attempt to minimize the error between the scattered field computed from an estimate of the particle distribution and that measured in practice. We describe an optimization procedure that is based on the conjugated gradient method (CGM) that makes use of a priori information (the size and refractive index of the seeding particles) to effectively reduce the problem to that of finding the set of particle locations. Some 2D numerical experiments are computed and some promising results are shown.

  7. Optical diffraction tomography in fluid velocimetry: the use of a priori information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobera, J; Coupland, J M

    2008-01-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) has been used successfully to make three-dimensional, three-component flow measurements from holographic recordings of seeded fluid. It is clear that measurements can only be made in regions that contain particles, but simply adding more seeding results in poor quality images due to the effects of multiple scattering. In this paper, we describe optical diffraction tomography (ODT) techniques and consider its use as a means to overcome the problems of multiple scattering in HPIV. We consider several approaches to tomographic reconstruction that are essentially based on linear and nonlinear combinations of holographic reconstructions of the scattered fields observed under varied illuminating conditions. We show that linear reconstruction provides images of highest fidelity, but none of the methods properly accounts for the effects of multiple scattering. We go on to consider nonlinear optimization methods in ODT that attempt to minimize the error between the scattered field computed from an estimate of the particle distribution and that measured in practice. We describe an optimization procedure that is based on the conjugated gradient method (CGM) that makes use of a priori information (the size and refractive index of the seeding particles) to effectively reduce the problem to that of finding the set of particle locations. Some 2D numerical experiments are computed and some promising results are shown

  8. Memory sparing, fast scattering formalism for rigorous diffraction modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iff, W.; Kämpfe, T.; Jourlin, Y.; Tishchenko, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The basics and algorithmic steps of a novel scattering formalism suited for memory sparing and fast electromagnetic calculations are presented. The formalism, called ‘S-vector algorithm’ (by analogy with the known scattering-matrix algorithm), allows the calculation of the collective scattering spectra of individual layered micro-structured scattering objects. A rigorous method of linear complexity is applied to model the scattering at individual layers; here the generalized source method (GSM) resorting to Fourier harmonics as basis functions is used as one possible method of linear complexity. The concatenation of the individual scattering events can be achieved sequentially or in parallel, both having pros and cons. The present development will largely concentrate on a consecutive approach based on the multiple reflection series. The latter will be reformulated into an implicit formalism which will be associated with an iterative solver, resulting in improved convergence. The examples will first refer to 1D grating diffraction for the sake of simplicity and intelligibility, with a final 2D application example.

  9. 'Ivory': Optomechanical modeling of an optical image correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatheway, Alson E.

    2005-09-01

    "Ivory" is a computer code that generates Optomechanical Constraint Equations (OCE) from the optical physical prescription data. The OCE predict the translation, rotation and size change of an optical image from the motions, temperature changes and other factors affecting the optical elements forming the image. An airborne optical image correlator has been designed and built for UAV applications. Commercially available optical components were used throughout. The centerpiece of the mechanical design was control of the manufacturing and assembly tolerances to assure precise alignment and stable image registration for high performance operation. Control was maintained during the design and manufacturing process by the use of optomechanical models based upon the Optomechanical Constraint Equations (OCE). The equations provided a comprehensive optomechanical model that related the critical optical functions (images and diffraction patterns) to the translation and rotation (dimensions and tolerances) of all the piece-parts. The equations also modeled the thermal and wavelength stability of the correlator. Engineers may generate the OCE by longhand calculations or in a computer spreadsheet. For larger optical systems this can be very time consuming. Ivory automates the generation of the OCE for the engineer making timely and accurate calculations of the image registration errors possible, even for very complex optical systems. This paper shows the application of the OCE to a variety of challenges in the optical image correlator: athermalization, alignment procedures, optical and mechanical tolerance budgets, optimizing the folded geometry and sizing alignment mechanisms.

  10. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  11. Improvements to optical performance in diffractive elements used for off-axis illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kevin; Fedor, Adam; Felder, Daniel; Childers, John; Emig, Tim

    2009-08-01

    As photolithographic tools are pressed to print the ever shrinking features required in today's devices, complex off-axis illumination is taking an ever increasing role in meeting this challenge. This, in turn, is driving tighter, more stringent requirements on the diffractive elements used in these illumination systems. Specifically, any imbalance in the poles of an off-axis illuminator will contribute to reductions in the ultimate imaging performance of a lithographic tool and increased complexity in tool-to-tool matching. The article will focus on improvements to the manufacturing process that achieve substantially better pole balance. The modeling of the possible process contributors will be discussed. Challenges resulting from the manufacturing methodology will be shared. Finally, the improvement in manufacturing process performance will be reported by means of a pole balance capability index.

  12. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, Petr; Oberta, Peter

    2011-03-01

    A new kind of two channel-cut crystals X-ray monochromator in dispersive (+,-,-,+) position which spatially separates harmonics is proposed. The diffracting surfaces are oriented so that the diffraction is inclined. Owing to refraction the diffracted beam is sagittally deviated. The deviation depends on wavelength and is much higher for the first harmonics than for higher harmonics. This leads to spatial harmonics separation. The idea is supported by ray-tracing simulation.

  13. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  14. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use...... of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested...... for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements....

  15. Influence of the spatial frequency on the diffractive optical elements fabrication in PDLCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, R.; Fenoll, S.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Francés, J.; Navarro Fuster, V.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2016-09-01

    Photopolymers are classical holographic recording materials. Recently their chemical composition and the fabrication techniques have been optimized for many new applications such as interconnectors, solar concentrations, 2-D photonic structures, or wave-guides. Their potential usefulness has been drastically increased by the introduction of dispersed liquid crystal molecules; these components can be concentrated in the non-exposed zones of the material by a photopolymerization induced phase separation process (PIPS). Therefore, by combining polymer and dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) has emerged as a new composite material for switchable diffractive optical elements (DOEs). Parallel to the material advances some techniques have been proposed to record very low spatial frequencies DOE's. Different researchers have reported proposes to record DOE like fork gratings, photonics structures, lenses, sinusoidal, blazed or fork gratings. In this work we have studied the behavior of a PDLC material to record DOE's with different spatial periods: from 1 μm, using holographic technique, to more than 200 μm, Liquid Cristal on Silicon (LCoS) display working in mostly amplitude mode as a master. Due to the improvement in the spatial light modulation technology and the pixel miniaturization, this technique permits us store gratings with spatial frequencies until few microns. Additionally, this technology permits us an accurate and dynamic control of the phase and the amplitude of the recording beam. In particular, for our case, to generate the blazed gratings, we use an LCoS-Pluto provided by Holoeye with a resolution of 1920x1080 (HDTV) pixels and a pixel size of 7.7x7.7 m2.

  16. Subreflector extension for improved efficiencies in Cassegrain antennas - GTD/PO analysis. [Geometrical Theory of Diffraction/Physical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1986-01-01

    Both offset and symmetric Cassegrain reflector antennas are used in satellite and ground communication systems. It is known that the subreflector diffraction can degrade the performance of these reflectors. A geometrical theory of diffraction/physical optics analysis technique is used to investigate the effects of the extended subreflector, beyond its optical rim, on the reflector efficiency and far-field patterns. Representative numerical results are shown for an offset Cassegrain reflector antenna with different feed illumination tapers and subreflector extensions. It is observed that for subreflector extensions as small as one wavelength, noticeable improvements in the overall efficiencies can be expected. Useful design data are generated for the efficiency curves and far-field patterns.

  17. Diffractive Optical Elements with a Large Angle of Operation Recorded in Acrylamide Based Photopolymer on Flexible Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Akbari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A holographic device characterised by a large angular range of operation is under development. The aim of this study is to increase the angular working range of the diffractive lens by stacking three layers of high efficiency optical elements on top of each other so that light is collected (and focussed from a broader range of angles. The angular range of each individual lens element is important, and work has already been done in an acrylamide-based photosensitive polymer to broaden the angular range of individual elements using holographic recording at a low spatial frequency. This paper reports new results on the angular selectivity of stacked diffractive lenses. A working range of 12° is achieved. The diffractive focussing elements were recorded holographically with a central spatial frequency of 300 l/mm using exposure energy of 60 mJ/cm2 at a range of recording angles. At this spatial frequency with layers of thickness 50 ± 5 µm, a diffraction efficiency of 80% and 50% was achieved in the single lens element and combined device, respectively. The optical recording process and the properties of the multilayer structure are described and discussed. Holographic recording of a single lens element is also successfully demonstrated on a flexible glass substrate (Corning(R Willow(R Glass for the first time.

  18. Light emitting polymer blends and diffractive optical elements in high-speed direct laser writing of microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyal, H; Waddie, A J; Taghizadeh, M R; McCarthy, A; Walker, A C; Mackintosh, A R; Kuehne, A J C; Pethrick, R A; Gu, E; Dawson, M D; Bradley, D D C

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a series of improvements that have been made to our direct laser writing waveguide/microfluidic fabrication technology. We demonstrate significant increases in the writing speed (measured in micrometres of written structure per second) by both the use of customized photopolymers containing light emitting polymer and the inclusion of a diffractive optical element to enable the writing of multiple channels in a single pass

  19. Near-diffraction-limited and low-haze electro-optical tunable liquid crystal lens with floating electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liwei; Bryant, Doug; Van Heugten, Tony; Bos, Philip J

    2013-04-08

    A near-diffraction-limited, low-haze and tunable liquid crystal (LC) lens is presented. Building on an understanding of the key factors that have limited the performance of lenses based on liquid crystals, we show a simple design whose optical quality is similar to a high quality glass lens. It uses 'floating' electrodes to provide a smooth, controllable applied potential profile across the aperture to manage the phase profile.

  20. Optical Excisor Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    The model is a set of equations which may be solved manually or by means of a computer to determine the behavior of the system under a specific set of...PMW 144-2, CDR Frentzel) Washington DC 20363-5103 7. Comando de Operaciones Navales 2 Edificio Libertad Comodoro Py 2055 Buenos Aires (1104) Reptiblica

  1. Application of the method of auxiliary sources in optical diffraction microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Hansen, Poul-Erik

    2010-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources is used for characterisation of grating defects. Grating profiles are characterised by best fit matching of a library of diffraction efficiencies with numerical simulated diffraction efficiencies with defects. It is shown that the presented method can solve the inv...... the inverse problem with an accuracy usually thought to require rigorous electromagnetic theories....

  2. Collision models in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum collision models (CMs) provide advantageous case studies for investigating major issues in open quantum systems theory, and especially quantum non-Markovianity. After reviewing their general definition and distinctive features, we illustrate the emergence of a CM in a familiar quantum optics scenario. This task is carried out by highlighting the close connection between the well-known input-output formalism and CMs. Within this quantum optics framework, usual assumptions in the CMs' literature - such as considering a bath of noninteracting yet initially correlated ancillas - have a clear physical origin.

  3. Modeling and verification of the diffraction-limited visible light telescope aboard the solar observing satellite HINODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Tsuneta, S.; Ichimoto, K.; Shimizu, T.

    2011-09-01

    HINODE, Japanese for "sunrise", is a spacecraft dedicated for observations of the Sun, and was launched in 2006 to study the Sun's magnetic fields and how their explosive energies propagate through the different atmospheric layers. The spacecraft carries the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), which has a 50 cm diameter clear aperture and provides a continuous series of diffraction-limited visible light images from space. The telescope was developed through international collaboration between Japan and US. In order to achieve the diffraction-limited performance, thermal and structural modeling of the telescope was extensively used in its development phase to predict how the optical performance changes dependent on the thermal condition in orbit. Not only the modeling, we devoted many efforts to verify the optical performance in ground tests before the launch. The verification in the ground tests helped us to find many issues, such as temperature dependent focus shifts, which were not identified only through the thermal-structural modeling. Another critical issue was micro-vibrations induced by internal disturbances of mechanical gyroscopes and momentum wheels for attitude control of the spacecraft. Because the structural modeling was not accurate enough to predict how much the image quality was degraded by the micro-vibrations, we measured their transmission in a spacecraft-level test.

  4. The Generation of Higher Order Diffraction Beams by Photorefractive Record of Harmonic Optical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Tarjanyi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are some results of investigation of photorefractive record of interference field created by two planar wave of Ar laser (488 nm in LiNbO3:Fe presented in this work. Such record behaves as a phase diffraction grating. The time dependence of diffracted beam intensity informs about process of the record creation. To read this record a weak beam of He-Ne laser (632.8 nm was used. During recording and erasure process of the record, the intensities of the zero and intensities of higher orders on both sides of reading beam were detected. Experimentally obtained time dependences of intensities of diffracted beams were compared with dependences following from diffraction integral integral for harmonic phase grating. Quite small differences between measured and calculated dependences occurred. The differences show that there are some non-linear processes taking place at the record creation.

  5. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rofouie, P.; Rey, A. D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mail.mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Pasini, D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrook West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0C3 (Canada)

    2015-09-21

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations’ amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC’s surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices.

  6. Low cost and high performance GPON, GEPON and RFoG optical network pentaplexer module design using diffractive grating approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-Ju; Chi, Chang-Chia; Tarn, Chen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    A new architecture of a pentaplexer transceiver module which can be used in GPON/GEPON and RFoG triple play optical networks with supporting of the multiple optical wavelengths of 1310 nm, 1490 nm, 1550 nm, 1610 nm, and 1650 nm, is proposed. By using diffractive grating elements combing with market readily available GRIN (Gradient-Index) lens, grating, mirrors, beamsplitter, LDs (Laser Diodes), and PDs (Photodetectors), the proposed design have the advantages of low cost, high efficiency/performance, easy design and manufacturing, over the contemporary triplex transceivers which are made of multilayer filters or waveguides that increase the complexity of manufacturing and reduce the performance efficiency. With the proposed design, a pentaplexer system can accommodate GPON/GEPON, RFoG, and monitoring integration services, total five optical wavelength channels into a hybrid-integrated TO-CAN package platform with sufficient efficiency.

  7. Modeling and measurement of a micro-optic beam deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milster, Tom D.; Wong, J. Nan

    1992-01-01

    The use is studied of a unity-magnification micro-optic beam deflector. The defelector consists of two arrays of positively powered lenslets. The lenslets on each array are arranged in a square grid. Design criteria are based on usefulness in optical data storage devices. The deflector is designed to operate over a + or - 1.6 range of deflection angles. Modeling results are compared with interferometric analysis of the wavefront from a single lenslet pair. The results indicate that the device is nearly diffraction limited, but there are substantial wavefront errors at the edges and corners of the lenslets.

  8. The neutron optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present status of optical model calculations of neutron scattering and interactions is reviewed, with special emphasis on more recent developments and the more promising lines of research. The use of dispersion relations to provide an extra constraint on the potential is discussed, together with their application to studies of the Fermi surface anomaly. The application of potential inversion techniques to determine the form of the potential is also considered. (author). 39 refs, figs

  9. Detailed Analysis of Amplitude and Slope Diffraction Coefficients for knife-edge structure in S-UTD-CH Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eray Arik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In urban, rural and indoor applications, diffraction mechanism is very important to predict the field strength and calculate the coverage accurately. The diffraction mechanism takes place on NLOS (non-line-of-sight cases like rooftop, vertex, corner, edge and sharp surfaces. S-UTD-CH model computes three type of electromagnetic wave incidence such as direct, reflected and diffracted waves, respectively. As obstacles in diffraction geometry are in the same or closer height, contribution of the diffraction mechanism is dominant. To predict the diffracted fields accurately, amplitude and slope diffraction coefficients and the derivative of these coefficients have to be taken correctly. In this paper, all the derivations about diffraction coefficients are made for knife edge type structures and extensive simulations are performed in order to analyze the amplitude and diffraction coefficients. In plane angle diffraction, contributions of amplitude and slope diffraction coefficient are maxima.

  10. X-ray diffraction and NMR data for the study of the location of idebenone and idebenol in model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gómez-Murcia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present some of our data about the interaction of idebenone and idebenol with dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC. In particular, we include data of small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD and wide angle X-ray diffraction experiments, obtention of electronic profiles of the membranes, 2H-NMR and 31P-NMR, as part of the research article: “Both idebenone and idebenol are localized near the lipid-water interface of the membrane and increase its fluidity” (Gomez-Murcia et al., 2016 [1]. These data were obtained from model membranes that included different proportions of idebenone and idebenol, at temperatures both above and below of the gel to fluid phase. The X-ray experiments were carried out by using a modified Kratky compact camera (MBraun-Graz-Optical Systems, Graz Austria, incorporating two coupled linear position sensitive detectors. The NMR data were collected from a a Bruker Avance 600 instrument.

  11. Extraordinary optical transmission with tapered slits: effect of higher diffraction and slit resonance orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, T.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Beermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission through thin metal films with a periodic arrangement of tapered slits is considered. Transmission maps covering a wide range of periods, film thicknesses, and taper angles are presented. The maps show resonant transmission when fundamental and higher-order slit resonances are excited....... A study of the effect on transmission of different combinations of available transmission and reflection diffraction orders show optimum total transmission when only the fundamental reflection order and higher transmission diffraction orders are available. The optimum taper angle is shown...

  12. Modeling of diffraction effects for specimen echoes simulations in ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamta-Djakou, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed at designing a ray method for complete simulation of specimen echoes (entry, back-wall or inner surfaces..) in ultrasonic NDT. The existing 'specular' model, based on geometrical elasto-dynamics, just takes into account specular reflections on scatterers. The objective was to extend this ray model by the account of specimen wedges diffraction. This thesis proposes in elasto-dynamics the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD), which adds to the reflection modelling that of diffraction from solid/void wedge edges. The UTD solutions developed for both the stress-free half-plane and wedge defects in solids have been theoretically validated and 2D UTD for a wedge implemented in the NDT software platform CIVA. The mixed model 'specular + UTD' has been compared to other CIVA models for specimen echoes simulation. A good agreement is obtained between these models. UTD just models diffraction by an infinite edge. To account for the finite edge size, two incremental methods involving a sum of spherical waves emitted by discretization points on the diffracting edge have been developed and experimentally validated. The UTD solution for a wedge developed during this thesis being available for wedge angles less than 180 degrees, a preliminary study has then been carried out in acoustics for a stress-free wedge in order to deal with diffraction for all wedge angles. (author) [fr

  13. Diffractive-optics-based sensor as a tool for detection of biocompatibility of titanium and titanium-doped hydrocarbon samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Silvennoinen, R.; Hasoň, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír; Penttinen, N.; Silvennoinen, M.; Myller, K.; Černochová, P.; Bartáková, S.; Prachár, P.; Cvrček, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 29 (2010), s. 5583-5591 ISSN 0003-6935 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200040651; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/08/1688; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/2378 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : fibrinogen adsorption * titanium dental implants * diffractive optical element Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.703, year: 2010

  14. Sub-diffraction positioning of a two-photon excited and optically trapped quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Kyrsting, Anders Højbo; Christensen, Eva Arnspang

    2014-01-01

    to blueshift. A quantum dot is much smaller than a diffraction limited laser focus and by mapping out the intensity of the focal volume and overlaying this with the positions visited by a quantum dot, a quantum dot is shown often to explore regions of the focal volume where the intensity is too low to render...

  15. Diffraction-unlimited optical imaging of unstained living cells in liquid by electron beam scanning of luminescent environmental cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hideki T; Kasaya, Takeshi; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi

    2013-11-18

    An environmental cell with a 50-nm-thick cathodoluminescent window was attached to a scanning electron microscope, and diffraction-unlimited near-field optical imaging of unstained living human lung epithelial cells in liquid was demonstrated. Electrons with energies as low as 0.8 - 1.2 kV are sufficiently blocked by the window without damaging the specimens, and form a sub-wavelength-sized illumination light source. A super-resolved optical image of the specimen adhered to the opposite window surface was acquired by a photomultiplier tube placed below. The cells after the observation were proved to stay alive. The image was formed by enhanced dipole radiation or energy transfer, and features as small as 62 nm were resolved.

  16. Educational Software for Interference and Optical Diffraction Analysis in Fresnel and Fraunhofer Regions Based on MATLAB GUIs and the FDTD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, J.; Perez-Molina, M.; Bleda, S.; Fernandez, E.; Neipp, C.; Belendez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Interference and diffraction of light are elementary topics in optics. The aim of the work presented here is to develop an accurate and cheap optical-system simulation software that provides a virtual laboratory for studying the effects of propagation in both time and space for the near- and far-field regions. In laboratory sessions, this software…

  17. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  18. Holographic X-ray optical elements: transition between refraction and diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Snigireva, I; Rau, C; Weitkamp, T; Aristov, V; Grigoriev, M; Kuznetsov, S; Shabelnikov, L; Yunkin, V; Hoffmann, M; Voges, E

    2001-01-01

    Planar microelectronics technology, involving photolithography and highly anisotropic plasma etching techniques, was applied to fabricate refractive and diffractive (kinoform) lenses. Focusing properties in terms of focus spot and efficiency in the energy range 8-25 keV for both types of lenses were tested at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID22 beamline. Focal spot of 1.5 mu m with a gain of 25 was measured at 15 keV.

  19. Optimizing the coupling of output of a quasi-optical gyrotron owing to a diffraction grating with ellipsoidal support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogge, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The output scheme of a quasi-optical gyrotron has been optimized in order to produce a gaussian output microwave beam suitable for transmission over long distances. The technique which has been applied consists of substituting one of the mirrors of the Fabry-Perot resonator in which the particle-wave interaction takes place by a diffraction grating placed in the -1 order Littrow mount and designed such that only orders -1 and 0 can propagate. In such a configuration, the diffraction angle of the order -1 coincides exactly with the incidence direction, thus providing a feedback in the cavity, whereas the order 0 constitutes the output of the resonator. A theoretical study of the power content in each diffracted order of a planar grating of infinite extent with equally spaced linear grooves as a function of the grating parameters has been performed. It has been shown that parameter domains can be found, which provide appropriate efficiencies in both orders for an application on a quasi-optical gyrotron. The Littrow condition was then adapted in order to match the spherical wavefronts of a gaussian beam incident on a possibly non-planar surface. The grooves become thus curvilinear and are no longer equally spaced. Measurements made on a cold test stand have confirmed the validity of the Littrow condition extension and allowed to determine its limits. It has also been shown that this type of cavity provides a mode having an optimal gaussian content and giving a minimal cavity transmission. The angular dispersion of the grating leads to a higher cavity transmission and to a slightly lower gaussian content for the adjacent resonator modes. The fundamental eigenmode electric field profile has been measured inside the cavity and is similar to that of an equivalent resonator made with two spherical mirrors. (author) figs., tabs., 141 refs

  20. A system model for ultrasonic NDT based on the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmon, M; Dorval, V; Kamta Djakou, A; Fradkin, L; Chatillon, S

    2016-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasonic Non Destructive Testing (NDT) is helpful for evaluating performances of inspection techniques and requires the modelling of waves scattered by defects. Two classical flaw scattering models have been previously usually employed and evaluated to deal with inspection of planar defects, the Kirchhoff approximation (KA) for simulating reflection and the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) for simulating diffraction. Combining them so as to retain advantages of both, the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD) initially developed in electromagnetism has been recently extended to elastodynamics. In this paper a PTD-based system model is proposed for simulating the ultrasonic response of crack-like defects. It is also extended to provide good description of regions surrounding critical rays where the shear diffracted waves and head waves interfere. Both numerical and experimental validation of the PTD model is carried out in various practical NDT configurations, such as pulse echo and Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD), involving both crack tip and corner echoes. Numerical validation involves comparison of this model with KA and GTD as well as the Finite-Element Method (FEM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffractive-refractive optics: low aberration Bragg-case focusing by precise parabolic surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oberta, Peter; Mikulík, J.; Kittler, Martin; Hrdý, Jaromír; Peverini, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2010), s. 36-40 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412; GA AV ČR IAA100100716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : aberrations * parabolic groove * focusing Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2010

  2. Optical models of the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, David A; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-03-01

    Optical models of the human eye have been used in visual science for purposes such as providing a framework for explaining optical phenomena in vision, for predicting how refraction and aberrations are affected by change in ocular biometry and as computational tools for exploring the limitations imposed on vision by the optical system of the eye. We address the issue of what is understood by optical model eyes, discussing the 'encyclopaedia' and 'toy train' approaches to modelling. An extensive list of purposes of models is provided. We discuss many of the theoretical types of optical models (also schematic eyes) of varying anatomical accuracy, including single, three and four refracting surface variants. We cover the models with lens structure in the form of nested shells and gradient index. Many optical eye models give accurate predictions only for small angles and small fields of view. If aberrations and image quality are important to consider, such 'paraxial' model eyes must be replaced by 'finite model' eyes incorporating features such as aspheric surfaces, tilts and decentrations, wavelength-dependent media and curved retinas. Many optical model eyes are population averages and must become adaptable to account for age, gender, ethnicity, refractive error and accommodation. They can also be customised for the individual when extensive ocular biometry and optical performance data are available. We consider which optical model should be used for a particular purpose, adhering to the principle that the best model is the simplest fit for the task. We provide a glimpse into the future of optical models of the human eye. This review is interwoven with historical developments, highlighting the important people who have contributed so richly to our understanding of visual optics. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  3. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  4. A simple model for dynamic small-angle X-ray diffraction in colloidal crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, A.G.F.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    A simple model is presented that allows calculation of the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of perfect colloidal crystals. The model is based on the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation and permits a straightforward evaluation of multibeam interactions. Results are illustrated by several

