WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling defect trends

  1. Modeling defect trends for iterative development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. D.; Spanguolo, J. N.

    2003-01-01

    The Employment of Defects (EoD) approach to measuring and analyzing defects seeks to identify and capture trends and phenomena that are critical to managing software quality in the iterative software development lifecycle at JPL.

  2. Electricity market modeling trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventosa, Mariano; Baillo, Alvaro; Ramos, Andres; Rivier, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The trend towards competition in the electricity sector has led to efforts by the research community to develop decision and analysis support models adapted to the new market context. This paper focuses on electricity generation market modeling. Its aim is to help to identify, classify and characterize the somewhat confusing diversity of approaches that can be found in the technical literature on the subject. The paper presents a survey of the most relevant publications regarding electricity market modeling, identifying three major trends: optimization models, equilibrium models and simulation models. It introduces a classification according to their most relevant attributes. Finally, it identifies the most suitable approaches for conducting various types of planning studies or market analysis in this new context

  3. Stochastic and deterministic trend models

    OpenAIRE

    Estela Bee Dagum; Camilo Dagum

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of some trend models formulated for global and local estimation. Global trend models are based on the assumption that the trend or nonstationary mean of a time series can be approximated closely by simple functions of time over the entire span of the series. The most common representation of deterministic and stochastic trend are introduced. In particular, for the former we analyze polynomial and transcendental functions, whereas for the latter we assume t...

  4. Long term trends in prevalence of neural tube defects in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoshnood, Babak; Loane, Maria; Walle, Hermien de

    2015-01-01

    for mandatory folic acid fortification of food does not exist? METHODS: This was a population based, observational study using data on 11 353 cases of NTD not associated with chromosomal anomalies, including 4162 cases of anencephaly and 5776 cases of spina bifida from 28 EUROCAT (European Surveillance......STUDY QUESTION: What are the long term trends in the total (live births, fetal deaths, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly) and live birth prevalence of neural tube defects (NTD) in Europe, where many countries have issued recommendations for folic acid supplementation but a policy...... of Congenital Anomalies) registries covering approximately 12.5 million births in 19 countries between 1991 and 2011. The main outcome measures were total and live birth prevalence of NTD, as well as anencephaly and spina bifida, with time trends analysed using random effects Poisson regression models...

  5. Repair of Defective Composite Resin Restoration: Current Trend ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Repair of defective composite resins restorations is being increasingly recognized as a viable alternative to replacement. there is however no consensus yet on the treatment protocol. Objective: To determine the views and practice of specialists in Conservative Dentistry in Nigeria as regard to repair procedure ...

  6. Modeling of Powder Bed Manufacturing Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindt, H.-W.; Desmaison, O.; Megahed, M.; Peralta, A.; Neumann, J.

    2018-01-01

    Powder bed additive manufacturing offers unmatched capabilities. The deposition resolution achieved is extremely high enabling the production of innovative functional products and materials. Achieving the desired final quality is, however, hampered by many potential defects that have to be managed in due course of the manufacturing process. Defects observed in products manufactured via powder bed fusion have been studied experimentally. In this effort we have relied on experiments reported in the literature and—when experimental data were not sufficient—we have performed additional experiments providing an extended foundation for defect analysis. There is large interest in reducing the effort and cost of additive manufacturing process qualification and certification using integrated computational material engineering. A prerequisite is, however, that numerical methods can indeed capture defects. A multiscale multiphysics platform is developed and applied to predict and explain the origin of several defects that have been observed experimentally during laser-based powder bed fusion processes. The models utilized are briefly introduced. The ability of the models to capture the observed defects is verified. The root cause of the defects is explained by analyzing the numerical results thus confirming the ability of numerical methods to provide a foundation for rapid process qualification.

  7. Evacuation modeling trends

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Orlando; Alvear, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an overview of modeling definitions and concepts, theory on human behavior and human performance data, available tools and simulation approaches, model development, and application and validation methods. It considers the data and research efforts needed to develop and incorporate functions for the different parameters into comprehensive escape and evacuation simulations, with a number of examples illustrating different aspects and approaches. After an overview of basic modeling approaches, the book discusses benefits and challenges of current techniques. The representation of evacuees is a central issue, including human behavior and the proper implementation of representational tools. Key topics include the nature and importance of the different parameters involved in ASET and RSET and the interactions between them. A review of the current literature on verification and validation methods is provided, with a set of recommended verification tests and examples of validation tests. The book c...

  8. [Skin defect modeling in experimental animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, A N; Kornienko, V V; Tkachenko, Yu A; Kurganskaya, V A

    2015-02-01

    To assess the skin regeneration and explore new medical devices for the treatment of skin defects is necessary to conduct long-term experiments using laboratory animals. Currently, there are many methods for skin trauma modeling but most of them have disadvantages that limit their use. The purpose of this work - the development of an experimental model of the formation of skin defect of various etiologies with the specified parameters of depth and area of damage to the absence of systemic effects on the animal's body. We have developed an installation that allows us to form a skin defect of mechanical, thermal and chemical etiology with area from 1.76 cm2 to 2.0 cm2. The experiment was conducted on 18 male laboratory rats to examine the effectiveness of current method and control the depth and area of the defect. As a result of the new methodology, we were able to carry out simulation skin injuries of different etiology on laboratory animals in the short term and reduce the severity of injuries to extend the life span of animals to monitor the repair processes, as well as to standardize the modeling of injuries according to the criteria of area and depth of the defect.

  9. Systematic group-specific trends for point defects in bcc transition metals: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Dudarev, S.L.; Horsfield, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the systematic trends of point defect behaviours in bcc transition metals. We found that in all non-magnetic bcc transition metals, the most stable self-interstitial atom (SIAs) defect configuration has the symmetry. The calculated formation energy differences between the dumbbell and the lowest-energy configuration of metals in group 5B (V, Nb, Ta) are consistently larger than those of the corresponding element in group 6B (Cr, Mo, W). The predicted trends of SIA defects are fundamentally different from those in ferromagnetic α-Fe and correlate very well with the pronounced group-specific variation of thermally activated migration of SIAs under irradiation depending on the position of bcc metals in the periodic table

  10. Testing and analysis of internal hardwood log defect prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The severity and location of internal defects determine the quality and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. Models have been developed to predict the size and position of internal defects based on external defect indicator measurements. These models were shown to predict approximately 80% of all internal knots based on external knot indicators. However, the size...

  11. Multiscale crystal defect dynamics: A coarse-grained lattice defect model based on crystal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Dandan; Li, Shaofan

    2017-10-01

    Crystal defects have microstructure, and this microstructure should be related to the microstructure of the original crystal. Hence each type of crystals may have similar defects due to the same failure mechanism originated from the same microstructure, if they are under the same loading conditions. In this work, we propose a multiscale crystal defect dynamics (MCDD) model that models defects by considering its intrinsic microstructure derived from the microstructure or material genome of the original perfect crystal. The main novelties of present work are: (1) the discrete exterior calculus and algebraic topology theory are used to construct a scale-up (coarse-grained) dual lattice model for crystal defects, which may represent all possible defect modes inside a crystal; (2) a higher order Cauchy-Born rule (up to the fourth order) is adopted to construct atomistic-informed constitutive relations for various defect process zones, and (3) an hierarchical strain gradient theory based finite element formulation is developed to support an hierarchical multiscale cohesive (process) zone model for various defects in a unified formulation. The efficiency of MCDD computational algorithm allows us to simulate dynamic defect evolution at large scale while taking into account atomistic interaction. The MCDD model has been validated by comparing of the results of MCDD simulations with that of molecular dynamics (MD) in the cases of nanoindentation and uniaxial tension. Numerical simulations have shown that MCDD model can predict dislocation nucleation induced instability and inelastic deformation, and thus it may provide an alternative solution to study crystal plasticity.

  12. Supersymmetric defect models and mirror symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2013-11-01

    We study supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions doped by various configurations of electric charges or magnetic fluxes. These are supersymmetric avatars of impurity models. In the presence of additional sources such configurations are shown to preserve half of the supersymmetries. Mirror symmetry relates the two sets of configurations. We discuss the implications for impurity models in 3d NN = 4 QED with a single charged hypermultiplet (and its mirror, the theory of a free hypermultiplet) as well as 3d NN = 2 QED with one flavor and its dual, a supersymmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Mirror symmetry allows us to find backreacted solutions for arbitrary arrays of defects in the IR limit of NN = 4 QED. Our analysis, complemented with appropriate string theory brane constructions, sheds light on various aspects of mirror symmetry, the map between particles and vortices and the emergence of ground state entropy in QED at finite density.

  13. Validation of an internal hardwood log defect prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The type, size, and location of internal defects dictate the grade and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. However, acquiring internal defect knowledge with x-ray/computed-tomography or magnetic-resonance imaging technology can be expensive both in time and cost. An alternative approach uses prediction models based on correlations among external defect indicators...

  14. A detailed model for defect concentration and dopant activation in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We have also included Si and related defects when this element is implanted as an n-type dopant. All these defects are considered in several charge states allowed by their stability conditions. The model assumes thermodynamic equilibrium between the point defects at an anneal temperature. Then the GaAs wafer.

  15. Accurate modeling of defects in graphene transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Lukas; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Libisch, Florian

    2018-01-01

    We present an approach for embedding defect structures modeled by density functional theory into large-scale tight-binding simulations. We extract local tight-binding parameters for the vicinity of the defect site using Wannier functions. In the transition region between the bulk lattice and the defect the tight-binding parameters are continuously adjusted to approach the bulk limit far away from the defect. This embedding approach allows for an accurate high-level treatment of the defect orbitals using as many as ten nearest neighbors while keeping a small number of nearest neighbors in the bulk to render the overall computational cost reasonable. As an example of our approach, we consider an extended graphene lattice decorated with Stone-Wales defects, flower defects, double vacancies, or silicon substitutes. We predict distinct scattering patterns mirroring the defect symmetries and magnitude that should be experimentally accessible.

  16. Defect modelling of martensitic transformations in NiTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.C.; Nixon, T.

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical understanding of interfacial defects enable both the deformation and extent of diffusional flux associated with defect motion during phase transformation to be determined quantitatively. In the present paper this appreciation is used to show that transformations which proceed by the generation, motion and interaction of interfacial defects can only be diffusionless when special crystallographic circumstances pertain. The principal steps in modelling such transformations are outlined, and the results for the case of NiTi are presented. (orig.)

  17. Folic acid supplements to prevent neural tube defects: trends in East of Ireland 1996-2002.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, M

    2004-10-01

    Promotion of folic acid to prevent neural Tube Defects (NTD) has been ongoing for ten years in Ireland, without a concomitant reduction in the total birth prevalence of NTD. The effectiveness of folic acid promotion as the sole means of primary prevention of NTD is therefore questionable. We examined trends in folic acid knowledge and peri-conceptional use from 1996-2002 with the aim of assessing the value of this approach. From 1996-2002, 300 women attending ante-natal clinics in Dublin hospitals annually were surveyed regarding their knowledge and use of folic acid. During the period the proportion who had heard of folic acid rose from 54% to 94% between 1996 and 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Knowledge that folic acid can prevent NTD also rose from 21% to 66% (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Although the proportion who took folic acid during pregnancy increased from 14% to 83% from 1996 to 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001), peri-conceptional intake did not rise above 24% in any year. There is a high awareness of folic acid and its relation to NTD, which is not matched by peri-conceptional uptake. The main barrier to peri-conceptional uptake is the lack of pregnancy planning. To date promotional campaigns appear to have been ineffective in reducing the prevalence of NTD in Ireland. Consequently, fortification of staple foodstuffs is the only practical and reliable means of primary prevention of NTD.

  18. Changing trend in congenital abdominal wall defects in Eastern region of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2002-09-01

    In the past six years, there have been reports from abroad of an unexplained rise in the birth prevalence rate of the congenital abdominal wall defect gastroschisis, while rates for the macroscopically similar anomaly omphalocoele have remained stable. The Dublin EUROCAT Registry of congenital anomalies monitors trends in the birth prevalence of birth defects in the eastern region of Ireland. We analysed births of children with omphalocoele and gastroschisis born in the period 1981-2000, with comparisons of a number of demographic and obstetric variables. During the 20 year period the birth prevalence rate for omphalocoele remained stable at 2.5\\/10,000 births, whereas the rate for gastroschisis increased significantly during the 1990s from 1.0\\/10,000 in 1991 to 4.9\\/10,000 in 2000. Most of the increase occurred among mothers under 25 years of age. Omphalocoele was associated with a relatively high proportion of other major congenital anomalies. This study showed that there has been an unexpected rise in the birth prevalence of gastroschisis in the region, similar to that experienced in other countries in the same time period and likely to have common aetiological features.

  19. Energy models: methods and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, A.; Kuehner, R.; Wohlgemuth, N.

    1996-01-01

    Energy environmental and economical systems do not allow for experimentation since this would be dangerous, too expensive or even impossible. Instead, mathematical models are applied for energy planning. Experimenting is replaced by varying the structure and some parameters of 'energy models', computing the values of depending parameters, comparing variations, and interpreting their outcomings. Energy models are as old as computers. In this article the major new developments in energy modeling will be pointed out. We distinguish between 3 reasons of new developments: progress in computer technology, methodological progress and novel tasks of energy system analysis and planning

  20. Localized defects in classical one-dimensional models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, L.H.; Griffiths, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Several aspects of localized defects in the Frenkel-Kontorova, classical XY chain and analogous models with a finite range of interactions are discussed from a general point of view. Precise definitions are given for defect phase shifts (charges) and for creation, pinning, and interaction energies. Corresponding definitions are also provided for interfaces (localized regions separating two phases). For the nearest-neighbor Frenkel-Kontorova model, the various defect energies are related to areas enclosed by contours joining heteroclinic points of the area-preserving map generated by the conditions of mechanical equilibrium

  1. Interproximal periodontal defect model in dogs: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, U-W; Chang, Y-Y; Um, Y-J; Kim, C-S; Cho, K-S; Choi, S-H

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validity of a surgically created interproximal periodontal defect in dogs. Surgery was performed in the interproximal area between the maxillary second and third premolars in two beagle dogs. Following an incision and reflection of the gingival flap, a 3-mm wide and 5-mm high defect was prepared surgically at the interproximal area. A thorough root planing was performed and the flap was coronally positioned and sutured. The contra-lateral area was served as the control with no surgical intervention. After 8 weeks of healing, the animals were killed and the defect was analysed histometrically and radiographically. The interproximal periodontal defect resembled a naturally occurring defect and mimicked a clinical situation. After healing, the defect showed limited bone (0.89±0.02mm) and cementum regeneration (1.50± 0.48mm). Within the limitations of this pilot study, the interproximal periodontal defect showed limited bone and cementum regeneration. Thus, it can be considered as a standardized, reproducible defect model for testing new biomaterials. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Self-consistent tight-binding investigation of chemical trends for native defects in III-V semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, W.; Strehlow, R.; Hanke, M.

    1987-01-01

    Using the recently developed charge self-consistent version of the empirical tight-binding method (ETBM) in conjunction with the Koster-Slater scattering-theoretic approach the electronic properties induced by the substitutional native point defects (anion and cation antisite defect, anion and cation vacancy) in the six III-V semiconductors GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, and InSb are investigated. The calculations include the neutral and possible charged states of the defects. Chemical trends in the energetic position of gap states, the orbital composition, and the localization of the defect wave function are discussed and compared with other theoretical and experimental findings. (author)

  3. Reliable critical sized defect rodent model for cleft palate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Nesrine Z; Doschak, Michael R; Major, Paul W; Talwar, Reena

    2014-12-01

    Suitable animal models are necessary to test the efficacy of new bone grafting therapies in cleft palate surgery. Rodent models of cleft palate are available but have limitations. This study compared and modified mid-palate cleft (MPC) and alveolar cleft (AC) models to determine the most reliable and reproducible model for bone grafting studies. Published MPC model (9 × 5 × 3 mm(3)) lacked sufficient information for tested rats. Our initial studies utilizing AC model (7 × 4 × 3 mm(3)) in 8 and 16 weeks old Sprague Dawley (SD) rats revealed injury to adjacent structures. After comparing anteroposterior and transverse maxillary dimensions in 16 weeks old SD and Wistar rats, virtual planning was performed to modify MPC and AC defects dimensions, taking the adjacent structures into consideration. Modified MPC (7 × 2.5 × 1 mm(3)) and AC (5 × 2.5 × 1 mm(3)) defects were employed in 16 weeks old Wistar rats and healing was monitored by micro-computed tomography and histology. Maxillary dimensions in SD and Wistar rats were not significantly different. Preoperative virtual planning enhanced postoperative surgical outcomes. Bone healing occurred at defect margin leaving central bone void confirming the critical size nature of the modified MPC and AC defects. Presented modifications for MPC and AC models created clinically relevant and reproducible defects. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Recombination models for defects in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steingrube, Silke

    2011-07-06

    Rocombination of charge carriers via defects is a substantial loss mechanism in solar cells. In this work, recombination models for three defect types in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells are developed and analyzed. First, a model is developed to describe the injection dependence of the effective surface recombination velocity S{sub eff} of both SiN{sub x} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivated c-Si surfaces. This model relies on a damaged layer in the silicon close to the interface. A suitable parametrization is given that allows to reproduce the measured effective surface recombination velocity S{sub eff} of the investigated interfaces for all relevant injection densities and dopant densities. With the help of this model, we discuss possible reasons for the damage on a microscopic scale. Second, the interface between amorphous and crystalline silicon is investigated. A Shockley-Read-Hall (SRF) model is suggested to approximate the amphoteric properties of the defects at the interface. In contrast to the exact model, the approximate model has a closed-form-solution and is therefore easily integrated into device simulators. Physically motivated error bounds are derived which can help to decide in which cases the simplified model may be applied. For typical injection densities at interfaces, the error of the SRH model is small if the correlation energy of the donor- und acceptor-like defect distribution is positive and if the properties of charged defects are described by asymmetric capture cross sections for electrons and holes. In addition, the defect distribution must lie in between the quasi-Fermi levels for traps. In low-injection, e.g. when applied to the p-n junction of a solar cell or at low illumination levels, it may fail dramatically. Further, dark current-voltage curves (I-V curves) of c-Si solar cells having diode-ideality factors n{sub D} > 2 in forward direction, i.e. increase sub-exponentially in certain voltage ranges, are analyzed. These &apos

  5. Impact of model defect and experimental uncertainties on evaluated output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudecker, D.; Capote, R.; Leeb, H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the current major problems in nuclear data evaluation is the unreasonably small evaluated uncertainties often obtained. These small uncertainties are partly attributed to missing correlations of experimental uncertainties as well as to deficiencies of the model employed for the prior information. In this article, both uncertainty sources are included in an evaluation of 55 Mn cross-sections for incident neutrons. Their impact on the evaluated output is studied using a prior obtained by the Full Bayesian Evaluation Technique and a prior obtained by the nuclear model program EMPIRE. It is shown analytically and by means of an evaluation that unreasonably small evaluated uncertainties can be obtained not only if correlated systematic uncertainties of the experiment are neglected but also if prior uncertainties are smaller or about the same magnitude as the experimental ones. Furthermore, it is shown that including model defect uncertainties in the evaluation of 55 Mn leads to larger evaluated uncertainties for channels where the model is deficient. It is concluded that including correlated experimental uncertainties is equally important as model defect uncertainties, if the model calculations deviate significantly from the measurements. -- Highlights: • We study possible causes of unreasonably small evaluated nuclear data uncertainties. • Two different formulations of model defect uncertainties are presented and compared. • Smaller prior than experimental uncertainties cause too small evaluated ones. • Neglected correlations of experimental uncertainties cause too small evaluated ones. • Including model defect uncertainties in the prior improves the evaluated output

  6. Modelling of transport phenomena and defects in crystal growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A brief review of single crystal growth techniques and the associated problems is presented. Emphasis is placed on models for various transport and defect phenomena involoved in the growth process with the ultimate aim of integrating them into a comprehensive numerical model. The sources of dislocation nucleation in ...

  7. Modelling of defects in ingot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter

    The present report presents an investigation of the ingot forging process with special emphasis on modelling the influence of die geometry on the soundness of the ingot after hot forging. An investigation on how to model damage is also performed. The influence of the lower die angle is quantified...... angle of 130o-140o giving rise to the largest centreline porosity closure regardless of material hardening behaviour applied. Friction was found only to have minor influence on the optimum. Multi stroke forging operations have also been modelled since the ingot forging process consists of many forging...

  8. Modeling and experimental characterization of stepped and v-shaped (311) defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marqués, Luis A., E-mail: lmarques@ele.uva.es; Aboy, María [Departamento de Electrónica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. de Telecomunicación, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Dudeck, Karleen J.; Botton, Gianluigi A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Knights, Andrew P. [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Gwilliam, Russell M. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-14

    We propose an atomistic model to describe extended (311) defects in silicon. It is based on the combination of interstitial and bond defect chains. The model is able to accurately reproduce not only planar (311) defects but also defect structures that show steps, bends, or both. We use molecular dynamics techniques to show that these interstitial and bond defect chains spontaneously transform into extended (311) defects. Simulations are validated by comparing with precise experimental measurements on actual (311) defects. The excellent agreement between the simulated and experimentally derived structures, regarding individual atomic positions and shape of the distinct structural (311) defect units, provides strong evidence for the robustness of the proposed model.

  9. Compact Models for Defect Diffusivity in Semiconductor Alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Lee, Stephen R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Sciences Department; Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Materials and Data Science Department

    2017-09-01

    Predicting transient effects caused by short - pulse neutron irradiation of electronic devices is an important part of Sandia's mission. For example , predicting the diffusion of radiation - induced point defects is needed with in Sandia's Qualification Alternative to the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (QASPR) pro gram since defect diffusion mediates transient gain recovery in QASPR electronic devices. Recently, the semiconductors used to fabricate radiation - hard electronic devices have begun to shift from silicon to III - V compounds such as GaAs, InAs , GaP and InP . An advantage of this shift is that it allows engineers to optimize the radiation hardness of electronic devices by using alloy s such as InGaAs and InGaP . However, the computer codes currently being used to simulate transient radiation effects in QASP R devices will need to be modified since they presume that defect properties (charge states, energy levels, and diffusivities) in these alloys do not change with time. This is not realistic since the energy and properties of a defect depend on the types of atoms near it and , therefore, on its location in the alloy. In particular, radiation - induced defects are created at nearly random locations in an alloy and the distribution of their local environments - and thus their energies and properties - evolves with time as the defects diffuse through the alloy . To incorporate these consequential effects into computer codes used to simulate transient radiation effects, we have developed procedures to accurately compute the time dependence of defect energies and properties and then formulate them within compact models that can be employed in these computer codes. In this document, we demonstrate these procedures for the case of the highly mobile P interstitial (I P ) in an InGaP alloy. Further dissemination only as authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contractors; other requests shall be approved by the originating facility or higher DOE

  10. Microstructural defects modeling in the Al-Mo system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascuet, Maria I.; Fernandez, Julian R.; Monti, Ana M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we have utilized computer simulation techniques to study microstructural defects, such as point defects and interfaces, in the Al-Mo alloy. Such alloy is taken as a model to study the Al(fcc)/U-Mo(bcc) interface. The EAM interatomic potential used has been fitted to the formation energy and lattice constant of the AlMo 3 intermetallic. Formation of vacancies for both components Al and Mo and anti-sites, Al Mo and Mo Al , as well as vacancy migration was studied in this structure. We found that the lowest energy defect complex that preserves stoichiometry is the antisite pair Al Mo +Mo Al , in correspondence with other intermetallics of the same structure. Our results also suggest that the structure of the Al(fcc)/Mo(bcc) interface is unstable, while that of the Al(fcc)/Al 5 Mo interface is stable, as observed experimentally. (author) [es

  11. Extracting software static defect models using data mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Yousef

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Large software projects are subject to quality risks of having defective modules that will cause failures during the software execution. Several software repositories contain source code of large projects that are composed of many modules. These software repositories include data for the software metrics of these modules and the defective state of each module. In this paper, a data mining approach is used to show the attributes that predict the defective state of software modules. Software solution architecture is proposed to convert the extracted knowledge into data mining models that can be integrated with the current software project metrics and bugs data in order to enhance the prediction. The results show better prediction capabilities when all the algorithms are combined using weighted votes. When only one individual algorithm is used, Naïve Bayes algorithm has the best results, then the Neural Network and the Decision Trees algorithms.

  12. Defected Ground Structure: Fundamentals, Analysis, and Applications in Modern Wireless Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Khandelwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Slots or defects integrated on the ground plane of microwave planar circuits are referred to as Defected Ground Structure. DGS is adopted as an emerging technique for improving the various parameters of microwave circuits, that is, narrow bandwidth, cross-polarization, low gain, and so forth. This paper presents an introduction and evolution of DGS and how DGS is different from former technologies: PBG and EBG. A basic concept behind the DGS technology and several theoretical techniques for analysing the Defected Ground Structure are discussed. Several applications of DGS in the field of filters, planar waveguides, amplifiers, and antennas are presented.

  13. New trends in species distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Edwards, Thomas C.; Graham, Catherine H.; Pearman, Peter B.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Species distribution modelling has its origin in the late 1970s when computing capacity was limited. Early work in the field concentrated mostly on the development of methods to model effectively the shape of a species' response to environmental gradients (Austin 1987, Austin et al. 1990). The methodology and its framework were summarized in reviews 10–15 yr ago (Franklin 1995, Guisan and Zimmermann 2000), and these syntheses are still widely used as reference landmarks in the current distribution modelling literature. However, enormous advancements have occurred over the last decade, with hundreds – if not thousands – of publications on species distribution model (SDM) methodologies and their application to a broad set of conservation, ecological and evolutionary questions. With this special issue, originating from the third of a set of specialized SDM workshops (2008 Riederalp) entitled 'The Utility of Species Distribution Models as Tools for Conservation Ecology', we reflect on current trends and the progress achieved over the last decade.

  14. Modeling the relationships among internal defect features and external Appalachian hardwood log defect indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a hardwood tree grows and develops, surface defects such as branch stubs and wounds are overgrown. Evidence of these defects remain on the log surface for decades and in many instances for the life of the tree. As the tree grows the defect is encapsulated or grown over by new wood. During this process the appearance of the defect in the tree's bark changes. The...

  15. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamburoglu, Kivanc; Kursun, Sebnem; Kilic, Cenk; Eozen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60 X 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm 3 (FOV 60 ); 2) 80 X 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm 3 (FOV 80 ); and 3) 100 X 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm 3 (FOV 100 ). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements.

  16. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamburoglu, Kivanc [Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Kursun, Sebnem [Division of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Ministry of Health, Oral and Dental Health Center, Bolu (Turkmenistan); Kilic, Cenk; Eozen, Tuncer [Gealhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, (Turkmenistan)

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60 X 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 60}); 2) 80 X 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 80}); and 3) 100 X 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 100}). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements.

  17. A Proposal for a Flexible Trend Specification in DSGE Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slanicay Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I propose a flexible trend specification for estimating DSGE models on log differences. I demonstrate this flexible trend specification on a New Keynesian DSGE model of two economies, which I consequently estimate on data from the Czech economy and the euro area, using Bayesian techniques. The advantage of the trend specification proposed is that the trend component and the cyclical component are modelled jointly in a single model. The proposed trend specification is flexible in the sense that smoothness of the trend can be easily modified by different calibration of some of the trend parameters. The results suggest that this method is capable of finding a very reasonable trend in the data. Moreover, comparison of forecast performance reveals that the proposed specification offers more reliable forecasts than the original variant of the model.

  18. Working Towards a Risk Prediction Model for Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, A.J.; Lupo, Philip J.; Tinker, Sarah C.; Canfield, Mark A.; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several risk factors have been consistently associated with neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the predictive ability of these risk factors in combination has not been evaluated. METHODS To assess the predictive ability of established risk factors for NTDs, we built predictive models using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, which is a large, population-based study of nonsyndromic birth defects. Cases with spina bifida or anencephaly, or both (n = 1239), and controls (n = 8494) were randomly divided into separate training (75% of cases and controls) and validation (remaining 25%) samples. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed with the training samples. The predictive ability of these models was evaluated in the validation samples by assessing the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves. An ordinal predictive risk index was also constructed and evaluated. In addition, the ability of classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to identify subgroups of women at increased risk for NTDs in offspring was evaluated. RESULTS The predictive ability of the multivariable models was poor (area under the receiver operating curve: 0.55 for spina bifida only, 0.59 for anencephaly only, and 0.56 for anencephaly and spina bifida combined). The predictive abilities of the ordinal risk indexes and CART models were also low. CONCLUSION Current established risk factors for NTDs are insufficient for population-level prediction of a women’s risk for having affected offspring. Identification of genetic risk factors and novel nongenetic risk factors will be critical to establishing models, with good predictive ability, for NTDs. PMID:22253139

  19. Modeling Alaska boreal forests with a controlled trend surface approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo Zhou; Jingjing Liang

    2012-01-01

    An approach of Controlled Trend Surface was proposed to simultaneously take into consideration large-scale spatial trends and nonspatial effects. A geospatial model of the Alaska boreal forest was developed from 446 permanent sample plots, which addressed large-scale spatial trends in recruitment, diameter growth, and mortality. The model was tested on two sets of...

  20. Assessing climate model software quality: a defect density analysis of three models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pipitone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A climate model is an executable theory of the climate; the model encapsulates climatological theories in software so that they can be simulated and their implications investigated. Thus, in order to trust a climate model, one must trust that the software it is built from is built correctly. Our study explores the nature of software quality in the context of climate modelling. We performed an analysis of defect reports and defect fixes in several versions of leading global climate models by collecting defect data from bug tracking systems and version control repository comments. We found that the climate models all have very low defect densities compared to well-known, similarly sized open-source projects. We discuss the implications of our findings for the assessment of climate model software trustworthiness.

  1. Trends in development of innovative business models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The companies doing business in global markets are now compelled to do it in conditions of permanent and turbulent changes. In order to succeed within that kind of environment in the long run, they are to innovate and to continuously strengthen their own innovative strength. Consideration of gaining its own innovative strength becomes top agenda issue of strategic companies. To that purpose, this paper presents the shortened results of a desktop theoretical research that has been undertaken to improve the innovative power of companies. The survey and subsequent analysis identified relevant innovative business models (IBM of companies, some of which briefly presented (CANVAS, SHARE, and WOIS BLUE OCEAN Strategy, which now form the current IBM trend.

  2. Rag defects and thymic stroma: lessons from animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eMarrella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs cross-talk is essential to support T-cell development and preserve thymic architecture and maturation of TECs and Foxp3+ natural regulatory T (nTreg cells. Accordingly, disruption of thymic lymphostromal cross-talk may have major implications on the thymic mechanisms that govern T cell tolerance. Several genetic defects have been described in humans that affect early stages of T cell development (leading to Severe Combined Immune Deficiency, SCID or late stages in thymocyte maturation (resulting in combined immunodeficiency. Hypomorphic mutations in SCID-causing genes may allow for generation of a limited pool of T lymphocytes with a restricted repertoire. These conditions are often associated with infiltration of peripheral tissues by activated T cells and immune dysregulation, as best exemplified by Omenn syndrome (OS. In this review, we will discuss our recent findings on abnormalities of thymic microenvironment in OS with a special focus of defective maturation of TECs, altered distribution of thymic dendritic cells (DCs and impairment of deletional and non-deletional mechanisms of central tolerance. Here, taking advantage of mouse models of OS and atypical SCID, we will discuss how modifications in stromal compartment impact and shape lymphocyte differentiation, and vice versa how inefficient T cell signalling results in defective stromal maturation. These findings are instrumental to understand the extent to which novel therapeutic strategies should act on thymic stroma to achieve full immune reconstitution.

  3. Congenital tracheal defects: embryonic development and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Arooj Sher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal anomalies are potentially catastrophic congenital defects. As a newborn begins to breathe, the trachea needs to maintain an appropriate balance of elasticity and rigidity. If the tracheal cartilages are disorganized or structurally weak, the airways can collapse, obstructing breathing. Cartilage rings that are too small or too rigid can also obstruct breathing. These anomalies are frequently associated with craniofacial syndromes, and, despite the importance, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the spectrum of pathological phenotypes of the trachea and correlate them with the molecular events uncovered in mouse models.

  4. Defect scaling Lee–Yang model from the perturbed DCFT point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Bajnok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the defect scaling Lee–Yang model from the perturbed defect conformal field theory (DCFT point of view. First the defect Lee–Yang model is solved by calculating its structure constants from the sewing relations. Integrable defect perturbations are identified in conformal defect perturbation theory. Then pure defect flows connecting integrable conformal defects are described. We develop a defect truncated conformal space approach (DTCSA to analyze the one parameter family of integrable massive perturbations in finite volume numerically. Fusing the integrable defect to an integrable boundary the relation between the IR and UV parameters can be derived from the boundary relations. We checked these results by comparing the spectrum for large volumes to the scattering theory.

  5. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  6. Crystal and defect chemistry influences on band gap trends in alkaline earth perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonil; Woodford, William H.; Randall, Clive A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of perovskites with A-site alkaline earth chemistries being Ca, Sr, and Ba, and tetravalent cations including Ce, Zr, and Ti are measured for optical band gap and found to vary systematically with tolerance factor and lattice volume within limits defined by the chemistry of the octahedral site. This paper also focuses on the BaTiO 3 system, considering equilibrated nonstoichiometries, and determines the changes in band gap with respect to Ba/Ti ratios. It was found that the optical band gap changes in the solid solution regime and is invariant in the second phase regions, as would be expected. In the cases of Ba/Ti 1.0 stoichiometries, there is a distinct Urbach tail and the trend with lattice volume no longer holds. It is inferred that the V Ti q prime-2V O partial Schottky complex controls the band gap trend with Ba-rich nonstoichiometries

  7. Computational Modeling of Nondestructive Evaluation, Defect Detection, and Defect Identification for CFRP Composite Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work is to improve NDE state-of-the-art for detection and identification of manufacturing and service-initiated defects in CFRP...

  8. Cerebellar associative sensory learning defects in five mouse autism models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Alexander D; Badura, Aleksandra; Li, Amy; Cherskov, Adriana; Connolly, Sara G; Giovannucci, Andrea; Bangash, M Ali; Grasselli, Giorgio; Peñagarikano, Olga; Piochon, Claire; Tsai, Peter T; Geschwind, Daniel H; Hansel, Christian; Sahin, Mustafa; Takumi, Toru; Worley, Paul F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2015-01-01

    Sensory integration difficulties have been reported in autism, but their underlying brain-circuit mechanisms are underexplored. Using five autism-related mouse models, Shank3+/ΔC, Mecp2R308/Y, Cntnap2−/−, L7-Tsc1 (L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+), and patDp(15q11-13)/+, we report specific perturbations in delay eyeblink conditioning, a form of associative sensory learning requiring cerebellar plasticity. By distinguishing perturbations in the probability and characteristics of learned responses, we found that probability was reduced in Cntnap2−/−, patDp(15q11-13)/+, and L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+, which are associated with Purkinje-cell/deep-nuclear gene expression, along with Shank3+/ΔC. Amplitudes were smaller in L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+ as well as Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y, which are associated with granule cell pathway expression. Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y also showed aberrant response timing and reduced Purkinje-cell dendritic spine density. Overall, our observations are potentially accounted for by defects in instructed learning in the olivocerebellar loop and response representation in the granule cell pathway. Our findings indicate that defects in associative temporal binding of sensory events are widespread in autism mouse models. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06085.001 PMID:26158416

  9. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Physics Department, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  10. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates

  11. An Integrated Inventory Model with Controllable Lead time and Setup Cost Reduction for Defective and Non-Defective Items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vijayashree

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the study deals with the lead time and setup reduction problem in the vendor-purchaser integrated inventory model. The cost of capital (i.e., opportunity cost is one of the key factors in making the inventory and investment decisions. Lead time is an important element in any inventory system. The proposed model is presents an integrated inventory model with controllable lead time with setup cost reduction for defective and non defective items under investment for quality improvement. In this analysis, the proposed model, we assumed that the setup cost and process quality is logarithmic function. Setup cost reduction for defective and non defective items, is the main focus for the proposed model. The objective of the proposed model is to minimize the total cost of both the vendor-purchaser. The mathematical model is derived to investigate the effects to the optimal decisions when investment strategies in setup cost reductions are adopted. This paper attempts to determine optimal order quantity, lead time, process quality and setup cost reduction for production system such that the total cost is minimized. A solution procedure is developed to find the optimal solution and numerical examples are presented to illustrate the results of the proposed models.

  12. Modeling of the radionuclide release from an initially defective canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the effect of geochemical conditions of the repository on the release rate of radionuclides from an initially defective canister, a mathematical model is proposed. The model is based on the concept that ligands diffuse through the damage into the canister and form complexes with uranium, increasing its solubility. The complexes then diffuse out to the surroundings. Accordingly, the model combines a chemical equilibrium model for the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions, and a transport model for the release rate of uranium. The transport model takes into account the diffusion resistance in the damage as well as in the surrounding compacted bentonite clay and the water flow in the rock. Using this model, the sensitivity of the release rate of aqueous uranium species to the concentrations of various groundwater component species, to the diffusion coefficient and to other parameters is systematically investigated. The results show that, the concentrations of carbonate, phosphate, silicate and calcium species in deep groundwaters play the most important role in determining the release rate of radionuclides. The results help identify the key diffusion coefficients that are needed to obtain more reliable estimates of the release rate

  13. Evaluating Printability of Buried Native EUV Mask Phase Defects through a Modeling and Simulation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Mihir; Jindal, Vibhu; Basavalingappa, Adarsh; Herbol, Henry; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Jang, Il-Yong; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Marokkey, Sajan; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Pistor, Thomas V.; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2015-03-16

    The availability of defect-free masks is considered to be a critical issue for enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) as the next generation technology. Since completely defect-free masks will be hard to achieve, it is essential to have a good understanding of the printability of the native EUV mask defects. In this work, we performed a systematic study of native mask defects to understand the defect printability caused by them. The multilayer growth over native substrate mask blank defects was correlated to the multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects having similar profiles in terms of their width and height. To model the multilayer growth over the defects, a novel level-set multilayer growth model was used that took into account the tool deposition conditions of the Veeco Nexus ion beam deposition tool. The same tool was used for performing the actual deposition of the multilayer stack over the characterized native defects, thus ensuring a fair comparison between the actual multilayer growth over native defects, and modeled multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects. Further, the printability of the characterized native defects was studied with the SEMATECH-Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV mask-imaging microscope at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Printability of the modeled regular-shaped defects, which were propagated up the multilayer stack using level-set growth model was studied using defect printability simulations implementing the waveguide algorithm. Good comparison was observed between AIT and the simulation results, thus demonstrating that multilayer growth over a defect is primarily a function of a defect’s width and height, irrespective of its shape. This would allow us to predict printability of the arbitrarily-shaped native EUV mask defects in a systematic and robust manner.

  14. What do we know about the defect types detected in conceptual models?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granda, Maria Fernanda; Condori-Fernandez, Nelly; Vos, Tanja E.J.; Pastor, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    In Model-Driven Development (MDD), defects are managed at the level of conceptual models because the other artefacts are generated from them, such as more refined models, test cases and code. Although some studies have reported on defect types at model level, there still does not exist a clear and

  15. Modelled long term trends of surface ozone over South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available timescale seeks to provide a spatially comprehensive view of trends while also creating a baseline for comparisons with future projections of air quality through the forcing of air quality models with modelled predicted long term meteorology. Previous...

  16. Characterizing economic trends by Bayesian stochastic model specification search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassi, Stefano; Proietti, Tommaso

    on whether their parameters are fixed or evolutive. Stochastic model specification is carried out to discriminate two alternative hypotheses concerning the generation of trends: the trend-stationary hypothesis, on the one hand, for which the trend is a deterministic function of time and the short run...... dynamics are represented by a stationary autoregressive process; the difference-stationary hypothesis, on the other, according to which the trend results from the cumulation of the effects of random disturbances. We illustrate the methodology for a set of U.S. macroeconomic time series, which includes...

  17. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  18. SDG and qualitative trend based model multiple scale validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VV&A) is key technology of simulation and modelling. For the traditional model validation methods, the completeness is weak; it is carried out in one scale; it depends on human experience. The SDG (Signed Directed Graph) and qualitative trend based multiple scale validation is proposed. First the SDG model is built and qualitative trends are added to the model. And then complete testing scenarios are produced by positive inference. The multiple scale validation is carried out by comparing the testing scenarios with outputs of simulation model in different scales. Finally, the effectiveness is proved by carrying out validation for a reactor model.

  19. Transport-reaction model for defect and carrier behavior within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell,

    2014-02-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Charging of the defects can produce high electric fields within the cluster which may influence transport and reaction of carriers and defects, and which may enhance carrier recombination through band-to-trap tunneling. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to pulsed neutron irradiation.

  20. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  1. The negative binomial distribution as a model for external corrosion defect counts in buried pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valor, Alma; Alfonso, Lester; Caleyo, Francisco; Vidal, Julio; Perez-Baruch, Eloy; Hallen, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Observed external-corrosion defects in underground pipelines revealed a tendency to cluster. • The Poisson distribution is unable to fit extensive count data for these type of defects. • In contrast, the negative binomial distribution provides a suitable count model for them. • Two spatial stochastic processes lead to the negative binomial distribution for defect counts. • They are the Gamma-Poisson mixed process and the compound Poisson process. • A Rogeŕs process also arises as a plausible temporal stochastic process leading to corrosion defect clustering and to negative binomially distributed defect counts. - Abstract: The spatial distribution of external corrosion defects in buried pipelines is usually described as a Poisson process, which leads to corrosion defects being randomly distributed along the pipeline. However, in real operating conditions, the spatial distribution of defects considerably departs from Poisson statistics due to the aggregation of defects in groups or clusters. In this work, the statistical analysis of real corrosion data from underground pipelines operating in southern Mexico leads to conclude that the negative binomial distribution provides a better description for defect counts. The origin of this distribution from several processes is discussed. The analysed processes are: mixed Gamma-Poisson, compound Poisson and Roger’s processes. The physical reasons behind them are discussed for the specific case of soil corrosion.

  2. Canonical quantization of the WZW model with defects and Chern-Simons theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkissian, Gor

    2010-01-01

    model with $N$ defects on strip and Chern-Simons theory on disc times $R$ with $N+2$ Wilson lines. We obtained also symplectomorphism between phase space of the $N$-fold product of the WZW model with boundary conditions specified by permutation branes, and phase space of Chern-Simons theory on sphere......We perform canonical quantization of the WZW model with defects and permutation branes. We establish symplectomorphism between phase space of WZW model with $N$ defects on cylinder and phase space of Chern-Simons theory on annulus times $R$ with $N$ Wilson lines, and between phase space of WZW...

  3. Micro Surface Defect Detection Method for Silicon Steel Strip Based on Saliency Convex Active Contour Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kechen Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate detection of surface defect is an indispensable section in steel surface inspection system. In order to detect the micro surface defect of silicon steel strip, a new detection method based on saliency convex active contour model is proposed. In the proposed method, visual saliency extraction is employed to suppress the clutter background for the purpose of highlighting the potential objects. The extracted saliency map is then exploited as a feature, which is fused into a convex energy minimization function of local-based active contour. Meanwhile, a numerical minimization algorithm is introduced to separate the micro surface defects from cluttered background. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method presents good performance for detecting micro surface defects including spot-defect and steel-pit-defect. Even in the cluttered background, the proposed method detects almost all of the microdefects without any false objects.

  4. Tissue specific mutagenic and carcinogenic responses in NER defective mouse models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Hoogervorst, Esther M; Waard, Harm de; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der; Steeg, Harry van

    2007-01-01

    Several mouse models with defects in genes encoding components of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway have been developed. In NER two different sub-pathways are known, i.e. transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) and global-genome repair (GG-NER). A defect in one particular NER protein can

  5. Biomechanics trends in modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ogden, Ray

    2017-01-01

    The book presents a state-of-the-art overview of biomechanical and mechanobiological modeling and simulation of soft biological tissues. Seven well-known scientists working in that particular field discuss topics such as biomolecules, networks and cells as well as failure, multi-scale, agent-based, bio-chemo-mechanical and finite element models appropriate for computational analysis. Applications include arteries, the heart, vascular stents and valve implants as well as adipose, brain, collagenous and engineered tissues. The mechanics of the whole cell and sub-cellular components as well as the extracellular matrix structure and mechanotransduction are described. In particular, the formation and remodeling of stress fibers, cytoskeletal contractility, cell adhesion and the mechanical regulation of fibroblast migration in healing myocardial infarcts are discussed. The essential ingredients of continuum mechanics are provided. Constitutive models of fiber-reinforced materials with an emphasis on arterial walls ...

  6. New Trends, News Values, and New Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Mary Anne

    1996-01-01

    Explores implications of the prediction that in the next millennium the public will experience a scarcity of knowledge and a surplus of information. Reviews research suggesting that journalists focus on these news values: emphasizing how/why, devaluing immediacy, specializing/analyzing, representing a constituency. Examines two new models of…

  7. Trend-Stationarity in the I(2) Cointegration Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Anders; Kongsted, H.C.; Jørgensen, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    A vector autoregressive model for I(2) processes which allows for trend-stationary components and restricts the deterministic part of the process to be at most linear is defined. A two-step statistical analysis of the model is derived. The joint test of I(1) and I(2) cointegrating ranks is shown ...

  8. Trends in cytogenetic testing and identification of chromosomal abnormalities among pregnancies and children with birth defects, metropolitan Atlanta, 1968-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jodi M; Crider, Krista S; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Cragan, Janet D; Olney, Richard S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the use of cytogenetic testing and identification of chromosomal abnormalities among pregnancies and children with birth defects. Utilizing data from 1968 to 2005 from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, we analyzed trends in the frequency and timing (prenatal or postnatal) of cytogenetic testing and the prevalence of recognized chromosome abnormalities among pregnancies and children with birth defects (n = 51,424). Cytogenetic testing of pregnancies and children with birth defects increased from 7.2% in 1968 to 25.0% in 2005, as did the identification of chromosomal abnormalities (2.2% in 1968 to 6.8% in 2005). The use of prenatal cytogenetic testing decreased from 1996 to 2005 among women aged ≥35 years. Identification of chromosomal abnormalities in pregnancies and children with birth defects increased from 1968 to 2005, possibly due to increased testing, improved diagnostic techniques, or increasing maternal age. The decline in prenatal cytogenetic testing observed among mothers aged ≥35 years may be related to the availability of improved prenatal screening techniques, resulting in a reduction in the utilization of invasive diagnostic tests. Published 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Behaviour of defective CANDU fuel: fuel oxidation kinetic and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal performance of operating CANDU fuel under defect conditions is affected by the ingress of heavy water into the fuel element. A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the extent of fuel oxidation in defective fuel and its affect on fuel thermal performance. A thermodynamic treatment of such oxidized fuel has been performed as a basis for the boundary conditions in the kinetic model. Both the kinetic and thermodynamic models have been benchmarked against recent experimental work. (author)

  10. Recent trends in specialty pharma business model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannching Sherry Ku

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent rise of specialty pharma is attributed to its flexible, versatile, and open business model while the traditional big pharma is facing a challenging time with patent cliff, generic threat, and low research and development (R&D productivity. These multinational pharmaceutical companies, facing a difficult time, have been systematically externalizing R&D and some even establish their own corporate venture capital so as to diversify with more shots on goal, with the hope of achieving a higher success rate in their compound pipeline. Biologics and clinical Phase II proof-of-concept (POC compounds are the preferred licensing and collaboration targets. Biologics enjoys a high success rate with a low generic biosimilar threat, while the need is high for clinical Phase II POC compounds, due to its high attrition/low success rate. Repurposing of big pharma leftover compounds is a popular strategy but with limitations. Most old compounds come with baggage either in lackluster clinical performance or short in patent life. Orphan drugs is another area which has gained popularity in recent years. The shorter and less costly regulatory pathway provides incentives, especially for smaller specialty pharma. However, clinical studies on orphan drugs require a large network of clinical operations in many countries in order to recruit enough patients. Big pharma is also working on orphan drugs starting with a small indication, with the hope of expanding the indication into a blockbuster status. Specialty medicine, including orphan drugs, has become the growth engine in the pharmaceutical industry worldwide. Big pharma is also keen on in-licensing technology or projects from specialty pharma to extend product life cycles, in order to protect their blockbuster drug franchises. Ample opportunities exist for smaller players, even in the emerging countries, to collaborate with multinational pharmaceutical companies provided that the technology platforms or

  11. Recent trends in specialty pharma business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Mannching Sherry

    2015-12-01

    The recent rise of specialty pharma is attributed to its flexible, versatile, and open business model while the traditional big pharma is facing a challenging time with patent cliff, generic threat, and low research and development (R&D) productivity. These multinational pharmaceutical companies, facing a difficult time, have been systematically externalizing R&D and some even establish their own corporate venture capital so as to diversify with more shots on goal, with the hope of achieving a higher success rate in their compound pipeline. Biologics and clinical Phase II proof-of-concept (POC) compounds are the preferred licensing and collaboration targets. Biologics enjoys a high success rate with a low generic biosimilar threat, while the need is high for clinical Phase II POC compounds, due to its high attrition/low success rate. Repurposing of big pharma leftover compounds is a popular strategy but with limitations. Most old compounds come with baggage either in lackluster clinical performance or short in patent life. Orphan drugs is another area which has gained popularity in recent years. The shorter and less costly regulatory pathway provides incentives, especially for smaller specialty pharma. However, clinical studies on orphan drugs require a large network of clinical operations in many countries in order to recruit enough patients. Big pharma is also working on orphan drugs starting with a small indication, with the hope of expanding the indication into a blockbuster status. Specialty medicine, including orphan drugs, has become the growth engine in the pharmaceutical industry worldwide. Big pharma is also keen on in-licensing technology or projects from specialty pharma to extend product life cycles, in order to protect their blockbuster drug franchises. Ample opportunities exist for smaller players, even in the emerging countries, to collaborate with multinational pharmaceutical companies provided that the technology platforms or specialty medicinal

  12. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-07-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  13. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO 2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  14. A Trend Model for Alzheimer’s Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Örjan Hallberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, mortality rates from Alzheimer’s disease have increased since early 90’s.  In this study, we compared rates reported from 2006-2012 with projected trends determined previously and found a good fit.  The objective of this study was to investigate if increased mortality can be modeled as a single exponential function of time lived in a new environment, where the risk of dying from Alzheimer’s disease has been increased.  The results demonstrated that the exponential model can be used to predict future mortalities for different scenarios, and that it can also project age-specific trends.  We conclude that increasing mortality rates from Alzheimer’s disease seem caused by an environmental change introduced since the 1990’s.  Since similar trend breaks also have been reported for different cancers, responsible authorities should seriously address this problem to pinpoint causative factors.

  15. Bone tissue ultrastructural defects in a mouse model for osteogenesis imperfecta: a Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsoching; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.

    2004-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is genetic defect in which the genes that code for the α1(I) or α2(I) chains of type I collagen are defective. The defects often result in substitution of a bulky amino acid for glycine, causing formation of collagen that can not form the normal triple helix. Depending on the details of the defects, the outcomes range from controllable to lethal. This study focuses on OI type IV, a more common and moderately severe form of the disease. People with the disease have a substantial increase in the risk and rate of fracture. We examine the spectroscopic consequences of these defects, using a mouse model (BRTL) that mimics OI type IV. We compare Raman images from tibial cortical tissue of wild-type mice and BRTL mice with single copy of mutation and show that both mineral to matrix ratios and collagen inter-fibril cross-links are different in wild-type and mutant mice.

  16. Modeling of electric-field enhancement at nodular defects in dielectric mirror coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFord, J.F.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    In dielectric multilayer optical coatings, laser induced damage is often associated with μm-scale surface defects such as the well known nodule defect. The interaction mechanism of the laser light with the coating defects is not understood, however. Historically, laser damage has been associated with peaks in the standing-wave electric-field distribution within the multilayer films. In the present work we use a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic modeling code to study the influence of 3-D nodule defects on the E-field distribution. The coating studied is a dielectric multilayer HR consisting of alternating quarter-wave layers of HfO 2 and SiO 2 at 1.06 μm. The nodule is modeled as a parabolic defect initiated at a spherical seed. The modeling results show that E-field enhancements as large as a factor of 4 can be present at the defects. The enhancement shows a complex dependence on the size, depth and dielectric constant of the seed material. In general, defects initiated ,by large, shallow seeds produce the largest E-fields. Voids at the nodule boundary influence the E-field distribution, but have a small effect on the peak field

  17. Modelling Defects Acceptors And Determination Of Electric Model From The Nyquist Plot And Bode In Thin Film CIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demba Diallo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of the chalcopyrite material CuInGaSe2 CIGS used as an absorber layer in thin-film photovoltaic devices is significantly affected by the presence of native defects. Multivalent defects e.g. double acceptors or simple acceptor are important immaterial used in solar cell production in general and in chalcopyrite materials in particular. We used the thin film solar cell simulation software SCAPS to enable the simulation of multivalent defects with up to five different charge states.Algorithms enabled us to simulate an arbitrary number of possible states of load. The presented solution method avoids numerical inaccuracies caused by the subtraction of two almost equal numbers. This new modelling facility is afterwards used to investigate the consequences of the multivalent character of defects for the simulation of chalcopyrite based CIGS. The capacitance increase with the evolution of the number of defects C- f curves have found to have defect dependence.

  18. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  19. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense UMR 6087, Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France)

    2011-04-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  20. Modelling of trends in twitter using retweet graph dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thij, M. ten; Ouboter, T.M.; Worm, D.T.H.; Litvak, N.; Berg, J.L. van den; Bhulai, S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we model user behaviour in Twitter to capture the emergence of trending topics. For this purpose, we first extensively analyse tweet datasets of several different events. In particular, for these datasets, we construct and investigate the retweet graphs. We find that the retweet graph

  1. Automatic geometric modeling, mesh generation and FE analysis for pipelines with idealized defects and arbitrary location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, R.S.; Afonso, S.M.B.; Willmersdorf, R.B.; Lyra, P.R.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Cabral, H.L.D. [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Andrade, E.Q. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Although the Finite Element Method (FEM) has proved to be a powerful tool to predict the failure pressure of corroded pipes, the generation of good computational models of pipes with corrosion defects can take several days. This makes the use of computational simulation procedure difficult to apply in practice. The main purpose of this work is to develop a set of computational tools to produce automatically models of pipes with defects, ready to be analyzed with commercial FEM programs, starting from a few parameters that locate and provide the main dimensions of the defect or a series of defects. Here these defects can be internal and external and also assume general spatial locations along the pipe. Idealized rectangular and elliptic geometries can be generated. These tools were based on MSC.PATRAN pre and post-processing programs and were written with PCL (Patran Command Language). The program for the automatic generation of models (PIPEFLAW) has a simplified and customized graphical interface, so that an engineer with basic notions of computational simulation with the FEM can generate rapidly models that result in precise and reliable simulations. Some examples of models of pipes with defects generated by the PIPEFLAW system are shown, and the results of numerical analyses, done with the tools presented in this work, are compared with, empiric results. (author)

  2. Flux pinning and phase transitions in model high-temperature superconductors with columnar defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H.; Stroud, D. (Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)); Girvin, S.M. (Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States))

    1993-07-01

    We calculate the degree of flux pinning by defects in model high-temperature superconductors (HTSC's). The HTSC is modeled as a three-dimensional network of resistively shunted Josephson junctions in an external magnetic field, corresponding to a HTSC in the extreme type-II limit. Disorder is introduced either by randomizing the coupling between grains (model-[ital A] disorder) or by removing grains (model-[ital B] disorder). Three types of defects are considered: point disorder, random line disorder, and periodic line disorder; but the emphasis is on random line disorder. Static and dynamic properties of the models are determined by Monte Carlo simulations and by solution of the analogous coupled overdamped Josephson equations in the presence of thermal noise. Random line defects considerably raise the superconducting transition temperature [ital T][sub [ital c

  3. A Versatile Protocol for Studying Calvarial Bone Defect Healing in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Dudakovic, Amel; Zan, Pengfei; Pichurin, Oksana; Cool, Simon M; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2017-11-01

    Animal models are vital tools for the preclinical development and testing of therapies aimed at providing solutions for several musculoskeletal disorders. For bone tissue engineering strategies addressing nonunion conditions, rodent models are particularly useful for studying bone healing in a controlled environment. The mouse calvarial defect model permits evaluation of drug, growth factor, or cell transplantation efficacy, together with offering the benefit of utilizing genetic models to study intramembranous bone formation within defect sites. In this study, we describe a detailed methodology for creating calvarial defects in mouse and present our results on bone morphogenetic protein-2-loaded fibrin scaffolds, thus advocating the utility of this functional orthotopic mouse model for the evaluation of therapeutic interventions (such as growth factors or cells) intended for successful bone regeneration therapies.

