WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling center ccmc

  1. The NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Next Generation Space Weather Data Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Chulaki, A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Boblitt, J.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Swindell, M. J., IV; Bakshi, S. S.; Mays, M. L.; Shim, J. S.; Hesse, M.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables, supports, and performs research and development for next generation space science and space weather models. The CCMC currently hosts a large and expanding collection of state-or-the-art, physics-based space weather models that have been developed by the international research community. There are many tools and services provided by the CCMC that are currently available world-wide, along with the ongoing development of new innovative systems and software for research, discovery, validation, visualization, and forecasting. Over the history of the CCMC's existence, there has been one constant engineering challenge - describing, managing, and disseminating data. To address the challenges that accompany an ever-expanding number of models to support, along with a growing catalog of simulation output - the CCMC is currently developing a flexible and extensible space weather data warehouse to support both internal and external systems and applications. This paper intends to chronicle the evolution and future of the CCMC's data infrastructure, and the current infrastructure re-engineering activities that seek to leverage existing community data model standards like SPASE and the IMPEx Simulation Data Model.

  2. Latest Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) services and innovative tools supporting the space weather research and operational communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A. M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Shim, J. S.; MacNeice, P. J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Weigand, C.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Patel, K.; Pembroke, A. D.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Boblitt, J. M.; Bakshi, S. S.; Tsui, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), with the fundamental goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research, has been serving as an integral hub for over 15 years, providing invaluable resources to both space weather scientific and operational communities. CCMC has developed and provided innovative web-based point of access tools varying from: Runs-On-Request System - providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of state-of-the-art solar and space physics models, Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) - a powerful dissemination system for space weather information, Advanced Online Visualization and Analysis tools for more accurate interpretation of model results, Standard Data formats for Simulation Data downloads, and Mobile apps to view space weather data anywhere to the scientific community. In addition to supporting research and performing model evaluations, CCMC also supports space science education by hosting summer students through local universities. In this poster, we will showcase CCMC's latest innovative tools and services, and CCMC's tools that revolutionized the way we do research and improve our operational space weather capabilities. CCMC's free tools and resources are all publicly available online (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  3. Ionosphere-thermosphere models at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Phillip A.; Kuznetsova, Masha M.; Hesse, Michael; Rastaetter, Lutz; Chulaki, Anna

    2009-02-01

    One of the ways to address the science needs of the research community and to enable science progress is to provide community access to modern space science models. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multiagency partnership based at the Goddard Space Flight Center that hosts a set of state-of-the-art space science models ranging from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC provides a Web-based, no-cost, Runs on Request system, by which the interested scientist can readily request simulations for time intervals of interest. CCMC also provides a tailored Web-based visualization interface for the model output, including near-real-time results from select models. Model outputs have been specifically tailored for easy comparison with observational data to facilitate data analysis and model validation. This paper provides an overview of CCMC activities, with an emphasis on the ionosphere-thermosphere models residing there.

  4. CCMC: bringing space weather awareness to the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulaki, A.; Muglach, K.; Zheng, Y.; Mays, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Thompson, B. J.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Pembroke, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Making space weather an element of core education is critical for the future of the young field of space weather. Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is an interagency partnership established to aid the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research. Additionally, over the past ten years it has established itself as a global space science education resource supporting undergraduate and graduate education and research, and spreading space weather awareness worldwide. A unique combination of assets, capabilities and close ties to the scientific and educational communities enable our small group to serve as a hub for rising generations of young space scientists and engineers. CCMC offers a variety of educational tools and resources publicly available online and providing access to the largest collection of modern space science models developed by the international research community. CCMC has revolutionized the way these simulations are utilized in classrooms settings, student projects, and scientific labs. Every year, this online system serves hundreds of students, educators and researchers worldwide. Another major CCMC asset is an expert space weather prototyping team primarily serving NASA's interplanetary space weather needs. Capitalizing on its unique capabilities and experiences, the team also provides in-depth space weather training to hundreds of students and professionals. One training module offers undergraduates an opportunity to actively engage in real-time space weather monitoring, analysis, forecasting, tools development and research, eventually serving remotely as NASA space weather forecasters. In yet another project, CCMC is collaborating with Hayden Planetarium and Linkoping University on creating a visualization platform for planetariums (and classrooms) to provide simulations of dynamic processes in the large domain stretching from the solar corona to the Earth's upper

  5. NOAA SWPC / NASA CCMC Space Weather Modeling Assessment Project: Toward the Validation of Advancements in Heliospheric Space Weather Prediction Within WSA-Enlil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, E. T.; Pizzo, V. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Mays, M. L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Viereck, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    In 2011, NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) transitioned the world's first operational space weather model into use at the National Weather Service's Weather and Climate Operational Supercomputing System (WCOSS). This operational forecasting tool is comprised of the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) solar wind model coupled with the Enlil heliospheric MHD model. Relying on daily-updated photospheric magnetograms produced by the National Solar Observatory's Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG), this tool provides critical predictive knowledge of heliospheric dynamics such as high speed streams and coronal mass ejections. With the goal of advancing this predictive model and quantifying progress, SWPC and NASA's Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) have initiated a collaborative effort to assess improvements in space weather forecasts at Earth by moving from a single daily-updated magnetogram to a sequence of time-dependent magnetograms to drive the ambient inputs for the WSA-Enlil model as well as incorporating the newly developed Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model. We will provide a detailed overview of the scope of this effort and discuss preliminary results from the first phase focusing on the impact of time-dependent magnetogram inputs to the WSA-Enlil model.

  6. Generic magnetohydrodynamic model at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkonen, I. J.; Rastaetter, L.; Glocer, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a multi-agency partnership to enable, support and perform research and development for next-generation space science and space weather models. CCMC currently hosts nearly 100 numerical models and a cornerstone of this activity is the Runs on Request (RoR) system which allows anyone to request a model run and analyse/visualize the results via a web browser. CCMC is also active in the education community by organizing student research contests, heliophysics summer schools, and space weather forecaster training for students, government and industry representatives. Recently a generic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model was added to the CCMC RoR system which allows the study of a variety of fluid and plasma phenomena in one, two and three dimensions using a dynamic point-and-click web interface. For example students can experiment with the physics of fundamental wave modes of hydrodynamic and MHD theory, behavior of discontinuities and shocks as well as instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz.Students can also use the model to experiments with numerical effects of models, i.e. how the process of discretizing a system of equations and solving them on a computer changes the solution. This can provide valuable background understanding e.g. for space weather forecasters on the effects of model resolution, numerical resistivity, etc. on the prediction.

  7. Validation of the Kp Geomagnetic Index Forecast at CCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechette, B. P.; Mays, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) sub-team provides space weather services to NASA robotic mission operators and science campaigns and prototypes new models, forecasting techniques, and procedures. The Kp index is a measure of geomagnetic disturbances for space weather in the magnetosphere such as geomagnetic storms and substorms. In this study, we performed validation on the Newell et al. (2007) Kp prediction equation from December 2010 to July 2017. The purpose of this research is to understand the Kp forecast performance because it's critical for NASA missions to have confidence in the space weather forecast. This research was done by computing the Kp error for each forecast (average, minimum, maximum) and each synoptic period. Then to quantify forecast performance we computed the mean error, mean absolute error, root mean square error, multiplicative bias and correlation coefficient. A contingency table was made for each forecast and skill scores were computed. The results are compared to the perfect score and reference forecast skill score. In conclusion, the skill score and error results show that the minimum of the predicted Kp over each synoptic period from the Newell et al. (2007) Kp prediction equation performed better than the maximum or average of the prediction. However, persistence (reference forecast) outperformed all of the Kp forecasts (minimum, maximum, and average). Overall, the Newell Kp prediction still predicts within a range of 1, even though persistence beats it.

  8. Space Weather Products and Tools Used in Auroral Monitoring and Forecasting at CCMC/SWRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Rastaetter, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Key points discussed in this chapter are (1) the importance of aurora research to scientific advances and space weather applications, (2) space weather products at CCMC that are relevant to aurora monitoring and forecasting, and (3) the need for more effort from the whole community to achieve a better and long-lead-time forecast of auroral activity. Aurora, as manifestations of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling that occurs in a region of space that is relatively easy to access for sounding rockets, satellites, and other types of observational platforms, serves as a natural laboratory for studying the underlying physics of the complex system. From a space weather application perspective, auroras can cause surface charging of technological assets passing through the region, result in scintillation effects affecting communication and navigation, and cause radar cluttering that hinders military and civilian applications. Indirectly, an aurora and its currents can induce geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on the ground, which poses major concerns for the wellbeing and operation of power grids, particularly during periods of intense geomagnetic activity. In addition, accurate auroral forecasting is desired for auroral tourism. In this chapter, we first review some of the existing auroral models and discuss past validation efforts. Such efforts are crucial in transitioning a model(s) from research to operations and for further model improvement and development that also benefits scientific endeavors. Then we will focus on products and tools that are used for auroral monitoring and forecasting at the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC). As part of the CCMC (Community Coordinated Modeling Center), SWRC has been providing space weather services since 2010.

  9. Space Weather Data Dissemination Tools from the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donti, N.; Berrios, D.; Boblitt, J.; LaSota, J.; Maddox, M. M.; Mullinix, R.; Hesse, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed new space weather data dissemination products. These include a Java-based conversion software for space weather simulation data, an interactive and customizable timeline tool for time series data, and Android phone and tablet versions of the NASA Space Weather App for mobile devices. We highlight the new features of all the updated services, discuss the back-end capabilities required to realize these services, and talk about future services in development.

  10. ISS Plasma Environment: Status of CCMC Products for ISS Mission Ops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    ISS Program currently using FPMU Ne, Te in-situ measurements to support operations and anomaly investigations. Working to acquire alternative data sources if FPMU is not available. Work is progressing on CCMC tools for low Earth orbit ionosphere characterization. Validation against FPMU data required before model output can be used for ISS operational support. MSFC plans to continue comparing CTIP output during FPMU campaigns. Results to date have been useful in identifying ionospheric origins of high latitude charging environments.

  11. Verification of real-time WSA-ENLIL+Cone simulations of CME arrival-time at the CCMC/SWRC from 2010-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, A. M.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; MacNeice, P. J.; Jian, L. K.

    2017-12-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model is used extensively in space weather operations world-wide to model CME propagation. As such, it is important to assess its performance. We present validation results of the WSA-ENLIL+Cone model installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) and executed in real-time by the CCMC/Space Weather Research Center (SWRC). CCMC/SWRC uses the WSA-ENLIL+Cone model to predict CME arrivals at NASA missions throughout the inner heliosphere. In this work we compare model predicted CME arrival-times to in-situ ICME leading edge measurements near Earth, STEREO-A and STEREO-B for simulations completed between March 2010-December 2016 (over 1,800 CMEs). We report hit, miss, false alarm, and correct rejection statistics for all three spacecraft. For all predicted CME arrivals, the hit rate is 0.5, and the false alarm rate is 0.1. For the 273 events where the CME was predicted to arrive at Earth, STEREO-A, or STEREO-B and we observed an arrival (hit), the mean absolute arrival-time prediction error was 10.4 ± 0.9 hours, with a tendency to early prediction error of -4.0 hours. We show the dependence of the arrival-time error on CME input parameters. We also explore the impact of the multi-spacecraft observations used to initialize the model CME inputs by comparing model verification results before and after the STEREO-B communication loss (since September 2014) and STEREO-A side-lobe operations (August 2014-December 2015). There is an increase of 1.7 hours in the CME arrival time error during single, or limited two-viewpoint periods, compared to the three-spacecraft viewpoint period. This trend would apply to a future space weather mission at L5 or L4 as another coronagraph viewpoint to reduce CME arrival time errors compared to a single L1 viewpoint.