  5. Elastoplastic properties of duplex steel determined using neutron diffraction and self-consistent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baczmanski, A.; Braham, C.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for determining the parameters characterising elastoplastic deformation of two-phase material is proposed. The method is based on the results of neutron diffraction and mechanical experiments, which are analysed using the self-consistent rate-independent model of elastoplastic deformation. The neutron diffraction method has been applied to determine the lattice strains and diffraction peak broadening in two-phase austeno-ferritic steel during uniaxial tensile test. The elastoplastic model was used to predict evolution of internal stresses and critical resolved shear stresses. Calculations based on this model were successfully compared with experimental results and the parameters characterising elastoplastic deformation were determined for both phases of duplex steel

  6. Quantitative simulation of ultrasonic time of flight diffraction technique in 2D geometries using Huygens-Fresnel diffraction model: theory and experimental comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy; Chitti Venkata, Krishnamurthy; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an analytical approach for simulation of ultrasonic diffracted wave signals from cracks in two-dimensional geometries based on a novel Huygens-Fresnel Diffraction Model (HFDM). The model employs the frequency domain far-field displacement expressions derived by Miller and Pursey in 2D for a line source located on the free surface boundary of a semi-infinite elastic medium. At each frequency in the bandwidth of a pulsed excitation, the complex diffracted field is obtained by summation of displacements due to the unblocked virtual sources located in the section containing a vertical crack. The time-domain diffracted wave signal amplitudes in a general isotropic solid are obtained by standard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedures. The wedge based finite aperture transducer refracted beam profiles were modelled by treating the finite dimension transducer as an array of line sources. The proposed model is able to evaluate back-wall signal amplitude and lateral wave signal amplitude, quantitatively. The model predicted range-dependent diffracted amplitudes from the edge of a bottom surface-breaking crack in the isotropic steel specimen were compared with Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) results. The good agreement confirms the validity of the HFDM method. The simulated ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) A-scan signals for surface-breaking crack lengths 2 mm and 4 mm in a 10 mm thick aluminium specimen were compared quantitatively with the experimental results. Finally, important applications of HFDM method to the ultrasonic quantitative non-destructive evaluation are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of the structural and optical properties of CuIn1−xGaxSe2 QJ;thin films by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ya-Fen; Hsu, Hung-Pin; Chen, Hung-Ing

    2013-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of Cu-poor CuIn 1−x Ga x Se 2 thin films with different gallium contents grown using the co-evaporated technique were studied. Measurements of X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL), and photoreflectance (PR) were performed on the samples. The emission peaks in the PL spectra and PR spectra observed around 1.0–1.2 eV are attributed to donor–acceptor pairs and defect-related luminescence. With increasing gallium content, the linewidths of the luminescence spectra for the samples become wider, which we attribute to greater statistical disordering between indium and gallium. The structural properties of the CuIn 1−x Ga x Se 2 thin films are further characterized by simulation of the XRD spectra with a theoretical model. It is found that the sample with higher gallium content exhibits less uniformity of microstructure size. The X-ray diffraction line profile analysis also shows a stronger internal strain in the sample with the higher gallium content, which is consistent with its broader microstructure size distribution. The conversion efficiency of the CuIn 1−x Ga x Se 2 -based solar cells is also obtained and investigated through theoretical analysis. The experimental results coincide with the inferences given by the X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. -- Highlights: • Co-evaporated CuIn 1−x Ga x Se 2 thin films with different gallium contents were studied. • XRD line profiles from the samples are analyzed by a theoretical model. • Less size uniformity and higher internal strain are obtained for high gallium sample. • The efficiency of CIGS solar cells is investigated through theoretical analysis. • The inferences from XRD spectra analysis coincide with experimental measurements

  8. Modified surface testing method for large convex aspheric surfaces based on diffraction optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haidong; Wang, Xiaokun; Xue, Donglin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2017-12-01

    Large convex aspheric optical elements have been widely applied in advanced optical systems, which have presented a challenging metrology problem. Conventional testing methods cannot satisfy the demand gradually with the change of definition of "large." A modified method is proposed in this paper, which utilizes a relatively small computer-generated hologram and an illumination lens with certain feasibility to measure the large convex aspherics. Two example systems are designed to demonstrate the applicability, and also, the sensitivity of this configuration is analyzed, which proves the accuracy of the configuration can be better than 6 nm with careful alignment and calibration of the illumination lens in advance. Design examples and analysis show that this configuration is applicable to measure the large convex aspheric surfaces.

  9. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  10. Realizing high photovoltaic efficiency with parallel multijunction solar cells based on spectrum-splitting and -concentrating diffractive optical element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin-Ze; Huang Qing-Li; Xu Xin; Quan Bao-Gang; Luo Jian-Heng; Li Dong-Mei; Meng Qing-Bo; Yang Guo-Zhen; Zhang Yan; Ye Jia-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Based on the facts that multijunction solar cells can increase the efficiency and concentration can reduce the cost dramatically, a special design of parallel multijunction solar cells was presented. The design employed a diffractive optical element (DOE) to split and concentrate the sunlight. A rainbow region and a zero-order diffraction region were generated on the output plane where solar cells with corresponding band gaps were placed. An analytical expression of the light intensity distribution on the output plane of the special DOE was deduced, and the limiting photovoltaic efficiency of such parallel multijunction solar cells was obtained based on Shockley–Queisser’s theory. An efficiency exceeding the Shockley–Queisser limit (33%) can be expected using multijunction solar cells consisting of separately fabricated subcells. The results provide an important alternative approach to realize high photovoltaic efficiency without the need for expensive epitaxial technology widely used in tandem solar cells, thus stimulating the research and application of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. (paper)

  11. Optical analysis, reading performance, and quality-of-life evaluation after implantation of a diffractive multifocal intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Plaza-Puche, Ana B; Piñero, David P; Amparo, Francisco; Jiménez, Ramón; Rodríguez-Prats, Jose L; Javaloy, Jaime; Pongo, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the reading performance, changes in quality of life, and optical performance after cataract surgery with multifocal diffractive intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Vissum Corporation, Alicante, Spain. Prospective case series. Patients with bilateral cataract had implantation of Acri.LISA 366D multifocal IOLs. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity outcomes were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up. Other parameters evaluated included reading performance (Salzburg Reading Desk), a 25-item quality-of-life questionnaire (National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire-25 [NEI VFQ-25] and appendix NEI VFQ-39), and ocular optical performance (ocular aberrometry and modulation transfer function). The study included 48 eyes (24 patients) ranging in age from 47 to 77 years. The mean uncorrected distance visual acuity (logMAR) improved significantly 1 month postoperatively (P<.01), with no significant changes afterward (6 months, P≥.06). The mean reading acuity without correction improved significantly from 0.68 logRAD ± 0.20 (SD) to 0.16 ± 0.08 logRAD 1 month after surgery (P < .01). However, it was worse by the end of the follow-up (6 months, P = .04). During the follow-up, no significant changes were found in the mean reading speed without near correction (6 months, P = .50). Contrast sensitivity improved significantly at all spatial frequencies under photopic and scotopic conditions after surgery (6 months, P≤.02). The quality-of-life index related to reading ability also improved significantly (3 months, P = .03). Implantation of the multifocal diffractive IOL significantly improved reading performance, which had a positive effect on the patient's quality of life postoperatively. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Numerical analysis of first-order acousto-optic Bragg diffraction of profiled optical beams using open-loop transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Almehmadi, Fares S.

    2014-03-01

    In standard acousto-optic Bragg analysis, the incident light and sound beams are assumed to be uniform plane waves (with constant profiles) leading to the results based on standard weak interaction theory. As a follow-up to earlier work dealing with nonuniform incident optical beams, we revisit the problem of Bragg diffraction under nonuniform profiles, and include Gaussian, third-order Hermite-Gaussian, and zeroth-order Bessel profiles in our investigation, along with a few others. The first-order diffracted beam is examined (using a transfer function formalism based on angular spectra) under several parametric limits [such as the Klein-Cook parameter Q, the effective profile width, and the optical phase-shift parameter (α) in the sound cell]. Wherever feasible, the numerical results are compared with analytic theory. The scattered first-order profile output versus the optical phase-shift appears to maintain behavior similar to the known first-order characteristics (sin2 in intensity) encountered for the uniform incident beam case. It is observed, however, that such conformity exists seemingly only at relatively small values of Q (typically about 20 to 50). At higher Qs, on the other hand (where one would otherwise expect behavior closer to standard Bragg theory based on large Qs), it is found that the first-order intensity deviates substantially from the expected sin2- (or related) pattern. This deviation actually becomes more severe at even higher Qs. Additionally, the output profiles at higher Qs are also found to be distorted relative to the incident profiles. These results, though anomalous, are nevertheless generally compatible with earlier studies. Based on the transfer function theory, it is also known that for very large optical phase shifts (i.e., when α goes to infinity), the scattered first-order output for a Gaussian profile undergoes an axial (spatial) shift past the output plane of the sound cell. This predicted result is corroborated in our

  13. Theoretical study on optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Hung Gi.

    1984-08-01

    The optical model potential of non-local effect on the rounded edge of the potential is derived. On the basis of this potential the functional form of the optical model potential, the energy dependence and relationship of its parameters, and the dependency of the values of the parameters on energy change are shown in this paper. (author)

  14. Diffraction enhanced imaging of a rat model of gastric acid aspiration pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Dean M; Zhong, Zhong; Foda, Hussein D; Wiebe, Sheldon; Parham, Christopher A; Dilmanian, F Avraham; Cole, Elodia B; Pisano, Etta D

    2011-12-01

    Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) is a type of phase contrast x-ray imaging that has improved image contrast at a lower dose than conventional radiography for many imaging applications, but no studies have been done to determine if DEI might be useful for diagnosing lung injury. The goals of this study were to determine if DEI could differentiate between healthy and injured lungs for a rat model of gastric aspiration and to compare diffraction-enhanced images with chest radiographs. Radiographs and diffraction-enhanced chest images of adult Sprague Dawley rats were obtained before and 4 hours after the aspiration of 0.4 mL/kg of 0.1 mol/L hydrochloric acid. Lung damage was confirmed with histopathology. The radiographs and diffraction-enhanced peak images revealed regions of atelectasis in the injured rat lung. The diffraction-enhanced peak images revealed the full extent of the lung with improved clarity relative to the chest radiographs, especially in the portion of the lower lobe that extended behind the diaphragm on the anteroposterior projection. For a rat model of gastric acid aspiration, DEI is capable of distinguishing between a healthy and an injured lung and more clearly than radiography reveals the full extent of the lung and the lung damage. Copyright © 2011 AUR. All rights reserved.

  15. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  16. Modeling laser beam diffraction and propagation by the mode-expansion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, James J

    2007-08-01

    In the mode-expansion method for modeling propagation of a diffracted beam, the beam at the aperture can be expanded as a weighted set of orthogonal modes. The parameters of the expansion modes are chosen to maximize the weighting coefficient of the lowest-order mode. As the beam propagates, its field distribution can be reconstructed from the set of weighting coefficients and the Gouy phase of the lowest-order mode. We have developed a simple procedure to implement the mode-expansion method for propagation through an arbitrary ABCD matrix, and we have demonstrated that it is accurate in comparison with direct calculations of diffraction integrals and much faster.

  17. Ultra-high resolution zone-doubled diffractive X-ray optics for the multi-keV regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Gorelick, Sergey; Färm, Elina; Kewish, Cameron M; Diaz, Ana; Barrett, Ray; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Ritala, Mikko; David, Christian

    2011-01-03

    X-ray microscopy based on Fresnel zone plates is a powerful technique for sub-100 nm resolution imaging of biological and inorganic materials. Here, we report on the modeling, fabrication and characterization of zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates for the multi-keV regime (4-12 keV). We demonstrate unprecedented spatial resolution by resolving 15 nm lines and spaces in scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and focusing diffraction efficiencies of 7.5% at 6.2 keV photon energy. These developments represent a significant step towards 10 nm spatial resolution for hard X-ray energies of up to 12 keV.

  18. Broadband multilayer mirror and diffractive optics for attosecond pulse shaping in the 280-500 eV photon energy range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chirped broadband multilayer mirrors are key components to shape attosecond pulses in the XUV range. Compressing high harmonic pulses to their Fourier limit is the major goal for attosecond physics utilizing short pulse pump-probe experiments. Here, we report about the first implementation of multilayers and diffractive optics fulfilling these requirements in the “water-window” spectral range.

  19. Three-dimensionally modulated anisotropic structure for diffractive optical elements created by one-step three-beam polarization holographic photoalignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Noda, Kohei; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Ono, Hiroshi; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A diffractive optical element with a three-dimensional liquid crystal (LC) alignment structure for advanced control of polarized beams was fabricated by a highly efficient one-step photoalignment method. This study is of great significance because different two-dimensional continuous and complex alignment patterns can be produced on two alignment films by simultaneously irradiating an empty glass cell composed of two unaligned photocrosslinkable polymer LC films with three-beam polarized interference beam. The polarization azimuth, ellipticity, and rotation direction of the diffracted beams from the resultant LC grating widely varied depending on the two-dimensional diffracted position and the polarization states of the incident beams. These polarization diffraction properties are well explained by theoretical analysis based on Jones calculus.

  20. MODELLING OF EXTRINSIC FIBER OPTIC SAGNAC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Ultrasonic waves are used extensively in nondestructive testing both for characterization of material properties, in this paper, we describe a fiber optic sensor suitable for detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on an extrinsic fiber optic sagnac interferometer. The proposed sensor model can act as a ...

  1. Experimental evaluation of a polycrystal deformation modeling scheme using neutron diffraction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bjørn; Lorentzen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    The uniaxial behavior of aluminum polycrystals is simulated using a rate-independent incremental self-consistent elastic-plastic polycrystal deformation model, and the results are evaluated by neutron diffraction measurements. The elastic strains deduced from the model show good agreement...... with the experimental results for the 111 and 220 reflections, whereas the predicted elastic strain level for the 200 reflection is, in general, approximately 10 pct too low in the plastic regime....

  2. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veluraja, K., E-mail: veluraja@msuniv.ac.in [Department of Physics, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, Tamilnadu 627012 (India); Vennila, K.N. [CAS in Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600025 (India); Umamakeshvari, K.; Jasmine, A. [Department of Physics, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, Tamilnadu 627012 (India); Velmurugan, D. [CAS in Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600025 (India)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.

  3. Empirically testing vaterite structural models using neutron diffraction and thermal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Pracheil, Brenda M; Koenigs, Ryan P; Bruch, Ronald M; Feygenson, Mikhail

    2016-11-18

    Otoliths, calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) ear bones, are among the most commonly used age and growth structures of fishes. Most fish otoliths are comprised of the most dense CaCO 3 polymorph, aragonite. Sturgeon otoliths, in contrast, have been characterized as the rare and structurally enigmatic polymorph, vaterite-a metastable polymorph of CaCO 3 . Vaterite is an important material ranging from biomedical to personal care applications although its crystal structure is highly debated. We characterized the structure of Lake Sturgeon otoliths using thermal analysis and neutron powder diffraction, which is used non-destructively. We confirmed that while Lake Sturgeon otoliths are primarily composed of vaterite, they also contain the denser CaCO 3 polymorph, calcite. For the vaterite fraction, neutron diffraction data provide enhanced discrimination of the carbonate group compared to x-ray diffraction data, owing to the different relative neutron scattering lengths, and thus offer the opportunity to uniquely test the more than one dozen crystal structural models that have been proposed for vaterite. Of those, space group P6 5 22 model, a = 7.1443(4)Å, c = 25.350(4)Å, V = 1121.5(2)Å 3 provides the best fit to the neutron powder diffraction data, and allows for a structure refinement using rigid carbonate groups.

  4. Background modelling of diffraction data in the presence of ice rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Parkhurst

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for modelling the background for each Bragg reflection in a series of X-ray diffraction images containing Debye–Scherrer diffraction from ice in the sample is presented. The method involves the use of a global background model which is generated from the complete X-ray diffraction data set. Fitting of this model to the background pixels is then performed for each reflection independently. The algorithm uses a static background model that does not vary over the course of the scan. The greatest improvement can be expected for data where ice rings are present throughout the data set and the local background shape at the size of a spot on the detector does not exhibit large time-dependent variation. However, the algorithm has been applied to data sets whose background showed large pixel variations (variance/mean > 2 and has been shown to improve the results of processing for these data sets. It is shown that the use of a simple flat-background model as in traditional integration programs causes systematic bias in the background determination at ice-ring resolutions, resulting in an overestimation of reflection intensities at the peaks of the ice rings and an underestimation of reflection intensities either side of the ice ring. The new global background-model algorithm presented here corrects for this bias, resulting in a noticeable improvement in R factors following refinement.

  5. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  6. Thermodynamic modelling and in-situ neutron diffraction investigation of the (Nd + Mg + Zn) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zhijun; Gharghouri, Michael A.; Pelton, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • All phase diagram and thermodynamic data critically assessed for the (Nd + Mg + Zn) system. • All phases described by optimised thermodynamic models. • In-situ neutron diffraction performed to identify phases and transition temperatures. • Assessments of other (RE + Mg + Zn) systems have been carried out simultaneously. • The final product is a thermodynamic database for multicomponent (Mg + RE + Zn) systems. - Abstract: All available phase diagram data for the (Nd + Mg + Zn) system were critically assessed. In-situ neutron diffraction (ND) experiments were performed on selected samples to identify phases and transition temperatures. A critical thermodynamic evaluation and optimization of the (Nd + Mg + Zn) system was carried out and model parameters for the thermodynamic properties of all phases were obtained. The phase transformation behaviour of selected samples was well resolved from the ND experiments and experimental values were used to refine the thermodynamic model parameters.

  7. Thermodynamic modelling and in-situ neutron diffraction investigation of the (Ce + Mg + Zn) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zhijun; Gharghouri, Michael A.; Medraj, Mamoun; Lee, Soo Yeol; Pelton, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • All phase diagram and thermodynamic data critically assessed for the (Ce + Mg + Zn) system. • All phases described by optimized thermodynamic models. • In-situ neutron diffraction performed to identify phases and transition temperatures. • Assessments of other (RE + Mg + Zn) systems have been carried out simultaneously. • The final product is a thermodynamic database for multicomponent (Mg + RE + Zn) systems. - Abstract: All available phase diagram data for the (Ce + Mg + Zn) system were critically assessed. In-situ neutron diffraction (ND) experiments were performed on selected samples to identify phases and transition temperatures. A critical thermodynamic evaluation and optimization of the (Ce + Mg + Zn) system were carried out and model parameters for the thermodynamic properties of all phases were obtained. The phase transformation behaviour of selected samples was well resolved from the ND experiments and experimental data were used to refine the thermodynamic model parameters.

  8. Solving finite-difference equations for diffractive optics problems using graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovashkin, Dimitry Lvovich; Vorotnokova, Daria G.; Kochurov, Alexander V.; Malysheva, Svetlana A.

    2013-09-01

    This article presents a vector algorithm of the solution of the Helmholtz equation by beam propagation method (BPM), based on representation of calculations in the single instruction, multiple data model. Use of this algorithm on the graphic NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660Ti processor on the compute unified device architecture technology results in 30-times acceleration of calculations in comparison with calculations on the Intel Core2 Duo CPU E8500.

  9. A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried perfect electric conductors within the physical optics approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, Burak; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried 3-D perfect electric conductors is addressed within the framework of diffraction tomography. The similarity of the present forward model derived within the physical optics approximation with that derived within the first Born approxim......A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried 3-D perfect electric conductors is addressed within the framework of diffraction tomography. The similarity of the present forward model derived within the physical optics approximation with that derived within the first Born...

  10. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  11. Label-free high-resolution 3-D imaging of gold nanoparticles inside live cells using optical diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doyeon; Oh, Nuri; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, SangYun; Pack, Chan-Gi; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2018-03-01

    Delivery of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into live cells has high potentials, ranging from molecular-specific imaging, photodiagnostics, to photothermal therapy. However, studying the long-term dynamics of cells with GNPs using conventional fluorescence techniques suffers from phototoxicity and photobleaching. Here, we present a method for 3-D imaging of GNPs inside live cells exploiting refractive index (RI) as imaging contrast. Employing optical diffraction tomography, 3-D RI tomograms of live cells with GNPs are precisely measured for an extended period with sub-micrometer resolution. The locations and contents of GNPs in live cells are precisely addressed and quantified due to their distinctly high RI values, which was validated by confocal fluorescence imaging of fluorescent dye conjugated GNPs. In addition, we perform quantitative imaging analysis including the segmentations of GNPs in the cytosol, the volume distributions of aggregated GNPs, and the temporal evolution of GNPs contents in HeLa and 4T1 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. X-ray diffraction and imaging with a coherent beam: application to X-ray optical elements and to crystals exhibiting phase inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiello, F.

    2011-05-01

    The exceptional properties of synchrotron light sources have been exploited in very different disciplines, from archaeology to chemistry, from material science to biology, from medicine to physics. Among these properties it is important to mention the high brilliance, continuum spectrum, high degree of polarization, time structure, small source size and divergence of the beam, the last resulting in a high transversal coherence of the produced radiation. This high transversal coherence of the synchrotron sources has permitted the development of new techniques, e.g. phase contrast imaging, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI). This thesis work will consist essentially of three parts. In the first part it will be presented the work done as a member of the X-ray Optics Group of ESRF in the characterization of high quality diamond crystals foreseen as X-ray optical elements. The characterization has been done using different complementary X-ray techniques, such as high resolution diffraction, topography, grazing incidence diffraction, reflectivity and measurements of the coherence preservation using the Talbot effect. In the second part, I will show the result obtained in the study of the temperature behaviours of the domain in periodically poled ferroelectrics crystals. This type of measurements, based on Bragg-Fresnel diffraction, are possible only thanks to the high degree of coherence of the beam. In the third part, I will present the results obtained in the characterization of diamonds foreseen for applications other than X-ray optical elements. (author)

  13. Validation of a Crystal Plasticity Model Using High Energy Diffraction Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, A. J.; Obstalecki, M.; Storer, R.; Tayon, W.; Mach, J.; Kenesei, P.; Lienert, U.

    2012-01-01

    High energy diffraction microscopy is used to measure the crystallographic orientation and evolution of lattice strain in an Al Li alloy. The relative spatial arrangement of the several pancake-shaped grains in a tensile sample is determined through in situ and ex situ techniques. A model for crystal plasticity with continuity of lattice spin is posed, where grains are represented by layers in a finite element mesh following the arrangement indicated by experiment. Comparison is drawn between experiment and simulation.

  14. Diffraction of polarized light on periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukanina, V; Divakov, D; Tyutyunnik, A; Hohlov, A

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures as photonic crystals are widely used in modern laser devices, communication technologies and for creating various beam splitters and filters. Diffraction gratings are applied for creating 3D television sets, DVD and Blu-ray drives and reflective structures (Berkley mirror). It is important to simulate diffraction on such structures to design optical systems with predetermined properties based on photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Methods of simulating diffraction on periodic structures uses theory of Floquet-Bloch and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Current work is dedicated to analysis of photonic band gaps and simulating diffraction on one-dimensional binary diffraction grating using RCWA. The Maxwell's equations for isotropic media and constitutive relations based on the cgs system were used as a model.