  4. Solution-diffusion with defects model for pressure-assisted forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Jintang

    2014-11-01

    An osmosis transport model is presented that combines the standard internal and external concentration polarization equations in the forward osmosis (FO) field with the selective layer transport equations first proposed by Sherwood in 1967. The Sherwood model describes water flux as the sum of a solute-selective, diffusive component driven by the sum of osmotic pressure and hydraulic pressure differences, and a nonselective, convective component driven by hydraulic pressure difference only. This solution-diffusion with defects (SDWD) model and the solution-diffusion (SD) model were compared against data collected using polyamide thin-film-composite (PA-TFC) and integrally-skinned asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) membranes, evaluated in various configurations. When tested with pure water on the porous support side and 1.5. M (π=72.7. bar) sodium chloride solution on the selective layer side, applying 1.25. bar of hydraulic pressure to the porous support side increased water flux by an order of magnitude for PA-TFC membranes, but had negligible effect on CTA membrane flux. These large flux variations can be explained by the SDWD model, but not the SD model. To confirm the existence of defects, a PA-TFC membrane was coated with a uniform, highly water-permeable, nonselective polymer. After coating to block convection through defects, the influence of hydraulic pressure on water flux through this membrane essentially disappeared. Water flux through these defects is low (<1% of total water flux for PA-TFC membranes) and of little consequence in practical FO or reverse osmosis (RO) applications. But in pressure-assisted forward osmosis (PAFO) or pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO), convective transport through defects affects the solute concentration difference across the membrane selective layer, increasing or decreasing water flux through defect-free regions. The presence of defects may explain why membrane power density in PRO is lower than that predicted based on

  5. Rate theory modeling of defect evolution under cascade damage conditions: the influence of vacancy-type cascade remnants and application to the defect production characterization by microstructural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Muroga, Takeo; Kohyama, Akira; Stoller, R.E.; Namba, Chusei; Motojima, Osamu.

    1995-11-01

    Recent computational and experimental studies have confirmed that high energy cascades produce clustered defects of both vacancy- and interstitial-types as well as isolated point defects. However, the production probability, configuration, stability and other characteristics of the cascade clusters are not well understood in spite of the fact that clustered defect production would substantially affect the irradiation-induced microstructures and the consequent property changes in a certain range of temperatures and displacement rates. In this work, a model of point defect and cluster evolution in irradiated materials under cascade damage conditions was developed by combining the conventional reaction rate theory and the results from the latest molecular dynamics simulation studies. This paper provides a description of the model and a model-based fundamental investigation of the influence of configuration, production efficiency and the initial size distribution of cascade-produced vacancy clusters. In addition, using the model, issues on characterizing cascade-induced defect production by microstructural analysis will be discussed. In particular, the determination of cascade vacancy cluster configuration, surviving defect production efficiency and cascade-interaction volume is attempted by analyzing the temperature dependence of swelling rate and loop growth rate in austenitic steels and model alloys. (author)

  6. Technology trends in econometric energy models: Ignorance or information?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, G.; Kokkelenberg, E.; State Univ., of New York, Binghamton, NY; Ross, M.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI

    1991-01-01

    Simple time trend variables in factor demand models can be statistically powerful variables, but may tell the researcher very little. Even more complex specification of technical change, e.g. factor biased, are still the economentrician's ''measure of ignorance'' about the shifts that occur in the underlying production process. Furthermore, in periods of rapid technology change the parameters based on time trends may be too large for long run forecasting. When there is clearly identifiable engineering information about new technology adoption that changes the factor input mix, data for the technology adoption may be included in the traditional factor demand model to economically model specific factor biased technical change and econometrically test their contribution. The adoption of thermomechanical pulping (TMP) and electric are furnaces (EAF) are two electricity intensive technology trends in the Paper and Steel industries, respectively. This paper presents the results of including these variables in a tradition econometric factor demand model, which is based on the Generalized Leontief. The coefficients obtained for this ''engineering based'' technical change compares quite favorably to engineering estimates of the impact of TMP and EAF on electricity intensities, improves the estimates of the other price coefficients, and yields a more believable long run electricity forecast. 6 refs., 1 fig

  7. Modeling the Influence of Hemispheric Transport on Trends in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development and application of the hemispheric version of the CMAQ to examine the influence of long-range pollutant transport on trends in surface level O3 distributions. The WRF-CMAQ model is expanded to hemispheric scales and multi-decadal model simulations were recently performed for the period spanning 1990-2010 to examine changes in hemispheric air pollution resulting from changes in emissions over this period. Simulated trends in ozone and precursor species concentrations across the U.S. and the northern hemisphere over the past two decades are compared with those inferred from available measurements during this period. Additionally, the decoupled direct method (DDM) in CMAQ is used to estimate the sensitivity of O3 to emissions from different source regions across the northern hemisphere. The seasonal variations in source region contributions to background O3 is then estimated from these sensitivity calculations and will be discussed. A reduced form model combining these source region sensitivities estimated from DDM with the multi-decadal simulations of O3 distributions and emissions trends, is then developed to characterize the changing contributions of different source regions to background O3 levels across North America. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas

  8. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in silicon in a simplified phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, S.; Lazanu, I.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of primary radiation-induced defects has been previously estimated considering both the explicit mechanisms of the primary interaction between the incoming particle and the nuclei of the semiconductor lattice, and the recoil energy partition between ionisation and displacements, in the frame of the Lindhard theory. The primary displacement defects are vacancies and interstitials that are essentially unstable in silicon. They interact via migration, recombination, annihilation or produce other defects. In the present work, the time evolution of the concentration of defects induced by pions in medium and high resistivity silicon for detectors is modelled, after irradiation. In some approximations, the differential equations representing the time evolution processes could be decoupled. The theoretical equations so obtained are solved analytically in some particular cases, with one free parameter, for a wide range of particle fluences and/or for a wide energy range of incident particles, for different temperatures; the corresponding stationary solutions are also presented

  9. An Analytical Model for Prediction of Magnetic Flux Leakage from Surface Defects in Ferromagnetic Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analytical model is proposed to predict magnetic flux leakage (MFL signals from the surface defects in ferromagnetic tubes. The analytical expression consists of elliptic integrals of first kind based on the magnetic dipole model. The radial (Bz component of leakage fields is computed from the cylindrical holes in ferromagnetic tubes. The effectiveness of the model has been studied by analyzing MFL signals as a function of the defect parameters and lift-off. The model predicted results are verified with experimental results and a good agreement is observed between the analytical and the experimental results. This analytical expression could be used for quick prediction of MFL signals and also input data for defect reconstructions in inverse MFL problem.

  10. Modeling charged defects, dopant diffusion and activation mechanisms for TCAD simulations using kinetic Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Bragado, Ignacio [Synopsys Inc, 700 East Middlefield Road, Mountain View, 94043 CA (United States)]. E-mail: Ignacio.martin-bragado@synopsys.com; Tian, S. [Synopsys Inc, 700 East Middlefield Road, Mountain View, 94043 CA (United States); Johnson, M. [Synopsys Inc, 700 East Middlefield Road, Mountain View, 94043 CA (United States); Castrillo, P. [Department of Electronics, University of Valladolid Campus Miguel Delibes, Camino del Cementerio S/N, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Department of Electronics, University of Valladolid Campus Miguel Delibes, Camino del Cementerio S/N, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Rubio, J. [Department of Electronics, University of Valladolid Campus Miguel Delibes, Camino del Cementerio S/N, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Jaraiz, M. [Department of Electronics, University of Valladolid Campus Miguel Delibes, Camino del Cementerio S/N, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    This work will show how the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) technique is able to successfully model the defects and diffusion of dopants in Si-based materials for advanced microelectronic devices, especially for non-equilibrium conditions. Charge states of point defects and paired dopants are also simulated, including the dependency of the diffusivities on the Fermi level and charged particle drift coming from the electric field. The KMC method is used to simulate the diffusion of the point defects, and formation and dissolution of extended defects, whereas a quasi-atomistic approach is used to take into account the carrier densities. The simulated mechanisms include the kick-out diffusion mechanism, extended defect formation and the activation/deactivation of dopants through the formation of impurity clusters. Damage accumulation and amorphization are also taken into account. Solid phase epitaxy regrowth is included, and also the dopants redistribution during recrystallization of the amorphized regions. Regarding the charged defects, the model considers the dependencies of charge reactions, electric bias, pairing and break-up reactions according to the local Fermi level. Some aspects of the basic physical mechanisms have also been taken into consideration: how to smooth out the atomistic dopant point charge distribution, avoiding very abrupt and unphysical charge profiles and how to implement the drift of charged particles into the existing electric field. The work will also discuss the efficiency, accuracy and relevance of the method, together with its implementation in a technology computer aided design process simulator.

  11. Combining DFT, Cluster Expansions, and KMC to Model Point Defects in Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modine, N. A.; Wright, A. F.; Lee, S. R.; Foiles, S. M.; Battaile, C. C.; Thomas, J. C.; van der Ven, A.

    In an alloy, defect energies are sensitive to the occupations of nearby atomic sites, which leads to a distribution of defect properties. When radiation-induced defects diffuse from their initially non-equilibrium locations, this distribution becomes time-dependent. The defects can become trapped in energetically favorable regions of the alloy leading to a diffusion rate that slows dramatically with time. Density Functional Theory (DFT) allows the accurate determination of ground state and transition state energies for a defect in a particular alloy environment but requires thousands of processing hours for each such calculation. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) can be used to model defect diffusion and the changing distribution of defect properties but requires energy evaluations for millions of local environments. We have used the Cluster Expansion (CE) formalism to ``glue'' together these seemingly incompatible methods. The occupation of each alloy site is represented by an Ising-like variable, and products of these variables are used to expand quantities of interest. Once a CE is fit to a training set of DFT energies, it allows very rapid evaluation of the energy for an arbitrary configuration, while maintaining the accuracy of the underlying DFT calculations. These energy evaluations are then used to drive our KMC simulations. We will demonstrate the application of our DFT/MC/KMC approach to model thermal and carrier-induced diffusion of intrinsic point defects in III-V alloys. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE.

  12. Prenatal cleft lip and maxillary alveolar defect repair in a 2-step fetal lamb model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.H.; Deprest, J.; Goetz, W.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Bergé, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: As there is no satisfying animal model simulating the complex cleft lip and palate anatomy in a standardized defect on one hand, and comprising the possibilities for extensive surgical procedures on the other hand, an improved fetal lamb model for cleft surgery was developed. MATERIALS AND

  13. The Need for Market Segmentation in Buy-Till-You-Defect Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Korkmaz (Evsen); D. Fok (Dennis); R. Kuik (Roelof)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBuy-till-you-defect [BTYD] models are built for companies operating in a non- contractual setting to predict customers’ transaction frequency, amount and timing as well as customer lifetime. These models tend to perform well, although they often predict unrealistically long lifetimes for

  14. Predicting Defects Using Information Intelligence Process Models in the Software Technology Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Manjula Gandhi; Jayabal, Devi Shree; Srinivasan, Thenmozhi; Balasubramanie, Palanisamy

    2015-01-01

    A key differentiator in a competitive market place is customer satisfaction. As per Gartner 2012 report, only 75%-80% of IT projects are successful. Customer satisfaction should be considered as a part of business strategy. The associated project parameters should be proactively managed and the project outcome needs to be predicted by a technical manager. There is lot of focus on the end state and on minimizing defect leakage as much as possible. Focus should be on proactively managing and shifting left in the software life cycle engineering model. Identify the problem upfront in the project cycle and do not wait for lessons to be learnt and take reactive steps. This paper gives the practical applicability of using predictive models and illustrates use of these models in a project to predict system testing defects thus helping to reduce residual defects.

  15. DEFECT MONITORING IN IRON CASTING USING RESIDUES OF AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanusa Andrea Casarin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to monitor the index of general waste irons forecasting nodular and gray using the residues originated from the methodology Box & Jenkins by means of X-bar and R control charts. Search is to find a general class of model ARIMA (p, d, q but as data have autocorrelation is found to the number of residues which allowed the application of charts. The found model was the model SARIMA (0,1,1(0,1,1 . In step of checking the stability of the model was found that some comments are out of control due to temperature and chemical composition.

  16. Effects of mechanical loading on cortical defect repair using a novel mechanobiological model of bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Carrera, Robert; Flamini, Vittoria; Kenny, Lena; Cabahug-Zuckerman, Pamela; George, Benson M; Hunter, Daniel; Liu, Bo; Singh, Gurpreet; Leucht, Philipp; Mann, Kenneth A; Helms, Jill A; Castillo, Alesha B

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical loading is an important aspect of post-surgical fracture care. The timing of load application relative to the injury event may differentially regulate repair depending on the stage of healing. Here, we used a novel mechanobiological model of cortical defect repair that offers several advantages including its technical simplicity and spatially confined repair program, making effects of both physical and biological interventions more easily assessed. Using this model, we showed that daily loading (5N peak load, 2Hz, 60 cycles, 4 consecutive days) during hematoma consolidation and inflammation disrupted the injury site and activated cartilage formation on the periosteal surface adjacent to the defect. We also showed that daily loading during the matrix deposition phase enhanced both bone and cartilage formation at the defect site, while loading during the remodeling phase resulted in an enlarged woven bone regenerate. All loading regimens resulted in abundant cellular proliferation throughout the regenerate and fibrous tissue formation directly above the defect demonstrating that all phases of cortical defect healing are sensitive to physical stimulation. Stress was concentrated at the edges of the defect during exogenous loading, and finite element (FE)-modeled longitudinal strain (ε zz ) values along the anterior and posterior borders of the defect (~2200με) was an order of magnitude larger than strain values on the proximal and distal borders (~50-100με). It is concluded that loading during the early stages of repair may impede stabilization of the injury site important for early bone matrix deposition, whereas loading while matrix deposition and remodeling are ongoing may enhance stabilization through the formation of additional cartilage and bone. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Model based defect detection for free stator of ultrasonic motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Mojallali, Hamed; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of admittance magnitude and phase are used to identify the complex values of equivalent circuit model for free stator of an ultrasonic motor. The model is used to evaluate the changes in the admittance and relative changes in the values of equivalent circuit elements. ...

  18. The Statistical Modeling of the Trends Concerning the Romanian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela OPAIT

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects the statistical modeling concerning the resident population in Romania, respectively the total of the romanian population, through by means of the „Least Squares Method”. Any country it develops by increasing of the population, respectively of the workforce, which is a factor of influence for the growth of the Gross Domestic Product (G.D.P.. The „Least Squares Method” represents a statistical technique for to determine the trend line of the best fit concerning a model.

  19. Large scale Bayesian nuclear data evaluation with consistent model defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnabel, G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of nuclear data evaluation is the reliable determination of cross sections and related quantities of the atomic nuclei. To this end, evaluation methods are applied which combine the information of experiments with the results of model calculations. The evaluated observables with their associated uncertainties and correlations are assembled into data sets, which are required for the development of novel nuclear facilities, such as fusion reactors for energy supply, and accelerator driven systems for nuclear waste incineration. The efficiency and safety of such future facilities is dependent on the quality of these data sets and thus also on the reliability of the applied evaluation methods. This work investigated the performance of the majority of available evaluation methods in two scenarios. The study indicated the importance of an essential component in these methods, which is the frequently ignored deficiency of nuclear models. Usually, nuclear models are based on approximations and thus their predictions may deviate from reliable experimental data. As demonstrated in this thesis, the neglect of this possibility in evaluation methods can lead to estimates of observables which are inconsistent with experimental data. Due to this finding, an extension of Bayesian evaluation methods is proposed to take into account the deficiency of the nuclear models. The deficiency is modeled as a random function in terms of a Gaussian process and combined with the model prediction. This novel formulation conserves sum rules and allows to explicitly estimate the magnitude of model deficiency. Both features are missing in available evaluation methods so far. Furthermore, two improvements of existing methods have been developed in the course of this thesis. The first improvement concerns methods relying on Monte Carlo sampling. A Metropolis-Hastings scheme with a specific proposal distribution is suggested, which proved to be more efficient in the studied scenarios than the

  20. The quantum nonlinear Schroedinger model with point-like defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, V; Mintchev, M; Ragoucy, E

    2004-01-01

    We establish a family of point-like impurities which preserve the quantum integrability of the nonlinear Schroedinger model in 1+1 spacetime dimensions. We briefly describe the construction of the exact second quantized solution of this model in terms of an appropriate reflection-transmission algebra. The basic physical properties of the solution, including the spacetime symmetry of the bulk scattering matrix, are also discussed. (letter to the editor)

  1. Multiscale modelling of the interaction of hydrogen with interstitial defects and dislocations in BCC tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; Mason, D. R.; Domain, C.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Marinica, M.-C.; Ventelon, L.; Becquart, C. S.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2018-01-01

    In a fusion tokamak, the plasma of hydrogen isotopes is in contact with tungsten at the surface of a divertor. In the bulk of the material, the hydrogen concentration profile tends towards dynamic equilibrium between the flux of incident ions and their trapping and release from defects, either native or produced by ion and neutron irradiation. The dynamics of hydrogen exchange between the plasma and the material is controlled by pressure, temperature, and also by the energy barriers characterizing hydrogen diffusion in the material, trapping and de-trapping from defects. In this work, we extend the treatment of interaction of hydrogen with vacancy-type defects, and investigate how hydrogen is trapped by self-interstitial atom defects and dislocations. The accumulation of hydrogen on dislocation loops and dislocations is assessed using a combination of density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics with empirical potentials, and linear elasticity theory. The equilibrium configurations adopted by hydrogen atoms in the core of dislocations as well as in the elastic fields of defects, are modelled by DFT. The structure of the resulting configurations can be rationalised assuming that hydrogen atoms interact elastically with lattice distortions and that they interact between themselves through short-range repulsion. We formulate a two-shell model for hydrogen interaction with an interstitial defect of any size, which predicts how hydrogen accumulates at defects, dislocation loops and line dislocations at a finite temperature. We derive analytical formulae for the number of hydrogen atoms forming the Cottrell atmosphere of a mesoscopic dislocation loop or an edge dislocation. The solubility of hydrogen as a function of temperature, pressure and the density of dislocations exhibits three physically distinct regimes, dominated by the solubility of hydrogen in a perfect lattice, its retention at dislocation cores, and trapping by long-range elastic fields of

  2. Defect Detection: Combining Bounded Model Checking and Code Contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Akhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bounded model checking (BMC of C/C++ programs is a matter of scientific enquiry that attracts great attention in the last few years. In this paper, we present our approach to this problem. It is based on combining several recent results in BMC, namely, the use of LLVM as a baseline for model generation, employment of high-performance Z3 SMT solver to do the formula heavy-lifting, and the use of various function summaries to improve analysis efficiency and expressive power. We have implemented a basic prototype; experiment results on a set of simple test BMC problems are satisfactory.  

  3. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umoh, Joseph U; Holdsworth, David W [Pre-Clinical Imaging Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, PO Box 5015, 100 Perth Drive, London, ON N6A 5K8 (Canada); Sampaio, Arthur V; Underhill, T Michael [Laboratory of Molecular Skeletogenesis, Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Welch, Ian [Animal Care and Veterinary Services, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A [CIHR Group in Skeletal Development and Remodelling, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)], E-mail: jumoh@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: asampaio@interchange.ubc.ca, E-mail: tunderhi@interchange.ubc.ca, E-mail: iwelch@uwo.ca, E-mail: vasek.pitelka@schulich.uwo.ca, E-mail: hagoldbe@uwo.ca, E-mail: david.holdsworth@imaging.robarts.ca

    2009-04-07

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 {mu}m. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 {+-} 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 {+-} 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r{sup 2} = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  4. Calibrating a multi-model approach to defect production in high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-model approach to simulating defect production processes at the atomic scale is described that incorporates molecular dynamics (MD), binary collision approximation (BCA) calculations and stochastic annealing simulations. The central hypothesis is that the simple, fast computer codes capable of simulating large numbers of high energy cascades (e.g., BCA codes) can be made to yield the correct defect configurations when their parameters are calibrated using the results of the more physically realistic MD simulations. The calibration procedure is investigated using results of MD simulations of 25 keV cascades in copper. The configurations of point defects are extracted from the MD cascade simulations at the end of the collisional phase, thus providing information similar to that obtained with a binary collision model. The MD collisional phase defect configurations are used as input to the ALSOME annealing simulation code, and values of the ALSOME quenching parameters are determined that yield the best fit to the post-quenching defect configurations of the MD simulations. ((orig.))

  5. process setting models for the minimization of costs defectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    2. Optimal Setting Process Models. 2.1 Optimal setting of process mean in the case of one-sided limit. In filling operation, the process average net weight must be set. The standards prescribe the minimum weight which is printed on the packet. This set of quality control problems has one-sided limit (the minimum net weight).

  6. Modeling Finite Deformations in Trigonal Ceramic Crystals with Lattice Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    Horstemeyer, M.F., Korellis, J.S., Grishabar, R.B., Mosher, D., 1998. High temperature sensitivity of notched AISI 304L stainless steel tests. Theor...Macmillan, New York, pp. 283– 304 . Marinopoulos, A.G., Elsasser, C., 2001. Density-functional and shell-model calculations of the energetics of basal

  7. Oxygen Nonstoichiometry and Defect Chemistry Modeling of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2010-01-01

    The oxygen nonstoichiometry (delta) of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2−delta has been measured as a function of PO2 at temperatures between 600 and 900°C by coulometric titration and thermogravimetry. An ideal solution defect model, a regular solution model, and a defect association model, taking into account...

  8. Study on non-universal critical behaviour in Ising model with defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    One-dimensional quantum analogous of two-dimensional Ising models with line and step type linear defects are studied. The phenomenological renormalization group was approached using conformal invariance for relating critical exponent N sup(*) sub(H). Aiming to obtain the Hamiltonian diagonal, Lanczos tridiagonal method was used. (H.C.K.)

  9. The effect of service constraint on EPQ model with random defective rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiu studied the effect of service-level constraint on the economic production quantity (EPQ model with random defective rate. In this note, we will offer a simple algebraic approach to replace his differential calculus skill to find the optimal solution under the expected annual cost minimization.

  10. Model support for an out-reactor-instrumented-defected-fuel-experiment to validate the RMC fuel oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quastel, A.D.; Corcoran, E.C.; Lewis, B.J. [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Thiriet, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Hadaller, G. [Stern Laboratories Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    An out-reactor fuel oxidation experiment with controlled parameters is being planned to provide data for validation of the Royal Military College (RMC) mechanistic fuel oxidation model. In support of this work, fuel oxidation 2D r-θ and 3D models are presented. The 2D r-θ model with radial cracks provides the radial temperature distribution in the test fuel element and also provides heating power information. The 3D model with radial cracks and a pellet-pellet gap under a defected sheath indicate that an oxygen stoichiometry deviation of 0.057 could result within one week of heating a defected UO{sub 2} fuel element with a 5-mm{sup 2} sheath defect. (author)

  11. Role of Defects in Self-Organized Criticality: A Directed Coupled Map Lattice Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tadic, Bosiljka; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    1996-01-01

    We study a directed coupled map lattice model in two dimensions, with two degrees of freedom associated with each lattice site. The two freedoms are coupled at a fraction $c$ of lattice bonds acting as quenched random defects. In the case of conservative dynamics, at any concentration of defects the system reaches a self-organized critical state with universal critical exponents close to the mean-field values. The probability distributions follow the general scaling form $P(X,L)= L^{-\\alpha}{...

  12. Automatic Fabric Defect Detection with a Multi-Scale Convolutional Denoising Autoencoder Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Mei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fabric defect detection is a necessary and essential step of quality control in the textile manufacturing industry. Traditional fabric inspections are usually performed by manual visual methods, which are low in efficiency and poor in precision for long-term industrial applications. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised learning-based automated approach to detect and localize fabric defects without any manual intervention. This approach is used to reconstruct image patches with a convolutional denoising autoencoder network at multiple Gaussian pyramid levels and to synthesize detection results from the corresponding resolution channels. The reconstruction residual of each image patch is used as the indicator for direct pixel-wise prediction. By segmenting and synthesizing the reconstruction residual map at each resolution level, the final inspection result can be generated. This newly developed method has several prominent advantages for fabric defect detection. First, it can be trained with only a small amount of defect-free samples. This is especially important for situations in which collecting large amounts of defective samples is difficult and impracticable. Second, owing to the multi-modal integration strategy, it is relatively more robust and accurate compared to general inspection methods (the results at each resolution level can be viewed as a modality. Third, according to our results, it can address multiple types of textile fabrics, from simple to more complex. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model is robust and yields good overall performance with high precision and acceptable recall rates.

  13. Incorporation of defects into the central atoms model of a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, Eric A.; Zhu Aiwu; Shiflet, G.J.; Joseph Poon, S.

    2011-01-01

    The central atoms model (CAM) of a metallic glass is extended to incorporate thermodynamically stable defects, similar to vacancies in a crystalline solid, within the amorphous structure. A bond deficiency (BD), which is the proposed defect present in all metallic glasses, is introduced into the CAM equations. Like vacancies in a crystalline solid, BDs are thermodynamically stable entities because of the increase in entropy associated with their creation, and there is an equilibrium concentration present in the glassy phase. When applied to Cu-Zr and Ni-Zr binary metallic glasses, the concentration of thermally induced BDs surrounding Zr atoms reaches a relatively constant value at the glass transition temperature, regardless of composition within a given glass system. Using this 'critical' defect concentration, the predicted temperatures at which the glass transition is expected to occur are in good agreement with the experimentally determined glass transition temperatures for both alloy systems.

  14. Application of the Point Defect Model to modelling the corrosion of iron based canisters in geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataillon, C.

    2003-01-01

    A corrosion model for iron and low alloy steels is proposed. This model is essentially based on the Point Defect Model. A modification of the original model has been introduced. To take into consideration the free corrosion case, electron flux has been added. So the mean electric field becomes voltage dependent. As a consequence, no analytical solution for this model is available even in stationary conditions. (authors)

  15. VIRTUAL 3-D MODELLING OF AIRWAYS IN CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Speggiorin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimentional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardio-vascualr structure. Unfortunately IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modelling (CM of has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship.. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the pre-surgical assessment. We report 4 cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures : ascending aorta in 1, left pulmonary artery sling in 1, Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in 1 and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in 1. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  16. Virtual 3D Modeling of Airways in Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speggiorin, Simone; Durairaj, Saravanan; Mimic, Branko; Corno, Antonio F

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimensional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardiovascular structure. Unfortunately, IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modeling has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the presurgical assessment. We report four cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures - ascending aorta in one, left pulmonary artery sling in one, patent ductus arteriosus in one, and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in one. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  17. New Trends in Model Coupling Theory, Numerics and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquel, F.; Godlewski, E.; Herard, J. M.; Segre, J.

    2010-01-01

    This special issue comprises selected papers from the workshop New Trends in Model Coupling, Theory, Numerics and Applications (NTMC'09) which took place in Paris, September 2 - 4, 2009. The research of optimal technological solutions in a large amount of industrial systems requires to perform numerical simulations of complex phenomena which are often characterized by the coupling of models related to various space and/or time scales. Thus, the so-called multi-scale modelling has been a thriving scientific activity which connects applied mathematics and other disciplines such as physics, chemistry, biology or even social sciences. To illustrate the variety of fields concerned by the natural occurrence of model coupling we may quote: meteorology where it is required to take into account several turbulence scales or the interaction between oceans and atmosphere, but also regional models in a global description, solid mechanics where a thorough understanding of complex phenomena such as propagation of cracks needs to couple various models from the atomistic level to the macroscopic level; plasma physics for fusion energy for instance where dense plasmas and collisionless plasma coexist; multiphase fluid dynamics when several types of flow corresponding to several types of models are present simultaneously in complex circuits; social behaviour analysis with interaction between individual actions and collective behaviour. (authors)

  18. A modified rabbit ulna defect model for evaluating periosteal substitutes in bone engineering: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M El Backly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib. For group II, an e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb. Animals were euthanized after 12-16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (µCT, and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  19. A Modified Rabbit Ulna Defect Model for Evaluating Periosteal Substitutes in Bone Engineering: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Backly, Rania M.; Chiapale, Danilo; Muraglia, Anita; Tromba, Giuliana; Ottonello, Chiara; Santolini, Federico; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm) were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane) scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia) or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib). For group II, an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) (GORE-TEX®) membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa) or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb). Animals were euthanized after 12–16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (μCT), and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX®) membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute. PMID:25610828

  20. Photonic crystal defect mode cavity modelling: a phenomenological dimensional reduction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Qiang, Zexuan; Chen, Li

    2007-05-01

    A phenomenological dimensional reduction approach (PDRA) for the cavity characteristics in defect mode based photonic crystal (PC) lasers is presented. Based on the fully vectorial three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D FDTD) technique, simultaneous enhancement and suppression in spontaneous emission and absorption were obtained in an absorptive photonic crystal slab (PCS) cavity. Effective index perturbation (EIP) was proposed for fast and accurate determination of the effective index and the dominant resonant cavity frequency in a 3D PCS structure, with two-dimensional (2D) FDTD simulation. Further dimensional reduction from 2D to one-dimensional planar cavity enables phenomenological modelling of lasing characteristics via the effective reflectivity calculation and rate equation analysis. Very fast and accurate results have been achieved with this PDRA approach. A high spontaneous emission factor and cavity quality factor Q were obtained in a single defect cavity, which led to over an order reduction in lasing gain threshold. The model offers a fast and accurate tool for the design and modelling of PC defect mode cavity based devices and aids the research in the proposed novel defect mode based devices such as ultra-compact light sources on Si and spectrally resolved PC infrared photodetectors.

  1. Defects in neuromuscular junction remodelling in the Smn(2B/-) mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Beauvais, Ariane; Bhanot, Kunal; Kothary, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating childhood motor neuron disease caused by mutations and deletions within the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Although other tissues may be involved, motor neurons remain primary pathological targets, with loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) representing an early and significant event in pathogenesis. Although defects in axonal outgrowth and pathfinding have been observed in cell culture and in lower organisms upon Smn depletion, developmental defects in mouse models have been less obvious. Here, we have employed the Smn(2B/-) mouse model to investigate NMJ remodelling during SMA pathology, induced reinnervation, and paralysis. We show that whilst NMJs are capable of remodelling during pathogenesis, there is a marked reduction in paralysis-induced remodelling and in the nerve-directed re-organisation of acetylcholine receptors. This reduction in remodelling potential could not be attributed to a decreased rate of axonal growth. Finally, we have identified a loss of terminal Schwann cells which could contribute to the defects in remodelling/maintenance observed. Our work demonstrates that there are specific defects in NMJ remodelling in an intermediate SMA mouse model, which could contribute to or underlie pathogenesis in SMA. The development of strategies that can promote the remodelling potential of NMJs may therefore be of significant benefit to SMA patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A modified rabbit ulna defect model for evaluating periosteal substitutes in bone engineering: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Backly, Rania M; Chiapale, Danilo; Muraglia, Anita; Tromba, Giuliana; Ottonello, Chiara; Santolini, Federico; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm) were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane) scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia) or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib). For group II, an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) (GORE-TEX(®)) membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa) or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb). Animals were euthanized after 12-16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (μCT), and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX(®)) membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  3. SIS with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages patch tracheoplasty in a rabbit model for tracheal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longfang; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Pengcheng; Zhao, Daqing; Chen, Wenxian

    2007-06-01

    In the rabbit model, small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compounded with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages appeared to be an efficacious method for the patch repair of partial circumferential tracheal defects instead of autologous grafts. SIS appears to be a safe and promising means of facilitating neovascularization and tissue regeneration. The long-term use of SIS and tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages warrants further investigation. Tracheal defect reparation remains a challenging surgical problem that can require reconstruction using autologous grafts or artificial stents. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of SIS, a biocompatible, acellular matrix, compounded with different tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages, in the repair of a critical-size tracheal defect. A full-thickness defect (4 x 8 mm) was created in tracheal rings four to six in adult rabbits. A piece of 8-ply SIS sandwiched in thyroid cartilage, auricular cartilage, or without cartilage, respectively (designated experiment 1, 2, or 3, respectively), was sutured to the edges of the defect with interrupted 4-0 polypropylene sutures. In control animals, the defect was closed with lamina praetrachealis. All animals were followed until signs of dyspnea became apparent or for 4 or 12 weeks. After follow-up and euthanasia, the trachea was harvested and prepared for histologic evaluation using conventional techniques. All animals tolerated the procedure well but two animals in group 1 (n=5), three in group 2 (n=5), and one in group 3 (n=5) had stridor after operation and expired within 1 month. Histologically, neovascularization of the patch was noted with moderate inflammation. The surface of the SIS patch was covered with a lining of ciliated epithelial cells. The tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages degraded to some extent.

  4. Non-probabilistic defect assessment for structures with cracks based on interval model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Qiao; Zhou, Changyu; Peng, Jian; Chen, Xiangwei; He, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-probabilistic approach is introduced to defect assessment. • Definition and establishment of IFAC are put forward. • Determination of assessment rectangle is proposed. • Solution of non-probabilistic reliability index is presented. -- Abstract: Traditional defect assessment methods conservatively treat uncertainty of parameters as safety factors, while the probabilistic method is based on the clear understanding of detailed statistical information of parameters. In this paper, the non-probabilistic approach is introduced to the failure assessment diagram (FAD) to propose a non-probabilistic defect assessment method for structures with cracks. This novel defect assessment method contains three critical processes: establishment of the interval failure assessment curve (IFAC), determination of the assessment rectangle, and solution of the non-probabilistic reliability degree. Based on the interval theory, uncertain parameters such as crack sizes, material properties and loads are considered as interval variables. As a result, the failure assessment curve (FAC) will vary in a certain range, which is defined as IFAC. And the assessment point will vary within a rectangle zone which is defined as an assessment rectangle. Based on the interval model, the establishment of IFAC and the determination of the assessment rectangle are presented. Then according to the interval possibility degree method, the non-probabilistic reliability degree of IFAC can be determined. Meanwhile, in order to clearly introduce the non-probabilistic defect assessment method, a numerical example for the assessment of a pipe with crack is given. In addition, the assessment result of the proposed method is compared with that of the traditional probabilistic method, which confirms that this non-probabilistic defect assessment can reasonably resolve the practical problem with interval variables

  5. Non-probabilistic defect assessment for structures with cracks based on interval model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Qiao; Zhou, Changyu, E-mail: changyu_zhou@163.com; Peng, Jian; Chen, Xiangwei; He, Xiaohua

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Non-probabilistic approach is introduced to defect assessment. • Definition and establishment of IFAC are put forward. • Determination of assessment rectangle is proposed. • Solution of non-probabilistic reliability index is presented. -- Abstract: Traditional defect assessment methods conservatively treat uncertainty of parameters as safety factors, while the probabilistic method is based on the clear understanding of detailed statistical information of parameters. In this paper, the non-probabilistic approach is introduced to the failure assessment diagram (FAD) to propose a non-probabilistic defect assessment method for structures with cracks. This novel defect assessment method contains three critical processes: establishment of the interval failure assessment curve (IFAC), determination of the assessment rectangle, and solution of the non-probabilistic reliability degree. Based on the interval theory, uncertain parameters such as crack sizes, material properties and loads are considered as interval variables. As a result, the failure assessment curve (FAC) will vary in a certain range, which is defined as IFAC. And the assessment point will vary within a rectangle zone which is defined as an assessment rectangle. Based on the interval model, the establishment of IFAC and the determination of the assessment rectangle are presented. Then according to the interval possibility degree method, the non-probabilistic reliability degree of IFAC can be determined. Meanwhile, in order to clearly introduce the non-probabilistic defect assessment method, a numerical example for the assessment of a pipe with crack is given. In addition, the assessment result of the proposed method is compared with that of the traditional probabilistic method, which confirms that this non-probabilistic defect assessment can reasonably resolve the practical problem with interval variables.

  6. Recent trends in social systems quantitative theories and quantitative models

    CERN Document Server

    Hošková-Mayerová, Šárka; Soitu, Daniela-Tatiana; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The papers collected in this volume focus on new perspectives on individuals, society, and science, specifically in the field of socio-economic systems. The book is the result of a scientific collaboration among experts from “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iaşi (Romania), “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti-Pescara (Italy), "University of Defence" of Brno (Czech Republic), and "Pablo de Olavide" University of Sevilla (Spain). The heterogeneity of the contributions presented in this volume reflects the variety and complexity of social phenomena. The book is divided in four Sections as follows. The first Section deals with recent trends in social decisions. Specifically, it aims to understand which are the driving forces of social decisions. The second Section focuses on the social and public sphere. Indeed, it is oriented on recent developments in social systems and control. Trends in quantitative theories and models are described in Section 3, where many new formal, mathematical-statistical to...

  7. Modeling the dynamic behavior of railway track taking into account the occurrence of defects in the system wheel-rail

    OpenAIRE

    Loktev Alexey; Sychev Vyacheslav; Gluzberg Boris; Gridasova Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of wheel defects on the development of rail defects up to a state where rail prompt replacement becomes necessary taking into account different models of the dynamic contact between a wheel and a rail. In particular, the quasistatic Hertz model, the linear elastic model and the elastoplastic Aleksandrov-Kadomtsev model. Based on the model of the wheel-rail contact the maximum stresses are determined which take place in the rail in the presence of wheel de...

  8. {Γ}-Convergence Analysis of a Generalized XY Model: Fractional Vortices and String Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Rufat; Cicalese, Marco; De Luca, Lucia; Ponsiglione, Marcello

    2018-03-01

    We propose and analyze a generalized two dimensional XY model, whose interaction potential has n weighted wells, describing corresponding symmetries of the system. As the lattice spacing vanishes, we derive by {Γ}-convergence the discrete-to-continuum limit of this model. In the energy regime we deal with, the asymptotic ground states exhibit fractional vortices, connected by string defects. The {Γ}-limit takes into account both contributions, through a renormalized energy, depending on the configuration of fractional vortices, and a surface energy, proportional to the length of the strings. Our model describes in a simple way several topological singularities arising in Physics and Materials Science. Among them, disclinations and string defects in liquid crystals, fractional vortices and domain walls in micromagnetics, partial dislocations and stacking faults in crystal plasticity.

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Akbari, F.; Thompson, D.M.; Thurgood, C.; Higgs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical treatment has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective nuclear fuel elements. The equilibrium stoichiometry deviation in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel has been derived from thermodynamic considerations using a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for the U-O system, which emphasizes replication of solubilities and three-phase invariant conditions displayed in the U-O binary phase diagram. The kinetics model accounts for multi-phase transport including interstitial oxygen diffusion in the solid and gas-phase transport of hydrogen and steam in the fuel cracks. The fuel oxidation model is further coupled to a heat conduction model to account for the feedback effect of a reduced thermal conductivity in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel. A numerical solution has been developed using a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB software package. The model has been compared to available data from several in-reactor X-2 loop experiments with defective fuel conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories. The model has also been benchmarked against an O/U profile measurement for a spent defective fuel element discharged from a commercial reactor

  10. Creation of a uniform pleural defect model for the study of lung sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Masato; Tao, Hiroyuki; Sato, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Naoki; Sugai, Hajime; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2007-07-01

    Animal models are indispensable for the development of new therapeutic methods for the closure of alveolar air leakage. However, it is difficult to create a uniform pleural defect model. The purpose of this study was to establish an appropriate animal model for assessing the efficacy and histotoxicity of synthetic sealants for lung surgery. Nine beagle dogs were used to evaluate the pleural defect model in comparison with conventional resection procedures. A donut-shaped silicon ring with an inner diameter of 15 mm was placed on the pleura, and 0.1 mL of cyanoacrylate was dropped into the ring. A pleural defect was created by sliding a microtome blade just beneath the polymerized cyanoacrylate. Hemostasis was performed by pressure with a sponge. Morphologically, round areas of the pleura were uniformly resected with our procedure. The resected tissue consisted of pleura and thin underlying lung parenchyma. Among the results from 3 surgeons, there were no significant differences in the mean time required for hemostasis (P = .69), the mean thickness of the resected tissue (P = .13), and the mean amount of air leakage from the resected area (P = .19). No penetration of cyanoacrylate into the lung parenchyma was evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy. Histologically, when the pleura was resected without using cyanoacrylate, a thick fibrocellular layer extended to the lung parenchyma. Furthermore, severe fibrosis was observed when electrocautery was used for hemostasis. However, when the pleura was resected using cyanoacrylate, the normal alveolar structure was preserved. Our uniform pleural defect model using cyanoacrylate may be feasible for the evaluation of synthetic sealants for alveolar air leakage.

  11. Quantitative assessment of bone defect healing by multidetector CT in a pig model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegger, Carolin; Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Miese, Falk R.; Antoch, Gerald; Scherer, Axel; Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Wild, Michael; Hakimi, Ahmad R.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate multidetector CT volumetry in the assessment of bone defect healing in comparison to histopathological findings in an animal model. In 16 mini-pigs, a circumscribed tibial bone defect was created. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the tibia was performed on a 64-row scanner 42 days after the operation. The extent of bone healing was estimated quantitatively by MDCT volumetry using a commercially available software programme (syngo Volume, Siemens, Germany).The volume of the entire defect (including all pixels from -100 to 3,000 HU), the nonconsolidated areas (-100 to 500 HU), and areas of osseous consolidation (500 to 3,000 HU) were assessed and the extent of consolidation was calculated. Histomorphometry served as the reference standard. The extent of osseous consolidation in MDCT volumetry ranged from 19 to 92% (mean 65.4 ± 18.5%). There was a significant correlation between histologically visible newly formed bone and the extent of osseous consolidation on MDCT volumetry (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001). A significant negative correlation was detected between osseous consolidation on MDCT and histological areas of persisting defect (r = -0.9, P < 0.0001). MDCT volumetry is a promising tool for noninvasive monitoring of bone healing, showing excellent correlation with histomorphometry. (orig.)

  12. Quantitative assessment of bone defect healing by multidetector CT in a pig model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegger, Carolin; Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Miese, Falk R.; Antoch, Gerald; Scherer, Axel [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Wild, Michael [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hakimi, Ahmad R. [Universtity Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Oral Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    To evaluate multidetector CT volumetry in the assessment of bone defect healing in comparison to histopathological findings in an animal model. In 16 mini-pigs, a circumscribed tibial bone defect was created. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the tibia was performed on a 64-row scanner 42 days after the operation. The extent of bone healing was estimated quantitatively by MDCT volumetry using a commercially available software programme (syngo Volume, Siemens, Germany).The volume of the entire defect (including all pixels from -100 to 3,000 HU), the nonconsolidated areas (-100 to 500 HU), and areas of osseous consolidation (500 to 3,000 HU) were assessed and the extent of consolidation was calculated. Histomorphometry served as the reference standard. The extent of osseous consolidation in MDCT volumetry ranged from 19 to 92% (mean 65.4 {+-} 18.5%). There was a significant correlation between histologically visible newly formed bone and the extent of osseous consolidation on MDCT volumetry (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001). A significant negative correlation was detected between osseous consolidation on MDCT and histological areas of persisting defect (r = -0.9, P < 0.0001). MDCT volumetry is a promising tool for noninvasive monitoring of bone healing, showing excellent correlation with histomorphometry. (orig.)

  13. Effects of Hydroxyapatite on Bone Graft Resorption in an Experimental Model of Maxillary Alveolar Arch Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Pilanci

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most commonly used treatments use autologous bone grafts to address bony defects in patients with cleft palate. Major disadvantages of autogenous bone grafts include donor site morbidity and resorption. Suggestions to overcome such problems include biomaterials that can be used alone or in combination with bone. We examined the effect of hydroxyapatite cement on bone graft resorption in a rabbit maxillary alveolar defect model. We divided 16 young adult albino New Zealand rabbits into two groups. A defect 1 cm wide was created in each rabbit's maxillary arch. In Group 1, the removed bone was disrupted, and the pieces were replaced in the defect. In the other group, the pieces were replaced after mixing (1:1 with hydroxyapatite cement. Quantitative computed tomographic evaluation of these grafts was performed in axial and coronal planes for each rabbit at 2 and 12 weeks. In axial images at 12 weeks, the group without cement showed mean bone resorption of 15%. In the cement group, a mean volumetric increase of 68% was seen. No resorption occurred when bone grafts were mixed with hydroxyapatite cement. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(3.000: 170-175

  14. Tissuepatch is biocompatible and seals iatrogenic membrane defects in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Alexander C; Joyeux, Luc; Van der Merwe, Johannes; Jimenez, Julio; Prapanus, Savitree; Barrett, David W; Connon, Che; Chowdhury, Tina T; David, Anna L; Deprest, Jan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate novel sealing techniques for their biocompatibility and sealing capacity of iatrogenic fetal membrane defects in a pregnant rabbit model. At day 23 of gestation (term = d31), a standardized fetoscopy was performed through a 14G cannula. The resulting fetal membrane defect was closed with condensed collagen, collagen with fibrinogen, Tissuepatch, Duraseal, or a conventional collagen plug (Lyostypt) as reference. At d30, the fetuses were harvested and full thickness fetal membrane samples were analyzed. The study consisted of 2 consecutive parts: (1) biocompatibility testing by fetal survival, apoptosis, and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells in the membranes and (2) the efficacy to seal fetal membrane defects. Three sealants (collagen with fibrinogen, Duraseal, or Lyostypt) were associated with a higher fetal mortality compared to control unmanipulated littermates and hence were excluded from further analysis. Tissuepatch was biocompatible, and amniotic fluid levels were comparable to those of control untouched littermates. Compared to the condensed collagen, Tissuepatch was also easier in surgical handling and induced limited cell proliferation. Tissuepatch had the best biocompatibility and efficacy in sealing an iatrogenic fetal membrane defect in the pregnant rabbit compared to other readily available sealants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Defect-phase-dynamics approach to statistical domain-growth problem of clock models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, K.

    1985-01-01

    The growth of statistical domains in quenched Ising-like p-state clock models with p = 3 or more is investigated theoretically, reformulating the analysis of Ohta et al. (1982) in terms of a phase variable and studying the dynamics of defects introduced into the phase field when the phase variable becomes multivalued. The resulting defect/phase domain-growth equation is applied to the interpretation of Monte Carlo simulations in two dimensions (Kaski and Gunton, 1983; Grest and Srolovitz, 1984), and problems encountered in the analysis of related Potts models are discussed. In the two-dimensional case, the problem is essentially that of a purely dissipative Coulomb gas, with a sq rt t growth law complicated by vertex-pinning effects at small t.

  16. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  17. Mathematical modelling of ultrasonic testing of components with defects close to a non-planar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westlund, Jonathan; Bostroem, Anders

    2011-05-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The aim of the present report is to describe work that has been performed to model ultrasonic testing of components that contain a defect close to a nonplanar surface. For nuclear power applications this may be a crack or other defect on the inside of a pipe with a diameter change or connection. This is an extension of the computer program UTDefect, which previously only admits a planar back surface (which is often applicable also to pipes if the pipe diameter is large enough). The problems are investigated in both 2D and 3D, and in 2D both the simpler anti-plane (SH) and the in-plane (P-SV) problem are studied. The 2D investigations are primarily solved to get a 'feeling' for the solution procedure, the discretizations, etc. In all cases an integral equation approach with a Green's function in the kernel is taken. The nonplanar surface is treated by the boundary element method (BEM) where a division of the surface is made in small elements. The defects are mainly cracks, strip-like (in 2D) or rectangular (in 3D), and these are treated with more analytical methods. In 2D also more general defects are treated with the help of their transition (T) matrix. As in other parts of UTDefect the ultrasonic probes in transmission and reception are included in the model. In 3D normalization by a side drilled hole is possible. Some numerical results

  18. Defects spectroscopy by means of the simple trapping model of the Fe78Si9B13 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, A.; Cabral P, A.; Garcia S, S.F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is analyzed quantitatively the results of the positron annihilation in the Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 alloy by means of the simple trapping model. From this analysis its are derived: a reason of positron trapping in the defects (K), the defects concentration (C d ) and the electronic density associated to the defect (n d ); both first parameters, (K, C d ) its increase and n d diminishes when increasing the alloy temperature. From this analysis it is also inferred that the defect consists of a multi vacancy of between 15 and 20 mono vacancies. (Author)

  19. Open die forging of large shafts with porosity defects – physical and numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    The aim and scope of this paper is centered to analyze the influence of the geometry of V-shaped dies on the closure of internal centerline porosity defects in ingots during multistep open-die forging. The investigation is performed with small scale physical models made from lead using V-shaped d......The aim and scope of this paper is centered to analyze the influence of the geometry of V-shaped dies on the closure of internal centerline porosity defects in ingots during multistep open-die forging. The investigation is performed with small scale physical models made from lead using V......-shaped dies with 90o and 120o and a reference pair of flat parallel platens. Holes drilled through the center of these preforms are produced to mimic centerline porosity in full scale cast ingots and intermediate rotation of the preforms replicate a multi-stage forging sequence under laboratory testing...... conditions. The presentation is supported by finite element modelling using an in-house developed computer program and the overall investigation shows that better results in closure of centerline defects are obtained with a V-shaped die with 120º die angle....

  20. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects after Oncologic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Romeo, Marco; Chae, Michael P; Hunter-Smith, David J; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction, in such cases, and demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning. Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600 cm 2 . Latissimus dorsi (LD)-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery (SA) was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications, and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland). An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. The clinical series of LD free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the SA as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead space. Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of the SA as a recipient in free flap sacral

  1. Intrinsic point defects in zinc oxide. Modeling of structural, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhart, P.

    2006-07-01

    The present dissertation deals with the modeling of zinc oxide on the atomic scale employing both quantum mechanical as well as atomistic methods. The first part describes quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory of intrinsic point defects in ZnO. To begin with, the geometric and electronic structure of vacancies and oxygen interstitials is explored. In equilibrium oxygen interstitials are found to adopt dumbbell and split interstitial configurations in positive and negative charge states, respectively. Semi-empirical self-interaction corrections allow to improve the agreement between the experimental and the calculated band structure significantly; errors due to the limited size of the supercells can be corrected by employing finite-size scaling. The effect of both band structure corrections and finite-size scaling on defect formation enthalpies and transition levels is explored. Finally, transition paths and barriers for the migration of zinc as well as oxygen vacancies and interstitials are determined. The results allow to interpret diffusion experiments and provide a consistent basis for developing models for device simulation. In the second part an interatomic potential for zinc oxide is derived. To this end, the Pontifix computer code is developed which allows to fit analytic bond-order potentials. The code is subsequently employed to obtain interatomic potentials for Zn-O, Zn-Zn, and O-O interactions. To demonstrate the applicability of the potentials, simulations on defect production by ion irradiation are carried out. (orig.)

  2. Unique Challenges for Modeling Defect Dynamics in Concentrated Solid-Solution Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shijun; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2017-11-01

    Recently developed concentrated solid solution alloys (CSAs) are shown to have improved performance under irradiation that depends strongly on the number of alloying elements, alloying species, and their concentrations. In contrast to conventional dilute alloys, CSAs are composed of multiple principal elements situated randomly in a simple crystalline lattice. As a result, the intrinsic disorder has a profound influence on energy dissipation pathways and defect evolution when these CSAs are subjected to energetic particle irradiation. Extraordinary irradiation resistance, including suppression of void formation by two orders of magnitude at an elevated temperature, has been achieved with increasing compositional complexity in CSAs. Unfortunately, the loss of translational invariance associated with the intrinsic chemical disorder poses great challenges to theoretical modeling at the electronic and atomic levels. Based on recent computer simulation results for a set of novel Ni-containing, face-centered cubic CSAs, we review theoretical modeling progress in handling disorder in CSAs and underscore the impact of disorder on defect dynamics. We emphasize in particular the unique challenges associated with the description of defect dynamics in CSAs.

  3. Osteogenic Activity of Locally Applied Small Molecule Drugs in a Rat Femur Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Cottrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term success of arthroplastic joints is dependent on the stabilization of the implant within the skeletal site. Movement of the arthroplastic implant within the bone can stimulate osteolysis, and therefore methods which promote rigid fixation or bone growth are expected to enhance implant stability and the long-term success of joint arthroplasty. In the present study, we used a simple bilateral bone defect model to analyze the osteogenic activity of three small-molecule drug implants via microcomputerized tomography (micro-CT and histomorphometry. In this study, we show that local delivery of alendronate, but not lovastatin or omeprazole, led to significant new bone formation at the defect site. Since alendronate impedes osteoclast-development, it is theorized that alendronate treatment results in a net increase in bone formation by preventing osteoclast mediated remodeling of the newly formed bone and upregulating osteoblasts.

  4. Analysis of arbitrary defects in photonic crystals by use of the source-model technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Alon; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2004-07-01

    A novel method derived from the source-model technique is presented to solve the problem of scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab that contains an arbitrary defect (perturbation). In this method, the electromagnetic fields in the perturbed problem are expressed in terms of the field due to the periodic currents obtained from a solution of the corresponding unperturbed problem plus the field due to yet-to-be-determined correction current sources placed in the vicinity of the perturbation. Appropriate error measures are suggested, and a few representative structures are presented and analyzed to demonstrate the versatility of the proposed method and to provide physical insight into waveguiding and defect coupling mechanisms typical of finite-thickness photonic crystal slabs.

  5. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the excision repair system. The number of mismatches as a result of translesion synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. The effect of temporal modulation of the number of single-stranded DNA during postreplication repair has been predicted. A comparison of effectiveness of different repair systems has been conducted.