  12. Verification of real-time WSA-ENLIL+Cone simulations of CME arrival-time at the CCMC from 2010 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Alexandra M.; Mays, M. Leila; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Jian, Lan K.; Odstrcil, Dusan; MacNeice, Peter

    2018-03-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model is used extensively in space weather operations world-wide to model coronal mass ejection (CME) propagation. As such, it is important to assess its performance. We present validation results of the WSA-ENLIL+Cone model installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) and executed in real-time by the CCMC space weather team. CCMC uses the WSA-ENLIL+Cone model to predict CME arrivals at NASA missions throughout the inner heliosphere. In this work we compare model predicted CME arrival-times to in situ interplanetary coronal mass ejection leading edge measurements at Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Behind (STEREO-B), and Earth (Wind and ACE) for simulations completed between March 2010 and December 2016 (over 1,800 CMEs). We report hit, miss, false alarm, and correct rejection statistics for all three locations. For all predicted CME arrivals, the hit rate is 0.5, and the false alarm rate is 0.1. For the 273 events where the CME was predicted to arrive at Earth, STEREO-A, or STEREO-B, and was actually observed (hit event), the mean absolute arrival-time prediction error was 10.4 ± 0.9 h, with a tendency to early prediction error of -4.0 h. We show the dependence of the arrival-time error on CME input parameters. We also explore the impact of the multi-spacecraft observations used to initialize the model CME inputs by comparing model verification results before and after the STEREO-B communication loss (since September 2014) and STEREO-A sidelobe operations (August 2014-December 2015). There is an increase of 1.7 h in the CME arrival time error during single, or limited two-viewpoint periods, compared to the three-spacecraft viewpoint period. This trend would apply to a future space weather mission at L5 or L4 as another coronagraph viewpoint to reduce CME arrival time errors compared to a single L1 viewpoint.

  13. Comparative Validation of Realtime Solar Wind Forecasting Using the UCSD Heliospheric Tomography Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeice, Peter; Taktakishvili, Alexandra; Jackson, Bernard; Clover, John; Bisi, Mario; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego 3D Heliospheric Tomography Model reconstructs the evolution of heliospheric structures, and can make forecasts of solar wind density and velocity up to 72 hours in the future. The latest model version, installed and running in realtime at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center(CCMC), analyzes scintillations of meter wavelength radio point sources recorded by the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory(STELab) together with realtime measurements of solar wind speed and density recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer(ACE) Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor(SWEPAM).The solution is reconstructed using tomographic techniques and a simple kinematic wind model. Since installation, the CCMC has been recording the model forecasts and comparing them with ACE measurements, and with forecasts made using other heliospheric models hosted by the CCMC. We report the preliminary results of this validation work and comparison with alternative models.

  14. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  15. Validation for global solar wind prediction using Ulysses comparison: Multiple coronal and heliospheric models installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, we have quantitatively assessed the models' capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs. The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  16. Validation for Global Solar Wind Prediction Using Ulysses Comparison: Multiple Coronal and Heliospheric Models Installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and Heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, wehave quantitatively assessed the models capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs.The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  17. Space Weather Forecasting and Research at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Weather Research Center (SWRC), within the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), provides experimental research forecasts and analysis for NASA's robotic mission operators. Space weather conditions are monitored to provide advance warning and forecasts based on observations and modeling using the integrated Space Weather Analysis Network (iSWA). Space weather forecasters come from a variety of backgrounds, ranging from modelers to astrophysicists to undergraduate students. This presentation will discuss space weather operations and research from an undergraduate perspective. The Space Weather Research, Education, and Development Initiative (SW REDI) is the starting point for many undergraduate opportunities in space weather forecasting and research. Space weather analyst interns play an active role year-round as entry-level space weather analysts. Students develop the technical and professional skills to forecast space weather through a summer internship that includes a two week long space weather boot camp, mentorship, poster session, and research opportunities. My unique development of research projects includes studying high speed stream events as well as a study of 20 historic, high-impact solar energetic particle events. This unique opportunity to combine daily real-time analysis with related research prepares students for future careers in Heliophysics.

  18. Phenomenological three center model

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Gherghescu, R A; Nagame, Y; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results on ternary fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf suggest the existence of a short-lived quasi-molecular state. We present a three-center phenomenological model able to explain such a state by producing a new minimum in the deformation energy at a separation distance very close to the touching point. The shape parametrization chosen by us allows to describe the essential geometry of the systems in terms of one independent coordinate, namely, the distance between the heavy fragment centers. The shell correction (also treated phenomenologically) only produces quantitative effects; qualitatively it is not essential for the new minimum. Half-lives of some quasi-molecular states which could be formed in sup 1 sup 0 B accompanied fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 Cm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 sup , sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 Fm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 sup , sup 2 sup 6 sup 0 No, and sup 2 sup 6 sup 2 Rf are roughly estimated. (authors)

  19. Pengembangan Model Manajemen ICT Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkun Elmunsyah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Pengembangan Model Manajemen ICT Center. Kemendiknas telah melakukan investasi  cukup besar berupa pembangunan Jejaring komputer pendidikan nasional yang disebut Jaringan Pendidikan Nasional (Jardiknas, pada sekolah menengah kejuruan (SMK di seluruh Indonesia yang dikenal dengan nama ICT center. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menemukan model manajemen ICT center sesuai karakteristik SMK sehingga dapat memberikan kontribusi mutu pada SMK tersebut. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian pengembangan atau Research and Development yang dikembangkan oleh Borg and Gall. Hasil secara keseluruhan penelitian menunjukkan berdasarkan uji coba keefektivan kinerja manajemen pada skala terbatas dan lebih luas menunjukkan bahwa model manajemen ICT center memenuhi kriteria sangat efektif. Kata-kata kunci: Jardiknas, SMK, model manajemen ICT center, kontribusi mutu

  20. The substorm loading-unloading cycle as reproduced by community-available global MHD magnetospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, Evgeny; Sergeev, Victor; Tsyganenko, Nikolay; Kuznetsova, Maria; Rastaetter, Lutz; Raeder, Joachim; Toth, Gabor; Lyon, John; Merkin, Vyacheslav; Wiltberger, Michael

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigate how well the three community-available global MHD models, supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC NASA), reproduce the global magnetospheric dynamics, including the loading-unloading substorm cycle. We found that in terms of global magnetic flux transport CCMC models display systematically different response to idealized 2-hour north then 2-hour south IMF Bz variation. The LFM model shows a depressed return convection in the tail plasma sheet and high rate of magnetic flux loading into the lobes during the growth phase, as well as enhanced return convection and high unloading rate during the expansion phase, with the amount of loaded/unloaded magnetotail flux and the growth phase duration being the closest to their observed empirical values during isolated substorms. BATSRUS and Open GGCM models exhibit drastically different behavior. In the BATS-R-US model the plasma sheet convection shows a smooth transition to the steady convection regime after the IMF southward turning. In the Open GGCM a weak plasma sheet convection has comparable intensities during both the growth phase and the following slow unloading phase. Our study shows that different CCMC models under the same solar wind conditions (north to south IMF variation) produce essentially different solutions in terms of global magnetospheric convection.

  1. The New Space Weather Action Center; the Next Level on Space Weather Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Lewis, E. M.; Cline, T. D.; MacDonald, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Space Weather Action Center (SWAC) provides access for students to near real-time space weather data, and a set of easy instructions and well-defined protocols that allow them to correctly interpret such data. It is a student centered approach to teaching science and technology in classrooms, as students are encouraged to act like real scientists by accessing, collecting, analyzing, recording, and communicating space weather forecasts. Integration and implementation of several programs will enhance and provide a rich education experience for students' grades 5-16. We will enhance the existing data and tutorials available using the Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) tool created by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA GSFC. iSWA is a flexible, turn-key, customer-configurable, Web-based dissemination system for NASA-relevant space weather information that combines data based on the most advanced space weather models available through the CCMC with concurrent space environment information. This tool provides an additional component by the use of videos and still imagery from different sources as a tool for educators to effectively show what happens during an eruption from the surface of the Sun. We will also update content on the net result of space weather forecasting that the public can experience by including Aurorasaurus, a well established, growing, modern, innovative, interdisciplinary citizen science project centered around the public's visibility of the northern lights with mobile applications via the use of social media connections.

  2. Model Pseudopotentials for Color Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gash, P.; Bartram, R. H.; Gryk, T. J.

    2010-11-01

    The energy-dependent pseudopotentials for electron-excess color centers in ionic crystals adopted by Bartram, Stoneham and Gash (BSG) were determined by a smoothness criterion because the trial wave functions employed are slowly varying on the scale of the ion cores. Energy-independent norm-conserving pseudopotentials were introduced subsequently in the context of molecular-orbital calculations to ensure that the outer parts of valence pseudo-orbitals coincide with those of true valence orbitals. In the present investigation, whole-ion norm-conserving pseudopotentials calculated from numerical wave functions are employed in F-center calculations for comparison with BSG calculations. It is concluded that the smoothness criterion should take precedence in that application.

  3. Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

  4. Comprehensive Assessment of Models and Events based on Library tools (CAMEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastaetter, L.; Boblitt, J. M.; DeZeeuw, D.; Mays, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wiegand, C.

    2017-12-01

    At the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), the assessment of modeling skill using a library of model-data comparison metrics is taken to the next level by fully integrating the ability to request a series of runs with the same model parameters for a list of events. The CAMEL framework initiates and runs a series of selected, pre-defined simulation settings for participating models (e.g., WSA-ENLIL, SWMF-SC+IH for the heliosphere, SWMF-GM, OpenGGCM, LFM, GUMICS for the magnetosphere) and performs post-processing using existing tools for a host of different output parameters. The framework compares the resulting time series data with respective observational data and computes a suite of metrics such as Prediction Efficiency, Root Mean Square Error, Probability of Detection, Probability of False Detection, Heidke Skill Score for each model-data pair. The system then plots scores by event and aggregated over all events for all participating models and run settings. We are building on past experiences with model-data comparisons of magnetosphere and ionosphere model outputs in GEM2008, GEM-CEDAR CETI2010 and Operational Space Weather Model challenges (2010-2013). We can apply the framework also to solar-heliosphere as well as radiation belt models. The CAMEL framework takes advantage of model simulations described with Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) metadata and a database backend design developed for a next-generation Run-on-Request system at the CCMC.

  5. 2008 GEM Modeling Challenge: Metrics Study of the Dst Index in Physics-Based Magnetosphere and Ring Current Models and in Statistical and Analytic Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M.; Hesse, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Glocer, A.; Yu, Y.; Meng, X.; Raeder, J.; Wiltberger, M.; Welling, D.; hide

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the metrics-based results of the Dst part of the 2008-2009 GEM Metrics Challenge are reported. The Metrics Challenge asked modelers to submit results for 4 geomagnetic storm events and 5 different types of observations that can be modeled by statistical or climatological or physics-based (e.g. MHD) models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We present the results of over 25 model settings that were run at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) and at the institutions of various modelers for these events. To measure the performance of each of the models against the observations we use comparisons of one-hour averaged model data with the Dst index issued by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism, Kyoto, Japan, and direct comparison of one-minute model data with the one-minute Dst index calculated by the United States Geologic Survey (USGS).