  15. Simulation and modeling of the powder diffraction pattern from nanoparticles: Studying the influence of surface strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerlein, Kenneth Roy

    Nanostructured materials are currently at the forefront of nearly every emerging industry, as they offer promising solutions to problems ranging from those facing energy technologies, to those concerning the structural integrity of materials. With all of these future applications, it is crucial that methods are developed which can offer accurate, and statistically reliable characterization of these materials in a reasonable amount of time. X-ray diffraction is one such method which is already widely available, and can offer further insight into the atomic structure, as well as, microstructure of nanomaterials. This thesis work is then focused on investigating how different structural features of nanoparticles influence the line profiles of the x-ray powder diffraction pattern. Due to their extremely small size, the contribution from crystallite size broadening becomes the dominating feature in an observed diffraction peak. Therefore, the theory of size broadening was critically reviewed concerning the considerations necessary when the crystallite size approaches a few nanometers. Furthermore, the analysis of synthesized shape controlled platinum nanoparticles was carried out using a developed line profile analysis routine, based on the Debye function analysis (DFA) approach, to determine the distribution of particle size and shape in the sample. The DFA method is based on the use of atomistic models to simulate the features in the powder diffraction pattern. The atomistic descriptions of molecular dynamics simulations was coupled with this approach, allowing for the further understanding of the pattern from nanoparticles. The techniques were developed to study how lattice dynamics, and the resulting thermal diffuse scattering, are affected by the small crystallite domains. Furthermore, the relaxation of structural models for nanoparticles by MD simulations allowed for the assessment of features which are a present in the powder pattern as a result of a strain

  16. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluraja, K; Vennila, K N; Umamakeshvari, K; Jasmine, A; Velmurugan, D

    2011-03-25

    The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 Å. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 Å is attributed to the antiparallel β-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 Å reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  18. Modeling and optimization of LCD optical performance

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, Dmitry A; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theoretical foundations of modeling the optical characteristics of liquid crystal displays, critically reviewing modern modeling methods and examining areas of applicability. The modern matrix formalisms of optics of anisotropic stratified media, most convenient for solving problems of numerical modeling and optimization of LCD, will be considered in detail. The benefits of combined use of the matrix methods will be shown, which generally provides the best compromise between physical adequacy and accuracy with computational efficiency and optimization fac

  19. X-ray diffraction study on the structure of concentrated aqueous solutions involving alanine molecules with different optical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Yasuo; Okuyama, Aya; Amo, Yuko; Usuki, Takeshi; Kohara, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements on aqueous 2.5 mol% DL-, L-, and D-alanine solutions in D 2 O were carried out at 26±2degC in order to obtain information concerning the difference in the hydrogen-bonded structure between aqueous solutions involving amino acid molecules with different optical activities. The difference function, Δi inter (Q), between intermolecular interference term observed for DL- and L-alanine and between DL- and D-alanine solutions both exhibited a first peak at Q=1.6 A -1 , followed by oscillatory features extending to higher-Q region, implying that there is a difference in the intermolecular structure is present between these solutions. The difference distribution function, Δg inter (r), obtained from the Fourier transform of the Δi inter (Q) between DL- and L-, and between DL- and D-alanine solutions showed an obvious negative peak at r=2.8 A, which was attributed to the nearest neighbor hydrogen-bonded O...O interaction. The least squares fitting analysis of the observed Δi inter (Q) showed that the intermolecular O...O distance and the difference in the coordination number between DL- and L-, and between DL- and D-alanine solutions are 2.76(2) A and -0.18(1), and 2.81(3) A and -0.18(1), respectively. It was concluded that the intermolecular hydrogen-bonded network in aqueous L- and D-alanine solutions is stronger than that in the DL-alanine solution. (author)

  20. A uniform geometrical optics and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction for evaluating high frequency EM fields near smooth caustics and composite shadow boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniform geometrical optics (UGO) and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (EUTD) are developed for evaluating high frequency electromagnetic (EM) fields within transition regions associated with a two and three dimensional smooth caustic of reflected rays and a composite shadow boundary formed by the caustic termination or the confluence of the caustic with the reflection shadow boundary (RSB). The UGO is a uniform version of the classic geometrical optics (GO). It retains the simple ray optical expressions of classic GO and employs a new set of uniform reflection coefficients. The UGO also includes a uniform version of the complex GO ray field that exists on the dark side of the smooth caustic. The EUTD is an extension of the classic uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) and accounts for the non-ray optical behavior of the UGO reflected field near caustics by using a two-variable transition function in the expressions for the edge diffraction coefficients. It also uniformly recovers the classic UTD behavior of the edge diffracted field outside the composite shadow boundary transition region. The approach employed for constructing the UGO/EUTD solution is based on a spatial domain physical optics (PO) radiation integral representation for the fields which is then reduced using uniform asymptotic procedures. The UGO/EUTD analysis is also employed to investigate the far-zone RCS problem of plane wave scattering from two and three dimensional polynomial defined surfaces, and uniform reflection, zero-curvature, and edge diffraction coefficients are derived. Numerical results for the scattering and diffraction from cubic and fourth order polynomial strips are also shown and the UGO/EUTD solution is validated by comparison to an independent moment method (MM) solution. The UGO/EUTD solution is also compared with the classic GO/UTD solution. The failure of the classic techniques near caustics and composite shadow boundaries is clearly

  1. Review: Model particles in atmospheric optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa

    2014-01-01

    This review paper provides an overview over model geometries for computing light scattering by small particles. The emphasis is on atmospheric optics, although much of this review will also be relevant to neighbouring fields, in particular to astronomy. Various morphological particle properties are discussed, such as overall nonsphericity, pristine shapes, aggregation, and different forms of inhomogeneity, e.g. porous and compact inhomogeneous morphologies, as well as encapsulated aggregates. Models employed to reproduce the optical properties of complex particles range from strongly simplified to highly realistic and morphologically sophisticated model geometries. Besides reviewing the most recent literature, we discuss the idea behind models of varying degree of complexity with regard to the intended use of the models. Applications range from fundamental studies of light scattering processes to routine applications of particle optics look-up tables in operational modelling systems. - Highlights: • Particle models in atmospheric optics are reviewed. • Review of recent literature on nonspherical particles. • Applications of particle models are discussed

  2. Completely integrable models of nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The models of the nonlinear optics in which solitons appeared are considered. These models are of paramount importance in studies of nonlinear wave phenomena. The classical ex- amples of phenomena of this kind are the self-focusing, self-induced transparency and parametric interaction of three waves.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography: Advanced Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T.

    2013-01-01

    - and multiple-scattering regimes is derived. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also derived, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. From the analytical model, an algorithm for enhancing OCT images...

  4. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated.

  5. Analytical model of the optical vortex microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płocinniczak, Łukasz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Szatkowski, Mateusz

    2016-04-20

    This paper presents an analytical model of the optical vortex scanning microscope. In this microscope the Gaussian beam with an embedded optical vortex is focused into the sample plane. Additionally, the optical vortex can be moved inside the beam, which allows fine scanning of the sample. We provide an analytical solution of the whole path of the beam in the system (within paraxial approximation)-from the vortex lens to the observation plane situated on the CCD camera. The calculations are performed step by step from one optical element to the next. We show that at each step, the expression for light complex amplitude has the same form with only four coefficients modified. We also derive a simple expression for the vortex trajectory of small vortex displacements.

  6. Structure of Aqueous Trehalose Solution by Neutron Diffraction and Structural Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Christoffer; Jansson, Helén; Youngs, Tristan; Swenson, Jan

    2016-12-15

    The molecular structure of an aqueous solution of the disaccharide trehalose (C 12 H 22 O 11 ) has been studied by neutron diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modeling. Six different isotope compositions with 33 wt % trehalose (corresponding to 38 water molecules per trehalose molecule) were measured to ensure that water-water, trehalose-water, and trehalose-trehalose correlations were accurately determined. In fact, this is the first neutron diffraction study of an aqueous trehalose solution in which also the nonexchangeable hydrogen atoms in trehalose are deuterated. With this approach, it was possible to determine that (1) there is a substantial hydrogen bonding between trehalose and water (∼11 hydrogen bonds per trehalose molecule), which is in contrast to previous neutron diffraction studies, and (2) there is no tendency of clustering of trehalose, in contrast to what is generally observed by molecular dynamics simulations and experimentally found for other disaccharides. Thus, the results give the structural picture that trehalose prefers to interact with water and participate in a hydrogen-bonded network. This strong network character of the solution might be one of the key reasons for its extraordinary stabilization effect on biological materials.

  7. Model-free polarized neutron diffraction study of an acentric crystal: Metamagnetic UCoAl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoular, R.J.; Delapalme, A.

    1994-01-01

    For the first time, a model-free procedure is developed to analyze polarized neutron diffraction data pertaining to acentric crystals. It consists of a two-step process, featuring first an effective flipping ratio and second a linear inverse problem. The latter is solved either by a new generalized inverse Fourier transform or by using maximum entropy. Using metamagnetic UCoAl as a test case, we find the following results: (i) the U and Co(2) moments increase with an applied magnetic field whereas the Co(1) moment remains almost constant, (ii) the U and Co(2) magnetic densities are weakly anisotropic

  8. Scaling of multiplicity distribution in hadron collisions and diffractive-excitation like models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, A.J.; Dethlefsen, J.M.; Koba, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Multiplicity distribution of secondary particles in inelastic hadron collision at high energy is studied in the semiclassical impact parameter representation. The scaling function is shown to consist of two factors: one geometrical and the other dynamical. We propose a specific choice of these factors, which describe satisfactorily the elastic scattering, the ratio of elastic to total cross-section and the simple scaling behaviour of multiplicity distribution in p-p collisions. Two versions of diffractive-excitation like models (global and local excitation) are presented as interpretation of our choice of dynamical factor. (author)

  9. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.

    2010-01-01

    encountered in single-crystal studies of small-unit-cell inorganic structures can be overcome with synchrotron powder diffraction. It is shown that the standard Hansen-Coppens multipole model is not flexible enough to fit the static theoretical structure factors, whereas fitting of thermally smeared structure...... parameter. This directly exposes a correlation between electron density and thermal parameters even for a light atom such as carbon, and it also underlines that in organic systems proper deconvolution of thermal motion is important for obtaining correct static electron densities....

  10. Vectorial diffraction of extreme ultraviolet light and ultrashort light pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugrowati, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we present applications in optics involving the diffraction theory of light for two advanced technologies. We have used a rigorous vectorial diffraction method to model: (i) the imaging of mask structures in extreme ultraviolet lithography, and (ii) ultrashort pulse propagation

  11. Comparison between a position sensitive germanium detector and a taper optics CCD ``FRELON'' camera for diffraction enhanced imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravin, A.; Fiedler, S.; Coan, P.; Labiche, J.-C.; Ponchut, C.; Peterzol, A.; Thomlinson, W.

    2003-09-01

    Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) can significantly improve the expressiveness of radiology. The contrast mechanism of DEI, in addition to absorption contrast, exploits the differences in X-ray refraction properties, which are sensed by a perfect crystal placed between the sample and the detector. DEI needs a monochromatic collimated X-ray source, which is available for instance from synchrotrons. The X-ray beam is laminar and the sample is vertically scanned for projection imaging or is rotated for CT. Detectors should match the beam characteristics and should also accomplish the other two main requirements for DEI mammography: high spatial resolution and high Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) in a large energy range (20-60 keV). The first permit to exploit the edge contrast enhancement obtained with the DEI technique, for example the improved visualization of microcalcifications in mammographic imaging. The second allows minimizing the dose needed for a radiograph without sacrificing spatial resolution. Apart from this, a dynamic range as good as possible is required (typically from 14 to 16 bits) as well as a high readout speed, which is particularly important for CT. These specifications are difficult to be all condensed in a single detector. At the medical beamline of the ESRF two devices have been utilized for DEI radiography: a linear germanium detector (432 pixels, 350 microns pitch), which had been developed for angiography and cerebral CT and a 2048×2048 CCD camera with taper optics which has been built at the ESRF. The first detector shows an excellent DQE at zero frequency in a large energy range (˜90% from 20 keV up to 50 keV) but limited spatial resolution. In the latter a better compromise for DEI in the 20-30 keV range has been realized: a pixel size of 47 μm and a DQE(0) from 0.5 to 0.6 has been achieved. The performances of the two detectors will be presented here in detail and discussed.

  12. Parametric uncertainty in optical image modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potzick, James; Marx, Egon; Davidson, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Optical photomask feature metrology and wafer exposure process simulation both rely on optical image modeling for accurate results. While it is fair to question the accuracies of the available models, model results also depend on several input parameters describing the object and imaging system. Errors in these parameter values can lead to significant errors in the modeled image. These parameters include wavelength, illumination and objective NA's, magnification, focus, etc. for the optical system, and topography, complex index of refraction n and k, etc. for the object. In this paper each input parameter is varied over a range about its nominal value and the corresponding images simulated. Second order parameter interactions are not explored. Using the scenario of the optical measurement of photomask features, these parametric sensitivities are quantified by calculating the apparent change of the measured linewidth for a small change in the relevant parameter. Then, using reasonable values for the estimated uncertainties of these parameters, the parametric linewidth uncertainties can be calculated and combined to give a lower limit to the linewidth measurement uncertainty for those parameter uncertainties.

  13. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stx@bnu.edu.cn; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  14. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-21

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  15. Model fitting in two dimensions to small angle diffraction patterns from soft tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, S J; Rogers, K D; Hall, C J

    2006-01-01

    In our research programme small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to provide information on the axial arrangement of collagen molecules as well as data about the state of other components of the extra cellular matrix (ECM) in human tissues. Derivation of parameters to describe and simplify the data is required for much of the SAXS patterns analysis. A method is presented here to achieve function fitting to collagen diffraction peaks along with a representation of the underlying diffuse scatter. A simple model was used which proved reliable in fitting a variety of 2D diffraction patterns. The logarithm of the scatter intensity over the area of the scatter image was taken to reduce the range and improve fitting accuracy. Our model was then used to fit the log data. The model consisted of a radial exponential diffuse scatter component added to a specified number of Gaussian peaks. In 2D the peak model is toroidal, each component being rotated about a common specified centre. Initial search parameters from a 1D averaged sector were supplied to the iterative 2D fitting routine. With the aid of data weighting and basic wavelet filtering, successful and reliable fitting of a specified 2D model to real data is achievable. The process is easily automated. Multiple SAXS patterns can be fitted without operator intervention. As described the model is simple enough to converge rapidly and yet allows image data to be parameterized to a form suitable for extracting the requisite information. The fitting method is flexible enough to be extended to achieve a more comprehensive and complex pattern fitting in two dimensions if this turns out to be necessary. It is our intention to implement orientation distribution functions in the near future by including an angular scaling factor

  16. Biophysical modeling of forward scattering from bacterial colonies using scalar diffraction theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Huff, Karleigh; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul; Hirleman, E. Daniel

    2007-06-01

    A model for forward scattering from bacterial colonies is presented. The colonies of interest consist of approximately 1012-1013 individual bacteria densely packed in a configuration several millimeters in diameter and approximately 0.1-0.2 mm in thickness. The model is based on scalar diffraction theory and accounts for amplitude and phase modulation created by three macroscopic properties of the colonies: phase modulation due to the surface topography, phase modulation due to the radial structure observed from some strains and species, and diffraction from the outline of the colony. Phase contrast and confocal microscopy were performed to provide quantitative information on the shape and internal structure of the colonies. The computed results showed excellent agreement with the experimental scattering data for three different Listeria species: Listeria innocua, Listeria ivanovii, and Listeria monocytogenes. The results provide a physical explanation for the unique and distinctive scattering signatures produced by colonies of closely related Listeria species and support the efficacy of forward scattering for rapid detection and classification of pathogens without tagging.

  17. Structure of naturally hydrated ferrihydrite revealed through neutron diffraction and first-principles modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Helen F.; Thom, William; Bowron, Daniel T.; Faria, Nuno; Hasnip, Philip J.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2017-08-01

    Ferrihydrite, with a ``two-line'' x-ray diffraction pattern (2L-Fh), is the most amorphous of the iron oxides and is ubiquitous in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. It also plays a central role in the regulation and metabolism of iron in bacteria, algae, higher plants, and animals, including humans. In this study, we present a single-phase model for ferrihydrite that unifies existing analytical data while adhering to fundamental chemical principles. The primary particle is small (20-50 Å) and has a dynamic and variably hydrated surface, which negates long-range order; collectively, these features have hampered complete characterization and frustrated our understanding of the mineral's reactivity and chemical/biochemical function. Near and intermediate range neutron diffraction (NIMROD) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) were employed in this study to generate and interpret high-resolution data of naturally hydrated, synthetic 2L-Fh at standard temperature. The structural optimization overcomes transgressions of coordination chemistry inherent within previously proposed structures, to produce a robust and unambiguous single-phase model.

  18. Diffraction gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  19. High Capacity High Speed Optical Data Storage System Based on Diffraction-Free Nanobeam. Final Report, 09-02-98 to 03-17-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin Aye

    1999-06-16

    Physical Optics Corporation (POC) investigated the development of an optical data storage system built around a current well-engineered high-speed optical disk system with an innovative diffraction-free micro-optical element to produce a beam {approximately}250 nm wide with {approximately}4-5 mm depth of focus, allowing the system to address data at {approximately}100 Mbits/second and to store it 100 to 1,000 times more densely ({approximately}10 Gbit/in.{sup 2}) than in present systems. In Phase 1 of this project POC completed a thorough feasibility study by system design and analysis, successfully demonstrated fabrication of the key components, and conducted a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration. Specifically, production of a subwavelength ({approximately}380 nm) large depth of focus ({approximately}4-5 mm) addressing beam was demonstrated by fabricating a special microdiffractive optical element and recording this beam on a standard optical recording disk coated with a photopolymer material.

  20. Chromatic confocal microscope using hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A chromatic confocal microscope is a single point non-contact distance measurement sensor. For three decades the vast majority of the chromatic confocal microscope use refractive-based lenses to code the measurement axis chromatically. However, such an approach is limiting the range of applications. In this paper the performance of refractive, diffractive and Hybrid aspheric diffractive are compared. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses combine the low geometric aberration of a diffractive lens with the high optical power of an aspheric lens. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses can reduce the number of elements in an imaging system significantly or create large hyper- chromatic lenses for sensing applications. In addition, diffractive lenses can improve the resolution and the dynamic range of a chromatic confocal microscope. However, to be suitable for commercial applications, the diffractive optical power must be significant. Therefore, manufacturing such lenses is a challenge. We show in this paper how a theoretical manufacturing model can demonstrate that the hybrid aspheric diffractive configuration with the best performances is achieved by step diffractive surface. The high optical quality of step diffractive surface is then demonstrated experimentally. Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 5/10/14, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 5/19/14. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance.

  1. Modelling Nonlinear Optics in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank; Faus-Golfe, A; Collier, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear fields arising from eddy currents in the vac-uum chamber and remanent fields in the magnets of the CERN SPS vary with time and with the acceleration cycle. We describe a procedure of constructing a nonlinear op-tics model for the SPS, by considering sextupolar, octupo-lar, and decapolar field errors in the dipole and quadrupole magnets, respectively, whose strengths are adjusted so as to best reproduce the measured nonlinear chromaticities up to third order in the momentum deviation. Applying this procedure to SPS chromaticity measurements taken at 26 GeV/c, we have obtained a refined optics model. The tune shifts with the transverse amplitude predicted by this model are consistent with a direct measurement.

  2. Polarized neutron diffraction - a tool for testing extinction models: application to yttrium iron garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, M.; Delapalme, A.; Becker, P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper shows that polarized neutron experiments, which do not depend on any scale factor, are very dependent on extinction and provide original tests for extinction models. Moon, Koehler, Cable and Child (1972) have formulated the problem and proposed a first-order solution applicable only when the extinction is small. In the first part, some analytical derivations of secondary extinction corrections are discussed, using the formalism of Becker and Coppens (1974). In the second part, the main principles governing polarized neutron diffraction are briefly reviewed, with a special discussion of extinction problems. The method is then applied to the case of yttrium iron garnet (YIG). This experiment shows the technique of polarized neutrons to be very powerful for testing extinction models and for deciding whether the crystal behaves dynamically or kinematically (following Kato's criterion). (Auth.)

  3. Study of stress localisation in polycrystalline grains using self-consistent modelling and neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczmański, A.; Gaj, A.; Le Joncour, L.; Wroński, S.; François, M.; Panicaud, B.; Braham, C.; Paradowska, A. M.

    2012-08-01

    The time-of-flight neutron diffraction technique and the elastoplastic self-consistent model were used to study the behaviour of single and multi-phase materials. Critical resolved shear stresses and hardening parameters in austenitic and austenitic-ferritic steels were found by analysing the evolution of the lattice strains measured during tensile tests. Special attention was paid to the changes of the grain stresses occurring due to transition from elastic to plastic deformation. Using a new method of data analysis, the variation of the stress localisation tensor as a function of macrostress was measured. The experimental results were successfully compared with model predictions for both phases of the duplex steel and also for the austenitic sample.

  4. A calculation model for X-ray diffraction by curved-graphene nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernozatonskii, L.A.; Neverov, V.S.; Kukushkin, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    An approximation of the positions of carbon atoms in a curved graphene sheet is suggested for calculation of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of curved-graphene nanoparticles. The model is tested for carbon nanotubes and newly calculated carbon nanotoroids consisting of several hundreds of atoms. It is shown that the random distribution of carbon atoms with graphene surface-averaged density and the local graphene-like rearrangement of atoms in a curved lattice are sufficient for describing the XRD patterns of an ensemble of respective exact carbon nanoparticles of random isotropic orientation in the range of scattering wave vector's modulus q from several units to several tens of inverse nanometers. The model is of interest to a fast-routine identification of curved-graphene nanoparticles in carbonaceous materials.

  5. Probing deformation substructure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and dislocation dynamics modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Eve, Sophie; Collins, Steve P

    2010-09-01

    Materials characterization at the nano-scale is motivated by the desire to resolve the structural aspects and deformation behavior at length scales relevant to those mechanisms that define the novel and unusual properties of nano-structured materials. A range of novel techniques has recently become accessible with the help of synchrotron X-ray beams that can be focused down to spot sizes of less than a few microns on the sample. The unique combination of tunability (energy selection), parallelism and brightness of synchrotron X-ray beams allows their use for high resolution diffraction (determination of crystal structure and transformations, analysis of dislocation sub-structures, orientation and texture analysis, strain mapping); small angle X-ray scattering (analysis of nano-scale voids and defects; orientation analysis) and imaging (radiography and tomography). After a brief review of the state-of-the-art capabilities for monochromatic and white beam synchrotron diffraction, we consider the usefulness of these techniques for the task of bridging the gap between experiment and modeling. Namely, we discuss how the experiments can be configured to provide information relevant to the validation and improvement of modeling approaches, and also how the results of various simulations can be post-processed to improve the possibility of (more or less) direct comparison with experiments. Using the example of some recent experiments carried out on beamline 116 at Diamond Light Source near Oxford, we discuss how such experimental results can be interpreted in view and in conjunction with numerical deformation models, particularly those incorporating dislocation effects, e.g., finite-element based pseudo-continuum strain gradient formulations, and discrete dislocation simulations. Post-processing of FE and discrete dislocation simulations is described, illustrating the kind of information that can be extracted from comparisons between modeling and experimental data.

  6. Anatomically accurate, finite model eye for optical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, H L; Brennan, N A

    1997-08-01

    There is a need for a schematic eye that models vision accurately under various conditions such as refractive surgical procedures, contact lens and spectacle wear, and near vision. Here we propose a new model eye close to anatomical, biometric, and optical realities. This is a finite model with four aspheric refracting surfaces and a gradient-index lens. It has an equivalent power of 60.35 D and an axial length of 23.95 mm. The new model eye provides spherical aberration values within the limits of empirical results and predicts chromatic aberration for wavelengths between 380 and 750 nm. It provides a model for calculating optical transfer functions and predicting optical performance of the eye.

  7. Green Network Planning Model for Optical Backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Jensen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Communication networks are becoming more essential for our daily lives and critically important for industry and governments. The intense growth in the backbone traffic implies an increment of the power demands of the transmission systems. This power usage might have a significant negative effect...... on the environment in general. In network planning there are existing planning models focused on QoS provisioning, investment minimization or combinations of both and other parameters. But there is a lack of a model for designing green optical backbones. This paper presents novel ideas to be able to define...... an analytical model to consider environmental aspects in the planning stage of backbones design....

  8. Photon diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  9. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  10. A single-spatial-mode semiconductor laser based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots with a diffraction filter of optical modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, N. Yu.; Novikov, I. I.; Kuznetsov, A. M.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Maximov, M. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Chunareva, A. V.; Payusov, A. S.; Livshits, D. A.; Kovsh, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of a diffraction optical filter is used for prevention of high-order mode oscillation in a design of stripe laser diodes with an active region based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots emitting in the 1.3-μm wavelength range grown on GaAs substrates. Incorporation of such a filter made it possible to increase the width of the stripe and obtain an output power as high as 700 mW with retention of a single-spatial-mode character of lasing.

  11. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-01-01

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  12. Optical Effects Accompanying the Dynamical Bragg Diffraction in Linear 1D Photonic Crystals Based on Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Maydykovskiy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We survey our recent results on the observation and studies of the effects accompanying the dynamical Bragg diffraction in one-dimensional photonic crystals (PhC. Contrary to the kinematic Bragg diffraction, the dynamical one considers a continuous interaction between the waves travelling within a spatially-periodic structure and is the most pronounced in the so called Laue geometry, leading to a number of exciting phenomena. In the described experiments, we study the PhC based on porous silicon or porous quartz, made by the electrochemical etching of crystalline silicon with the consequent thermal annealing. Importantly, these PhC are approximately hundreds of microns thick and contain a few hundreds of periods, so that the experiments in the Laue diffraction scheme are available. We discuss the effect of the temporal splitting of femtosecond laser pulses and show that the effect is quite sensitive to the polarization and the phase of a femtosecond laser pulse. We also show the experimental realization of the Pendular effect in porous quartz PhC and demonstrate the experimental conditions for the total spatial switching of the output radiation between the transmitted and diffracted directions. All described effects are of high interest for the control over the light propagation based on PhC structures.

  13. The magneto-optical gradient effect in anexchange-biased thin film: experimental evidencefor classical diffraction theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schäfer, R.; Hamann, C.; McCord, J.; Schultz, L.; Kamberský, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 5 (2010), 053006/1-053006/10 ISSN 1367-2630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : magnetooptics * magnetic domains * light diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.849, year: 2010

  14. Comparison of quartz crystallographic preferred orientations identified with optical fabric analysis, electron backscatter and neutron diffraction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, N J R; Wilson, C J L; Luzin, V

    2017-02-01

    Three techniques are used to measure crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in a naturally deformed quartz mylonite: transmitted light cross-polarized microscopy using an automated fabric analyser, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction. Pole figure densities attributable to crystal-plastic deformation are variably recognizable across the techniques, particularly between fabric analyser and diffraction instruments. Although fabric analyser techniques offer rapid acquisition with minimal sample preparation, difficulties may exist when gathering orientation data parallel with the incident beam. Overall, we have found that EBSD and fabric analyser techniques are best suited for studying CPO distributions at the grain scale, where individual orientations can be linked to their source grain or nearest neighbours. Neutron diffraction serves as the best qualitative and quantitative means of estimating the bulk CPO, due to its three-dimensional data acquisition, greater sample area coverage, and larger sample size. However, a number of sampling methods can be applied to FA and EBSD data to make similar approximations. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Wakefield and the diffraction model due to a flat beam moving past a conducting wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Henke, H.