  6. Global models underestimate large decadal declining and rising water storage trends relative to GRACE satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Bridget R; Zhang, Zizhan; Save, Himanshu; Sun, Alexander Y; Müller Schmied, Hannes; van Beek, Ludovicus P H; Wiese, David N; Wada, Yoshihide; Long, Di; Reedy, Robert C; Longuevergne, Laurent; Döll, Petra; Bierkens, Marc F P

    2018-02-06

    Assessing reliability of global models is critical because of increasing reliance on these models to address past and projected future climate and human stresses on global water resources. Here, we evaluate model reliability based on a comprehensive comparison of decadal trends (2002-2014) in land water storage from seven global models (WGHM, PCR-GLOBWB, GLDAS NOAH, MOSAIC, VIC, CLM, and CLSM) to trends from three Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite solutions in 186 river basins (∼60% of global land area). Medians of modeled basin water storage trends greatly underestimate GRACE-derived large decreasing (≤-0.5 km 3 /y) and increasing (≥0.5 km 3 /y) trends. Decreasing trends from GRACE are mostly related to human use (irrigation) and climate variations, whereas increasing trends reflect climate variations. For example, in the Amazon, GRACE estimates a large increasing trend of ∼43 km 3 /y, whereas most models estimate decreasing trends (-71 to 11 km 3 /y). Land water storage trends, summed over all basins, are positive for GRACE (∼71-82 km 3 /y) but negative for models (-450 to -12 km 3 /y), contributing opposing trends to global mean sea level change. Impacts of climate forcing on decadal land water storage trends exceed those of modeled human intervention by about a factor of 2. The model-GRACE comparison highlights potential areas of future model development, particularly simulated water storage. The inability of models to capture large decadal water storage trends based on GRACE indicates that model projections of climate and human-induced water storage changes may be underestimated. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. Analysis of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-06-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  8. Determination of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  9. Assessing trends in observed and modelled climate extremes over Australia in relation to future projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Nine global coupled climate models were assessed for their ability to reproduce observed trends in a set of indices representing temperature and precipitation extremes over Australia. Observed trends for 1957-1999 were compared with individual and multi-modelled trends calculated over the same period. When averaged across Australia the magnitude of trends and interannual variability of temperature extremes were well simulated by most models, particularly for the warm nights index. Except for consecutive dry days, the majority of models also reproduced the correct sign of trend for precipitation extremes. A bootstrapping technique was used to show that most models produce plausible trends when averaged over Australia, although only heavy precipitation days simulated from the multi-model ensemble showed significant skill at reproducing the observed spatial pattern of trends. Two of the models with output from different forcings showed that only with anthropogenic forcing included could the models capture the observed areally averaged trend for some of the temperature indices, but the forcing made little difference to the models' ability to reproduce the spatial pattern of trends over Australia. Future projected changes in extremes using three emissions scenarios were also analysed. Australia shows a shift towards significant warming of temperature extremes with much longer dry spells interspersed with periods of increased extreme precipitation irrespective of the scenario used. More work is required to determine whether regional projected changes over Australia are robust

  10. Antisite Defects of the L12 Structure Determined by the Phase Field Microelasticity Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Zhang; Zheng, Chen; Yan-Li, Lu; Yong-Xin, Wang; Yan, Zhao

    2009-01-01

    A phase field microelasticity simulation is performed to examine the antisite defect of L1 2 -Ni 3 Al in Ni 75 Al 5.3 V 19.7 ternary alloy. Combinimg strain energy with the phase field model leads to an atom configuration change as time proceeds. For the Ni sublattice, the antisite defect Al Ni , the equilibrium occupancy probability (OP) of which declines, precedes Ni Ni and V Ni in reaching equilibrium; subsequently, Ni Ni and V Ni present a phenomenon of symmetrical rise and decline individually. Similarly, for the Al sublattice, the antisite defect Ni Al , the OP of which eventually rises, takes fewer time steps than Al Ai and V Al to attain equilibrium. Thereafter, Al Al rises while V Al declines symmetrically at the axes of the Ni Al MAI curve. Furthermore, the OP for the Al sublattice is much more sensitive to strain energy than that for the Ni sublattice. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  11. Eddy Current Inversion Models for Estimating Dimensions of Defects in Multilayered Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In eddy current nondestructive evaluation, one of the principal challenges is to determine the dimensions of defects in multilayered structures from the measured signals. It is a typical inverse problem which is generally considered to be nonlinear and ill-posed. In the paper, two effective approaches have been proposed to estimate the defect dimensions. The first one is a partial least squares (PLS regression method. The second one is a kernel partial least squares (KPLS regression method. The experimental research is carried out. In experiments, the eddy current signals responding to magnetic field changes are detected by a giant magnetoresistive (GMR sensor and preprocessed for noise elimination using a wavelet packet analysis (WPA method. Then, the proposed two approaches are used to construct the inversion models of defect dimension estimation. Finally, the estimation results are analyzed. The performance comparison between the proposed two approaches and the artificial neural network (ANN method is presented. The comparison results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed two methods. Between them, the KPLS regression method gives a better prediction performance than the PLS regression method at present.

  12. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  13. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne; Boer, Wim de

    2017-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  14. A spatial model to predict the incidence of neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lianfa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental exposure may play an important role in the incidences of neural tube defects (NTD of birth defects. Their influence on NTD may likely be non-linear; few studies have considered spatial autocorrelation of residuals in the estimation of NTD risk. We aimed to develop a spatial model based on generalized additive model (GAM plus cokriging to examine and model the expected incidences of NTD and make the inference of the incidence risk. Methods We developed a spatial model to predict the expected incidences of NTD at village level in Heshun County, Shanxi Province, China, a region with high NTD cases. GAM was used to establish linear and non-linear relationships between local covariates and the expected NTD incidences. We examined the following village-level covariates in the model: projected coordinates, soil types, lithodological classes, distance to watershed, rivers, faults and major roads, annual average fertilizer uses, fruit and vegetable production, gross domestic product, and the number of doctors. The residuals from GAM were assumed to be spatially auto-correlative and cokriged with regional residuals to improve the prediction. Our approach was compared with three other models, universal kriging, generalized linear regression and GAM. Cross validation was conducted for validation. Results Our model predicted the expected incidences of NTD well, with a good CV R2 of 0.80. Important predictive factors included the fertilizer uses, locations of the centroid of each village, the shortest distance to rivers and faults and lithological classes with significant spatial autocorrelation of residuals. Our model out-performed the other three methods by 16% or more in term of R2. Conclusions The variance explained by our model was approximately 80%. This modeling approach is useful for NTD epidemiological studies and intervention planning.

  15. Ordering Cost Reduction in Inventory Model with Defective Items and Backorder Price Discount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppuchamy Annadurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the real market, as unsatisfied demands occur, the longer the length of lead time is, the smaller the proportion of backorder would be. In order to make up for the inconvenience and even the losses of royal and patient customers, the supplier may offer a backorder price discount to secure orders during the shortage period. Also, ordering policies determined by conventional inventory models may be inappropriate for the situation in which an arrival lot contains some defective items. To compensate for the inconvenience of backordering and to secure orders, the supplier may offer a price discount on the stockout item. The purpose of this study is to explore a coordinated inventory model including defective arrivals by allowing the backorder price discount and ordering cost as decision variables. There are two inventory models proposed in this paper, one with normally distributed demand and another with distribution free demand. A computer code using the software Matlab 7.0 is developed to find the optimal solution and present numerical examples to illustrate the models. The results in the numerical examples indicate that the savings of the total cost are realized through ordering cost reduction and backorder price discount.

  16. Evaluation of Osteoconductive and Osteogenic Potential of a Dentin-Based Bone Substitute Using a Calvarial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the osteoconductive and osteogenic properties of processed bovine dentin using a robust rabbit calvarial defect model. In total, 16 New Zealand White rabbits were operated to create three circular defects in the calvaria. One defect was left unfilled, one filled with collected autogenous bone, and the third defect was filled with the dentin-based bone substitute. Following surgery and after a healing period of either 1 or 6 weeks, a CT scan was obtained. Following sacrificing, the tissues were processed for histological examination. The CT data showed the density in the area grafted with the dentin-based material was higher than the surrounding bone and the areas grafted with autologous bone after 1 week and 6 weeks of healing. The area left unfilled remained an empty defect after 1 week and 6 weeks. Histological examination of the defects filled with the dentin product after 6 weeks showed soft tissue encapsulation around the dentin particles. It can be concluded that the rabbit calvarial model used in this study is a robust model for the assessment of bone materials. Bovine dentin is a biostable material; however, it may not be suitable for repairing large 4-wall defects.

  17. In silico Mechano-Chemical Model of Bone Healing for the Regeneration of Critical Defects: The Effect of BMP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico O Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The healing of bone defects is a challenge for both tissue engineering and modern orthopaedics. This problem has been addressed through the study of scaffold constructs combined with mechanoregulatory theories, disregarding the influence of chemical factors and their respective delivery devices. Of the chemical factors involved in the bone healing process, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 has been identified as one of the most powerful osteoinductive proteins. The aim of this work is to develop and validate a mechano-chemical regulatory model to study the effect of BMP-2 on the healing of large bone defects in silico. We first collected a range of quantitative experimental data from the literature concerning the effects of BMP-2 on cellular activity, specifically proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and extracellular matrix production. These data were then used to define a model governed by mechano-chemical stimuli to simulate the healing of large bone defects under the following conditions: natural healing, an empty hydrogel implanted in the defect and a hydrogel soaked with BMP-2 implanted in the defect. For the latter condition, successful defect healing was predicted, in agreement with previous in vivo experiments. Further in vivo comparisons showed the potential of the model, which accurately predicted bone tissue formation during healing, bone tissue distribution across the defect and the quantity of bone inside the defect. The proposed mechano-chemical model also estimated the effect of BMP-2 on cells and the evolution of healing in large bone defects. This novel in silico tool provides valuable insight for bone tissue regeneration strategies.

  18. Modelling of dielectric hysteresis loops in ferroelectric semiconductors with charged defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozovska, Anna N; Eliseev, Eugene A

    2004-01-01

    We have proposed the phenomenological description of dielectric hysteresis loops in ferroelectric semiconductors with charged defects and prevailing extrinsic conductivity. We have modified the Landau-Ginsburg approach and shown that the macroscopic state of the aforementioned inhomogeneous system can be described by three coupled equations for three order parameters. Both the experimentally observed coercive field values well below the thermodynamic values and the various hysteresis-loop deformations (constricted and double loops) have been obtained in the framework of our model. The obtained results quantitatively explain the ferroelectric switching in such ferroelectric materials as thick PZT films

  19. [ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW RADIUS DEFECT MODEL BASED ON ULNA ANATOMICAL MEASUREMENT IN RABBITS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjiang; Guo, Ying; Mei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    To introduce a new bone defect model based on the anatomical measurement of radius and ulna in rabbits for offering a standard model for further tissue engineering research. Fifteen healthy 4-month-old New Zealand rabbits were selected for anatomic measurement and radiological measurement of the radius and ulna. Another 30 healthy 4-month-old New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into groups A, B, and C (n=10). The radius bone defect was created bilaterally in 3 groups. In group A, the periosteum and interosseous membranes were fully removed with jig-saw by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and musculus extensor digitorum. The periosteum and interosseous membranes were fully removed in group B, and only periosteum was removed in group C with electric-saw by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and flexor digitorum profundus based on anatomical analysis results of ulnar and radial measurement. The gross observation, X-ray, micro-CT three-dimensional reconstruction, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC) were observed and recorded at immediate and 15 weeks after operation. HE staining and Masson staining were performed to observe bone formation in the defect areas. Blood vessel injury (1 rabbit), tendon injury (2 rabbits), postoperative hematoma (1 rabbit), and infection (1 rabbit) occurred in group A, postoperative infection (1 rabbit) in group C, and no postoperative complications in group B; the complication rate of group A (50%) was significantly higher than that of groups B (0%) and C (10%) (P0.05). HE staining and Masson staining results showed bone formation in group A, with structure disturbance and sclerosis. New bone formed in groups B and C, cartilage cells were observed in the center of bone cells. The radius bone defect model established by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and flexor digitorum profundus is an ideal model because of better exposures, less intra-operative blood loss, less

  20. Periodontal Defects in the A116T Knock-in Murine Model of Odontohypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B L; Sheen, C R; Hatch, N E; Liu, J; Cory, E; Narisawa, S; Kiffer-Moreira, T; Sah, R L; Whyte, M P; Somerman, M J; Millán, J L

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in ALPL result in hypophosphatasia (HPP), a disease causing defective skeletal mineralization. ALPL encodes tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that promotes mineralization by reducing inorganic pyrophosphate, a mineralization inhibitor. In addition to skeletal defects, HPP causes dental defects, and a mild clinical form of HPP, odontohypophosphatasia, features only a dental phenotype. The Alpl knockout (Alpl (-/-)) mouse phenocopies severe infantile HPP, including profound skeletal and dental defects. However, the severity of disease in Alpl (-/-) mice prevents analysis at advanced ages, including studies to target rescue of dental tissues. We aimed to generate a knock-in mouse model of odontohypophosphatasia with a primarily dental phenotype, based on a mutation (c.346G>A) identified in a human kindred with autosomal dominant odontohypophosphatasia. Biochemical, skeletal, and dental analyses were performed on the resulting Alpl(+/A116T) mice to validate this model. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured 50% reduction in plasma ALP activity compared with wild-type controls. No differences in litter size, survival, or body weight were observed in Alpl(+/A116T) versus wild-type mice. The postcranial skeleton of Alpl(+/A116T) mice was normal by radiography, with no differences in femur length, cortical/trabecular structure or mineral density, or mechanical properties. Parietal bone trabecular compartment was mildly altered. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured alterations in the alveolar bone, including radiolucencies and resorptive lesions, osteoid accumulation on the alveolar bone crest, and significant differences in several bone properties measured by micro-computed tomography. Nonsignificant changes in acellular cementum did not appear to affect periodontal attachment or function, although circulating ALP activity was correlated significantly with incisor cementum thickness. The Alpl(+/A116T) mouse is the first model of odontohypophosphatasia

  1. Engraftment of Prevascularized, Tissue Engineered Constructs in a Novel Rabbit Segmental Bone Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Kaempfen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard treatment of large segmental bone defects is autologous bone transfer, which suffers from low availability and additional morbidity. Tissue engineered bone able to engraft orthotopically and a suitable animal model for pre-clinical testing are direly needed. This study aimed to evaluate engraftment of tissue-engineered bone with different prevascularization strategies in a novel segmental defect model in the rabbit humerus. Decellularized bone matrix (Tutobone seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells was used directly orthotopically or combined with a vessel and inserted immediately (1-step or only after six weeks of subcutaneous “incubation” (2-step. After 12 weeks, histological and radiological assessment was performed. Variable callus formation was observed. No bone formation or remodeling of the graft through TRAP positive osteoclasts could be detected. Instead, a variable amount of necrotic tissue formed. Although necrotic area correlated significantly with amount of vessels and the 2-step strategy had significantly more vessels than the 1-step strategy, no significant reduction of necrotic area was found. In conclusion, the animal model developed here represents a highly challenging situation, for which a suitable engineered bone graft with better prevascularization, better resorbability and higher osteogenicity has yet to be developed.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Radiant Heat Transfer in Mirror Systems Considering Deep Reflecting Surface Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing large-sized mirror concentrating systems (MCS for high-temperature solar power plants, one must have at disposal reasonably reliable and economical methods and tools, making it possible to analyze its characteristics, to predict them depending on the operation conditions and accordingly to choose the most suitable system for the solution of particular task.Experimental determination of MCS characteristics requires complicated and expensive experimentation, having significant limitations on interpretation of the results, as well as limitations imposed due to the size of the structure. Therefore it is of particular interest to develop a mathematical model capable of estimating power characteristics of MCS considering the influence of operating conditions, design features, roughness and other surface defects.For efficient solution of the tasks the model must ensure simulation of solar radiant flux as well as simulation of geometrical and optical characteristics of reflection surface and their interaction. In this connection a statistical mathematical model of radiation heat exchange based on use of Monte Carlo methods and Finite Element Method was developed and realized in the software complex, making it possible to determine main characteristics of the MCS.In this paper the main attention is given to definition of MCS radiation characteristics with account for deep reflecting surface defects (cavities, craters. Deep cavities are not typical for MCS, but their occurrence is possible during operation as a result of erosion or any physical damage. For example, for space technology it is primarily micrometeorite erosion.

  3. A New Coated Nitinol Occluder for Transcatheter Closure of Ventricular Septal Defects in a Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This study evaluated feasibility and safety of implanting the polyester-coated nitinol ventricular septal defect occluder (pcVSDO in the canine model. Methods and Results. VSD models were successfully established by transseptal ventricular septal puncture via the right jugular vein in 15 out of 18 canines. Two types of VSDOs were implanted, either with pcVSDOs (n=8 as the new type occluder group or with the commercial ventricular septal defect occluders (VSDOs, n=7, Shanghai Sharp Memory Alloy Co. Ltd. as the control group. Sheath size was 10 French (10 Fr in two groups. Then the general state of the canines was observed after implantation. ECG and TTE were performed, respectively, at 7, 30, 90 days of follow-up. The canines were sacrificed at these time points for pathological and scanning electron microscopy examination. The devices were successfully implanted in all 15 canines and were retrievable and repositionable. There was no thrombus formation on the device or occurrence of complete heart block. The pcVSDO surface implanted at day 7 was already covered with neotissue by gross examination, and it completed endothelialization at day 30, while the commercial VSDO was covered with the neotissue in 30th day and the complete endothelialization in 90th day. Conclusion. The study shows that pcVSDO is feasible and safe to close canine VSD model and has good biocompatibility and shorter time of endothelialization.

  4. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  5. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinckley, C. Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  6. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects After Oncologic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Garcia-Tutor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction in such cases, and demonstrate 3D haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning.Methods: Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600cm2. Latissimus dorsi-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland. An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. Results: The clinical series of latissimus dorsi free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the subcostal artery as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead-space.Conclusion: Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead-space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of

  7. Ball bearing defect models: A study of simulated and experimental fault signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, C.; Samantaray, A. K.; Chakraborty, G.

    2017-07-01

    Numerical model based virtual prototype of a system can serve as a tool to generate huge amount of data which replace the dependence on expensive and often difficult to conduct experiments. However, the model must be accurate enough to substitute the experiments. The abstraction level and details considered during model development depend on the purpose for which simulated data should be generated. This article concerns development of simulation models for deep groove ball bearings which are used in a variety of rotating machinery. The purpose of the model is to generate vibration signatures which usually contain features of bearing defects. Three different models with increasing level-of-complexity are considered: a bearing kinematics based planar motion block diagram model developed in MATLAB Simulink which does not explicitly consider cage and traction dynamics, a planar motion model with cage, traction and contact dynamics developed using multi-energy domain bond graph formalism in SYMBOLS software, and a detailed spatial multi-body dynamics model with complex contact and traction mechanics developed using ADAMS software. Experiments are conducted using Spectra Quest machine fault simulator with different prefabricated faulted bearings. The frequency domain characteristics of simulated and experimental vibration signals for different bearing faults are compared and conclusions are drawn regarding usefulness of the developed models.

  8. The effect of service level constraint on EPQ model with random defective rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of service level constraint on the economic production quantity (EPQ model with random defective rate. We first prove that the expected overall cost for imperfect quality EPQ model with backlogging permitted is less than or equal to that of the same model without backlogging. Secondly, the relationship between “imputed backorder cost” and maximal shortage level is derived for decision-making on whether the required service level is achievable. Then an equation is proposed for calculating the intangible backorder cost for the situation when the required service level is not attainable. By including this intangible backorder cost in the mathematical analysis, one can derive a new optimal lot-size policy that minimizes expected total costs as well as satisfies the service level constraint. Numerical example is provided to demonstrate its practical usage.

  9. Interpreting space-based trends in carbon monoxide with multiple models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Strode

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We use a series of chemical transport model and chemistry climate model simulations to investigate the observed negative trends in MOPITT CO over several regions of the world, and to examine the consistency of time-dependent emission inventories with observations. We find that simulations driven by the MACCity inventory, used for the Chemistry Climate Modeling Initiative (CCMI, reproduce the negative trends in the CO column observed by MOPITT for 2000–2010 over the eastern United States and Europe. However, the simulations have positive trends over eastern China, in contrast to the negative trends observed by MOPITT. The model bias in CO, after applying MOPITT averaging kernels, contributes to the model–observation discrepancy in the trend over eastern China. This demonstrates that biases in a model's average concentrations can influence the interpretation of the temporal trend compared to satellite observations. The total ozone column plays a role in determining the simulated tropospheric CO trends. A large positive anomaly in the simulated total ozone column in 2010 leads to a negative anomaly in OH and hence a positive anomaly in CO, contributing to the positive trend in simulated CO. These results demonstrate that accurately simulating variability in the ozone column is important for simulating and interpreting trends in CO.

  10. Defect evolution in cosmology and condensed matter quantitative analysis with the velocity-dependent one-scale model

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, C J A P

    2016-01-01

    This book sheds new light on topological defects in widely differing systems, using the Velocity-Dependent One-Scale Model to better understand their evolution. Topological defects – cosmic strings, monopoles, domain walls or others - necessarily form at cosmological (and condensed matter) phase transitions. If they are stable and long-lived they will be fossil relics of higher-energy physics. Understanding their behaviour and consequences is a key part of any serious attempt to understand the universe, and this requires modelling their evolution. The velocity-dependent one-scale model is the only fully quantitative model of defect network evolution, and the canonical model in the field. This book provides a review of the model, explaining its physical content and describing its broad range of applicability.

  11. Applying Ant Colony Algorithm and Neural Network Model to Color Deviation Defect Detection in Liquid Crystal Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Dar Lin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin Film Transistor Liquid Crystal Display (TFT-LCD has excellent properties such as lower voltage to start and less occupied space if comparing with traditional Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT. But screen flaw points and display color deviation defects on image display exist in TFT-LCD products. This research proposes a new automated visual inspection method to solve the problems. We first use multivariate Hotelling T2 statistic for integrating coordinates of color models to construct a T2 energy diagram for inspecting defects and controlling patterns in TFT-LCD display images. An Ant Colony based approach that integrates computer vision techniques is developed to detect the flaw point defects. Then, Back Propagation Network (BPN model is proposed to inspect small deviation defects of the LCD display colors. Experimental results show the proposed system can provide good effects and practicality.

  12. Evaluation of a biodegradable graft substitute in rabbit bone defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiaoBo Yang

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: These findings demonstrated that the novel biodegradable copolymers can repair large areas of cancellous bone defects. With its controllable degradation rate, it suggests that CS/PAA may be a series of useful therapeutic substitute for bone defects.

  13. Trends in hydrodesulfurization catalysis based on realistic surface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moses, P.G.; Grabow, L.C.; Fernandez Sanchez, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Trends in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity are investigated on the basis of surface properties calculated by density functional theory for a series of HDS catalysts. It is shown that approximately linear correlations exist between HS group binding energies and activation barriers of key elemen...

  14. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis for the 'initial defect in the canister' reference model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormenzana, J. L.

    2013-08-01

    In Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. Three potential causes of canister failure and radionuclide release are considered: (i) the presence of an initial defect in the copper shell of one canister that penetrates the shell completely, (ii) corrosion of the copper overpack, that occurs more rapidly if buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (iii) shear movement on fractures intersecting the deposition hole. All three failure modes are analysed deterministically in Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, and for the 'initial defect in the canister' reference model a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) has been carried out. The main steps of the PSA have been: quantification of the uncertainties in the model input parameters through the creation of probability density distributions (PDFs), Monte Carlo simulations of the evolution of the system up to 106 years using parameters values sampled from the previous PDFs. Monte Carlo simulations with 10,000 individual calculations (realisations) have been used in the PSA, quantification of the uncertainty in the model outputs due to uncertainty in the input parameters (uncertainty analysis), and identification of the parameters whose uncertainty have the greatest effect on the uncertainty in the model outputs (sensitivity analysis) Since the biosphere is not included in the Monte Carlo simulations of the system, the model outputs studied are not doses, but total and radionuclide-specific normalised release rates from the near-field and to the biosphere. These outputs are calculated dividing the activity release rates by the constraints on the activity fluxes to the environment set out by the Finnish regulator. Two different cases are analysed in the PSA: (i) the 'hole forever' case, in which the small hole through the copper overpack remains unchanged during the assessment

  15. A model for the molecular underpinnings of tooth defects in Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Venugopalan, Shankar R.; Cao, Huojun; Pinho, Flavia O.; Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Semina, Elena V.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Axenfeld–Rieger Syndrome (ARS) present various dental abnormalities, including hypodontia, and enamel hypoplasia. ARS is genetically associated with mutations in the PITX2 gene, which encodes one of the earliest transcription factors to initiate tooth development. Thus, Pitx2 has long been considered as an upstream regulator of the transcriptional hierarchy in early tooth development. However, because Pitx2 is also a major regulator of later stages of tooth development, especially during amelogenesis, it is unclear how mutant forms cause ARS dental anomalies. In this report, we outline the transcriptional mechanism that is defective in ARS. We demonstrate that during normal tooth development Pitx2 activates Amelogenin (Amel) expression, whose product is required for enamel formation, and that this regulation is perturbed by missense PITX2 mutations found in ARS patients. We further show that Pitx2-mediated Amel activation is controlled by chromatin-associated factor Hmgn2, and that Hmgn2 prevents Pitx2 from efficiently binding to and activating the Amel promoter. Consistent with a physiological significance to this interaction, we show that K14-Hmgn2 transgenic mice display a severe loss of Amel expression on the labial side of the lower incisors, as well as enamel hypoplasia—consistent with the human ARS phenotype. Collectively, these findings define transcriptional mechanisms involved in normal tooth development and shed light on the molecular underpinnings of the enamel defect observed in ARS patients who carry PITX2 mutations. Moreover, our findings validate the etiology of the enamel defect in a novel mouse model of ARS. PMID:23975681

  16. Prediction of guided wave scattering by defects in rails using numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Craig S.; Loveday, Philip W.

    2014-02-01

    A guided wave based monitoring system for welded freight rail, has previously been developed. The current arrangement consists of alternating transmit and receive stations positioned roughly 1 km apart, and is designed to reliably detect complete breaks in a rail. Current research efforts are focused on extending this system to include a pulse-echo mode of operation in order to detect, locate, monitor and possibly characterize damage, before a complete break occurs. For monitoring and inspection applications, it is beneficial to be able to distinguish between scattering defects which do not represent damage (such as welds) and cracks which could result in rail breaks. In this paper we investigate the complex interaction between selected propagating modes and various weld and crack geometries in an attempt to relate scattering behaviour to defect geometry. An efficient hybrid method is employed which models the volume containing the defect with conventional solid finite elements, while the semi-infinite incoming and outgoing waveguides are accounted for using the SAFE method. Four candidate modes, suitable for long range propagation, are identified and evaluated. A weighted average reflection coefficient is used as a measure to quantify mode conversion between these four modes, and results are represented graphically in the form of reflection maps. The results show that it should be possible to distinguish between a large crack in the crown of the rail and a weld. We also show that there may be difficulties associated with reliably identifying cracks in the web as well as cracks in the crown which occur at a thermite weld. We suspect that it will be difficult to detect damage in the foot of the rail.

  17. Implementation of Chaotic Gaussian Particle Swarm Optimization for Optimize Learning-to-Rank Software Defect Prediction Model Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchari, M. A.; Mardiyanto, S.; Hendradjaya, B.

    2018-03-01

    Finding the existence of software defect as early as possible is the purpose of research about software defect prediction. Software defect prediction activity is required to not only state the existence of defects, but also to be able to give a list of priorities which modules require a more intensive test. Therefore, the allocation of test resources can be managed efficiently. Learning to rank is one of the approach that can provide defect module ranking data for the purposes of software testing. In this study, we propose a meta-heuristic chaotic Gaussian particle swarm optimization to improve the accuracy of learning to rank software defect prediction approach. We have used 11 public benchmark data sets as experimental data. Our overall results has demonstrated that the prediction models construct using Chaotic Gaussian Particle Swarm Optimization gets better accuracy on 5 data sets, ties in 5 data sets and gets worse in 1 data sets. Thus, we conclude that the application of Chaotic Gaussian Particle Swarm Optimization in Learning-to-Rank approach can improve the accuracy of the defect module ranking in data sets that have high-dimensional features.

  18. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  19. Prediction of power ramp defects - development of a physically based model and evaluation of existing criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Kohn, E.

    2001-01-01

    Power-ramp induced fuel failure is not a problem in the present CANDU reactors. The current empirical correlations that define probability of failure do not agree one-with-another and do not allow extrapolation outside the database. A new methodology, based on physical processes, is presented and compared to data. The methodology calculates the pre-ramp sheath stress and the incremental stress during the ramp, and whether or not there is a defect is predicted based on a failure threshold stress. The proposed model confirms the deductions made by daSilva from an empirical 'fit' to data from the 1988 PNGS power ramp failure incident. It is recommended that daSilvas' correlation be used as reference for OPG (Ontario Power Generation) power reactor fuel, and that extrapolation be performed using the new model. (author)

  20. Comparison of Decadal Water Storage Trends from Global Hydrological Models and GRACE Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Save, H.; Sun, A. Y.; Mueller Schmied, H.; Van Beek, L. P.; Wiese, D. N.; Wada, Y.; Long, D.; Reedy, R. C.; Doll, P. M.; Longuevergne, L.

    2017-12-01

    Global hydrology is increasingly being evaluated using models; however, the reliability of these global models is not well known. In this study we compared decadal trends (2002-2014) in land water storage from 7 global models (WGHM, PCR-GLOBWB, and GLDAS: NOAH, MOSAIC, VIC, CLM, and CLSM) to storage trends from new GRACE satellite mascon solutions (CSR-M and JPL-M). The analysis was conducted over 186 river basins, representing about 60% of the global land area. Modeled total water storage trends agree with those from GRACE-derived trends that are within ±0.5 km3/yr but greatly underestimate large declining and rising trends outside this range. Large declining trends are found mostly in intensively irrigated basins and in some basins in northern latitudes. Rising trends are found in basins with little or no irrigation and are generally related to increasing trends in precipitation. The largest decline is found in the Ganges (-12 km3/yr) and the largest rise in the Amazon (43 km3/yr). Differences between models and GRACE are greatest in large basins (>0.5x106 km2) mostly in humid regions. There is very little agreement in storage trends between models and GRACE and among the models with values of r2 mostly <0.1. Various factors can contribute to discrepancies in water storage trends between models and GRACE, including uncertainties in precipitation, model calibration, storage capacity, and water use in models and uncertainties in GRACE data related to processing, glacier leakage, and glacial isostatic adjustment. The GRACE data indicate that land has a large capacity to store water over decadal timescales that is underrepresented by the models. The storage capacity in the modeled soil and groundwater compartments may be insufficient to accommodate the range in water storage variations shown by GRACE data. The inability of the models to capture the large storage trends indicates that model projections of climate and human-induced changes in water storage may be

  1. Tropospheric ozone trend over Beijing from 2001-2010: ozonesonde measurements and modeling analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.; Konopka, P.; Liu, Y.; Chen, H.; Müller, R.; Plöger, F.; Riese, M.; Cai, Z.; Lü, D.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of ozonesonde data and numerical simulations of the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS), the trend of tropospheric ozone (O3) during 2002–2010 over Beijing was investigated. Tropospheric ozone over Beijing shows a winter minimum and a broad summer maximum with a clear positive trend in the maximum summer ozone concentration over the last decade. The observed significant trend of tropospheric column ozone is mainly caused by photoche...

  2. Tropospheric ozone trend over Beijing from 2002–2010: ozonesonde measurements and modeling analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Wang; P. Konopka; Y. Liu; H. Chen; R. Müller; F. Plöger; M. Riese; Z. Cai; D. Lü

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of ozonesonde data and numerical simulations of the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS), the trend of tropospheric ozone (O3) during 2002–2010 over Beijing was investigated. Tropospheric ozone over Beijing shows a winter minimum and a broad summer maximum with a clear positive trend in the maximum summer ozone concentration over the last decade. The observed significant trend of tropospheric column ozone for the entire time serie...

  3. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Trimborn

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome. The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608 containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  4. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Song; J Willer; P Scherer; J Panzer; A Kugath; E Skordalakes; R Gregg; G Willer; R Balice-Gordon

    2011-12-31

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development.

  5. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy irradiation experiments with cluster dynamics modeling to study nanoscale defect agglomeration in structural metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.; Li Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combinatorial approach that integrates state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in situ irradiation experiments and high-performance computing techniques to study irradiation defect dynamics in metals. Here, we have studied the evolution of visible defect clusters in nanometer-thick molybdenum foils under 1 MeV krypton ion irradiation at 80 °C through both cluster dynamics modeling and in situ TEM experiments. The experimental details are reported elsewhere; we focus here on the details of model construction and comparing the model with the experiments. The model incorporates continuous production of point defects and/or small clusters, and the accompanying interactions, which include clustering, recombination and loss to the surfaces that result from the diffusion of the mobile defects. To account for the strong surface effect in thin TEM foils, the model includes one-dimensional spatial dependence along the foil depth, and explicitly treats the surfaces as black sinks. The rich amount of data (cluster number density and size distribution at a variety of foil thickness, irradiation dose and dose rate) offered by the advanced in situ experiments has allowed close comparisons with computer modeling and permitted significant validation and optimization of the model in terms of both physical model construct (damage production mode, identities of mobile defects) and parameterization (diffusivities of mobile defects). The optimized model exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the in situ TEM experiments. The combinatorial approach is expected to bring a unique opportunity for the study of radiation damage in structural materials.

  6. Fragment Hamiltonian model potential for nickel: metallic character and defects in crystalline lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, Steven M.; Atlas, Susan R.; Baskes, Michael I.

    2014-06-01

    The Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model is introduced as the basis for a new class of atomistic potentials that may be viewed as generalizations of the embedded atom method (EAM) and related atomistic potentials. Many metals and alloys have been successfully modeled by this method and other related methods, but the nature of the metallic character in the models has been lost. Here we attempt to recover this character, at a qualitative level, by defining an embedding energy as a function of two variables through the FH model. One of these variables, called the ionicity, is associated with the established concept of background density in EAM models. The FH embedding energy is composed of two types of energies, one for energies of different states of an atom and the other for hopping energies that transform an atom from one state to another. A combination of the energies for the states of an atom yield a local gap energy that conforms to a generalized definition of the ‘Hubbard-U’ energy. The hopping energies compete with the gap energy to provide a notion of metallic behavior in an atomic-scale model. Lattices of nickel with different coordinations and spatial dimensions, elastic constants, energies for several types of defects in three-dimensional lattices and two surface energies are calculated to show the strengths and limitations of the current implementation and to explore their metallic character.

  7. Oxygen Nonstoichiometry and Defect Chemistry Modeling of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2-delta

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2010-01-01

    The oxygen nonstoichiometry (delta) of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2−delta has been measured as a function of PO2 at temperatures between 600 and 900°C by coulometric titration and thermogravimetry. An ideal solution defect model, a regular solution model, and a defect association model, taking into account the association of reduced dopant species and oxygen vacancies, were unable to reproduce the experimental results. However, excellent agreement with the experimentally determined oxygen nonstoichiometry co...

  8. Effect of Hydroxyapatite on Bone Integration in a Rabbit Tibial Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Taek; Kim, Chul-Hong; Ahn, Hee-Bae; Rho, Mee-Sook; Jeong, Min-Ho; Sun, Sang-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to prepare hydroxyapatite (HA) and then characterize its effect on bone integration in a rabbit tibial defect model. The bone formation with different designs of HA was compared and the bony integration of several graft materials was investigated qualitatively by radiologic and histologic study. Methods Ten rabbits were included in this study; two holes were drilled bilaterally across the near cortex and the four holes in each rabbit were divided into four treatment groups (HAP, hydroxyapatite powder; HAC, hydroxyapatite cylinder; HA/TCP, hydroxyapatite/tri-calcium phosphate cylinder, and titanium cylinder). The volume of bone ingrowth and the change of bone mineral density were statistically calculated by computed tomography five times for each treatment group at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after grafting. Histologic analysis was performed at 8 weeks after grafting. Results The HAP group showed the most pronounced effect on the bone ingrowth surface area, which seen at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after graft (p 0.05). On histological examination, the HAP group revealed well-recovered cortical bone, but the bone was irregularly thickened and haphazardly admixed with powder. The HAC group showed similar histological features to those of the HA/TCP group; the cortical surface of the newly developed bone was smooth and the bone matrix on the surface of the cylinder was regularly arranged. Conclusions We concluded that both the hydroxyapatite powder and cylinder models investigated in our study may be suitable as a bone substitute in the rabbit tibial defect model, but their characteristic properties are quite different. In contrast to hydroxyapatite powder, which showed better results for the bone ingrowth surface, the hydroxyapatite cylinder showed better results for the sustained morphology. PMID:20514266

  9. Point Defects in 3D and 1D Nanomaterials: The Model Case of Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauth, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide is one of the most important oxides for applications in energy and environment, such as solar cells, photocatalysis, lithium-ion batteries. In recent years, new forms of titanium dioxide with unusual structure and/or morphology have been developed, including nanocrystals, nanotubes or nanowires. We have studied in detail the point defect chemistry in nanocrystalline TiO 2 powders and ceramics. There can be a change from predominant Frenkel to Schottky disorder, depending on the experimental conditions, e.g. temperature and oxygen partial pressure. We have also studied the local environment of various dopants with similar ion radius, but different ion charge (Zn 2+ , Y 3+ , Sn 4+ , Zr 4+ , Nb 5+ ) in TiO 2 nanopowders and nanoceramics by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy. Interfacial segregation of acceptors was demonstrated, but donors and isovalent ions do not segregate. An electrostatic 'space charge' segregation model is applied, which explains well the observed phenomena.

  10. Genetic Enhancement of Limb Defects in a Mouse Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; CALOF, ANNE L.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl+/− mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl+/− mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl+/− mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. PMID:27120109

  11. Evaluation of trends in high temperature extremes in north-western Europe in regional climate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, E; Hazeleger, W; Van Oldenborgh, G J; Sterl, A

    2013-01-01

    Projections of future changes in weather extremes on the regional and local scale depend on a realistic representation of trends in extremes in regional climate models (RCMs). We have tested this assumption for moderate high temperature extremes (the annual maximum of the daily maximum 2 m temperature, T ann.max ). Linear trends in T ann.max from historical runs of 14 RCMs driven by atmospheric reanalysis data are compared with trends in gridded station data. The ensemble of RCMs significantly underestimates the observed trends over most of the north-western European land surface. Individual models do not fare much better, with even the best performing models underestimating observed trends over large areas. We argue that the inability of RCMs to reproduce observed trends is probably not due to errors in large-scale circulation. There is also no significant correlation between the RCM T ann.max trends and trends in radiation or Bowen ratio. We conclude that care should be taken when using RCM data for adaptation decisions. (letter)

  12. [Reconstruction of mandibular bone defects using three-dimensional skull model and individualized titanium prosthetics from computer assisted design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenyu; Li, Guohua; Liu, Yanpu; He, Lisheng; Zhou, Bing; Li, Dichen

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of reconstruction of mandibular bone defects using three-dimensional skull model and individualized titanium prosthetics from computer assisted design. Between July 2002 and November 2009, 9 patients with mandibular defects accepted restorative operation using individualized bone prosthetics. Among 9 cases, 4 were male and 5 were female, aged 19-55 years. The causes of mandibulectomy were benign lesions in 8 patients and carcinoma of gingival in 1 patient. Mandibular defects exceeded midline in 2 cases, involved condylar in 4 cases, and was limited in one side without involvement of temporo-mandibular joint in 3 cases. The range of bone defects was 9.0 cm x 2.5 cm-17.0 cm x 2.5 cm. The preoperative spiral CT scan was performed and three-dimensional skull model was obtained. Titanium prosthetics of mandibular defects were designed and fabricated through multi-step procedure of reverse engineering and rapid prototyping. Titanium prosthetics were used for one-stage repair of mandibular bone defects, then two-stage implant denture was performed after 6 months. The individualized titanium prosthetics were inserted smoothly with one-stage operative time of 10-23 minutes. All the cases achieved incision healing by first intention and the oblique mandibular movement was corrected. They all got satisfactory face, had satisfactory contour and good occlusion. In two-stage operation, no loosening of the implants was observed and the abutments were in good position with corresponding teeth which were designed ideally before operation. All cases got satisfactory results after 1-9 years of follow-up. At last follow-up, X-ray examinations showed no loosening of implants with symmetry contour. Computer assisted design and three-dimensional skull model techniques could accomplish the design and manufacture of individualized prosthetic for the repair of mandibular bone defects.

  13. Rolling Process Modeling Report: Finite-Element Prediction of Roll Separating Force and Rolling Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulami, Ayoub [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Paxton, Dean M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-04-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum (U-10Mo) alloy plate-type fuel for the U.S. high-performance research reactors. This work supports the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll separating forces and rolling defects. Simulations were performed using a finite-element model developed using the commercial code LS-Dyna. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel have been conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll-pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. This report discusses various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., dog-boning and thickness non-uniformity).

  14. New trends in parameter identification for mathematical models

    CERN Document Server

    Leitão, Antonio; Zubelli, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    The Proceedings volume contains 16 contributions to the IMPA conference “New Trends in Parameter Identification for Mathematical Models”, Rio de Janeiro, Oct 30 – Nov 3, 2017, integrating the “Chemnitz Symposium on Inverse Problems on Tour”.  This conference is part of the “Thematic Program on Parameter Identification in Mathematical Models” organized  at IMPA in October and November 2017. One goal is to foster the scientific collaboration between mathematicians and engineers from the Brazialian, European and Asian communities. Main topics are iterative and variational regularization methods in Hilbert and Banach spaces for the stable approximate solution of ill-posed inverse problems, novel methods for parameter identification in partial differential equations, problems of tomography ,  solution of coupled conduction-radiation problems at high temperatures, and the statistical solution of inverse problems with applications in physics.

  15. Acamprosate rescues neuronal defects in the Drosophila model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Russell L; Thompson, Rachel L; Bantel, Andrew P; Tessier, Charles R

    2018-02-15

    Several off-label studies have shown that acamprosate can provide some clinical benefits in youth with Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), an autism spectrum disorder caused by loss of function of the highly conserved FMR1 gene. This study investigated the ability of acamprosate to rescue cellular, molecular and behavioral defects in the Drosophila model of FXS. A high (100μM) and low (10μM) dose of acamprosate was fed to Drosophila FXS (dfmr1 null) or genetic control (w 1118 ) larvae and then analyzed in multiple paradigms. A larval crawling assay was used to monitor aberrant FXS behavior, overgrowth of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) was quantified to assess neuronal development, and quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate expression of deregulated cbp53E mRNA. Acamprosate treatment partially or completely rescued all of the FXS phenotypes analyzed, according to dose. High doses rescued cellular overgrowth and dysregulated cbp53E mRNA expression, but aberrant crawling behavior was not affected. Low doses of acamprosate, however, did not affect synapse number at the NMJ, but could rescue NMJ overgrowth, locomotor defects, and cbp53E mRNA expression. This dual nature of acamprosate suggests multiple molecular mechanisms may be involved in acamprosate function depending on the dosage used. Acamprosate may be a useful therapy for FXS and potentially other autism spectrum disorders. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved with different doses of this drug will likely be necessary to obtain optimal results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Plexin-Semaphorin Signaling Modifies Neuromuscular Defects in a Drosophila Model of Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J. Grice

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in GARS, encoding the ubiquitous enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS, cause peripheral nerve degeneration and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D (CMT2D. This genetic disorder exemplifies a recurring paradigm in neurodegeneration, in which mutations in essential genes cause selective degeneration of the nervous system. Recent evidence suggests that the mechanism underlying CMT2D involves extracellular neomorphic binding of mutant GlyRS to neuronally-expressed proteins. Consistent with this, our previous studies indicate a non-cell autonomous mechanism, whereby mutant GlyRS is secreted and interacts with the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. In this Drosophila model for CMT2D, we have previously shown that mutant gars expression decreases viability and larval motor function, and causes a concurrent build-up of mutant GlyRS at the larval neuromuscular presynapse. Here, we report additional phenotypes that closely mimic the axonal branching defects of Drosophila plexin transmembrane receptor mutants, implying interference of plexin signaling in gars mutants. Individual dosage reduction of two Drosophila Plexins, plexin A (plexA and B (plexB enhances and represses the viability and larval motor defects caused by mutant GlyRS, respectively. However, we find plexB levels, but not plexA levels, modify mutant GlyRS association with the presynaptic membrane. Furthermore, increasing availability of the plexB ligand, Semaphorin-2a (Sema2a, alleviates the pathology and the build-up of mutant GlyRS, suggesting competition for plexB binding may be occurring between these two ligands. This toxic gain-of-function and subversion of neurodevelopmental processes indicate that signaling pathways governing axonal guidance could be integral to neuropathology and may underlie the non-cell autonomous CMT2D mechanism.

  17. Temperature trends during the Present and Last Interglacial periods - a multi-model-data comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, P.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Martrat, B.; Charbit, S.; Renssen, H.; Gröger, M.; Krebs-Kanzow, U.; Lohmann, G.; Lunt, D. J.; Pfeiffer, M.; Phipps, S. J.; Prange, M.; Ritz, S. P.; Schulz, M.; Stenni, B.; Stone, E. J.; Varma, V.

    2014-09-01

    Though primarily driven by insolation changes associated with well-known variations in Earth's astronomical parameters, the response of the climate system during interglacials includes a diversity of feedbacks involving the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, vegetation and land ice. A thorough multi-model-data comparison is essential to assess the ability of climate models to resolve interglacial temperature trends and to help in understanding the recorded climatic signal and the underlying climate dynamics. We present the first multi-model-data comparison of transient millennial-scale temperature changes through two intervals of the Present Interglacial (PIG; 8-1.2 ka) and the Last Interglacial (LIG; 123-116.2 ka) periods. We include temperature trends simulated by 9 different climate models, alkenone-based temperature reconstructions from 117 globally distributed locations (about 45% of them within the LIG) and 12 ice-core-based temperature trends from Greenland and Antarctica (50% of them within the LIG). The definitions of these specific interglacial intervals enable a consistent inter-comparison of the two intervals because both are characterised by minor changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and more importantly by insolation trends that show clear similarities. Our analysis shows that in general the reconstructed PIG and LIG Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitude cooling compares well with multi-model, mean-temperature trends for the warmest months and that these cooling trends reflect a linear response to the warmest-month insolation decrease over the interglacial intervals. The most notable exception is the strong LIG cooling trend reconstructed from Greenland ice cores that is not simulated by any of the models. A striking model-data mismatch is found for both the PIG and the LIG over large parts of the mid-to-high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere where the data depicts negative temperature trends that are not in agreement with near zero

  18. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung W; Gerencser, Akos A; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R; Gibson, Bradford W; Nicholls, David G; Bredesen, Dale E; Brand, Martin D

    2012-11-21

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months, and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to age-matched controls. No consistent bioenergetic deficiencies were detected in synaptosomes from the three models; only APP/PS cortical synaptosomes from 14-month-old mice showed an increase in respiration associated with proton leak. J20 mice were chosen for a highly stringent investigation of mitochondrial function and content. There were no significant differences in the quality of the synaptosomal preparations or the mitochondrial volume fraction. Furthermore, respiratory variables, calcium handling, and membrane potentials of synaptosomes from symptomatic J20 mice under calcium-imposed stress were not consistently impaired. The recovery of marker proteins during synaptosome preparation was the same, ruling out the possibility that the lack of functional bioenergetic defects in synaptosomes from J20 mice was due to the selective loss of damaged synaptosomes during sample preparation. Our results support the conclusion that the intrinsic bioenergetic capacities of presynaptic nerve terminals are maintained in these symptomatic AD mouse models.

  19. Zebrafish models for dyskeratosis congenita reveal critical roles of p53 activation contributing to hematopoietic defects through RNA processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome in which hematopoietic defects are the main cause of mortality. The most studied gene responsible for DC pathogenesis is DKC1 while mutations in several other genes encoding components of the H/ACA RNP telomerase complex, which is involved in ribosomal RNA(rRNA processing and telomere maintenance, have also been implicated. GAR1/nola1 is one of the four core proteins of the H/ACA RNP complex. Through comparative analysis of morpholino oligonucleotide induced knockdown of dkc1 and a retrovirus insertion induced mutation of GAR1/nola1 in zebrafish, we demonstrate that hematopoietic defects are specifically recapitulated in these models and that these defects are significantly reduced in a p53 null mutant background. We further show that changes in telomerase activity are undetectable at the early stages of DC pathogenesis but rRNA processing is clearly defective. Our data therefore support a model that deficiency in dkc1 and nola1 in the H/ACA RNP complex likely contributes to the hematopoietic phenotype through p53 activation associated with rRNA processing defects rather than telomerase deficiency during the initial stage of DC pathogenesis.

  20. Modeling the dynamic behavior of railway track taking into account the occurrence of defects in the system wheel-rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of wheel defects on the development of rail defects up to a state where rail prompt replacement becomes necessary taking into account different models of the dynamic contact between a wheel and a rail. In particular, the quasistatic Hertz model, the linear elastic model and the elastoplastic Aleksandrov-Kadomtsev model. Based on the model of the wheel-rail contact the maximum stresses are determined which take place in the rail in the presence of wheel defects (e.g. flat spot, weld-on deposit, etc.. In this paper, the solution of the inverse problem is presented, i.e., investigation of the influence of the strength of a wheel impact upon rails on wheel defects as well as evaluation of the stresses emerging in rails. During the motion of a railway vehicle, the wheel pair position in relation to rails changes significantly, which causes various combinations of wheel-rail contact areas. Even provided the constant axial load, the normal stresses will substantially change due to the differences in the radii of curvature of contact surfaces of these areas, as well as movement velocities of railway vehicles.

  1. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  2. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  3. Evaluation of Bone Regeneration on Polyhydroxyethyl-polymethyl Methacrylate Membrane in a Rabbit Calvarial Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Somin; Hwang, Yawon; Kashif, Muhammad; Jeong, Dosun; Kim, Gonhyung

    This study was conducted to evaluate the capacity of guiding bone regeneration of polyhydroxyethyl-polymethyl methacrylate (PHEMA-PMMA) membrane as a guided tissue regeneration membrane for bone defects. Two 8-mm diameter transosseous round defects were made at the parietal bone of 18 New Zealand White rabbits. Defects were covered with or without PHEMA-PMMA membrane. Radiological and histological evaluation revealed that the bone tissue over the defect was more regenerated with time in both groups. However, there was significantly more bone regeneration at 8 weeks in the experimental group than the control group (p<0.05). There was no sign of membrane degradation or tissue inflammation and no invasion of muscle and fibrous tissue into defects. PHEMA-PMMA is a potential material for guided tissue regeneration membrane as it induces no adverse tissue reaction and effectively supports selective bone regeneration. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Development and evaluation of multi-agent models predicting Twitter trends in multiple domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, T.; Maanen, P.P. van; Meeuwissen, E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns multi-agent models predicting Twitter trends. We use a step-wise approach to develop a novel agent-based model with the following properties: (1) it uses individual behavior parameters for a set of Twitter users and (2) it uses a retweet graph to model the underlying social

  5. Modelling surface run-off and trends analysis over India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responsible for run-off generation plays a major role in run-off modelling at region scales. Remote sensing, GIS and advancement of the computer technology based evaluation of land surface prop- erties at spatial and temporal scales are very useful input data for hydrological models. Using remote sensing data is not only ...

  6. 3D imaging acquisition, modeling, and prototyping for facial defects reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Cavagnini, Gianluca; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach that combines optical three-dimensional imaging, reverse engineering (RE) and rapid prototyping (RP) for mold production in the prosthetic reconstruction of facial prostheses is presented. A commercial laser-stripe digitizer is used to perform the multiview acquisition of the patient's face; the point clouds are aligned and merged in order to obtain a polygonal model, which is then edited to sculpture the virtual prothesis. Two physical models of both the deformed face and the 'repaired' face are obtained: they differ only in the defect zone. Depending on the material used for the actual prosthesis, the two prototypes can be used either to directly cast the final prosthesis or to fabricate the positive wax pattern. Two case studies are presented, referring to prostetic reconstructions of an eye and of a nose. The results demonstrate the advantages over conventional techniques as well as the improvements with respect to known automated manufacturing techniques in the mold construction. The proposed method results into decreased patient's disconfort, reduced dependence on the anaplasthologist skill, increased repeatability and efficiency of the whole process.

  7. Modeling Defects, Shape Evolution, and Programmed Auto-origami in Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eKonya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystal elastomers represent a novel class of programmable shape-transforming materials whose shape change trajectory is encoded in the material’s nematic director field. Using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element elastodynamics simulation, we model a variety of different actuation geometries and device designs: thin films containing topological defects, patterns that induce formation of folds and twists, and a bas-relief structure. The inclusion of finite bending energy in the simulation model reveals features of actuation trajectory that may be absent when bending energy is neglected. We examine geometries with a director pattern uniform through the film thickness encoding multiple regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Simulations indicate that heating such a system uniformly produces a disordered state with curved regions emerging randomly in both directions due to the film’s up/down symmetry. By contrast, applying a thermal gradient by heating the material first on one side breaks up/down symmetry and results in a deterministic trajectory producing a more ordered final shape. We demonstrate that a folding zone design containing cut-out areas accommodates transverse displacements without warping or buckling; and demonstrate that bas-relief and more complex bent/twisted structures can be assembled by combining simple design motifs.

  8. Structure, Raman spectra and defect chemistry modelling of conductive pyrochlore oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.; Glerup, M.; Holtappels, P.

    2000-01-01

    Mixed ionic-electronic conducting pyrochlore structure oxides, with Pr and Gd on the A site and Zr, Mn, Ce, Sn, In, Mo, and Ti on the B site, were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Mn and In have a solubility around x = 0.1-0.2 in Pr2Zr2-xMnxO7 and Pr2Sn2-xInxO7......-O(x) and V-O on the O site, interstitial oxygens O-i", and delocalised electrons and electron holes. Four mass action law expressions govern such a model. The defect model can rationalise why home-valent doping, i.e. substitution of Zr(4+) by Ce(4+), can lead to an increase in ionic conductivity....... The calculated Brouwer diagram for Pr2Zr1.6Ce0.4O7+/-delta is shown. This composition has a transition from mixed ionic p-type to presumably pure ionic conduction around pO(2) = 10(-7.5) atm. At pO(2)

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel heterozygous GRN mutation (progranulin [PGRN] S116X. In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X induced pluripotent stem cells, the levels of intracellular and secreted PGRN were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of PGRN haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by PGRN expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with PGRN deficiency, and provide a compelling model for studying PGRN-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies.

  10. Astrocyte-secreted thrombospondin-1 modulates synapse and spine defects in the fragile X mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Connie; Lau, Sally K M; Doering, Laurie C

    2016-08-02

    Astrocytes are key participants in various aspects of brain development and function, many of which are executed via secreted proteins. Defects in astrocyte signaling are implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by abnormal neural circuitry such as Fragile X syndrome (FXS). In animal models of FXS, the loss in expression of the Fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP) from astrocytes is associated with delayed dendrite maturation and improper synapse formation; however, the effect of astrocyte-derived factors on the development of neurons is not known. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an important astrocyte-secreted protein that is involved in the regulation of spine development and synaptogenesis. In this study, we found that cultured astrocytes isolated from an Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1 KO) mouse model of FXS displayed a significant decrease in TSP-1 protein expression compared to the wildtype (WT) astrocytes. Correspondingly, Fmr1 KO hippocampal neurons exhibited morphological deficits in dendritic spines and alterations in excitatory synapse formation following long-term culture. All spine and synaptic abnormalities were prevented in the presence of either astrocyte-conditioned media or a feeder layer derived from FMRP-expressing astrocytes, or following the application of exogenous TSP-1. Importantly, this work demonstrates the integral role of astrocyte-secreted signals in the establishment of neuronal communication and identifies soluble TSP-1 as a potential therapeutic target for Fragile X syndrome.

  11. Structural defects in monocrystalline silicon: from radiation ones to growing and technological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimenko, N.N.; Pavlyuchenko, M.N.; Dzhamanbalin, K.K.