  6. A Maturity Model for Digital Data Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Hugo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital data and service centers, such as those envisaged by the ICSU World Data System (WDS, are subject to a wide-ranging collection of requirements and constraints. Many of these requirements are traditionally difficult to assess and to measure objectively and consistently. As a solution to this problem, an approach based on a maturity model is proposed. This adds significant value not only in respect to objective assessment but also in assisting with evaluation of overlapping and competing criteria, planning of continuous improvement, and progress towards formal evaluation by accreditation authorities.

  7. National Space Science Data Center Information Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E. V.; McCaslin, P.; Grayzeck, E.; McLaughlin, S. A.; Kodis, J. M.; Morgan, T. H.; Williams, D. R.; Russell, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) was established by NASA in 1964 to provide for the preservation and dissemination of scientific data from NASA missions. It has evolved to support distributed, active archives that were established in the Planetary, Astrophysics, and Heliophysics disciplines through a series of Memoranda of Understanding. The disciplines took over responsibility for working with new projects to acquire and distribute data for community researchers while the NSSDC remained vital as a deep archive. Since 2000, NSSDC has been using the Archive Information Package to preserve data over the long term. As part of its effort to streamline the ingest of data into the deep archive, the NSSDC developed and implemented a data model of desired and required metadata in XML. This process, in use for roughly five years now, has been successfully used to support the identification and ingest of data into the NSSDC archive, most notably those data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) submitted under PDS3. A series of software packages (X-ware) were developed to handle the submission of data from the PDS nodes utilizing a volume structure. An XML submission manifest is generated at the PDS provider site prior to delivery to NSSDC. The manifest ensures the fidelity of PDS data delivered to NSSDC. Preservation metadata is captured in an XML object when NSSDC archives the data. With the recent adoption by the PDS of the XML-based PDS4 data model, there is an opportunity for the NSSDC to provide additional services to the PDS such as the preservation, tracking, and restoration of individual products (e.g., a specific data file or document), which was unfeasible in the previous PDS3 system. The NSSDC is modifying and further streamlining its data ingest process to take advantage of the PDS4 model, an important consideration given the ever-increasing amount of data being generated and archived by orbiting missions at the Moon and Mars, other active projects

  8. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  9. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  10. Support Center for Regulatory Atmospheric Modeling (SCRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technical site provides access to air quality models (including computer code, input data, and model processors) and other mathematical simulation techniques used in assessing air emissions control strategies and source impacts.

  11. The substorm cycle as reproduced by global MHD models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, E.; Sergeev, V.; Tsyganenko, N.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastäetter, L.; Raeder, J.; Tóth, G.; Lyon, J.; Merkin, V.; Wiltberger, M.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Gordeev et al. (2015) suggested a method to test global MHD models against statistical empirical data. They showed that four community-available global MHD models supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) produce a reasonable agreement with reality for those key parameters (the magnetospheric size, magnetic field, and pressure) that are directly related to the large-scale equilibria in the outer magnetosphere. Based on the same set of simulation runs, here we investigate how the models reproduce the global loading-unloading cycle. We found that in terms of global magnetic flux transport, three examined CCMC models display systematically different response to idealized 2 h north then 2 h south interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz variation. The LFM model shows a depressed return convection and high loading rate during the growth phase as well as enhanced return convection and high unloading rate during the expansion phase, with the amount of loaded/unloaded magnetotail flux and the growth phase duration being the closest to their observed empirical values during isolated substorms. Two other models exhibit drastically different behavior. In the BATS-R-US model the plasma sheet convection shows a smooth transition to the steady convection regime after the IMF southward turning. In the Open GGCM a weak plasma sheet convection has comparable intensities during both the growth phase and the following slow unloading phase. We also demonstrate potential technical problem in the publicly available simulations which is related to postprocessing interpolation and could affect the accuracy of magnetic field tracing and of other related procedures.

  12. MODEL OF HEAT SIMULATOR FOR DATA CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Novotný

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a design and a development of a heat simulator, which will be used for a flow research in data centers. The designed heat simulator is based on an ideological basis of four-processor 1U Supermicro server. The designed heat simulator enables to control the flow and heat output within the range of 10–100 %. The paper covers also the results of testing measurements of mass flow rates and heat flow rates in the simulator. The flow field at the outlet of the server was measured by the stereo PIV method. The heat flow rate was determined, based on measuring the temperature field at the inlet and outlet of the simulator and known mass flow rate.

  13. Scattering center models of backscattering waves by dielectric spheroid objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun-Yi; Han, Xiao-Zhe; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2018-02-19

    Scattering center models provide a simple and effective way of describing the complex electromagnetic scattering phenomena of targets and have been successfully applied in radar applications. However, the existing models are limited to conducting objects. Numerical results show that scattering centers of dielectric objects are far more complex than conducting objects and most of them are distributed beyond the object. For the lossless and low-loss media, the major scattering contributions to total fields are surface waves and multiple internal reflections rather than the direct reflection. Concise scattering center models for backscattering from dielectric spheroid objects are proposed in this work, which can characterize the backscattered waves by scattering centers with sparse and physical parameters. Good agreement has been demonstrated between the high resolution range profiles simulated by this model with those obtained by Mie series and the full wave numerical method.

  14. Assessing the performance of community-available global MHD models using key system parameters and empirical relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, E.; Sergeev, V.; Honkonen, I.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastätter, L.; Palmroth, M.; Janhunen, P.; Tóth, G.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M.

    2015-12-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling is a powerful tool in space weather research and predictions. There are several advanced and still developing global MHD (GMHD) models that are publicly available via Community Coordinated Modeling Center's (CCMC) Run on Request system, which allows the users to simulate the magnetospheric response to different solar wind conditions including extraordinary events, like geomagnetic storms. Systematic validation of GMHD models against observations still continues to be a challenge, as well as comparative benchmarking of different models against each other. In this paper we describe and test a new approach in which (i) a set of critical large-scale system parameters is explored/tested, which are produced by (ii) specially designed set of computer runs to simulate realistic statistical distributions of critical solar wind parameters and are compared to (iii) observation-based empirical relationships for these parameters. Being tested in approximately similar conditions (similar inputs, comparable grid resolution, etc.), the four models publicly available at the CCMC predict rather well the absolute values and variations of those key parameters (magnetospheric size, magnetic field, and pressure) which are directly related to the large-scale magnetospheric equilibrium in the outer magnetosphere, for which the MHD is supposed to be a valid approach. At the same time, the models have systematic differences in other parameters, being especially different in predicting the global convection rate, total field-aligned current, and magnetic flux loading into the magnetotail after the north-south interplanetary magnetic field turning. According to validation results, none of the models emerges as an absolute leader. The new approach suggested for the evaluation of the models performance against reality may be used by model users while planning their investigations, as well as by model developers and those interesting to quantitatively

  15. A mathematical model on germinal center kinetics andtermination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesmir, Can; De Boer, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    We devise a mathematical model to study germinal center (GC) kinetics. Earlier models for GC kinetics areextended by explicitly modeling 1) the cell division history of centroblasts, 2) the Ag uptake by centrocytes,and 3) T cell dynamics. Allowing for T cell kinetics and T-B cell interactions, we...

  16. To center or not to center? Investigating inertia with a multilevel autoregressive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen L. Hamaker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether level 1 predictors should be centered per cluster has received considerable attention in the multilevel literature. While most agree that there is no one preferred approach, it has also been argued that cluster mean centering is desirable when the within-cluster slope and the between-cluster slope are expected to deviate, and the main interest is in the within-cluster slope. However, we show in a series of simulations that if one has a multilevel autoregressive model in which the level 1 predictor is the lagged outcome variable (i.e., the outcome variable at the previous occasion, cluster mean centering will in general lead to a downward bias in the parameter estimate of the within-cluster slope (i.e., the autoregressive relationship. This is particularly relevant if the main question is whether there is on average an autoregressive effect. Nonetheless, we show that if the main interest is in estimating the effect of a level 2 predictor on the autoregressive parameter (i.e., a cross-level interaction, cluster mean centering should be preferred over other forms of centering. Hence, researchers should be clear on what is considered the main goal of their study, and base their choice of centering method on this when using a multilevel autoregressive model.

  17. Development of Models for Regional Cardiac Surgery Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Seon Park

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to develop the models for regional cardiac surgery centers, which take regional characteristics into consideration, as a policy measure that could alleviate the concentration of cardiac surgery in the metropolitan area and enhance the accessibility for patients who reside in the regions. Methods: To develop the models and set standards for the necessary personnel and facilities for the initial management plan, we held workshops, debates, and conference meetings with various experts. Results: After partitioning the plan into two parts (the operational autonomy and the functional comprehensiveness, three models were developed: the ‘independent regional cardiac surgery center’ model, the ‘satellite cardiac surgery center within hospitals’ model, and the ‘extended cardiac surgery department within hospitals’ model. Proposals on personnel and facility management for each of the models were also presented. A regional cardiac surgery center model that could be applied to each treatment area was proposed, which was developed based on the anticipated demand for cardiac surgery. The independent model or the satellite model was proposed for Chungcheong, Jeolla, North Gyeongsang, and South Gyeongsang area, where more than 500 cardiac surgeries are performed annually. The extended model was proposed as most effective for the Gangwon and Jeju area, where more than 200 cardiac surgeries are performed annually. Conclusion: The operation of regional cardiac surgery centers with high caliber professionals and quality resources such as optimal equipment and facility size, should enhance regional healthcare accessibility and the quality of cardiac surgery in South Korea.

  18. A person-centered communication and reflection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Harder, Ingegerd; Kirkevold, Marit

    2008-01-01

    : managing poorly controlled diabetes. A person-centered communication and reflection model was developed, identifying SDM in chronic care to be a question of professionals gaining insight into patients' decisions, rather than the opposite. The model reveals important choices in communication and reflection......, which were decisive for whether SDM was achieved or not. SDM involved co-creating person-centered knowledge: concrete evidence which empowered patients and professionals in problem solving. Although further testing is required, the general tenets of the model are expected to be applicable across chronic...

  19. Vocabulary and Experiences to Develop a Center of Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaar, Taylor; Pollack, Linda B.; Lerner, Michael E.; Engels, Robert J.

    2017-10-01

    The use of systems in many introductory courses is limited and often implicit. Modeling two or more objects as a system and tracking the center of mass of that system is usually not included. Thinking in terms of the center of mass facilitates problem solving while exposing the importance of using conservation laws. We present below three laboratory activities that build this systems thinking for introductory physics students.

  20. Customer-centered careflow modeling based on guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biqing; Zhu, Peng; Wu, Cheng

    2012-10-01

    In contemporary society, customer-centered health care, which stresses customer participation and long-term tailored care, is inevitably becoming a trend. Compared with the hospital or physician-centered healthcare process, the customer-centered healthcare process requires more knowledge and modeling such a process is extremely complex. Thus, building a care process model for a special customer is cost prohibitive. In addition, during the execution of a care process model, the information system should have flexibility to modify the model so that it adapts to changes in the healthcare process. Therefore, supporting the process in a flexible, cost-effective way is a key challenge for information technology. To meet this challenge, first, we analyze various kinds of knowledge used in process modeling, illustrate their characteristics, and detail their roles and effects in careflow modeling. Secondly, we propose a methodology to manage a lifecycle of the healthcare process modeling, with which models could be built gradually with convenience and efficiency. In this lifecycle, different levels of process models are established based on the kinds of knowledge involved, and the diffusion strategy of these process models is designed. Thirdly, architecture and prototype of the system supporting the process modeling and its lifecycle are given. This careflow system also considers the compatibility of legacy systems and authority problems. Finally, an example is provided to demonstrate implementation of the careflow system.