    1995-07-01

    A collimator is often used to clean a beam of its excessive tail particles. If the beam intensity is high enough or if the beam is brought too close to the collimator, however, the wakefields generated by the beam-collimator interaction can cause additional beam tails to grow, thus defeating, or even worsening, the beam-tail cleaning process. The wakefield generated by a sheet beam moving past a conducting wedge has been obtained in closed form by Henke using the method of conformal mapping. This result is applied in the present work to obtain the wake force and the transverse kick received by a test charge moving with the beam. For the beam to be approximated as sheet beams, it is assumed to be flat and the collimator is assumed to have an infinite extent in the flat dimention. We derive an exact expression for the transverse wake force delivered to particles in the beam bunch. Implication of emittance growth as a beam passes closely by a collimator is discussed. We consider two idealized wedge geometries: In Section 2, when the wedge has the geometry as a disrupted beam pipe, and in Section 3, when it is like a semi-infinite screen. Unfortunately, we do not have solutions for more realistic collimator geometries such as when it is tapered to minimize the wakefield effects. However, our results should still serve as pessimistic limiting cases. An interesting opportunity is offered by our exact calculation of the wakefields: it can be used to confront the diffraction model used to estimate the high-frequency impedance of a cavity structure. It is shown that the field pattern, as well as the impedance, agrees with those obtained by the diffraction model in appropriate limits

  16. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: Effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Diaz, J.; Lindsay, I.D.; de Beer, Sissi; Duvigneau, Joost; Schön, Peter Manfred; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2015-01-01

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal

  17. Ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in exosporium of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A revealed by electron microscopy using optical diffraction and filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, K; Kawata, T; Takumi, K; Kinouchi, T

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in the exosporium from spores of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A strain 190L was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained exosporium fragments using optical diffraction and filtration. The exosporium was composed of three or more lamellae showing and equilateral, hexagonal periodicity. Images of the single exosporium layer from which the noise had been filtered optically revealed that the hexagonally arranged, morphological unit of the exosporium was composed of three globular subunits about 2.1 nm in diameter which were arranged at the vertices of an equilateral triangle with sides of about 2.4 nm. The morphological units were arranged with a spacing of about 4.5 nm. the adjacent globular subunits appeared to be interconnected by delicate linkers.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography: Modeling and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars

    An analytical model is presented that is able to describe the performance of OCT systems in both the single and multiple scattering regimes simultaneously. This model inherently includes the shower curtain effect, well-known for light propagation through the atmosphere. This effect has been omitted...... in previous theoretical models of OCT systems. It is demonstrated that the shower curtain effect is of utmost importance in the theoretical description of an OCT system. The analytical model, together with proper noise analysis of the OCT system, enables calculation of the SNR, where the optical properties...... geometry, i.e., reflection geometry, is developed. As in the new OCT model, multiple scattered photons has been taken into account together with multiple scattering effects. As an important result, a novel method of creating images based on measurements of the momentum width of the Wigner phase...

  19. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Diffraction methods, especially X-ray diffraction, are widely used in materials science. Neutron diffraction is in many ways similar to X-ray diffraction, but is also complementary to the X-ray technique so that in some cases it yields information not accessible using X-rays. Successes of neutron diffraction include the elucidation of the crystal structures of high temperature superconductors and materials that display colossal magnetoresistance, the phase analysis of zirconia engineering ceramics, in depth stress determination in composites, successful determination of the structures of metal hydrides, transition metal polymer complexes and the determination of magnetic structure. A brief description of current studies, using neutron diffraction is given

  20. Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cobourne, G.; Mountjoy, G.; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego

    2014-01-01

    potential structure refinement method has been used to make a model of magnesium-stabilised ACC and the results revealed a fair agreement with the experimental diffraction data. The model has well-defined CO3 and H2O molecules. The average coordination number of Ca is 7.4 and is composed of 6.8 oxygen atoms...

  1. Approximate analytical method to evaluate diffraction crosstalk in free-space optical interconnects systems that use circular microlenses with finite uniform apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ababneh, Nedal

    2014-07-01

    We propose an accurate analytical model to calculate the optical crosstalk of a first-order free space optical interconnects system that uses microlenses with circular apertures. The proposed model is derived by evaluating the resulted finite integral in terms of an infinite series of Bessel functions. Compared to the model that uses complex Gaussian functions to expand the aperture function, it is shown that the proposed model is superior in estimating the crosstalk and provides more accurate results. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed model gives results close to that of the numerical model with superior computational efficiency.

  2. Emitting far-field multicolor patterns and characters through plastic diffractive micro-optics elements illuminated by common Gaussian lasers in the visible range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Hui; Liu, Kan; Luo, Jun; Xie, Changsheng; Ji, An; Zhang, Tianxu

    2011-04-01

    Far-field multicolor patterns and characters are emitted effectively in a relatively wide and deep spatial region by plastic diffractive micro-optics elements (DMOEs), which are illuminated directly by common Gaussian lasers in the visible range. Phase-only DMOEs are composed of a large number of fine step-shaped phase microstructures distributed sequentially over the plastic wafer selected. The initial DMOEs in silicon wafer are fabricated by an innovative technique with a combination of a single-mask ultraviolet photolithography and low-cost and rapid wet KOH etching. The fabricated silicon DMOEs are further converted into a nickel mask by the conventional electrochemical method, and they are finally transferred onto the surface of the plastic wafer through mature hot embossing. Morphological measurements show that the surface roughness of the plastic DMOEs is in the nanometer range, and the feature height of the phase steps in diffractive elements is in the submicrometer scale, which can be designed and adjusted flexibly according to requirements. The dimensions of the DMOEs can be changed from the order of millimeters to centimeters. A large number of pixel phase microstructures with a square microappearance employed to construct the phase-only DMOEs are created by the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm, according to the target patterns and characters and common Gaussian lasers manipulated by the DMOEs fabricated. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  3. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  4. Modelling the X-ray powder diffraction of nitrogen-expanded austenite using the Debye formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Stress-free and homogeneous samples of nitrogen-expanded austenite, a defect-rich f.c.c. structure with a high interstitial nitrogen occupancy (between 0.36 and 0.61), have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Debye simulations. The simulations confirm the presence of deformation...... to be indistinguishable to X-ray powder diffraction....

  5. A comprehensive simulation model of the performance of photochromic films in absorbance-modulation-optical-lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apratim Majumder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical lithography is the most prevalent method of fabricating micro-and nano-scale structures in the semiconductor industry due to the fact that patterning using photons is fast, accurate and provides high throughput. However, the resolution of this technique is inherently limited by the physical phenomenon of diffraction. Absorbance-Modulation-Optical Lithography (AMOL, a recently developed technique has been successfully demonstrated to be able to circumvent this diffraction limit. AMOL employs a dual-wavelength exposure system in conjunction with spectrally selective reversible photo-transitions in thin films of photochromic molecules to achieve patterning of features with sizes beyond the far-field diffraction limit. We have developed a finite-element-method based full-electromagnetic-wave solution model that simulates the photo-chemical processes that occur within the thin film of the photochromic molecules under illumination by the exposure and confining wavelengths in AMOL. This model allows us to understand how the material characteristics influence the confinement to sub-diffraction dimensions, of the transmitted point spread function (PSF of the exposure wavelength inside the recording medium. The model reported here provides the most comprehensive analysis of the AMOL process to-date, and the results show that the most important factors that govern the process, are the polarization of the two beams, the ratio of the intensities of the two wavelengths, the relative absorption coefficients and the concentration of the photochromic species, the thickness of the photochromic layer and the quantum yields of the photoreactions at the two wavelengths. The aim of this work is to elucidate the requirements of AMOL in successfully circumventing the far-field diffraction limit.

  6. Optical modeling and simulation of thin-film photovoltaic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Krc, Janez

    2013-01-01

    In wafer-based and thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices, the management of light is a crucial aspect of optimization since trapping sunlight in active parts of PV devices is essential for efficient energy conversions. Optical modeling and simulation enable efficient analysis and optimization of the optical situation in optoelectronic and PV devices. Optical Modeling and Simulation of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Devices provides readers with a thorough guide to performing optical modeling and simulations of thin-film solar cells and PV modules. It offers insight on examples of existing optical models

  7. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-01

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  8. The forward tracking, an optical model method

    CERN Document Server

    Benayoun, M

    2002-01-01

    This Note describes the so-called Forward Tracking, and the underlying optical model, developed in the context of LHCb-Light studies. Starting from Velo tracks, cheated or found by real pattern recognition, the tracks are found in the ST1-3 chambers after the magnet. The main ingredient to the method is a parameterisation of the track in the ST1-3 region, based on the Velo track parameters and an X seed in one ST station. Performance with the LHCb-Minus and LHCb-Light setups is given.

  9. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  10. A boundary element model for diffraction of water waves on varying water depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Sanne

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis a boundary element model for calculating diffraction of water waves on varying water depth is presented. The varying water depth is approximated with a perturbed constant depth in the mild-slope wave equation. By doing this, the domain integral which is a result of the varying depth is no longer a function of the unknown wave potential but only a function of position and the constant depth wave potential. The number of unknowns is the resulting system of equations is thus reduced significantly. The integration procedures in the model are tested very thoroughly and it is found that a combination of analytical integration in the singular region and standard numerical integration outside works very well. The gradient of the wave potential is evaluated successfully using a hypersingular integral equation. Deviations from the analytical solution are only found on the boundary or very close to, but these deviations have no significant influence on the accuracy of the solution. The domain integral is evaluated using the dual reciprocity method. The results are compared with a direct integration of the integral, and the accuracy is quite satisfactory. The problem with irregular frequencies is taken care of by the CBIEM (or CHIEF-method) together with a singular value decomposition technique. This method is simple to implement and works very well. The model is verified using Homma`s island as a test case. The test cases are limited to shallow water since the analytical solution is only valid in this region. Several depth ratios are examined, and it is found that the accuracy of the model increases with increasing wave period and decreasing depth ratio. Short waves, e.g. wind generated waves, can allow depth variations up to approximately 2 before the error exceeds 10%, while long waves can allow larger depth ratios. It is concluded that the perturbation idea is highly usable. A study of (partially) absorbing boundary conditions is also conducted. (EG)

  11. Demonstrations of Wave Optics (Interference and Diffraction of Light) for Large Audiences Using a Laser and a Multimedia Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new technique for performing most well-known demonstrations of wave optics. Demonstrations which are normally very hard to show to more than a few people can be presented easily to very large audiences with excellent visibility for everyone. The proposed setup is easy to put together and use and can be very useful for…

  12. Deuteron diffractive dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, A.C.B.; Caruso, F.

    1984-01-01

    Deuteron diffractive dissociation is studied in the framework of the Three Components Deck Model. The applicability of this model to light nuclei diffractive dissociation is assumed. The existence of a slope-mass-cos theta correlation is pointed out. The relevant distributions are obtained. (Author) [pt

  13. Preliminayr Study on Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging for a Canine Model of Cartilage Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehleman,C.; Li, J.; Zhong, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the ability of a novel radiographic technique, Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging (DEI), to render high contrast images of canine knee joints for identification of cartilage lesions in situ. Methods: DEI was carried out at the X-15A beamline at Brookhaven National Laboratory on intact canine knee joints with varying levels of cartilage damage. Two independent observers graded the DE images for lesions and these grades were correlated to the gross morphological grade. Results: The correlation of gross visual grades with DEI grades for the 18 canine knee joints as determined by observer 1 (r2=0.8856, P=0.001) and observer 2 (r2=0.8818, P=0.001) was high. The overall weighted ? value for inter-observer agreement was 0.93, thus considered high agreement. Conclusion: The present study is the first study for the efficacy of DEI for cartilage lesions in an animal joint, from very early signs through erosion down to subchondral bone, representing the spectrum of cartilage changes occurring in human osteoarthritis (OA). Here we show that DEI allows the visualization of cartilage lesions in intact canine knee joints with good accuracy. Hence, DEI may be applicable for following joint degeneration in animal models of OA.

  14. Simulation of X-ray diffraction-line broadening due to dislocations in a model composite material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Cleveringa, H.H.M.; Delhez, R; van der Giessen, E.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diffraction-line profiles of two-dimensional, plastically deformed model composite materials are calculated and analysed in detail. The composite consists of elastic reinforcements in a crystalline solid and is subjected to macroscopic shear. Slip occurs in the matrix only due to the

  15. Diffractive processes in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahn, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The book reviews diffraction scattering in nuclear physics. The first part concerns nuclear diffraction models, and includes the basic concepts and theory of diffraction scattering, as well as diffraction in configuration space and in angular momentum space. The second part deals with closed formalism for strong absorption processes including: elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, transfer reactions and coupled-channel extensions. (U.K.)

  16. Integrated modeling of the Canadian Very Large Optical Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Scott C.; Pazder, John S.; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff T.; Herriot, Glen; Loewen, Nathan; Smith, Malcolm J.; Dunn, Jennifer; Saddlemyer, Leslie K.

    2004-07-01

    We describe the VLOT integrated model, which simulates the telescope optical performance under the influence of external disturbances including wind. Details of the implementation in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment are given, and the data structures are described. The structural to optical interface is detailed, including a discussion of coordinate transformations. The optical model includes both an interface with ZEMAX to perform raytracing analysis and an efficient Linear Optics Model for producing telescope optical path differences from within MATLAB. An extensive set of optical analysis routines has been developed for use with the integrated model. The telescope finite element model, state-space formulation and the high fidelity 1500 mode modal state-space structural dynamics model are presented. Control systems and wind models are described. We present preliminary results, showing the delivered image quality under the influence of wind on the primary mirror, with and without primary mirror control.

  17. High-pressure optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on synthetic cobalt aluminum silicate garnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Taran, Michail; Nestola, Fabrizio; Ohashi, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The pressure-induced behavior of spin-allowed dd-bands of VIIICo2+ in the absorption spectra of synthetic Co3Al2Si3O12 garnet was studied from 10-4 to 13 GPa. The plots of the peak energy vs. pressure for the three sharpest well resolved bands at ca. 5160, 17 680, and 18 740 cm-1 display small...... but discernible breaks in linear relations between 4 and 5 GPa. Datafromsingle-crystalX-raydiffractionData from single-crystal X-ray diffraction likewise show discontinuities in trends of CoO8 polyhedral volume and distortion, and Co-O and Si-O bond distances over this pressure range. These effects are related...

  18. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  19. Dynamic ray tracing for modeling optical cell manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sraj, Ihab; Szatmary, Alex C.; Marr, David W. M.; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    Current methods for predicting stress distribution on a cell surface due to optical trapping forces are based on a traditional ray optics scheme for fixed geometries. Cells are typically modeled as solid spheres as this facilitates optical force calculation. Under such applied forces however, real and non-rigid cells can deform, so assumptions inherent in traditional ray optics methods begin to break down. In this work, we implement a dynamic ray tracing technique to calculate the stress distribution on a deformable cell induced by optical trapping. Here, cells are modeled as three-dimensional elastic capsules with a discretized surface with associated hydrodynamic forces calculated using the Immersed Boundary Method. We use this approach to simulate the transient deformation of spherical, ellipsoidal and biconcave capsules due to external optical forces induced by a single diode bar optical trap for a range of optical powers. PMID:20721060

  20. Electric field control of a Bragg diffraction optical beam splitter based on a cubic K(0.99)Li(0.01)Ta(0.63)Nb(0.37)O3 single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Dewei; Tian, Hao; Tan, Liying; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2011-01-01

    We have realized an electric field controlled Bragg diffraction optical beam splitter based on a photorefractive Bragg diffraction grating. In our experiments, the splitter was produced by wave coupling (532.0 nm) with a potassium lithium tantalate niobate single crystal. In the process of splitting, the incident beam could be split into multioutput beams by the splitter. The influence of an externally applied electric field was studied, and the results show that the intensity of the Bragg diffraction could be controlled by the electric field. The polarization properties of the splitter are discussed.

  1. Optical and structural properties in type-II InAlAs/AlGaAs quantum dots observed by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Daly, A.; Craciun, D.; Laura Ursu, E.; Lemaître, A.; Maaref, M. A.; Iacomi, F.; Vasile, B. S.; Craciun, V.

    2017-10-01

    We present the effects of AlGaAs alloy composition on InAlAs quantum dots (QDs) optical and structural properties. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples having a variety of aluminium composition values covering type-II transitions clearly in QDs showed the presence of two transitions X-Sh and X-Ph. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) investigations showed that the layers grew epitaxially on the GaAs substrate, with no relaxation regardless the Al content of AlGaAs layer. From the reciprocal space map (RSM) investigation around (004) and (115) diffraction peaks, it was shown that the InAlAs layer is fully strained, the in-plane lattice parameters (a and b, a = b) being identical to those of GaAs substrate, while the c lattice parameter was dependent on the In and Al concentrations, being larger than that of the substrate. High-resolution transmission electronic microscopy (HRTEM) investigations confirmed that films grew epitaxially on the GaAs substrate with no visible dislocations or other major defects within the InAlAs/GaAlAs QDs structure.

  2. Molecular structure of hybrid imino-chalcone in the solid state: X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy study and third-order nonlinear optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, J. M. F.; Santos, F. G.; Vaz, W. F.; Cunha, C. E. P.; Silveira, R. G.; Anjos, M. M.; Campos, C. E. M.; Oliveira, G. R.; Martins, F. T.; da Silva, C. C.; Valverde, C.; Baseia, B.; Napolitano, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive structural study of the compound (2E)-1-((E)-4-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)phenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one was carried out in this work. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), NMR, Raman and Infrared spectroscopies, and DFT calculations were performed for characterization of this iminochalcone hybrid. Intermolecular interactions were described by Hirshfeld surface analysis derived from crystal structure. Reactivity and intramolecular charge transfer were investigated using the frontier molecular orbitals and molecular electrostatic potential. In addition, we have calculated the Nonlinear Optical Properties at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311+g(d) level of theory in the presence of different solvents (gas-phase, acetone, chloroform, dichloromethane, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethanol, methanol, and water), being found meaningful NLO parameters for our compound. At last, there is a good agreement between calculated and experimental IR spectrum, allowing the assignment of some of normal vibrational modes of the iminochalcone hybrid.

  3. Virtual Mie particle model of laser damage to optical elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Hirata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, devices being developed for application systems have used laser beams that have high average power, high peak power, short pulse width, and short wavelength. Therefore, optical elements using such application systems require a high laser damage threshold. The laser damage threshold is provided by International Organization for Standardization 11254 (ISO11254. One of the measurement methods of the laser damage threshold provided by ISO11254 is an online method to measure the intensity of light scattering due to a laser damage trace. In this paper, we propose a measurement method for the laser damage threshold that realizes high sensitivity and high accuracy by using polarized light and lock-in detection. Since the scattering light with laser damage is modeled on the asperity of the optical element-surface as Mie particles (virtual Mie particles, we consider the intensity change of scattering light as a change in the radius of a virtual Mie particle. To evaluate this model, the laser damage trace on the optical element-surface was observed by an atomic force microscopy (AFM. Based on the observed AFM image, we analyzed the frequency domain by the Fourier transform, and estimated the dominant virtual Mie particle radius in the AFM measurement area. In addition, we measured the laser damage threshold. The light source was the fifth generation of a Nd:YAG laser (λ =213nm. The specifications of the laser were: repetition frequency 10Hz, pulse width 4ns, linear type polarization, laser pulse energy 4mJ, and laser transverse mode TEM00. The laser specifications were a repetition frequency, pulse width, pulse energy and beam diameter of 10Hz, 4ns, 4mJ and 13mm, respectively. The laser damage thresholds of an aluminum coated mirror and a dielectric multi-layer mirror designed at a wavelength of 213nm as measured by this method were 0.684 J/cm2 and 0.998J/cm2, respectively. These laser damage thresholds were 1/4 the laser damage

  4. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  5. The at-wavelength metrology facility for UV- and XUV-reflection and diffraction optics at BESSY-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfers, F.; Bischoff, P.; Eggenstein, F.; Erko, A.; Gaupp, A.; Künstner, S.; Mast, M.; Schmidt, J.-S.; Senf, F.; Siewert, F.; Sokolov, A.; Zeschke, Th.

    2016-01-01

    A technology center for the production of high-precision reflection gratings has been established. Within this project a new optics beamline and a versatile reflectometer for at-wavelength characterization of UV- and XUV-reflection gratings and other (nano-) optical elements has been set up at BESSY-II. The Plane Grating Monochromator beamline operated in collimated light (c-PGM) is equipped with an SX700 monochromator, of which the blazed gratings (600 and 1200 lines mm−1) have been recently exchanged for new ones of improved performance produced in-house. Over the operating range from 10 to 2000 eV this beamline has very high spectral purity achieved by (i) a four-mirror arrangement of different coatings which can be inserted into the beam at different angles and (ii) by absorber filters for high-order suppression. Stray light and scattered radiation is removed efficiently by double sets of in situ exchangeable apertures and slits. By use of in- and off-plane bending-magnet radiation the beamline can be adjusted to either linear or elliptical polarization. One of the main features of a novel 11-axes reflectometer is the possibility to incorporate real life-sized gratings. The samples are adjustable within six degrees of freedom by a newly developed UHV-tripod system carrying a load up to 4 kg, and the reflectivity can be measured between 0 and 90° incidence angle for both s- and p-polarization geometry. This novel powerful metrology facility has gone into operation recently and is now open for external users. First results on optical performance and measurements on multilayer gratings will be presented here. PMID:26698047

  6. Research on Acoustical Scattering, Diffraction Catastrophes, Optics of Bubbles, Acoustical Phase Conjugation, and Wake of an Oscillating Circular Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-31

    Flax , G. C. Gaunaurd, and H. Uberall, "Theory of Resonance Scattering," in Physical Acoustics, edited by W. P. Mason and R. N. Thurston (Academic, New...722. [81 Flax , L., Dragonette, L. R., and Uberall H., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 63 (1978) 723. [9] Marston, P. L., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85 (1989) 2663. [10...8217 aIed in the theoretical contours in Fi 3. Fiure 4 shows the resulting image of the optical caustic wxith the same ret .:a:,in ,urtace, ,oUrc’c location

  7. Analysis of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) for tunable low frequency diffractive optical elements recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Francés, J.; Martínez, F. J.; Pascual, I.; Beléndez, A.

    2018-02-01

    Holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) are the result of the optimization of the photopolymer fabrication techniques. They are made by recording in a photopolymerization induced phase separation process (PIPS) in which the liquid crystal molecules diffuse to dark zones in the diffraction grating originated. Thanks to the addition of liquid crystal molecules to the composition, this material has a dynamic behavior by reorientation of the liquid crystal molecules applying an electrical field. In this sense, it is possible to use this material to make dynamic devices. In this work, we study the behavior of this material working in low frequencies with different spatial periods of blazed gratings, a sharp profile whose recording is possible thanks to the addition of a Holoeye LCoS-Pluto spatial light modulator with a resolution of 1920 × 1080 pixels (HD) and a pixel size of 8 × 8 μm2. This device allows us to have an accurate and dynamic control of the phase and amplitude of the recording beam.

  8. A study of the Pythia 8 description of ATLAS minimum bias measurements with the Donnachie-Landshoff diffractive model

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present a new tune of the Pythia8 event generator, titled ``A3'' and suitable for inclusive QCD modelling, including minimum bias physics and pile-up overlay. The tuning uses the early Run~2 charged particle distribution and inelastic cross section results from ATLAS in addition to the Run~1 data used to construct previous minimum-bias tunes. For the first time, the tuning included a consideration of diffraction modelling parameters and a diffractive model other than the Pythia8 default is used in the final configuration. That resulted in a better descriptions of the measured inelastic cross-sections, and similar or better level of agreement compared to the currently used A2 tune for other distributions considered.

  9. Effects of higher-order diffractive processes in an absorptive eikonal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffner, J.G.; Camillo, P.J.; Fishbane, P.M.; Trefil, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    We investigate the effects of opening diffractive channels on elastic scattering and diffractive production. Using a type of field-theoretic calculation in the eikonal approximation, we derive general expressions for elastic and diffractive amplitudes. We show that an explicit counting of all contributing graphs is completely equivalent to diagonalization procedures of a multichannel eikonal. By demanding that the calculated cross sections satisfy (sigma) + sigma)) less than or equal to sigma), we find that for a given absorption an upper bound exists on the ratio of diffractive to elastic coupling strengths. With this relation we derive the following results: (1) For a black-disk absorption profile, 1/8 less than or equal to sigma)/sigma) less than or equal to 1/2 and 0 less than or equal to sigma)/sigma/subT/ less than or equal to3/8; (2) for a Gaussian-shaped profile, approx. 0.06 less than or equal to sigma)/sigma) less than or equal to0.25 and 0 less than or equal to sigma)/sigma) less than or equal to approx.0.91. Bounds for (sigma) + sigma))/sigma) are also investigated

  10. Analytical model for neutron diffraction peak shifts due to the surface effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šaroun, Jan; Kornmeier, J. R.; Hofmann, M.; Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 6 (2013), s. 628-638 ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0654 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : residual-stress * neutron diffraction * Monte Carlo simulation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.950, year: 2013

  11. Application of the ellipsoid modeling of the average shape of nanosized crystallites in powder diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katerinopoulou, Anna; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropic broadening correction in X-ray powder diffraction by an ellipsoidal formula is applied on samples with nanosized crystals. Two cases of minerals with largely anisotropic crystallite shapes are presented. The properly applied formalism not only improves the fitting of the theoretical...