    2001-01-01

    The systematical review of properties and conditions of radiation structures in monocrystalline silicon including own defects (elementary and complex, disordered fields) as well as defect-impurity formations is presented. The most typical examples of principle effects influence of known defects on radiation-induced processes (phase transformations, diffusion and heteration and others are considered. Experimental facts and models of silicon radiation amorphization have been analyzed in comparison of state of the radiation amorphization radiation problem of metals and alloys. The up-to-date status of the problem of the radiation defects physics are discussed, including end-of-range -, n+-, rod-like- defects. The phenomenon self-organization in crystals with defects has been considered. The examples of directed using radiation defects merged in independent trend - defects engineering - are given

  12. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  13. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  14. Thermodynamic properties of nonstoichiometric H-Nb2 Osub(5-x) derived from a statistical model of its defect structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, O.F.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical method for the treatment of the defect structure of oxides is applied to H-Nb 2 Osub(5-x) and its thermodynamic properties are derived as a function of x and temperature. The results based on a model of Nb O 3 vacancy clusters located at the tetrahedral columns of the structure presented very good agreement with experimental data in the literature [2]. Further, the predicted arrangement of the clusters of vacancies along the columns at the limiting composition of the H-Nb 2 O 5 phase indicates, according to recent electron microscopy experiments [18, 19], that the initial step of the transformation is the collapse of the structure around rows of defective sites along the columns, involving Andersson and Wadsley's [20] cooperative migration of atoms. The limiting compositions of the H-Nb 2 O 5 and Nb 53 O 132 phases are also correctly predicted on the basis of electrostatic interactions among defect units only. Thus elastic interactions among planar defects appear to affect only the arrangement of such defects, and not the compositions of the initial and final compounds. (author)

  15. Models of marine molluscan diseases: Trends and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eric N; Hofmann, Eileen E

    2015-10-01

    Disease effects on host population dynamics and the transmission of pathogens between hosts are two important challenges for understanding how epizootics wax and wane and how disease influences host population dynamics. For the management of marine shellfish resources, marine diseases pose additional challenges in early intervention after the appearance of disease, management of the diseased population to limit a decline in host abundance, and application of measures to restrain that decline once it occurs. Mathematical models provide one approach for quantifying these effects and addressing the competing goals of managing the diseased population versus managing the disease. The majority of models for molluscan diseases fall into three categories distinguished by these competing goals. (1) Models that consider disease effects on the host population tend to focus on pathogen proliferation within the host. Many of the well-known molluscan diseases are pandemic, in that they routinely reach high prevalence rapidly over large geographic expanses, are characterized by transmission that does not depend upon a local source, and exert a significant influence on host population dynamics. Models focused on disease proliferation examine the influence of environmental change on host population metrics and provide a basis to better manage diseased stocks. Such models are readily adapted to questions of fishery management and habitat restoration. (2) Transmission models are designed to understand the mechanisms triggering epizootics, identify factors impeding epizootic development, and evaluate controls on the rate of disease spread over the host's range. Transmission models have been used extensively to study terrestrial diseases, yet little attention has been given to their potential for understanding the epidemiology of marine molluscan diseases. For management of diseases of wild stocks, transmission models open up a range of options, including the application of area

  16. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Anzai

    Full Text Available The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT. After FGF-2 (0.3% or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological

  17. Integrated Supply Chain Cooperative Inventory Model with Payment Period Being Dependent on Purchasing Price under Defective Rate Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Feng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In most commercial transactions, the buyer and vendor may usually agree to postpone payment deadline. During such delayed period, the buyer is entitled to keep the products without having to pay the sale price. However, the vendor usually hopes to receive full payment as soon as possible, especially when the transaction involves valuable items; yet, the buyer would offer a higher purchasing price in exchange of a longer postponement. Therefore, we assumed such permissible delayed period is dependent on the purchasing price. As for the manufacturing side, defective products are inevitable from time to time, and not all of those defective products can be repaired. Hence, we would like to add defective production and repair rate to our proposed model and discuss how these factors may affect profits. In addition, holding cost, ordering cost, and transportation cost will also be considered as we develop the integrated inventory model with price-dependent payment period under the possible condition of defective products. We would like to find the maximum of the joint expected total profit for our model and come up with a suitable inventory policy accordingly. In the end, we have also provided a numerical example to clearly illustrate possible solutions.

  18. Non-existence of Steady State Equilibrium in the Neoclassical Growth Model with a Longevity Trend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Mikkel Nørlem

    of steady state equilibrium when considering the empirically observed trend in longevity. We extend a standard continuous time overlapping generations model by a longevity trend and are thereby able to study the properties of mortality-driven population growth. This turns out to be exceedingly complicated...... to handle, and it is shown that in general no steady state equilibrium exists. Consequently analytical results and long run implications cannot be obtained in a setting with a realistic demographic setup....

  19. Turbulent Combustion Modeling Advances, New Trends and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Echekki, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent combustion sits at the interface of two important nonlinear, multiscale phenomena: chemistry and turbulence. Its study is extremely timely in view of the need to develop new combustion technologies in order to address challenges associated with climate change, energy source uncertainty, and air pollution. Despite the fact that modeling of turbulent combustion is a subject that has been researched for a number of years, its complexity implies that key issues are still eluding, and a theoretical description that is accurate enough to make turbulent combustion models rigorous and quantitative for industrial use is still lacking. In this book, prominent experts review most of the available approaches in modeling turbulent combustion, with particular focus on the exploding increase in computational resources that has allowed the simulation of increasingly detailed phenomena. The relevant algorithms are presented, the theoretical methods are explained, and various application examples are given. The book ...

  20. External Influences on Modeled and Observed Cloud Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Kate; Zelinka, Mark; Klein, Stephen A.; Bonfils, Celine; Caldwell, Peter; Doutriaux, Charles; Santer, Benjamin D.; Taylor, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cloud response to external forcing is a major challenge for climate science. This crucial goal is complicated by intermodel differences in simulating present and future cloud cover and by observational uncertainty. This is the first formal detection and attribution study of cloud changes over the satellite era. Presented herein are CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 5) model-derived fingerprints of externally forced changes to three cloud properties: the latitudes at which the zonally averaged total cloud fraction (CLT) is maximized or minimized, the zonal average CLT at these latitudes, and the height of high clouds at these latitudes. By considering simultaneous changes in all three properties, the authors define a coherent multivariate fingerprint of cloud response to external forcing and use models from phase 5 of CMIP (CMIP5) to calculate the average time to detect these changes. It is found that given perfect satellite cloud observations beginning in 1983, the models indicate that a detectable multivariate signal should have already emerged. A search is then made for signals of external forcing in two observational datasets: ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) and PATMOS-x (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended). The datasets are both found to show a poleward migration of the zonal CLT pattern that is incompatible with forced CMIP5 models. Nevertheless, a detectable multivariate signal is predicted by models over the PATMOS-x time period and is indeed present in the dataset. Despite persistent observational uncertainties, these results present a strong case for continued efforts to improve these existing satellite observations, in addition to planning for new missions.

  1. Intercomparison of temperature trends in IPCC CMIP5 simulations with observations, reanalyses and CMIP3 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 and the climate model simulations covering 1979 through 2005, the temperature trends and their uncertainties have been examined to note the similarities or differences compared to the radiosonde observations, reanalyses and the third Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 simulations. The results show noticeable discrepancies for the estimated temperature trends in the four data groups (radiosonde, reanalysis, CMIP3 and CMIP5, although similarities can be observed. Compared to the CMIP3 model simulations, the simulations in some of the CMIP5 models were improved. The CMIP5 models displayed a negative temperature trend in the stratosphere closer to the strong negative trend seen in the observations. However, the positive tropospheric trend in the tropics is overestimated by the CMIP5 models relative to CMIP3 models. While some of the models produce temperature trend patterns more highly correlated with the observed patterns in CMIP5, the other models (such as CCSM4 and IPSL_CM5A-LR exhibit the reverse tendency. The CMIP5 temperature trend uncertainty was significantly reduced in most areas, especially in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere, compared to the CMIP3 simulations. Similar to the CMIP3, the CMIP5 simulations overestimated the tropospheric warming in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere and underestimated the stratospheric cooling. The crossover point where tropospheric warming changes into stratospheric cooling occurred near 100 hPa in the tropics, which is higher than in the radiosonde and reanalysis data. The result is likely related to the overestimation of convective activity over the tropical areas in both the CMIP3 and CMIP5 models. Generally, for the temperature trend estimates associated with the numerical models including the reanalyses and global climate models, the uncertainty in the stratosphere is much larger than that in the troposphere, and the

  2. Rapid-prototyped PLGA/β-TCP/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds in a rabbit femoral defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Alvarez-Urena, Pedro; Song, Young-Hye; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Tellis, Brandi; Dean, David D; Sylvia, Victor L; Elgendy, Hoda; Ong, Joo

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering scaffolds composed of poly(d,l-lactide:glycolide) (DL-PLGA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) nanocomposites were prepared and characterized. Scaffolds with two specific architectures were produced via fused deposition modeling (FDM), a type of extrusion freeform fabrication. Microfilaments deposited at angles of 0° and 90° were designated as the ‘simple’ scaffold architecture, while those deposited at angles alternating between 0°, 90°, 45° and −45° were designated as the ‘complex’ scaffold architecture. In addition, the simple and complex scaffolds were coated with hydroxyapatite (HA). The surface morphology of the scaffolds was assessed before and after HA coating and uniform distribution of HA coating on the surface was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The scaffolds were implanted into rabbit femoral unicortical bone defects according to four treatment groups based on pore structure and HA coating. After 6 and 12 weeks, scaffolds and host bone were recovered and processed for histology. Data suggest that all configurations of the scaffolds integrated with the host bone and were biocompatible and thus may offer an exciting new scaffold platform for delivery of biologicals for bone regeneration. (paper)

  3. Metformin Ameliorates Uterine Defects in a Rat Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehui Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult rats treated concomitantly with insulin and human chorionic gonadotropin exhibit endocrine, metabolic, and reproductive abnormalities that are very similar to those observed in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS patients. In this study, we used this rat model to assess the effects of metformin on PCOS-related uterine dysfunction. In addition to reducing androgen levels, improving insulin sensitivity, and correcting the reproductive cycle, metformin treatment induced morphological changes in the PCOS-like uterus. At the molecular and cellular levels, metformin normalized the androgen receptor-mediated transcriptional program and restored epithelial–stromal interactions. In contrast to glucose transport, uterine inflammatory gene expression was suppressed through the PI3K–Akt–NFκB network, but without affecting apoptosis. These effects appeared to be independent of AMPK subunit and autophagy-related protein regulation. We found that when metformin treatment partially restored implantation, several implantation-related genes were normalized in the PCOS-like rat uterus. These results improve our understanding of how metformin rescues the disruption of the implantation process due to the uterine defects that result from hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Our data provide insights into the molecular and functional clues that might help explain, at least in part, the potential therapeutic options of metformin in PCOS patients with uterine dysfunction.

  4. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  5. Hawaiian forest bird trends: using log-linear models to assess long-term trends is supported by model diagnostics and assumptions (reply to Freed and Cann 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richard J.; Pratt, Thane K.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Woodworth, Bethany L.; Jeffrey, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Freed and Cann (2013) criticized our use of linear models to assess trends in the status of Hawaiian forest birds through time (Camp et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2010) by questioning our sampling scheme, whether we met model assumptions, and whether we ignored short-term changes in the population time series. In the present paper, we address these concerns and reiterate that our results do not support the position of Freed and Cann (2013) that the forest birds in the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) are declining, or that the federally listed endangered birds are showing signs of imminent collapse. On the contrary, our data indicate that the 21-year long-term trends for native birds in Hakalau Forest NWR are stable to increasing, especially in areas that have received active management.

  6. Phase-field models of microstructure evolution in a system with elastic inhomogeneity and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shenyang

    In this thesis, the phase-field approach is employed to study the effect of elastic inhomogeneity and structural defects on phase separation kinetics and morphological evolution in bulk and film systems, the precipitation of theta ' phase (Al2Cu) in Al-Cu alloys, and solute strengthening of alloys. By combining the iteration method for calculating the elastic energy and a semi-implicit spectral method for solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation an extremely efficient phase-field model is developed for studying morphological evolution in coherent systems with large elastic inhomogeneity. Spinodal decomposition in a thin film with periodically distributed arrays of interfacial dislocations is simulated. The results show that the periodic stress field associated with the array of interfacial dislocations leads to a directional phase separation and the formation of ordered microstructures. The metastable theta' (Al2Cu) precipitates are one of the primary strengthening precipitates in Al-Cu alloys. They are of a plate-like shape with strong interfacial energy and mobility anisotropies. A phase-field model which can automatically incorporate the thermodynamic and kinetic information from databases is developed. The relationships between phase-field model parameters and material thermodynamic and kinetic properties are established. Systematic simulations of theta' growth in 1D, 2D and 3D are carried out. The growth of a single theta ' precipitate in 1D exactly reproduces the results from analytical solutions. The phase-filed model can serve as a basis for quantitative understanding of the influence of elastic energy, interface energy anisotropy and interface mobility anisotropy on the precipitation of theta' in Al-Cu alloys. Precipitates and solutes are commonly used to strengthen alloys. A phase field model of dislocation dynamics, which employs 12 order parameter fields to describe the dislocation distribution in a single fcc crystal, and one composition field to describe

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel rod behavior modelling and current trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.

    2001-01-01

    Safety assessment of nuclear reactors is carried out by simulating the events to taking place in nuclear reactors by realistic computer codes. Such codes are developed in a way that each event is represented by differential equations derived based on physical laws. Nuclear fuel is an important barrier against radioactive fission gas release. The release of radioactivity to environment is the main concern and this can be avoided by preserving the integrity of fuel rod. Therefore, safety analyses should cover an assessment of fuel rod behavior with certain extent. In this study, common approaches for fuel behavior modeling are discussed. Methods utilized by widely accepted computer codes are reviewed. Shortcomings of these methods are explained. Current research topics to improve code reliability and problems encountered in fuel rod behavior modeling are presented

  8. Recent trends of extreme precipitation indices in the Iberian Peninsula using observations and WRF model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomeu, S.; Carvalho, M. J.; Marta-Almeida, M.; Melo-Gonçalves, P.; Rocha, A.

    2016-08-01

    Spatial and temporal distributions of the trends of extreme precipitation indices were analysed between 1986 and 2005, over the Iberian Peninsula (IP). The knowledge of the patterns of extreme precipitation is important for impacts assessment, development of adaptation and mitigation strategies. As such, there is a growing need for a more detailed knowledge of precipitation climate change. This analysis was performed for Portuguese and Spanish observational datasets and results performed by the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model forced by the ERA-Interim reanalysis. Extreme precipitation indices recommended by the Expert Team for Climate Change Detection Monitoring and Indices were computed, by year and season. Then, annual and seasonal trends of the indices were estimated by Theil-Sen method and their significance was tested by the Mann-Kendal test. Additionally, a second simulation forced by the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM), was considered. This second modelling configuration was created in order to assess its performance when simulating extremes of precipitation. The annual trends estimated for the 1986-2005, from the observational datasets and from the ERA-driven simulation reveal: 1) negative statistically significant trends of the CWD index in the Galicia and in the centre of the IP; 2) positive statistically significant trends of the CDD index over the south of the IP and negative statistically significant trends in Galicia, north and centre of Portugal; 3) positive statistically significant trends of the R75p index in some regions of the north of the IP; 4) positive statistically significant trends in the R95pTOT index in the Central Mountains Chain, Leon Mountains and in the north of Portugal. Seasonally, negative statistically significant trends of the CWD index were found in Galicia, in winter and in the south of the IP, in summer. Positive statistically significant trends of the CWD index were identified in the Leon Mountains

  9. Tropospheric ozone trend over Beijing from 2002–2010: ozonesonde measurements and modeling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of ozonesonde data and numerical simulations of the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS, the trend of tropospheric ozone (O3 during 2002–2010 over Beijing was investigated. Tropospheric ozone over Beijing shows a winter minimum and a broad summer maximum with a clear positive trend in the maximum summer ozone concentration over the last decade. The observed significant trend of tropospheric column ozone is mainly caused by photochemical production (3.1% yr−1 for a mean level of 52 DU. This trend is close to the significant trend of partial column ozone in the lower troposphere (0–3 km resulting from the enhanced photochemical production during summer (3.0% yr−1 for a mean level of 23 DU. Analysis of the CLaMS simulation shows that transport rather than chemistry drives most of the seasonality of tropospheric ozone. However, dynamical processes alone cannot explain the trend of tropospheric ozone in the observational data. Clearly enhanced ozone values and a negative vertical ozone gradient in the lower troposphere in the observational data emphasize the importance of photochemistry within the troposphere during spring and summer, and suggest that the photochemistry within the troposphere significantly contributes to the tropospheric ozone trend over Beijing during the last decade.

  10. Modeling the Influence of Hemispheric Transport on Trends in O3 Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development and application of the hemispheric version of the CMAQ to examine the influence of long-range pollutant transport on trends in surface level O3 distributions. The WRF-CMAQ model is expanded to hemispheric scales and multi-decadal model simulations were...

  11. New trends in interaction, virtual reality and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Penichet, Victor MR; Gallud, José A

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between a user and a device forms the foundation of today's application design.Covering the following topics: * A suite of five structural principles helping designers to structure their mockups;* An agile method for exploiting desktop eye tracker equipment in combination with mobile devices;* An approach to explore large-scale collections based on classification systems;* A framework based on the use of modeling and components composition techniques to simplify the development of organizational collaborative systems;* A low-cost virtual reality system that provides highly sati

  12. The long-run forecasting of energy prices using the model of shifting trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, Stanislav

    2005-01-01

    Developing models for accurate long-term energy price forecasting is an important problem because these forecasts should be useful in determining both supply and demand of energy. On the supply side, long-term forecasts determine investment decisions of energy-related companies. On the demand side, investments in physical capital and durable goods depend on price forecasts of a particular energy type. Forecasting long-run rend movements in energy prices is very important on the macroeconomic level for several developing countries because energy prices have large impacts on their real output, the balance of payments, fiscal policy, etc. Pindyck (1999) argues that the dynamics of real energy prices is mean-reverting to trend lines with slopes and levels that are shifting unpredictably over time. The hypothesis of shifting long-term trend lines was statistically tested by Benard et al. (2004). The authors find statistically significant instabilities for coal and natural gas prices. I continue the research of energy prices in the framework of continuously shifting levels and slopes of trend lines started by Pindyck (1999). The examined model offers both parsimonious approach and perspective on the developments in energy markets. Using the model of depletable resource production, Pindyck (1999) argued that the forecast of energy prices in the model is based on the long-run total marginal cost. Because the model of a shifting trend is based on the competitive behavior, one may examine deviations of oil producers from the competitive behavior by studying the difference between actual prices and long-term forecasts. To construct the long-run forecasts (10-year-ahead and 15-year-ahead) of energy prices, I modify the univariate shifting trends model of Pindyck (1999). I relax some assumptions on model parameters, the assumption of white noise error term, and propose a new Bayesian approach utilizing a Gibbs sampling algorithm to estimate the model with autocorrelation. To

  13. Using Mouse and Zebrafish Models to Understand the Etiology of Developmental Defects in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; MUTO, AKIHIKO; LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SCHILLING, THOMAS F.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.; CALOF, ANNE L.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem birth defects disorder that affects every tissue and organ system in the body. Understanding the factors that contribute to the origins, prevalence, and severity of these developmental defects provides the most direct approach for developing screens and potential treatments for individuals with CdLS. Since the majority of cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for NIPBL (Nipped-B-like, which encodes a cohesin-associated protein), we have developed mouse and zebrafish models of CdLS by using molecular genetic tools to create Nipbl-deficient mice and zebrafish (Nipbl+/− mice, zebrafish nipbl morphants). Studies of these vertebrate animal models have yielded novel insights into the developmental etiology and genes/gene pathways that contribute to CdLS-associated birth defects, particularly defects of the gut, heart, craniofacial structures, nervous system, and limbs. Studies of these mouse and zebrafish CdLS models have helped clarify how deficiency for NIPBL, a protein that associates with cohesin and other transcriptional regulators in the nucleus, affects processes important to the emergence of the structural and physiological birth defects observed in CdLS: NIPBL exerts chromosome position-specific effects on gene expression; it influences long-range interactions between different regulatory elements of genes; and it regulates combinatorial and synergistic actions of genes in developing tissues. Our current understanding is that CdLS should be considered as not only a cohesinopathy, but also a “transcriptomopathy,” that is, a disease whose underlying etiology is the global dysregulation of gene expression throughout the organism. PMID:27120001

  14. Annealing Kinetic Model Using Fast and Slow Metastable Defects for Hydrogenated-Amorphous-Silicon-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yeop Myong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-component kinetic model employing “fast” and “slow” metastable defects for the annealing behaviors in pin-type hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon- (a-Si:H- based solar cells is simulated using a normalized fill factor. Reported annealing data on pin-type a-Si:H-based solar cells are revisited and fitted using the model to confirm its validity. It is verified that the two-component model is suitable for fitting the various experimental phenomena. In addition, the activation energy for annealing of the solar cells depends on the definition of the recovery time. From the thermally activated and high electric field annealing behaviors, the plausible microscopic mechanism on the defect removal process is discussed.

  15. New device for closure of muscular ventricular septal defects in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Z; Gu, X; Berry, J M; Bass, J L; Titus, J L; Urness, M; Han, Y M; Amplatz, K

    1999-07-20

    Repair of muscular ventricular septal defects (MVSDs) has always been challenging to the surgeon. Long-term morbidity and mortality are significantly increased if the defects are closed via left ventriculotomy or if they are associated with other complex congenital anomalies. The purpose of this study was to close MVSDs with the Amplatz ventricular septal defect device. This device is constructed from 0.004-in nitinol wire mesh filled with polyester fibers. It is retrievable, repositionable, self-centering, and of low profile. MVSDs were created with the help of a sharp punch in 10 dogs. The location of the defects was anterior muscular (n=3), midmuscular (n=3), apical (n=3), and inlet muscular (n=1). The diameter of the defects ranged from 6 to 14 mm. All defects were closed in the catheterization laboratory. The device was placed with the help of transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy. A 7F sheath was used to deploy the device from the right ventricular side in 8 and the left ventricular side in 2 dogs. Placement was successful in all animals. The complete closure rate was 30% (3/10) immediately after placement and 100% at 1-week follow-up. Pathological examination of the heart revealed complete endothelialization of the device in dogs killed after 3 months. The Amplatz ventricular septal defect device appears highly efficacious in closing MVSDs. The advantages include a small delivery sheath, complete retrievability before release, and the fact that it is self-centering and self-expanding, thereby making it an attractive option in smaller children.

  16. Hybrid model for forecasting time series with trend, seasonal and salendar variation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono; Rahayu, S. P.; Prastyo, D. D.; Wijayanti, D. G. P.; Juliyanto

    2017-09-01

    Most of the monthly time series data in economics and business in Indonesia and other Moslem countries not only contain trend and seasonal, but also affected by two types of calendar variation effects, i.e. the effect of the number of working days or trading and holiday effects. The purpose of this research is to develop a hybrid model or a combination of several forecasting models to predict time series that contain trend, seasonal and calendar variation patterns. This hybrid model is a combination of classical models (namely time series regression and ARIMA model) and/or modern methods (artificial intelligence method, i.e. Artificial Neural Networks). A simulation study was used to show that the proposed procedure for building the hybrid model could work well for forecasting time series with trend, seasonal and calendar variation patterns. Furthermore, the proposed hybrid model is applied for forecasting real data, i.e. monthly data about inflow and outflow of currency at Bank Indonesia. The results show that the hybrid model tend to provide more accurate forecasts than individual forecasting models. Moreover, this result is also in line with the third results of the M3 competition, i.e. the hybrid model on average provides a more accurate forecast than the individual model.

  17. Single vacancy defect in graphene: Insights into its magnetic properties from theoretical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, A. M.; Caldas, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic properties of a single vacancy in graphene is a relevant and still much discussed problem. The experimental results point to a clearly detectable magnetic defect state at the Fermi energy, while calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) yield widely varying results for the magnetic moment, in the range of μ =1.04 -2.0 μB . We present a multitool ab initio theoretical study of the same defect, using two simulation protocols for a defect in a crystal (cluster and periodic boundary conditions) and different DFT functionals—bare and hybrid DFT, mixing a fraction of the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange. We find that due to the π character of the Fermi-energy states of graphene, delocalized in the in-plane and localized in the out-of-plane direction, the inclusion of the HF exchange is crucial, and moreover, that defect-defect interactions are long-range and have to be carefully taken into account. Our main conclusions are two-fold. First, for a single isolated vacancy we can predict an integer magnetic moment μ =2 μB . Second, we find that due to the specific symmetry of the graphene lattice, periodic arrays of single vacancies may provide interesting diffuse spin-spin interactions.

  18. Mandibular Defect Reconstruction with the Help of Mirror Imaging Coupled with Laser Stereolithographic Modeling Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Wei Lee

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of microsurgery, composite defect in the mandible can be repaired with various forms of osteocutaneous free flaps. However, it is difficult to accurately reconstruct a large defect in the mandible when not enough mandibular reference blueprints remain. This case report describes a large ameloblastoma at the left lower molar region and ascending ramus of the mandible in a 53-year-old male patient. Before surgery, spiral computed tomography scanning of the whole skull of the patient was performed. Using three-dimensional reconstruction and mirror imaging coupled with laser stereolithographic technique, a complete mandibular biomodel with idealized shape was fabricated. A titanium reconstruction plate was made using the biomodel as a guide. The tumor mass together with the left mandible from the second premolar to the condylar head area was resected en bloc. The large mandibular defect was then reconstructed with the precontoured titanium plate and three segments of vascularized fibular bone graft fixed along the plate. The temporomandibular joint was restored with temporalis muscle as an interpositional disc replacement. The complex defect in the mandible was thus repaired with satisfactory functioning and esthetic result. We suggest that with the help of mirror imaging coupled with laser stereolithographic technique, a precontoured titanium plate can be made for the reconstruction of large mandibular defects. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(3:244-250

  19. Tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds for bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Donovan, Amy; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Darr, Aniq; Magno, Maria Hanshella R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect (CSD) model using a specific polymer composition (E1001(1k)) from a library of tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds coated with a calcium phosphate (CP) formulation (E1001(1k) + CP) supplemented with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Specific doses of rhBMP-2 (0, 17, and 35 μg/scaffold) were used. E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds were implanted in unilateral segmental defects (15 mm length) in the radial diaphyses of New Zealand White rabbits. At 4 and 8 weeks post-implantation, bone regeneration was determined using micro-computed tomography (µCT), histology, and histomorphometry. The quantitative outcome data suggest that E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds with rhBMP-2 were biocompatible and promoted bone regeneration in segmental bone defects. Histological examination of the implant sites showed that scaffolds made of E1001(1k) + CP did not elicit adverse cellular or tissue responses throughout test periods up to 8 weeks. Noteworthy is that the incorporation of a very small amount of rhBMP-2 into the scaffolds (as low as 17 μg/defect site) promoted significant bone regeneration compared to scaffolds consisting of E1001(1k) + CP alone. This finding indicates that E1001(1k) + CP may be an effective platform for bone regeneration in a critical size rabbit radius segmental defect model, requiring only a minimal dose of rhBMP-2. (paper)

  20. Differential diagnosis of vertical root fractures using reconstructed three-dimensional models of bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, K; Abe, Y; Yoshioka, T; Ishimura, H; Ebihara, A; Suda, H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of diagnosing vertical root fractures (VRFs) by comparing the volume of bone defects in VRFs with those in non-VRFs on reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) models (TDMs) using CBCT. 32 maxillary pre-molars and anterior teeth with radiolucent areas were evaluated on pre-operative CBCT images. Of the 32 teeth, 16 had a fractured root (VRF group) and 16 had a non-fractured root (non-VRF group). The radiolucent area of each tooth was traced in each dimension [mesiodistal, buccolingual and horizontal (the apicoincisal aspect)] by two observers, and 3D images were reconstructed with the Amira(®) software (Visage Imaging Inc., Richmond, Australia). The volume, V, of the TDM was divided into the coronal side and the periapical side at the horizontal slice through the apical foramen, and v was defined as the volume of the coronal side. The values of v/V were calculated for all cases. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare values between the VRF group and the non-VRF group (p < 0.05). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed to select the optimal cut-point. There was a statistically significant difference in the value of v/V between the two groups (p < 0.05). With a cut-point derived from the ROC curve, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of predicting the VRFs were 1.00, 0.75 and 0.88, respectively. Lesions resulting from VRFs can be distinguished from those of non-VRFs on 3D CBCT images with a high degree of accuracy, based on their different 3D shapes.

  1. Trends in Ocean Irradiance using a Radiative Model Forced with Terra Aerosols and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson; Casey, Nancy; Romanou, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud information from MODIS on Terra provide enhanced capability to understand surface irradiance over the oceans and its variability. These relationships can be important for ocean biology and carbon cycles. An established radiative transfer model, the Ocean-Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model (OASIM) is used to describe ocean irradiance variability on seasonal to decadal time scales. The model is forced with information on aerosols and clouds from the MODIS sensor on Terra and Aqua. A 7-year record (2000-2006) showed no trends in global ocean surface irradiance or photosynthetic available irradiance (PAR). There were significant (P20 W/sq m. The trends using MODIS data contrast with results from OASIM using liquid water path estimates from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Here, a global trend of -2 W/sq m was observed, largely dues to a large negative trend in the Antarctic -12 W/sq m. These results suggest the importance of the choice of liquid water path data sets in assessments of medium-length trends in ocean surface irradiance. The choices also impact the evaluation of changes in ocean biogeochemistry.

  2. Examining secular trend  and seasonality in count data using dynamic generalized linear modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Dethlefsen, Claus; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders

    Aims  Time series of incidence counts often show secular trends and seasonal patterns. We present a model for incidence counts capable of handling a possible gradual change in growth rates and seasonal patterns, serial correlation and overdispersion. Methods  The model resembles an ordinary time...... series regression model for Poisson counts. It differs in allowing the regression coefficients to vary gradually over time in a random fashion. Data  In the period January 1980 to 1999, 17,989 incidents of acute myocardial infarction were recorded in the county of Northern Jutland, Denmark. Records were...... updated daily. Results  The model with a seasonal pattern and an approximately linear trend was fitted to the data, and diagnostic plots indicate a good model fit. The analysis with the dynamic model revealed peaks coinciding with influenza epidemics. On average the peak-to-trough ratio is estimated...

  3. Evidence for link between modelled trends in Antarctic sea ice and underestimated westerly wind changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purich, Ariaan; Cai, Wenju; England, Matthew H; Cowan, Tim

    2016-02-04

    Despite global warming, total Antarctic sea ice coverage increased over 1979-2013. However, the majority of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 models simulate a decline. Mechanisms causing this discrepancy have so far remained elusive. Here we show that weaker trends in the intensification of the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind jet simulated by the models may contribute to this disparity. During austral summer, a strengthened jet leads to increased upwelling of cooler subsurface water and strengthened equatorward transport, conducive to increased sea ice. As the majority of models underestimate summer jet trends, this cooling process is underestimated compared with observations and is insufficient to offset warming in the models. Through the sea ice-albedo feedback, models produce a high-latitude surface ocean warming and sea ice decline, contrasting the observed net cooling and sea ice increase. A realistic simulation of observed wind changes may be crucial for reproducing the recent observed sea ice increase.

  4. In vivo performance of combinations of autograft, demineralized bone matrix, and tricalcium phosphate in a rabbit femoral defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Dean, David D; Sylvia, Victor L; Doll, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Large bone defects may be treated with autologous or allogeneic bone preparations. Each treatment has advantages and disadvantages; therefore, a clinically viable option for treating large (e.g., gap) bone defects may be a combination of the two. In the present study, bone repair was determined with combinations of autografts, allografts, and synthetic bone grafts using an established rabbit femoral defect model. Bilateral unicortical femoral defects were surgically prepared and treated with combinatorial bone grafts according to one of seven treatment groups. Recipient sites were retrieved at six weeks. Cellular/tissue responses and new bone formation were assessed by histology and histomorphometry. Histological analysis images indicated neither evidence of inflammatory, immune responses, tissue necrosis, nor osteolysis. Data suggested co-integration of implanted agents with host and newly formed bone. Finally, the histomorphometric data suggested that the tricalcium phosphate-based synthetic bone graft substitute allowed new bone formation that was similar to the allograft (i.e., demineralized bone matrix, DBM). (paper)

  5. Evaluation of an injectable bioactive borate glass cement to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xu; Huang, Wenhai; Zhang, Yadong; Huang, Chengcheng; Yu, Zunxiong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wenlong; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Nai; Wang, Deping; Pan, Haobo; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for synthetic biomaterials to heal bone defects using minimal invasive surgery. In the present study, an injectable cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and a chitosan bonding solution was developed and evaluated for its capacity to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model. The injectability and setting time of the cement in vitro decreased but the compressive strength increased (8±2MPa to 31±2MPa) as the ratio of glass particles to chitosan solution increased (from 1.0gml -1 to 2.5gml -1 ). Upon immersing the cement in phosphate-buffered saline, the glass particles reacted and converted to hydroxyapatite, imparting bioactivity to the cement. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed enhanced proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity when incubated in media containing the soluble ionic product of the cement. The bioactive glass cement showed a better capacity to stimulate bone formation in rabbit femoral condyle defects at 12weeks postimplantation when compared to a commercial calcium sulfate cement. The injectable bioactive borate glass cement developed in this study could provide a promising biomaterial to heal bone defects by minimal invasive surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Type I integrable defects and finite-gap solutions for KdV and sine-Gordon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, E.; Parini, R.

    2017-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to extend results, which have been obtained previously to describe the classical scattering of solitons with integrable defects of type I, to include the much larger and intricate collection of finite-gap solutions defined in terms of generalised theta functions. In this context, it is generally not feasible to adopt a direct approach, via ansätze for the fields to either side of the defect tuned to satisfy the defect sewing conditions. Rather, essential use is made of the fact that the defect sewing conditions themselves are intimately related to Bäcklund transformations in order to set up a strategy to enable the calculation of the field on one side by suitably transforming the field on the other side. The method is implemented using Darboux transformations and illustrated in detail for the sine-Gordon and KdV models. An exception, treatable by both methods, indirect and direct, is provided by the genus 1 solutions. These can be expressed in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions, which satisfy a number of useful identities of relevance to this problem. There are new features to the solutions obtained in the finite-gap context but, in all cases, if a (multi)soliton limit is taken within the finite-gap solutions previously known results are recovered.

  7. Off-pump atrial septal defect closure using the universal cardiac introducer®: creation of models of atrial septal defects in the pig access and surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraudon, Gerard M; Jones, Douglas L; Bainbridge, Daniel; Moore, John T; Wedlake, Chris; Linte, Cristian; Wiles, Andrew; Peters, Terry M

    2009-01-01

    : Optimal atrial septal defect (ASD) closure should combine off-pump techniques with the effectiveness and versatility of open-heart techniques. We report our experience with off-pump ASD closure using the Universal Cardiac Introducer (UCI) in a porcine model. The goal was to create an ASD over the fossa ovale (FO) and position a patch over the ASD under ultrasound (US) imaging and augmented virtual reality guidance. : An US probe (tracked with a magnetic tracking system) was positioned into the esophagus (transesophageal echocardiographic probe) for real-time image-guidance. The right atrium (RA) of six pigs was exposed via a right lateral thoracotomy or medial sternotomy. The UCI was attached to the RA wall. A punching tool was introduced via the UCI, navigated and positioned, under US guidance, to create an ASD into the FO. A patch with its holder and a stapling device were introduced into the RA via the UCI. The patch was positioned on the ASD. Occlusion of the ASD was determined using US and Doppler imaging. : The FO membrane was excised successfully in all animals. US image-guidance provided excellent visualization. The patch was positioned in all cases with complete occlusion of the ASD. The stapling device proved too bulky, impeding circumferential positioning. : Using the UCI, ASD closure was safe and feasible. US imaging, combined with virtual and augmented reality provided accurate navigating and positioning. This study also provided valuable information on the future design of anchoring devices for intracardiac procedures.

  8. Coupling reducing k-points for supercell models of defects in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    The optimum choice of k-point for supercell calculations of defect states in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is investigated for the case of a supercell with a simple cubic (SC) structure. By using the k-point (1/4,1/4,1/4) it is possible to eliminate the symmetric part of the repeated......-image couplings for the first three neighbour shells in the SC lattice. This result is shown to hold also for the case of non-equivalent axes (e.g. a distorted lattice, or an asymmetric defect structure). A specific example of a donor defect in a woodpile structure demonstrates that use of this k-point can lead...

  9. Detection of subsurface defects in metal materials using infrared thermography; Image processing and finite element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Infrared thermography is an emerging approach to non-contact, non-intrusive, and non-destructive inspection of various solid materials such as metals, composites, and semiconductors for industrial and research interests. In this study, data processing was applied to infrared thermography measurements to detect defects in metals that were widely used in industrial fields. When analyzing experimental data from infrared thermographic testing, raw images were often not appropriate. Thus, various data analysis methods were used at the pre-processing and processing levels in data processing programs for quantitative analysis of defect detection and characterization; these increased the infrared non-destructive testing capabilities since subtle defects signature became apparent. A 3D finite element simulation was performed to verify and analyze the data obtained from both the experiment and the image processing techniques.

  10. The Critical Size Defect as an Experimental Model for Craniomaxillofacial Nonunions,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    W W W W V W-- U U U U 50I defects in the humn skull do not spontaneously repair. In this ird, the regenerative capacity of the calvaria of...Graft Material. J. Periodont . Res. 8:229, 1973. 20. Friedenberg, Z.B. and Lawrence, R.R.: The Regeneration of Pone in Defects of Varying Size. Surg...100, 1982. 61. Turnbull, R.S. and Freenan, E.: Use of Wounds in the Parietal Bone of the Rat for Evaluating Hone Marrow for Grafting Into Periodontal

  11. An assessment of historical Antarctic precipitation and temperature trend using CMIP5 models and reanalysis datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Malcolm S. Y.; Chenoli, Sheeba Nettukandy; Samah, Azizan Abu; Hai, Ooi See

    2018-03-01

    The study of Antarctic precipitation has attracted a lot of attention recently. The reliability of climate models in simulating Antarctic precipitation, however, is still debatable. This work assess the precipitation and surface air temperature (SAT) of Antarctica (90 oS to 60 oS) using 49 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate models and the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts "Interim" reanalysis (ERA-Interim); the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR); the Japan Meteorological Agency 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55); and the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) datasets for 1979-2005 (27 years). For precipitation, the time series show that the MERRA and JRA-55 have significantly increased from 1979 to 2005, while the ERA-Int and CFSR have insignificant changes. The reanalyses also have low correlation with one another (generally less than +0.69). 37 CMIP5 models show increasing trend, 18 of which are significant. The resulting CMIP5 MMM also has a significant increasing trend of 0.29 ± 0.06 mm year-1. For SAT, the reanalyses show insignificant changes and have high correlation with one another, while the CMIP5 MMM shows a significant increasing trend. Nonetheless, the variability of precipitation and SAT of MMM could affect the significance of its trend. One of the many reasons for the large differences of precipitation is the CMIP5 models' resolution.

  12. Fitting a defect non-linear model with or without prior, distinguishing nuclear reaction products as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesson, P.; Sjöstrand, H.

    2017-11-01

    Fitting a parametrized function to data is important for many researchers and scientists. If the model is non-linear and/or defect, it is not trivial to do correctly and to include an adequate uncertainty analysis. This work presents how the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear generalized least squares fitting can be used with a prior distribution for the parameters and how it can be combined with Gaussian processes to treat model defects. An example, where three peaks in a histogram are to be distinguished, is carefully studied. In particular, the probability r1 for a nuclear reaction to end up in one out of two overlapping peaks is studied. Synthetic data are used to investigate effects of linearizations and other assumptions. For perfect Gaussian peaks, it is seen that the estimated parameters are distributed close to the truth with good covariance estimates. This assumes that the method is applied correctly; for example, prior knowledge should be implemented using a prior distribution and not by assuming that some parameters are perfectly known (if they are not). It is also important to update the data covariance matrix using the fit if the uncertainties depend on the expected value of the data (e.g., for Poisson counting statistics or relative uncertainties). If a model defect is added to the peaks, such that their shape is unknown, a fit which assumes perfect Gaussian peaks becomes unable to reproduce the data, and the results for r1 become biased. It is, however, seen that it is possible to treat the model defect with a Gaussian process with a covariance function tailored for the situation, with hyper-parameters determined by leave-one-out cross validation. The resulting estimates for r1 are virtually unbiased, and the uncertainty estimates agree very well with the underlying uncertainty.

  13. Muscle-derived Decellularised Extracellular Matrix Improves Functional Recovery in a Rat Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    in vivo torque production from EMG in mouse muscles injured by eccentric contractions. J Physiol 1999;515(Pt 2):609e19. 27. Gamba PG, Conconi MT, Lo... Muscle -derived decellularised extracellular matrix improves functional recovery in a rat latissimus dorsi muscle defect model Xiaoyu K. Chen a,b...maxillary injuries; Muscle function; Skeletal muscle ; Volumetric muscle loss Summary Purpose: Craniofacial maxillary injuries represent nearly 30% of all

  14. Population trends for North American winter birds based on hierarchical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soykan, Candan U.; Sauer, John; Schuetz, Justin G.; LeBaron, Geoffrey S.; Dale, Kathy; Langham, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Managing widespread and persistent threats to birds requires knowledge of population dynamics at large spatial and temporal scales. For over 100 yrs, the Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC) has enlisted volunteers in bird monitoring efforts that span the Americas, especially southern Canada and the United States. We employed a Bayesian hierarchical model to control for variation in survey effort among CBC circles and, using CBC data from 1966 to 2013, generated early-winter population trend estimates for 551 species of birds. Selecting a subset of species that do not frequent bird feeders and have ≥25% range overlap with the distribution of CBC circles (228 species) we further estimated aggregate (i.e., across species) trends for the entire study region and at the level of states/provinces, Bird Conservation Regions, and Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. Moreover, we examined the relationship between ten biological traits—range size, population size, migratory strategy, habitat affiliation, body size, diet, number of eggs per clutch, age at sexual maturity, lifespan, and tolerance of urban/suburban settings—and CBC trend estimates. Our results indicate that 68% of the 551 species had increasing trends within the study area over the interval 1966–2013. When trends were examined across the subset of 228 species, the median population trend for the group was 0.9% per year at the continental level. At the regional level, aggregate trends were positive in all but a few areas. Negative population trends were evident in lower latitudes, whereas the largest increases were at higher latitudes, a pattern consistent with range shifts due to climate change. Nine of 10 biological traits were significantly associated with median population trend; however, none of the traits explained >34% of the deviance in the data, reflecting the indirect relationships between population trend estimates and species traits. Trend estimates based on the CBC are broadly congruent with

  15. Warning About the Use of Critical-Size Defects for the Translational Study of Bone Repair: Analysis of a Sheep Tibial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammens, Johan; Maréchal, Marina; Geris, Lisbet; Van der Aa, Joshua; Van Hauwermeiren, Hadewych; Luyten, Frank P; Delport, Hendrik

    2017-11-01

    The repair of large long bone defects requires complex surgical procedures as the bone loss cannot simply be replaced by autologous grafts due to an insufficient bone stock of the human body. Tissue engineering strategies and the use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs) for these reconstructions remain a considerable challenge, in particular since robust outcomes in well-defined large animal models are lacking. To be suitable as a model for treatment of human sized bone defects, we developed a large animal model in both skeletally immature and mature sheep and made close observations on the spontaneous healing of defects. We warn for the spontaneous repair of large defects in immature animals, which can mask the (in)effectiveness of ATMP therapies, and propose the use of large 4.5 cm defects that are pretreated with a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spacer in skeletally mature animals.

  16. Assessment of the regenerative potential of allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells in a rodent periodontal defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Menicanin, D; Marino, V; Ge, S; Mrozik, K; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2014-06-01

    The complex microenvironment of the periodontal wound creates many challenges associated with multitissue regeneration of periodontal lesions. Recent characterization of mesenchymal stem cell-like populations residing in periodontal ligament tissues has shown that these cells exhibit features of postnatal stem cells. Despite these advances, a lack of consistency in design of preclinical studies and a limited study of allogeneic transplantation applications has restricted our understanding of their clinical utility in the treatment of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the regenerative potential of allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in a rat periodontal fenestration defect mode and to identify an optimal end time-point suitable for quantitative assessment of tissue regeneration. Periodontal fenestration defects, created in Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with allogeneic PDLSCs seeded onto Gelfoam(®) (Absorbable gelatin sponge; Pharmacia Corporation, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) or with Gelfoam(®) alone, or remained untreated. Experimental rats were killed at 7, 14, 21 or 28 d after surgery and the tissues were processed for immunohistochemical and histomorphometric examination. Defects treated with PDLSCs showed significantly greater percentage bone fill and length of new bone bridge compared with the untreated group or the group treated with Gelfoam(®) alone on days 14 and 21. Similarly, a statistically significant difference was achieved within specimens retrieved on day 21 for analysis of regeneration of cementum/periodontal ligament (PDL)-like structures. The present investigation shows that allogeneic PDLSCs have a marked ability to repair periodontal defects by forming bone, PDL and cementum-like tissue in vivo. The results suggest that treatment periods of 14 and 21 d are optimal end time-points for quantitative assessment of periodontal regeneration within the rodent fenestration-defect model utilized in the present study

  17. Coupling reducing k-points for supercell models of defects in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    The optimum choice of k-point for supercell calculations of defect states in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is investigated for the case of a supercell with a simple cubic (SC) structure. By using the k-point (1/4,1/4,1/4) it is possible to eliminate the symmetric part of the repeated...

  18. Recognition and defect detection of dot-matrix text via variation-model based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Wataru; Suzuki, Koushi; Wakabayashi, Tetsushi

    2017-03-01

    An algorithm for recognition and defect detection of dot-matrix text printed on products is proposed. Extraction and recognition of dot-matrix text contains several difficulties, which are not involved in standard camera-based OCR, that the appearance of dot-matrix characters is corrupted and broken by illumination, complex texture in the background and other standard characters printed on product packages. We propose a dot-matrix text extraction and recognition method which does not require any user interaction. The method employs detected location of corner points and classification score. The result of evaluation experiment using 250 images shows that recall and precision of extraction are 78.60% and 76.03%, respectively. Recognition accuracy of correctly extracted characters is 94.43%. Detecting printing defect of dot-matrix text is also important in the production scene to avoid illegal productions. We also propose a detection method for printing defect of dot-matrix characters. The method constructs a feature vector of which elements are classification scores of each character class and employs support vector machine to classify four types of printing defect. The detection accuracy of the proposed method is 96.68 %.

  19. A Simulation Model of Focus and Radial Servos in Compact Disc Players with Disc Surface Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2004-01-01

    Compact Disc players have been on the market in more than two decades.As a consequence most of the control servo problems have been solved. A large remaining problem to solve is the handling of Compact Discs with severe surface defects like scratches and fingerprints. This paper introduces a method...

  20. Robust option replication for a Black-Scholes model extended with nondeterministic trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, J.G.M.; Kloeden, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Statistical analysis on various stocks reveals long range dependence behavior of the stock prices that is not consistent with the classical Black and Scholes model. This memory or nondeterministic trend behavior is often seen as a reflection of market sentiments and causes that the historical

  1. Age Differences within Secular IQ Trends: An Individual Growth Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Tomoe; Ceci, Stephen J.; Scullin, Matthew H.

    2005-01-01

    Age differences within the yo-yo trend in IQ, caused when aging norms that produce inflated scores are replaced with new norms, were examined using longitudinal WISC, WISC-R and WISC-III records of students tested for special education services from 10 school districts. Descriptive and individual growth modeling analyses revealed that while the…

  2. A growing animal model for neonatal repair of large diaphragmatic defects to evaluate patch function and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyeux, Luc; Pranpanus, Savitree; Van der Merwe, Johannes; Verbeken, Eric; De Vleeschauwer, Stephanie; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deprest, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to develop a more representative model for neonatal congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair in a large animal model, by creating a large defect in a fast-growing pup, using functional pulmonary and diaphragmatic read outs. Background Grafts are increasingly used to repair congenital diaphragmatic hernia with the risk of local complications. Growing animal models have been used to test novel materials. Methods 6-week-old rabbits underwent fiberoptic intubation, left subcostal laparotomy and hemi-diaphragmatic excision (either nearly complete (n = 13) or 3*3cm (n = 9)) and primary closure (Gore-Tex patch). Survival was further increased by moving to laryngeal mask airway ventilation (n = 15). Sham operated animals were used as controls (n = 6). Survivors (90 days) underwent chest X-Ray (scoliosis), measurements of maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure and breathing pattern (tidal volume, Pdi). Rates of herniation, lung histology and right hemi-diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area was measured. Results Rabbits surviving 90 days doubled their weight. Only one (8%) with a complete defect survived to 90 days. In the 3*3cm defect group all survived to 48 hours, however seven (78%) died later (16–49 days) from respiratory failure secondary to tracheal stricture formation. Use of a laryngeal mask airway doubled 90-day survival, one pup displaying herniation (17%). Cobb angel measurements, breathing pattern, and lung histology were comparable to sham. Under exertion, sham animals increased their maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure 134% compared to a 71% increase in patched animals (p<0.05). Patched animals had a compensatory increase in their right hemi-diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area (p<0.0001). Conclusions A primarily patched 3*3cm defect in growing rabbits, under laryngeal mask airway ventilation, enables adequate survival with normal lung function and reduced maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure compared to controls. PMID:28358826

  3. A growing animal model for neonatal repair of large diaphragmatic defects to evaluate patch function and outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Patrice Eastwood

    Full Text Available We aimed to develop a more representative model for neonatal congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair in a large animal model, by creating a large defect in a fast-growing pup, using functional pulmonary and diaphragmatic read outs.Grafts are increasingly used to repair congenital diaphragmatic hernia with the risk of local complications. Growing animal models have been used to test novel materials.6-week-old rabbits underwent fiberoptic intubation, left subcostal laparotomy and hemi-diaphragmatic excision (either nearly complete (n = 13 or 3*3cm (n = 9 and primary closure (Gore-Tex patch. Survival was further increased by moving to laryngeal mask airway ventilation (n = 15. Sham operated animals were used as controls (n = 6. Survivors (90 days underwent chest X-Ray (scoliosis, measurements of maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure and breathing pattern (tidal volume, Pdi. Rates of herniation, lung histology and right hemi-diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area was measured.Rabbits surviving 90 days doubled their weight. Only one (8% with a complete defect survived to 90 days. In the 3*3cm defect group all survived to 48 hours, however seven (78% died later (16-49 days from respiratory failure secondary to tracheal stricture formation. Use of a laryngeal mask airway doubled 90-day survival, one pup displaying herniation (17%. Cobb angel measurements, breathing pattern, and lung histology were comparable to sham. Under exertion, sham animals increased their maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure 134% compared to a 71% increase in patched animals (p<0.05. Patched animals had a compensatory increase in their right hemi-diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area (p<0.0001.A primarily patched 3*3cm defect in growing rabbits, under laryngeal mask airway ventilation, enables adequate survival with normal lung function and reduced maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure compared to controls.

  4. Why are models unable to reproduce multi-decadal trends in lower tropospheric baseline ozone levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Liu, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Strahan, S. E.; Steenrod, S.

    2017-12-01

    Assessments of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing rely on accurate model simulations. Parrish et al (2014) found that three chemistry-climate models (CCMs) overestimate present-day O3 mixing ratios and capture only 50% of the observed O3 increase over the last five decades at 12 baseline sites in the northern mid-latitudes, indicating large uncertainties in our understanding of the ozone trends and their implications for radiative forcing. Here we present comparisons of outputs from two chemical transport models (CTMs) - GEOS-Chem and the Global Modeling Initiative model - with O3 observations from the same sites and from the global ozonesonde network. Both CTMs are driven by reanalysis meteorological data (MERRA or MERRA2) and thus are expected to be different in atmospheric transport processes relative to those freely running CCMs. We test whether recent model developments leading to more active ozone chemistry affect the computed ozone sensitivity to perturbations in emissions. Preliminary results suggest these CTMs can reproduce present-day ozone levels but fail to capture the multi-decadal trend since 1980. Both models yield widespread overpredictions of free tropospheric ozone in the 1980s. Sensitivity studies in GEOS-Chem suggest that the model estimate of natural background ozone is too high. We discuss factors that contribute to the variability and trends of tropospheric ozone over the last 30 years, with a focus on intermodel differences in spatial resolution and in the representation of stratospheric chemistry, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, halogen chemistry, and biogenic VOC emissions and chemistry. We also discuss uncertainty in the historical emission inventories used in models, and how these affect the simulated ozone trends.

  5. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallam, Brett; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation

  6. A comparative study of tissue-engineered constructs from Acropora and Porites coral in a large animal bone defect model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassero, M.; Bensidhoum, M.; Lecuelle, B.; Logeart-Avramoglou, D.; Petite, H.; Viateau, V.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the therapeutic potential of tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and coral granules from either Acropora or Porites to repair large bone defects. Materials and Methods Bone marrow-derived, autologous MSCs were seeded on Acropora or Porites coral granules in a perfusion bioreactor. Acropora-TECs (n = 7), Porites-TECs (n = 6) and bone autografts (n = 2) were then implanted into 25 mm long metatarsal diaphyseal defects in sheep. Bimonthly radiographic follow-up was completed until killing four months post-operatively. Explants were subsequently processed for microCT and histology to assess bone formation and coral bioresorption. Statistical analyses comprised Mann-Whitney, t-test and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. Results A two-fold increaseof newly formed bone volume was observed for Acropora-TECs when compared with Porites-TECs (14 sd 1089 mm3 versus 782 sd 507 mm3; p = 0.09). Bone union was consistent with autograft (1960 sd 518 mm3). The kinetics of bioresorption and bioresorption rates at four months were different for Acropora-TECs and Porites-TECs (81% sd 5% versus 94% sd 6%; p = 0.04). In comparing the defects that healed with those that did not, we observed that, when major bioresorption of coral at two months occurs and a scaffold material bioresorption rate superior to 90% at four months is achieved, bone nonunion consistently occurred using coral-based TECs. Discussion Bone regeneration in critical-size defects could be obtained with full bioresorption of the scaffold using coral-based TECs in a large animal model. The superior performance of Acropora-TECs brings us closer to a clinical application, probably because of more suitable bioresorption kinetics. However, nonunion still occurred in nearly half of the bone defects. Cite this article: A. Decambron, M. Manassero, M. Bensidhoum, B. Lecuelle, D. Logeart-Avramoglou, H. Petite, V. Viateau. A

  7. Repair of Achilles tendon defect with autologous ASCs engineered tendon in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dan; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Peihua; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are an important cell source for tissue regeneration and have been demonstrated the potential of tenogenic differentiation in vitro. This study explored the feasibility of using ASCs for engineered tendon repair in vivo in a rabbit Achilles tendon model. Total 30 rabbits were involved in this study. A composite tendon scaffold composed of an inner part of polyglycolic acid (PGA) unwoven fibers and an outer part of a net knitted with PGA/PLA (polylactic acid) fibers was used to provide mechanical strength. Autologous ASCs were harvested from nuchal subcutaneous adipose tissues and in vitro expanded. The expanded ASCs were harvested and resuspended in culture medium and evenly seeded onto the scaffold in the experimental group, whereas cell-free scaffolds served as the control group. The constructs of both groups were cultured inside a bioreactor under dynamic stretch for 5 weeks. In each of 30 rabbits, a 2 cm defect was created on right side of Achilles tendon followed by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-seeded scaffold in the experimental group of 15 rabbits, or by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-free scaffold in the control group of 15 rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 12, 21 and 45 weeks post-surgery for gross view, histology, and mechanical analysis. The results showed that short term in vitro culture enabled ASCs to produce matrix on the PGA fibers and the constructs showed tensile strength around 50 MPa in both groups (p > 0.05). With the increase of implantation time, cell-seeded constructs gradually form neo-tendon and became more mature at 45 weeks with histological structure similar to that of native tendon and with the presence of bipolar pattern and D-periodic structure of formed collagen fibrils. Additionally, both collagen fibril diameters and tensile strength increased continuously with significant difference among different time points (p tendon tissue with fibril structure observable only at 45 weeks

  8. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  9. Application of layered poly (L-lactic acid cell free scaffold in a rabbit rotator cuff defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui Atsuyuki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the application of a layered cell free poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA scaffold to regenerate an infraspinatus tendon defect in a rabbit model. We hypothesized that PLLA scaffold without cultivated cells would lead to regeneration of tissue with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus without tendon defects. Methods Layered PLLA fabric with a smooth surface on one side and a pile-finished surface on the other side was used. Novel form of layered PLLA scaffold was created by superimposing 2 PLLA fabrics. Defects of the infraspinatus tendon were created in 32 rabbits and the PLLA scaffolds were transplanted, four rabbits were used as normal control. Contralateral infraspinatus tendons were reattached to humeral head without scaffold implantation. Histological and mechanical evaluations were performed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after operation. Results At 4 weeks postoperatively, cell migration was observed in the interstice of the PLLA fibers. Regenerated tissue was directly connected to the bone composed mainly of type III collagen, at 16 weeks postoperatively. The ultimate failure load increased in a time-dependent manner and no statistical difference was seen between normal infraspinatus tendon and scaffold group at 8 and 16 weeks postoperatively. There were no differences between scaffold group and reattach group at each time of point. The stiffness did not improve significantly in both groups. Conclusions A novel form of layered PLLA scaffold has the potential to induce cell migration into the scaffold and to bridge the tendon defect with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus tendon model.