  1. Mathematical Model of Synthesis Catalyst with Local Reaction Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a catalyst granule with a porous ceramic passive substrate and point active centers on which an exothermic synthesis reaction occurs. A rate of the chemical reaction depends on the temperature according to the Arrhenius law. Heat is removed from the pellet surface in products of synthesis due to heat transfer. In our work we first proposed a model for calculating the steady-state temperature of a catalyst pellet with local reaction centers. Calculation of active centers temperature is based on the idea of self-consistent field (mean-field theory. At first, it is considered that powers of the reaction heat release at the centers are known. On the basis of the found analytical solution, which describes temperature distribution inside the granule, the average temperature of the reaction centers is calculated, which then is inserted in the formula for heat release. The resulting system of transcendental algebraic equations is transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations of relaxation type and solved numerically to achieve a steady-state value. As a practical application, the article considers a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst granule with active cobalt metallic micro-particles. Cobalt micro-particles are the centers of the exothermic reaction of hydrocarbons macromolecular synthesis. Synthesis occurs as a result of absorption of the components of the synthesis gas on metallic cobalt. The temperature distribution inside the granule for a single local center and reaction centers located on the same granule diameter is found. It was found that there is a critical temperature of reactor exceeding of which leads to significant local overheating of the centers - thermal explosion. The temperature distribution with the local reaction centers is qualitatively different from the granule temperature, calculated in the homogeneous approximation. It is shown that, in contrast to the homogeneous approximation, the

  2. The vacancy-interstitial model of DX centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    Recent DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) studies of 'DX' centers in dilute Al x Ga 1-x As alloys agree with a model of the deep neutral state in which the donor has moved into an adjacent interstitial site leaving behind a vacancy. The enthalpy and entropy of these states, which depend on the number (0 to 3) of Al atoms adjacent to the donors, have been obtained by fitting the data. This model, which also predicts the large potential barriers between the centered and relaxed states, thus accounting for PPC (persistent photoconductivity), is an extension to large displacement of the displaced donor model proposed earlier. It is equivalent to recent model of the EL2 metastable state based on displaced antisite double-donors. (author) 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. Probing dark matter models with neutrinos from the Galactic center

    OpenAIRE

    Erkoca, Arif Emre; Reno, Mary Hall; Sarcevic, Ina

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the contained and upward muon and shower fluxes due to neutrinos produced via dark matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic center. We consider dark matter models in which the dark matter particle is a gravitino, a Kaluza-Klein particle and a particle in leptophilic models. The Navarro-Frenk-White profile for the dark matter density distribution in the Galaxy is used. We incorporate neutrino oscillations by assuming maximal mixing and parametrize our results for muon and show...

  4. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Chemical Release Modeling Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirrup, Timothy Scott [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This evaluation documents the methodology and results of chemical release modeling for operations at Building 518, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Core Facility. This evaluation is intended to supplement an update to the CINT [Standalone] Hazards Analysis (SHA). This evaluation also updates the original [Design] Hazards Analysis (DHA) completed in 2003 during the design and construction of the facility; since the original DHA, additional toxic materials have been evaluated and modeled to confirm the continued low hazard classification of the CINT facility and operations. This evaluation addresses the potential catastrophic release of the current inventory of toxic chemicals at Building 518 based on a standard query in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

  5. Lifetime-Aware Cloud Data Centers: Models and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Chiaraviglio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a model to evaluate the server lifetime in cloud data centers (DCs. In particular, when the server power level is decreased, the failure rate tends to be reduced as a consequence of the limited number of components powered on. However, the variation between the different power states triggers a failure rate increase. We therefore consider these two effects in a server lifetime model, subject to an energy-aware management policy. We then evaluate our model in a realistic case study. Our results show that the impact on the server lifetime is far from negligible. As a consequence, we argue that a lifetime-aware approach should be pursued to decide how and when to apply a power state change to a server.

  6. Model-Based Systems Engineering in Concurrent Engineering Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Curtis; Infeld, Samantha; Bracken, Jennifer Medlin; McGuire, Melissa; McQuirk, Christina; Kisdi, Aron; Murphy, Jonathan; Cole, Bjorn; Zarifian, Pezhman

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Centers (CECs) are specialized facilities with a goal of generating and maturing engineering designs by enabling rapid design iterations. This is accomplished by co-locating a team of experts (either physically or virtually) in a room with a narrow design goal and a limited timeline of a week or less. The systems engineer uses a model of the system to capture the relevant interfaces and manage the overall architecture. A single model that integrates other design information and modeling allows the entire team to visualize the concurrent activity and identify conflicts more efficiently, potentially resulting in a systems model that will continue to be used throughout the project lifecycle. Performing systems engineering using such a system model is the definition of model-based systems engineering (MBSE); therefore, CECs evolving their approach to incorporate advances in MBSE are more successful in reducing time and cost needed to meet study goals. This paper surveys space mission CECs that are in the middle of this evolution, and the authors share their experiences in order to promote discussion within the community.

  7. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  8. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mellor-Crummey

    2008-02-29

    Rice University's achievements as part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing include: (1) design and implemention of cafc, the first multi-platform CAF compiler for distributed and shared-memory machines, (2) performance studies of the efficiency of programs written using the CAF and UPC programming models, (3) a novel technique to analyze explicitly-parallel SPMD programs that facilitates optimization, (4) design, implementation, and evaluation of new language features for CAF, including communication topologies, multi-version variables, and distributed multithreading to simplify development of high-performance codes in CAF, and (5) a synchronization strength reduction transformation for automatically replacing barrier-based synchronization with more efficient point-to-point synchronization. The prototype Co-array Fortran compiler cafc developed in this project is available as open source software from http://www.hipersoft.rice.edu/caf.

  9. A model for evaluating academic research centers: Case study of the Asian/Pacific Islander Youth Violence Prevention Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Stephanie T; Hishinuma, Earl S; Goebert, Deborah A; Onoye, Jane M M; Sugimoto-Matsuda, Jeanelle J

    2018-02-01

    To provide one model for evaluating academic research centers, given their vital role in addressing public health issues. A theoretical framework is described for a comprehensive evaluation plan for research centers. This framework is applied to one specific center by describing the center's Logic Model and Evaluation Plan, including a sample of the center's activities. Formative and summative evaluation information is summarized. In addition, a summary of outcomes is provided: improved practice and policy; reduction of risk factors and increase in protective factors; reduction of interpersonal youth violence in the community; and national prototype for prevention of interpersonal youth violence. Research centers are important mechanisms to advance science and improve people's quality of life. Because of their more infrastructure-intensive and comprehensive approach, they also require substantial resources for success, and thus, also require careful accountability. It is therefore important to comprehensively evaluate these centers. As provided herein, a more systematic and structured approach utilizing logic models, an evaluation plan, and successful processes can provide research centers with a functionally useful method in their evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Geometric Modeling and Reasoning of Human-Centered Freeform Products

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Charlie C L

    2013-01-01

    The recent trend in user-customized product design requires the shape of products to be automatically adjusted according to the human body’s shape, so that people will feel more comfortable when wearing these products.  Geometric approaches can be used to design the freeform shape of products worn by people, which can greatly improve the efficiency of design processes in various industries involving customized products (e.g., garment design, toy design, jewel design, shoe design, and design of medical devices, etc.). These products are usually composed of very complex geometric shapes (represented by free-form surfaces), and are not driven by a parameter table but a digital human model with free-form shapes or part of human bodies (e.g., wrist, foot, and head models).   Geometric Modeling and Reasoning of Human-Centered Freeform Products introduces the algorithms of human body reconstruction, freeform product modeling, constraining and reconstructing freeform products, and shape optimization for improving...

  11. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  12. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  13. Accessing patient-centered care using the advanced access model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantau, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Waits and delays for healthcare are legendary. These delays are not only frustrating and potentially hazardous for patients and providers but also represent significant cost to office practices. The traditional medical model that defines urgent care versus routine care is a vain and futile attempt to sort demand. This approach is at constant odds with patients' definition of urgency. Trusting patients to determine when and how they want to access care makes sense from a customer service perspective. If approached systematically using the principles of Advanced Access, patient demand patterns can be tracked to forecast demand. These demand patterns become the template for deploying the resources necessary to meet patients' needs. Although not a simple journey, the transformation to Advanced Access provides an entree to patient-centered care where patients can say, "I get exactly the care I want and need, when I want and need it."

  14. Teaching professional writing in an academic health sciences center: the Writing Center model at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tom G; Ariail, Jennie; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Kerr, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Writing is taught as professional competency in higher education generally, but the health science education literature emphasizes writing as a pedagogical means rather than a professional end. The Medical University of South Carolina established a Writing Center in 1994 to teach professional writing. This report describes the rationale for profession-specific, graduate-level writing instruction; summarizes the Writing Center model; and reports usage data. Students have reported improvement in particular texts and said they would be better able to complete writing tasks in the future. Interventions modeled after the Writing Center and staffed with professionally trained writing teachers may provide a means to pool resources to teach writing as professional competency. The Writing Center has provided the expertise to teach professional writing without demanding curricular revision.

  15. Cloud data centers and cost modeling a complete guide to planning, designing and building a cloud data center

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Caesar

    2015-01-01

    Cloud Data Centers and Cost Modeling establishes a framework for strategic decision-makers to facilitate the development of cloud data centers. Just as building a house requires a clear understanding of the blueprints, architecture, and costs of the project; building a cloud-based data center requires similar knowledge. The authors take a theoretical and practical approach, starting with the key questions to help uncover needs and clarify project scope. They then demonstrate probability tools to test and support decisions, and provide processes that resolve key issues. After laying a foundati

  16. An Approach to Comprehensive and Sustainable Solar Wind Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Boblitt, J. M.; Wiegand, C.

    2017-12-01

    The number of models of the corona and inner heliosphere and of their updates and upgrades grows steadily, as does the number and character of the model inputs. Maintaining up to date validation of these models, in the face of this constant model evolution, is a necessary but very labor intensive activity. In the last year alone, both NASA's LWS program and the CCMC's ongoing support of model forecasting activities at NOAA SWPC have sought model validation reports on the quality of all aspects of the community's coronal and heliospheric models, including both ambient and CME related wind solutions at L1. In this presentation I will give a brief review of the community's previous model validation results of L1 wind representation. I will discuss the semi-automated web based system we are constructing at the CCMC to present comparative visualizations of all interesting aspects of the solutions from competing models.This system is designed to be easily queried to provide the essential comprehensive inputs to repeat andupdate previous validation studies and support extensions to them. I will illustrate this by demonstrating how the system is being used to support the CCMC/LWS Model Assessment Forum teams focused on the ambient and time dependent corona and solar wind, including CME arrival time and IMF Bz.I will also discuss plans to extend the system to include results from the Forum teams addressing SEP model validation.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling and Validating Experiments of Airflow in a Data Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emelie Wibron

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide demand on data storage continues to increase and both the number and the size of data centers are expanding rapidly. Energy efficiency is an important factor to consider in data centers since the total energy consumption is huge. The servers must be cooled and the performance of the cooling system depends on the flow field of the air. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD can provide detailed information about the airflow in both existing data centers and proposed data center configurations before they are built. However, the simulations must be carried out with quality and trust. The k– ε model is the most common choice to model the turbulent airflow in data centers. The aim of this study is to examine the performance of more advanced turbulence models, not previously investigated for CFD modeling of data centers. The considered turbulence models are the k– ε model, the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM and Detached Eddy Simulations (DES. The commercial code ANSYS CFX 16.0 is used to perform the simulations and experimental values are used for validation. It is clarified that the flow field for the different turbulence models deviate at locations that are not in the close proximity of the main components in the data center. The k– ε model fails to predict low velocity regions. RSM and DES produce very similar results and, based on the solution times, it is recommended to use RSM to model the turbulent airflow data centers.