  12. Diffraction: what do we know; what can we learn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randa, J.

    1983-05-01

    High energy diffractive scattering is reviewed. We first summarize experimental results and information gleaned from geometric and optical models. We then discuss dynamics from the perspectives of hadron structure and Pomeron structure. Particular emphasis is placed on investigating hadron structure using a simple model of the Pomeron. 58 references

  13. X-ray microstructural analysis of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films by diffraction pattern modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, D. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); PCM Computacional Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Ospina, R. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Gómez, A.G. [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Seccional Cali, Facultad de Ingeniería, Departamento de Ciencias de la Ingeniería y la Producción (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); PCM Computacional Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2014-02-15

    A detailed microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films grown at different substrate temperatures (T{sub S}) was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total diffraction pattern modeling based on more meaningful microstructural parameters, such as crystallite size distribution and dislocation density, was performed to describe the microstructure of the thin films more precisely. This diffraction modeling has been implemented and used mostly to characterize powders, but the technique can be very useful to study hard thin films by taking certain considerations into account. Nanocrystalline films were grown by using the cathodic pulsed vacuum arc technique on stainless steel 316L substrates, varying the temperature from room temperature to 200 °C. Further surface morphology analysis was performed to study the dependence of grain size on substrate temperature using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The crystallite and surface grain sizes obtained and the high density of dislocations observed indicate that the films underwent nanostructured growth. Variations in these microstructural parameters as a function of T{sub S} during deposition revealed a competition between adatom mobility and desorption processes, resulting in a specific microstructure. These films also showed slight anisotropy in their microstructure, and this was incorporated into the diffraction pattern modeling. The resulting model allowed for the films' microstructure during synthesis to be better understood according to the experimental results obtained. - Highlights: • Mobility and desorption competition generates a critical temperature. • A microstructure anisotropy related to the local strain was observed in thin films. • Adatom mobility and desorption influence grain size and microstrain.

  14. Load partion in NiTi shape memory alloy polycrystals investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction and micromechanics modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šittner, Petr; Novák, Václav; Lukáš, Petr; Lugovyy, Dmytro; Neov, Dimitar

    404-407, - (2002), s. 829-834 ISSN 0255-5476 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107; GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : shape memory alloy * neutron diffraction * martensitic transformation * NiTi * micromechanics modelling * load partition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.613, year: 2002

  15. Global phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials for alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hairui; Su, Xinwu; Liang, Haiying; Xu, Yongli; Han, Yinlu; Shen, Qingbiao

    2017-09-01

    The global phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials for alpha with the incident energy up to 400 MeV are obtained. The global phenomenological optical model potential is extracted by simultaneously fitting the experimental data of total reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions in the mass range of target nuclei 20 ≤ A ≤ 209. The microscopic optical model potential is obtained by the Green function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme nucleon-nucleon interaction. Both optical model potentials are used to calculate the reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions for the target nuclei in the mass range 12 ≤ A ≤ 209 at incident alpha energies up to 400 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data, and the calculated results by phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials are also compared with each other.

  16. Global phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials for alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hairui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The global phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials for alpha with the incident energy up to 400 MeV are obtained. The global phenomenological optical model potential is extracted by simultaneously fitting the experimental data of total reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions in the mass range of target nuclei 20 ≤ A ≤ 209. The microscopic optical model potential is obtained by the Green function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme nucleon-nucleon interaction. Both optical model potentials are used to calculate the reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions for the target nuclei in the mass range 12 ≤ A ≤ 209 at incident alpha energies up to 400 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data, and the calculated results by phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials are also compared with each other.

  17. Modeling the structure of amorphous MoS3: a neutron diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibble, Simon J; Wood, Glenn B

    2004-01-28

    A model for the structure of amorphous molybdenum trisulfide, a-MoS3, has been created using reverse Monte Carlo methods. This model, which consists of chains of MoS6 units sharing three sulfurs with each of its two neighbors and forming alternate long, nonbonded, and short, bonded, Mo-Mo separations, is a good fit to the neutron diffraction data and is chemically and physically realistic. The paper identifies the limitations of previous models based on Mo3 triangular clusters in accounting for the available experimental data.

  18. Model experiment of in vivo synchrotron X-ray diffraction of human kidney stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancharov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ancharov@mail.ru; Potapov, S.S. [Institute of Mineralogy UB RAS, Miass (Russian Federation); Moiseenko, T.N. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Feofilov, I.V. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nizovskii, A.I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    The diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) was used to explore the phase composition of kidney stones placed into a specific object phantom, which imitated the human body. As an imitation of the patient breath, the kidney stone was moved vertically and rotated to an angle of 15{sup o} during the recording of the X-ray pattern. It was shown that rotation and displacement did not distort the X-ray pattern.

  19. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Quasicrystal Structures from X-ray Diffraction: An Icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Tae

    2017-07-03

    Quasicrystals (QCs) are well-ordered but aperiodic crystals with classically forbidden symmetries (such as 5-fold). High-dimensional (HD) crystallography is a standard method to locate atom positions explicitly. However, in practice, it is still challenging because of its complexity. Here, we report a new simple approach to three-dimensional (3D) atomic modeling derived from X-ray diffraction data, and apply it to the icosahedral QC Al 0.63 Cu 0.25 Fe 0.12 . Electron density maps were calculated directly from 3D diffraction data indexed with noninteger (fractional) numbers as measured, with proper phases; each of 2 5 = 32 possible phase assignments for the five strongest reflections was used for Fourier synthesis. This resulted in an initial phasing model based on chemically sensible electron density maps. The following procedure was exactly the same as that used to determine ordinary crystal structures, except that fractional indices were assigned to the reciprocal vectors relative to the three orthogonal 2-fold axes in icosahedral (I h ) symmetry to which the observed diffraction data conformed. Finally, ∼30 000 atoms were located within a sphere of a ∼48 Å radius. Structural motifs or basic repeating units with a hierarchical nature can be found. Isolated icosahedral clusters are surrounded by a concentric dodecahedron, beyond which there is a concentric truncated icosahedron. These are strikingly similar to those obtained via HD crystallography, but show very clear real-space relationships between the clusters.

  20. Optical Fibres in the Modeling of Translucent Concrete Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    M.N.V.Padma Bhushan, D.Johnson, Md. Afzal Basheer Pasha And Ms. K. Prasanthi

    2013-01-01

    Translucent concrete is a concrete based material with light-transmissive properties, obtained due to embedded light optical elements like Optical fibers in it. Light is conducted through the stone from one end to the other. This results into a certain light pattern on the other surface, depending on the fibre structure. Optical fibres transmit light so effectively that there is virtually no loss of light conducted through the fibres. Our paper deals with the modelling of such translucent or ...

  1. Wave-Optics Modeling of the Optical-Transport Line for Passive Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, V. A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsytem critical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the {\\sc Synchrotron Radiation Workshop} (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  2. Wave-optics modeling of the optical-transport line for passive optical stochastic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsystemcritical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the SYNCHROTRON RADIATION WORKSHOP (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  3. Gaussian beam diffraction in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Yu.A., E-mail: kravtsov@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland); Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 117 997 (Russian Federation); Berczynski, P., E-mail: pawel.berczynski@ps.p [Institute of Physics, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin 70-310 (Poland); Bieg, B., E-mail: b.bieg@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland)

    2009-08-10

    Combination of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of geometric optics with paraxial complex geometric optics (PCGO) is suggested, which allows describing both diffraction and polarization evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic beams in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media. Combination QIA/PCGO reduces Maxwell equations to the system of the ordinary differential equations of the first order and radically simplifies solution of various problems, related to microwave plasma diagnostics, including plasma polarimetry, interferometry and refractometry in thermonuclear reactors. Efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of electromagnetic beam diffraction in a linear layer of magnetized plasma with parameters, modeling tokamak plasma in the project ITER.

  4. Extending the reach of powder diffraction modelling by user defined macros

    CERN Document Server

    Scardi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of this special topic volume is the development and possibilities of the MACRO language within TOPAS, with a specific session dedicated to WPPM. The collection is presented here in the form of a ""macro tutorial"" for the benefit of the entire powder diffraction community. More than a collection of standard scientific papers, the contributions to this special issue provide methods, tutorials and practical suggestions and solutions for the proper use of TOPAS and WPPM in a number of applications; ranging from the most common to the most refined and specific cases.Readers will fin

  5. Diffraction of slow electrons by the periodic structure in the lattice gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozol'kov, A.E.; Fedyanin, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data on diffraction of small energy electrons on the systems: hydrogen-tungsten and hydrogen oxide-nickel has been analysed. It was shown that in the hemsorbed adatom system the two-dimensional phase transition of another type there occurs. The results of Onsager as well as Fischer's idea about the analogy of hemsorption on a half overlap to an antiferromagnetic in a zero magnetic field were applied. The parameter of effective interaction (epsilon) between adatoms was obtained for adsorption of H on W(100). The estimated value (epsilon) approximately + 0.145/+0.17 eV agrees well with (epsilon) from calorimetric measurements

  6. Electro-optic sampling at 90 degree interaction geometry for time-of-arrival stamping of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Scoby

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study a new geometry setup for electro-optic sampling (EOS where the electron beam runs parallel to the ⟨110⟩ face of a ZnTe crystal and the probe laser is perpendicular to it and to the beam path. The simple setup is used to encode the time-of-arrival information of a 3.5  MeV<10  pC electron bunch on the spatial profile of the laser pulse. The electric field lines inside the dielectric bend at an angle due to a relatively large (n∼3 index of refraction of the ZnTe crystal. We found theoretically and experimentally that the EOS signal can be maximized with a proper choice of incoming laser polarization angle. We achieved single-shot nondestructive measurement of the relative time of arrival between the pump and the probe beams thus improving the temporal resolution of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction experiments.

  7. Diffractive optical element-based glossmeter for the on-line measurement of normal reflectance on a printed porous coated paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksman, Antti; Kuivalainen, Kalle; Ta˚G, Carl-Mikael; Juuti, Mikko; Mattila, Rauno; Hietala, Eero; Gane, Patrick A. C.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2011-04-01

    Gloss of a product, such as print gloss, is mainly inspected with conventional white light glossmeters both at laboratory or production facilities. However, problems occur in conventional gloss measurement when the inspected surface is vertically moved in the plane of incidence and reflection or when the measurement area is small or curved. For a partial solution to these problems, we have previously introduced diffractive optical element-based glossmeters (DOGs) for the gloss inspection in laboratories and off-line use. We present a new construction of DOG, termed μDOG 1D, for the one-dimensional on-line print gloss measurement, in the form of the reflectance determination normal to the surface. The function of the glossmeter is demonstrated by laboratory tests and on-line measurements at a heat-set web offset printing machine. It is shown that gloss (i.e., normal reflectance) and minute gloss variation of papers and prints can be measured at the printing line using the glossmeter. This glossmeter is expected to be useful in real-time monitoring of the gloss and surface-specific absorption not only in the printing industry but also in inspection of products in other industrial sectors, such as metal finishing, laminating, paper, and construction materials manufacturing.

  8. X-ray powder diffraction, phase transitions and optical characterization of the Cu(In1-xGa x)3Te5 semiconducting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, R.; Marin, G.; Delgado, J.M.; Wasim, S.M.; Rincon, C.; Perez, G. Sanchez

    2005-01-01

    Ingots of several compositions of the Cu(In 1-x Ga x ) 3 Te 5 semiconducting system were prepared by the Vertical Bridgman technique. X-ray powder diffraction, differential thermal analysis and optical absorption studies were used to characterize the fundamental structural aspects and phase transitions and determine the energy band gap E G of this alloy system. It is found that a solid solution with a tetragonal chalcopyrite-related structure is formed over the entire range of composition for temperatures below 620 deg. C. The parameters a and c at room temperature of the tetragonal unit cell were found to vary linearly with composition x from 6.1639(4) and 12.346(6) A for x = 0, to 5.93231(8) and 11.825(4) A for x = 1. A phase transition to a cubic phase in the whole range of composition was observed above 620 deg. C. The energy band gap has been determined to be direct and varies linearly with composition x

  9. The Maxwell-Lorentz Model for optical Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Brio, Moysey

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of optical pulses, especially of ultra short femtosecond pulses, are of great technological and theoretical interest. The dynamics of optical pulses is usually studied using the nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation model. While such approach works surprisingly well for description of pulse...

  10. Modelling of Extrinsic Fiber Optic Sagnac Ultrasound Interferometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasonic waves are used extensively in nondestructive testing both for characterization of material properties, in this paper, we describe a fiber optic sensor suitable for detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on an extrinsic fiber optic sagnac interferometer. The proposed sensor model can act as a conventional ...

  11. Diffraction dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarbanel, H.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyse the present theoretical situation in the field of diffraction scattering. Two not yet fully answered questions related with a typical diffraction process AB→CD, namely: what is the structure of the transition matrix elements, and what is the structure of the exchange mechanism responsible for the scattering, are formulated and various proposals for answers are reviewed. Interesting general statement that the products (-1)sup(J)P, where J and P are respectively spin and parity, is conserved at each vertex has been discussed. The exchange mechanism in diffractive scattering has been considered using the language of the complex J-plane as the most appropriate. The known facts about the exchange mechanism are recalled and several routs to way out are proposed. The idea to consider the moving pole and associated branch points as like a particle and the associated two and many particle unitarity cuts is described in more details. (S.B.)

  12. Optical wireless communications system and channel modelling with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Ghassemlooy, Z

    2012-01-01

    Detailing a systems approach, Optical Wireless Communications: System and Channel Modelling with MATLAB(R), is a self-contained volume that concisely and comprehensively covers the theory and technology of optical wireless communications systems (OWC) in a way that is suitable for undergraduate and graduate-level students, as well as researchers and professional engineers. Incorporating MATLAB(R) throughout, the authors highlight past and current research activities to illustrate optical sources, transmitters, detectors, receivers, and other devices used in optical wireless communications. The

  13. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, G.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs

  14. Neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heger, G. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Inst. fuer Kristallographie, Aachen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  15. Analytical models of optical response in one-dimensional semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical description of the optical properties of crystalline materials typically requires extensive numerical computation. Including excitonic and non-perturbative field effects adds to the complexity. In one dimension, however, the analysis simplifies and optical spectra can be computed exactly. In this paper, we apply the Wannier exciton formalism to derive analytical expressions for the optical response in four cases of increasing complexity. Thus, we start from free carriers and, in turn, switch on electrostatic fields and electron–hole attraction and, finally, analyze the combined influence of these effects. In addition, the optical response of impurity-localized excitons is discussed. - Highlights: • Optical response of one-dimensional semiconductors including excitons. • Analytical model of excitonic Franz–Keldysh effect. • Computation of optical response of impurity-localized excitons

  16. Contribution to diffraction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chako, N.

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  17. Cooperative photo-induced effects: from photo-magnetism under continuous irradiation to ultra-fast phenomena - study through optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glijer, D.

    2006-12-01

    The control with ultra-short laser pulses of the collective and concerted transformation of molecules driving a macroscopic state switching on an ultra-fast time scale in solid state opens new prospects in materials science. The goal is to realize at the material level what happens at the molecular level in femto-chemistry. These processes are highly cooperative and highly non-linear, leading to self-amplification and self-organization within the material, a so-called photo-induced phase transition with a new long range order (structural, magnetic, ferroelectric,...). Two families of molecular compounds have been studied here: first of all, spin transition materials changing from a diamagnetic state over to a paramagnetic state under the effect of temperature or under continuous laser excitation. It concerns photo-active molecular bi-stability prototype materials in solid state, whose switching has been studied during X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and magnetism experiments. Then we have studied charge-transfer molecular systems, prototype compounds for ultrafast photo-induced phase transitions: insulator-metal, neutral-ionic....As well as ultrafast optical experiments, time-resolved X ray crystallography is a key technique in order to follow at the atomic level the different steps of the photo-induced transformation and thus to observe the involved mechanisms. We have underlined a process of photo-formation of one-dimensional nano-domains of lattice-relaxed charge-transfer excitations, governing the photo-induced phase transition of the molecular charge-transfer complex TTF-CA by the first time-resolved diffuse scattering measurements. Moreover, a new femtosecond laser-plasma source and a optical pump-probe spectroscopy set-up with a highly sensitive detecting system have been developed in this work. The results presented here will be an illustration of the present scientific challenges existing on the one hand with the development of projects of major

  18. Damage thresholds for blaze diffraction gratings and grazing incidence optics at an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Conley, Raymond; Moeller, Stefan; Gwalt, Grzegorz; Siewert, Frank; Waberski, Christoph; Zeschke, Thomas; Cocco, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is upgrading its machine to high repetition rate and to extended ranges. Novel coatings, with limited surface oxidation, which are able to work at the carbon edge, are required. In addition, high-resolution soft X-ray monochromators become necessary. One of the big challenges is to design the mirror geometry and the grating profile to have high reflectivity (or efficiency) and at the same time survive the high peak energy of the free-electron laser pulses. For these reasons the experimental damage threshold, at 900 eV, of two platinum-coated gratings with different blazed angles has been investigated. The gratings were tested at 1° grazing incidence. To validate a model for which the damage threshold on the blaze grating can be estimated by calculating the damage threshold of a mirror with an angle of incidence identical to the angle of incidence on the grating plus the blaze angle, tests on Pt-coated substrates have also been performed. The results confirmed the prediction. Uncoated silicon, platinum and SiB 3 (both deposited on a silicon substrate) were also investigated. In general, the measured damage threshold at grazing incidence is higher than that calculated under the assumption that there is no energy transport from the volume where the photons are absorbed. However, it was found that, for the case of the SiB 3 coating, the grazing incidence condition did not increase the damage threshold, indicating that the energy transport away from the extinction volume is negligible.

  19. Dynamic quantum crystallography: lattice-dynamical models refined against diffraction data. II. Applications to L-alanine, naphthalene and xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoser, Anna A; Madsen, Anders Ø

    2017-03-01

    In the first paper of this series [Hoser & Madsen (2016). Acta Cryst. A72, 206-214], a new approach was introduced which enables the refinement of frequencies of normal modes obtained from ab initio periodic computations against single-crystal diffraction data. In this contribution, the performance of this approach is tested by refinement against data in the temperature range from 23 to 205 K on the molecular crystals of L-alanine, naphthalene and xylitol. The models, which are lattice-dynamical models derived at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone, are able to describe the atomic vibrations of L-alanine and naphthalene to a level where the residual densities are similar to those obtained from the independent atom model. For the more flexible molecule xylitol, larger deviations are found. Hydrogen ADPs (anisotropic displacement parameters) derived from the models are in similar or better agreement with neutron diffraction results than ADPs obtained by other procedures. The heat capacity calculated after normal mode refinement for naphthalene is in reasonable agreement with the heat capacity obtained from calorimetric measurements (to less than 1 cal mol -1  K -1 below 300 K), with deviations at higher temperatures indicating anharmonicity. Standard uncertainties and correlation of the refined parameters have been derived based on a Monte Carlo procedure. The uncertainties are quite small and probably underestimated.

  20. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reviews neutron diffraction work from the early studies to the present-day development of the subject. Direct structural investigations were described, including chemical applications associated with single crystal techniques, and magnetic applications identified with powder techniques. The properties of the neutron beams are discussed, as well as the use of polarised beams. (UK)

  1. The accuracy of heavy ion optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozik, T.

    1980-01-01

    There is investigated in detail the sources and magnitude of numerical errors in heavy ion optical model calculations. It is shown on example of 20 Ne + 24 Mg scattering at Esub(LAB)=100 MeV. (author)

  2. Mark formation modeling in optical rewritable recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brusche, J.H.; Segal, A.; Vuik, C.; Urbach, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    In optical rewritable recording media, such as the Blu-ray Disc, amorphous marks are formed on a crystalline background of a phase-change layer, by means of short, high power laser pulses. In order to improve this data storage concept, it is of great importance to understand the mark formation

  3. Load partition in NiTi shape memory alloy polycrystals investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction and micromechanics modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šittner, P.; Novák, V.; Lukáš, Petr; Lugovyy, Dmytro; Neov, Dimitar; Tovar, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 404, č. 4 (2002), s. 829-834 ISSN 0255-5476. [Proceedings of the European conference on residual stresses /6./. Coimbra, 10.07.2002-13.07.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107; GA ČR GV202/97/K038; GA AV ČR KSK1010104 Keywords : shape memory alloy * neutron diffraction * martensitic transformation * NiTi * micromechanics modelling * load partition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.613, year: 2002

  4. Comparative study of different Schlieren diffracting elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This second type of diffraction degrades the quality of Schlieren results. Experimental results showing the effect of diffraction of light deflected from the test object at a phase knife-edge, corner of a square phase aperture and an optical fiber tip as Schlieren diffracting elements have been presented and discussed.

  5. Analytical model of the optical response of periodically structured metallic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabbas, A; Halté, V; Bigot, J-Y

    2005-10-31

    In this paper we investigate the optical response of periodically structured metallic films constituted of sub-wavelength apertures. Our approach consists in studying the diffraction of transverse magnetic polarized electromagnetic waves by a one-dimensional grating. The method that we use is the Rigorous Coupled Waves Analysis allowing us to obtain an analytical model to calculate the diffraction efficiencies. The zero and first order terms allow determining the transmission, reflectivity and absorption of symmetric or asymmetric nanostructures surrounded either by identical or different dielectric media. For both type of nanostructures the spectral shape of the enhanced resonant transmission associated to surface plasmons displays a Fano profile. In the case of symmetric nanostructures, we study the conditions of formation of coupled surface plasmon-polaritons as well as their effect on the optical response of the modulated structure. For asymmetric nanostructures, we discuss the non-reciprocity of the reflectivity and we investigate the spectral dependency of the enhanced resonant transmission on the refractive index of the dielectric surrounding the metal film.

  6. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  7. Study of Optical Models Regarding the Human Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Abolmasoomi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Until now, many models have been presented for optical study of the human eye. In recent years, surgery on the anterior section of the eye (such as cataract and photo-refractive surgery has increased, so a study on the optics of the eye and evaluation of vision quality has become more important. Material and Methods: In this article, some of these models are considered. They include models with spherical and conic-section surfaces (for cornea and lens, simple models and new models with complex surfaces. Results: Evaluation of the optical models of the eye provides the possibility of enhancing the representation of human vision and also increasing the accuracy of surgery on the anterior section of the eye to enable higher quality vision.

  8. π−-12C elastic scattering above the ∆ resonance using diffraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diffraction model phenomenology as proposed in I provides a very good discretion of the π−-12C elastic scattering data over a wide range of energies from 400 to. 766 MeV. Hence, it could be applied for obtaining analytic optical potential by inversion in this energy range. This optical potential involves lesser number of.

  9. Optical clocks and their contribution to gravity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Mohammad; Mohamadhosseini, Babak; Hatami, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Optical clocks, as one of the latest achievements in atomic and molecular physics, have applications more than timing, due to their accuracy and stability. In general relativity, gravitational potential differences in space and time, cause frequency difference in optical clocks. Hence, ultra precise optical clocks can be used as a tool to observe potential differences and consequently as a new gravimetry technique. In this contribution, we investigate the latest optical clocks based on atomic transition in Al+ and derive a simple equation for frequency change related to geo-potential differences. Moreover, we consider the capability of optical clocks for gravity modeling in combination with other gravity observations. Finally, the possibility to detect potential changes in geo-dynamically active zones, such as East-Asia and the requirements for such studies are discussed.

  10. Powder Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer1,2 in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull3,4 in the United States of America. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the, first period, until the- mid-1940's. applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, cerarffics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated5. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish6 and by Langford and Loudr7. By 1980 there were probably 10000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation8-10. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments11.

  11. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    A brief account is given of neutron diffraction techniques. Similarities and differences compared with the more familiar X-ray counterparts are discussed. In certain applications, neutron diffraction can be used to obtain information about materials which would be difficult or even impossible to obtain using other techniques. One spectacular success has been the elucidation, from neutron powder diffraction, of the crystal structures of high critical temperature oxide superconductors. There have been substantial contributions in other fields, and these are illustrated by Australian work. The ability of the neutron to penetrate deeply into most materials has been invoked for in-depth determination of stresses in composites and of phase composition in zirconia ceramics. The unique properties of the neutron have been successfully exploited in studies of metal hydrides, to determine where hydrogen is located, and in magnetic structure determination. There is much interest in studying materials under different conditions of temperature and pressure, and kinetic studies under such conditions are now becoming possible. The article includes information on the principles, the instrumentation with particular reference to the instruments installed around the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights, and methods for the interpretation of data. 59 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs

  12. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  13. Powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of the interaction between amphotericin B and lipid-sterol model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Lawrence, M. Jayne; Demeė, Bruno; Fragneto, Giovanna; Barlow, David

    2012-10-01

    Over the last 50 years or so, amphotericin has been widely employed in treating life-threatening systemic fungal infections. Its usefulness in the clinic, however, has always been circumscribed by its dose-limiting side-effects, and it is also now compromised by an increasing incidence of pathogen resistance. Combating these problems through development of new anti-fungal agents requires detailed knowledge of the drug's molecular mechanism, but unfortunately this is far from clear. Neutron diffraction studies of the drug's incorporation within lipid-sterol membranes have here been performed to shed light on this problem. The drug is shown to disturb the structures of both fungal and mammalian membranes, and co-localises with the membrane sterols in a manner consistent with trans-membrane pore formation. The differences seen in the membrane lipid ordering and in the distributions of the drug-ergosterol and drug-cholesterol complexes within the membranes are consistent with the drug's selectivity for fungal vs. human cells.

  15. Photonic encryption : modeling and functional analysis of all optical logic.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jason D.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Robertson, Perry J.