  10. Long Wavelength SAR Backscatter Modelling Trends as a Consequence of the Emergent Properties of Tree Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Brolly

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the novel use of a macroecological plant and forest structure model in conjunction with a Radiative Transfer (RT model to better understand interactions between microwaves and forest canopies. Trends predicted by the RT model, resulting from interactions with mixed age, mono and multi species forests, are analysed in comparison to those predicted using a simplistic structure based scattering model. This model relates backscatter to scatterer cross sectional or volume specifications, dependent on the size. The Spatially Explicit Reiterative Algorithm (SERA model is used to provide a widely varied tree size distribution while maintaining allometric consistency to produce a natural-like forest representation. The RT model is parameterised using structural information from SERA and microwave backscatter simulations are used to analyse the impact of changes to the forest stand. Results show that the slope of the saturation curve observed in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR backscatter-biomass relationship is sensitive to thinning and therefore forest basal area. Due to similarities displayed between the results of the RT and simplistic model, it is determined that forest SAR backscatter behaviour at long microwave wavelengths may be described generally using equations related to total stem volume and basal area. The nature of these equations is such that they describe saturating behaviour of forests in the absence of attenuation in comparable fashion to the trends exhibited using the RT model. Both modelled backscatter trends predict a   relationship to forest basal area from an early age when forest volume is increasing. When this is not the case, it is assumed to be a result of attenuation of the dominant stem-ground interaction due to the presence of excessive numbers of stems. This work shows how forest growth models can be successfully incorporated into existing independent scattering models and reveals, through the RT

  11. A general procedure to model and to analyze pipelines with real defects caused by corrosion measured in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Adriano D.M.; Souza, Antonio H.T. de; Willmersdorf, Ramiro B.; Lira, Paulo R.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Silvana, M.B. Afonso; Motta, Renato S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Andrade, Edmundo Q. de [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2009-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to present an automatic procedure to generate a geometric model and FE meshes from data provided by some field inspection. From the data provided a smooth geometry representation in the corroded area of the pipeline is generated. This generation is coupled with surface tools provided by MSC.Patran Soft-ware, pre and post-processing, program. To accomplish the generation of the whole model, discretization rules were coded for the corroded area and for the interfaces necessary to fulfill the discretization of the whole model. In this work, the module that automatized the generation of computer models of identified defects with irregular geometry is described in detail. These modules were implemented with functions written in the programming language PCL (Patran Command Language) and added to the program PIPEFLAW (Cabral, 2007) developed by the group PADMEC (High Perform Computing on Computational Mechanics) from UFPE. The program has a friendly and customized graphical interface which allows the user to provide the main parameters of the pipe and defect. A structural non-linear analysis was performed for some models to obtain the internal pressure that would cause rupture of the model, representing the mechanical failure of the pipeline. For the purpose of numerical analysis the commercial finite element program ANSYS was used, which were being managed by scripts written in Phyton. (author)

  12. Using regression heteroscedasticity to model trends in the mean and variance of floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jory; Vogel, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the frequency of extreme floods have been observed and anticipated in many hydrological settings in response to numerous drivers of environmental change, including climate, land cover, and infrastructure. To help decision-makers design flood control infrastructure in settings with non-stationary hydrological regimes, a parsimonious approach for detecting and modeling trends in extreme floods is needed. An approach using ordinary least squares (OLS) to fit a heteroscedastic regression model can accommodate nonstationarity in both the mean and variance of flood series while simultaneously offering a means of (i) analytically evaluating type I and type II trend detection errors, (ii) analytically generating expressions of uncertainty, such as confidence and prediction intervals, (iii) providing updated estimates of the frequency of floods exceeding the flood of record, (iv) accommodating a wide range of non-linear functions through ladder of powers transformations, and (v) communicating hydrological changes in a single graphical image. Previous research has shown that the two-parameter lognormal distribution can adequately model the annual maximum flood distribution of both stationary and non-stationary hydrological regimes in many regions of the United States. A simple logarithmic transformation of annual maximum flood series enables an OLS heteroscedastic regression modeling approach to be especially suitable for creating a non-stationary flood frequency distribution with parameters that are conditional upon time or physically meaningful covariates. While heteroscedasticity is often viewed as an impediment, we document how detecting and modeling heteroscedasticity presents an opportunity for characterizing both the conditional mean and variance of annual maximum floods. We introduce an approach through which variance trend models can be analytically derived from the behavior of residuals of the conditional mean flood model. Through case studies of

  13. Experimental reconstruction of cervical esophageal defect with artificial esophagus made of polyurethane in a dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Cui, Y; Ma, K; Gong, M; Chang, D; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    The defect of esophagus after surgical excision in patients is usually replaced by autologous stomach, jejunum, or colon. The operation brings severe trauma and complications. Using artificial esophagus to replace the defect in situ can reduce the operative trauma, simplify the operative procedures, and decrease the influence to digestive function. A variety of experiments have been designed for developing a practical artificial esophagus. Nevertheless, a safe and reliable artificial esophagus is not yet available. The objective is to evaluate the possibility of the artificial esophagus made of non-degradable polyurethane materials being used in reconstruction of the segmental defect of cervical esophagus in beagles, observe the regeneration of esophageal tissue, and gather experience for future study. The cervical esophageal defects in 13 beagles were designed to 2-cm long and were constructed by the artificial esophagus made of non-degradable polyurethane materials. Nutrition supports were given after the operation. The operative mortality, anastomotic leakage, migration of artificial esophagus, and dysphagia were followed up. The regeneration of the esophageal tissues was evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemical labeled streptavidin-biotin method. The surgical procedures were successfully completed in all beagles, and 12-month follow-ups were done. Only one beagle died of severe infection, and all others survived until being killed. The anastomotic leakage occurred in nine beagles, most of them (8/9) were cured after supportive therapy. The migration of artificial esophagus occurred in all 12 surviving beagles, and one artificial esophagus stayed in situ after migration. All 12 surviving beagles showed dysphagia with taking only fluid or soft food. No beagle died of malnutrition. The neo-esophagus was composed of granulation tissue, and the inner surface was covered by epithelium in 2-3 months completely. But the inner surface of neo-esophagus with

  14. Temporal Topic Modeling to Assess Associations between News Trends and Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saurav; Chakraborty, Prithwish; Nsoesie, Elaine O.; Cohn, Emily; Mekaru, Sumiko R.; Brownstein, John S.; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2017-01-01

    In retrospective assessments, internet news reports have been shown to capture early reports of unknown infectious disease transmission prior to official laboratory confirmation. In general, media interest and reporting peaks and wanes during the course of an outbreak. In this study, we quantify the extent to which media interest during infectious disease outbreaks is indicative of trends of reported incidence. We introduce an approach that uses supervised temporal topic models to transform large corpora of news articles into temporal topic trends. The key advantages of this approach include: applicability to a wide range of diseases and ability to capture disease dynamics, including seasonality, abrupt peaks and troughs. We evaluated the method using data from multiple infectious disease outbreaks reported in the United States of America (U.S.), China, and India. We demonstrate that temporal topic trends extracted from disease-related news reports successfully capture the dynamics of multiple outbreaks such as whooping cough in U.S. (2012), dengue outbreaks in India (2013) and China (2014). Our observations also suggest that, when news coverage is uniform, efficient modeling of temporal topic trends using time-series regression techniques can estimate disease case counts with increased precision before official reports by health organizations.

  15. Following a trend with an exponential moving average: Analytical results for a Gaussian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Serror, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how price variations of a stock are transformed into profits and losses (P&Ls) of a trend following strategy. In the frame of a Gaussian model, we derive the probability distribution of P&Ls and analyze its moments (mean, variance, skewness and kurtosis) and asymptotic behavior (quantiles). We show that the asymmetry of the distribution (with often small losses and less frequent but significant profits) is reminiscent to trend following strategies and less dependent on peculiarities of price variations. At short times, trend following strategies admit larger losses than one may anticipate from standard Gaussian estimates, while smaller losses are ensured at longer times. Simple explicit formulas characterizing the distribution of P&Ls illustrate the basic mechanisms of momentum trading, while general matrix representations can be applied to arbitrary Gaussian models. We also compute explicitly annualized risk adjusted P&L and strategy turnover to account for transaction costs. We deduce the trend following optimal timescale and its dependence on both auto-correlation level and transaction costs. Theoretical results are illustrated on the Dow Jones index.

  16. Identification of Sox8 as a modifier gene in a mouse model of Hirschsprung disease reveals underlying molecular defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maka, Marzena; Stolt, C Claus; Wegner, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in the Sox10 gene display aganglionosis of the colon and represent a model for human Hirschsprung disease. Here, we show that the closely related Sox8 functions as a modifier gene for Sox10-dependent enteric nervous system defects as it increases both penetrance and severity of the defect in Sox10 heterozygous mice despite having no detectable influence on enteric nervous system development on its own. Sox8 exhibits an expression pattern very similar to Sox10 with occurrence in vagal and enteric neural crest cells and later confinement to enteric glia. Loss of Sox8 alleles in Sox10 heterozygous mice impaired colonization of the gut by enteric neural crest cells already at early times. Whereas proliferation, apoptosis, and neuronal differentiation were normal for enteric neural crest cells in the gut of mutant mice, apoptosis was dramatically increased in vagal neural crest cells outside the gut. The defects in enteric nervous system development of mice with Sox10 and Sox8 mutations are therefore likely caused by a reduction of the pool of undifferentiated vagal neural crest cells. Our study suggests that Sox8 and Sox10 are jointly required for the maintenance of these vagal neural crest stem cells.

  17. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration.

  18. Using bayesian models to assess the effects of under-reporting of cannabis use on the association with birth defects, national birth defects prevention study, 1997-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, M.M.H.J. van; Donders, A.R.T.; Devine, O.; Roeleveld, N.; Reefhuis, J.; Prevention, S. National Birth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on associations between periconceptional cannabis exposure and birth defects have mainly relied on self-reported exposure. Therefore, the results may be biased due to under-reporting of the exposure. The aim of this study was to quantify the potential effects of this form of

  19. Analysis and prediction of rainfall trends over Bangladesh using Mann-Kendall, Spearman's rho tests and ARIMA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Atiqur; Yunsheng, Lou; Sultana, Nahid

    2017-08-01

    In this study, 60-year monthly rainfall data of Bangladesh were analysed to detect trends. Modified Mann-Kendall, Spearman's rho tests and Sen's slope estimators were applied to find the long-term annual, dry season and monthly trends. Sequential Mann-Kendall analysis was applied to detect the potential trend turning points. Spatial variations of the trends were examined using inverse distance weighting (IDW) interpolation. AutoRegressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used for the country mean rainfall and for other two stations data which depicted the highest and the lowest trend in the Mann-Kendall and Spearman's rho tests. Results showed that there is no significant trend in annual rainfall pattern except increasing trends for Cox's Bazar, Khulna, Satkhira and decreasing trend for Srimagal areas. For the dry season, only Bogra area represented significant decreasing trend. Long-term monthly trends demonstrated a mixed pattern; both negative and positive changes were found from February to September. Comilla area showed a significant decreasing trend for consecutive 3 months while Rangpur and Khulna stations confirmed the significant rising trends for three different months in month-wise trends analysis. Rangpur station data gave a maximum increasing trend in April whereas a maximum decreasing trend was found in August for Comilla station. ARIMA models predict +3.26, +8.6 and -2.30 mm rainfall per year for the country, Cox's Bazar and Srimangal areas, respectively. However, all the test results and predictions revealed a good agreement among them in the study.

  20. Trends of air pollution in Denmark - Normalised by a simple weather index model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiilsholm, S.; Rasmussen, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report is a part of the Traffic Pool projects on 'Traffic and Environments', 1995-99, financed by the Danish Ministry of Transport. The Traffic Pool projects included five different projects on 'Surveillance of the Air Quality', 'Atmospheric Modelling', 'Atmospheric Chemistry Modelling', 'Smog and ozone' and 'Greenhouse effects and Climate', [Rasmussen, 2000]. This work is a part of the project on 'Surveillance of the Air Quality' with the main objectives to make trend analysis of levels of air pollution from traffic in Denmark. Other participants were from the Road Directory mainly focusing on measurement of traffic and trend analysis of the air quality utilising a nordic model for the air pollution in street canyons called BLB (Beregningsmodel for Luftkvalitet i Byluftgader) [Vejdirektoratet 2000], National Environmental Research Institute (HERI) mainly focusing on. measurements of air pollution and trend analysis with the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) [DMU 2000], and the Copenhagen Environmental Protection Agency mainly focusing on measurements. In this study a more simple statistical model has been developed for trend analysis of the air quality. The model is filtering out the influence of the variations from year to year in the meteorological conditions on the air pollution levels. The weather factors found most important are wind speed, wind direction and mixing height. Measurements of CO, NO and NO 2 from three streets in Copenhagen have been used, these streets are Jagtvej, Bredgade and H. C. Andersen's Boulevard (HCAB). The years 1994-1996 were used for evaluation of the method and annual indexes of air pollution index dependent only on meteorological parameters, called WEATHIX, were calculated for the years 1990-1997 and used for normalisation of the observed air pollution trends. Meteorological data were taken from either the background stations at the H.C. Oersted - building situated close to one of the street stations or the synoptic

  1. Research of combination model for prediction of the trend of outbreak of hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-ping CHEN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish a combination model of autoregressive integrated moving average model and the grey dynamics (ARIMA-GM of hepatitis B incidence rate (1/100 000 to predict the trend of outbreak of hepatitis B, as to provide a scientific basis for the early discovery of the infectious diseases for the performance of countermeasures of controlling its spread. Methods The monthly incidence of hepatitis B in Qian'an city, Hebei province, was collected from Jan 2004 to Dec 2012, and a model (ARIMA was reproduced with SPSS software. The GM (1,1 model was used to correct the residual sequence with a threshold value, and a combined forecasting model was reproduced. This combination model was used to predict the monthly incidence rate in this city in 2013. Results The model ARIMA(0,1,1(0,1,112 was established successfully and the residual sequence was a white noise sequence. Then the GM (1,1 model with a threshold of 3 was used to correct its residuals and obtain its nonlinear feature extraction of information. The forecasting model met required precision standards (C=0.673, P=0.877, the fitting accuracy of which was basically qualified. The results showed that the MAE, MAPE of the ARIMA-GM combined model were smaller than that of a single model, and the combined model could improve the prediction accuracy. Using the combined model to forecast the incidence of hepatitis B during Jan 2013 to Dec 2013, the overall trend was relatively consistent with the condition of previous years. Conclusion The ARIMA-GM combined model can better fit the incidence rate of hepatitis B with a greater accuracy than the seasonal ARIMA model. The prediction results can provide the reference for the early warning system of HBV. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.01.12

  2. Ab initio phonon point defect scattering and thermal transport in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos A.; Lindsay, Lucas

    2018-01-01

    We study the scattering of phonons from point defects and their effect on lattice thermal conductivity κ using a parameter-free ab initio Green's function methodology. Specifically, we focus on the scattering of phonons by boron (B), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus substitutions as well as single- and double-carbon vacancies in graphene. We show that changes of the atomic structure and harmonic interatomic force constants locally near defects govern the strength and frequency trends of the scattering of out-of-plane acoustic (ZA) phonons, the dominant heat carriers in graphene. ZA scattering rates due to N substitutions are nearly an order of magnitude smaller than those for B defects despite having similar mass perturbations. Furthermore, ZA phonon scattering rates from N defects decrease with increasing frequency in the lower-frequency spectrum in stark contrast to expected trends from simple models. ZA phonon-vacancy scattering rates are found to have a significantly softer frequency dependence (˜ω0 ) in graphene than typically employed in phenomenological models. The rigorous Green's function calculations demonstrate that typical mass-defect models do not adequately describe ZA phonon-defect scattering rates. Our ab initio calculations capture well the trend of κ vs vacancy density from experiments, though not the magnitudes. This work elucidates important insights into phonon-defect scattering and thermal transport in graphene, and demonstrates the applicability of first-principles methods toward describing these properties in imperfect materials.

  3. Model-based auralizations of violin sound trends accompanying plate-bridge tuning or holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George; Mores, Robert

    2015-04-01

    To expose systematic trends in violin sound accompanying "tuning" only the plates or only the bridge, the first structural acoustics-based model auralizations of violin sound were created by passing a bowed-string driving force measured at the bridge of a solid body violin through the dynamic filter (DF) model radiativity profile "filter" RDF(f) (frequency-dependent pressure per unit driving force, free-free suspension, anechoic chamber). DF model auralizations for the more realistic case of a violin held/played in a reverberant auditorium reveal that holding the violin greatly diminishes its low frequency response, an effect only weakly compensated for by auditorium reverberation.

  4. Modeling of punctual defects in UAL4 from the U-Al system: Combination of CALPHAD method with first principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniznik, L; Alonso, P.R; Gargano, P.H; Rubiolo, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the point defect structure of oI20 UAl 4 in order to study aluminum diffusion. We performed ab initio calculations within a pseudopotentials method implemented in the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) to obtain point defect formation energies: vacancies (V U and V A l ) and antisites (Al U and U A l). Using a statistical-thermodynamic model we calculated defects concentrations as function of temperature and deviation from stoichiometry. For stoichiometric UAl 4 antisites are the dominant thermal defects. In off-stoichiometric UAl 4 , antisites are the constitutional defects. For U-rich UAl 4 , the thermal defect is called Entre Ramas, where one antisite U atom is replaced by five Al vacancies. For Al-rich UAl 4 , the thermal defect is also an Entre Ramas, where four antisite Al atoms are replaced by five U vacancies. Our first principles results were used to model UAl 4 intermediate phase with a two sublattices Wagner-Schottky model. The Thermocalc data bases previously used were modified, including antisites and vacancies in both sublattices of the UAl 4 intermediate phase: (U,Al,VA) 0.2 : (Al,U,VA) 0.8 . We obtained a consistent thermodynamic database able to reproduce the entire U-Al equilibrium phase diagram (author)

  5. Double-plating of ovine critical sized defects of the tibia: a low morbidity model enabling continuous in vivo monitoring of bone healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearce Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies using sheep critical sized defect models to test tissue engineered products report high morbidity and complications rates. This study evaluates a large bone defect model in the sheep tibia, stabilized with two, a novel Carbon fibre Poly-ether-ether-ketone (CF-PEEK and a locking compression plate (LCP which could sustain duration for up to 6 month with an acceptable low complication rate. Methods A large bone defect of 3 cm was performed in the mid diaphysis of the right tibia in 33 sheep. The defect was stabilised with the CF - PEEK plate and an LCP. All sheep were supported with slings for 8 weeks after surgery. The study was carried out for 3 months in 6 and for 6 months in 27 animals. Results The surgical procedure could easily be performed in all sheep and continuous in vivo radiographic evaluation of the defect was possible. This long bone critical sized defect model shows with 6.1% a low rate of complications compared with numbers mentioned in the literature. Conclusions This experimental animal model could serve as a standard model in comparative research. A well defined standard model would reduce the number of experimental animals needed in future studies and would therefore add to ethical considerations.

  6. A new metaphyseal bone defect model in osteoporotic rats to study biomaterials for the enhancement of bone healing in osteoporotic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Volker; Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Zahner, Daniel; Dürselen, Lutz; Lips, Katrin; El Khassawna, Thaqif; Heiss, Christian; Riedrich, Alina; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Ignatius, Anita; Kampschulte, Marian; von Dewitz, Helena; Heinemann, Sascha; Schnettler, Reinhard; Langheinrich, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    The intention of this study was to establish a new critical size animal model that represents clinically relevant situations with osteoporotic bone status and internally fixated metaphyseal defect fractures in which biomaterials for the enhancement of fracture healing in osteoporotic fracture defects can be studied. Twenty-eight rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with a calcium-, phosphorus-, vitamin D3-, soy- and phytoestrogen-free diet. After 3months Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements showed statistically significant reductions in bone mineral density of the spine of -25.9% and of the femur of -21.3% of the OVX rats compared with controls, confirming osteoporosis in the OVX rats. The OVX rats then underwent either 3 or 5mm wedge-shaped osteotomy of the distal metaphyseal area of the femur that was internally stabilized with a T-shaped mini-plate. After 42days biomechanical testing yielded completely unstable conditions in the 5mm defect femora (bending stiffness 0Nmm(-2)) and a bending stiffness of 12,500Nmm(-2) in the 3mm defects, which showed the beginning of fracture consolidation. Micro-computed tomography showed statistically significant more new bone formation in the 3mm defects (4.83±0.37mm(2)), with bridging of the initial fracture defect area, compared with the 5mm defects (2.68±0.34mm(2)), in which no bridging of the initial defect was found. These results were confirmed by histology. In conclusion, the 5mm defect can be considered as a critical size defect model in which biomaterials can be tested. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term surface pCO2 trends from observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry F. Tjiputra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We estimate regional long-term surface ocean pCO2 growth rates using all available underway and bottled biogeochemistry data collected over the past four decades. These observed regional trends are compared with those simulated by five state-of-the-art Earth system models over the historical period. Oceanic pCO2 growth rates faster than the atmospheric growth rates indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake, while ocean pCO2 growth rates slower than the atmospheric growth rates indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 uptake. Aside from the western subpolar North Pacific and the subtropical North Atlantic, our analysis indicates that the current observation-based basin-scale trends may be underestimated, indicating that more observations are needed to determine the trends in these regions. Encouragingly, good agreement between the simulated and observed pCO2 trends is found when the simulated fields are subsampled with the observational coverage. In agreement with observations, we see that the simulated pCO2 trends are primarily associated with the increase in surface dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC associated with atmospheric carbon uptake, and in part by warming of the sea surface. Under the RCP8.5 future scenario, DIC continues to be the dominant driver of pCO2 trends, with little change in the relative contribution of SST. However, the changes in the hydrological cycle play an increasingly important role. For the contemporary (1970–2011 period, the simulated regional pCO2 trends are lower than the atmospheric growth rate over 90% of the ocean. However, by year 2100 more than 40% of the surface ocean area has a higher oceanic pCO2 trend than the atmosphere, implying a reduction in the atmospheric CO2 uptake rate. The fastest pCO2 growth rates are projected for the subpolar North Atlantic, while the high-latitude Southern Ocean and eastern equatorial Pacific have the weakest growth rates, remaining below the atmospheric pCO2 growth rate. Our work

  8. L-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2015-03-15

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite α-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Sea Ice Trends in Climate Models Only Accurate in Runs with Biased Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Erica; Eisenman, Ian

    2017-08-01

    Observations indicate that the Arctic sea ice cover is rapidly retreating while the Antarctic sea ice cover is steadily expanding. State-of-the-art climate models, by contrast, typically simulate a moderate decrease in both the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice covers. However, in each hemisphere there is a small subset of model simulations that have sea ice trends similar to the observations. Based on this, a number of recent studies have suggested that the models are consistent with the observations in each hemisphere when simulated internal climate variability is taken into account. Here we examine sea ice changes during 1979-2013 in simulations from the most recent Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) as well as the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM-LE), drawing on previous work that found a close relationship in climate models between global-mean surface temperature and sea ice extent. We find that all of the simulations with 1979-2013 Arctic sea ice retreat as fast as observed have considerably more global warming than observations during this time period. Using two separate methods to estimate the sea ice retreat that would occur under the observed level of global warming in each simulation in both ensembles, we find that simulated Arctic sea ice retreat as fast as observed would occur less than 1% of the time. This implies that the models are not consistent with the observations. In the Antarctic, we find that simulated sea ice expansion as fast as observed typically corresponds with too little global warming, although these results are more equivocal. We show that because of this, the simulations do not capture the observed asymmetry between Arctic and Antarctic sea ice trends. This suggests that the models may be getting the right sea ice trends for the wrong reasons in both polar regions.

  10. Trend modelling of wave parameters and application in onboard prediction of ship responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Jensen, J. Juncher

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a trend analysis for prediction of sea state parameters onboard shipsduring voyages. Given those parameters, a JONSWAP model and also the transfer functions, prediction of wave induced ship responses are thus made. The procedure is tested with full-scale data of an in-service...... container ship. Comparison between predictions and the actual measurements, implies a good agreementin general. This method can be an efficient way to improve decision support on board ships....

  11. Prediction Model of Machining Failure Trend Based on Large Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jirong

    2017-12-01

    The mechanical processing has high complexity, strong coupling, a lot of control factors in the machining process, it is prone to failure, in order to improve the accuracy of fault detection of large mechanical equipment, research on fault trend prediction requires machining, machining fault trend prediction model based on fault data. The characteristics of data processing using genetic algorithm K mean clustering for machining, machining feature extraction which reflects the correlation dimension of fault, spectrum characteristics analysis of abnormal vibration of complex mechanical parts processing process, the extraction method of the abnormal vibration of complex mechanical parts processing process of multi-component spectral decomposition and empirical mode decomposition Hilbert based on feature extraction and the decomposition results, in order to establish the intelligent expert system for the data base, combined with large data analysis method to realize the machining of the Fault trend prediction. The simulation results show that this method of fault trend prediction of mechanical machining accuracy is better, the fault in the mechanical process accurate judgment ability, it has good application value analysis and fault diagnosis in the machining process.

  12. Trends of oral health care and dental treatment needs in relation to molar incisor hypomineralisation defects: a study amongst a group of Iraqi schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanim, A M; Manton, D J; Morgan, M V; Mariño, R J; Bailey, D L

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic properties of molar-incisor-hypomineralisation lesions (MIH) may impact negatively on personal daily oral care resulting in increased treatment needs. To describe and compare individual oral health care practices between MIH-affected and non-affected children, to evaluate and compare dental treatment needs between hypomineralised and non-hypomineralised first permanent molars, and to explore the role of reported fluoride exposure in the development of MIH. A cluster sample of 7-9 year-old Iraqi schoolchildren (823 of 1000 eligible, response rate 82.3%) had their first permanent molars and incisors evaluated using the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry evaluation criteria for MIH. Of these 153 were diagnosed with the defect and were referred to as MIH-affected children. Mothers of the participating children were asked to complete an oral health-questionnaire administered at schools. This included questions regarding child's history of dental visits, fluoride intake and the pattern of oral hygiene practices. Assessment of the dental treatment requirements for the first permanent molars was performed in a sample subset drawn from a larger data set of affected children (n=100) having their teeth assessed previously for dental caries status following the International Caries Detection and Assessment System. The sample subset consisted of 130 hypomineralised molars and 270 non-hypomineralised molars. Of the total sample, approximately 71% of parents had taken their children to the dentist at some stage. For the total sample, tooth restoration or extraction was the most likely causes for seeking dental care at the first dental appointment (57.9%). Tap water was the main source of water consumed at home by the majority of children (77.8%). The prevalence of dental caries and tooth restorations was higher in hypomineralised affected molars (78.5%) than in the defect-free molars (33.7%). MIH-affected children reported significantly higher frequency of

  13. Multifactorial origins of heart and gut defects in nipbl-deficient zebrafish, a model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Muto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS is the founding member of a class of multi-organ system birth defect syndromes termed cohesinopathies, named for the chromatin-associated protein complex cohesin, which mediates sister chromatid cohesion. Most cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for Nipped-B-like (Nipbl, a highly conserved protein that facilitates cohesin loading. Consistent with recent evidence implicating cohesin and Nipbl in transcriptional regulation, both CdLS cell lines and tissues of Nipbl-deficient mice show changes in the expression of hundreds of genes. Nearly all such changes are modest, however--usually less than 1.5-fold--raising the intriguing possibility that, in CdLS, severe developmental defects result from the collective action of many otherwise innocuous perturbations. As a step toward testing this hypothesis, we developed a model of nipbl-deficiency in zebrafish, an organism in which we can quantitatively investigate the combinatorial effects of gene expression changes. After characterizing the structure and embryonic expression of the two zebrafish nipbl genes, we showed that morpholino knockdown of these genes produces a spectrum of specific heart and gut/visceral organ defects with similarities to those in CdLS. Analysis of nipbl morphants further revealed that, as early as gastrulation, expression of genes involved in endodermal differentiation (sox32, sox17, foxa2, and gata5 and left-right patterning (spaw, lefty2, and dnah9 is altered. Experimental manipulation of the levels of several such genes--using RNA injection or morpholino knockdown--implicated both additive and synergistic interactions in causing observed developmental defects. These findings support the view that birth defects in CdLS arise from collective effects of quantitative changes in gene expression. Interestingly, both the phenotypes and gene expression changes in nipbl morphants differed from those in mutants or morphants for genes encoding

  14. Trend-Residual Dual Modeling for Detection of Outliers in Low-Cost GPS Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojian; Cui, Tingting; Fu, Jianhong; Peng, Jianwei; Shan, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Low-cost GPS (receiver) has become a ubiquitous and integral part of our daily life. Despite noticeable advantages such as being cheap, small, light, and easy to use, its limited positioning accuracy devalues and hampers its wide applications for reliable mapping and analysis. Two conventional techniques to remove outliers in a GPS trajectory are thresholding and Kalman-based methods, which are difficult in selecting appropriate thresholds and modeling the trajectories. Moreover, they are insensitive to medium and small outliers, especially for low-sample-rate trajectories. This paper proposes a model-based GPS trajectory cleaner. Rather than examining speed and acceleration or assuming a pre-determined trajectory model, we first use cubic smooth spline to adaptively model the trend of the trajectory. The residuals, i.e., the differences between the trend and GPS measurements, are then further modeled by time series method. Outliers are detected by scoring the residuals at every GPS trajectory point. Comparing to the conventional procedures, the trend-residual dual modeling approach has the following features: (a) it is able to model trajectories and detect outliers adaptively; (b) only one critical value for outlier scores needs to be set; (c) it is able to robustly detect unapparent outliers; and (d) it is effective in cleaning outliers for GPS trajectories with low sample rates. Tests are carried out on three real-world GPS trajectories datasets. The evaluation demonstrates an average of 9.27 times better performance in outlier detection for GPS trajectories than thresholding and Kalman-based techniques.

  15. Trend-Residual Dual Modeling for Detection of Outliers in Low-Cost GPS Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojian Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost GPS (receiver has become a ubiquitous and integral part of our daily life. Despite noticeable advantages such as being cheap, small, light, and easy to use, its limited positioning accuracy devalues and hampers its wide applications for reliable mapping and analysis. Two conventional techniques to remove outliers in a GPS trajectory are thresholding and Kalman-based methods, which are difficult in selecting appropriate thresholds and modeling the trajectories. Moreover, they are insensitive to medium and small outliers, especially for low-sample-rate trajectories. This paper proposes a model-based GPS trajectory cleaner. Rather than examining speed and acceleration or assuming a pre-determined trajectory model, we first use cubic smooth spline to adaptively model the trend of the trajectory. The residuals, i.e., the differences between the trend and GPS measurements, are then further modeled by time series method. Outliers are detected by scoring the residuals at every GPS trajectory point. Comparing to the conventional procedures, the trend-residual dual modeling approach has the following features: (a it is able to model trajectories and detect outliers adaptively; (b only one critical value for outlier scores needs to be set; (c it is able to robustly detect unapparent outliers; and (d it is effective in cleaning outliers for GPS trajectories with low sample rates. Tests are carried out on three real-world GPS trajectories datasets. The evaluation demonstrates an average of 9.27 times better performance in outlier detection for GPS trajectories than thresholding and Kalman-based techniques.

  16. arXiv Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; De Boer, Wim

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors poly-crystalline diamond sensors are used. Here high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the CCE. However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is so much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and hence reduces the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed ...

  17. Computer modeling of point defects and diffusion in ordered intermetallic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Y.

    2003-03-01

    This paper gives an overview of the recent progress in the understanding of diffusion mechanisms in ordered intermetallic compounds, particularly the structural aluminides TiAl and NiAl. The long-range order of the crystal structure imposes selection rules on possible diffusion mechanisms. It favors mechanisms that either do not affect the order or destroy it only locally and temporarily but recover it once the diffusion cycle is complete. Atomistic simulation tools for studying point defects and diffusion in ordered structures are discussed and their applications are demonstrated. The compositional disorder in TiAl is accommodated by antisite defects on both sides of the stoichiometry. Diffusion in TiAl involves sublattice vacancy jumps, inter-sublattice jumps, and three-jump vacancy cycles. NiAl contains antisites on the Al sublattice in Ni-rich compositions and constitutional vacancies on the Ni sublattice in Al-rich compositions. Diffusion in NiAl is governed by several mechanisms operating concurrently, including sublattice diffusion of Ni vacancies, six-jump vacancy cycles, and other processes. Many of the vacancy jumps are collective transitions involving two atoms. The dominant diffusion mechanism depends on the temperature and the degree of off-stoichiometry. The diffusion coefficients obtained by atomistic calculations compare well with experimental data.

  18. Evaluation of injectable silica-embedded nanohydroxyapatite bone substitute in a rat tibia defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiguo; Ganz, Cornelia; Weber, Ulf; Adam, Martin; Holzhüter, Gerd; Wolter, Daniel; Frerich, Bernhard; Vollmar, Brigitte; Gerber, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, vertebral compression fractures occur after trauma and osteoporosis. Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure using bone filler material for the treatment of such fractures. A full synthetic injectable bone substitute (SIBS) was manufactured by means of spray drying. The aim of this study was to characterize the SIBS and to analyze the remodelling process during degradation of the biomaterial and new bone formation after implantation. SIBS is an aqueous suspension of donut-like microparticles. These microparticles consist of nanocrystallites of synthetic hydroxyapatite embedded in amorphous silica gel. After implantation of SIBS in a proximal tibial diaphyseal defect in 52 rats, grafts were harvested for subsequent analysis on different days. Newly formed bone originating from endosteum was observed on day 6. Hematomas in the medullary space and cortical wounds disappeared on day 12. The wound region was completely replaced by a composite of newly formed cancellous bone, extracellular matrix, and SIBS. At day 63 the cortical defect was fully healed by bone, while newly formed bone in the medullary space almost disappeared and was replaced with bone marrow. In conclusion, SIBS demonstrated a unique structure with osteoinductive and bioresorbable properties, which induced fast bone regeneration. Therefore, a clinical application of SIBS for kyphoplasty is promising.

  19. Volumetric Analysis of Alveolar Bone Defect Using Three-Dimensional-Printed Models Versus Computer-Aided Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengzhou; Li, Binghang; Yin, Ningbei; Cao, Yilin; Wang, Yongqian

    2017-03-01

    Knowing the volume of a graft is essential in repairing alveolar bone defects. This study investigates the 2 advanced preoperative volume measurement methods: three-dimensional (3D) printing and computer-aided engineering (CAE). Ten unilateral alveolar cleft patients were enrolled in this study. Their computed tomographic data were sent to 3D printing and CAE software. A simulated graft was used on the 3D-printed model, and the graft volume was measured by water displacement. The volume calculated by CAE software used mirror-reverses technique. The authors compared the actual volumes of the simulated grafts with the CAE software-derived volumes. The average volume of the simulated bone grafts by 3D-printed models was 1.52 mL, higher than the mean volume of 1.47 calculated by CAE software. The difference between the 2 volumes was from -0.18 to 0.42 mL. The paired Student t test showed no statistically significant difference between the volumes derived from the 2 methods. This study demonstrated that the mirror-reversed technique by CAE software is as accurate as the simulated operation on 3D-printed models in unilateral alveolar cleft patients. These findings further validate the use of 3D printing and CAE technique in alveolar defect repairing.

  20. Nonhomologous recombination between defective poliovirus and coxsackievirus genomes suggests a new model of genetic plasticity for picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2014-08-05

    Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3' end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. Importance: The multiplication of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in poorly immunized human populations can render these viruses pathogenic, causing poliomyelitis outbreaks. Most cVDPVs are intertypic recombinants between a poliovirus (PV) strain and another human enterovirus, such as type 17 coxsackie A viruses (CA17). For further studies of the genetic exchanges

  1. Excessive activity of cathepsin K is associated with cartilage defects in a zebrafish model of mucolipidosis II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Petrey

    2012-03-01

    The severe pediatric disorder mucolipidosis II (ML-II; also known as I-cell disease is caused by defects in mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P biosynthesis. Patients with ML-II exhibit multiple developmental defects, including skeletal, craniofacial and joint abnormalities. To date, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these clinical manifestations are poorly understood. Taking advantage of a zebrafish model of ML-II, we previously showed that the cartilage morphogenesis defects in this model are associated with altered chondrocyte differentiation and excessive deposition of type II collagen, indicating that aspects of development that rely on proper extracellular matrix homeostasis are sensitive to decreases in Man-6-P biosynthesis. To further investigate the molecular bases for the cartilage phenotypes, we analyzed the transcript abundance of several genes in chondrocyte-enriched cell populations isolated from wild-type and ML-II zebrafish embryos. Increased levels of cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP transcripts were noted in ML-II cell populations. This increase in transcript abundance corresponded with elevated and sustained activity of several cathepsins (K, L and S and MMP-13 during early development. Unlike MMP-13, for which higher levels of protein were detected, the sustained activity of cathepsin K at later stages seemed to result from its abnormal processing and activation. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity by pharmacological or genetic means not only reduced the activity of this enzyme but led to a broad reduction in additional protease activity, significant correction of the cartilage morphogenesis phenotype and reduced type II collagen staining in ML-II embryos. Our findings suggest a central role for excessive cathepsin K activity in the developmental aspects of ML-II cartilage pathogenesis and highlight the utility of the zebrafish system to address the biochemical underpinnings of metabolic disease.

  2. Modeling of Semiconductors and Correlated Oxides with Point Defects by First Principles Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2014-06-15

    Point defects in silicon, vanadium dioxide, and doped ceria are investigated by density functional theory. Defects involving vacancies and interstitial oxygen and carbon in silicon are after formed in outer space and significantly affect device performances. The screened hybrid functional by Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof is used to calculate formation energies, binding energies, and electronic structures of the defective systems because standard density functional theory underestimates the bang gap of silicon. The results indicate for the A-center a −2 charge state. Tin is proposed to be an effective dopant to suppress the formation of A-centers. For the total energy difference between the A- and B-type carbon related G-centers we find close agreement with the experiment. The results indicate that the C-type G-center is more stable than both the A- and B-types. The electronic structures of the monoclinic and rutile phases of vanadium dioxide are also studied using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional. The ground states of the pure phases obtained by calculations including spin polarization disagree with the experimental observations that the monoclinic phase should not be magnetic, the rutile phase should be metallic, and the monoclinic phase should have a lower total energy than the rutile phase. By tuning the Hartree-Fock fraction α to 10% the agreement with experiments is improved in terms of band gaps and relative energies of the phases. A calculation scheme is proposed to simulate the relationship between the transition temperature of the metal-insulator transition and the dopant concentration in tungsten doped vanadium dioxide. We achieve good agreement with the experimental situation. 18.75% and 25% yttrium, lanthanum, praseodymium, samarium, and gadolinium doped ceria supercells generated by the special quasirandom structure approach are employed to investigate the impact of doping on the O diffusion. The experimental behavior of the conductivity for the

  3. Trends and Challenges of Electronic Auctions as a New Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Janeska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The virtual internet based market allowed different forms of trading. Electronic business opens up new markets and market segments. Auctions are a very reliable and competitive trading model which allows to achieve fair prices and to choose the optimal business partners. The purpose of this model is that the system can extend the duration of the auction until they met various commercial applications.The basic motivation for research in this paper is the increasing trend of the use of electronic auctions in the process of selling and buying products and services.

  4. Model-simulated trend of surface carbon monoxide for the 2001–2010 decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    We present decadal trend estimates of surface carbon monoxide (CO) simulated using the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy for Atmospheric Chemistry) based on the emission scenarios Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 for anthropogenic activity and Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) v3.1 for biomass burning from 2001 through 2010. The spatial distribution of the modeled surface CO is evaluated with monthly data from the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) thermal infrared product. The global means of correlation coefficient and relative bias for the decade 2001-2010 are 0.95 and -4.29 %, respectively. We also find a reasonable correlation (R =0.78) between the trends of EMAC surface CO and full 10-year monthly records from ground-based observation (World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases, WDCGG). Over western Europe, eastern USA, and northern Australia, the significant decreases in EMAC surface CO are estimated at -35.5±5.8, -59.6±9.1, and -13.7±9.5 ppbv per decade, respectively. In contrast, the surface CO increases by +8.9±4.8 ppbv per decade over southern Asia. A high correlation (R =0.92) between the changes in EMAC-simulated surface CO and total emission flux shows that the significant regional trends are attributed to the changes in primary and direct emissions from both anthropogenic activity and biomass burning.

  5. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  6. Dictyostelium LvsB Mutants Model the Lysosomal Defects Associated with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Edward; Wang, Ning; Wu, Wei-l; Weatherford, Alisha; De Lozanne, Arturo; Cardelli, James

    2002-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in a gene encoding a protein named LYST in humans (“lysosomal trafficking regulator”) or Beige in mice. A prominent feature of this disease is the accumulation of enlarged lysosome-related granules in a variety of cells. The genome of Dictyostelium discoideum contains six genes encoding proteins that are related to LYST/Beige in amino acid sequence, and disruption of one of these genes, lvsA (large volume sphere), results in profound defects in cytokinesis. To better understand the function of this family of proteins in membrane trafficking, we have analyzed mutants disrupted in lvsA, lvsB, lvsC, lvsD, lvsE, and lvsF. Of all these, only lvsA and lvsB mutants displayed interesting phenotypes in our assays. lvsA-null cells exhibited defects in phagocytosis and contained abnormal looking contractile vacuole membranes. Loss of LvsB, the Dictyostelium protein most similar to LYST/Beige, resulted in the formation of enlarged vesicles that by multiple criteria appeared to be acidic lysosomes. The rates of endocytosis, phagocytosis, and fluid phase exocytosis were normal in lvsB-null cells. Also, the rates of processing and the efficiency of targeting of lysosomal α-mannosidase were normal, although lvsB mutants inefficiently retained α-mannosidase, as well as two other lysosomal cysteine proteinases. Finally, results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that an increase in fusion rates accounted for the enlarged lysosomes in lvsB-null cells, suggesting that LvsB acts as a negative regulator of fusion. Our results support the notion that LvsB/LYST/Beige function in a similar manner to regulate lysosome biogenesis. PMID:11854420

  7. Recapitulation of metabolic defects in a model of propionic acidemia using patient-derived primary hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Collado, Maria S; Figler, Robert A; Hoang, Stephen A; Armstrong, Allison J; Cui, Wanxing; Purdy, Michael; Simmers, Michael B; Yazigi, Nada A; Summar, Marshall L; Wamhoff, Brian R; Dash, Ajit

    2016-03-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a disorder of intermediary metabolism with defects in the alpha or beta subunits of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCCA and PCCB respectively) enzyme. We previously described a liver culture system that uses liver-derived hemodynamic blood flow and transport parameters to restore and maintain primary human hepatocyte biology and metabolism utilizing physiologically relevant milieu concentrations. In this study, primary hepatocytes isolated from the explanted liver of an 8-year-old PA patient were cultured in the liver system for 10 days and evaluated for retention of differentiated polarized morphology. The expression of PCCA and PCCB was assessed at a gene and protein level relative to healthy donor controls. Ammonia and urea levels were measured in the presence and absence of amino acid supplements to assess the metabolic consequences of branched-chain amino acid metabolism in this disease. Primary hepatocytes from the PA patient maintained a differentiated polarized morphology (peripheral actin staining) over 10 days of culture in the system. We noted lower levels of PCCA and PCCB relative to normal healthy controls at the mRNA and protein level. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine (5mM) and valine (5mM) in the medium, resulted in increased ammonia and decreased urea in the PA patient hepatocyte system, but no such response was seen in healthy hepatocytes or patient-derived fibroblasts. We demonstrate for the first time the successful culture of PA patient-derived primary hepatocytes in a differentiated state, that stably retain the PCCA and PCCB enzyme defects at a gene and protein level. Phenotypic response of the system to an increased load of branched-chain amino acids, not possible with fibroblasts, underscores the utility of this system in the better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of PA and examining the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents in the most relevant tissue. Copyright © 2015

  8. Recapitulation of metabolic defects in a model of propionic acidemia using patient-derived primary hepatocytes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figler, Robert A.; Hoang, Stephen A.; Armstrong, Allison J.; Cui, Wanxing; Purdy, Michael; Simmers, Michael B.; Yazigi, Nada A.; Summar, Marshall L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Dash, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Background Propionic acidemia (PA) is a disorder of intermediary metabolism with defects in the alpha or beta subunits of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCCA and PCCB respectively) enzyme. We previously described a liver culture system that uses liver-derived hemodynamic blood flow and transport parameters to restore and maintain primary human hepatocyte biology and metabolism utilizing physiologically relevant milieu concentrations. Methods In this study, primary hepatocytes isolated from the explanted liver of an 8-year-old PA patient were cultured in the liver system for 10 days and evaluated for retention of differentiated polarized morphology. The expression of PCCA and PCCB was assessed at a gene and protein level relative to healthy donor controls. Ammonia and urea levels were measured in the presence and absence of amino acid supplements to assess the metabolic consequences of branched-chain amino acid metabolism in this disease. Results Primary hepatocytes from the PA patient maintained a differentiated polarized morphology (peripheral actin staining) over 10 days of culture in the system. We noted lower levels of PCCA and PCCB relative to normal healthy controls at the mRNA and protein level. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine (5 mM) and valine (5 mM) in the medium, resulted in increased ammonia and decreased urea in the PA patient hepatocyte system, but no such response was seen in healthy hepatocytes or patient-derived fibroblasts. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time the successful culture of PA patient-derived primary hepatocytes in a differentiated state, that stably retain the PCCA and PCCB enzyme defects at a gene and protein level. Phenotypic response of the system to an increased load of branched-chain amino acids, not possible with fibroblasts, underscores the utility of this system in the better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of PA and examining the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents in the

  9. Evaluation of injectable silica-embedded nanohydroxyapatite bone substitute in a rat tibia defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Weiguo Xu1, Cornelia Ganz2, Ulf Weber2, Martin Adam2, Gerd Holzhüter2, Daniel Wolter3, Bernhard Frerich3, Brigitte Vollmar1, Thomas Gerber21Institute for Experimental Surgery, 2Institute of Physics, 3Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery, University of Rostock, Rostock, GermanyAbstract: In clinical practice, vertebral compression fractures occur after trauma and osteoporosis. Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure using bone filler material for the treatment of such fractures. A full synthetic injectable bone substitute (SIBS was manufactured by means of spray drying. The aim of this study was to characterize the SIBS and to analyze the remodelling process during degradation of the biomaterial and new bone formation after implantation. SIBS is an aqueous suspension of donut-like microparticles. These microparticles consist of nanocrystallites of synthetic hydroxyapatite embedded in amorphous silica gel. After implantation of SIBS in a proximal tibial diaphyseal defect in 52 rats, grafts were harvested for subsequent analysis on different days. Newly formed bone originating from endosteum was observed on day 6. Hematomas in the medullary space and cortical wounds disappeared on day 12. The wound region was completely replaced by a composite of newly formed cancellous bone, extracellular matrix, and SIBS. At day 63 the cortical defect was fully healed by bone, while newly formed bone in the medullary space almost disappeared and was replaced with bone marrow. In conclusion, SIBS demonstrated a unique structure with osteoinductive and bioresorbable properties, which induced fast bone regeneration. Therefore, a clinical application of SIBS for kyphoplasty is promising.Keywords: bone remodelling, electron microscopy, histomorphometry, nanotechnology, tissue engineering

  10. A spontaneous and novel Pax3 mutant mouse that models Waardenburg syndrome and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Miura, Ikuo; Ohba, Hisako; Shimamoto, Chie; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2017-04-05

    Genes responsible for reduced pigmentation phenotypes in rodents are associated with human developmental defects, such as Waardenburg syndrome, where patients display congenital deafness along with various abnormalities mostly related to neural crest development deficiency. In this study, we identified a spontaneous mutant mouse line Rwa, which displays variable white spots on mouse bellies and white digits and tail, on a C57BL/6N genetic background. Curly tail and spina bifida were also observed, although at a lower penetrance. These phenotypes were dominantly inherited by offspring. We searched for the genetic mechanism of the observed phenotypes. We harnessed a rapid mouse gene mapping system newly developed in our laboratories to identify a responsible gene. We detected a region within chromosome 1 as a probable locus for the causal mutation. Dense mapping using interval markers narrowed the locus down to a 670-kbp region, containing four genes including Pax3, a gene known to be implicated in the types I and III Waardenburg syndrome. Extensive mutation screening of Pax3 detected an 841-bp deletion, spanning the promoter region and intron 1 of the gene. The defective allele of Pax3, named Pax3 Rwa , lacked the first coding exon and co-segregated perfectly with the phenotypes, confirming its causal nature. The genetic background of Rwa mice is almost identical to that of inbred C57BL/6N. These results highlight Pax3 Rwa mice as a beneficial tool for analyzing biological processes involving Pax3, in particular the development and migration of neural crest cells and melanocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. State-space modeling of population sizes and trends in Nihoa Finch and Millerbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorresen, P. Marcos; Brinck, Kevin W.; Camp, Richard J.; Farmer, Chris; Plentovich, Sheldon M.; Banko, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Both of the 2 passerines endemic to Nihoa Island, Hawai‘i, USA—the Nihoa Millerbird (Acrocephalus familiaris kingi) and Nihoa Finch (Telespiza ultima)—are listed as endangered by federal and state agencies. Their abundances have been estimated by irregularly implemented fixed-width strip-transect sampling from 1967 to 2012, from which area-based extrapolation of the raw counts produced highly variable abundance estimates for both species. To evaluate an alternative survey method and improve abundance estimates, we conducted variable-distance point-transect sampling between 2010 and 2014. We compared our results to those obtained from strip-transect samples. In addition, we applied state-space models to derive improved estimates of population size and trends from the legacy time series of strip-transect counts. Both species were fairly evenly distributed across Nihoa and occurred in all or nearly all available habitat. Population trends for Nihoa Millerbird were inconclusive because of high within-year variance. Trends for Nihoa Finch were positive, particularly since the early 1990s. Distance-based analysis of point-transect counts produced mean estimates of abundance similar to those from strip-transects but was generally more precise. However, both survey methods produced biologically unrealistic variability between years. State-space modeling of the long-term time series of abundances obtained from strip-transect counts effectively reduced uncertainty in both within- and between-year estimates of population size, and allowed short-term changes in abundance trajectories to be smoothed into a long-term trend.

  12. Modelling impacts of temperature, and acidifying and eutrophying deposition on DOC trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Kasia; Rowe, Ed; Evans, Chris; Monteith, Don; Vanguelova, Elena; Wade, Andrew; Clark, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    Surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in large parts of the northern hemisphere have risen over the past three decades, raising concern about enhanced contributions of carbon to the atmosphere and seas and oceans. The effect of declining acid deposition has been identified as a key control on DOC trends in soil and surface waters, since pH and ionic strength affect sorption and desorption of DOC. However, since DOC is derived mainly from recently-fixed carbon, and organic matter decomposition rates are considered sensitive to temperature, uncertainty persists regarding the extent to the relative importance of different drivers that affect these upward trends. We ran the dynamic model MADOC (Model of Acidity and Soil Organic Carbon) for a range of UK soils (podzols, gleysols and peatland), for which the time-series were available, to consider the likely relative importance of decreased deposition of sulphate and chloride, accumulation of reactive N, and higher temperatures, on DOC production in different soils. Modelled patterns of DOC change generally agreed favourably with measurements collated over 10-20 years, but differed markedly between sites. While the acidifying effect of sulphur deposition appeared to be the predominant control on the observed soil water DOC trends in all the soils considered other than a blanket peat, the model suggested that over the long term, the effects of nitrogen deposition on N-limited soils may have been sufficient to elevate the DOC recovery trajectory significantly. The second most influential cause of rising DOC in the model simulations was N deposition in ecosystems that are N-limited and respond with stimulated plant growth. Although non-marine chloride deposition made some contribution to acidification and recovery, it was not amongst the main drivers of DOC change. Warming had almost no effect on modelled historic DOC trends, but may prove to be a significant driver of DOC in future via its influence

  13. A computational model to monitor and predict trends in bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawieh, Ali; Sabra, Zahraa; Bizri, Abdul Rahman; Davies, Christopher; White, Roger; Zaraket, Fadi A

    2015-09-01

    Current concern over the emergence of multidrug-resistant superbugs has renewed interest in approaches that can monitor existing trends in bacterial resistance and make predictions of future trends. Recent advances in bacterial surveillance and the development of online repositories of susceptibility tests across wide geographical areas provide an important new resource, yet there are only limited computational tools for its exploitation. Here we propose a hybrid computational model called BARDmaps for automated analysis of antibacterial susceptibility tests from surveillance records and for performing future predictions. BARDmaps was designed to include a structural computational model that can detect patterns among bacterial resistance changes as well as a behavioural computational model that can use the detected patterns to predict future changes in bacterial resistance. Data from the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net) were used to validate and apply the model. BARDmaps was compared with standard curve-fitting approaches used in epidemiological research. Here we show that BARDmaps can reliably predict future trends in bacterial resistance across Europe. BARDmaps performed better than other curve-fitting approaches for predicting future resistance levels. In addition, BARDmaps was also able to detect abrupt changes in bacterial resistance in response to outbreaks and interventions as well as to compare bacterial behaviour across countries and drugs. In conclusion, BARDmaps is a reliable tool to automatically predict and analyse changes in bacterial resistance across Europe. We anticipate that BARDmaps will become an invaluable tool both for clinical providers and governmental agencies to help combat the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  14. Model for fracture mechanics based prediction of the fatigue strength of engineering alloys containing microscopical initial defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerbst Uwe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently two of the authors of the present paper proposed a model for fracture mechanics based prediction of the S-N characteristics of metallic components with large microstructural defects and supported this by a validation excercise on an aluminium alloy AL5380 H321. Within this presentation the authors extend the study using a number of data sets from the literature. Despite of necessary assumptions for the compensation of partially missing input information the results are fairly reasonable, with the exception of high loading levels where the analyses of two of the data sets yield non-conservative results. The authors propose multiple crack initiation as the potential root of the problem and discuss methods for extending the model for taking into account crack initiation.