  18. Model-Driven Policy Framework for Data Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caba, Cosmin Marius; Kentis, Angelos Mimidis; Soler, José

    2016-01-01

    Data Centers (DCs) continue to become increasingly complex, due to comprising multiple functional entities (e.g. routing, orchestration). Managing the multitude of interconnected components in the DC becomes difficult and error prone, leading to slow service provisioning, lack of QoS support, etc...

  19. Dst Index in the 2008 GEM Modeling Challenge - Model Performance for Moderate and Strong Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria; Hesse, Michael; Chulaki, Anna; Pulkkinen, Antti; Ridley, Aaron J.; Gombosi, Tamas; Vapirev, Alexander; Raeder, Joachim; Wiltberger, Michael James; hide

    2010-01-01

    The GEM 2008 modeling challenge efforts are expanding beyond comparing in-situ measurements in the magnetosphere and ionosphere to include the computation of indices to be compared. The Dst index measures the largest deviations of the horizontal magnetic field at 4 equatorial magnetometers from the quiet-time background field and is commonly used to track the strength of the magnetic disturbance of the magnetosphere during storms. Models can calculate a proxy Dst index in various ways, including using the Dessler-Parker Sckopke relation and the energy of the ring current and Biot-Savart integration of electric currents in the magnetosphere. The GEM modeling challenge investigates 4 space weather events and we compare models available at CCMC against each other and the observed values of Ost. Models used include SWMF/BATSRUS, OpenGGCM, LFM, GUMICS (3D magnetosphere MHD models), Fok-RC, CRCM, RAM-SCB (kinetic drift models of the ring current), WINDMI (magnetosphere-ionosphere electric circuit model), and predictions based on an impulse response function (IRF) model and analytic coupling functions with inputs of solar wind data. In addition to the analysis of model-observation comparisons we look at the way Dst is computed in global magnetosphere models. The default value of Dst computed by the SWMF model is for Bz the Earth's center. In addition to this, we present results obtained at different locations on the Earth's surface. We choose equatorial locations at local noon, dusk (18:00 hours), midnight and dawn (6:00 hours). The different virtual observatory locations reveal the variation around the earth-centered Dst value resulting from the distribution of electric currents in the magnetosphere during different phases of a storm.

  20. Integrated Exoplanet Modeling with the GSFC Exoplanet Modeling & Analysis Center (EMAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Avi M.; Hostetter, Carl; Pulkkinen, Antti; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn David

    2018-01-01

    Our ability to characterize the atmospheres of extrasolar planets will be revolutionized by JWST, WFIRST and future ground- and space-based telescopes. In preparation, the exoplanet community must develop an integrated suite of tools with which we can comprehensively predict and analyze observations of exoplanets, in order to characterize the planetary environments and ultimately search them for signs of habitability and life.The GSFC Exoplanet Modeling and Analysis Center (EMAC) will be a web-accessible high-performance computing platform with science support for modelers and software developers to host and integrate their scientific software tools, with the goal of leveraging the scientific contributions from the entire exoplanet community to improve our interpretations of future exoplanet discoveries. Our suite of models will include stellar models, models for star-planet interactions, atmospheric models, planet system science models, telescope models, instrument models, and finally models for retrieving signals from observational data. By integrating this suite of models, the community will be able to self-consistently calculate the emergent spectra from the planet whether from emission, scattering, or in transmission, and use these simulations to model the performance of current and new telescopes and their instrumentation.The EMAC infrastructure will not only provide a repository for planetary and exoplanetary community models, modeling tools and intermodal comparisons, but it will include a "run-on-demand" portal with each software tool hosted on a separate virtual machine. The EMAC system will eventually include a means of running or “checking in” new model simulations that are in accordance with the community-derived standards. Additionally, the results of intermodal comparisons will be used to produce open source publications that quantify the model comparisons and provide an overview of community consensus on model uncertainties on the climates of

  1. The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Jr., Francis Perry [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the Ox, HOx, NOx, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

  2. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  3. Practice and philosophy of climate model tuning across six US modeling centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Schmidt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Model calibration (or tuning is a necessary part of developing and testing coupled ocean–atmosphere climate models regardless of their main scientific purpose. There is an increasing recognition that this process needs to become more transparent for both users of climate model output and other developers. Knowing how and why climate models are tuned and which targets are used is essential to avoiding possible misattributions of skillful predictions to data accommodation and vice versa. This paper describes the approach and practice of model tuning for the six major US climate modeling centers. While details differ among groups in terms of scientific missions, tuning targets, and tunable parameters, there is a core commonality of approaches. However, practices differ significantly on some key aspects, in particular, in the use of initialized forecast analyses as a tool, the explicit use of the historical transient record, and the use of the present-day radiative imbalance vs. the implied balance in the preindustrial era as a target.

  4. Sustaining and Expanding Telehealth: A Survey of Business Models from Selected Prominent U.S. Telehealth Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effertz, Glen; Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Duffy, Veronica; Noon, Charles; Langell, Kevin; Antoniotti, Nina; Lowery, Curtis

    2017-02-01

    Telehealth centers across the country, including our own center, are addressing sustainability and best practice business models. We undertook this survey to explore the business models being used at other established telehealth centers. In the literature on telehealth and sustainability, there is a paucity of comparative studies as to how successful telehealth centers function. In this study, we compared the business models of 10 successful telehealth centers. We conducted the study by interviewing key individuals at the centers, either through teleconference or telephone. We found that there are five general approaches to sustaining a telehealth center: grants, telehealth network membership fees, income from providing clinical services, per encounter charges, and operating as a cost center. We also found that most centers use more than one approach. We concluded that, although the first four approaches can contribute to the success of a center, telehealth centers are and should remain cost centers for their respective institutions.

  5. Evaluating energy saving system of data centers based on AHP and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yingni

    2018-03-01

    Due to the high energy consumption of communication, energy saving of data centers must be enforced. But the lack of evaluation mechanisms has restrained the process on energy saving construction of data centers. In this paper, energy saving evaluation index system of data centers was constructed on the basis of clarifying the influence factors. Based on the evaluation index system, analytical hierarchy process was used to determine the weights of the evaluation indexes. Subsequently, a three-grade fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model was constructed to evaluate the energy saving system of data centers.

  6. Model - SEO - serious ovarian cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetically engineered mouse model Developed in house Genetic aberrations: Inactivation of Rb tumor suppression (via K18-T121 transgene) Tp53 loss or mutation (R172H) Brca1 or Brca2 loss Induction by injection of adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase under the ovrian bursa Pathology:

  7. Model Orlando regionally efficient travel management coordination center (MORE TMCC), phase II : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The final report for the Model Orlando Regionally Efficient Travel Management Coordination Center (MORE TMCC) presents the details of : the 2-year process of the partial deployment of the original MORE TMCC design created in Phase I of this project...

  8. NOAA Coastal Services Center Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Philadelphia WFO - Pennsylvania

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's Sea Level...

  9. Inerting a Boeing 747SP Center Wing Tank Scale Model With Nitrogen-Enriched Air

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavage, William

    2002-01-01

    Tests were performed in a 0.24 scale model of a Boeing 747SP center wing tank to validate the existing assumptions for inerting complex geometric spaces, which were developed from previous experiments, and to facilitate design...

  10. Location Model for Distribution Centers for Fulfilling Electronic Orders of Fresh Foods under Uncertain Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of locating distribution centers for delivering fresh food as a part of electronic commerce is a strategic decision problem for enterprises. This paper establishes a model for locating distribution centers that considers the uncertainty of customer demands for fresh goods in terms of time-sensitiveness and freshness. Based on the methodology of robust optimization in dealing with uncertain problems, this paper optimizes the location model in discrete demand probabilistic scenarios. In this paper, an improved fruit fly optimization algorithm is proposed to solve the distribution center location problem. An example is given to show that the proposed model and algorithm are robust and can effectively handle the complications caused by uncertain demand. The model proposed in this paper proves valuable both theoretically and practically in the selection of locations of distribution centers.

  11. The Learner-Centered Instructional Design Model: A Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Duane Allan

    2010-01-01

    The learner-centered instructional design model redefines the standard linear instructional design model to form a circular model where the learner's needs are the first item considered in the development of instruction. The purpose of this modified Delphi study was to have a panel of experts in the instructional design field review the…

  12. Absolute IGS antenna phase center model igs08.atx: status and potential improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, R.; Dach, R.; Collilieux, X.; Jäggi, A.; Schmitz, M.; Dilssner, F.

    2016-04-01

    On 17 April 2011, all analysis centers (ACs) of the International GNSS Service (IGS) adopted the reference frame realization IGS08 and the corresponding absolute antenna phase center model igs08.atx for their routine analyses. The latter consists of an updated set of receiver and satellite antenna phase center offsets and variations (PCOs and PCVs). An update of the model was necessary due to the difference of about 1 ppb in the terrestrial scale between two consecutive realizations of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2008 vs. ITRF2005), as that parameter is highly correlated with the GNSS satellite antenna PCO components in the radial direction.

  13. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  14. Terrestrial spreading centers under Venus conditions - Evaluation of a crustal spreading model for Western Aphrodite Terra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotin, C.; Senske, D. A.; Head, J. W.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1989-01-01

    The model of Reid and Jackson (1981) for terrestrial spreading centers is applied to Venus conditions. On the basis of spreading rate, mantle temperature, and surface temperature, the model predicts both isostatic topography and crustal thickness. The model and Pioneer Venus altimetry and gravity data are used to test the hypothesis of Head and Crumpler (1987) that Western Aphrodite Terra is the location of crustal spreading on Venus. It is concluded that a spreading center model for Ovda Regio in Western Aphrodite Terra could account for the observed topography and line-of-sight gravity anomalies found in the Pioneer data.