    2004-10-01

    With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the photonic domain to achieve the requisite encryption rates. This paper documents the innovations and advances of work first detailed in 'Photonic Encryption using All Optical Logic,' [1]. A discussion of underlying concepts can be found in SAND2003-4474. In order to realize photonic encryption designs, technology developed for electrical logic circuits must be translated to the photonic regime. This paper examines S-SEED devices and how discrete logic elements can be interconnected and cascaded to form an optical circuit. Because there is no known software that can model these devices at a circuit level, the functionality of S-SEED devices in an optical circuit was modeled in PSpice. PSpice allows modeling of the macro characteristics of the devices in context of a logic element as opposed to device level computational modeling. By representing light intensity as voltage, 'black box' models are generated that accurately represent the intensity response and logic levels in both technologies. By modeling the behavior at the systems level, one can incorporate systems design tools and a simulation environment to aid in the overall functional design. Each black box model takes certain parameters (reflectance, intensity, input response), and models the optical ripple

  16. A new and reliable animal model for optic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Li, Fengling; Zhang, Linlin

    2012-10-01

    To create an animal (rat) model of force percussion injury (FPI) to the optic nerve for clinical and experimental research. Seventy-one healthy female Wister rats, with no ocular disorders, were used in this study. Sixty-six rats were subjected to bilateral blunt trauma to the eyes via FPI; five rats were not subjected to trauma. According to the degree of optic nerve injury, injured eyes were divided into two groups: severe optic nerve injury group, with beat pressures of 699.14 ± 60.79 kPa and mild optic nerve injury group, with beat pressures of 243.18 ± 20.26 kPa. Eight rats were examined using flash visual-evoked potential (F-VEP) monitoring and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before, 1 and 3 days, and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after optic nerve injury. Fifty-six rats were examined by histopathology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis at 1 and 3 days, and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after optic nerve injury. Two rats were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) 4 and 8 weeks after optic nerve injury. The presence or absence of optic nerve injury was evaluated in all trauma eyes. Latency was prolonged in the severe injury group compared with controls 1 day after optic nerve injury (p nerve injury (p .05). Latency was prolonged in the mild optic nerve injury group compared with controls 1 day after optic nerve injury (p injury and then stabilized (p > .05). As measured by MRI, an abnormally high signal was seen 1 day after injury and remained significantly high 8 weeks after injury. A ruptured capillary was detected in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) 1 day after injury. Acellular regions in the ganglion cell layer were observed 4 weeks after optic nerve injury. TUNEL-positive cells were present in each layer of the retina 3 days after injury. The number of TUNEL-positive cells began to increase 1-2 weeks after injury, and then gradually decreased 4 weeks after injury (p nerve injury using

  17. Modeling illumination performance of plastic optical fiber passive daylighting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, A.Z.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most direct methods of utilizing solar energy for energy conservation is to bring natural light indoors to light up an area. This paper reports on the investigation of the feasibility to utilize large core optical fibers to convey and distribute solar light passively throughout residential or commercial structures. The focus of this study is on the mathematical modeling of the illumination performance and the light transmission efficiency of solid core end light fiber for optical day lighting systems. The Meatball simulations features the optical fiber transmittance for glass and plastic fibers, illumination performance over lengths of plastic end-lit fiber, spectral transmission, light intensity loss through the large diameter solid core optical fibers as well as the transmission efficiency of the optical fiber itself. It was found that plastic optical fiber has less transmission loss over the distance of the fiber run which clearly shows that the Plastic Optical Fiber should be optimized for emitting visible light. The findings from the analysis on the performance of large diameter optical fibers for day lighting systems seems feasible for energy efficient lighting system in commercial or residential buildings

  18. Generic distortion model for metrology under optical microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingjian; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Chao, YuhJin; Miraldo, Pedro; Shi, Yusheng

    2018-04-01

    For metrology under optical microscopes, lens distortion is the dominant source of error. Previous distortion models and correction methods mostly rely on the assumption that parametric distortion models require a priori knowledge of the microscopes' lens systems. However, because of the numerous optical elements in a microscope, distortions can be hardly represented by a simple parametric model. In this paper, a generic distortion model considering both symmetric and asymmetric distortions is developed. Such a model is obtained by using radial basis functions (RBFs) to interpolate the radius and distortion values of symmetric distortions (image coordinates and distortion rays for asymmetric distortions). An accurate and easy to implement distortion correction method is presented. With the proposed approach, quantitative measurement with better accuracy can be achieved, such as in Digital Image Correlation for deformation measurement when used with an optical microscope. The proposed technique is verified by both synthetic and real data experiments.

  19. Modelling of new generation plasma optical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litovko Irina V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new generation plasma optical devices based on the electrostatic plasma lens configuration that opens a novel attractive possibility for effective high-tech practical applications. Original approaches to use of plasma accelerators with closed electron drift and open walls for the creation of a cost-effective low-maintenance plasma lens with positive space charge and possible application for low-cost, low-energy rocket engine are described. The preliminary experimental, theoretical and simulation results are presented. It is noted that the presented plasma devices are attractive for many different applications in the state-of-the-art vacuum-plasma processing.

  20. Deep-lying hole states in the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevansky, S.P.; Lemmer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The strength function for deep-lying hole states in an optical potential is studied by the method of Green's functions. The role of isospin is emphasized. It is shown that, while the main trends of the experimental data on hole states in isotopes of Sn and Pd can be described by an energy independent optical potential, intermediate structures in these data indicate the specific nuclear polarization effects have to be included. This is done by introducing doorway states of good isospin into the optical model potential. Such states consist of neutron hole plus proton core vibrations as well as more complicated excitations that are analog states of proton hole plus neutron core vibrations of the parent nuclear system. Specific calculations for 115 Sn and 103 Pd give satisfactory fits to the strength function data using optical model and doorway state parameters that are reasonable on physical grounds

  1. Multiconjugate adaptive optics applied to an anatomically accurate human eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedggood, P. A.; Ashman, R.; Smith, G.; Metha, A. B.

    2006-09-01

    Aberrations of both astronomical telescopes and the human eye can be successfully corrected with conventional adaptive optics. This produces diffraction-limited imagery over a limited field of view called the isoplanatic patch. A new technique, known as multiconjugate adaptive optics, has been developed recently in astronomy to increase the size of this patch. The key is to model atmospheric turbulence as several flat, discrete layers. A human eye, however, has several curved, aspheric surfaces and a gradient index lens, complicating the task of correcting aberrations over a wide field of view. Here we utilize a computer model to determine the degree to which this technology may be applied to generate high resolution, wide-field retinal images, and discuss the considerations necessary for optimal use with the eye. The Liou and Brennan schematic eye simulates the aspheric surfaces and gradient index lens of real human eyes. We show that the size of the isoplanatic patch of the human eye is significantly increased through multiconjugate adaptive optics.

  2. Modeling the Stability of Topological Matter in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-18

    interactions between fermions in an optical lattice. And finally, in section 3D , I discuss results that studies strong interaction and strong spin...in the conventional bosonization approach. 3D : Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Spiral Order in Spin-orbit Coupled Optical Lattices In this work...is of the same order as the Heisenberg coupling constant, J. (II) We study the phase diagram of the effective spin model using classical Monte Carlo

  3. Study of UO2 mechanical behaviour implanted with helium ions using X-ray micro-diffraction and mechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Marcelle

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the mechanical behavior of nuclear fuel during direct long term storage, UO 2 polycrystals were implanted with Helium ions at a thin surface layer (1 μm approximately), which leads to stress and strain fields in the layer. Strains were measured, at the grains scale, by X-ray micro-diffraction, using synchrotron radiation (ESRF). Image analysis methods were developed for an automatic analysis of the large number of diffraction patterns. Applying statistical tools to Laue patterns allows an automatic detection of low quality images, and enhances the measurement precision. At low layer thickness, the mechanical interaction between grains can be neglected. At higher thickness, experimental results showed a higher mechanical interaction near grain boundaries that can be modeled using finite elements method. Geostatistical tools were used to quantify these interactions. The swelling and the elastic constants in the implanted layer can be estimated through the measured strains on a large number of grains with different orientations. This work allows the determination of the swelling of nuclear fuel in irradiation conditions, as well as the modification of its elastic properties. (author) [fr

  4. Remark on: the neutron spherical optical-model absorption.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    The energy-dependent behavior of the absorption term of the spherical neutron optical potential for doubly magic {sup 208}Pb and the neighboring {sup 209}Bi is examined. These considerations suggest a phenomenological model that results in an intuitively attractive energy dependence of the imaginary potential that provides a good description of the observed neutron cross sections and that is qualitatively consistent with theoretical concepts. At the same time it provides an alternative to some of the arbitrary assumptions involved in many conventional optical-model interpretations reported in the literature and reduces the number of the parameters of the model.

  5. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  6. Modelling the Pressure Profile for Optical Cables in Ducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, A.; Bresser, O.R.; Hoekstra, Sipke; Griffioen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The longitudinal pressure profile is an important parameter when calculating the correct blowing force during the process of installing optical fiber cables using the viscous flow of air. This paper presents a model of the pressure inside the duct that contains a moving cable. This new model of the

  7. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  8. Optical linear algebra processors: noise and error-source modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D; Ghosh, A

    1985-06-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAP's) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  9. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Jaeger, G; Khrennikov, A; Schlosshauer, M; Weihs, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified

  10. The Watanabe model for 6Li-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abul-Magd, A.Y.; Rabie, A.; El-Gazzar, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Optical potentials for the scattering of 6 Li projectiles are calculated using the Watanabe model and an α+d cluster model wave function for 6 Li. Reasonable fits to the elastic differential cross-section and vector polarization are obtained. (author)

  11. Event-Based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Jin, F.; Raedt, H. De

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a

  12. Advanced modelling of optical coherence tomography systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, L.; Yura, H.T.

    2004-01-01

    and multiple scattering regimes is reviewed. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also reviewed, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle. Moreover, for the first time the model is verified experimentally...

  13. Modeling and analysis of laser active interference optical path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Cong-miao; Sun, Hua-yan; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Chen, Jian-biao; Ren, Jian-ying

    2017-10-01

    By using the geometrical optics and physical optics method, the models of wedge plate interference optical path, Michelson interferometer and Mach Zehnder interferometer thus three different active interference pattern are built. The optical path difference (OPD) launched by different interference patterns, fringe spacing and contrast expression have been derived. The results show that far field interference peak intensity of the wedge plate interference is small, so the detection distance is limited, Michelson interferometer with low contrast affects the performance of detection system, Mach Zehnder interferometer has greater advantages in peak intensity, the variable range of interference fringe spacing and contrast ratio. The results of this study are useful for the theoretical research and practical application of laser active interference detection.

  14. A Fourier Optical Model for the Laser Doppler Velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars

    1972-01-01

    The treatment is based on a fourier optical model. It is shown how the various configurations (i.e. ldquodifferential moderdquo and reference beam mode with both one and two incident beams) are incorporated in the model, and how it can be extended to three dimensions. The particles are represented...... filtering ability vanishes as the aperture size converges towards zero. The results based on fourier optics are compared with the rough estimates obtainable by using the "antenna formular" for heterodyning (ArΩr≈λ2)....

  15. Finite-element modelling of multilayer X-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xianchao; Zhang, Lin

    2017-05-01

    Multilayer optical elements for hard X-rays are an attractive alternative to crystals whenever high photon flux and moderate energy resolution are required. Prediction of the temperature, strain and stress distribution in the multilayer optics is essential in designing the cooling scheme and optimizing geometrical parameters for multilayer optics. The finite-element analysis (FEA) model of the multilayer optics is a well established tool for doing so. Multilayers used in X-ray optics typically consist of hundreds of periods of two types of materials. The thickness of one period is a few nanometers. Most multilayers are coated on silicon substrates of typical size 60 mm × 60 mm × 100-300 mm. The high aspect ratio between the size of the optics and the thickness of the multilayer (10 7 ) can lead to a huge number of elements for the finite-element model. For instance, meshing by the size of the layers will require more than 10 16 elements, which is an impossible task for present-day computers. Conversely, meshing by the size of the substrate will produce a too high element shape ratio (element geometry width/height > 10 6 ), which causes low solution accuracy; and the number of elements is still very large (10 6 ). In this work, by use of ANSYS layer-functioned elements, a thermal-structural FEA model has been implemented for multilayer X-ray optics. The possible number of layers that can be computed by presently available computers is increased considerably.

  16. Finite-element modelling of multilayer X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xianchao; Zhang, Lin

    2017-04-11

    Multilayer optical elements for hard X-rays are an attractive alternative to crystals whenever high photon flux and moderate energy resolution are required. Prediction of the temperature, strain and stress distribution in the multilayer optics is essential in designing the cooling scheme and optimizing geometrical parameters for multilayer optics. The finite-element analysis (FEA) model of the multilayer optics is a well established tool for doing so. Multilayers used in X-ray optics typically consist of hundreds of periods of two types of materials. The thickness of one period is a few nanometers. Most multilayers are coated on silicon substrates of typical size 60 mm × 60 mm × 100–300 mm. The high aspect ratio between the size of the optics and the thickness of the multilayer (107) can lead to a huge number of elements for the finite-element model. For instance, meshing by the size of the layers will require more than 1016elements, which is an impossible task for present-day computers. Conversely, meshing by the size of the substrate will produce a too high element shape ratio (element geometry width/height > 106), which causes low solution accuracy; and the number of elements is still very large (106). In this work, by use of ANSYS layer-functioned elements, a thermal-structural FEA model has been implemented for multilayer X-ray optics. The possible number of layers that can be computed by presently available computers is increased considerably.

  17. Borehole Optical Stratigraphy Modeling, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of scripts and code designed for modeling the properties of boreholes in polar ice sheets, under a range of variations in the borehole...

  18. Quantitative study of Portland cement hydration by X-Ray diffraction/Rietveld analysis and geochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelot, F.; Seaman, J. C.; Simner, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study the hydration of Portland cements containing blast-furnace slag and type V fly ash were investigated during cement curing using X-ray diffraction, with geochemical modeling used to calculate the total volume of hydrates. The goal was to evaluate the relationship between the starting component levels and the hydrate assemblages that develop during the curing process. Blast furnace-slag levels of 60, 45 and 30 wt.% were studied in blends containing fly ash and Portland cement. Geochemical modelling described the dissolution of the clinker, and predicted quantitatively the amount of hydrates. In all cases the experiments showed the presence of C-S-H, portlandite and ettringite. The quantities of ettringite, portlandite and the amorphous phases as determined by XRD agreed well with the calculated amounts of these phases after different periods of time. These findings show that changes in the bulk composition of hydrating cements can be described by geochemical models. Such a comparison between experimental and modelled data helps to understand in more detail the active processes occurring during cement hydration.

  19. Characterisation of polycrystal deformation by numerical modelling and neutron diffraction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bjørn

    , that the effect of the elastic anisotropy is limited to the very early stages of plasticity (εP neutron diffraction mea-surements of elastic lattice strains...... reflections. The self-consistent model is used to determine the most suitable reflection for technological applications of neutron diffraction, where focus is on the volume av-erage stress state in engineering components. To be able to successfully convert the measured elastic lattice strains for a specific...... the smallest build-up of residual lattice strains. Below 5% deforma-tion the deviations from linearity and the residual strains are below the normal strain resolution of a neutron diffraction measurement. The model predictions have pinpointed, that the selection of the reflection is crucial for the validity...

  20. Optical model and calibration of a sun tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Sergei N.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.; Cheong, Hai Du; Kim, Dukhyeon

    2016-01-01

    Sun trackers are widely used to investigate scattering and absorption of solar radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. We present a method for optimization of the optical altazimuth sun tracker model with output radiation direction aligned with the axis of a stationary spectrometer. The method solves the problem of stability loss in tracker pointing at the Sun near the zenith. An optimal method for tracker calibration at the measurement site is proposed in the present work. A method of moving calibration is suggested for mobile applications in the presence of large temperature differences and errors in the alignment of the optical system of the tracker. - Highlights: • We present an optimal optical sun tracker model for atmospheric spectroscopy. • The problem of loss of stability of tracker pointing at the Sun has been solved. • We propose an optimal method for tracker calibration at a measurement site. • Test results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed optimization methods.

  1. Diffraction through partial identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.

    1981-06-01

    A model of diffraction dissociation is proposed in which the quantum-mechanical interference between the incoming and the outgoing wave determines the cross-section. This interference occurs due to the finite life-time of the excited state. (orig.)

  2. Dynamics from diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Cope, Elizabeth R.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the possibility that detailed dynamical information might be extracted from powder diffraction data. Our focus is a recently reported technique that employs statistical analysis of atomistic configurations to calculate dynamical properties from neutron total scattering data. We show that it is possible to access the phonon dispersion of low-frequency modes using such an approach, without constraining the results in terms of some pre-defined dynamical model. The high-frequency regions of the phonon spectrum are found to be less well preserved in the diffraction data

  3. Atomic structure of Mg-based metallic glass investigated with neutron diffraction, reverse Monte Carlo modeling and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilas, Rafał; Łukowiec, Dariusz; Temleitner, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The structure of a multicomponent metallic glass, Mg 65 Cu 20 Y 10 Ni 5 , was investigated by the combined methods of neutron diffraction (ND), reverse Monte Carlo modeling (RMC) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The RMC method, based on the results of ND measurements, was used to develop a realistic structure model of a quaternary alloy in a glassy state. The calculated model consists of a random packing structure of atoms in which some ordered regions can be indicated. The amorphous structure was also described by peak values of partial pair correlation functions and coordination numbers, which illustrated some types of cluster packing. The N = 9 clusters correspond to the tri-capped trigonal prisms, which are one of Bernal's canonical clusters, and atomic clusters with N = 6 and N = 12 are suitable for octahedral and icosahedral atomic configurations. The nanocrystalline character of the alloy after annealing was also studied by HRTEM. The selected HRTEM images of the nanocrystalline regions were also processed by inverse Fourier transform analysis. The high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) technique was used to determine phase separation in the studied glass after heat treatment. The HAADF mode allows for the observation of randomly distributed, dark contrast regions of about 4-6 nm. The interplanar spacing identified for the orthorhombic Mg 2 Cu crystalline phase is similar to the value of the first coordination shell radius from the short-range order.

  4. As-Cast Residual Stresses in an Aluminum Alloy AA6063 Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of thermally induced residual stresses, created during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns and the formation of defects during downstream processing. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. Recently, the variation in residual elastic strains in the steady-state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction (ND) in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. In the present study, these measurements are used to show that a well-designed thermomechanical finite element (FE) process model can reproduce relatively well the experimental results. A sensitivity analysis is then carried out to determine the relative effect of the various mechanical parameters when computing the as-cast residual stresses in a cylindrical billet. Two model parameters have been investigated: the temperature when the alloy starts to thermally contract and the plasticity behavior. It is shown that the mechanical properties at low temperatures have a much larger influence on the residual stresses than those at high temperatures.

  5. An HCMT model of optical microring-resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Analytical modes of the bus and cavity cores are combined into a 2-D hybrid analytical / numerical coupled mode theory (HCMT) model of integrated optical ring-resonators. The variational technique generates 1-D FEM-discretized solutions for the amplitude functions in their natural Cartesian and

  6. Modeling light–tissue interaction in optical coherence tomography systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) performs high-resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal tissue microstructure by measuring backscattered or backreflected light. The scope of this chapter is to present analytical and numerical models that are able to describe light...

  7. Modelling exciton–phonon interactions in optically driven quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazir, Ahsan; McCutcheon, Dara

    2016-01-01

    We provide a self-contained review of master equation approaches to modelling phonon effects in optically driven self-assembled quantum dots. Coupling of the (quasi) two-level excitonic system to phonons leads to dissipation and dephasing, the rates of which depend on the excitation conditions...

  8. Mathematical model of an optically pumped molecular laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, LR

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model was developed that accurately predicts the performance of an optically pumped HBr laser. Relatively high conversion efficiency was achieved. Tm pumped Ho:YLF is a viable source for pumping HBr laser, while HBr can be scaled...

  9. Features of optical modeling in educational and scientific activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article discusses the functionality of existing software for the modeling, analysis and optimization of lighting systems and optical elements, through which the stage of their design can be automated completely. The use of these programs is shown using the example of scientific work and the educational activity of ...

  10. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response...

  11. Convenient models of the atmosphere: optics and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ginsburg; Victor, Frolkis; Irina, Melnikova; Sergey, Novikov; Dmitriy, Samulenkov; Maxim, Sapunov

    2017-11-01

    Simple optical models of clear and cloudy atmosphere are proposed. Four versions of atmospheric aerosols content are considered: a complete lack of aerosols in the atmosphere, low background concentration (500 cm-3), high concentrations (2000 cm-3) and very high content of particles (5000 cm-3). In a cloud scenario, the model of external mixture is assumed. The values of optical thickness and single scattering albedo for 13 wavelengths are calculated in the short wavelength range of 0.28-0.90 µm, with regard to the molecular absorption bands, that is simulated with triangle function. A comparison of the proposed optical parameters with results of various measurements and retrieval (lidar measurement, sampling, processing radiation measurements) is presented. For a cloudy atmosphere models of single-layer and two-layer atmosphere are proposed. It is found that cloud optical parameters with assuming the "external mixture" agrees with retrieved values from airborne observations. The results of calculating hemispherical fluxes of the reflected and transmitted solar radiation and the radiative divergence are obtained with the Delta-Eddington approach. The calculation is done for surface albedo values of 0, 0.5, 0.9 and for spectral values of the sandy surface. Four values of solar zenith angle: 0°, 30°, 40° and 60° are taken. The obtained values are compared with data of radiative airborne observations. Estimating the local instantaneous radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols and clouds for considered models is presented together with the heating rate.

  12. Three dimensional rigorous model for optical scattering problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, X.

    2006-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional model based on the finite element method for solving the time-harmonic Maxwell equation in optics. It applies to isotropic or anisotropic dielectrics and metals, and to many configurations such as an isolated scatterer in a multilayer, bi-gratings and crystals. We

  13. The Diffraction Response Interpolation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Pedersen, Peder C.

    1998-01-01

    Computer modeling of the output voltage in a pulse-echo system is computationally very demanding, particularly whenconsidering reflector surfaces of arbitrary geometry. A new, efficient computational tool, the diffraction response interpolationmethod (DRIM), for modeling of reflectors in a fluid ...

  14. Quantum Electrostatic Model for Optical Properties of Nanoscale Gold Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Haoliang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of thin gold films with thickness varying from 2.5 nm to 30 nm are investigated. Due to the quantum size effect, the optical constants of the thin gold film deviate from the Drude model for bulk material as film thickness decreases, especially around 2.5 nm, where the electron energy level becomes discrete. A theory based on the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation is proposed and its predictions agree well with experimental results.

  15. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  16. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  17. New Results in Optical Modelling of Quantum Well Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvian Fara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This project brought further advancements to the quantum well solar cell concept proposed by Keith Barnham. In this paper, the optical modelling of MQW solar cells was analyzed and we focussed on the following topics: (i simulation of the refraction index and the reflectance, (ii simulation of the absorption coefficient, (iii simulation of the quantum efficiency for the absorption process, (iv discussion and modelling of the quantum confinement effect, and (v evaluation of datasheet parameters of the MQW cell.

  18. Modelling the response of quasi-optical corner cube mixers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, W.M.; Eivers, J.G.; Gans, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensional modeling technique is developed to analyze and predict the optical performance of Schottky-diode corner-cube/wire-antenna devices for submm-astronomy applications. The model determines the antenna efficiency for the case of Gaussian input beams, and simulations of performance in a variety of configurations can be used to optimize instrument designs. Corner-to-whisker spacing and antenna/beam orientation are found to be the most important coupling parameters. 12 references

  19. Theoretical review of diffractive phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golec-Biernat, K.

    2005-01-01

    We review QCD based descriptions of diffractive deep inelastic scattering emphasising the role of models with parton saturation. These models provide natural explanation of such experimentally observed facts as the constant ratio of σ diff /σ tot as a function of the Bjorken variable x, and Regge factorization of diffractive parton distributions. The Ingelman-Schlein model and the soft color interaction model are also presented

  20. Optical conductivity of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente Alvarez, J.J.; Balseiro, C.A.; Ceccatto, H.A.

    1996-07-01

    We study the response to a static electric field (charge stiffness) and the frequency-dependent conductivity of the Hubbard model in a resonant-valence-bond-type paramagnetic phase. This phase is described by means of a charge and spin rotational-invariant approach, based on a mixed fermion-boson representation of the original strongly correlated electrons. We found that the Mott transition at half filling is well described by the charge stiffness behaviour, and that the values for this quantity off half filling agree reasonably well with numerical results. Furthermore, for the frequency-dependent conductivity we trace back the origin of the band which appears inside the Hubbard gap to magnetic pair breaking. This points to a magnetic origin of midinfrared band in high-T c compounds, with no relation to superconductivity. (author). 12 refs, 2 tabs

  1. Underwater Optical Wireless Channel Modeling Using Monte-Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, P. Sri; Prince, Shanthi

    2011-10-01

    At present, there is a lot of interest in the functioning of the marine environment. Unmanned or Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (UUVs or AUVs) are used in the exploration of the underwater resources, pollution monitoring, disaster prevention etc. Underwater, where radio waves do not propagate, acoustic communication is being used. But, underwater communication is moving towards Optical Communication which has higher bandwidth when compared to Acoustic Communication but has shorter range comparatively. Underwater Optical Wireless Communication (OWC) is mainly affected by the absorption and scattering of the optical signal. In coastal waters, both inherent and apparent optical properties (IOPs and AOPs) are influenced by a wide array of physical, biological and chemical processes leading to optical variability. The scattering effect has two effects: the attenuation of the signal and the Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI) of the signal. However, the Inter-Symbol Interference is ignored in the present paper. Therefore, in order to have an efficient underwater OWC link it is necessary to model the channel efficiently. In this paper, the underwater optical channel is modeled using Monte-Carlo method. The Monte Carlo approach provides the most general and most flexible technique for numerically solving the equations of Radiative transfer. The attenuation co-efficient of the light signal is studied as a function of the absorption (a) and scattering (b) coefficients. It has been observed that for pure sea water and for less chlorophyll conditions blue wavelength is less absorbed whereas for chlorophyll rich environment red wavelength signal is absorbed less comparative to blue and green wavelength.