  15. Modeling a secular trend by Monte Carlo simulation of height biased migration in a spatial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    Background: In a recent Monte Carlo simulation, the clustering of body height of Swiss military conscripts within a spatial network with characteristic features of the natural Swiss geography was investigated. In this study I examined the effect of migration of tall individuals into network hubs on the dynamics of body height within the whole spatial network. The aim of this study was to simulate height trends. Material and methods: Three networks were used for modeling, a regular rectangular fishing net like network, a real world example based on the geographic map of Switzerland, and a random network. All networks contained between 144 and 148 districts and between 265-307 road connections. Around 100,000 agents were initially released with average height of 170 cm, and height standard deviation of 6.5 cm. The simulation was started with the a priori assumption that height variation within a district is limited and also depends on height of neighboring districts (community effect on height). In addition to a neighborhood influence factor, which simulates a community effect, body height dependent migration of conscripts between adjacent districts in each Monte Carlo simulation was used to re-calculate next generation body heights. In order to determine the direction of migration for taller individuals, various centrality measures for the evaluation of district importance within the spatial network were applied. Taller individuals were favored to migrate more into network hubs, backward migration using the same number of individuals was random, not biased towards body height. Network hubs were defined by the importance of a district within the spatial network. The importance of a district was evaluated by various centrality measures. In the null model there were no road connections, height information could not be delivered between the districts. Results: Due to the favored migration of tall individuals into network hubs, average body height of the hubs, and later

  16. Alveolar bone tissue engineering in critical-size defects of experimental animal models: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Siddharth; Pandis, Nikolaos; Mustafa, Kamal; Nyengaard, Jens R; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Regeneration of large, 'critical-size' bone defects remains a clinical challenge. Bone tissue engineering (BTE) is emerging as a promising alternative to autogenous, allogeneic and biomaterial-based bone grafting. The objective of this systematic review was to answer the focused question: in animal models, do cell-based BTE strategies enhance regeneration in alveolar bone critical-size defects (CSDs), compared with grafting with only biomaterial scaffolds or autogenous bone? Following PRISMA guidelines, electronic databases were searched for controlled animal studies reporting maxillary or mandibular CSD and implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or osteoblasts (OBs) seeded on biomaterial scaffolds. A random effects meta-analysis was performed for the outcome histomorphometric new bone formation (%NBF). Thirty-six studies were included that reported on large- (monkeys, dogs, sheep, minipigs) and small-animal (rabbits, rats) models. On average, studies presented with an unclear-to-high risk of bias and short observation times. In most studies, MSCs or OBs were used in combination with alloplastic mineral-phase scaffolds. In five studies, cells were modified by ex vivo gene transfer of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). The meta-analysis indicated statistically significant benefits in favour of: (1) cell-loaded vs. cell-free scaffolds [weighted mean difference (WMD) 15.59-49.15% and 8.60-13.85% NBF in large- and small-animal models, respectively]; and (2) BMP-gene-modified vs. unmodified cells (WMD 10.06-20.83% NBF in small-animal models). Results of cell-loaded scaffolds vs. autogenous bone were inconclusive. Overall, heterogeneity in the meta-analysis was high (I 2  > 90%). In summary, alveolar bone regeneration is enhanced by addition of osteogenic cells to biomaterial scaffolds. The direction and estimates of treatment effect are useful to predict therapeutic efficacy and guide future clinical trials of BTE. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  17. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  18. Geospatial Modeling for Investigating Spatial Pattern and Change Trend of Temperature and Rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abu Syed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh has been experiencing increased temperature and change in precipitation regime, which might adversely affect the important ecosystems in the country differentially. The river flows and groundwater recharge over space and time are determined by changes in temperature, evaporation and crucially precipitation. These again have a spatio-temporal dimension. This geospatial modeling research aimed at investigating spatial patterns and changing trends of temperature and rainfall within the geographical boundary of Bangladesh. This would facilitate better understanding the change pattern and their probable impacts on the ecosystem. The southeastern region, which is one of the most important forest ecosystem zones in the country, is experiencing early onset and withdrawal of rain but increasing trends in total rainfall except in the Monsoon season. This means that the region is experiencing a lower number of rainy days. However, total rainfall has not changed significantly. The differential between maximum and minimum showed an increasing trend. This changing pattern in average max and min temperature along with precipitation might cause a situation in which the species that are growing now may shift to suitable habitats elsewhere in the future. Consequently, the biodiversity, watersheds and fisheries, productivity of land, agriculture and food security in the region will be affected by these observed changes in climate.

  19. Defective pulmonary innate immune responses post-stem cell transplantation; review and results from one model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racquel eDomingo-Gonzalez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Infectious pulmonary complications limit the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT as a therapy for malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Susceptibility to pathogens in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients persists despite successful immune reconstitution. As studying the causal effects of these immune defects in the human population can be limiting, a bone marrow transplant (BMT mouse model can be used to understand the defect in mounting a productive innate immune response post-transplantation. When syngeneic BMT is performed, this system allows the study of BMT-induced alterations in innate immune cell function that are independent of the confounding effects of immunosuppressive therapy and graft-versus-host disease. Studies from several laboratories, including our own show that pulmonary susceptibility to bacterial infections post-BMT are largely due to alterations in the lung alveolar macrophages. Changes in these cells post-BMT include cytokine and eicosanoid dysregulations, scavenger receptor alterations, changes in micro RNA profiles, and alterations in intracellular signaling molecules that limit bacterial phagocytosis and killing. The changes that occur highlight mechanisms that promote susceptibility to infections commonly afflicting HSCT recipients and provide insight into therapeutic targets that may improve patient outcomes post-HSCT.

  20. Turmeric Extract Rescues Ethanol-Induced Developmental Defect in the Zebrafish Model for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Connors, Craig T; Mohammed, Arooj S; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, Kathleen; Marrs, James A; Chism, Grady W

    2017-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure causes the most frequent preventable birth disorder, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The effect of turmeric extracts in rescuing an ethanol-induced developmental defect using zebrafish as a model was determined. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms underlying FASD. We hypothesize that antioxidant inducing properties of turmeric may alleviate ethanol-induced defects. Curcuminoid content of the turmeric powder extract (5 mg/mL turmeric in ethanol) was determined by UPLC and found to contain Curcumin (124.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL), Desmethoxycurcumin (43.4 ± 0.1 μg/mL), and Bisdemethoxycurcumin (36.6 ± 0.1 μg/mL). Zebrafish embryos were treated with 100 mM (0.6% v/v) ethanol during gastrulation through organogenesis (2 to 48 h postfertilization (hpf)) and supplemented with turmeric extract to obtain total curcuminoid concentrations of 0, 1.16, 1.72, or 2.32 μM. Turmeric supplementation showed significant rescue of the body length at 72 hpf compared to ethanol-treated embryos. The mechanism underlying the rescue remains to be determined. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Reconstruction of facial defects with local flaps--a training model for medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Florian; Koerdt, Steffen; Rommel, Niklas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R; Weitz, Jochen

    2015-09-03

    The lack of surgeons will be a future major problem in patient care for multifaceted reasons. Niche specialties such as OMFS face an additional drawback because of the need for dual qualification. Special surgical training that gives students the opportunity to gain experience in the techniques of plastic-reconstructive surgery (PRS) has therefore been established to promote interest in OMFS. Two hands-on courses with 8 modules of 2 h for 10 students were established. Course modules included surgical techniques of PRS, such as local flaps in a complex facial defect on pig heads, and were supervised by two OMFS surgeons. The identical initial and final tests examined theoretical knowledge and practical skills. Questionnaires concerning basic demographic data, future career goals, and perception of surgical disciplines before and after the completion of the course were handed out. The 19 participating students (12 female, 7 male; median age 24 ± 2.24) were in their 8.31 ± 1.20 semester. Results of the tests showed improvement in knowledge following the courses (before 52.68 ± 12.64 vs. after 77.89 ± 11.37; p  0.05). Perception of OMFS as a surgical discipline changed (3.68 ± 1.09 vs. 1.80 ± 0.64; p teacher relationship and motivated instructors, is able to promote complex surgical skills in PRS.

  2. Linking a genetic defect in migraine to spreading depression in a computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Dahlem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM is a rare subtype of migraine with aura. A mutation causing FHM type 3 (FHM3 has been identified in SCN1A encoding the Nav1.1 Na+ channel. This genetic defect affects the inactivation gate. While the Na+ tail currents following voltage steps are consistent with both hyperexcitability and hypoexcitability, in this computational study, we investigate functional consequences beyond these isolated events. Our extended Hodgkin–Huxley framework establishes a connection between genotype and cellular phenotype, i.e., the pathophysiological dynamics that spans over multiple time scales and is relevant to migraine with aura. In particular, we investigate the dynamical repertoire from normal spiking (milliseconds to spreading depression and anoxic depolarization (tens of seconds and show that FHM3 mutations render gray matter tissue more vulnerable to spreading depression despite opposing effects associated with action potential generation. We conclude that the classification in terms of hypoexcitability vs. hyperexcitability is too simple a scheme. Our mathematical analysis provides further basic insight into also previously discussed criticisms against this scheme based on psychophysical and clinical data.

  3. Pulsating electromagnetic fields (PEMF) used to treat full thickness defects in the rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andino, R.V.; Feldman, D. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Skin ulcers have historically been treated by passive therapy. One active treatment, PEMF, has shown promise. The objective of this study was, therefore, to examine the effects of a current induced by a PEMF on full thickness defects in white New Zealand rabbits. It was hypothesized that the induced current would increase neutrophil, macrophage, and fibroblast proliferation during the wound healing process. This in turn, would lead to an increase in collagen deposition in the wound and thus increase the healing rate. A device which produces a 2.8 mTesla magnetic field at a frequency of 75 Hz was donated by the EBI Corp. and modified so that a rabbit could be fit between its two induction coils. Two rabbits with four 3 x 3 cm wounds each were stimulated for 3.5 hours/day for 1 week and two rabbits with identical wounds were stimulated for the same time period daily but for 2 weeks. These wounds were compared to unstimulated controls. Preliminary results indicate that the healing rate in the PEMF animals increased by about 25-30% and the number of neutrophils is greater in the one week stimulated group. In the two week stimulated group, the collagen deposition is greater, denser and in alignment.

  4. A defect density-based constitutive crystal plasticity framework for modeling the plastic deformation of Fe-Cr-Al cladding alloys subsequent to irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wen, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez Saez, Enrique [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-02-05

    It is essential to understand the deformation behavior of these Fe-Cr-Al alloys, in order to be able to develop models for predicting their mechanical response under varied loading conditions. Interaction of dislocations with the radiation-induced defects governs the crystallographic deformation mechanisms. A crystal plasticity framework is employed to model these mechanisms in Fe-Cr-Al alloys. This work builds on a previously developed defect density-based crystal plasticity model for bcc metals and alloys, with necessary modifications made to account for the defect substructure observed in Fe-Cr-Al alloys. The model is implemented in a Visco-Plastic Self Consistent (VPSC) framework, to predict the mechanical behavior under quasi-static loading.

  5. Finite-element model to predict roll-separation force and defects during rolling of U-10Mo alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Burkes, Douglas E.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean

    2017-10-01

    A major goal of the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is to enable high-performance research reactors to operate with low-enriched uranium rather than the high-enriched uranium currently used. To this end, uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) represents an ideal candidate because of its stable gamma phase, low neutron caption cross section, acceptable swelling response, and predictable irradiation behavior. However, because of the complexities of the fuel design and the need for rolled monolithic U-10Mo foils, new developments in processing and fabrication are necessary. This study used a finite-element code, LS-DYNA, as a predictive tool to optimize the rolling process. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel were conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. The study reported here discussed various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., waviness and thickness non-uniformity like dog-boning). To investigate the influence of the cladding material on these rolling defects, other cases were simulated: hot rolling with alternative can materials, namely, 304 stainless steel and Zircaloy-2, and bare-rolling. Simulation results demonstrated that reducing the mismatch in strength between the coupon and can material improves the quality of the rolled sheet. Bare-rolling simulation results showed a defect-free rolled coupon. The finite-element model developed and presented in this study can be used to conduct parametric studies of several process parameters (e.g., rolling speed, roll diameter, can material, and reduction).

  6. Biomechanical performance of flexible intramedullary nails with end caps tested in distal segmental defects of pediatric femur models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpon, José Batista; Perina, Maurício Martins; Okubo, Rodrigo; Maranho, Daniel Augusto Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Unstable distal femoral fractures in children are challenging lesions with restricted surgical options for adequate stabilization. Elastic nails have become popular for treating femoral shaft fractures, yet they are still challenging for using in distal fractures. The aim of this study was to test whether end caps (CAP) inserted into the nail extremity improved the mechanical stabilization of a segmental defect at the distal femoral metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction created in an artificial pediatric bone model. Two 3.5-mm titanium elastic nails (TEN) were introduced intramedullary into pediatric femur models, and a 7.0-mm-thick segmental defect was created at the distal diaphyseal-metaphyseal junction. Nondestructive 4-point bending, axial-bending, and torsion tests were conducted. After this, the end caps were inserted into the external tips of the nails and then screwed into the bone cortex. The mechanical tests were repeated. Stiffness, displacement, and torque were analyzed using the Wilcoxon nonparametric test for paired samples. In the combined axial-bending tests, the TEN+CAP combination was 8.75% stiffer than nails alone (Ptorsion tests, the TEN+CAP was 14% stiffer than nails alone (Pbending test did not show differences between the methods (P=0.91, stiffness; P=0.51, displacement). Thus, the end caps contributed to an increase in the construct stability for torsion and axial-bending forces but not for 4-point bending forces. These findings indicate that end caps fitted to elastic nails may contribute to the stabilization of fractures that our model mimics (small distal fragment, bone comminution, and distal bone fragment loss). Type II [therapeutic study: lesser-quality randomized controlled trial (eg, <80% follow-up, no blinding, or improper randomization)].

  7. Assessing the status and trend of bat populations across broad geographic regions with dynamic distribution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Vierling, Lee A.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Vierling, Kerri T.

    2012-01-01

    Bats face unprecedented threats from habitat loss, climate change, disease, and wind power development, and populations of many species are in decline. A better ability to quantify bat population status and trend is urgently needed in order to develop effective conservation strategies. We used a Bayesian autoregressive approach to develop dynamic distribution models for Myotis lucifugus, the little brown bat, across a large portion of northwestern USA, using a four-year detection history matrix obtained from a regional monitoring program. This widespread and abundant species has experienced precipitous local population declines in northeastern USA resulting from the novel disease white-nose syndrome, and is facing likely range-wide declines. Our models were temporally dynamic and accounted for imperfect detection. Drawing on species–energy theory, we included measures of net primary productivity (NPP) and forest cover in models, predicting that M. lucifugus occurrence probabilities would covary positively along those gradients.

  8. 3D-manufactured patient-specific models of congenital heart defects for communication in clinical practice: feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglino, Giovanni; Capelli, Claudio; Wray, Jo; Schievano, Silvia; Leaver, Lindsay-Kay; Khambadkone, Sachin; Giardini, Alessandro; Derrick, Graham; Jones, Alexander; Taylor, Andrew M

    2015-04-30

    To assess the communication potential of three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific models of congenital heart defects and their acceptability in clinical practice for cardiology consultations. This was a questionnaire-based study in which participants were randomised into two groups: the 'model group' received a 3D model of the cardiac lesion(s) being discussed during their appointment, while the 'control group' had a routine visit. Outpatient clinic, cardiology follow-up visits. 103 parents of children with congenital heart disease were recruited (parental age: 43±8 years; patient age: 12±6 years). In order to have a 3D model made, patients needed to have a recent cardiac MRI examination; this was the crucial inclusion criterion. Questionnaires were administered to the participants before and after the visits and an additional questionnaire was administered to the attending cardiologist. Rating (1-10) for the liking of the 3D model, its usefulness and the clarity of the explanation received were recorded, as well as rating (1-10) of the parental understanding and their engagement according to the cardiologist. Furthermore, parental knowledge was assessed by asking them to mark diagrams, tick keywords and provide free text answers. The duration of consultations was recorded and parent feedback collected. Parents and cardiologists both found the models to be very useful and helpful in engaging the parents in discussing congenital heart defects. Parental knowledge was not associated with their level of education (p=0.2) and did not improve following their visit. Consultations involving 3D models lasted on average 5 min longer (p=0.02). Patient-specific models can enhance engagement with parents and improve communication between cardiologists and parents, potentially impacting on parent and patient psychological adjustment following treatment. However, in the short-term, parental understanding of their child's condition did not improve. Published by the BMJ

  9. Time series analysis of malaria in Afghanistan: using ARIMA models to predict future trends in incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mohammad Y; Lewnard, Joseph A; Parikh, Sunil; Pitzer, Virginia E

    2016-11-22

    Malaria remains endemic in Afghanistan. National control and prevention strategies would be greatly enhanced through a better ability to forecast future trends in disease incidence. It is, therefore, of interest to develop a predictive tool for malaria patterns based on the current passive and affordable surveillance system in this resource-limited region. This study employs data from Ministry of Public Health monthly reports from January 2005 to September 2015. Malaria incidence in Afghanistan was forecasted using autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models in order to build a predictive tool for malaria surveillance. Environmental and climate data were incorporated to assess whether they improve predictive power of models. Two models were identified, each appropriate for different time horizons. For near-term forecasts, malaria incidence can be predicted based on the number of cases in the four previous months and 12 months prior (Model 1); for longer-term prediction, malaria incidence can be predicted using the rates 1 and 12 months prior (Model 2). Next, climate and environmental variables were incorporated to assess whether the predictive power of proposed models could be improved. Enhanced vegetation index was found to have increased the predictive accuracy of longer-term forecasts. Results indicate ARIMA models can be applied to forecast malaria patterns in Afghanistan, complementing current surveillance systems. The models provide a means to better understand malaria dynamics in a resource-limited context with minimal data input, yielding forecasts that can be used for public health planning at the national level.

  10. Application of the integral method to modelling the oxidation of defected fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, M.

    1995-06-01

    The starting point for this report is the discrepancy reported in previous work between the reaction-diffusion calculations and the CEX-1 experiment, which involves storage of defected fuel elements in air at 150 deg C. This discrepancy is considerably diminished here by a more critical choice of theoretical parameters, and by taking into account the fact that different CEX-1 fuel elements were oxidized at very different rates and that the fuel element used previously for comparison with theoretical calculations actually underwent two limited-oxygen-supply cycles. Much better agreement is obtained here between the theory and the third, unlimited-air, storage period of the CEX-1 experiment. The approximate integral method is used extensively for the solution of the one-dimensional diffusion moving-boundary problems that may describe various storage periods of the CEX-1 experiment. In some cases it is easy to extend this method to arbitrary precision by using higher moments of the diffusion equation. Using this method, the validity of quasi-steady-state approximation is verified. Diffusion-controlled oxidation is also studied. In this case, for the unlimited oxygen supply, the integral method leads to an exact analytical solution for linear geometry, and to a good analytical approximation of the solution for the spherically symmetric geometry. These solutions may have some application in the analysis of experiments on the oxidation of small UO 2 fragments or powders when the individual UO 2 grains may be considered to be approximately spherical. (author). 23 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs

  11. 21st Century Trends in Antarctic Temperature and Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) Area in the GEOS Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines trends in Antarctic temperature and APSC, a temperature proxy for the area of polar stratospheric clouds, in an ensemble of Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations of the 21st century. A selection of greenhouse gas, ozone-depleting substance, and sea surface temperature scenarios is used to test the trend sensitivity to these parameters. One scenario is used to compare temperature trends in two versions of the GEOS CCM. An extended austral winter season is examined in detail. In May, June, and July, the expected future increase in CO2-related radiative cooling drives temperature trends in the Antarctic lower stratosphere. At 50 hPa, a 1.3 K cooling is expected between 2000 and 2100. Ozone levels increase, despite this robust cooling signal and the consequent increase in APSC, suggesting the enhancement of stratospheric transport in future. In the lower stratosphere, the choice of climate change scenarios does not affect the magnitude of the early winter cooling. Midwinter temperature trends are generally small. In October, APSC trends have the same sign as the prescribed halogen trends. That is, there are negative APSC trends in "grealistic future" simulations, where halogen loading decreases in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and CO2 continues to increase. In these simulations, the speed of ozone recovery is not influenced by either the choice of sea surface temperature and greenhouse gas scenarios or by the model version.

  12. A computational study of doped olivine structured Cd2GeO4: local defect trapping of interstitial oxide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSloy, Adam J; Kelly, Paul F; Slater, Peter R; Panchmatia, Pooja M

    2016-09-21

    Computational modelling techniques have been employed to investigate defects and ionic conductivity in Cd 2 GeO 4 . We show due to highly unfavourable intrinsic defect formation energies the ionic conducting ability of pristine Cd 2 GeO 4 is extremely limited. The modelling results suggest trivalent doping on the Cd site as a viable means of promoting the formation of the oxygen interstitial defects. However, the defect cluster calculations for the first time explicitly suggest a strong association of the oxide defects to the dopant cations and tetrahedral units. Defect clustering is a complicated phenomenon and therefore not trivial to assess. In this study the trapping energies are explicitly quantified. The trends are further confirmed by molecular dynamic simulations. Despite this, the calculated diffusion coefficients do suggest an enhanced oxide ion mobility in the doped system compared to the pristine Cd 2 GeO 4 .

  13. Modeling Metallic Precipitate Dissolution in Silicon Under Point Defect Injection: Final Subcontract Report, 20 January 2004--19 January 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, T. Y.

    2005-05-01

    We have formulated the problem of gettering of metallic precipitates in Si for which there exists a volume misfit between the precipitate and the Si matrix material. The gettering process is modeled using an Al-Si liquid layer, and the volume misfit associated with dissolving the precipitates is assumed as accommodated by point defects, which may be dominated by vacancies (V), self-interstitials (I), or both contributing. Under the condition that V and I attained dynamical equilibrium, we found that for analytic purposes, the problem reduces to either the V or the I alone case, with the fast-diffusing case dominating. Our initial simulation results on gettering of FeSi2 (with a misfit of -0.15) showed that the process can be sped up by the injection of V.

  14. A point defect model for the general and pitting corrosion on iron-oxide-electrolyte interface deduced from current oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Pagitsas, M; Sazou, D

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the passive-active oscillatory region of the Fe-0.75 M H sub 2 SO sub 4 system, perturbed by adding small amounts of halide species, allow the distinction between pitting and general corrosion. Complex periodic and aperiodic current oscillations characterize pitting corrosion whereas monoperiodic oscillations of a relaxation type indicate general corrosion. A point defect model (PDM) is considered for the microscopic description of the growth and breakdown of the iron oxide film. The physicochemical processes leading to different types of corrosion can be clarified in terms of the PDM. Occupation of an anion vacancy by a halide ion results in the localized attack of the passive oxide and pitting corrosion. On the other hand, the formation of surface soluble iron complexes is related to the uniform dissolution of the passive oxide and general corrosion.

  15. Can the Point Defect Model Explain the Influence of Temperature and Anion Size on Pitting of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The pitting behaviours of 304L and 316L stainless steels were investigated at 3 °C to 90 °C in 1 M solutions of NaCl, NaBr and NaI by potentiodynamic polarization. The temperature dependences of the pitting potential varied according to the anion, being near linear in bromide but exponential in chloride. As a result, at low temperatures grades 304L and 316L steel are most susceptible to pitting by bromide ions, while at high temperatures both stainless steels were more susceptible to pitting by small chloride anions than the larger bromide and iodide. Thus, increasing temperature appears to favour attack by smaller anions. This paper will attempt to rationalise both of the above findings in terms of the point defect model. Initial findings are that qualitatively this approach can be reasonably successful, but not at the quantitative level, possibly due to insufficient data on the mechanical properties of thin passive films

  16. Data-driven modeling of surface temperature anomaly and solar activity trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A novel two-step modeling scheme is used to reconstruct and analyze surface temperature and solar activity data at global, hemispheric, and regional scales. First, the self-organizing map (SOM) technique is used to extend annual modern climate data from the century to millennial scale. The SOM component planes are used to identify and quantify strength of nonlinear relations among modern surface temperature anomalies (<150 years), tropical and extratropical teleconnections, and Palmer Drought Severity Indices (0–2000 years). Cross-validation of global sea and land surface temperature anomalies verifies that the SOM is an unbiased estimator with less uncertainty than the magnitude of anomalies. Second, the quantile modeling of SOM reconstructions reveal trends and periods in surface temperature anomaly and solar activity whose timing agrees with published studies. Temporal features in surface temperature anomalies, such as the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age, and Modern Warming Period, appear at all spatial scales but whose magnitudes increase when moving from ocean to land, from global to regional scales, and from southern to northern regions. Some caveats that apply when interpreting these data are the high-frequency filtering of climate signals based on quantile model selection and increased uncertainty when paleoclimatic data are limited. Even so, all models find the rate and magnitude of Modern Warming Period anomalies to be greater than those during the Medieval Warm Period. Lastly, quantile trends among reconstructed equatorial Pacific temperature profiles support the recent assertion of two primary El Niño Southern Oscillation types. These results demonstrate the efficacy of this alternative modeling approach for reconstructing and interpreting scale-dependent climate variables.

  17. Global developmental gene expression and pathway analysis of normal brain development and mouse models of human neuronal migration defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Pramparo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are the most common cause of human lissencephaly, a human neuronal migration defect, and DCX mutations are the most common cause of X-linked lissencephaly. LIS1 is part of a protein complex including NDEL1 and 14-3-3ε that regulates dynein motor function and microtubule dynamics, while DCX stabilizes microtubules and cooperates with LIS1 during neuronal migration and neurogenesis. Targeted gene mutations of Lis1, Dcx, Ywhae (coding for 14-3-3ε, and Ndel1 lead to neuronal migration defects in mouse and provide models of human lissencephaly, as well as aid the study of related neuro-developmental diseases. Here we investigated the developing brain of these four mutants and wild-type mice using expression microarrays, bioinformatic analyses, and in vivo/in vitro experiments to address whether mutations in different members of the LIS1 neuronal migration complex lead to similar and/or distinct global gene expression alterations. Consistent with the overall successful development of the mutant brains, unsupervised clustering and co-expression analysis suggested that cell cycle and synaptogenesis genes are similarly expressed and co-regulated in WT and mutant brains in a time-dependent fashion. By contrast, focused co-expression analysis in the Lis1 and Ndel1 mutants uncovered substantial differences in the correlation among pathways. Differential expression analysis revealed that cell cycle, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton organization pathways are commonly altered in all mutants, while synaptogenesis, cell morphology, and inflammation/immune response are specifically altered in one or more mutants. We found several commonly dysregulated genes located within pathogenic deletion/duplication regions, which represent novel candidates of human mental retardation and neurocognitive disabilities. Our analysis suggests that gene expression and pathway analysis in mouse models of a similar disorder or within a common pathway can

  18. Global developmental gene expression and pathway analysis of normal brain development and mouse models of human neuronal migration defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramparo, Tiziano; Libiger, Ondrej; Jain, Sonia; Li, Hong; Youn, Yong Ha; Hirotsune, Shinji; Schork, Nicholas J; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2011-03-01

    Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are the most common cause of human lissencephaly, a human neuronal migration defect, and DCX mutations are the most common cause of X-linked lissencephaly. LIS1 is part of a protein complex including NDEL1 and 14-3-3ε that regulates dynein motor function and microtubule dynamics, while DCX stabilizes microtubules and cooperates with LIS1 during neuronal migration and neurogenesis. Targeted gene mutations of Lis1, Dcx, Ywhae (coding for 14-3-3ε), and Ndel1 lead to neuronal migration defects in mouse and provide models of human lissencephaly, as well as aid the study of related neuro-developmental diseases. Here we investigated the developing brain of these four mutants and wild-type mice using expression microarrays, bioinformatic analyses, and in vivo/in vitro experiments to address whether mutations in different members of the LIS1 neuronal migration complex lead to similar and/or distinct global gene expression alterations. Consistent with the overall successful development of the mutant brains, unsupervised clustering and co-expression analysis suggested that cell cycle and synaptogenesis genes are similarly expressed and co-regulated in WT and mutant brains in a time-dependent fashion. By contrast, focused co-expression analysis in the Lis1 and Ndel1 mutants uncovered substantial differences in the correlation among pathways. Differential expression analysis revealed that cell cycle, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton organization pathways are commonly altered in all mutants, while synaptogenesis, cell morphology, and inflammation/immune response are specifically altered in one or more mutants. We found several commonly dysregulated genes located within pathogenic deletion/duplication regions, which represent novel candidates of human mental retardation and neurocognitive disabilities. Our analysis suggests that gene expression and pathway analysis in mouse models of a similar disorder or within a common pathway can be used to define

  19. Digital Revolution and Innovative Business Models in Healthcare: Global Trends and Russian Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznoy, A V; Saygitov, R T

    Digital revolution is one of the major global trends resulting in the unprecedented scale and depth of penetration of information and communication technologies into all sectors of national economy, including healthcare. The development of this trend brought about high expectations related to the improvement of quality of medical assistance, accessibility and economic efficiency of healthcare services. However, euphoria of the first steps of digital revolution is passing now, opening doors to more realistic analysis of opportunities and conditions of realization of the true potential hidden in the digital transformation of healthcare. More balanced perception of the peculiarities of innovation processes in the sector is coming together with understanding of the serious barriers, hampering implementation of the new ideas and practices due to complicated interweaving of social, economic, ethical and psychological factors. When taking into account the industry specifics it becomes evident that digital revolution cannot be a quick turnaround but rather would pass a number of phases and is likely to last more than one decade. In this context the article focuses on the prospects of the new business models, capable of making significant changes in today’s economic landscape of the sector (including uber-medicine, retail clinics, retainer medicine, network models of medical services). The authors also provide assessment of the current situation and perspectives of digital healthcare development in Russia.

  20. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Jun; Kitamura, Masahiro; Nozaki, Takenori; Nagayasu, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Murakami, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. → FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via β-TCP at the defects. → In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. → Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. → This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus β-TCP or β-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with β-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal regeneration following severe destruction by progressive

  1. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzai, Jun, E-mail: anzai_jun@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kitamura, Masahiro, E-mail: kitamura@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nozaki, Takenori, E-mail: tnozaki@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagayasu, Toshie, E-mail: nagayasu_toshie@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Terashima, Akio, E-mail: terashima_akio@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Asano, Taiji, E-mail: asano_taiji@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. {yields} FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via {beta}-TCP at the defects. {yields} In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. {yields} Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. {yields} This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus {beta}-TCP or {beta}-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with {beta}-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal

  2. The "Psychosomatic Family" Reconsidered II: Recalling a Defective Model and Looking Ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, James C.; Anderson, Barbara J.

    1989-01-01

    Comments on psychosomatic family concept. Reviews decline of psychosomatic models of illness that assume that arousal is the only or primary means by which psychosocial factors influence illness. Focuses on brittle diabetes, noting the potential for family theorists to develop more adequate models of poor self-care and medical crises as…

  3. Mechanistic modeling of developmental defects through computational embryology (WC10th)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: An important consideration for 3Rs is to identify developmental hazards utilizing mechanism-based in vitro assays (e.g., ToxCast) and in silico predictive models. Steady progress has been made with agent-based models that recapitulate morphogenetic drivers for angiogen...

  4. Point defect reduction in MOCVD (Al)GaN by chemical potential control and a comprehensive model of C incorporation in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pramod; Washiyama, Shun; Kaess, Felix; Kirste, Ronny; Mita, Seiji; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical framework that provides a quantitative relationship between point defect formation energies and growth process parameters is presented. It enables systematic point defect reduction by chemical potential control in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of III-nitrides. Experimental corroboration is provided by a case study of C incorporation in GaN. The theoretical model is shown to be successful in providing quantitative predictions of CN defect incorporation in GaN as a function of growth parameters and provides valuable insights into boundary phases and other impurity chemical reactions. The metal supersaturation is found to be the primary factor in determining the chemical potential of III/N and consequently incorporation or formation of point defects which involves exchange of III or N atoms with the reservoir. The framework is general and may be extended to other defect systems in (Al)GaN. The utility of equilibrium formalism typically employed in density functional theory in predicting defect incorporation in non-equilibrium and high temperature MOCVD growth is confirmed. Furthermore, the proposed theoretical framework may be used to determine optimal growth conditions to achieve minimum compensation within any given constraints such as growth rate, crystal quality, and other practical system limitations.

  5. Modelling the decadal trend of ecosystem carbon fluxes demonstrates the important role of functional changes in a temperate deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian; Jansson, P.E.; van der Linden, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Temperate forests are globally important carbon sinks and stocks. Trends in net ecosystem exchange have been observed in a Danish beech forest and this trend cannot be entirely attributed to changing climatic drivers. This study sought to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the observed trend......, using a dynamic ecosystem model (CoupModel) and model data fusion with multiple constraints and model experiments. Experiments with different validation datasets showed that a multiple constraints model data fusion approach that included the annual tree growth, the seasonal canopy development......, the latent and sensible heat fluxes and the CO2 fluxes decreased the parameter uncertainty considerably compared to using CO2 fluxes as validation data alone. The fitted model was able to simulate the observed carbon fluxes well (R2=0.8, mean error=0.1gCm−2d−1) but did not reproduce the decadal (1997...

  6. Modelling hydrochemical and ecological trends in acid sensitive surface waters in the Scottish Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin KERNAN

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic model MAGIC is used to predict the future response of surface waters to reductions in S deposition as stipulated by the recently agreed emission protocol (the 1999 Gothenburg Protocol. MAGIC was calibrated to 30 sites in the Scottish mountains with the best available soil and deposition data derived from large scale spatial datasets, and surface water chemistry from a regional loch survey conducted in October 2000. A comparison of input parameters and model responses are made at Lochnagar, a site for which detailed, high resolution spatial/temporal data exist. The model is capable of reproducing observed trends in non-marine SO4 2-, however simulated NO3 - from 1990 to 2000 is lower than the observed trends at Lochnagar due to possible hydrological controls and in-lake processes, rather than terrestrial processes. The Scottish Highlands are remote from emission sources and consequently peak deposition inputs of S in the 1980s are relatively low (33 kg S ha-1 y-1 compared to other regions in Europe. Nonetheless the amount of deposition appears sufficient to cause environmental damage in this acid sensitive region. During the 1980s, simulated Acid Neutralising Capacity (ANC of 13% of the modelled lakes was <20 μeq l-1, a chemical condition that potentially can cause damage to freshwater ecology. Regional and site simulations captured the recovery to 2000 in response to the existing emission reductions. Predictions to 2016 indicates the potential for biological recovery and a return to 'good status' as required by the EU Water Framework Directive, although the hydrochemistry of some sites remain some way from simulated pre-acidification conditions.

  7. The establishment of atrial septal defect model with interventional management canine: its applied anatomy and technical points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yufeng; Huang Xinmiao; Bei Yuan; Wang Wei; Hu Jianqiang; Qin Yongwen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide the relevant applied anatomic information for the preparation of atrial septal defect (ASD) model with transcatheter management in canine,and to discuss the technical points in making ASD model under DSA guidance. Methods: Anatomical measurements of the heart specimens,which were obtained from 15 healthy adult hybrid dogs (9 males and 6 females), were performed, from which the relevant anatomic parameters of the atrial septum were calculated. Cardiac 3D reconstruction with 64-sliced spiral CT scan was carried out in 5 dogs and the results were analyzed. According to the trans-illuminated position and angle obtained from 3D reconstruction images both the puncturing of the atrial septum with Brokenbrough needle and the balloon dilatation under fluoroscopic guidance were conducted in 20 dogs (body weight 17 -22 kg) to prepare ASD model. Results: The length and the width of the interauricular septum were (17.8 ± 4.3) mm and (14.5 ± 3.8) mm, respectively. The oval fossa was (11.2 ± 2.7) mm long and (8.7±1.9) mm wide. The distance from the central point of oval fossa to the central point of the orifice of coronary sinus was (7.2 ± 1.3) mm, which was (9.9 ± 1.5) mm to the center of the membranous atrial septum, (13.6 ± 3.1) mm to the middle point of septal tricuspid valve, (12.1 ± 2.3) mm to the central point of the bottom of aortic eminence and (11.3 ± 1.9) mm to the middle point of anterior bicuspid valve. The angle between atrial septal plane and sagittal plane was 15 degree ± 5 degree, and the angle between atrial septal plane and coronal plane was 75 degree ± 5 degree. Thus, the puncture of the interauricular septum was carried out with the dog in right anterior oblique position at 75 degree ± 5 degree. Of the total 20 dogs, ASD model was successfully established in 18, failure of the puncturing occurred in the remaining two, of which one died of cardiac tamponade after the procedure and the other one died of mistakenly puncturing

  8. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Susan

    1999-01-01

    ... (HE) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), using transgenic mouse models. Studies in this first year employed C-14-2-deoxyglucose in vivo autoradiography and spectrophotometric metabolic enzyme assays...

  9. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browne, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    ... Generation in Parkinson's Disease", which was appended to the original grant number. This project is to assess in vivo whether mitochondria are the source of free radical generation in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD...

  10. Fenestration defects in the rabbit jaw: an inadequate model for studying periodontal regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Meijer, G.J.; Bronckers, A.L.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the support of the teeth, eventually leading to loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Effective procedures for periodontal tissue engineering or regeneration require preclinical models before market introduction. Research has been performed in

  11. Fenestration defects in the rabbit jaw: an inadequate model for studying periodontal regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Meijer, G.J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the support of the teeth, eventually leading to loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Effective procedures for periodontal tissue engineering or regeneration require preclinical models before market introduction. Research has been performed in

  12. A New Method for Xenogeneic Bone Graft Deproteinization: Comparative Study of Radius Defects in a Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Lei

    Full Text Available Deproteinization is an indispensable process for the elimination of antigenicity in xenograft bones. However, the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 deproteinized xenograft, which is commonly used to repair bone defect, exhibits limited osteoinduction activity. The present study was designed to develop a new method for deproteinization and compare the osteogenic capacities of new pepsin deproteinized xenograft bones with those of conventional H2O2 deproteinized ones.Bones were deproteinized in H2O2 or pepsin for 8 hours. The morphologies were compared by HE staining. The content of protein and collagen I were measured by the Kjeldahl method and HPLC-MS, respectively. The physical properties were evaluated by SEM and mechanical tests. For in vivo study, X-ray, micro-CT and HE staining were employed to monitor the healing processes of radius defects in rabbit models transplanted with different graft materials.Compared with H2O2 deproteinized bones, no distinct morphological and physical changes were observed. However, pepsin deproteinized bones showed a lower protein content, and a higher collagen content were preserved. In vivo studies showed that pepsin deproteinized bones exhibited better osteogenic performance than H2O2 deproteinized bones, moreover, the quantity and quality of the newly formed bones were improved as indicated by micro-CT analysis. From the results of histological examination, the newly formed bones in the pepsin group were mature bones.Pepsin deproteinized xenograft bones show advantages over conventional H2O2 deproteinized bones with respect to osteogenic capacity; this new method may hold potential clinical value in the development of new biomaterials for bone grafting.

  13. Defects in the medial entorhinal cortex and dentate gyrus in the mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ohmi

    Full Text Available Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB is characterized by profound mental retardation in childhood, dementia and death in late adolescence; it is caused by deficiency of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and resulting lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate. A mouse model, generated by homologous recombination of the Naglu gene, was used to study pathological changes in the brain. We found earlier that neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC and the dentate gyrus showed a number of secondary defects, including the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau (Ptau detected with antibodies raised against Ptau in Alzheimer disease brain. By further use of immunohistochemistry, we now show staining in neurons of the same area for beta amyloid, extending the resemblance to Alzheimer disease. Ptau inclusions in the dentate gyrus of MPS IIIB mice were reduced in number when the mice were administered LiCl, a specific inhibitor of Gsk3β. Additional proteins found elevated in MEC include proteins involved in autophagy and the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, glypicans 1 and 5, the latter closely related to the primary defect. The level of secondary accumulations was associated with elevation of glypican, as seen by comparing brains of mice at different ages or with different mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. The MEC of an MPS IIIA mouse had the same intense immunostaining for glypican 1 and other markers as MPS IIIB, while MEC of MPS I and MPS II mice had weak staining, and MEC of an MPS VI mouse had no staining at all for the same proteins. A considerable amount of glypican was found in MEC of MPS IIIB mice outside of lysosomes. We propose that it is the extralysosomal glypican that would be harmful to neurons, because its heparan sulfate branches could potentiate the formation of Ptau and beta amyloid aggregates, which would be toxic as well as difficult to degrade.

  14. Nonhomologous Recombination between Defective Poliovirus and Coxsackievirus Genomes Suggests a New Model of Genetic Plasticity for Picornaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3′ end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. PMID:25096874

  15. Effect of bioactive borate glass microstructure on bone regeneration, angiogenesis, and hydroxyapatite conversion in a rat calvarial defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lianxiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Brown, Zackary; Samujh, Christopher; Liu, Xin; Mohammadkhah, Ali; Dusevich, Vladimir; Eick, J David; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2013-08-01

    Borate bioactive glasses are biocompatible and enhance new bone formation, but the effect of their microstructure on bone regeneration has received little attention. In this study scaffolds of borate bioactive glass (1393B3) with three different microstructures (trabecular, fibrous, and oriented) were compared for their capacity to regenerate bone in a rat calvarial defect model. 12weeks post-implantation the amount of new bone, mineralization, and blood vessel area in the scaffolds were evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The amount of new bone formed was 33%, 23%, and 15%, respectively, of the total defect area for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous microstructures. In comparison, the percent new bone formed in implants composed of silicate 45S5 bioactive glass particles (250-300μm) was 19%. Doping the borate glass with copper (0.4 wt.% CuO) had little effect on bone regeneration in the trabecular and oriented scaffolds, but significantly enhanced bone regeneration in the fibrous scaffolds (from 15 to 33%). The scaffolds were completely converted to hydroxyapatite within the 12week implantation. The amount of hydroxyapatite formed, 22%, 35%, and 48%, respectively, for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous scaffolds, increased with increasing volume fraction of glass in the as-fabricated scaffold. Blood vessels infiltrated into all the scaffolds, but the trabecular scaffolds had a higher average blood vessel area compared with the oriented and fibrous scaffolds. While all three scaffold microstructures were effective in supporting bone regeneration, the trabecular scaffolds supported more bone formation and may be more promising in bone repair. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A preclinical evaluation of alternative synthetic biomaterials for fascial defect repair using a rat abdominal hernia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ulrich

    Full Text Available Fascial defects are a common problem in the abdominal wall and in the vagina leading to hernia or pelvic organ prolapse that requires mesh enhancement to reduce operation failure. However, the long-term outcome of synthetic mesh surgery may be unsatisfactory due to post-surgical complications. We hypothesized that mesh fabricated from alternative synthetic polymers may evoke a different tissue response, and provide more appropriate mechanical properties for hernia repair. Our aim was to compare the in vivo biocompatibility of new synthetic meshes with a commercial mesh.We have fabricated 3 new warp-knitted synthetic meshes from different polymers with different tensile properties polyetheretherketone (PEEK, polyamide (PA and a composite, gelatin coated PA (PA+G. The rat abdominal hernia model was used to implant the meshes (25 × 35 mm, n = 24/ group. After 7, 30, 60, 90 days tissues were explanted for immunohistochemical assessment of foreign body reaction and tissue integration, using CD31, CD45, CD68, alpha-SMA antibodies. The images were analysed using an image analysis software program. Biomechanical properties were uniaxially evaluated using an Instron Tensile® Tester.This study showed that the new meshes induced complex differences in the type of foreign body reaction over the time course of implantation. The PA, and particularly the composite PA+G meshes, evoked a milder early inflammatory response, and macrophages were apparent throughout the time course. Our meshes led to better tissue integration and new collagen deposition, particularly with the PA+G meshes, as well as greater and sustained neovascularisation compared with the PP meshes.PA, PA+G and PEEK appear to be well tolerated and are biocompatible, evoking an overlapping and different host tissue response with time that might convey mechanical variations in the healing tissue. These new meshes comprising different polymers may provide an alternative option for future treatment

  17. Comparison of using different bridge prosthetic designs for partial defect restoration through mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styranivska, Oksana; Kliuchkovska, Nataliia; Mykyyevych, Nataliya

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the stress-strain states of bone and abutment teeth during the use of different prosthetic designs of fixed partial dentures with the use of relevant mathematical modeling principles. The use of Comsol Multiphysics 3.5 (Comsol AB, Sweden) software during the mathematical modeling of stress-strain states provided numerical data for analytical interpretation in three different clinical scenarios with fixed dentures and different abutment teeth and demountable prosthetic denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part. Microsoft Excel Software (Microsoft Office 2017) helped to evaluate absolute mistakes of stress and strain parameters of each abutment tooth during three modeled scenarios and normal condition and to summarize data into the forms of tables. In comparison with the fixed prosthetic denture supported by the canine, first premolar, and third molar, stresses at the same abutment teeth with the use of demountable denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part decreased: at the mesial abutment tooth by 2.8 times, at distal crown by 6.1 times, and at the intermediate part by 11.1 times, respectively, the deformation level decreased by 3.1, 1.9, and 1.4 times at each area. The methods of mathematical modeling proved that complications during the use of fixed partial dentures based on the overload effect of the abutment teeth and caused by the deformation process inside the intermediate section of prosthetic construction.

  18. Ab initio defect properties for modeling radiation-induced segregation in Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, J.D.; Allen, T.R.; Morgan, D.; Najafabadi, R.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) has been studied with experimental and theoretical methods for over 30 years and many models have been built in an attempt to understand the mechanisms involved. Input parameters for these models are often not available experimentally, limiting the model's predictive capabilities. In an effort to obtain more accurate input parameters we have calculated formation and migration energies for both vacancies and interstitials using ab initio methods in face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, with an emphasis on Ni-based alloys with dilute concentrations of Cr and Fe. The data gives new insight into a number of properties including species dependence of migration barriers and binding energies for both vacancies and interstitials. We predict species dependent vacancy migration barriers for Cr (0.82 eV), Fe (0.95 eV), and Ni (1.08 eV) and interstitial migration barriers for Cr (0.08 eV), Fe (0.11 eV), and Ni (0.14 eV) in a Ni matrix. Significant binding between Cr and the interstitial dumbbell was also observed. Further work will build on this data to create a rate theory models for RIS. (author)

  19. Modelling of the ultrasonic inspection of steel tubes with longitudinal defects; Modelisation du controle ultrasonore de tubes d`acier presentant des defauts de type ``entaille longitudinale``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mephane, M

    1998-12-31

    A model has been developed in order to simulate the ultrasonic inspection of steel tubes in the Vallourec control configuration. The model permits to simulate the control of steel tubes showing longitudinal defects located near the internal or external surface of tubes which appear during the rolling process. To detect this kind of defect, the probe is placed in an incident place perpendicular to the tube`s axis. The probe is in front of the external surface of the tube. The main characteristics of the model is to assume that the field radiated in the material does not depend on the probe`s position. This assumption permits to treat separately the field retracted in the material and the interaction between the defect and the ultrasonic beam. The focal plane is located in the material, so the plane waves approximation is applied where the waves front are assumed plane and parallel. The parallel refracted beam becomes divergent after reflection on the internal surface of tube. To treat the beam divergence, an amplitude weighting coefficient is then calculated by mean of the energy conservation of a tube of rays before and after reflection, following the Snell laws. This model can predict the edge diffraction echoes, the echoes issued from the corner effect, and also the mode conversion echoes. It has been validated on artificial notches, and on some natural defects. A comparison between experimental and modelling results shows a good agreement. (author) 39 refs.

  20. Regional aerosol trends over the North Atlantic Ocean since 2002: identifying and attributing using satellite, surface, and model datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeward, A.; Li, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols from natural and anthropogenic sources can influence atmospheric variability and alter Earth's radiative balance through direct and indirect processes. Recently, policies targeting anthropogenic species (e.g. the Clean Air Act) have seen success in improving air quality. The anthropogenic contributions to the total aerosol loading and its spatiotemporal pattern/trend are anticipated to be altered. In this work the aerosol loading and trend over the North Atlantic Ocean since 2002 are examined, a period of significant change due to anthropogenic emissions control measures within the U.S. Monthly mean data from satellite (MODIS), ground (AERONET, IMPROVE), and model (GOCART, MERRA) sources are employed. Two annual trends in aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed by MODIS are present: a -0.020 decade-1 trend in the mid-latitudes and a 0.015 decade-1 trend in the sub-tropics. Trends in GOCART species AOD reveal anthropogenic (natural) species as the likely driver of the mid-latitude (sub-tropical) trend. AERONET AOD trends confirm negative AOD trends at three upwind sites in the Eastern U.S. and IMPROVE particulate matter (PM) observations identifies the role of decreasing ammonium sulfate in the overall PM decrease. Meanwhile, an increasing AOD trend seen during summertime in the eastern sub-tropics is associated with dust aerosol from North Africa. A dust parameterization from Kaufman et al. (2005) allows for changes in the flux transport across the sub-tropics to be calculated and analyzed. Using MERRA reanalysis fields, it is hypothesized that amplified warming and increases in baroclinic instability over the Saharan desert may lead to increased dust mobilization and export from North Africa to the sub-tropical Atlantic. This study provides updated analysis through 2016.

  1. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  2. The "psychosomatic family" reconsidered ii: recalling a defective model and looking ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, J C; Anderson, B J

    1989-04-01

    The notion of the "psychosomatic" family continues to enjoy uncritical acceptance in the absence of promised data and despite its dependence on an outmoded view of how psychosocial factors are involved in illness. We review the decline of psychosomatic models of illness that assume that arousal is the only or primary means by which psychosocial factors influence illness. Focusing on brittle diabetes, we note the potential for family theorists to develop more adequate models of poor self-care and medical crises as interactional tactics, as dynamic efforts to solve problems, define relationships, and influence others, even if they are costly and self-defeating. In an appendix, we note the inadequacy of Rosman and Baker's (1988) reanalyses of the Minuchin, Rosman and Baker (1978) data.

  3. The effect of a combined glenoid and Hill-Sachs defect on glenohumeral stability: a biomechanical cadaveric study using 3-dimensional modeling of 142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciero, Robert A; Parrino, Anthony; Bernhardson, Andrew S; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Obopilwe, Elifho; Cote, Mark P; Golijanin, Petr; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Provencher, Matthew T

    2015-06-01

    Bone loss in anterior glenohumeral instability occurs on both the glenoid and the humerus; however, existing biomechanical studies have evaluated glenoid and humeral head defects in isolation. Thus, little is known about the combined effect of these bony lesions in a clinically relevant model on glenohumeral stability. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical efficacy of a Bankart repair in the setting of bipolar (glenoid and humeral head) bone defects determined via computer-generated 3-dimensional (3D) modeling of 142 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The null hypothesis was that adding a bipolar bone defect will have no effect on glenohumeral stability after soft tissue Bankart repair. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 142 consecutive patients with recurrent anterior instability were analyzed with 3D computed tomography scans. Two Hill-Sachs lesions were selected on the basis of volumetric size representing the 25th percentile (0.87 cm(3); small) and 50th percentile (1.47 cm(3); medium) and printed in plastic resin with a 3D printer. A total of 21 cadaveric shoulders were evaluated on a custom shoulder-testing device permitting 6 degrees of freedom, and the force required to translate the humeral head anteriorly 10 mm at a rate of 2.0 mm/s with a compressive load of 50 N was determined at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and 60° of external rotation. All Bankart lesions were made sharply from the 2- to 6-o'clock positions for a right shoulder. Subsequent Bankart repair with transosseous tunnels using high-strength suture was performed. Hill-Sachs lesions were made in the cadaver utilizing a plastic mold from the exact replica off the 3D printer. Testing was conducted in the following sequence for each specimen: (1) intact, (2) posterior capsulotomy, (3) Bankart lesion, (4) Bankart repair, (5) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect, (6) Bankart repair, (7) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect and Hill-Sachs lesion

  4. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Chicago Univ., IL; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-04-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings. 18 refs

  5. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended-inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of the bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings

  6. Trend and forecasting rate of cancer deaths at a public university hospital using univariate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A.; Hassan, Noor I.

    2013-09-01

    Cancer is one of the principal causes of death in Malaysia. This study was performed to determine the pattern of rate of cancer deaths at a public hospital in Malaysia over an 11 year period from year 2001 to 2011, to determine the best fitted model of forecasting the rate of cancer deaths using Univariate Modeling and to forecast the rates for the next two years (2012 to 2013). The medical records of the death of patients with cancer admitted at this Hospital over 11 year's period were reviewed, with a total of 663 cases. The cancers were classified according to 10th Revision International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Data collected include socio-demographic background of patients such as registration number, age, gender, ethnicity, ward and diagnosis. Data entry and analysis was accomplished using SPSS 19.0 and Minitab 16.0. The five Univariate Models used were Naïve with Trend Model, Average Percent Change Model (ACPM), Single Exponential Smoothing, Double Exponential Smoothing and Holt's Method. The overall 11 years rate of cancer deaths showed that at this hospital, Malay patients have the highest percentage (88.10%) compared to other ethnic groups with males (51.30%) higher than females. Lung and breast cancer have the most number of cancer deaths among gender. About 29.60% of the patients who died due to cancer were aged 61 years old and above. The best Univariate Model used for forecasting the rate of cancer deaths is Single Exponential Smoothing Technique with alpha of 0.10. The forecast for the rate of cancer deaths shows a horizontally or flat value. The forecasted mortality trend remains at 6.84% from January 2012 to December 2013. All the government and private sectors and non-governmental organizations need to highlight issues on cancer especially lung and breast cancers to the public through campaigns using mass media, media electronics, posters and pamphlets in the attempt to decrease the rate of cancer deaths in Malaysia.