  15. Pilot Study of a Patient-Centered Radiology Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J Shannon; Furtado, Vanessa F; Keller, Lisa A; Lotti, Judith Borsody; Saltalamacchia, Catherine A; Lennes, Inga T; Salazar, Gloria M

    2017-02-01

    The Radiology Process Model (RPM) was previously described in terms of its conceptual basis and proposed survey items. The current study describes the first pilot application of the RPM in the field and the results of initial psychometric analysis. We used an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot RPM survey in 100 patients having outpatient interventional radiology procedures. The 24 survey items had 4 or 5 levels of severity. We assessed for missing data, items that patients found confusing, any suggestions by patients for additional items and clarity of items from patient feedback. Factor analysis was performed and internal consistency measured. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of patient responses to the items as a summated scale with a visual analog scale (VAS) they completed indicating their interventional radiology experience. The visual analog scale and the RPM summated scale were strongly correlated (r = 0.7). Factor analysis showed four factors: interactions with facility and doctors/staff, time-sensitive aspects, pain, and anxiety. The items showed high internal consistency (alpha: 0.86) as a group and approximately 0.7 to 0.9 by the factors. Analysis shows that two items could be deleted (cost and communication between radiologist and referrers). Revision of two items and potential addition of others are discussed. The RPM shows initial evidence of psychometric validity and internal consistency reliability. Minor changes are anticipated before wider use. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lower Savannah aging, disability & transportation resource center : regional travel management and coordination center (TMCC) model and demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report details the deployed technology and implementation experiences of the Lower Savannah Aging, Disability & Transportation : Resource Center in Aiken, South Carolina, which served as the regional Travel Management and Coordination Center (TM...

  17. Synthetic Optimization Model and Algorithm for Railway Freight Center Station Location and Wagon Flow Organization Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-cai Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The railway freight center stations location and wagon flow organization in railway transport are interconnected, and each of them is complicated in a large-scale rail network. In this paper, a two-stage method is proposed to optimize railway freight center stations location and wagon flow organization together. The location model is present with the objective to minimize the operation cost and fixed construction cost. Then, the second model of wagon flow organization is proposed to decide the optimal train service between different freight center stations. The location of the stations is the output of the first model. A heuristic algorithm that combined tabu search (TS with adaptive clonal selection algorithm (ACSA is proposed to solve those two models. The numerical results show the proposed solution method is effective.

  18. A domain model of a clinical reading center - Design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Gunnar; Peters, Tobias; Zrenner, Eberhart; Wilke, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In clinical trials huge amounts of raw data are generated. Often these data are submitted to reading centers for being analyzed by experts of that particular type of examination. Although the installment of a reading center can raise the overall quality, they also introduce additional complexity to the management and conduction of a clinical trial. Software can help to handle this complexity. Domain-driven-design is one concept to tackle software development in such complex domains. Here we present our domain model for a clinical reading center, as well as its actual implementation utilizing the Nuxeo enterprise content management system.

  19. OWL: A code for the two-center shell model with spherical Woods-Saxon potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2018-03-01

    A Fortran-90 code for solving the two-center nuclear shell model problem is presented. The model is based on two spherical Woods-Saxon potentials and the potential separable expansion method. It describes the single-particle motion in low-energy nuclear collisions, and is useful for characterizing a broad range of phenomena from fusion to nuclear molecular structures.

  20. California Geriatric Education Center Logic Model: An Evaluation and Communication Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rachel M.; Alkema, Gretchen E.; Frank, Janet C.

    2009-01-01

    A logic model is a communications tool that graphically represents a program's resources, activities, priority target audiences for change, and the anticipated outcomes. This article describes the logic model development process undertaken by the California Geriatric Education Center in spring 2008. The CGEC is one of 48 Geriatric Education…

  1. Clinical Assessment at College Counseling Centers: The Consultant-on-Duty Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Eva; McKelley, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The consultant-on-duty (COD) clinical consultation model maximizes efficient use of services, is distinct from other university counseling center (UCC) services, and precedes therapy. This model enables clinicians to ensure optimal fit between client need and type of UCC services provided, including brief therapy. The 4 objectives of the COD model…

  2. Transforming Patient-Centered Care: Development of the Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennifer E; Titler, Marita G; Kane Low, Lisa; Dalton, Vanessa K; Sampselle, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    In response to the passage of the Affordable Care Act in the United States, clinicians and researchers are critically evaluating methods to engage patients in implementing evidence-based care to improve health outcomes. However, most models on implementation only target clinicians or health systems as the adopters of evidence. Patients are largely ignored in these models. A new implementation model that captures the complex but important role of patients in the uptake of evidence may be a critical missing link. Through a process of theory evaluation and development, we explore patient-centered concepts (patient activation and shared decision making) within an implementation model by mapping qualitative data from an elective induction of labor study to assess the model's ability to capture these key concepts. The process demonstrated that a new, patient-centered model for implementation is needed. In response, the Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model is presented. We conclude that, by fully integrating women into an implementation model, outcomes that are important to both the clinician and patient will improve. In the interest of providing evidence-based care to women during pregnancy and childbirth, it is essential that care is patient centered. The inclusion of concepts discussed in this article has the potential to extend beyond maternity care and influence other clinical areas. Utilizing the newly developed Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model provides a framework for utilizing evidence and translating it into practice while acknowledging the important role that women have in the process. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. IMPROVING TBO OF FREIGHT CAR BOGIES. GEOMETRY MODEL OF CENTER PAD WEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Muradian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The scientific work is aimed to: 1 analyze the technical condition of freight cars and technological methods used in the repair; 2 identify possible ways to improve resource of freight car bogies; 3 develop a mathematical model to describe the wear geometry of the original surface of bogie center pad at the corresponding life cycle of a freight car. Methodology. In order to solve the problem complex of increasing TBO of freight car bogies the methods for the synthesis, analysis and systematic approach were used. In addition, the use of mathematical modeling unit, solid state physics, the theory of friction and wear of solids. Findings. The analysis of the technical condition of freight cars has shown that up to 15% of the faults falls on the bogies. A separate element of the repaired bogie is a bolster. At this the center pad is recovered most often. The center pad wear is uneven and the technological methods used for the repair, do not allow providing uniform wear due to which there is a need in premature repairs. One of the ways to improve the center pad resource during repair is the application of welding or sputtering deposition, but with providing discrete strength and durability in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the car axis, respectively. In order to establish the boundaries of the distribution of renewable material along the center pad diameter it was considered the fatigue wear process in cooperation with center plate and described the geometry of the surface of the center pad wear. Originality. Technical condition of freight car bogies according to wear criterion was analyzed in the paper. It is shown that the dynamics of bogie faults has a positive character. In addition, a significant place among the repaired parts takes the bolster, and a special loaded place is the center pad. To describe the geometry of wear for the first time a mathematical model for determining the initial surface of the center pad in the

  4. Government As Innovation Catalyst: Lessons From The Early Center For Medicare And Medicaid Innovation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perla, Rocco J; Pham, Hoangmai; Gilfillan, Richard; Berwick, Donald M; Baron, Richard J; Lee, Peter; McCannon, C Joseph; Progar, Kevin; Shrank, William H

    2018-02-01

    Congress established the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) to design, test, and spread innovative payment and service delivery models that either reduce spending without reducing the quality of care or improve the quality of care without increasing spending. CMMI sought to leverage these models to foster market innovation and accelerate the transformation of payment and care delivery to achieve the Triple Aim of better health, better care, and lower cost. This article provides a perspective on the design and execution of CMMI's five initial models, the resulting outcomes and lessons, and how their core concepts evolved within and spread beyond CMMI. This experience yields three key insights that could inform future efforts by CMMI and public and private payers, including model designs and policy decisions. These insights center on the need for iterative testing and learning guided by market feedback, more realistic time frames to demonstrate impact on cost and quality, and greater integration of models.

  5. Geographic Modeling to Quantify the Impact of Primary and Comprehensive Stroke Center Destination Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Michael T; Pajerowski, William; Messé, Steven R; Mechem, C Crawford; Jia, Judy; Abboud, Michael; David, Guy; Carr, Brendan G; Band, Roger

    2018-02-28

    We evaluated the impact of a primary stroke center (PSC) destination policy in a major metropolitan city and used geographic modeling to evaluate expected changes for a comprehensive stroke center policy. We identified suspected stroke emergency medical services encounters from 1/1/2004 to 12/31/2013 in Philadelphia, PA. Transport times were compared before and after initiation of a PSC destination policy on 10/3/2011. Geographic modeling estimated the impact of bypassing the closest hospital for the closest PSC and for the closest comprehensive stroke center. There were 2 326 943 emergency medical services runs during the study period, of which 15 099 had a provider diagnosis of stroke. Bypassing the closest hospital for a PSC was common before the official policy and increased steadily over time. Geographic modeling suggested that bypassing the closest hospital in favor of the closest PSC adds a median of 3.1 minutes to transport time. Bypassing to the closest comprehensive stroke center would add a median of 8.3 minutes. Within a large metropolitan area, the time cost of routing patients preferentially to PSCs and comprehensive stroke centers is low. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Information System Success Model for Customer Relationship Management System in Health Promotion Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wona; Rho, Mi Jung; Park, Jiyun; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Intensified competitiveness in the healthcare industry has increased the number of healthcare centers and propelled the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) systems to meet diverse customer demands. This study aimed to develop the information system success model of the CRM system by investigating previously proposed indicators within the model. Methods The evaluation areas of the CRM system includes three areas: the system characteristics area (system quality, information quality, and service quality), the user area (perceived usefulness and user satisfaction), and the performance area (personal performance and organizational performance). Detailed evaluation criteria of the three areas were developed, and its validity was verified by a survey administered to CRM system users in 13 nationwide health promotion centers. The survey data were analyzed by the structural equation modeling method, and the results confirmed that the model is feasible. Results Information quality and service quality showed a statistically significant relationship with perceived usefulness and user satisfaction. Consequently, the perceived usefulness and user satisfaction had significant influence on individual performance as well as an indirect influence on organizational performance. Conclusions This study extends the research area on information success from general information systems to CRM systems in health promotion centers applying a previous information success model. This lays a foundation for evaluating health promotion center systems and provides a useful guide for successful implementation of hospital CRM systems. PMID:23882416

  7. Information system success model for customer relationship management system in health promotion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wona; Rho, Mi Jung; Park, Jiyun; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae; Choi, In Young

    2013-06-01

    Intensified competitiveness in the healthcare industry has increased the number of healthcare centers and propelled the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) systems to meet diverse customer demands. This study aimed to develop the information system success model of the CRM system by investigating previously proposed indicators within the model. THE EVALUATION AREAS OF THE CRM SYSTEM INCLUDES THREE AREAS: the system characteristics area (system quality, information quality, and service quality), the user area (perceived usefulness and user satisfaction), and the performance area (personal performance and organizational performance). Detailed evaluation criteria of the three areas were developed, and its validity was verified by a survey administered to CRM system users in 13 nationwide health promotion centers. The survey data were analyzed by the structural equation modeling method, and the results confirmed that the model is feasible. Information quality and service quality showed a statistically significant relationship with perceived usefulness and user satisfaction. Consequently, the perceived usefulness and user satisfaction had significant influence on individual performance as well as an indirect influence on organizational performance. This study extends the research area on information success from general information systems to CRM systems in health promotion centers applying a previous information success model. This lays a foundation for evaluating health promotion center systems and provides a useful guide for successful implementation of hospital CRM systems.

  8. The treatment model of the guidance center for gamblers and their relatives in Vienna/Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodecki, I

    1992-06-01

    Within 8 years, "Gamblers Anonymous" in Vienna evolved into a guidance center for gamblers and their relatives, with professional aid. It is a non-profit institution and the therapeutic team consists of one psychologist, one social-worker and one psychiatrist. The clients can remain anonymous, but about 90% of them reveal their identity. The treatment model integrating professional therapy and self-help is presented. The reasons we decided to base our work on an "addiction model" of pathological gambling are explained. All the clients consulting our center in 1990 (N=237) are described according to age, sex, types of gambling, duration of problem gambling, family status, profession, income, debts, and income/debt relationship. Finally, the treatment program of our center is presented.