  2. X-ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal : Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristanovic, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A; Schülli, Tobias U; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single-particle level. For the first time, one X-ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm-resolved X-ray diffraction

  3. Structure of AgxNa1-xPO3 glasses by neutron diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Andreas; Swenson, Jan; Karlsson, Christian; Adams, Stefan; Bowron, Daniel T

    2007-01-01

    We have performed structural studies of mixed mobile ion phosphate glasses Ag x Na 1-x PO 3 using diffraction experiments and reverse Monte Carlo simulations. This glass system is particularly interesting as a model system for investigations of the mixed mobile ion effect, due to its anomalously low magnitude in the system. As for previously studied mixed alkali phosphate glasses, with a much more pronounced mixed mobile ion effect, we find no substantial structural alterations of the phosphorous-oxygen network and the local coordination of the mobile cations. Furthermore, the mobile Ag + and Na + ions are randomly mixed with no detectable preference for either similar or dissimilar pairs of cations. However, in contrast to mixed mobile ion systems with a very pronounced mixed mobile ion effect, the two types of mobile ions have, in this case, very similar local environments. For all the studied glass compositions the average Ag-O and Na-O distances in the first coordination shell are determined to be 2.5 ± 0.1 and 2.5 ± 0.1 A, and the corresponding average coordination numbers are approximately 3.2 and 3.7, respectively. The similar local coordinations of the two types of mobile ions suggests that the energy mismatch for a Na + ion to occupy a site that previously has been occupied by a Ag + ion (and vice versa) is low, and that this low energy mismatch is responsible for the anomalously weak mixed mobile ion effect

  4. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  5. FreeCAD visualization of realistic 3D physical optics beams within a CAD system-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, D.; O'Sullivan, C.; Scully, S.; Burke, D.; Brossard, J.; Chapron, C.

    2016-07-01

    The facility to realise the shape and extent of optical beams within a telescope or beamcombiner can aid greatly in the design and layout of optical elements within the system. It can also greatly facilitate communication between the optical design team and other teams working on the mechanical design of an instrument. Beyond the realm where raytracing is applicable however, it becomes much more difficult to realise accurate 3D beams which incorporate diffraction effects. It then is another issue to incorporate this into a CAD model of the system. A novel method is proposed which has been used to aid with the design of an optical beam combiner for the QUBIC (Q and U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology) 1 experiment operating at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The method combines calculation work in GRASP 2, a commercial physical optics modelling tool from TICRA, geometrical work in Mathematica, and post processing in MATLAB. Finally, the Python console of the open source package FreeCAD3 is exploited to realise the 3D beams in a complete CAD system-model of the QUBIC optical beam combiner. This paper details and explains the work carried out to reach the goal and presents some graphics of the outcome. 3D representations of beams from some back-to-back input horns of the QUBIC instrument are shown within the CAD model. Beams of the -3dB and -13dB contour envelope are shown as well as envelopes enclosing 80% and 95% of the power of the beam. The ability to see these beams in situ with all the other elements of the combiner such as mirrors, cold stop, beam splitter and cryostat widows etc. greatly simplified the design for these elements and facilitated communication of element dimension and location between different subgroups within the QUBIC group.

  6. DIFFRACTION-LIMITED VISIBLE LIGHT IMAGES OF ORION TRAPEZIUM CLUSTER WITH THE MAGELLAN ADAPTIVE SECONDARY ADAPTIVE OPTICS SYSTEM (MagAO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, L. M.; Males, J. R.; Morzinski, K.; Kopon, D.; Follette, K.; Rodigas, T. J.; Hinz, P.; Wu, Y-L.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Pinna, E.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Uomoto, A; Hare, T.

    2013-01-01

    We utilized the new high-order (250-378 mode) Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high spatial resolution observations in ''visible light'' with MagAO's VisAO CCD camera. In the good-median seeing conditions of Magellan (0.''5-0.''7), we find MagAO delivers individual short exposure images as good as 19 mas optical resolution. Due to telescope vibrations, long exposure (60 s) r' (0.63 μm) images are slightly coarser at FWHM = 23-29 mas (Strehl ∼28%) with bright (R 1 Ori A, B, and C cluster members were obtained with VisAO. In particular, the 32 mas binary θ 1 Ori C 1 C 2 was easily resolved in non-interferometric images for the first time. The relative positions of the bright trapezium binary stars were measured with ∼0.6-5 mas accuracy. We are now sensitive to relative proper motions of just ∼0.2 mas yr –1 (∼0.4 km s –1 at 414 pc)—this is a ∼2-10 × improvement in orbital velocity accuracy compared to previous efforts. For the first time, we see clear motion of the barycenter of θ 1 Ori B 2 B 3 about θ 1 Ori B 1 . All five members of the θ 1 Ori B system appear likely to be a gravitationally bound ''mini cluster'', but we find that not all the orbits can be both circular and co-planar. The lowest mass member of the θ 1 Ori B system (B 4 ; mass ∼0.2 M ☉ ) has a very clearly detected motion (at 4.1 ± 1.3 km s –1 ; correlation = 99.9%) w.r.t. B 1 . Previous work has suggested that B 4 and B 3 are on long-term unstable orbits and will be ejected from this ''mini cluster''. However, our new ''baseline'' model of the θ 1 Ori B system suggests a more hierarchical system than previously thought, and so the ejection of B 4 may not occur for many orbits, and B 3 may be stable against ejection in the long-term. This ''ejection'' process of the lowest mass member of a ''mini cluster'' could play a major role in the formation of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

  7. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery.

  8. Tunable Beam Diffraction in Infiltrated Microstructured Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis H.; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites.......We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites....

  9. Diffraction from the perspective of the spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, R.; Carrasquilla-Alvarez, J.; Garcia-Sucerquia, J.

    2005-10-01

    The diffraction of spatially partially coherent optical fields is analysed by using two concepts recently introduced by the authors: the spatial coherence wavelets and the effective diffracting aperture. Within this framework, the intimate link between the spatial properties of the optical field and the aperture's edges in the diffraction phenomena is studied. New insight is proposed in regard to the diffraction in the Fresnel - Fraunhofer approximation. Our ideas are supported by numerical calculations and analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained when an optical field with adjustable spatial coherence impinges upon a circular aperture (author)

  10. Integrating Environmental Optics into Multidisciplinary, Predictive Models of Ocean Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 New modeling system – The photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll a plays a pivotal role in...directly supported. This research program was an extension of a long collaboration with Marlon Lewis coordinated through the NSERC/Satlantic Industrial ...the C-MORE summer course in Microbial Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (Cullen 2011). RESULTS Analysis of an extensive set of optical

  11. Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    backside light from the bulb back toward the bowl. The center of the bowl has a clear aperture cut through it, allowing the eye an unobstructed...AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2017-0022 Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling Michael A. Guevara William R. Brockmeier Thomas K. Kuyk...other person or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified

  12. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  13. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth. (paper)

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-07-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth.

  15. Semi-analytical model of filtering effects in microwave phase shifters based on semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Xue, Weiqi; Öhman, Filip

    2008-01-01

    We present a model to interpret enhanced microwave phase shifts based on filter assisted slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The model also demonstrates the spectral phase impact of input optical signals.......We present a model to interpret enhanced microwave phase shifts based on filter assisted slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The model also demonstrates the spectral phase impact of input optical signals....

  16. Behavioral Model of High Performance Camera for NIF Optics Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackel, B M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop software that will model the behavior of the high performance Spectral Instruments 1000 series Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera located in the Final Optics Damage Inspection (FODI) system on the National Ignition Facility. NIF's target chamber will be mounted with 48 Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) to convert the laser light from infrared to ultraviolet and focus it precisely on the target. Following a NIF shot, the optical components of each FOA must be carefully inspected for damage by the FODI to ensure proper laser performance during subsequent experiments. Rapid image capture and complex image processing (to locate damage sites) will reduce shot turnaround time; thus increasing the total number of experiments NIF can conduct during its 30 year lifetime. Development of these rapid processes necessitates extensive offline software automation -- especially after the device has been deployed in the facility. Without access to the unique real device or an exact behavioral model, offline software testing is difficult. Furthermore, a software-based behavioral model allows for many instances to be running concurrently; this allows multiple developers to test their software at the same time. Thus it is beneficial to construct separate software that will exactly mimic the behavior and response of the real SI-1000 camera

  17. Dynamical theory of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    We present a review of the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction by macroscopic bodies which provides the theoretical basis for the study of neutron optics. We consider both the theory of dispersion, in which it is shown that the coherent wave in the medium satisfies a macroscopic one-body Schroedinger equation, and the theory of reflection, refraction, and diffraction in which the above equation is solved for a number of special cases of interest. The theory is illustrated with the help of experimental results obtained over the past 10 years by a number of new techniques such as neutron gravity refractometry. Pendelloesung interference, and neutron interferometry. (author)

  18. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    The current capabilities of and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades have been mainly the emergence of third-generation pulsed sources with a megawatt time-averaged power and advances in neutron optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method from F L Shapiro, the centennial of whose birth was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on extracted beams is reviewed in a special section.

  19. On unitarity of the particle-hole dispersive optical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, M. L.; Shlomo, S.; Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2018-02-01

    For the recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model, weak violations of unitarity due to a phenomenological description of the spreading effect are considered. Methods for unitarity restoration are proposed and implemented for the 208Pb nucleus in the description of the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density and strength functions in a wide excitation energy interval that includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. To illustrate abilities of the model, direct neutron decay of the mentioned giant resonance is also considered.

  20. Analysis of distributed optical fibre acoustic sensors through numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2017-12-11

    A distributed optical fibre acoustic sensor is numerically modelled. To increase the flexibility of the model, the building blocks of the sensing system are modelled separately and later combined to form the numerical model. This approach is adopted to facilitate the evaluation of each of the individual building blocks and their effects on the output of the sensor. The numerical model is used to assess the effect of parameters such as the linewidth of the laser source, the width of the probe pulse, and the frequency and amplitude of perturbation on the response of the sensing system. It is shown that the precision and accuracy of the sensing system are affected by the frequency and amplitude of perturbation as well as the pulse width and linewidth of the probe pulse.

  1. The Diffraction Response Interpolation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Pedersen, Peder C.

    1998-01-01

    Computer modeling of the output voltage in a pulse-echo system is computationally very demanding, particularly whenconsidering reflector surfaces of arbitrary geometry. A new, efficient computational tool, the diffraction response interpolationmethod (DRIM), for modeling of reflectors in a fluid...... medium, is presented. The DRIM is based on the velocity potential impulseresponse method, adapted to pulse-echo applications by the use of acoustical reciprocity. Specifically, the DRIM operates bydividing the reflector surface into planar elements, finding the diffraction response at the corners...

  2. Optical choppers with rotational elements: modeling, design and prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Cira, Octavian; Demian, Dorin

    2017-05-01

    We present a brief overview of our contributions regarding the analysis and design of optical choppers. Their applications range numerous domains, from optical sensing in radiometry or telescopes to laser manufacturing and biomedical imaging - for example for the controlled attenuation of light, the elimination of selected spectral domains, or the switching of optical paths. While these aspects are pointed out, the paper describes our analysis, modeling, and manufacturing of prototypes for choppers with: (a) wheels with windows with linear margins; (b) wheels with windows with non-linear margins (semi-circular or elliptical), outward or inward; (c) rotational shafts with different shapes, with slits or with holes. While variant (a) represents classical choppers, variant (b) represents the "eclipse" choppers that we have developed and also patented for the solution with two adjustable wheels that can produce circular windows. Variant (c), of choppers with shafts is also a patent application. Their transmission functions are discussed, for the shape of the laser pulses produced and for the attenuation coefficients obtained. While this discussion has been completed analytically for top-hat laser beams, it has been modeled using simulations for Gaussian and Bessel beams. Design, manufacturing aspects, and prototypes of the different chopper configurations complete the presentation.

  3. Multiple Scattering Model for Optical Coherence Tomography with Rytov Approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Muxingzi

    2017-04-24

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a coherence-gated, micrometer-resolution imaging technique that focuses a broadband near-infrared laser beam to penetrate into optical scattering media, e.g. biological tissues. The OCT resolution is split into two parts, with the axial resolution defined by half the coherence length, and the depth-dependent lateral resolution determined by the beam geometry, which is well described by a Gaussian beam model. The depth dependence of lateral resolution directly results in the defocusing effect outside the confocal region and restricts current OCT probes to small numerical aperture (NA) at the expense of lateral resolution near the focus. Another limitation on OCT development is the presence of a mixture of speckles due to multiple scatterers within the coherence length, and other random noise. Motivated by the above two challenges, a multiple scattering model based on Rytov approximation and Gaussian beam optics is proposed for the OCT setup. Some previous papers have adopted the first Born approximation with the assumption of small perturbation of the incident field in inhomogeneous media. The Rytov method of the same order with smooth phase perturbation assumption benefits from a wider spatial range of validity. A deconvolution method for solving the inverse problem associated with the first Rytov approximation is developed, significantly reducing the defocusing effect through depth and therefore extending the feasible range of NA.

  4. DIFFRACTION-LIMITED VISIBLE LIGHT IMAGES OF ORION TRAPEZIUM CLUSTER WITH THE MAGELLAN ADAPTIVE SECONDARY ADAPTIVE OPTICS SYSTEM (MagAO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, L. M.; Males, J. R.; Morzinski, K.; Kopon, D.; Follette, K.; Rodigas, T. J.; Hinz, P.; Wu, Y-L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Pinna, E.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Uomoto, A; Hare, T., E-mail: lclose@as.arizona.edu [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We utilized the new high-order (250-378 mode) Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high spatial resolution observations in ''visible light'' with MagAO's VisAO CCD camera. In the good-median seeing conditions of Magellan (0.''5-0.''7), we find MagAO delivers individual short exposure images as good as 19 mas optical resolution. Due to telescope vibrations, long exposure (60 s) r' (0.63 {mu}m) images are slightly coarser at FWHM = 23-29 mas (Strehl {approx}28%) with bright (R < 9 mag) guide stars. These are the highest resolution filled-aperture images published to date. Images of the young ({approx}1 Myr) Orion Trapezium {theta}{sup 1} Ori A, B, and C cluster members were obtained with VisAO. In particular, the 32 mas binary {theta}{sup 1} Ori C{sub 1} C{sub 2} was easily resolved in non-interferometric images for the first time. The relative positions of the bright trapezium binary stars were measured with {approx}0.6-5 mas accuracy. We are now sensitive to relative proper motions of just {approx}0.2 mas yr{sup -1} ({approx}0.4 km s{sup -1} at 414 pc)-this is a {approx}2-10 Multiplication-Sign improvement in orbital velocity accuracy compared to previous efforts. For the first time, we see clear motion of the barycenter of {theta}{sup 1} Ori B{sub 2} B{sub 3} about {theta}{sup 1} Ori B{sub 1}. All five members of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system appear likely to be a gravitationally bound ''mini cluster'', but we find that not all the orbits can be both circular and co-planar. The lowest mass member of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system (B{sub 4}; mass {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun }) has a very clearly detected motion (at 4.1 {+-} 1.3 km s{sup -1}; correlation = 99.9%) w.r.t. B{sub 1}. Previous work has suggested that B{sub 4} and B{sub 3} are on long-term unstable orbits and will be ejected from this ''mini cluster''. However, our new &apos

  5. Optical modelling of photoluminescence emitted by thin doped films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeat, P.; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Briancon, J.L.; Rinnert, H.

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra emitted by doped films are deformed owing to film thickness-dependent wave interference. This hampers knowing well their PL generating mechanisms as well as designing photonic devices with suitable geometries that improve their PL efficiency. We develop in this paper an energy model for PL emitted by doped films considering the interaction between the wavelength-differing incident standing and emitted waves, their energy transfer in-between, and the interferences undergone by both. The film optical constants are estimated fitting the model to the measured PL. This simple model has thus allowed us to interpret the evolution of PL emitted by Er-doped AlN films prepared on Si substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. The shapes, the amplitudes, and the illusive sub-spectral features of the PL spectra depend essentially on the film thickness. The model further predicts high sensitivity for PL emitted by non-homogenously doped stacked-films to incident light wavelengths and film-thickness variations. This property has potential applications in tracking wavelength variations and in measuring physical quantities producing thickness variations. This model may be used to optimise PL efficiency of photonic devices through different film geometries and optical properties.

  6. Revisit to diffraction anomalous fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Tokuda, K.; Shimada, K.; Ichitsubo, T.; Oishi, M.; Mizuki, J.; Matsubara, E.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction anomalous fine structure method has been revisited by applying this measurement technique to polycrystalline samples and using an analytical method with the logarithmic dispersion relation. The diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) method that is a spectroscopic analysis combined with resonant X-ray diffraction enables the determination of the valence state and local structure of a selected element at a specific crystalline site and/or phase. This method has been improved by using a polycrystalline sample, channel-cut monochromator optics with an undulator synchrotron radiation source, an area detector and direct determination of resonant terms with a logarithmic dispersion relation. This study makes the DAFS method more convenient and saves a large amount of measurement time in comparison with the conventional DAFS method with a single crystal. The improved DAFS method has been applied to some model samples, Ni foil and Fe 3 O 4 powder, to demonstrate the validity of the measurement and the analysis of the present DAFS method

  7. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  8. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  9. Stoichiometry Calculation in BaxSr1−xTiO3 Solid Solution Thin Films, Prepared by RF Cosputtering, Using X-Ray Diffraction Peak Positions and Boltzmann Sigmoidal Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reséndiz-Muñoz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel procedure based on the use of the Boltzmann equation to model the x parameter, the film deposition rate, and the optical band gap of BaxSr1−xTiO3 thin films is proposed. The BaxSr1−xTiO3 films were prepared by RF cosputtering from BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 targets changing the power applied to each magnetron to obtain different Ba/Sr contents. The method to calculate x consisted of fitting the angular shift of (110, (111, and (211 diffraction peaks observed as the density of substitutional Ba2+ increases in the solid solution when the applied RF power increases, followed by a scale transformation from applied power to x parameter using the Boltzmann equation. The Ba/Sr ratio was obtained from X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; the comparison with the X-ray diffraction derived composition shows a remarkable coincidence while the discrepancies offer a valuable diagnosis on the sputtering flux and phase composition. The proposed method allows a quick setup of the RF cosputtering system to control film composition providing a versatile tool to optimization of the process.

  10. Optical waveguide modeling of refractive index mediated pH responses in silica nanocomposite thin film based fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohodnicki, P. R.; Wang, C.

    2016-02-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated a pH-dependent optical transmission of silica based nanocomposite thin film enabled evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy based fiber optic sensors in aqueous solutions. Although the response was observed to linearly correlate with the pH-dependent surface charge density of the silica matrix, the responsible mechanism was not fully clarified. In this manuscript, an optical waveguide model is applied to describe observed responses through a modified effective refractive index of the silica matrix layer as a function of the solution phase pH. The refractive index dependence results from a surface charge dependent ionic adsorption, resulting in concentration of ionic species at charged surfaces. The resultant effective index modification to porous silica is estimated through effective medium theories and applied to an optical waveguide model of a multi-mode fiber optic based sensor response capable of reproducing all experimental observations reported to date.

  11. Substrate-mediated sub-diffraction guiding of optical signals through a linear chain of metal nanoparticles : Polarization dependence and the role of the dispersion relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, P.J.; Malyshev, V.A.; Knoester, J.

    We theoretically investigate the efficiency of transmitting optical signals through a linear chain consisting of identical and equidistantly spaced silver nanoparticles in the presence of a reflecting substrate. The energy exchange between surface plasmon polaritons of the chain and the substrate

  12. Investigation of deformation mechanisms involved in the plasticity of AZ31 Mg alloy: in situ neutron diffraction and EPSC modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muránsky, Ondrej; Carr, D.G.; Barnett, M.R.; Oliver, E.C.; Šittner, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 496, 1-2 (2008), s. 14-24 ISSN 0921-5093 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 505226 - MULTIMAT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : magnesium * neutron diffraction * twinning * mechanical testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  13. Analytical Modeling Tool for Design of Hydrocarbon Sensitive Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Al Handawi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pipelines are the main transportation means for oil and gas products across large distances. Due to the severe conditions they operate in, they are regularly inspected using conventional Pipeline Inspection Gages (PIGs for corrosion damage. The motivation for researching a real-time distributed monitoring solution arose to mitigate costs and provide a proactive indication of potential failures. Fiber optic sensors with polymer claddings provide a means of detecting contact with hydrocarbons. By coating the fibers with a layer of metal similar in composition to that of the parent pipeline, corrosion of this coating may be detected when the polymer cladding underneath is exposed to the surrounding hydrocarbons contained within the pipeline. A Refractive Index (RI change occurs in the polymer cladding causing a loss in intensity of a traveling light pulse due to a reduction in the fiber’s modal capacity. Intensity losses may be detected using Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR while pinpointing the spatial location of the contact via time delay calculations of the back-scattered pulses. This work presents a theoretical model for the above sensing solution to provide a design tool for the fiber optic cable in the context of hydrocarbon sensing following corrosion of an external metal coating. Results are verified against the experimental data published in the literature.

  14. Yanqing solar field: Dynamic optical model and operational safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Dongming; Wang, Zhifeng; Xu, Ershu; Zhu, Lingzhi; Lei, Dongqiang; Xu, Li; Yuan, Guofeng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic optical model of the Yanqing solar field was built. • Tracking angle characteristics were studied with different SCA layouts and time. • The average energy flux was simulated across four clear days. • Influences of defocus angles for energy flux were analyzed. - Abstract: A dynamic optical model was established for the Yanqing solar field at the parabolic trough solar thermal power plant and a simulation was conducted on four separate days of clear weather (March 3rd, June 2nd, September 25th, December 17th). The solar collector assembly (SCA) was comprised of a North-South and East-West layout. The model consisted of the following modules: DNI, SCA operational, and SCA optical. The tracking angle characteristics were analyzed and the results showed that the East-West layout of the tracking system was the most viable. The average energy flux was simulated for a given time period and different SCA layouts, yielding an average flux of 6 kW/m 2 , which was then used as the design and operational standards of the Yanqing parabolic trough plant. The mass flow of North-South layout was relatively stable. The influences of the defocus angles on both the average energy flux and the circumferential flux distribution were also studied. The results provided a theoretical basis for the following components: solar field design, mass flow control of the heat transfer fluid, design and operation of the tracking system, operational safety of SCAs, and power production prediction in the Yanqing 1 MW parabolic trough plant.

  15. Diffractive X-ray Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted space- time in the immediate vicinity of the super...

  16. Measurement of infrared refractive indices of organic and organophosphorous compounds for optical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Danby, Tyler O.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2017-05-03

    The complex optical refractive index contains the optical constants, n($\\tilde{u}$)and k($\\tilde{u}$), which correspond to the dispersion and absorption of light within a medium, respectively. By obtaining the optical constants one can in principle model most optical phenomena in media and at interfaces including reflection, refraction and dispersion. We have developed improved protocols based on the use of multiple path lengths to determine the optical constants for dozens of liquids, including organic and organophosphorous compounds. Detailed description of the protocols to determine the infrared indices will be presented, along with preliminary results using the constants with their applications to optical modeling.

  17. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 1...... from the linear propagation regime of surface plasmon polaritons at the average input power of 100 mW and above. Possible reasons for this deviation are heating of the waveguides and subsequent changes in the coupling and propagation losses....

  18. Optical model with multiple band couplings using soft rotator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Dmitry; Soukhovitskii, Efrem; Capote, Roberto; Quesada, Jose Manuel; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A new dispersive coupled-channel optical model (DCCOM) is derived that describes nucleon scattering on 238U and 232Th targets using a soft-rotator-model (SRM) description of the collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM Hamiltonian parameters are adjusted to the observed collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM nuclear wave functions (mixed in K quantum number) have been used to calculate coupling matrix elements of the generalized optical model. Five rotational bands are coupled: the ground-state band, β-, γ-, non-axial- bands, and a negative parity band. Such coupling scheme includes almost all levels below 1.2 MeV of excitation energy of targets. The "effective" deformations that define inter-band couplings are derived from SRM Hamiltonian parameters. Conservation of nuclear volume is enforced by introducing a monopolar deformed potential leading to additional couplings between rotational bands. The present DCCOM describes the total cross section differences between 238U and 232Th targets within experimental uncertainty from 50 keV up to 200 MeV of neutron incident energy. SRM couplings and volume conservation allow a precise calculation of the compound-nucleus (CN) formation cross sections, which is significantly different from the one calculated with rigid-rotor potentials with any number of coupled levels.

  19. Light propagation in linear optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, Glen D; Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Light Propagation in Linear Optical Media describes light propagation in linear media by expanding on diffraction theories beyond what is available in classic optics books. In one volume, this book combines the treatment of light propagation through various media, interfaces, and apertures using scalar and vector diffraction theories. After covering the fundamentals of light and physical optics, the authors discuss light traveling within an anisotropic crystal and present mathematical models for light propagation across planar boundaries between different media. They describe the propagation o

  20. Mathematical and computer modeling of electro-optic systems using a generic modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, M.I.; Murray-Smith, D.J.; Hickman, D.

    2007-01-01

    The conventional approach to modelling electro-optic sensor systems is to develop separate models for individual systems or classes of system, depending on the detector technology employed in the sensor and the application. However, this ignores commonality in design and in components of these systems. A generic approach is presented for modelling a variety of sensor systems operating in the infrared waveband that also allows systems to be modelled with different levels of detail and at diffe...

  1. Axial and focal-plane diffraction catastrophe integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, M V; Howls, C J

    2010-01-01

    Exact expressions in terms of Bessel functions are found for some of the diffraction catastrophe integrals that decorate caustics in optics and mechanics. These are the axial and focal-plane sections of the elliptic and hyperbolic umbilic diffraction catastrophes, and symmetric elliptic and hyperbolic unfoldings of the X 9 diffraction catastrophes. These representations reveal unexpected relations between the integrals.