  7. The Effects of Latarjet Reconstruction on Glenohumeral Kinematics in the Presence of Combined Bony Defects: A Cadaveric Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ronak M; Walia, Piyush; Gottschalk, Lionel; Kuklis, Matthew; Jones, Morgan H; Fening, Steve D; Miniaci, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Recurrent glenohumeral instability is often a result of underlying bony defects in the glenoid and/or humeral head. Anterior glenoid augmentation with a coracoid bone block (ie, Latarjet procedure) has been recommended for glenoid bone loss in the face of recurrent instability. However, no study has investigated the effect of Latarjet augmentation in the setting of both glenoid and humeral head defects (Hill-Sachs defects). To evaluate the glenohumeral kinematics of the Latarjet procedure in the presence of combined bony defects. Controlled laboratory study. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens void of all surrounding soft tissue were tested at all combinations of glenohumeral abduction (ABD) angles of 20°, 40°, and 60° and 3 external rotation (ER) levels of 0°, 40°, and 80°. Each experiment comprised anterior dislocation by translating the glenoid under a 50-N medial load applied on the humerus, simulating the static load of soft tissue. The primary outcome measurement was defined as the percentage of intact translation (normalized distance to dislocation). Specimens were tested in an intact condition (no defect), with different combinations of defects, and with Latarjet augmentation. The Latarjet procedure was performed for 20% and 30% glenoid defects by transferring the specimen's coracoid process anterior to the glenoid so that it was flush with the articulating surface. Results depended on the position of the arm. At 20° of ABD and 0° of ER, a 20% glenoid defect decreased the percentage of intact translation regardless of the humeral head defect size (P ≤ .0001). In this same setting, Latarjet reconstruction restored translation to dislocation greater than the native intact joint for all sizes of humeral head defects. At 60° of ABD and 80° of ER, a 20% glenoid defect led to an overall decrease in translation to dislocation with increasing humeral head defects. While Latarjet augmentation resulted in increased translation to dislocation for all

  8. Economic trends of tokamak power plants independent of physics scaling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    This study examines the effects of plasma radius, field on axis, plasma impurity level, and aspect ratio on power level and unit capital cost, $/kW/sub e/, of tokamak power plants sized independent of plasma physics scaling models. It is noted that tokamaks sized in this manner are thermally unstable based on trapped particle scaling relationships. It is observed that there is an economic advantage for larger power level tokamaks achieved by physics independent sizing; however, the incentive for increased power levels is less than that for fission reactors. It is further observed that the economic advantage of these larger power level tokamaks is decreased when plasma thermal stability measures are incorporated, such as by increasing the plasma impurity concentration. This trend of economy with size obtained by physics independent sizing is opposite to that observed when the tokamak designs are constrained to obey the trapped particle and empirical scaling relationships

  9. Effects of defects in composite wind turbine blades – Part 2: Progressive damage modeling of fiberglass-reinforced epoxy composites with manufacturing-induced waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Nelson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Composite wind turbine blades are typically reliable; however, premature failures are often in regions of manufacturing defects. While the use of damage modeling has increased with improved computational capabilities, they are often performed for worst-case scenarios in which damage or defects are replaced with notches or holes. To better understand and predict these effects, an effects-of-defects study has been undertaken. As a portion of this study, various progressive damage modeling approaches were investigated to determine if proven modeling capabilities could be adapted to predict damage progression of composite laminates with typical manufacturing flaws commonly found in wind turbine blades. Models were constructed to match the coupons from, and compare the results to, the characterization and material testing study presented as a companion. Modeling methods were chosen from established methodologies and included continuum damage models (linear elastic with Hashin failure criteria, user-defined failure criteria, nonlinear shear criteria, a discrete damage model (cohesive elements, and a combined damage model (nonlinear shear with cohesive elements. A systematic, combined qualitative–quantitative approach was used to compare consistency, accuracy, and predictive capability for each model to responses found experimentally. Results indicated that the Hashin and combined models were best able to predict material response to be within 10 % of the strain at peak stress and within 10 % of the peak stress. In both cases, the correlation was not as accurate as the wave shapes were changed in the model; correlation was still within 20 % in many cases. The other modeling approaches did not correlate well within the comparative framework. Overall, the results indicate that this combined approach may provide insight into blade performance with known defects when used in conjunction with a probabilistic flaw framework.

  10. Finite-element model to predict roll-separation force and defects during rolling of U-10Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Burkes, Douglas E.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean

    2017-10-01

    This study used a finite element code, LSDYNA, as a predictive tool to optimize the rolling process. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel were conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. The study reported here discussed various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., waviness and thickness non-uniformity like dog boning). To investigate the influence of the cladding material on these rolling defects, other cases were simulated:  hot rolling with alternative can materials, namely, 304 stainless steel and Zircaloy-2, and bare-rolling.

  11. Time series models of decadal trends in the harmful algal species Karlodinium veneficum in Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hsien Michelle; Lyubchich, Vyacheslav; Glibert, Patricia M

    2018-03-01

    The harmful dinoflagellate, Karlodnium veneficum, has been implicated in fish-kill and other toxic, harmful algal bloom (HAB) events in waters worldwide. Blooms of K. veneficum are known to be related to coastal nutrient enrichment but the relationship is complex because this HAB taxon relies not only on dissolved nutrients but also particulate prey, both of which have also changed over time. Here, applying cross-correlations of climate-related physical factors, nutrients and prey, with abundance of K. veneficum over a 10-year (2002-2011) period, a synthesis of the interactive effects of multiple factors on this species was developed for Chesapeake Bay, where blooms of the HAB have been increasing. Significant upward trends in the time series of K. veneficum were observed in the mesohaline stations of the Bay, but not in oligohaline tributary stations. For the mesohaline regions, riverine sources of nutrients with seasonal lags, together with particulate prey with zero lag, explained 15%-46% of the variation in the K. veneficum time series. For the oligohaline regions, nutrients and particulate prey generally showed significant decreasing trends with time, likely a reflection of nutrient reduction efforts. A conceptual model of mid-Bay blooms is presented, in which K. veneficum, derived from the oceanic end member of the Bay, may experience enhanced growth if it encounters prey originating from the tributaries with different patterns of nutrient loading and which are enriched in nitrogen. For all correlation models developed herein, prey abundance was a primary factor in predicting K. veneficum abundance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling the status, trends, and impacts of wild bee abundance in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Insu; Lonsdorf, Eric V.; Williams, Neal M.; Brittain, Claire; Isaacs, Rufus; Gibbs, Jason; Ricketts, Taylor H.

    2016-01-01

    Wild bees are highly valuable pollinators. Along with managed honey bees, they provide a critical ecosystem service by ensuring stable pollination to agriculture and wild plant communities. Increasing concern about the welfare of both wild and managed pollinators, however, has prompted recent calls for national evaluation and action. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we assess the status and trends of wild bees and their potential impacts on pollination services across the coterminous United States. We use a spatial habitat model, national land-cover data, and carefully quantified expert knowledge to estimate wild bee abundance and associated uncertainty. Between 2008 and 2013, modeled bee abundance declined across 23% of US land area. This decline was generally associated with conversion of natural habitats to row crops. We identify 139 counties where low bee abundances correspond to large areas of pollinator-dependent crops. These areas of mismatch between supply (wild bee abundance) and demand (cultivated area) for pollination comprise 39% of the pollinator-dependent crop area in the United States. Further, we find that the crops most highly dependent on pollinators tend to experience more severe mismatches between declining supply and increasing demand. These trends, should they continue, may increase costs for US farmers and may even destabilize crop production over time. National assessments such as this can help focus both scientific and political efforts to understand and sustain wild bees. As new information becomes available, repeated assessments can update findings, revise priorities, and track progress toward sustainable management of our nation’s pollinators. PMID:26699460

  13. Modeling Huntington disease in Drosophila: Insights into axonal transport defects and modifiers of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krench, Megan; Littleton, J Troy

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) gene. Despite years of research, there is no treatment that extends life for patients with the disorder. Similarly, little is known about which cellular pathways that are altered by pathogenic Huntingtin (Htt) protein expression are correlated with neuronal loss. As part of a longstanding effort to gain insights into HD pathology, we have been studying the protein in the context of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. We generated transgenic HD models in Drosophila by engineering flies that carry a 12-exon fragment of the human Htt gene with or without the toxic trinucleotide repeat expansion. We also created variants with a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) tag fused to Htt that allows in vivo imaging of Htt protein localization and aggregation. While wild-type Htt remains diffuse throughout the cytoplasm of cells, pathogenic Htt forms insoluble aggregates that accumulate in neuronal soma and axons. Aggregates can physically block transport of numerous organelles along the axon. We have also observed that aggregates are formed quickly, within just a few hours of mutant Htt expression. To explore mechanisms of neurodegeneration in our HD model, we performed in vivo and in vitro screens to search for modifiers of viability and pathogenic Htt aggregation. Our results identified several novel candidates for HD therapeutics that can now be tested in mammalian models of HD. Furthermore, these experiments have highlighted the complex relationship between aggregates and toxicity that exists in HD.

  14. Osteochondral defect repair using bilayered hydrogels encapsulating both chondrogenically and osteogenically pre-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells in a rabbit model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, J.; Lu, S.; Lee, E.J.; Trachtenberg, J.E.; Meretoja, V.V.; Dahlin, R.L.; van den Beucken, J.J.; Tabata, Y.; Wong, M.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.; Kasper, F.K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ability of cell-laden bilayered hydrogels encapsulating chondrogenically and osteogenically (OS) pre-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to effect osteochondral defect repair in a rabbit model. By varying the period of chondrogenic pre-differentiation from 7

  15. Corrigendum to: Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate brittle material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to AlON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, A. L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2017-09-01

    A minor error was present in one equation in the original paper, "Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate brittle material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to AlON" and in the corresponding computational implementation. The correction is provided here. None of the primary conclusions of the original paper are affected.

  16. Recent trends of high-latitude vegetation activity assessed and explained by contrasting modelling approaches with earth observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, M.; Carvalhais, N.; Reichstein, M.; Thonicke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite observations of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) showed increasing trends in the arctic tundra and the boreal forests since the 1980s. This greening is related to an increase in photosynthetic activity and is driven by increasing temperatures and a prolongation of the growing season. However, NDVI experienced a decrease in large regions of the boreal forests since the mid-1990s. This browning is related to fire disturbances, temperature-induced summer drought and potentially to insect infestations and diseases. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBM) can be used to assess the impacts of these changes in vegetation productivity on the carbon and water cycles and on the climate system. In general, these models provide descriptions of ecosystem processes and states that are forced by and feedback to the climate system such as photosynthesis and transpiration, ecosystem respiration, soil carbon and water stocks and vegetation composition. The evaluation of TBMs against observations is a necessary step to assess their suitability to simulate such processes and dynamics. The increasing availability of long-term observations of vegetation activity enables us to evaluate the model ability to diagnose these vegetation greening and browning trends in arctic and boreal regions. The first aim of this study is to evaluate trends in vegetation activity in high-latitude regions as simulated by TBMs against observed trends in vegetation activity. The second aim is to identify potential drivers of these observed and simulated trends to evaluate the ability of models to reproduce the observed functional relations between climatic and environmental drivers and the vegetation trends. The trends in vegetation activity were estimated for a set of satellite-based remote sensing products: NDVI from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), as well as FAPAR observations (Fraction of Observed Photosynthetically

  17. Strategic production modeling for defective items with imperfect inspection process, rework, and sales return under two-level trade credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality decisions are one of the major decisions in inventory management. It affects customer’s demand, loyalty and customer satisfaction and also inventory costs. Every manufacturing process is inherent to have some chance causes of variation which may lead to some defectives in the lot. So, in order to cater the customers with faultless products, an inspection process is inevitable, which may also be prone to errors. Thus for an operations manager, maintaining the quality of the lot and the screening process becomes a challenging task, when his objective is to determine the optimal order quantity for the inventory system. Besides these operational tasks, the goal is also to increase the customer base which eventually leads to higher profits. So, as a promotional tool, trade credit is being offered by both the retailer and supplier to their respective customers to encourage more frequent and higher volume purchases. Thus taking into account of these facts, a strategic production model is formulated here to study the combined effects of imperfect quality items, faulty inspection process, rework process, sales return under two level trade credit. The present study is a general framework for many articles and classical EPQ model. An analytical method is employed which jointly optimizes the retailer’s credit period and order quantity, so as to maximize the expected total profit per unit time. To study the behavior and application of the model, a numerical example has been cited and a comprehensive sensitivity analysis has been performed. The model can be widely applicable in manufacturing industries like textile, footwear, plastics, electronics, furniture etc.

  18. Early-onset sleep defects in Drosophila models of Huntington's disease reflect alterations of PKA/CREB signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Erin D.; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; Zhang, Jiabin; Chaffee, Ryan P.; Yin, Jerry C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurological disorder whose non-motor symptoms include sleep disturbances. Whether sleep and activity abnormalities are primary molecular disruptions of mutant Huntingtin (mutHtt) expression or result from neurodegeneration is unclear. Here, we report Drosophila models of HD exhibit sleep and activity disruptions very early in adulthood, as soon as sleep patterns have developed. Pan-neuronal expression of full-length or N-terminally truncated mutHtt recapitulates sleep phenotypes of HD patients: impaired sleep initiation, fragmented and diminished sleep, and nighttime hyperactivity. Sleep deprivation of HD model flies results in exacerbated sleep deficits, indicating that homeostatic regulation of sleep is impaired. Elevated PKA/CREB activity in healthy flies produces patterns of sleep and activity similar to those in our HD models. We were curious whether aberrations in PKA/CREB signaling were responsible for our early-onset sleep/activity phenotypes. Decreasing signaling through the cAMP/PKA pathway suppresses mutHtt-induced developmental lethality. Genetically reducing PKA abolishes sleep/activity deficits in HD model flies, restores the homeostatic response and extends median lifespan. In vivo reporters, however, show dCREB2 activity is unchanged, or decreased when sleep/activity patterns are abnormal, suggesting dissociation of PKA and dCREB2 occurs early in pathogenesis. Collectively, our data suggest that sleep defects may reflect a primary pathological process in HD, and that measurements of sleep and cAMP/PKA could be prodromal indicators of disease, and serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. PMID:26604145

  19. The contribution of anthropogenic bromine emissions to past stratospheric ozone trends: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-M. Sinnhuber

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bromine compounds play an important role in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. We have calculated the changes in stratospheric ozone in response to changes in the halogen loading over the past decades, using a two-dimensional (latitude/height model constrained by source gas mixing ratios at the surface. Model calculations of the decrease of total column ozone since 1980 agree reasonably well with observed ozone trends, in particular when the contribution from very short-lived bromine compounds is included. Model calculations with bromine source gas mixing ratios fixed at 1959 levels, corresponding approximately to a situation with no anthropogenic bromine emissions, show an ozone column reduction between 1980 and 2005 at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes of only ≈55% compared to a model run including all halogen source gases. In this sense anthropogenic bromine emissions are responsible for ≈45% of the model estimated column ozone loss at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes. However, since a large fraction of the bromine induced ozone loss is due to the combined BrO/ClO catalytic cycle, the effect of bromine would have been smaller in the absence of anthropogenic chlorine emissions. The chemical efficiency of bromine relative to chlorine for global total ozone depletion from our model calculations, expressed by the so called α-factor, is 64 on an annual average. This value is much higher than previously published results. Updates in reaction rate constants can explain only part of the differences in α. The inclusion of bromine from very short-lived source gases has only a minor effect on the global mean α-factor.

  20. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-14

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  1. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-27

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  2. Atomistic modeling of defect evolution in Si for amorphizing and subamorphizing implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Solid phase epitaxial regrowth of pre-amorphizing implants has received significant attention as a method to achieve high dopant activation with minimal diffusion at low implant temperatures and suppress channelling. Therefore, a good understanding of the amorphization and regrowth mechanisms is required in process simulators. We present an atomistic amorphization and recrystallization model that uses the interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pair as a building block to describe the amorphous phase. I-V pairs are locally characterized by the number of neighbouring I-V pairs. This feature captures the damage generation and the dynamical annealing during ion implantation, and also explains the annealing behaviour of amorphous layers and amorphous pockets

  3. Prognosticating fault development rate in wind turbine generator bearings using local trend models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Palou, Jonel; Sweeney, Christian Walsted

    2016-01-01

    Generator bearing defects, e.g. ball, inner and outer race defects, are ranked among the most frequent mechanical failures encountered in wind turbines. Diagnosis and prognosis of bearing faults can be successfully implemented using vibration based condition monitoring systems, where tracking...... to maintenance planning and component replacement. The above approach offers numerous benefits from financial and operational perspective, such as increased availability, uptower repairs and minimization of secondary and catastrophic damages. In this work, a non-speed related condition indicator, measuring...

  4. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Nelson

    2012-11-01

    Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APCMin/+; multiple intestinal neoplasia model demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APCMin/+ intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause cell

  5. Delayed minimally invasive injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell sheets regenerates large bone defects in an ovine preclinical animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Arne; Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A; Steck, Roland; Nerlich, Michael; Schuetz, Michael A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2015-05-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering approaches are promising strategies in the field of regenerative medicine. However, the mode of cell delivery is still a concern and needs to be significantly improved. Scaffolds and/or matrices loaded with cells are often transplanted into a bone defect immediately after the defect has been created. At this point, the nutrient and oxygen supply is low and the inflammatory cascade is incited, thus creating a highly unfavorable microenvironment for transplanted cells to survive and participate in the regeneration process. We therefore developed a unique treatment concept using the delayed injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) sheets to regenerate a critical-sized tibial defect in sheep to study the effect of the cells' regeneration potential when introduced at a postinflammatory stage. Minimally invasive percutaneous injection of allogenic BMSCs into biodegradable composite scaffolds 4 weeks after the defect surgery led to significantly improved bone regeneration compared with preseeded scaffold/cell constructs and scaffold-only groups. Biomechanical testing and microcomputed tomography showed comparable results to the clinical reference standard (i.e., an autologous bone graft). To our knowledge, we are the first to show in a validated preclinical large animal model that delayed allogenic cell transplantation can provide applicable clinical treatment alternatives for challenging bone defects in the future. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. The Axolotl Fibula as a Model for the Induction of Regeneration across Large Segment Defects in Long Bones of the Extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Song, Fengyu; Jhamb, Deepali; Li, Jiliang; Bottino, Marco C.; Palakal, Mathew J.; Stocum, David L.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the ability of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) fibula to regenerate across segment defects of different size in the absence of intervention or after implant of a unique 8-braid pig small intestine submucosa (SIS) scaffold, with or without incorporated growth factor combinations or tissue protein extract. Fractures and defects of 10% and 20% of the total limb length regenerated well without any intervention, but 40% and 50% defects failed to regenerate after either simple removal of bone or implanting SIS scaffold alone. By contrast, scaffold soaked in the growth factor combination BMP-4/HGF or in protein extract of intact limb tissue promoted partial or extensive induction of cartilage and bone across 50% segment defects in 30%-33% of cases. These results show that BMP-4/HGF and intact tissue protein extract can promote the events required to induce cartilage and bone formation across a segment defect larger than critical size and that the long bones of axolotl limbs are an inexpensive model to screen soluble factors and natural and synthetic scaffolds for their efficacy in stimulating this process. PMID:26098852

  7. Maximum field emission current density of CuO nanowires: theoretical study using a defect-related semiconductor field emission model and in situ measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zufang; Zhao, Peng; Ye, Peng; Chen, Yicong; Gan, Haibo; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we proposed a theoretical model for one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires (NWs), taking account of the defect-related electrical transport process. The maximum emission current density was calculated by considering the influence of Joule heating, using a one-dimensional heat equation. The field emission properties of individual CuO NWs with different electrical properties were studied using an in situ experimental technique. The experimental results for maximum emission current density agreed well with the theoretical predictions and suggested that multiple conduction mechanisms were active. These may be induced by the concentration of defects in the CuO NW. The concentration of defects and the transport mechanisms were found to be key factors influencing the maximum field emission current density of the semiconductor NW. As is limited by the change of resistivity with temperature, only thermal runaway can trigger breakdown in CuO NWs.

  8. Using Growth Mixture Modeling for Clustering Asian and North African Countries on the Road Injury Death Trend (1990–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Salari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The physical injuries and financial implications as a result of road accidents have serious economic, cultural, and social effects. We conducted this study to determine any changes in the trend of road-accident-related deaths in Asian and North African countries from 1990 to 2010. Methods: The current study was carried out using data from the Global Burden of Disease database. First, the process was assessed using the growth curve divided into six regions. Moreover, the classification was done based on the death rate using growth mixed modeling. Results: The road injury death trend for men had more variations than women. Classification of these countries based on mortality using the latent growth mixture model resulted in more homogeneous classes according to trend in road fatalities. Disregarding gender and sex, there were four optimal classes. The first three classes had a decreasing trend with the third class having the greatest decreasing trend. South Korea and Taiwan were in this group. Afghanistan, Indonesia, Thailand, Iran, the UAE, Saudi Arabia, and Oman lay in group 4 and had an increasing trend in road injury deaths. Conclusions: Successful interventions that developed countries have used to avoid casualties of road injuries could be used in developing countries. These include passing laws making the use of seatbelts and child seats compulsory and determining appropriate speed limits.

  9. Insensitivity to small defects of the rupture of materials governed by the Dugdale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Huang, W.; Duan, Y. H.; Chan, J. C. L.; Chen, P. Y.; Yu, R. L.

    2007-08-01

    A new typhoon model named as GRAPES_TCM is applied to study the pre-landfall erratic track of Typhoon Haitang (2005), which hit China twice in mid-July by making landfall in Taiwan and Fujian provinces consecutively. The model is based on the Chinese Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) and put into real-time operational test since 2004. It predicts almost correctly the pre-landfall loop and sharp turn of Haitang and its asymmetric rainfall distribution. Haitang’s erratic track is well explained by the potential vorticity (PV) theory on tropical cyclone motion, with the typhoon center moving toward the area of maximum wave-number 1 (WN1) PV tendency most of the time. Among the terms contributing to the WN1 PV tendency, the horizontal advection of PV is dominant with the diabatic heating and residual terms also being not negligible. A sensitivity experiment is carried out with removal of the Taiwan terrain to determine its importance in the erratic track of Haitang and it is found that the basic erratic feature of Haitang’s track remians unchanged although it tends to have a larger loop and a weaker northward turn, which suggests that Taiwan terrain may not be a key factor here. The sudden change of Haitang’s moving direction is always accompanied by a newly-generated or re-intensified WN1 PV center in the southern semicircle, which circles around the TC center cyclonically afterwards and weakens in the north or northwestern part. A phase-lock WN1 PV forcing related to diabatic heating is proposed to be the major contributor, the importance of which is magnified as it is in phase with the WN1 horizontal advection of PV. The intrusion of mid-level warm and dry air, as well as the existence of a low-level southwesterly jet, is considered to be the main reasons for such a phase-lock of the diabatic heating forcing on the PV tendency field that finally results in the erratic track of Haitang.

  10. Nitisinone improves eye and skin pigmentation defects in a mouse model of oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onojafe, Ighovie F; Adams, David R; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Zhang, Jun; Chan, Chi-Chao; Bernardini, Isa M; Sergeev, Yuri V; Dolinska, Monika B; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Brilliant, Murray H; Gahl, William A; Brooks, Brian P

    2011-10-01

    Mutation of the tyrosinase gene (TYR) causes oculocutaneous albinism, type 1 (OCA1), a condition characterized by reduced skin and eye melanin pigmentation and by vision loss. The retinal pigment epithelium influences postnatal visual development. Therefore, increasing ocular pigmentation in patients with OCA1 might enhance visual function. There are 2 forms of OCA1, OCA-1A and OCA-1B. Individuals with the former lack functional tyrosinase and therefore lack melanin, while individuals with the latter produce some melanin. We hypothesized that increasing plasma tyrosine concentrations using nitisinone, an FDA-approved inhibitor of tyrosine degradation, could stabilize tyrosinase and improve pigmentation in individuals with OCA1. Here, we tested this hypothesis in mice homozygous for either the Tyrc-2J null allele or the Tyrc-h allele, which model OCA-1A and OCA-1B, respectively. Only nitisinone-treated Tyrc-h/c-h mice manifested increased pigmentation in their fur and irides and had more pigmented melanosomes. High levels of tyrosine improved the stability and enzymatic function of the Tyrc-h protein and also increased overall melanin levels in melanocytes from a human with OCA-1B. These results suggest that the use of nitisinone in OCA-1B patients could improve their pigmentation and potentially ameliorate vision loss.

  11. The Time Series Analysis in the Inspection of Defective Rate on Radio Frequency Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Mei LI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of purchased parts is an important factor affecting the whole quality of the products, that how to grasp the size and trend of the defective rate in the warehouse-in inspection, becomes a meaningful theme in the quality control, through studying the modeling method of time series ARIMA model, applies variance analysis to the time series modeling, and carries out the variance analysis to the season data and determine the cycle. From all aspects of model identification, parameter estimation, modeling and prediction, this paper introduces the whole process of modeling and prediction. Utilizing SAS software, together with the variance test method and algorithm flow, establishes an ARIMA model for the defective rate data of purchased RF parts in the incoming inspection from January 2010 to July 2012 in the business platform of a department of XX Company, then performs the NJ time series analysis, and finally completes the short-term prediction for the defective rate value.

  12. Persistent short-term memory defects following sleep deprivation in a drosophila model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seugnet, Laurent; Galvin, James E; Suzuki, Yasuko; Gottschalk, Laura; Shaw, Paul J

    2009-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States. It is associated with motor deficits, sleep disturbances, and cognitive impairment. The pathology associated with PD and the effects of sleep deprivation impinge, in part, upon common molecular pathways suggesting that sleep loss may be particularly deleterious to the degenerating brain. Thus we investigated the long-term consequences of sleep deprivation on shortterm memory using a Drosophila model of Parkinson disease. Transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Using the GAL4-UAS system, human alpha-synuclein was expressed throughout the nervous system of adult flies. Alpha-synuclein expressing flies (alpha S flies) and the corresponding genetic background controls were sleep deprived for 12 h at age 16 days and allowed to recover undisturbed for at least 3 days. Short-term memory was evaluated using aversive phototaxis suppression. Dopaminergic systems were assessed using mRNA profiling and immunohistochemistry. MEASURMENTS AND RESULTS: When sleep deprived at an intermediate stage of the pathology, alpha S flies showed persistent short-term memory deficits that lasted > or = 3 days. Cognitive deficits were not observed in younger alpha S flies nor in genetic background controls. Long-term impairments were not associated with accelerated loss of dopaminergic neurons. However mRNA expression of the dopamine receptors dDA1 and DAMB were significantly increased in sleep deprived alpha S flies. Blocking D1-like receptors during sleep deprivation prevented persistent shortterm memory deficits. Importantly, feeding flies the polyphenolic compound curcumin blocked long-term learning deficits. These data emphasize the importance of sleep in a degenerating/reorganizing brain and shows that pathological processes induced by sleep deprivation can be dissected at the molecular and cellular level using Drosophila genetics.

  13. Assessment of climate change impacts on climate variables using probabilistic ensemble modeling and trend analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Hamid R.; Sajjadi, Sayed Mahdi; Raghibi, Vahid

    2017-10-01

    Water resources in snow-dependent regions have undergone significant changes due to climate change. Snow measurements in these regions have revealed alarming declines in snowfall over the past few years. The Zayandeh-Rud River in central Iran chiefly depends on winter falls as snow for supplying water from wet regions in high Zagrous Mountains to the downstream, (semi-)arid, low-lying lands. In this study, the historical records (baseline: 1971-2000) of climate variables (temperature and precipitation) in the wet region were chosen to construct a probabilistic ensemble model using 15 GCMs in order to forecast future trends and changes while the Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG) was utilized to project climate variables under two A2 and B1 scenarios to a future period (2015-2044). Since future snow water equivalent (SWE) forecasts by GCMs were not available for the study area, an artificial neural network (ANN) was implemented to build a relationship between climate variables and snow water equivalent for the baseline period to estimate future snowfall amounts. As a last step, homogeneity and trend tests were performed to evaluate the robustness of the data series and changes were examined to detect past and future variations. Results indicate different characteristics of the climate variables at upstream stations. A shift is observed in the type of precipitation from snow to rain as well as in its quantities across the subregions. The key role in these shifts and the subsequent side effects such as water losses is played by temperature.

  14. A mouse model for nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB12) links hearing loss to defects in tip links of mechanosensory hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwander, Martin; Xiong, Wei; Tokita, Joshua; Lelli, Andrea; Elledge, Heather M.; Kazmierczak, Piotr; Sczaniecka, Anna; Kolatkar, Anand; Wiltshire, Tim; Kuhn, Peter; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Kachar, Bechara; Tarantino, Lisa; Müller, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Deafness is the most common form of sensory impairment in humans and is frequently caused by single gene mutations. Interestingly, different mutations in a gene can cause syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of deafness, as well as progressive and age-related hearing loss. We provide here an explanation for the phenotypic variability associated with mutations in the cadherin 23 gene (CDH23). CDH23 null alleles cause deaf-blindness (Usher syndrome type 1D; USH1D), whereas missense mutations cause nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB12). In a forward genetic screen, we have identified salsa mice, which suffer from hearing loss due to a Cdh23 missense mutation modeling DFNB12. In contrast to waltzer mice, which carry a CDH23 null allele mimicking USH1D, hair cell development is unaffected in salsa mice. Instead, tip links, which are thought to gate mechanotransduction channels in hair cells, are progressively lost. Our findings suggest that DFNB12 belongs to a new class of disorder that is caused by defects in tip links. We propose that mutations in other genes that cause USH1 and nonsyndromic deafness may also have distinct effects on hair cell development and function. PMID:19270079

  15. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FORECASTING MODELS FOR TREND AND SEASONAL TIME SERIES DOES COMPLEX MODEL ALWAYS YIELD BETTER FORECAST THAN SIMPLE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhartono Suhartono

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many business and economic time series are non-stationary time series that contain trend and seasonal variations. Seasonality is a periodic and recurrent pattern caused by factors such as weather, holidays, or repeating promotions. A stochastic trend is often accompanied with the seasonal variations and can have a significant impact on various forecasting methods. In this paper, we will investigate and compare some forecasting methods for modeling time series with both trend and seasonal patterns. These methods are Winter's, Decomposition, Time Series Regression, ARIMA and Neural Networks models. In this empirical research, we study on the effectiveness of the forecasting performance, particularly to answer whether a complex method always give a better forecast than a simpler method. We use a real data, that is airline passenger data. The result shows that the more complex model does not always yield a better result than a simpler one. Additionally, we also find the possibility to do further research especially the use of hybrid model by combining some forecasting method to get better forecast, for example combination between decomposition (as data preprocessing and neural network model.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells and their conditioned medium can enhance the repair of uterine defects in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hong Ho

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that transplantation of MSCs could enhance uterine defect repair by paracrine effects involving IL-6, which are findings that may be applied to facilitate uterine wound healing in the removal of huge intramural masses.

  17. A New-Trend Model-Based to Solve the Peak Power Problems in OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf A. Eltholth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The high peak to average power ration (PAR levels of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM signals attract the attention of many researchers during the past decade. Existing approaches that attack this PAR issue are abundant, but no systematic framework or comparison between them exists to date. They sometimes even differ in the problem definition itself and consequently in the basic approach to follow. In this paper, we propose a new trend in mitigating the peak power problem in OFDM system based on modeling the effects of clipping and amplifier nonlinearities in an OFDM system. We showed that the distortion due to these effects is highly related to the dynamic range itself rather than the clipping level or the saturation level of the nonlinear amplifier, and thus we propose two criteria to reduce the dynamic range of the OFDM, namely, the use of MSK modulation and the use of Hadamard transform. Computer simulations of the OFDM system using Matlab are completely matched with the deduced model in terms of OFDM signal quality metrics such as BER, ACPR, and EVM. Also simulation results show that even the reduction of PAR using the two proposed criteria is not significat, and the reduction in the amount of distortion due to HPA is truley delightful.

  18. Mathematical modelling of the the processes of radiating formation of defects at interaction of carbon with graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kupchishin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Processes of radiation formation of defects in the carbon irradiated by graphite are considered in work. The regularities arising at selection of approximation expressions, a finding of result area at calculation of cascadely - probabilistic functions depending on number of interactions and depth of penetration of particles are revealed. The regularities formed at calculations of concentration of radiating defects in graphite, irradiated by carbon are received. Results of calculations are presented in the form of tables and schedules.

  19. Determination of defect content and defect profile in semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubiaga, A [Laboratory of Physics, HUT, PO Box 1100, 02015 TKK, Espoo (Finland); Garcia, J A; Plazaola, F [Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unbertsitatea, P. K. 644, 48080, Bilbao (Spain); Zuniga-Perez, J; Munoz-Sanjose, V, E-mail: fernando.plazaola@ehu.es [Universitat de Valencia, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada i Electromagnetisme, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-01-10

    In this article we present an overview of the technique to obtain the defects depth profile and width of a deposited layer and multilayer based on positron annihilation spectroscopy. In particular we apply the method to ZnO and ZnO/ZnCdO layers deposited on sapphire substrates. After introducing some terminology we first calculate the trend that the W/S parameters of the Doppler broadening measurements must follow, both in a qualitative and quantitative way. From this point we extend the results to calculate the width and defect profiles in deposited layer samples.

  20. Optimization of Soft Tissue Management, Spacer Design, and Grafting Strategies for Large Segmental Bone Defects using the Chronic Caprine Tibial Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    reconstructed into 3D volumes using a modified tent-Feldkamp algorithm and calibrated to mg/cm3 of HA using an air/water/hydroxyapatite phantom scanned...inner layer” (zone immediately adjacent to the spacer) and an “outer” layer. “C” Samples were minced and incubated in 10 ml of prepared digest...modeling algorithms fail when the data contains missing values; one exception to that are Bayesian based algorithms . The data collected was missing

  1. Modeling US Adult Obesity Trends: A System Dynamics Model for Estimating Energy Imbalance Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmandad, Hazhir; Huang, Terry T.-K.; Bures, Regina M.; Glass, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We present a system dynamics model that quantifies the energy imbalance gap responsible for the US adult obesity epidemic among gender and racial subpopulations. Methods. We divided the adult population into gender–race/ethnicity subpopulations and body mass index (BMI) classes. We defined transition rates between classes as a function of metabolic dynamics of individuals within each class. We estimated energy intake in each BMI class within the past 4 decades as a multiplication of the equilibrium energy intake of individuals in that class. Through calibration, we estimated the energy gap multiplier for each gender–race–BMI group by matching simulated BMI distributions for each subpopulation against national data with maximum likelihood estimation. Results. No subpopulation showed a negative or zero energy gap, suggesting that the obesity epidemic continues to worsen, albeit at a slower rate. In the past decade the epidemic has slowed for non-Hispanic Whites, is starting to slow for non-Hispanic Blacks, but continues to accelerate among Mexican Americans. Conclusions. The differential energy balance gap across subpopulations and over time suggests that interventions should be tailored to subpopulations’ needs. PMID:24832405

  2. EURODELTA-Trends, a multi-model experiment of air quality hindcast in Europe over 1990-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colette, Augustin; Andersson, Camilla; Manders, Astrid; Mar, Kathleen; Mircea, Mihaela; Pay, Maria-Teresa; Raffort, Valentin; Tsyro, Svetlana; Cuvelier, Cornelius; Adani, Mario; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Bergström, Robert; Briganti, Gino; Butler, Tim; Cappelletti, Andrea; Couvidat, Florian; D'Isidoro, Massimo; Doumbia, Thierno; Fagerli, Hilde; Granier, Claire; Heyes, Chris; Klimont, Zig; Ojha, Narendra; Otero, Noelia; Schaap, Martijn; Sindelarova, Katarina; Stegehuis, Annemiek I.; Roustan, Yelva; Vautard, Robert; van Meijgaard, Erik; Garcia Vivanco, Marta; Wind, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The EURODELTA-Trends multi-model chemistry-transport experiment has been designed to facilitate a better understanding of the evolution of air pollution and its drivers for the period 1990-2010 in Europe. The main objective of the experiment is to assess the efficiency of air pollutant emissions mitigation measures in improving regional-scale air quality. The present paper formulates the main scientific questions and policy issues being addressed by the EURODELTA-Trends modelling experiment with an emphasis on how the design and technical features of the modelling experiment answer these questions. The experiment is designed in three tiers, with increasing degrees of computational demand in order to facilitate the participation of as many modelling teams as possible. The basic experiment consists of simulations for the years 1990, 2000, and 2010. Sensitivity analysis for the same three years using various combinations of (i) anthropogenic emissions, (ii) chemical boundary conditions, and (iii) meteorology complements it. The most demanding tier consists of two complete time series from 1990 to 2010, simulated using either time-varying emissions for corresponding years or constant emissions. Eight chemistry-transport models have contributed with calculation results to at least one experiment tier, and five models have - to date - completed the full set of simulations (and 21-year trend calculations have been performed by four models). The modelling results are publicly available for further use by the scientific community. The main expected outcomes are (i) an evaluation of the models' performances for the three reference years, (ii) an evaluation of the skill of the models in capturing observed air pollution trends for the 1990-2010 time period, (iii) attribution analyses of the respective role of driving factors (e.g. emissions, boundary conditions, meteorology), (iv) a dataset based on a multi-model approach, to provide more robust model results for use in impact

  3. Transient exposure to ethanol during zebrafish embryogenesis results in defects in neuronal differentiation: an alternative model system to study FASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joya, Xavier; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Vall, Oriol; Pujades, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of the human embryo to ethanol results in a spectrum of disorders involving multiple organ systems, including the impairment of the development of the central nervous system (CNS). In spite of the importance for human health, the molecular basis of prenatal ethanol exposure remains poorly understood, mainly to the difficulty of sample collection. Zebrafish is now emerging as a powerful organism for the modeling and the study of human diseases. In this work, we have assessed the sensitivity of specific subsets of neurons to ethanol exposure during embryogenesis and we have visualized the sensitive embryonic developmental periods for specific neuronal groups by the use of different transgenic zebrafish lines. In order to evaluate the teratogenic effects of acute ethanol exposure, we exposed zebrafish embryos to ethanol in a given time window and analyzed the effects in neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and brain patterning. Zebrafish larvae exposed to ethanol displayed small eyes and/or a reduction of the body length, phenotypical features similar to the observed in children with prenatal exposure to ethanol. When neuronal populations were analyzed, we observed a clear reduction in the number of differentiated neurons in the spinal cord upon ethanol exposure. There was a decrease in the population of sensory neurons mainly due to a decrease in cell proliferation and subsequent apoptosis during neuronal differentiation, with no effect in motoneuron specification. Our investigation highlights that transient exposure to ethanol during early embryonic development affects neuronal differentiation although does not result in defects in early neurogenesis. These results establish the use of zebrafish embryos as an alternative research model to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) of ethanol-induced developmental toxicity at very early stages of embryonic development.

  4. Transient exposure to ethanol during zebrafish embryogenesis results in defects in neuronal differentiation: an alternative model system to study FASD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Joya

    Full Text Available The exposure of the human embryo to ethanol results in a spectrum of disorders involving multiple organ systems, including the impairment of the development of the central nervous system (CNS. In spite of the importance for human health, the molecular basis of prenatal ethanol exposure remains poorly understood, mainly to the difficulty of sample collection. Zebrafish is now emerging as a powerful organism for the modeling and the study of human diseases. In this work, we have assessed the sensitivity of specific subsets of neurons to ethanol exposure during embryogenesis and we have visualized the sensitive embryonic developmental periods for specific neuronal groups by the use of different transgenic zebrafish lines.In order to evaluate the teratogenic effects of acute ethanol exposure, we exposed zebrafish embryos to ethanol in a given time window and analyzed the effects in neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and brain patterning. Zebrafish larvae exposed to ethanol displayed small eyes and/or a reduction of the body length, phenotypical features similar to the observed in children with prenatal exposure to ethanol. When neuronal populations were analyzed, we observed a clear reduction in the number of differentiated neurons in the spinal cord upon ethanol exposure. There was a decrease in the population of sensory neurons mainly due to a decrease in cell proliferation and subsequent apoptosis during neuronal differentiation, with no effect in motoneuron specification.Our investigation highlights that transient exposure to ethanol during early embryonic development affects neuronal differentiation although does not result in defects in early neurogenesis. These results establish the use of zebrafish embryos as an alternative research model to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s of ethanol-induced developmental toxicity at very early stages of embryonic development.

  5. Current Trends in the Detection of Sociocultural Signatures: Data-Driven Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Bell, Eric B.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2014-09-15

    available that are shaping social computing as a strongly data-driven experimental discipline with an increasingly stronger impact on the decision-making process of groups and individuals alike. In this chapter, we review current advances and trends in the detection of sociocultural signatures. Specific embodiments of the issues discussed are provided with respect to the assessment of violent intent and sociopolitical contention. We begin by reviewing current approaches to the detection of sociocultural signatures in these domains. Next, we turn to the review of novel data harvesting methods for social media content. Finally, we discuss the application of sociocultural models to social media content, and conclude by commenting on current challenges and future developments.

  6. MODELING TRENDS OF INVESTMENT AND CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraskina Inna Nikolaevna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject: the results of the study are particularly relevant in the modern system of cyclical crisis generated by the change of Kondratieff’s long waves of economic development and technological structures. From the point of view of synergetics, these processes have the ability to trigger a new order having spontaneous transformation due to endogenous factors. Qualitatively predictable fluctuations in the socio-economic environment and management may lead to self-organization and sustainable development of the economic system. Construction and investment activity of Russia in the majority of cases was investigated by economists without a detailed understanding of system characteristics, inherent properties and laws, which are identified from the results of economic-mathematical modeling. Research objectives: 1. Timely and qualitative prediction of moments of crisis in the investment and construction activities of Russia; 2. Modeling of management activities for the purpose of transitioning to the desired path of development of economic system; 3. Creation of a model that is simple enough for practical use by economists and the use of public data sets in it; studying influence of the bifurcation diagram at a certain time and bypassing the critical points of the system that lead to undesirable outcome. Materials and methods: approximation of the statistical data sets, regression analysis, phase analysis, differential modeling. Results: The authors developed a mathematical model that allows us to use statistical data on investment and construction activities and accurately forecast the chances of recession of the system, and also identify the sensitivity of order parameters to the dynamics of control variables, bifurcation states and behavior of the object under certain management conditions. Conclusions: the paper presents an approach to modeling and forecasting the trends of development of complex cyclic and stochastic subsystem of the national

  7. Cellular Scanning Strategy for Selective Laser Melting: Capturing Thermal Trends with a Low-Fidelity, Pseudo-Analytical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankhya Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of additive manufacturing processes are known to be computationally expensive. The resulting large runtimes prohibit their application in secondary analysis requiring several complete simulations such as optimization studies, and sensitivity analysis. In this paper, a low-fidelity pseudo-analytical model has been introduced to enable such secondary analysis. The model has been able to mimic a finite element model and was able to capture the thermal trends associated with the process. The model has been validated and subsequently applied in a small optimization case study. The pseudo-analytical modelling technique is established as a fast tool for primary modelling investigations.

  8. Estimation of Coast-Wide Population Trends of Marbled Murrelets in Canada Using a Bayesian Hierarchical Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas F Bertram

    Full Text Available Species at risk with secretive breeding behaviours, low densities, and wide geographic range pose a significant challenge to conservation actions because population trends are difficult to detect. Such is the case with the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus, a seabird listed as 'Threatened' by the Species at Risk Act in Canada largely due to the loss of its old growth forest nesting habitat. We report the first estimates of population trend of Marbled Murrelets in Canada derived from a monitoring program that uses marine radar to detect birds as they enter forest watersheds during 923 dawn surveys at 58 radar monitoring stations within the six Marbled Murrelet Conservation Regions on coastal British Columbia, Canada, 1996-2013. Temporal trends in radar counts were analyzed with a hierarchical Bayesian multivariate modeling approach that controlled for variation in tilt of the radar unit and day of year, included year-specific deviations from the overall trend ('year effects', and allowed for trends to be estimated at three spatial scales. A negative overall trend of -1.6%/yr (95% credibility interval: -3.2%, 0.01% indicated moderate evidence for a coast-wide decline, although trends varied strongly among the six conservation regions. Negative annual trends were detected in East Vancouver Island (-9%/yr and South Mainland Coast (-3%/yr Conservation Regions. Over a quarter of the year effects were significantly different from zero, and the estimated standard deviation in common-shared year effects between sites within each region was about 50% per year. This large common-shared interannual variation in counts may have been caused by regional movements of birds related to changes in marine conditions that affect the availability of prey.

  9. CORPORATE MODEL OF PUBLIC SECTOR OF THE RUSSIAN ECONOMY: TRENDS AND PATTERNS OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga S. Makarenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the issues of development and functioning of corporate model of public sector of the Russian economy. Today Russia is fully influenced by consequences of entry into world economy. Privatization processes, on the one hand, and increase in intervention of the state in economy, on the other hand, changed composition and structure of the public sector of the Russian economy. Establishment of large state corporations and further increase in scales and directions of Russian government’s policy. These corporations acquired an extensive set of functions, large volumes of state property (federal budgetary funds, different production and financial assets, which ensured their activity in the long run. The state corporations carry out an important role in ensuring stable development of national economic systems for already several years, smoothing the so-called “failures” of the market, and create the necessary conditions for overcoming the crisis phenomena. The author presents the classification of economic sectors consisting of public, municipal and private sectors, studies the character and structure of public sector of the developed foreign countries. The carried-out comparative characteristic of main national models of public sector allowed to reveal the extent of state’s influence on the economy in the North American, Western European and Asian countries, as well as to define the main features of public sector in these countries. The concept and essence of the state corporation, as well as trends of their creation and development are also studied. The author proposes the corporate model of public sector of the Russian economy and defines its main characteristics. The analysis of the conducted research allowed to draw a conclusion on the need of further development of the state corporations and large national companies with the state participation.

  10. Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition and temperature on long-term DOC trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, K; Rowe, E C; Evans, C D; Monteith, D T; E I Vanguelova; Wade, A J; J M Clark

    2017-02-01

    It is increasingly recognised that widespread and substantial increases in Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in remote surface, and soil, waters in recent decades are linked to declining acid deposition. Effects of rising pH and declining ionic strength on DOC solubility have been proposed as potential dominant mechanisms. However, since DOC in these systems is derived mainly from recently-fixed carbon, and since organic matter decomposition rates are considered sensitive to temperature, uncertainty persists over the extent to which other drivers that could influence DOC production. Such potential drivers include fertilisation by nitrogen (N) and global warming. We therefore ran the dynamic soil chemistry model MADOC for a range of UK soils, for which time series data are available, to consider the likely relative importance of decreased deposition of sulphate and chloride, accumulation of reactive N, and higher temperatures, on soil DOC production in different soils. Modelled patterns of DOC change generally agreed favourably with measurements collated over 10-20years, but differed markedly between sites. While the acidifying effect of sulphur deposition appeared to be the predominant control on the observed soil water DOC trends in all the soils considered other than a blanket peat, the model suggested that over the long term, the effects of nitrogen deposition on N-limited soils may have been sufficient to raise the "acid recovery DOC baseline" significantly. In contrast, reductions in non-marine chloride deposition and effects of long term warming appeared to have been relatively unimportant. The suggestion that future DOC concentrations might exceed preindustrial levels as a consequence of nitrogen pollution has important implications for drinking water catchment management and the setting and pursuit of appropriate restoration targets, but findings still require validation from reliable centennial-scale proxy records, such as those being developed

  11. Modelling uncertainties and possible future trends of precipitation and temperature for 10 sub-basins in Columbia River Basin (CRB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadalipour, A.; Rana, A.; Qin, Y.; Moradkhani, H.

    2014-12-01

    Trends and changes in future climatic parameters, such as, precipitation and temperature have been a central part of climate change studies. In the present work, we have analyzed the seasonal and yearly trends and uncertainties of prediction in all the 10 sub-basins of Columbia River Basin (CRB) for future time period of 2010-2099. The work is carried out using 2 different sets of statistically downscaled Global Climate Model (GCMs) projection datasets i.e. Bias correction and statistical downscaling (BCSD) generated at Portland State University and The Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogs (MACA) generated at University of Idaho. The analysis is done for with 10 GCM downscaled products each from CMIP5 daily dataset totaling to 40 different downscaled products for robust analysis. Summer, winter and yearly trend analysis is performed for all the 10 sub-basins using linear regression (significance tested by student t test) and Mann Kendall test (0.05 percent significance level), for precipitation (P), temperature maximum (Tmax) and temperature minimum (Tmin). Thereafter, all the parameters are modelled for uncertainty, across all models, in all the 10 sub-basins and across the CRB for future scenario periods. Results have indicated in varied degree of trends for all the sub-basins, mostly pointing towards a significant increase in all three climatic parameters, for all the seasons and yearly considerations. Uncertainty analysis have reveled very high change in all the parameters across models and sub-basins under consideration. Basin wide uncertainty analysis is performed to corroborate results from smaller, sub-basin scale. Similar trends and uncertainties are reported on the larger scale as well. Interestingly, both trends and uncertainties are higher during winter period than during summer, contributing to large part of the yearly change.

  12. Maternal exposure to ambient PM10during pregnancy increases the risk of congenital heart defects: Evidence from machine learning models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhoupeng; Zhu, Jun; Gao, Yanfang; Yin, Qian; Hu, Maogui; Dai, Li; Deng, Changfei; Yi, Lin; Deng, Kui; Wang, Yanping; Li, Xiaohong; Wang, Jinfeng

    2018-02-19

    Previous research suggested an association between maternal exposure to ambient air pollutants and risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs), though the effects of particulate matter ≤10μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 ) on CHDs are inconsistent. We used two machine learning models (i.e., random forest (RF) and gradient boosting (GB)) to investigate the non-linear effects of PM 10 exposure during the critical time window, weeks 3-8 in pregnancy, on risk of CHDs. From 2009 through 2012, we carried out a population-based birth cohort study on 39,053 live-born infants in Beijing. RF and GB models were used to calculate odds ratios for CHDs associated with increase in PM 10 exposure, adjusting for maternal and perinatal characteristics. Maternal exposure to PM 10 was identified as the primary risk factor for CHDs in all machine learning models. We observed a clear non-linear effect of maternal exposure to PM 10 on CHDs risk. Compared to 40μgm -3 , the following odds ratios resulted: 1) 92μgm -3 [RF: 1.16 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.28); GB: 1.26 (95% CI: 1.17, 1.35)]; 2) 111μgm -3 [RF: 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.14); GB: 1.04 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.08)]; 3) 124μgm -3 [RF: 1.01 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.10); GB: 0.98 (95% CI: 0.93, 1.02)]; 4) 190μgm -3 [RF: 1.29 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.44); GB: 1.71 (95% CI: 1.04, 2.17)]. Overall, both machine models showed an association between maternal exposure to ambient PM 10 and CHDs in Beijing, highlighting the need for non-linear methods to investigate dose-response relationships. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Trend of surface solar radiation over Asia simulated by aerosol transport-climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, T.; Ohmura, A.

    2009-12-01

    Long-term records of surface radiation measurements indicate a decrease in the solar radiation between the 1950s and 1980s (“global dimming”), then its recovery afterward (“global brightening”) at many locations all over the globe [Wild, 2009]. On the other hand, the global brightening is delayed over the Asian region [Ohmura, 2009]. It is suggested that these trends of the global dimming and brightening are strongly related with a change in aerosol loading in the atmosphere which affect the climate change through the direct, semi-direct, and indirect effects. In this study, causes of the trend of the surface solar radiation over Asia during last several decades are analyzed with an aerosol transport-climate model, SPRINTARS. SPRINTARS is coupled with MIROC which is a general circulation model (GCM) developed by Center for Climate System Research (CCSR)/University of Tokyo, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), and Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC) [Takemura et al., 2000, 2002, 2005, 2009]. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are T106 (approximately 1.1° by 1.1°) and 56 layers, respectively. SPRINTARS includes the transport, radiation, cloud, and precipitation processes of all main tropospheric aerosols (black and organic carbons, sulfate, soil dust, and sea salt). The model treats not only the aerosol mass mixing ratios but also the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations as prognostic variables, and the nucleation processes of cloud droplets and ice crystals depend on the number concentrations of each aerosol species. Changes in the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations affect the cloud radiation and precipitation processes in the model. Historical emissions, that is consumption of fossil fuel and biofuel, biomass burning, aircraft emissions, and volcanic eruptions are prescribed from database provided by the Aerosol Model Intercomparison Project (AeroCom) and the latest IPCC inventories

  14. Coagulation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Doreen E; Broadman, Lynn M

    2006-09-01

    The present understanding of the coagulation process emphasizes the final common pathway and the proteolytic systems that result in the degradation of formed clots and the prevention of unwanted clot formations, as well as a variety of defense systems that include tissue repair, autoimmune processes, arteriosclerosis, tumor growth, the spread of metastases, and defense systems against micro-organisms. This article discusses diagnosis and management of some of the most common bleeding disorders. The goals are to provide a simple guide on how best to manage patients afflicted with congenital or acquired clotting abnormalities during the perioperative period, present a brief overview of the methods of testing and monitoring the coagulation defects, and discuss the appropriate pharmacologic or blood component therapies for each disease.

  15. Estimating temporal trend in the presence of spatial complexity: a Bayesian hierarchical model for a wetland plant population undergoing restoration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Rodhouse

    Full Text Available Monitoring programs that evaluate restoration and inform adaptive management are important for addressing environmental degradation. These efforts may be well served by spatially explicit hierarchical approaches to modeling because of unavoidable spatial structure inherited from past land use patterns and other factors. We developed bayesian hierarchical models to estimate trends from annual density counts observed in a spatially structured wetland forb (Camassia quamash [camas] population following the cessation of grazing and mowing on the study area, and in a separate reference population of camas. The restoration site was bisected by roads and drainage ditches, resulting in distinct subpopulations ("zones" with different land use histories. We modeled this spatial structure by fitting zone-specific intercepts and slopes. We allowed spatial covariance parameters in the model to vary by zone, as in stratified kriging, accommodating anisotropy and improving computation and biological interpretation. Trend estimates provided evidence of a positive effect of passive restoration, and the strength of evidence was influenced by the amount of spatial structure in the model. Allowing trends to vary among zones and accounting for topographic heterogeneity increased precision of trend estimates. Accounting for spatial autocorrelation shifted parameter coefficients in ways that varied among zones depending on strength of statistical shrinkage, autocorrelation and topographic heterogeneity--a phenomenon not widely described. Spatially explicit estimates of trend from hierarchical models will generally be more useful to land managers than pooled regional estimates and provide more realistic assessments of uncertainty. The ability to grapple with historical contingency is an appealing benefit of this approach.

  16. Regression model analysis of the decreasing trend of cesium-137 concentration in the atmosphere since the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Kyo; Ohse, Kenji; Shima, Nagayoshi; Kawatsu, Kencho; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2016-11-01

    The decreasing trend of the atmospheric 137 Cs concentration in two cities in Fukushima prefecture was analyzed by a regression model to clarify the relation between the parameter of the decrease in the model and the trend and to compare the trend with that after the Chernobyl accident. The 137 Cs particle concentration measurements were conducted in urban Fukushima and rural Date sites from September 2012 to June 2015. The 137 Cs particle concentrations were separated in two groups: particles of more than 1.1 μm aerodynamic diameters (coarse particles) and particles with aerodynamic diameter lower than 1.1 μm (fine particles). The averages of the measured concentrations were 0.1 mBq m -3 in Fukushima and Date sites. The measured concentrations were applied in the regression model which decomposed them into two components: trend and seasonal variation. The trend concentration included the parameters for the constant and the exponential decrease. The parameter for the constant was slightly different between the Fukushima and Date sites. The parameter for the exponential decrease was similar for all the cases, and much higher than the value of the physical radioactive decay except for the concentration in the fine particles at the Date site. The annual decreasing rates of the 137 Cs concentration evaluated by the trend concentration ranged from 44 to 53% y -1 with average and standard deviation of 49 ± 8% y -1 for all the cases in 2013. In the other years, the decreasing rates also varied slightly for all cases. These indicated that the decreasing trend of the 137 Cs concentration was nearly unchanged for the location and ground contamination level in the three years after the accident. The 137 Cs activity per aerosol particle mass also decreased with the same trend as the 137 Cs concentration in the atmosphere. The results indicated that the decreasing trend of the atmospheric 137 Cs concentration was related with the reduction of the 137 Cs concentration

  17. AN ANALYSIS OF ACCIDENT TRENDS AND MODELING OF SAFETY INDICES IN AN INDIAN CONSTRUCTION ORGANIZATION

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    Sunku Venkata Siva Rajaprasad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry has been recognized as a hazardous industry in many countries due to distinct nature of execution of works.The accident rate in construction sector is high all over the world due to dynamic nature of work activities. Occurrence of accidents and its severity in construction industry is several times higher than the manufacturing industries. The study was limited to a major construction organization in India to examine the trends in construction accidents for the period 2008-2014. In India, safety performance is gauged basing on safety indices; frequency, severity and incidence rates. It is not practicable to take decisions or to implement safety strategies on the basis of indices. The data used for this study was collected from a leading construction organization involved in execution of major construction activities all over India and abroad. The multiple regression method was adopted to model the pattern of safety indices wise .The pattern showed that significant relationships exist between the three safety indices and the related independent variables.