  9. A time-motion study of inpatient rounds using a family-centered rounds model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhansali, P.; Birch, S.; Campbell, J.K.; Agrawal, D.; Hoffner, W.; Manicone, P.; Shah, K.; Krieger, E.; Ottolini, M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Family-centered rounds (FCR) have become increasingly prevalent in pediatric hospital settings. The objective of our study was to describe time use and discrete events during pediatric inpatient rounds by using a FCR model. METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study at

  10. The CAREL Center for Education Diagnosis and Learning: A Self-Correcting Innovative Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Albert

    1968-01-01

    The Central Atlantic Regional Educational Laboratory (CAREL) Center for Educational Diagnosis and Learning is a model based on a cybernetic approach for the development of educational programs designed to personalize the student's instructional experiences and humanize his daily living. The CAREL Project has set three major objectives and 12…

  11. Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

  12. Developing Student-Centered Learning Model to Improve High Order Mathematical Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, Sahat; Napitupulu, Elvis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop student-centered learning model aiming to improve high order mathematical thinking ability of junior high school students of based on curriculum 2013 in North Sumatera, Indonesia. The special purpose of this research was to analyze and to formulate the purpose of mathematics lesson in high order…

  13. Center-of-mass corrections in the S+V potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladino, B.E.

    1987-02-01

    Center-of-mass corrections to the mass spectrum and static properties of low-lying S-wave baryons and mesons are discussed in the context of a relativistic, independent quark model, based on a Dirac equation, with equally mixed scalar (S) and vector (V) confining potential. (author) [pt

  14. Developing of National Accreditation Model for Rural Health Centers in Iran Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Gharibi, Farid; Pirahary, Samereh

    2013-12-01

    The primary health care has notable effects on community health and accreditation is one of the appropriate evaluation methods that led to health system performance improvement, therefore, this study aims to developing of national accreditation model for rural health centers in Iran Health System. Firstly the suitable accreditation models selected to benchmarking worldwide via systematic review, the related books and medical university's web site surveyed and some interviews hold with experts. Then the obtain standards surveyed from the experts' perspectives via Delphi technique. Finally, the obtainedmodel assessedvia the experts' perspective and pilot study. The researchers identified JCAHO and CCHSA as the most excellent models. The obtained standards and their quality accepted from experts' perspective and pilot study, and finally the number of 55 standards acquired. The designed model has standards with acceptable quality and quantity, and researchers' hopeful that its application in rural health centers led to continues quality improvement.

  15. Fostering the development of effective person-centered healthcare communication skills: an interprofessional shared learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, James T; Konrad, Shelley Cohen

    2012-01-01

    To describe the implementation of an interprofessional shared learning model designed to promote the development of person-centered healthcare communication skills. Master of social work (MSW) and doctor of physical therapy (DPT) degree students. The model used evidence-based principles of effective healthcare communication and shared learning methods; it was aligned with student learning outcomes contained in MSW and DPT curricula. Students engaged in 3 learning sessions over 2 days. Sessions involved interactive reflective learning, simulated role-modelpan>ing with peer assessment, and context-specific practice of communication skills. The perspective of patients/clients was included in each learning activity. Activities were evaluated through narrative feedback. Students valued opportunities to learn directly from each other and from healthcare consumers. Important insights and directions for future interprofessional learning experiences were gleaned from model implementation. The interprofessional shared learning model shows promise as an effective method for developing person-centered communication skills.

  16. An Integrated Modeling Approach to Evaluate and Optimize Data Center Sustainability, Dependability and Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Callou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Data centers have evolved dramatically in recent years, due to the advent of social networking services, e-commerce and cloud computing. The conflicting requirements are the high availability levels demanded against the low sustainability impact and cost values. The approaches that evaluate and optimize these requirements are essential to support designers of data center architectures. Our work aims to propose an integrated approach to estimate and optimize these issues with the support of the developed environment, Mercury. Mercury is a tool for dependability, performance and energy flow evaluation. The tool supports reliability block diagrams (RBD, stochastic Petri nets (SPNs, continuous-time Markov chains (CTMC and energy flow (EFM models. The EFM verifies the energy flow on data center architectures, taking into account the energy efficiency and power capacity that each device can provide (assuming power systems or extract (considering cooling components. The EFM also estimates the sustainability impact and cost issues of data center architectures. Additionally, a methodology is also considered to support the modeling, evaluation and optimization processes. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the adopted methodology on data center power systems.

  17. Dust modelling and forecasting in the Barcelona Supercomputing Center: Activities and developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C; Baldasano, J M; Jimenez-Guerrero, P; Jorba, O; Haustein, K; Basart, S [Earth Sciences Department. Barcelona Supercomputing Center. Barcelona (Spain); Cuevas, E [Izanaa Atmospheric Research Center. Agencia Estatal de Meteorologia, Tenerife (Spain); Nickovic, S [Atmospheric Research and Environment Branch, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: carlos.perez@bsc.es

    2009-03-01

    The Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) is the National Supercomputer Facility in Spain, hosting MareNostrum, one of the most powerful Supercomputers in Europe. The Earth Sciences Department of BSC operates daily regional dust and air quality forecasts and conducts intensive modelling research for short-term operational prediction. This contribution summarizes the latest developments and current activities in the field of sand and dust storm modelling and forecasting.

  18. The center-of-mass bag model and the Lorentz-boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.M.

    1984-01-01

    A center-of-mass (CM) bag model and its cavity approximation are suggested by introducing a phenomenological four-potential of confinement and the CM four-vector. This model, equivalent to the MIT version on the rest CM-frame, seems to provide a field-theory interpretation of our previous assumptions about the collective motion of bagged quarks and can be readily quantized. (orig.)

  19. Zero-point energies in the two-center shell model. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.

    1978-01-01

    The zero-point energy (ZPE) contained in the potential-energy surface of a two-center shell model (TCSM) is evaluated. In extension of previous work, the author uses here the full TCSM with l.s force, smoothing and asymmetry. The results show a critical dependence on the height of the potential barrier between the centers. The ZPE turns out to be non-negligible along the fission path for 236 U, and even more so for lighter systems. It is negligible for surface quadrupole motion and it is just on the fringe of being negligible for motion along the asymmetry coordinate. (Auth.)

  20. Towards a Person-Centered Model of Instruction: Can An Emphasis on the Personal Enhance Instruction in Cyberspace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher; Mazur, Joan M.

    2001-01-01

    A person-centered instructional design model was developed for virtual, Web-based environments, based on the work of Carl Rogers. This model attempts to address several issues raised in the literature. A person-centered instructional model is described and contrasted with instructionalist and constructivist approaches. Theoretical and practical…

  1. MENGATASI MASALAH LOW SELF ESTEEM SISWA MELALUI KONSELING INDIVIDU MODEL PERSON CENTERED THERAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi Hanifah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research applied based on the phenomenon in SMPN 25 Semarang which indicates several students who have low self-esteem, through the results of the DCM’s analysis distributed to the students of 9th grade. This research used to show the students’ self-esteem before and after having individual counseling model of person-centered Therapy and whether the model of person-centered Therapy counseling can overcome the problem of low self-esteem students. This research design is experimental research which using one group pretest-posttest design. The participants of this study were six students. The writer use Wilcoxon test as Hypothesis testing by comparing the level of the smallest of the pre and posttest. Obtained results Zcount 2,206 > Z table = 1.645, which means Ha accepted and Ho rejected. The research findings showed that (1 the pretest of the experiment of sixth counselees was 48.45% (2 In another hand the posttest result of the experiment sixth counselees was 75.65% (3 The problem of low self-esteem students can be solved through counseling models centered person theraphy. The result of the study shows that there is positive result and significant improvement of students’ self-esteem when teacher using Person Centered Therapy to solve low self-esteem problem.

  2. An evidence-based patient-centered method makes the biopsychosocial model scientific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert C; Fortin, Auguste H; Dwamena, Francesca; Frankel, Richard M

    2013-06-01

    To review the scientific status of the biopsychosocial (BPS) model and to propose a way to improve it. Engel's BPS model added patients' psychological and social health concerns to the highly successful biomedical model. He proposed that the BPS model could make medicine more scientific, but its use in education, clinical care, and, especially, research remains minimal. Many aver correctly that the present model cannot be defined in a consistent way for the individual patient, making it untestable and non-scientific. This stems from not obtaining relevant BPS data systematically, where one interviewer obtains the same information another would. Recent research by two of the authors has produced similar patient-centered interviewing methods that are repeatable and elicit just the relevant patient information needed to define the model at each visit. We propose that the field adopt these evidence-based methods as the standard for identifying the BPS model. Identifying a scientific BPS model in each patient with an agreed-upon, evidence-based patient-centered interviewing method can produce a quantum leap ahead in both research and teaching. A scientific BPS model can give us more confidence in being humanistic. In research, we can conduct more rigorous studies to inform better practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Validation of foF2 and TEC Modeling During Geomagnetic Disturbed Times: Preliminary Outcomes of International Forum for Space Weather Modeling Capabilities Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J. S.; Tsagouri, I.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Kuznetsova, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    To address challenges of assessment of space weather modeling capabilities, the CCMC (Community Coordinated Modeling Center) is leading the newly established "International Forum for Space Weather Modeling Capabilities Assessment." This presentation will focus on preliminary outcomes of the International Forum on validation of modeled foF2 and TEC during geomagnetic storms. We investigate the ionospheric response to 2013 Mar. geomagnetic storm event using ionosonde and GPS TEC observations in North American and European sectors. To quantify storm impacts on foF2 and TEC, we first quantify quiet-time variations of foF2 and TEC (e.g., the median and the average of the five quietest days for the 30 days during quiet conditions). It appears that the quiet time variation of foF2 and TEC are about 10% and 20-30%, respectively. Therefore, to quantify storm impact, we focus on foF2 and TEC changes during the storm main phase larger than 20% and 50%, respectively, compared to 30-day median. We find that in European sector, both foF2 and TEC response to the storm are mainly positive phase with foF2 increase of up to 100% and TEC increase of 150%. In North America sector, however, foF2 shows negative effects (up to about 50% decrease), while TEC shows positive response (the largest increase is about 200%). To assess modeling capability of reproducing the changes of foF2 and TEC due to the storm, we use various model simulations, which are obtained from empirical, physics-based, and data assimilation models. The performance of each model depends on the selected metrics, therefore, only one metrics is not enough to evaluate the models' predictive capabilities in capturing the storm impact. The performance of the model also varies with latitude and longitude.

  4. The Application of Barnes Filter to Positioning the Center of Landed Tropical Cyclone in Numerical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available After a tropical cyclone (TC making landfall, the numerical model output sea level pressure (SLP presents many small-scale perturbations which significantly influence the positioning of the TC center. To fix the problem, Barnes filter with weighting parameters C=2500 and G=0.35 is used to remove these perturbations. A case study of TC Fung-Wong which landed China in 2008 shows that Barnes filter not only cleanly removes these perturbations, but also well preserves the TC signals. Meanwhile, the centers (track obtained from SLP processed with Barnes filter are much closer to the observations than that from SLP without Barnes filter. Based on the distance difference (DD between the TC center determined by SLP with/without Barnes filter and observation, statistics analysis of 12 TCs which landed China during 2005–2015 shows that in most cases (about 85% the DDs are small (between −30 km and 30 km, while in a few cases (about 15% the DDs are large (greater than 30 km even 70 km. This further verifies that the TC centers identified from SLP with Barnes filter are more accurate compared to that directly obtained from model output SLP. Moreover, the TC track identified with Barnes filter is much smoother than that without Barnes filter.