  2. Multiscale modeling and computation of optically manipulated nano devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Gang, E-mail: baog@zju.edu.cn [Department of Mathematics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu, Di, E-mail: richardl@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Luo, Songting, E-mail: luos@iastate.edu [Department of Mathematics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We present a multiscale modeling and computational scheme for optical-mechanical responses of nanostructures. The multi-physical nature of the problem is a result of the interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) field, the molecular motion, and the electronic excitation. To balance accuracy and complexity, we adopt the semi-classical approach that the EM field is described classically by the Maxwell equations, and the charged particles follow the Schrödinger equations quantum mechanically. To overcome the numerical challenge of solving the high dimensional multi-component many-body Schrödinger equations, we further simplify the model with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics to determine the motion of the nuclei, and use the Time-Dependent Current Density Functional Theory (TD-CDFT) to calculate the excitation of the electrons. This leads to a system of coupled equations that computes the electromagnetic field, the nuclear positions, and the electronic current and charge densities simultaneously. In the regime of linear responses, the resonant frequencies initiating the out-of-equilibrium optical-mechanical responses can be formulated as an eigenvalue problem. A self-consistent multiscale method is designed to deal with the well separated space scales. The isomerization of azobenzene is presented as a numerical example.

  3. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  4. Modeling of optical wireless scattering communication channels over broad spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihao; Zou, Difan; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2015-03-01

    The air molecules and suspended aerosols help to build non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical scattering communication links using carriers from near infrared to visible light and ultraviolet bands. This paper proposes channel models over such broad spectra. Wavelength dependent Rayleigh and Mie scattering and absorption coefficients of particles are analytically obtained first. They are applied to the ray tracing based Monte Carlo method, which models the photon scattering angle from the scatterer and propagation distance between two consecutive scatterers. Communication link path loss is studied under different operation conditions, including visibility, particle density, wavelength, and communication range. It is observed that optimum communication performances exist across the wavelength under specific atmospheric conditions. Infrared, visible light and ultraviolet bands show their respective features as conditions vary.

  5. Comparison of optical models and signals from XPS and VASE characterized titanium after PBS immersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Penttinen, N.; Hasoň, Stanislav; Silvennoinen, M.; Joska, L.; Silvennoinen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 285, č. 6 (2012), s. 965-968 ISSN 0030-4018 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1782 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : permittivity * XPS titanium * diffractive optical element-based sensor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2012

  6. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  7. Phonons from neutron powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, D. A.; Louca, D.; Röder, H.

    1999-09-01

    The spherically averaged structure function S(\\|q\\|) obtained from pulsed neutron powder diffraction contains both elastic and inelastic scattering via an integral over energy. The Fourier transformation of S(\\|q\\|) to real space, as is done in the pair density function (PDF) analysis, regularizes the data, i.e., it accentuates the diffuse scattering. We present a technique which enables the extraction of off-center (\\|q\\|≠0) phonon information from powder diffraction experiments by comparing the experimental PDF with theoretical calculations based on standard interatomic potentials and the crystal symmetry. This procedure [dynamics from powder diffraction] has been successfully implemented as demonstrated here for two systems, a simple metal fcc Ni and an ionic crystal CaF2. Although computationally intensive, this data analysis allows for a phonon based modeling of the PDF, and additionally provides off-center phonon information from neutron powder diffraction.

  8. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  9. Deformation behavior of Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy under reverse loading investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction and elastic viscoplastic self-consistent modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Gharghouri, M.A.; Wu, P.D.; Yoon, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    The EVPSC-TDT model for polycrystal plasticity and in-situ neutron diffraction have been used to investigate the behavior of a Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy with two starting textures: 1) a typical extrusion texture in which a majority of the grains are oriented favorably for extension twinning via compression perpendicular to the basal pole, and 2) a modified texture in which extension twinning can be activated via tension parallel to the basal pole in a majority of the grains. Using a small number of adjustable parameters, and only two macroscopic tensile stress–strain curves for calibration, the model is able to capture, quantitatively, the trends in multiple data sets, including grain-level elastic lattice strains, and diffraction peak intensity changes due to lattice re-orientation associated with twinning. For twinning, the model assumes a polar critical resolved shear stress activation criterion and assigns the stress and hardening of the parent crystal to a newly formed twin. The model allows twinning to be driven either by the stress in the parent crystal (matrix reduction), in which case all of the twin transformation strain is assigned to the matrix, or by the stress in the twin (twin propagation), in which case all of the twin transformation strain is assigned to the twin. A detailed comparison between the model predictions and the neutron diffraction data reveals that assigning all of the twin transformation strain either to the matrix or to the twin is too one-sided, leading to excessive relaxation and hardening effects. A more equitable partitioning of the twin transformation strain is necessary. It is suggested that the stress and hardening assigned to a newly formed twin is of less importance to the performance of the model than the partitioning of the twin transformation strain.

  10. Virtual optical network provisioning with unified service logic processing model for software-defined multidomain optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Li, Shikun; Song, Yinan; Sun, Ji; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Hierarchical control architecture is designed for software-defined multidomain optical networks (SD-MDONs), and a unified service logic processing model (USLPM) is first proposed for various applications. USLPM-based virtual optical network (VON) provisioning process is designed, and two VON mapping algorithms are proposed: random node selection and per controller computation (RNS&PCC) and balanced node selection and hierarchical controller computation (BNS&HCC). Then an SD-MDON testbed is built with OpenFlow extension in order to support optical transport equipment. Finally, VON provisioning service is experimentally demonstrated on the testbed along with performance verification.

  11. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, Steven P; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the ‘α’ parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R 2 , of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. (paper)

  12. Adaptive optics for reduced threshold energy in femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in water based eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anja; Krueger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-03-01

    In ophthalmic microsurgery tissue dissection is achieved using femtosecond laser pulses to create an optical breakdown. For vitreo-retinal applications the irradiance distribution in the focal volume is distorted by the anterior components of the eye causing a raised threshold energy for breakdown. In this work, an adaptive optics system enables spatial beam shaping for compensation of aberrations and investigation of wave front influence on optical breakdown. An eye model was designed to allow for aberration correction as well as detection of optical breakdown. The eye model consists of an achromatic lens for modeling the eye's refractive power, a water chamber for modeling the tissue properties, and a PTFE sample for modeling the retina's scattering properties. Aberration correction was performed using a deformable mirror in combination with a Hartmann-Shack-sensor. The influence of an adaptive optics aberration correction on the pulse energy required for photodisruption was investigated using transmission measurements for determination of the breakdown threshold and video imaging of the focal region for study of the gas bubble dynamics. The threshold energy is considerably reduced when correcting for the aberrations of the system and the model eye. Also, a raise in irradiance at constant pulse energy was shown for the aberration corrected case. The reduced pulse energy lowers the potential risk of collateral damage which is especially important for retinal safety. This offers new possibilities for vitreo-retinal surgery using femtosecond laser pulses.

  13. A Model for the Effect of Disturbances in the Optical Media on the OCT Image Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Pauline H. B.; van Dijk, Hille W.; van den Berg, Thomas J. T. P.; Verbraak, Frank D.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. The loss of quality of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images resulting from disturbances in the optical media has been modeled. METHODS. OCT measurements were performed in two healthy volunteers using time domain (TD)-OCT (StratusOCT; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Optical

  14. Modeling silica aerogel optical performance by determining its radiative properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Yang, Sungwoo; Bhatia, Bikram; Strobach, Elise; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-02-01

    Silica aerogel has been known as a promising candidate for high performance transparent insulation material (TIM). Optical transparency is a crucial metric for silica aerogels in many solar related applications. Both scattering and absorption can reduce the amount of light transmitted through an aerogel slab. Due to multiple scattering, the transmittance deviates from the Beer-Lambert law (exponential attenuation). To better understand its optical performance, we decoupled and quantified the extinction contributions of absorption and scattering separately by identifying two sets of radiative properties. The radiative properties are deduced from the measured total transmittance and reflectance spectra (from 250 nm to 2500 nm) of synthesized aerogel samples by solving the inverse problem of the 1-D Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The obtained radiative properties are found to be independent of the sample geometry and can be considered intrinsic material properties, which originate from the aerogel's microstructure. This finding allows for these properties to be directly compared between different samples. We also demonstrate that by using the obtained radiative properties, we can model the photon transport in aerogels of arbitrary shapes, where an analytical solution is difficult to obtain.

  15. Diffractive production off nuclei-shadow of hadronic bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.; Czyz, W.

    1974-01-01

    Diffractive production on nuclei is calculated using as an input a specific model for diffractive production on nucleons. In this model diffractive production is described as a shadow of non-diffractive multiple production of particles. The mechanism for non-diffractive production is taken to be hadronic bremsstrahlung of independently produced clusters. It is shown that such a model naturally explains the strikingly simple pattern of absorption observed in coherent production on nuclei. Possible generalizations of these results are indicated. (author)

  16. Phase behavior in diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical formulation of a straight edge diffraction shows a phase difference of π/2 between the incoming and diffracted waves. Experiments using two straight edges do not confirm the π/2 difference but suggest that the incoming wave is in phase with the wave diffracted into the shadowed region of the edge and out of phase by a factor of π with the wave diffracted into the illuminated region. (Author) [pt

  17. Optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals: model with saturation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgna, Juan Pablo; Panayotaros, Panayotis; Rial, Diego; de la Vega, Constanza Sánchez F.

    2018-04-01

    We study a 2D system that couples a Schrödinger evolution equation to a nonlinear elliptic equation and models the propagation of a laser beam in a nematic liquid crystal. The nonlinear elliptic equation describes the response of the director angle to the laser beam electric field. We obtain results on well-posedness and solitary wave solutions of this system, generalizing results for a well-studied simpler system with a linear elliptic equation for the director field. The analysis of the nonlinear elliptic problem shows the existence of an isolated global branch of solutions with director angles that remain bounded for arbitrary electric field. The results on the director equation are also used to show local and global existence, as well as decay for initial conditions with sufficiently small L 2‑norm. For sufficiently large L 2‑norm we show the existence of energy minimizing optical solitons with radial, positive and monotone profiles.

  18. MEMS Tunable Diffraction Grating for Spaceborne Imaging Spectroscopic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanathanan S. Muttikulangara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Diffraction gratings are among the most commonly used optical elements in applications ranging from spectroscopy and metrology to lasers. Numerous methods have been adopted for the fabrication of gratings, including microelectromechanical system (MEMS fabrication which is by now mature and presents opportunities for tunable gratings through inclusion of an actuation mechanism. We have designed, modeled, fabricated and tested a silicon based pitch tunable diffraction grating (PTG with relatively large resolving power that could be deployed in a spaceborne imaging spectrometer, for example in a picosatellite. We have carried out a detailed analytical modeling of PTG, based on a mass spring system. The device has an effective fill factor of 52% and resolving power of 84. Tuning provided by electrostatic actuation results in a displacement of 2.7 μ m at 40 V . Further, we have carried out vibration testing of the fabricated structure to evaluate its feasibility for spaceborne instruments.

  19. Quasi-optical converters for high-power gyrotrons: a brief review of physical models, numerical methods and computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabchevski, S [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Benova, E [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Atanassov, V [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Dankov, P [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Thumm, M [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arnold, A [University of Karlsruhe, Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jin, J [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rzesnicki, T [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association EURATOM-FZK, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Quasi-optical (QO) mode converters are used to transform electromagnetic waves of complex structure and polarization generated in gyrotron cavities into a linearly polarized, Gaussian-like beam suitable for transmission. The efficiency of this conversion as well as the maintenance of low level of diffraction losses are crucial for the implementation of powerful gyrotrons as radiation sources for electron-cyclotron-resonance heating of fusion plasmas. The use of adequate physical models, efficient numerical schemes and up-to-date computer codes may provide the high accuracy necessary for the design and analysis of these devices. In this review, we briefly sketch the most commonly used QO converters, the mathematical base they have been treated on and the basic features of the numerical schemes used. Further on, we discuss the applicability of several commercially available and free software packages, their advantages and drawbacks, for solving QO related problems.

  20. Quasi-optical converters for high-power gyrotrons: a brief review of physical models, numerical methods and computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabchevski, S; Zhelyazkov, I; Benova, E; Atanassov, V; Dankov, P; Thumm, M; Arnold, A; Jin, J; Rzesnicki, T

    2006-01-01

    Quasi-optical (QO) mode converters are used to transform electromagnetic waves of complex structure and polarization generated in gyrotron cavities into a linearly polarized, Gaussian-like beam suitable for transmission. The efficiency of this conversion as well as the maintenance of low level of diffraction losses are crucial for the implementation of powerful gyrotrons as radiation sources for electron-cyclotron-resonance heating of fusion plasmas. The use of adequate physical models, efficient numerical schemes and up-to-date computer codes may provide the high accuracy necessary for the design and analysis of these devices. In this review, we briefly sketch the most commonly used QO converters, the mathematical base they have been treated on and the basic features of the numerical schemes used. Further on, we discuss the applicability of several commercially available and free software packages, their advantages and drawbacks, for solving QO related problems

  1. Modeling and optical characterization of vibrating micro- and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksnes, Astrid; Leirset, Erlend; Martinussen, Hanne; Engan, Helge E.

    2008-08-01

    The lack of commercial equipment for characterization of vibrating micro- and nanostructures has motivated the development of a heterodyne interferometer. The setup is designed to measure phase and absolute amplitude in the entire frequency range 0-1.2 GHz. Its transverse resolution is CMUTs) are being developed for diagnostic imaging of vulnerable plaques in the coronary arteries. The CMUTs have 5.7 μm radii, 100 nm membrane thickness and ~30 MHz center frequency. Arrays of ~7500 CMUTs have been fabricated. Frequency scan measurements along a row of CMUTs reveal a variation in resonance frequency. This may be due to variations of material properties, dimensions such as thickness and transverse dimensions, and other manufacturing variance. The frequency scan revealed the fundamental mode and two closely spaced higher order modes. Modeling of individual CMUT elements was performed using the commercial program COMSOL. A finite element model (FEM) based on symmetry assumptions predicted only one higher order mode. After closer analysis it was found that the symmetry assumptions were insufficient. By using a complete physical model two higher order modes were predicted in agreement with the measurements. Simulations are able to predict transducer characteristics in great detail but are dependent on accurate input parameters. The optical measurements contribute to validate or complement simulations and assumptions they rely on. The heterodyne interferometer is therefore a valuable tool for quality control in the conception, design and manufacturing of new acoustic devices.

  2. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  3. Development of Optics Kit for schools in developing countries: International School of Photonics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; James, Jemy; Krisha, Yedhu; Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2009-06-01

    In India, the pedagogy of science education is "believe what text book says". Providing schools with appropriate teaching materials to enhance teaching has always been a challenge in a developing country like India. Generally it is not possible for a normal school in India to afford the expensive teaching materials to teach through demonstrations and experiments. Thus students are forced to believe what text book says rather than learning concepts through experiments. The International School of Photonics SPIE (International Society for Optical Engineering) student chapter came up with `Optics kit' to supplement the teaching of optics in school level. `Optics kit', developed with indigenously procured components, could be sold at an affordable prize for an average Indian School. The chapter is currently selling the kit for less than $20. The content of the kit is at par with many kits already available commercially in developed countries, and the price is just 10% compared to those kits. The kit is aimed to higher secondary level students in India, where students are taught Ray optics and basics of Wave Optics. The content of the kit is developed based on this syllabus. The Optics Kit contains simple optical elements like lens, grating, polarizer, mirror, diode laser etc. The kit can be used to demonstrate optics phenomena like interference, diffraction, polarization etc. The kit was developed based on the feedback gathered by the chapter through its outreach activities. The syllabus for the kit was developed through thorough discussion with educational experts in the field of Physics. The student community welcomed the optics kit with overwhelming enthusiasm and hence the project proved to be successful in giving an opportunity for students to "See and Believe" what they are learning.

  4. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The possibilities currently offered and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades has been mainly the emergence of third generation pulsed sources with a MW time-averaged power and advances in neutron-optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method by F.L.Shapiro whose 100th birth anniversary was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on output beams is reviewed in a special section. [ru

  5. Diffraction operators in paraxial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasso, William; Navas, Marianela; Añez, Liz; Urdaneta, Romer; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, César O.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, research in the field of science education points to the creation of alternative ways of teaching contents encouraging the development of more elaborate reasoning, where a high degree of abstraction and generalization of scientific knowledge prevails. On that subject, this research shows a didactic alternative proposal for the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts applying the Fourier transform technique in the study of electromagnetic waves propagation in free space. Curvature transparency and Fourier sphere operators in paraxial approximation are used in order to make the usual laborious mathematical approach easier. The main result shows that the composition of optic metaxial operators results in the discovery of a simpler way out of the standard electromagnetic wave propagation in free space between a transmitter and a receptor separated from a given distance. This allows to state that the didactic proposal shown encourages the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts in a more effective and easier way than the traditional teaching.

  6. Large capacity multi-float configurations for the wave energy converter M4 using a time-domain linear diffraction model

    OpenAIRE

    Stansby, Peter; Carpintero Moreno, Efrain; Stallard, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The moored three-float line absorber WEC M4 has been developed to optimise power capture through experiments and linear diffraction modelling. With the progression down wave from small to medium to large floats, the device heads naturally into the wave direction. The bow and mid floats are rigidly connected by a beam and a beam from the stern float is connected to the hinge point above the mid float for power take off (PTO). Increasing the bow to mid float spacing to be more than 50% greater ...

  7. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  8. CERN Large Hadron Collider optics model, measurements, and corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tomás

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Optics stability during all phases of operation is crucial for the LHC. Tools and procedures have been developed for rapid checks of beta beating, dispersion, and linear coupling, as well as for prompt optics corrections. Important optics errors during the different phases of the beam commissioning were observed and locally corrected using the segment-by-segment technique. The most relevant corrections at injection have been corroborated with dedicated magnetic measurements.

  9. Efficient Weibull channel model for salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical communications

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-12-13

    Recent advances in underwater wireless optical communications necessitate a better understanding of the underwater channel. We propose the Weibull model to characterize the fading of salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical channels. The model shows an excellent agreement with the measured data under all channel conditions.

  10. Cooperative photo-induced effects: from photo-magnetism under continuous irradiation to ultra-fast phenomena - study through optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction; Effets photo-induits cooperatifs: du photomagnetisme sous irradiation continue aux phenomenes ultrarapides - etude par spectroscopie optique et diffraction X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glijer, D

    2006-12-15

    The control with ultra-short laser pulses of the collective and concerted transformation of molecules driving a macroscopic state switching on an ultra-fast time scale in solid state opens new prospects in materials science. The goal is to realize at the material level what happens at the molecular level in femto-chemistry. These processes are highly cooperative and highly non-linear, leading to self-amplification and self-organization within the material, a so-called photo-induced phase transition with a new long range order (structural, magnetic, ferroelectric,...). Two families of molecular compounds have been studied here: first of all, spin transition materials changing from a diamagnetic state over to a paramagnetic state under the effect of temperature or under continuous laser excitation. It concerns photo-active molecular bi-stability prototype materials in solid state, whose switching has been studied during X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and magnetism experiments. Then we have studied charge-transfer molecular systems, prototype compounds for ultrafast photo-induced phase transitions: insulator-metal, neutral-ionic....As well as ultrafast optical experiments, time-resolved X ray crystallography is a key technique in order to follow at the atomic level the different steps of the photo-induced transformation and thus to observe the involved mechanisms. We have underlined a process of photo-formation of one-dimensional nano-domains of lattice-relaxed charge-transfer excitations, governing the photo-induced phase transition of the molecular charge-transfer complex TTF-CA by the first time-resolved diffuse scattering measurements. Moreover, a new femtosecond laser-plasma source and a optical pump-probe spectroscopy set-up with a highly sensitive detecting system have been developed in this work. The results presented here will be an illustration of the present scientific challenges existing on the one hand with the development of projects of major

  11. Engineering Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-01-01

    Engineering Optics is a book for students who want to apply their knowledge of optics to engineering problems, as well as for engineering students who want to acquire the basic principles of optics. It covers such important topics as optical signal processing, holography, tomography, holographic radars, fiber optical communication, electro- and acousto-optic devices, and integrated optics (including optical bistability). As a basis for understanding these topics, the first few chapters give easy-to-follow explanations of diffraction theory, Fourier transforms, and geometrical optics. Practical examples, such as the video disk, the Fresnel zone plate, and many more, appear throughout the text, together with numerous solved exercises. There is an entirely new section in this updated edition on 3-D imaging.

  12. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-02

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Influence of the penetration enhancer isopropyl myristate on stratum corneum lipid model membranes revealed by neutron diffraction and 2H NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Adina; Stahlberg, Sören; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Lange, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias E; Hauß, Thomas; Schroeter, Annett; Huster, Daniel; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2017-05-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) provides the main barrier properties in native skin. The barrier function is attributed to the intercellular lipids, forming continuous multilamellar membranes. In this study, SC lipid membranes in model ratios were enriched with deuterated lipids in order to investigate structural and dynamical properties by neutron diffraction and 2 H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Further, the effect of the penetration enhancer isopropyl myristate (IPM) on the structure of a well-known SC lipid model membrane containing synthetically derived methyl-branched ceramide [EOS], ceramide [AP], behenic acid and cholesterol (23/10/33/33wt%) was investigated. IPM supported the formation of a single short-periodicity phase (SPP), in which we determined the molecular organization of CER[AP] and CER[EOS]-br for the first time. Furthermore, the thermotropic phase behavior of the lipid system was analyzed by additional neutron diffraction studies as well as by 2 H solid-state NMR spectroscopy, covering temperatures of 32°C (physiological skin temperature), 50°C, and 70°C with a subsequent cooldown back to skin temperature. Both techniques revealed a phase transition and a hysteresis effect. During the cooldown, Bragg peaks corresponding to a long-periodicity phase (LPP) appeared. Additionally, 2 H NMR revealed that the IPM molecules are isotopic mobile at all temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Soliton models in resonant and nonresonant optical fibers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dispersive characteristics of a fiber can be minimized in the oper- ating region of the system by ... The lower order nonlinearities manifest themselves in three different ways: self- phase modulation (SPM) ... These are mainly due to the optical losses, dispersion, nonlinearity and amplifier induced noise in the optical fiber.

  15. Diffraction phase microscopy imaging and multi-physics modeling of the nanoscale thermal expansion of a suspended resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Tianjian; Yu, Xin; Jin, Jian-Ming; Goddard, Lynford L

    2017-07-04

    We studied the nanoscale thermal expansion of a suspended resistor both theoretically and experimentally and obtained consistent results. In the theoretical analysis, we used a three-dimensional coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical simulation and obtained the temperature and displacement field of the suspended resistor under a direct current (DC) input voltage. In the experiment, we recorded a sequence of images of the axial thermal expansion of the central bridge region of the suspended resistor at a rate of 1.8 frames/s by using epi-illumination diffraction phase microscopy (epi-DPM). This method accurately measured nanometer level relative height changes of the resistor in a temporally and spatially resolved manner. Upon application of a 2 V step in voltage, the resistor exhibited a steady-state increase in resistance of 1.14 Ω and in relative height of 3.5 nm, which agreed reasonably well with the predicted values of 1.08 Ω and 4.4 nm, respectively.

  16. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). (orig.)

  17. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  18. Optical Neural Network Models Applied To Logic Program Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormon, Charles D.

    1988-05-01

    Logic programming is being used extensively by Artificial Intelligence researchers to solve problems including natural language processing and expert systems. These languages, of which Prolog is the most widely used, promise to revolutionize software engineering, but much greater performance is needed. Researchers have demonstrated the applicability of neural network models to the solution of certain NP-complete problems, but these methods are not obviously applicable to the execution of logic programs. This paper outlines the use of neural networks in four aspects of the logic program execution cycle, and discusses results of a simulation of three of these. Four neural network functional units are described, called the substitution agent, the clause filter, the structure processor, and the heuristics generator, respectively. Simulation results suggest that the system described may provide several orders of magnitude improvement in execution speed for large logic programs. However, practical implementation of the proposed architecture will require the application of optical computing techniques due to the large number of neurons required, and the need for massive, adaptive connectivity.

  19. Modelling of bio-optical parameters of open ocean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim N. Pelevin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An original method for estimating the concentration of chlorophyll pigments, absorption of yellow substance and absorption of suspended matter without pigments and yellow substance in detritus using spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance and irradiance reflectance data has been applied to sea waters of different types in the open ocean (case 1. Using the effective numerical single parameter classification with the water type optical index m as a parameter over the whole range of the open ocean waters, the calculations have been carried out and the light absorption spectra of sea waters tabulated. These spectra are used to optimize the absorption models and thus to estimate the concentrations of the main admixtures in sea water. The value of m can be determined from direct measurements of the downward irradiance attenuation coefficient at 500 nm or calculated from remote sensing data using the regressions given in the article. The sea water composition can then be readily estimated from the tables given for any open ocean area if that one parameter m characterizing the basin is known.

  20. Neutron powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, W.I.F.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a powerful technique that provides a detailed description of moderately complex crystal structures. This is nowhere more apparent than in the area of high temperature superconductors where neutron powder diffraction has provided precise structural and magnetic information, not only under ambient conditions but also at high and low temperatures and high pressures. Outside superconductor research, the variety of materials studied by neutron powder diffraction is equally impressive including zeolites, fast ionic conductors, permanent magnets and materials undergoing phase transitions. Recent advances that include high resolution studies and real-time crystallography are presented. Future possibilities of neutron powder diffraction are discussed