  18. Trends in Social Science: The Impact of Computational and Simulative Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Rosaria; Paolucci, Mario; Cecconi, Federico

    This paper discusses current progress in the computational social sciences. Specifically, it examines the following questions: Are the computational social sciences exhibiting positive or negative developments? What are the roles of agent-based models and simulation (ABM), network analysis, and other "computational" methods within this dynamic? (Conte, The necessity of intelligent agents in social simulation, Advances in Complex Systems, 3(01n04), 19-38, 2000; Conte 2010; Macy, Annual Review of Sociology, 143-166, 2002). Are there objective indicators of scientific growth that can be applied to different scientific areas, allowing for comparison among them? In this paper, some answers to these questions are presented and discussed. In particular, comparisons among different disciplines in the social and computational sciences are shown, taking into account their respective growth trends in the number of publication citations over the last few decades (culled from Google Scholar). After a short discussion of the methodology adopted, results of keyword-based queries are presented, unveiling some unexpected local impacts of simulation on the takeoff of traditionally poorly productive disciplines.

  19. On the use of a regression model for trend estimates from ground-based atmospheric observations in the Southern hemisphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bencherif, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present reports on the use of a multi-regression model adapted at Reunion University for temperature and ozone trend estimates. Depending on the location of the observing site, the studied geophysical signal is broken down in form of a sum...

  20. On the duality between long-run relations and common trends in the I(1) versus I(2) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juselius, Katarina

    1994-01-01

    Long-run relations and common trends are discussed in terms of the multivariate cointegration model given in the autoregressive and the moving average form. The basic results needed for the analysis of I(1) and 1(2)processes are reviewed and the results applied to Danish monetary data. The test...

  1. Exploration of the Growing Trend of Electric Vehicles in Beijing with System Dynamics method and Vensim model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, C.; Qin, C.

    2014-01-01

    This research is conducted to explore the growing trend of private vehicles in Beijing, China, in the coming 25 years using the system dynamics (SD) method. The vensim software is used to build the SD model and do simulations. First, the paper introduces the background of the private vehicles in

  2. Osteoinductivity of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate sponges loaded with different concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells and bone morphogenetic protein-2 in an equine bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jong-Pil; Tsuzuki, Nao; Haneda, Shingo; Yamada, Kazutaka; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Naoki

    2014-03-01

    Fracture is one of the most life-threatening injuries in horses. Fracture repair is often associated with unsatisfactory outcomes and is associated with a high incidence of complications. This study aimed to evaluate the osteogenic effects of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate (GT) sponges loaded with different concentrations/ratios of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in an equine bone defect model. Seven thoroughbred horses were used in this study. Eight bone defects were created in the third metatarsal bones of each horse. Then, eight treatments, namely control, GT, GT/M-5, GT/M-6, GT/M-5/B-1, GT/M-5/B-3, GT/M-6/B-1, and GT/M-6/B-3 were applied to the eight different sites in a randomized manner (M-5: 2 × 10(5) MSCs; M-6: 2 × 10(6) MSCs; B-1: 1 μg of BMP-2; B-3: 3 μg of BMP-2). Repair of bone defects was assessed by radiography, quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and histopathological evaluation. Radiographic scores and CT values were significantly lower in the control group than in the other groups, while they were significantly higher in the GT/M-5/B-3 and GT/M-6/B-3 groups than in the other groups. The amount of mature compact bone filling the defects was greater in the GT/M-5/B-3 and GT/M-6/B-3 groups than in the other groups. The present study demonstrated that the GT sponge loaded with MSCs and BMP-2 promoted bone regeneration in an equine bone defect model. The GT/MSC/BMP-2 described here may be useful for treating horses with bone injuries.

  3. Analysis of RNA splicing defects in PITX2 mutants supports a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semina Elena V

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS is associated with mutations in the PITX2 gene that encodes a homeobox transcription factor. Several intronic PITX2 mutations have been reported in Axenfeld-Rieger patients but their effects on gene expression have not been tested. Methods We present two new families with recurrent PITX2 intronic mutations and use PITX2c minigenes and transfected cells to address the hypothesis that intronic mutations effect RNA splicing. Three PITX2 mutations have been analyzed: a G>T mutation within the AG 3' splice site (ss junction associated with exon 4 (IVS4-1G>T, a G>C mutation at position +5 of the 5' (ss of exon 4 (IVS4+5G>C, and a previously reported A>G substitution at position -11 of 3'ss of exon 5 (IVS5-11A>G. Results Mutation IVS4+5G>C showed 71% retention of the intron between exons 4 and 5, and poorly expressed protein. Wild-type protein levels were proportionally expressed from correctly spliced mRNA. The G>T mutation within the exon 4 AG 3'ss junction shifted splicing exclusively to a new AG and resulted in a severely truncated, poorly expressed protein. Finally, the A>G substitution at position -11 of the 3'ss of exon 5 shifted splicing exclusively to a newly created upstream AG and resulted in generation of a protein with a truncated homeodomain. Conclusion This is the first direct evidence to support aberrant RNA splicing as the mechanism underlying the disorder in some patients and suggests that the magnitude of the splicing defect may contribute to the variability of ARS phenotypes, in support of a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

  4. The in vivo evaluation of tissue-based biomaterials in a rat full-thickness abdominal wall defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Nicholas; Ahswin, Helen; Smart, Neil; Bayon, Yves; Wohlert, Stephen; Hunt, John A

    2014-05-01

    Hernias are defects in which an anatomical fascia is breached resulting in ectopic positioning of an organ into an orifice which routinely does not contain it. Intervention often involves repositioning translocated organs and repair of damaged fascia using exogenous grafts. Despite hernia prevalence, repairs can still fail due to postoperative complications, such as chronic pain and decreased mobility. This study compared repair capacities and characterized the foreign body response elicited by a number of hernia repair grafts to deduce their bulk inflammatory properties while also concluding the point in their fabrication when these are inferred. Materials derived from human dermis (Alloderm(®) ), porcine dermis (Permacol™, patch A, patch D and Strattice(®) ), porcine small-intestinal submucosa (Surgisis™) and a synthetic (multifilament Surgipro™) were implanted into a rat full-thickness abdominal wall excision model, incubated for up to 2 years and characterized histopathologically. Surgisis™ resorbed the fastest of the materials tested (1-3 months) resulting in a mechanically stable parietal peritoneum. Decellularization using sodium dodecyl sulfate (patch A) stimulated a large early inflammatory response which ultimately may have contributed to increased resorption of porcine dermal matrix however the remaining materials typically persisted throughout the 2-year incubation. Cross-linking porcine dermis using 1,6-hexamethylene disocyanate (vs. an identical noncross-linked counterpart) showed no difference in cell recruitment or material integration over 2 years. Typically Strattice(®) and Alloderm(®) recruited larger early populations of cells than Permacol™; however, over extended periods of time in vivo this response normalized. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A resorbable antibiotic-eluting polymer composite bone void filler for perioperative infection prevention in a rabbit radial defect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Brooks

    Full Text Available Nearly 1.3 million total joint replacement procedures are performed in the United States annually, with numbers projected to rise exponentially in the coming decades. Although finite infection rates for these procedures remain consistently low, device-related infections represent a significant cause of implant failure, requiring secondary or revision procedures. Revision procedures manifest several-fold higher infection recurrence rates. Importantly, many revision surgeries, infected or not, require bone void fillers to support the host bone and provide a sufficient tissue bed for new hardware placement. Antibiotic-eluting bone void fillers (ABVF, providing both osteoconductive and antimicrobial properties, represent one approach for reducing rates of orthopedic device-related infections. Using a solvent-free, molten-cast process, a polymer-controlled antibiotic-eluting calcium carbonate hydroxyapatite (HAP ceramic composite BVF (ABVF was fabricated, characterized, and evaluated in vivo using a bacterial challenge in a rabbit radial defect window model. ABVF loaded with tobramycin eliminated the infectious burden in rabbits challenged with a clinically relevant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (inoculum as high as 10⁷ CFU. Histological, microbiological, and radiographic methods were used to detail the effects of ABVF on microbial challenge to host bone after 8 weeks in vivo. In contrast to the HAP/BVF controls, which provided no antibiotic protection and required euthanasia 3 weeks post-operatively, tobramycin-releasing ABVF animals showed no signs of infection (clinical, microbiological, or radiographic when euthanized at the 8-week study endpoint. ABVF sites did exhibit fibrous encapsulation around the implant at 8 weeks. Local antibiotic release from ABVF to orthopedic sites requiring bone void fillers eliminated the periprosthetic bacterial challenge in this 8-week in vivo study, confirming previous in vitro results.

  6. Remodeling of injectable, low-viscosity polymer/ceramic bone grafts in a sheep femoral defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Anne D; McEnery, Madison A; Kalpakci, Kerem N; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Shimko, Daniel A; Guelcher, Scott A

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic/polymer composite bone grafts offer the potential advantage of combining the osteoconductivity of ceramic component with the ductility of polymeric component, resulting in a graft that meets many of the desired properties for bone void fillers (BVF). However, the relative contributions of the polymer and ceramic components to bone healing are not well understood. In this study, we compared remodeling of low-viscosity (LV) ceramic/poly(ester urethane) composites to a ceramic BVF control in a sheep femoral condyle plug defect model. LV composites incorporating either ceramic (LV/CM) or allograft bone (LV/A) particles were evaluated. We hypothesized that LV/CM composites which have the advantageous handling properties of injectability, flowability, and settability would heal comparably to the CM control, which was evaluated for up to 2 years to study its long-term degradation properties. Remodeling of LV/CM was comparable to that observed for the CM control, as evidenced by new bone formation on the surface of the ceramic particles. At early time points (4 months), LV/CM composites healed similar to the ceramic clinical control, while LV/A components showed more variable healing due to osteoclast-mediated resorption of the allograft particles. At longer time points (12-15 months), healing of LV/CM composites was more variable due to the nonhomogeneous distribution and lower concentration of the ceramic particles compared to the ceramic clinical control. Resorption of the ceramic particles was almost complete at 2 years. This study highlights the importance of optimizing the loading and distribution of ceramic particles in polymer/ceramic composites to maximize bone healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2333-2343, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Porous Alpha-Tricalcium Phosphate with Immobilized Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Enhances Bone Regeneration in a Canine Mandibular Bone Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Kobayashi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porous alpha-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP with immobilized basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF on bone regeneration was evaluated in a canine mandibular bone defect model. Identical bone defects were made in the canine mandible; six defects in each animal were filled with porous α-TCP with bFGF bound via heparin (bFGF group, whereas the other was filled with unmodified porous α-TCP (control group. Micro-computed tomography and histological evaluation were performed two, four and eight weeks after implantation. The bone mineral density of the bFGF group was higher than that of the control group at each time point (p < 0.05, and the bone mineral content of the bFGF group was higher than that of the control group at four and eight weeks (p < 0.05. Histological evaluation two weeks after implantation revealed that the porous α-TCP had degraded and bone had formed on the surface of α-TCP particles in the bFGF group. At eight weeks, continuous cortical bone with a Haversian structure covered the top of bone defects in the bFGF group. These findings demonstrate that porous α-TCP with immobilized bFGF can promote bone regeneration.

  8. Development of a Fluid-Particle Model in Simulating the Motion of External Solidified Crystals and the Evolution of Defect Bands in High-Pressure Die Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Cheng; Xiong, Shoumei; Li, Xiaobo; Guo, Zhipeng

    2016-04-01

    A numerical fluid-particle model was developed to simulate the motion of external solidified crystals (ESCs) in the melt during the filling process of high-pressure die casting (HPDC). Simulation results on a tensile bar casting with two types of ingates (semi-circle and circle) revealed that for a long time scale the ESCs tended to distribute in a ring pattern around the specimen center, whereas for a short time scale the ESC distribution changed constantly from the ring pattern to either the center pattern or the ring-center pattern. It was proposed that the defect bands would form at these areas where two solidification fronts met (where solidification shrinkage occurred), including one originating from the skin layer of the specimen and the other from the ESC region. Accordingly, three types of defect band patterns, which were commonly observed in HPDC experiment, could be successfully simulated and explained using this model.

  9. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired w...

  10. Holographic Chern-Simons defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky,Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Melby-Thompson, Charles M. [Department of Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS),The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Meyer, René [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS),The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Sugimoto, Shigeki [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS),The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-06-28

    We study SU(N) Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in the presence of defects that shift the Chern-Simons level from a holographic point of view by embedding the system in string theory. The model is a D3-D7 system in Type IIB string theory, whose gravity dual is given by the AdS soliton background with probe D7 branes attaching to the AdS boundary along the defects. We holographically renormalize the free energy of the defect system with sources, from which we obtain the correlation functions for certain operators naturally associated to these defects. We find interesting phase transitions when the separation of the defects as well as the temperature are varied. We also discuss some implications for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and for 2-dimensional QCD.

  11. Modeling trend of the immune system in HIV positive people treated with antiretroviral drugs, using Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jambarsang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: After primary infection, the number of CD4 T-cells decreases with disease progress. The patient’s immunological status could inform by The CD4 T-cell counts over the time. The main purpose of this study is to assess the trend of CD4 cell count in HIV+ patient that received Antiretroviral Therapy (ART by using a multistate Markov model to estimate transition intensities and transition probabilities among various states. Methods: A total of 122 HIV+ patients were included in this cohort study who are undergoing Antiretroviral Therapy treatment in the Iran AIDS center in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran that inter during March 1995 to January 2005 and then fallow up to October 2014. All adults with at least two follow-up visits in addition to their pre-ART treatment were considered to be eligible for inclusion in the study. Continuous-time Markov processes are used to describe the evolution of a disease over different states. The mean sojourn time for each state was estimated by multi state Markov model. Results: Sample included 22 (18% female with a mean age of 43.32 (standard deviation 8.33 years and 100 (82% male with a mean age of 45.28 (standard deviation 8.34 year. Age was divided in to two categories, 40 years old and lower than that 66 (54.1 patents and persons older than 40 years old 56 (45.9 patents. A total of 122 patients were included. 29 patients died during follow-up. One year transition probability for staying in state 1 of CD4 cell count was 51%. This probability for six year was 33%. The mean sojourn time for sate 4 was 21 month. The hazard ratio of transition from state 3 to state 4 was 4.4 in men related to women. Conclusion: The use of antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV infected persons reduce viral replication and increase in CD4 T lymphocyte count, and delay the progression of disease. This paper is shown the progression of this trend.

  12. Histologic Evaluation of Osseous Regeneration Following Combination Therapy With Platelet-Rich Plasma and Bio-Oss in a Rat Calvarial Critical-Size Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNicolo, Philip J; Guyton, M Kelly; Cuenin, Michael F; Hokett, Steven D; Sharawy, Mohamed; Borke, James; McPherson, James C

    2015-10-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autogenous source of growth factors shown to facilitate human bone growth. Bio-Oss, an osteoconductive xenograft, is used clinically to regenerate periodontal defects, restore dental alveolar ridges, and facilitate sinus-lift procedures. The purpose of this study was to analyze whether a combination of PRP and Bio-Oss would enhance bone regeneration better than either material alone. PRP and/or Bio-Oss were administered in an 8-mm critical-size defect (CSD) rat calvarial model of bone defect between 2 polytetrafluoroethylene membranes to prevent soft tissue incursion. Eight weeks after the induction of the CSD, histologic sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and analyzed via light microscopy. Qualitative analyses revealed new bone regeneration in all 4 groups. The Bio-Oss and PRP plus Bio-Oss groups demonstrated greater areas of closure in the defects than the control or PRP-only groups because of the space-maintaining ability of Bio-Oss. The groups grafted with Bio-Oss showed close contact with new bone growth throughout the defects, suggesting a stronger graft. The use of PRP alone or in combination with Bio-Oss, however, did not appear to enhance osseous regeneration at 8 weeks. Areas grafted with Bio-Oss demonstrated greater space-maintaining capacity than controls, and PRP was an effective vehicle for placement of the Bio-Oss. However, at 8 weeks this study was unable to demonstrate a significant advantage of using PRP plus Bio-Oss over using Bio-Oss alone.

  13. Modelling deforestation trends in Costa Rica and predicting future forest sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Kayla; Sanchez, Arturo

    2017-04-01

    Deforestation in Costa Rica has historically varied between the original degradation of primary forest due to land-based industries, followed by secondary regrowth. The regeneration of forests largely came into effect with incentive based programs such as payments for ecosystem services, creation of large protected areas, and a new industry of ecotourism in the country. Given the changes that have occurred within the last 50 years from heavy deforestation pressures to regeneration patterns, and a correlation between deforestation and policy/economic influences, it is important to understand the historical changes that have occurred and how the forests will change in the future, which provides the objective of this study. Future projections are increasingly important given changes in the global socio-political structure, climatic change, and the ever increasing globalization of capitalistic endeavours. The trajectory of the forest in the country can also serve as a way to track both these global pressures on the natural landscape in Costa Rica, and as a proxy for how to manage deforestation in other similar political and geographic areas of the tropics. To determine the historical deforestation trends and link them to the different biogeophysical and socioeconomic variables, forest maps from 1960-2013 were used in the Dinamica Environment for Geoprocessing Objects (Dinamica EGO) to create deforestation models for Costa Rica. Dinamica EGO is a cellular automata model which utilizes Bayesian statistics and expert opinion to replicate both patterns and quantities of land cover change over time with both static and dynamic variables. Additional legislative variables can be used to track how political pressures shift deforestation both spatially and temporally. The historical model was built and analyzed for changes in landscape metrics such as patch size and distance between 1960 and 2013. After validation of the model's ability to replicate patterns, first between 2005

  14. EPQ model for imperfect production processes with rework and random preventive machine time for deteriorating items and trended demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Nita H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic production quantity (EPQ model has been analyzed for trended demand, and units in inventory are subject to constant rate. The system allows rework of imperfect units, and preventive maintenance time is random. A search method is used to study the model. The proposed methodology is validated by a numerical example. The sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the critical model parameters. It is observed that the rate of change of demand, and the deterioration rate have a significant impact on the decision variables and the total cost of an inventory system. The model is highly sensitive to the production and demand rate.

  15. Measurement and modelling of the defect chemistry and transport properties of ceramic oxide mixed ionic and electronic conductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The mixed ionic and electronic conducting fluorite and perovskite materials examined in this thesis are all oxide ion conducting materials. The defect chemistry and transport properties of a number of these materials are measured using: 1) a measurement technique using an oxygen pump and an

  16. First-order and tricritical wetting transitions in the two-dimensional Ising model caused by interfacial pinning at a defect line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobo, Marta L; Albano, Ezequiel V; Binder, Kurt

    2014-08-01

    We present a study of the critical behavior of the Blume-Capel model with three spin states (S=±1,0) confined between parallel walls separated by a distance L where competitive surface magnetic fields act. By properly choosing the crystal field (D), which regulates the density of nonmagnetic species (S=0), such that those impurities are excluded from the bulk (where D=-∞) except in the middle of the sample [where D(M)(L/2)≠-∞], we are able to control the presence of a defect line in the middle of the sample and study its influence on the interface between domains of different spin orientations. So essentially we study an Ising model with a defect line but, unlike previous work where defect lines in Ising models were defined via weakened bonds, in the present case the defect line is due to mobile vacancies and hence involves additional entropy. In this way, by drawing phase diagrams, i.e., plots of the wetting critical temperature (T(w)) versus the magnitude of the crystal field at the middle of the sample (D(M)), we observe curves of (first-) second-order wetting transitions for (small) high values of D(M). Theses lines meet in tricritical wetting points, i.e., (T(w)(tc),D(M)(tc)), which also depend on the magnitude of the surface magnetic fields. It is found that second-order wetting transitions satisfy the scaling theory for short-range interactions, while first-order ones do not exhibit hysteresis, provided that small samples are used, since fluctuations wash out hysteretic effects. Since hysteresis is observed in large samples, we performed extensive thermodynamic integrations in order to accurately locate the first-order transition points, and a rather good agreement is found by comparing such results with those obtained just by observing the jump of the order parameter in small samples.

  17. Interpretation of GIA and ice-sheet mass trends over Antarctica using GRACE and ICESat data as a constraint to GIA models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Fukuda, Yoichi; Doi, Koichiro

    2011-11-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) have provided data sets covering observations over a period of more than 6 years since their respective launches. In this study, we used the GRACE mass change trend obtained by version 2 of CNES/GRGS solutions and the ICEsat elevation change trend from October 4, 2003, to March 21, 2008, to assess whether currently used glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models agree with the data sets. For six selected areas over West Antarctica, the mass trends for the surface ice sheet, which were obtained by subtracting the four GIA model trends (ICE-5G, IJ05, ANT5 and ANT6) from the estimated GRACE mass trend, were compared with the ICESat trends in order to assess whether these two trends are consistent within the uncertainty of the ice column density. The results show that the mass trend predicted by IJ05 GIA model is the most preferable to explain surface mass trends over some of these areas. The result is consistent with Riva et al. (2009); their estimated GIA trend from GRACE and ICESat data is very similar with IJ05 model.

  18. Bone marrow aspiration concentrate and platelet rich plasma for osteochondral repair in a porcine osteochondral defect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Betsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC may possess a high potency for cartilage and osseous defect healing because it contains stem cells and multiple growth factors. Alternatively, platelet rich plasma (PRP, which contains a cocktail of multiple growth factors released from enriched activated thrombocytes may potentially stimulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in bone marrow to proliferate and differentiate. METHODS: A critical size osteochondral defect (10×6 mm in both medial femoral condyles was created in 14 Goettinger mini-pigs. All animals were randomized into the following four groups: biphasic scaffold alone (TRUFIT BGS, Smith & Nephew, USA, scaffold with PRP, scaffold with BMAC and scaffold in combination with BMAC and PRP. After 26 weeks all animals were euthanized and histological slides were cut, stained and evaluated using a histological score and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The thrombocyte number was significantly increased (p = 0.049 in PRP compared to whole blood. In addition the concentration of the measured growth factors in PRP such as BMP-2, BMP-7, VEGF, TGF-β1 and PDGF were significantly increased when compared to whole blood (p<0.05. In the defects of the therapy groups areas of chondrogenic tissue were present, which stained blue with toluidine blue and positively for collagen type II. Adding BMAC or PRP in a biphasic scaffold led to a significant improvement of the histological score compared to the control group, but the combination of BMAC and PRP did not further enhance the histological score. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical application of BMAC or PRP in osteochondral defect healing is attractive because of their autologous origin and cost-effectiveness. Adding either PRP or BMAC to a biphasic scaffold led to a significantly better healing of osteochondral defects compared with the control group. However, the combination of both therapies did not further enhance healing.

  19. Contribution of H. pylori and smoking trends to US incidence of intestinal-type noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma: a microsimulation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Yeh

    Full Text Available Although gastric cancer has declined dramatically in the US, the disease remains the second leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. A better understanding of reasons for the decline can provide important insights into effective preventive strategies. We sought to estimate the contribution of risk factor trends on past and future intestinal-type noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma (NCGA incidence.We developed a population-based microsimulation model of intestinal-type NCGA and calibrated it to US epidemiologic data on precancerous lesions and cancer. The model explicitly incorporated the impact of Helicobacter pylori and smoking on disease natural history, for which birth cohort-specific trends were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS. Between 1978 and 2008, the model estimated that intestinal-type NCGA incidence declined 60% from 11.0 to 4.4 per 100,000 men, <3% discrepancy from national statistics. H. pylori and smoking trends combined accounted for 47% (range = 30%-58% of the observed decline. With no tobacco control, incidence would have declined only 56%, suggesting that lower smoking initiation and higher cessation rates observed after the 1960s accelerated the relative decline in cancer incidence by 7% (range = 0%-21%. With continued risk factor trends, incidence is projected to decline an additional 47% between 2008 and 2040, the majority of which will be attributable to H. pylori and smoking (81%; range = 61%-100%. Limitations include assuming all other risk factors influenced gastric carcinogenesis as one factor and restricting the analysis to men.Trends in modifiable risk factors explain a significant proportion of the decline of intestinal-type NCGA incidence in the US, and are projected to continue. Although past tobacco control efforts have hastened the decline, full benefits will take decades to be realized, and further discouragement of smoking and

  20. Neural circuit architecture defects in a Drosophila model of Fragile X syndrome are alleviated by minocycline treatment and genetic removal of matrix metalloproteinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul S. Siller

    2011-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS, caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 product (FMRP, is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. FXS patients suffer multiple behavioral symptoms, including hyperactivity, disrupted circadian cycles, and learning and memory deficits. Recently, a study in the mouse FXS model showed that the tetracycline derivative minocycline effectively remediates the disease state via a proposed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibition mechanism. Here, we use the well-characterized Drosophila FXS model to assess the effects of minocycline treatment on multiple neural circuit morphological defects and to investigate the MMP hypothesis. We first treat Drosophila Fmr1 (dfmr1 null animals with minocycline to assay the effects on mutant synaptic architecture in three disparate locations: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, clock neurons in the circadian activity circuit and Kenyon cells in the mushroom body learning and memory center. We find that minocycline effectively restores normal synaptic structure in all three circuits, promising therapeutic potential for FXS treatment. We next tested the MMP hypothesis by assaying the effects of overexpressing the sole Drosophila tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP in dfmr1 null mutants. We find that TIMP overexpression effectively prevents defects in the NMJ synaptic architecture in dfmr1 mutants. Moreover, co-removal of dfmr1 similarly rescues TIMP overexpression phenotypes, including cellular tracheal defects and lethality. To further test the MMP hypothesis, we generated dfmr1;mmp1 double null mutants. Null mmp1 mutants are 100% lethal and display cellular tracheal defects, but co-removal of dfmr1 allows adult viability and prevents tracheal defects. Conversely, co-removal of mmp1 ameliorates the NMJ synaptic architecture defects in dfmr1 null mutants, despite the lack of detectable difference in MMP1 expression or gelatinase activity between the single

  1. The App-Runx1 region is critical for birth defects and electrocardiographic dysfunctions observed in a Down syndrome mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Raveau

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS leads to complex phenotypes and is the main genetic cause of birth defects and heart diseases. The Ts65Dn DS mouse model is trisomic for the distal part of mouse chromosome 16 and displays similar features with post-natal lethality and cardiovascular defects. In order to better understand these defects, we defined electrocardiogram (ECG with a precordial set-up, and we found conduction defects and modifications in wave shape, amplitudes, and durations in Ts65Dn mice. By using a genetic approach consisting of crossing Ts65Dn mice with Ms5Yah mice monosomic for the App-Runx1 genetic interval, we showed that the Ts65Dn viability and ECG were improved by this reduction of gene copy number. Whole-genome expression studies confirmed gene dosage effect in Ts65Dn, Ms5Yah, and Ts65Dn/Ms5Yah hearts and showed an overall perturbation of pathways connected to post-natal lethality (Coq7, Dyrk1a, F5, Gabpa, Hmgn1, Pde10a, Morc3, Slc5a3, and Vwf and heart function (Tfb1m, Adam19, Slc8a1/Ncx1, and Rcan1. In addition cardiac connexins (Cx40, Cx43 and sodium channel sub-units (Scn5a, Scn1b, Scn10a were found down-regulated in Ts65Dn atria with additional down-regulation of Cx40 in Ts65Dn ventricles and were likely contributing to conduction defects. All these data pinpoint new cardiac phenotypes in the Ts65Dn, mimicking aspects of human DS features and pathways altered in the mouse model. In addition they highlight the role of the App-Runx1 interval, including Sod1 and Tiam1, in the induction of post-natal lethality and of the cardiac conduction defects in Ts65Dn. These results might lead to new therapeutic strategies to improve the care of DS people.

  2. Mismatch between observed and modeled trends in dissolved upper-ocean oxygen over the last 50 yr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stramma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Observations and model runs indicate trends in dissolved oxygen (DO associated with current and ongoing global warming. However, a large-scale observation-to-model comparison has been missing and is presented here. This study presents a first global compilation of DO measurements covering the last 50 yr. It shows declining upper-ocean DO levels in many regions, especially the tropical oceans, whereas areas with increasing trends are found in the subtropics and in some subpolar regions. For the Atlantic Ocean south of 20° N, the DO history could even be extended back to about 70 yr, showing decreasing DO in the subtropical South Atlantic. The global mean DO trend between 50° S and 50° N at 300 dbar for the period 1960 to 2010 is –0.066 μmol kg−1 yr−1. Results of a numerical biogeochemical Earth system model reveal that the magnitude of the observed change is consistent with CO2-induced climate change. However, the pattern correlation between simulated and observed patterns of past DO change is negative, indicating that the model does not correctly reproduce the processes responsible for observed regional oxygen changes in the past 50 yr. A negative pattern correlation is also obtained for model configurations with particularly low and particularly high diapycnal mixing, for a configuration that assumes a CO2-induced enhancement of the C : N ratios of exported organic matter and irrespective of whether climatological or realistic winds from reanalysis products are used to force the model. Depending on the model configuration the 300 dbar DO trend between 50° S and 50° N is −0.027 to –0.047 μmol kg−1 yr−1 for climatological wind forcing, with a much larger range of –0.083 to +0.027 μmol kg−1 yr−1 for different initializations of sensitivity runs with reanalysis wind forcing. Although numerical models reproduce the overall sign and, to

  3. On the passive and semiconducting behavior of severely deformed pure titanium in Ringer's physiological solution at 37°C: A trial of the point defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Ghazaleh; Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash

    2017-06-01

    The effects of sever plastic deformation through multi-pass accumulative roll bonding on the passive and semiconducting behavior of pure titanium is evaluated in Ringer's physiological solution at 37°C in the present paper. Produced results by polarization plots and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements revealed a significant advance in the passive response of the nano-grained sample compared to that of the annealed pure titanium. Also, Mott-Schottky test results of the nano-grained pure titanium represented a lower donor density and reduced flat-band potential in the formed passive film in comparison with the annealed sample. Moreover, based on the Mott-Schottky analysis in conjunction with the point defect model, it was suggested that with increase in formation potential, the calculated donor density of both annealed and nano-grained samples decreases exponentially and the thickness of the passive film linearly increases. These observations were consistent with the point defect model predictions, considering that the point defects within the passive film are metal interstitials, oxygen vacancies, or both. From the viewpoint of passive and semiconducting behavior, nano-grained pure titanium appeared to be more suitable for implant applications in simulate human body environment compared to annealed pure titanium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  5. Methotrexate Toxicity in Growing Long Bones of Young Rats: A Model for Studying Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Bone Growth Defects in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaming Fan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement and intensive use of chemotherapy in treating childhood cancers has led to a growing population of young cancer survivors who face increased bone health risks. However, the underlying mechanisms for chemotherapy-induced skeletal defects remain largely unclear. Methotrexate (MTX, the most commonly used antimetabolite in paediatric cancer treatment, is known to cause bone growth defects in children undergoing chemotherapy. Animal studies not only have confirmed the clinical observations but also have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced skeletal damage. These models revealed that high-dose MTX can cause growth plate dysfunction, damage osteoprogenitor cells, suppress bone formation, and increase bone resorption and marrow adipogenesis, resulting in overall bone loss. While recent rat studies have shown that antidote folinic acid can reduce MTX damage in the growth plate and bone, future studies should investigate potential adjuvant treatments to reduce chemotherapy-induced skeletal toxicities.

  6. THE EFFECT OF DECOMPOSITION METHOD AS DATA PREPROCESSING ON NEURAL NETWORKS MODEL FOR FORECASTING TREND AND SEASONAL TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subanar Subanar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, one of the central topics for the neural networks (NN community is the issue of data preprocessing on the use of NN. In this paper, we will investigate this topic particularly on the effect of Decomposition method as data processing and the use of NN for modeling effectively time series with both trend and seasonal patterns. Limited empirical studies on seasonal time series forecasting with neural networks show that some find neural networks are able to model seasonality directly and prior deseasonalization is not necessary, and others conclude just the opposite. In this research, we study particularly on the effectiveness of data preprocessing, including detrending and deseasonalization by applying Decomposition method on NN modeling and forecasting performance. We use two kinds of data, simulation and real data. Simulation data are examined on multiplicative of trend and seasonality patterns. The results are compared to those obtained from the classical time series model. Our result shows that a combination of detrending and deseasonalization by applying Decomposition method is the effective data preprocessing on the use of NN for forecasting trend and seasonal time series.

  7. EURODELTA-Trends, a multi-model experiment of air quality hindcast in Europe over 1990–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Colette

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The EURODELTA-Trends multi-model chemistry-transport experiment has been designed to facilitate a better understanding of the evolution of air pollution and its drivers for the period 1990–2010 in Europe. The main objective of the experiment is to assess the efficiency of air pollutant emissions mitigation measures in improving regional-scale air quality. The present paper formulates the main scientific questions and policy issues being addressed by the EURODELTA-Trends modelling experiment with an emphasis on how the design and technical features of the modelling experiment answer these questions. The experiment is designed in three tiers, with increasing degrees of computational demand in order to facilitate the participation of as many modelling teams as possible. The basic experiment consists of simulations for the years 1990, 2000, and 2010. Sensitivity analysis for the same three years using various combinations of (i anthropogenic emissions, (ii chemical boundary conditions, and (iii meteorology complements it. The most demanding tier consists of two complete time series from 1990 to 2010, simulated using either time-varying emissions for corresponding years or constant emissions. Eight chemistry-transport models have contributed with calculation results to at least one experiment tier, and five models have – to date – completed the full set of simulations (and 21-year trend calculations have been performed by four models. The modelling results are publicly available for further use by the scientific community. The main expected outcomes are (i an evaluation of the models' performances for the three reference years, (ii an evaluation of the skill of the models in capturing observed air pollution trends for the 1990–2010 time period, (iii attribution analyses of the respective role of driving factors (e.g. emissions, boundary conditions, meteorology, (iv a dataset based on a multi-model approach, to provide more robust model

  8. Evaluation of Thompson-type trend and monthly weather data models for corn yields in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    An evaluation was made of Thompson-Type models which use trend terms (as a surrogate for technology), meteorological variables based on monthly average temperature, and total precipitation to forecast and estimate corn yields in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. Pooled and unpooled Thompson-type models were compared. Neither was found to be consistently superior to the other. Yield reliability indicators show that the models are of limited use for large area yield estimation. The models are objective and consistent with scientific knowledge. Timely yield forecasts and estimates can be made during the growing season by using normals or long range weather forecasts. The models are not costly to operate and are easy to use and understand. The model standard errors of prediction do not provide a useful current measure of modeled yield reliability.

  9. Graphene with line defect as a membrane for gas separation: Design via a first-principles modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xian; Meng, Qingyuan; Feng, Yuanping; Gao, Yufei

    2013-01-01

    A new line defect consisting of a sequence of octagons and all-hydrogen passivated pores in graphene was designed as a gas separation membrane using first-principles calculations. The all-hydrogen passivated pore produces a formidable barrier of 1.5 eV for CH4 but an easily surmountable barrier of 0.12 eV for H2. Hence it exhibits extremely high separation capability in favor of H2 among all studied species with the selectivity on the order of 1022 for H2/CH4. These results suggest that such a line-defect-containing graphene-based membrane could play a great role on numerous clean energy applications.

  10. A model that accounts for the interdependence of extent and severity in the automatic evaluation of myocardial defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ali, Henrik Hussein; Palmer, John; Edenbrandt, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The extent and severity are two important parameters when describing a regional defect in myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging. Intuitively, these two parameters should be independent of each other, but we have shown in a previous study that there is an ...... that there is an interdependence. This interdependence has been investigated in two commercially available analysis programs (AutoQUANT and 4D-MSPECT) using Monte Carlo-simulated SPECT data....

  11. Illicit trafficking of radiological and nuclear materials: modeling and analysis of trafficking trends and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, David L.; Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2005-01-01

    Concerns over the illicit trafficking of radiological and nuclear materials were focused originally on the lack of security and accountability of such material throughout the former Soviet states. This is primarily attributed to the frequency of events that have occurred involving the theft and trafficking of critical material components that could be used to construct a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) or even a rudimentary nuclear device. However, with the continued expansion of nuclear technology and the deployment of a global nuclear fuel cycle these materials have become increasingly prevalent, affording a more diverse inventory of dangerous materials and dual-use items. To further complicate the matter, the list of nuclear consumers has grown to include: (1) Nation-states that have gone beyond the IAEA agreed framework and additional protocols concerning multiple nuclear fuel cycles and processes that reuse the fuel through reprocessing to exploit technologies previously confined to the more industrialized world; (2) Terrorist organizations seeking to acquire nuclear and radiological material due to the potential devastation and psychological effect of their use; (3) Organized crime, which has discovered a lucrative market in trafficking of illicit material to international actors and/or countries; and (4) Amateur smugglers trying to feed their families in a post-Soviet era. An initial look at trafficking trends of this type seems scattered and erratic, localized primarily to a select group of countries. This is not necessarily the case. The success with which other contraband has been smuggled throughout the world suggests that nuclear trafficking may be carried out with relative ease along the same routes by the same criminals or criminal organizations. Because of the inordinately high threat posed by terrorist or extremist groups acquiring the ingredients for unconventional weapons, it is necessary that illicit trafficking of these materials be better

  12. Multiple organ system defects and transcriptional dysregulation in the Nipbl(+/- mouse, a model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimako Kawauchi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS is a multi-organ system birth defects disorder linked, in at least half of cases, to heterozygous mutations in the NIPBL gene. In animals and fungi, orthologs of NIPBL regulate cohesin, a complex of proteins that is essential for chromosome cohesion and is also implicated in DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Mice heterozygous for a gene-trap mutation in Nipbl were produced and exhibited defects characteristic of CdLS, including small size, craniofacial anomalies, microbrachycephaly, heart defects, hearing abnormalities, delayed bone maturation, reduced body fat, behavioral disturbances, and high mortality (75-80% during the first weeks of life. These phenotypes arose despite a decrease in Nipbl transcript levels of only approximately 30%, implying extreme sensitivity of development to small changes in Nipbl activity. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that Nipbl deficiency leads to modest but significant transcriptional dysregulation of many genes. Expression changes at the protocadherin beta (Pcdhb locus, as well as at other loci, support the view that NIPBL influences long-range chromosomal regulatory interactions. In addition, evidence is presented that reduced expression of genes involved in adipogenic differentiation may underlie the low amounts of body fat observed both in Nipbl+/- mice and in individuals with CdLS.

  13. [Treatment of acute full-thickness chondral defects with high molecular weight hyaluronic acid; an experimental model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, D; Espinosa, M; Calvo, R; Scheu, M; Valderrama, J J; Gallegos, M; Conget, P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 2 different protocols of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA, hylan G-F20) to articular cartilage regeneration in acute full-thickness chondral defects. Full-thickness chondral defects of 3 x 6 mm were performed into the lateral femoral condyles of New Zealand rabbits, treated with a single or three doses of HA. The animals were sacrified at 12 weeks and the regenerated tissue was evaluated by direct observation and histology with the ICRS scale. Macroscopically, in both groups treated with HA the defects were filled with irregular tissue with areas similar to hyaline cartilage and others in which depressed areas with exposed subchondral bone were observed. Histological analysis showed in both groups treated with HA a hyaline-like cartilage compared to control group. However, the score of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scale did not show differences between the groups treated with HA. The use of single dose or 3 doses of AH in acute chondral lesions has a limited and similar benefit in articular cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of hierarchical models to analyze European trends in congenital anomaly prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavadino, Alana; Prieto-Merino, David; Addor, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    that combine information from several subgroups simultaneously would enhance current surveillance methods using data collected by EUROCAT, a European network of population-based congenital anomaly registries. METHODS: Ten-year trends (2003 to 2012) in 18 EUROCAT registries over 11 countries were analyzed...

  15. Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report: Assessment of global-scale model performance for global and regional ozone distributions, variability, and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Young

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR is to provide the research community with an up-to-date scientific assessment of tropospheric ozone, from the surface to the tropopause. While a suite of observations provides significant information on the spatial and temporal distribution of tropospheric ozone, observational gaps make it necessary to use global atmospheric chemistry models to synthesize our understanding of the processes and variables that control tropospheric ozone abundance and its variability. Models facilitate the interpretation of the observations and allow us to make projections of future tropospheric ozone and trace gas distributions for different anthropogenic or natural perturbations. This paper assesses the skill of current-generation global atmospheric chemistry models in simulating the observed present-day tropospheric ozone distribution, variability, and trends. Drawing upon the results of recent international multi-model intercomparisons and using a range of model evaluation techniques, we demonstrate that global chemistry models are broadly skillful in capturing the spatio-temporal variations of tropospheric ozone over the seasonal cycle, for extreme pollution episodes, and changes over interannual to decadal periods. However, models are consistently biased high in the northern hemisphere and biased low in the southern hemisphere, throughout the depth of the troposphere, and are unable to replicate particular metrics that define the longer term trends in tropospheric ozone as derived from some background sites. When the models compare unfavorably against observations, we discuss the potential causes of model biases and propose directions for future developments, including improved evaluations that may be able to better diagnose the root cause of the model-observation disparity. Overall, model results should be approached critically, including determining whether the model performance is acceptable for

  16. TRENDS [Transport and Retention of Nuclides in Dominant Sequences]: A code for modeling iodine behavior in containment during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.; Daish, S.R.; Shockley, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    The ultimate aim of a description of iodine behavior in severe LWR accidents is a time-dependent accounting of iodine species released into containment and to the environment. Factors involved in the behavior of iodine can be conveniently divided into four general categories: (1) initial release into containment, (2) interaction of iodine species in containment not directly involving water pools, (3) interaction of iodine species in, or with, water pools, and (4) interaction with special systems such as ice condensers or gas treatment systems. To fill the large gaps in knowledge and to provide a means for assaying the iodine source term, this program has proceeded along two paths: (1) Experimental studies of the chemical behavior of iodine under containment conditions. (2) Development of TRENDS (Transport and Retention of Nuclides in Dominant Sequences), a computer code for modeling the behavior of iodine in containment and its release from containment. The main body of this report consists of a description of TRENDS. These two parts to the program are complementary in that models within TRENDS use data that were produced in the experimental program; therefore, these models are supported by experimental evidence that was obtained under conditions expected in severe accidents. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Modeling the Trend of Credit Card Usage Behavior for Different Age Groups Based on Singular Spectrum Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Nai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Credit card holders from different age groups have different usage behaviors, so deeply investigating the credit card usage condition and properly modeling the usage trend of all customers in different age groups from time series data is meaningful for financial institutions as well as banks. Until now, related research in trend analysis of credit card usage has mostly been focused on specific group of people, such as the behavioral tendencies of the elderly or college students, or certain behaviors, such as the increasing number of cards owned and the rise in personal card debt or bankruptcy, in which the only analysis methods employed are simply enumerating or classifying raw data; thus, there is a lack of support in specific mathematical models based on usage behavioral time series data. Considering that few systematic modeling methods have been introduced, in this paper, a novel usage trend analysis method for credit card holders in different age groups based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA has been proposed, using the time series data from the Survey of Consumer Payment Choice (SCPC. The decomposition and reconstruction process in the method is proposed. The results show that the credit card usage frequency falls down from the age of 26 to the lowest point at around the age of 58 and then begins to increase again. At last, future work is discussed.

  18. Controlled Release of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Osteoconductive and Biodegradable Properties of Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate in a Rat Calvarial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Minagawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous bone grafts remain the gold standard for the treatment of congenital craniofacial disorders; however, there are potential problems including donor site morbidity and limitations to the amount of bone that can be harvested. Recent studies suggest that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF promotes fracture healing or osteogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether topically applied G-CSF can stimulate the osteoconductive properties of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP in a rat calvarial defect model. A total of 27 calvarial defects 5 mm in diameter were randomly divided into nine groups, which were treated with various combinations of a β-TCP disc and G-CSF in solution form or controlled release system using gelatin hydrogel. Histologic and histomorphometric analyses were performed at eight weeks postoperatively. The controlled release of low-dose (1 μg and 5 μg G-CSF significantly enhanced new bone formation when combined with a β-TCP disc. Moreover, administration of 5 μg G-CSF using a controlled release system significantly promoted the biodegradable properties of β-TCP. In conclusion, the controlled release of 5 μg G-CSF significantly enhanced the osteoconductive and biodegradable properties of β-TCP. The combination of G-CSF slow-release and β-TCP is a novel and promising approach for treating pediatric craniofacial bone defects.

  19. Modeling lodgepole pine radial growth relative to climate and genetics using universal growth-trend response functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Sierra C; LeMay, Valerie M; Aitken, Sally N

    2011-04-01

    Forests strongly affect Earth's carbon cycles, making our ability to forecast forest-productivity changes associated with rising temperatures and changes in precipitation increasingly critical. In this study, we model the influence of climate on annual radial growth using lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) trees grown for 34 years in a large provenance experiment in western Canada. We use a random-coefficient modeling approach to build universal growth-trend response functions that simultaneously incorporate the impacts of different provenance and site climates on radial growth trends under present and future annual (growth-year), summer, and winter climate regimes. This approach provides new depth to traditional quantitative genetics population response functions by illustrating potential changes in population dominance over time, as well as indicating the age and size at which annual growth begins declining for any population growing in any location under any present or future climate scenario within reason, given the ages and climatic conditions sampled. Our models indicate that lodgepole pine radial-growth levels maximize between 3.9 degrees and 5.1 degrees C mean growth-year temperature. This translates to productivity declining by the mid-21st century in southern and central British Columbia (BC), while increasing beyond the 2080s in northern BC and Yukon, as temperatures rise. Relative to summer climate indices, productivity is predicted to decline continuously through the 2080s in all locations, while relative to winter climate variables, the opposite trend occurs, with the growth increases caused by warmer winters potentially offsetting the summer losses. Trees from warmer provenances, i.e., from the center of the species range, perform best in nearly all of our present and future climate-scenario models. We recommend that similar models be used to analyze population growth trends relative to annual and intra-annual climate in other large-scale provenance

  20. Use of small intestinal submucosal and acellular dermal matrix grafts in giant omphaloceles in neonates and a rabbit abdominal wall defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Zhang, Jie; Lv, Xiaofeng; Lu, Changgui; Chen, Huan; Xu, Xiaoqun; Tang, Weibing

    2016-03-01

    The described surgical strategies for the management of omphalocele include primary closure, staged closure, and delayed closure. A primary repair is not suitable for all giant omphaloceles. We implanted two grafts, small intestinal submucosal (SIS) and acellular dermal matrix (ADM) onto abdominal wall defects in neonates to study the safety and efficacy of SIS and ADM graft techniques for initial closure of giant omphaloceles in infants, and we also implanted these grafts onto abdominal wall defects in an animal model. Twenty-four patients with giant omphaloceles were divided into two groups (ADM group, 12 patients; SIS group, 12 patients). The operative time, skin healing time postoperatively, and the incidence of skin infections, and abdominal wall hernias were observed. In the rabbit animal model, bilateral full-thickness incisions were made through the rabbit rectus abdominus muscles and a 2×4cm longitudinal whole layer defect was created on either the left or right lateral anterior abdominal wall. A four-layered variant of the SIS graft was used to repair the right abdominal defect; ADM was used to repair the left. Tensile strength was measured using an Instron tensiometer. Electron scanning and light microscopy were used to evaluate neovascularization, collagen deposition, and muscle fibers at 2, 4, 8, and 16weeks postimplantation. In the neonatal patients, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to operative time, skin healing time postoperatively, the incidence of skin infections, or abdominal wall hernias. In the SIS group, only one patient developed a skin infection, which led to skin necrosis and sloughing. In the ADM group, four patients developed skin infection postoperatively, and the patch was gradually removed. In the animal study, there was no significant difference between the mean breaking strength of ADM versus SIS repairs. Scanning electron and light microscopy showed collagen deposition

  1. Transport and Environment Database System (TRENDS): Maritime Air Pollutant Emission Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakaki, Aliki; Coffey, R. A.; Lock, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the development of the maritime module within the framework of the TRENDS project. A detailed database has been constructed, which includes all stages of the energy consumption and air pollutant emission calculations. The technical assumptions and factors incorporated in the da...... ¿ short sea or deep-sea shipping. Key Words: Air Pollution, Maritime Transport, Air Pollutant Emissions......This paper reports the development of the maritime module within the framework of the TRENDS project. A detailed database has been constructed, which includes all stages of the energy consumption and air pollutant emission calculations. The technical assumptions and factors incorporated...... encountered since the statistical data collection was not undertaken with a view to this purpose are mentioned. Examples of the results obtained by the database are presented. These include detailed air pollutant emission results per port and vessel type, to aggregate results for different types of movements...

  2. Model thermohaline trends in the Mediterranean Sea during the last years: a change with respect to the last decades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Navarro, F Javier; Criado-Aldeanueva, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Temperature and salinity outputs from ECCO (years 93-09) and GLORYS (years 03-09) models have been used to compute the thermohaline and steric sea level trends in the surface (0-150 m), intermediate (150 m-600 m), and deep (600 m-bottom) layers of the Mediterranean Sea. Some changes with respect to the second half of the 20th century have been observed: the cooling of the upper waters of the entire eastern basin since 1950 seems to have vanished; the warming of WMDW historically reported for the second half of the last century could have reversed, although there is no agreement between both models at this point (trends of different sign are predicted); the salinification of WMDW reported for the previous decades is not observed in the south-westernmost area in the period 93-09, and a clear change from positive to negative in the steric sea level trend with respect to the period 93-05 is detected due to the sharp decreasing steric sea level of years 02-06.

  3. Evaluation of rhBMP-2/collagen/TCP-HA bone graft with and without bone marrow cells in the canine femoral multi defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangphakdy, V; Shinohara, K; Pan, H; Boehm, C; Samaranska, A; Muschler, G F

    2015-01-12

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, when applied to an absorbable type 1 bovine collagen sponge (rhBMP-2/ACS) is an effective therapy in many bone grafting settings. Bone marrow aspirate (BMA) has also been used as a source of transplantable osteogenic connective tissue progenitors. This study was designed to characterize the performance of a scaffold comprising rhBMP-2/ACS in which the sponge wraps around tri-calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite granules (rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA) and to test the hypothesis that addition of BMA will improve the performance of this construct in the Canine Femoral Multi Defect Model. In each subject, two sites were grafted with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA scaffold loaded with BMA clot and two other sites with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA scaffold loaded with wound blood (WB). After correction for unresorbed TCP-HA granules, sites grafted with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA+BMA and rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA+WB were similar, with mean percent bone volumes of 10.9 %±1.2 and 11.2 %±1.2, respectively. No differences were seen in quantitative histomorphometry. While bone formation using both constructs was robust, this study did not support the hypothesis that the addition of unprocessed bone marrow aspirate clot improved bone regeneration in a site engrafted with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA+BMA. In contrast to prior studies using this model, new bone formation was greater at the center of the defect where TCP-HA was distributed. This finding suggests a potential synergy between rhBMP-2 and the centrally placed ceramic and cellular components of the graft construct. Further optimization may also require more uniform distribution of TCP-HA, alternative cell delivery strategies, and a more rigorous large animal segmental defect model.

  4. Understanding Catalytic Activity Trends for NO Decomposition and CO Oxidation using Density Functional Theory and Microkinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne

    towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional theory calculations. We establish the full potential energy diagram for the direct NO decomposition reaction over stepped transition...... and Pt are the best direct NO decomposition catalysts among the 3d, 4d, and 5d metals. We analyze the NO decomposition reaction in terms of the Sabatier analysis and a Sabatier–Gibbs-type analysis and obtain an activity trend in agreement with experimental results. We show specifically why the key...... problem in using transition metal surfaces to catalyze direct NO decomposition is their significant relative overbinding of atomic oxygen compared to atomic nitrogen. We calculate adsorption and transition state energies for the full CO oxidation reaction pathway by the use of DFT for a number...

  5. Experimental evidence for an associated defect model for the neutron generated As/sub Ga/ center in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golzene, A.; Meyer, B.; Schwab, C.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal dependence of EPR spectra of fast neutron irradiated n-type GaAs over the whole 4.2 to 300 K temperature range has been studied using the decomposition of spectra into a quadruplet of four identical Gaussian lines and a Lorentzian singlet. Quadruplet and singlet spectra as well as their proper parameters (inverse of paramagnetic susceptibility, hyperfine constants) could be determined separately. Experiments give evidence that the neutron generated anionic antisites As/sub Ga/ in GaAs are constituting associated defect centers, most likely of intrinsic nature

  6. Endogenous reactive oxygen species cause astrocyte defects and neuronal dysfunctions in the hippocampus: a new model for aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takamasa; Takanashi, Yumi; Sugita, Koichi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Yanagihara, Rintaro; Yasuda, Kayo; Onouchi, Hiromi; Kawabe, Noboru; Nakata, Munehiro; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Hartman, Phil S; Ishii, Naoaki

    2017-02-01

    The etiology of astrocyte dysfunction is not well understood even though neuronal defects have been extensively studied in a variety of neuronal degenerative diseases. Astrocyte defects could be triggered by the oxidative stress that occurs during physiological aging. Here, we provide evidence that intracellular or mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) at physiological levels can cause hippocampal (neuronal) dysfunctions. Specifically, we demonstrate that astrocyte defects occur in the hippocampal area of middle-aged Tet-mev-1 mice with the SDHC V69E mutation. These mice are characterized by chronic oxidative stress. Even though both young adult and middle-aged Tet-mev-1 mice overproduced MitoSOX Red-detectable mitochondrial ROS compared to age-matched wild-type C57BL/6J mice, only young adult Tet-mev-1 mice upregulated manganese and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Mn- and Cu/Zn-SODs) activities to eliminate the MitoSOX Red-detectable mitochondrial ROS. In contrast, middle-aged Tet-mev-1 mice accumulated both MitoSOX Red-detectable mitochondrial ROS and CM-H 2 DCFDA-detectable intracellular ROS. These ROS levels appeared to be in the physiological range as shown by normal thiol and glutathione disulfide/glutathione concentrations in both young adult and middle-aged Tet-mev-1 mice relative to age-matched wild-type C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, only middle-aged Tet-mev-1 mice showed JNK/SAPK activation and Ca 2+ overload, particularly in astrocytes. This led to decreasing levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β in the hippocampal area. Significantly, there were no pathological features such as apoptosis, amyloidosis, and lactic acidosis in neurons and astrocytes. Our findings suggest that the age-dependent physiologically relevant chronic oxidative stress caused astrocyte defects in mice with impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain functionality. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Distribution of defects in wind turbine blades and reliability assessment of blades containing defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard Toft, Henrik; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    2009-01-01

    on the assumption that one error in the production process tends to trigger several defects. For both models additional information about number, type and size of the defects is included as stochastic variables. The probability of failure for a wind turbine blade will not only depend on variations in the material......In the present paper two stochastic models for the distribution of defects in wind turbine blades are proposed. The first model assumes that the individual defects are completely randomly distributed in the blade. The second model assumes that the defects occur in clusters of different size based...... properties and the load but also on potential defects in the blades. As a numerical example the probability of failure is calculated for the main spar both with and without defects in terms of delaminations. The delaminations increase the probability of failure compared to a perfect blade, but by applying...

  8. Chlamydia induces anchorage independence in 3T3 cells and detrimental cytological defects in an infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E Knowlton

    Full Text Available Chlamydia are gram negative, obligate intracellular bacterial organisms with different species causing a multitude of infections in both humans and animals. Chlamydia trachomatis is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection (STI Chlamydia, the most commonly acquired bacterial STI in the United States. Chlamydial infections have also been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in women co-infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV. We have previously shown chlamydial infection results in centrosome amplification and multipolar spindle formation leading to chromosomal instability. Many studies indicate that centrosome abnormalities, spindle defects, and chromosome segregation errors can lead to cell transformation. We hypothesize that the presence of these defects within infected dividing cells identifies a possible mechanism for Chlamydia as a cofactor in cervical cancer formation. Here we demonstrate that infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is able to transform 3T3 cells in soft agar resulting in anc