  5. Transport spatial model for the definition of green routes for city logistics centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamučar, Dragan; Gigović, Ljubomir; Ćirović, Goran; Regodić, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a transport spatial decision support model (TSDSM) for carrying out the optimization of green routes for city logistics centers. The TSDSM model is based on the integration of the multi-criteria method of Weighted Linear Combination (WLC) and the modified Dijkstra algorithm within a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS is used for processing spatial data. The proposed model makes it possible to plan routes for green vehicles and maximize the positive effects on the environment, which can be seen in the reduction of harmful gas emissions and an increase in the air quality in highly populated areas. The scheduling of delivery vehicles is given as a problem of optimization in terms of the parameters of: the environment, health, use of space and logistics operating costs. Each of these input parameters was thoroughly examined and broken down in the GIS into criteria which further describe them. The model presented here takes into account the fact that logistics operators have a limited number of environmentally friendly (green) vehicles available. The TSDSM was tested on a network of roads with 127 links for the delivery of goods from the city logistics center to the user. The model supports any number of available environmentally friendly or environmentally unfriendly vehicles consistent with the size of the network and the transportation requirements. - Highlights: • Model for routing light delivery vehicles in urban areas. • Optimization of green routes for city logistics centers. • The proposed model maximizes the positive effects on the environment. • The model was tested on a real network.

  6. Transport spatial model for the definition of green routes for city logistics centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamučar, Dragan, E-mail: dpamucar@gmail.com [University of Defence in Belgrade, Department of Logistics, Pavla Jurisica Sturma 33, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Gigović, Ljubomir, E-mail: gigoviclj@gmail.com [University of Defence in Belgrade, Department of Mathematics, Pavla Jurisica Sturma 33, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Ćirović, Goran, E-mail: cirovic@sezampro.rs [College of Civil Engineering and Geodesy, The Belgrade University, Hajduk Stankova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Regodić, Miodrag, E-mail: mregodic62@gmail.com [University of Defence in Belgrade, Department of Mathematics, Pavla Jurisica Sturma 33, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents a transport spatial decision support model (TSDSM) for carrying out the optimization of green routes for city logistics centers. The TSDSM model is based on the integration of the multi-criteria method of Weighted Linear Combination (WLC) and the modified Dijkstra algorithm within a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS is used for processing spatial data. The proposed model makes it possible to plan routes for green vehicles and maximize the positive effects on the environment, which can be seen in the reduction of harmful gas emissions and an increase in the air quality in highly populated areas. The scheduling of delivery vehicles is given as a problem of optimization in terms of the parameters of: the environment, health, use of space and logistics operating costs. Each of these input parameters was thoroughly examined and broken down in the GIS into criteria which further describe them. The model presented here takes into account the fact that logistics operators have a limited number of environmentally friendly (green) vehicles available. The TSDSM was tested on a network of roads with 127 links for the delivery of goods from the city logistics center to the user. The model supports any number of available environmentally friendly or environmentally unfriendly vehicles consistent with the size of the network and the transportation requirements. - Highlights: • Model for routing light delivery vehicles in urban areas. • Optimization of green routes for city logistics centers. • The proposed model maximizes the positive effects on the environment. • The model was tested on a real network.

  7. Implementing the obesity care model at a community health center in Hawaii to address childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okihiro, May; Pillen, Michelle; Ancog, Cristeta; Inda, Christy; Sehgal, Vija

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, the most common chronic disease of childhood, is prevalent among economically disadvantaged children. The Chronic Care and Obesity Care Models are comprehensive health care strategies to improve outcomes by linking primary care best practices and community-based programs. Pediatric providers and community health centers are well positioned to design and implement coordinated and synergistic programs to address childhood health disparities. This article describes a comprehensive project based on the Obesity Care Model initiated at a rural community health center in Hawaii to address childhood obesity including: (1) the health care delivery changes constituting the quality improvement project; (2) capacity and team-building activities; (3) use of the project community level data to strengthen community engagement and investment; and (4) the academic-community partnership providing the project framework. We anticipate that these efforts will contribute to the long-term goal of reducing the prevalence of obesity and obesity associated morbidity in the community.

  8. A model to improve the accuracy of US Poison Center data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzelok, E P; Reynolds, K M; Dart, R C; Green, J L

    2014-01-01

    Over 2 million human exposure calls are reported annually to United States regional poison information centers. All exposures are documented electronically and submitted to the American Association of Poison Control Center's National Poison Data System. This database represents the largest data source available on the epidemiology of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical poisoning exposures. The accuracy of these data is critical; however, research has demonstrated that inconsistencies and inaccuracies exist. This study outlines the methods and results of a training program that was developed and implemented to enhance the quality of data collection using acetaminophen exposures as a model. Eleven poison centers were assigned randomly to receive either passive or interactive education to improve medical record documentation. A task force provided recommendations on educational and training strategies and the development of a quality-measurement scorecard to serve as a data collection tool to assess poison center data quality. Poison centers were recruited to participate in the study. Clinical researchers scored the documentation of each exposure record for accuracy. Results. Two thousand two hundred cases were reviewed and assessed for accuracy of data collection. After training, the overall mean quality scores were higher for both the passive (95.3%; + 1.6% change) and interactive intervention groups (95.3%; + 0.9% change). Data collection accuracy improved modestly for the overall accuracy score and significantly for the substance identification component. There was little difference in accuracy measures between the different training methods. Despite the diversity of poison centers, data accuracy, specifically substance identification data fields, can be improved by developing a standardized, systematic, targeted, and mandatory training process. This process should be considered for training on other important topics, thus enhancing the value of these data in

  9. Spatial Model for Determining the Optimum Placement of Logistics Centers in a Predefined Economic Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Iulia Țarțavulea (Dieaconescu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of globalization has stimulated the demand for logistics services at a level of speed and increased efficiency, which involves using of techniques, tools, technologies and modern models in supply chain management. The aim of this research paper is to present a model that can be used in order to achieve an optimized supply chain, associated with minimum transportation costs. The utilization of spatial modeling for determining the optimal locations for logistics centers in a predefined economic area is proposd in this paper. The principal methods used to design the model are mathematic optimization and linear programming. The output data of the model are the precise placement of one up to ten logistics centers, in terms of minimum operational costs for delivery from the optimum locations to consumer points. The results of the research indicate that by using the proposed model, an efficient supply chain that is consistent with optimization of transport can be designed, in order to streamline the delivery process and thus reduce operational costs

  10. Improving skills development in residency using a deliberate-practice and learner-centered model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Nasir I; Ahmed, Aadil

    2015-10-01

    Work-hour restrictions, increased workload, and subjective assessment of competency are major threats to the efficacy of the traditional apprenticeship model of surgical training in modern surgical practice. In response, medical educators are developing time- and resource-efficient competency-based models of surgical training. The purpose of our project was to develop, implement, and measure the outcomes of such objective and structured programs in otolaryngology. We also investigated factors affecting the learning curve, especially deliberate practice, formative feedback, and learners' autonomy. Prospective, longitudinal study. To measure the surgical skills of residents, we first developed and tested objective tools for otolaryngology procedures. Based on these instruments, we identified milestones of the procedures. Training on a virtual-reality simulator was validated to shorten the learning curve. We also studied a learner-centered approach of training, factors affecting the learning curve, and barriers to a competency-based model. The objective tools were found to be a feasible, reliable, and valid opportunity for measuring competency in both the laboratory and operating room. With the formative assessment from these tools, residents had a remediation target to be achieved by deliberate practice. The milestones helped identify the threshold of competency, and deliberate practice on the simulator gave an opportunity for improving skills. The learner-centered approach allowed flexibility and personalized learning by shifting the responsibility of the learning process to the learners. The competency-based model of residency, based on the principles of deliberate practice and a learner-centered approach, is a feasible model of residency training that allows development of competent surgeons and hence improves patient outcomes. Despite these advantages, challenges to this model require a concerted effort to overcome and fully implement these principles of training

  11. Efficient workload management in geographically distributed data centers leveraging autoregressive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Albino; Cesario, Eugenio; Mastroianni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The opportunity of using Cloud resources on a pay-as-you-go basis and the availability of powerful data centers and high bandwidth connections are speeding up the success and popularity of Cloud systems, which is making on-demand computing a common practice for enterprises and scientific communities. The reasons for this success include natural business distribution, the need for high availability and disaster tolerance, the sheer size of their computational infrastructure, and/or the desire to provide uniform access times to the infrastructure from widely distributed client sites. Nevertheless, the expansion of large data centers is resulting in a huge rise of electrical power consumed by hardware facilities and cooling systems. The geographical distribution of data centers is becoming an opportunity: the variability of electricity prices, environmental conditions and client requests, both from site to site and with time, makes it possible to intelligently and dynamically (re)distribute the computational workload and achieve as diverse business goals as: the reduction of costs, energy consumption and carbon emissions, the satisfaction of performance constraints, the adherence to Service Level Agreement established with users, etc. This paper proposes an approach that helps to achieve the business goals established by the data center administrators. The workload distribution is driven by a fitness function, evaluated for each data center, which weighs some key parameters related to business objectives, among which, the price of electricity, the carbon emission rate, the balance of load among the data centers etc. For example, the energy costs can be reduced by using a "follow the moon" approach, e.g. by migrating the workload to data centers where the price of electricity is lower at that time. Our approach uses data about historical usage of the data centers and data about environmental conditions to predict, with the help of regressive models, the values of the

  12. A radial distribution function-based open boundary force model for multi-centered molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    We derive an expression for radial distribution function (RDF)-based open boundary forcing for molecules with multiple interaction sites. Due to the high-dimensionality of the molecule configuration space and missing rotational invariance, a computationally cheap, 1D approximation of the arising integral expressions as in the single-centered case is not possible anymore. We propose a simple, yet accurate model invoking standard molecule- and site-based RDFs to approximate the respective integral equation. The new open boundary force model is validated for ethane in different scenarios and shows very good agreement with data from periodic simulations. © World Scientific Publishing Company.

  13. An Unsteady Long Bearing Squeeze Film Damper Model. Part 1; Circular Centered Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallhorn, P. A.; Elrod, D. A.; Goggin, D. G.; Majumdar, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the first of a two-part series, presents results of an unsteady rotordynamic analysis of a long-bearing squeeze film damper executing circular centered orbits using a fluid circuit approach. A series of nodes and branches represent the geometry of the flow circuit. The mass and momentum conservation equations are solved to predict the pressure distribution in the squeeze film. The motion of the bearing is simulated by the variation of geometry within the flow path. The modeling methodology is benchmarked against published experimental long-bearing squeeze film damper test results. The model provides good agreement with the experimental damping coefficient.

  14. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2010 Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F. W.; Justus, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Global Reference Atmospheric Model was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes), as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. In addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations.

  15. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loonen, Jacqueline J; Blijlevens, Nicole Ma; Prins, Judith; Dona, Desiree Js; Den Hartogh, Jaap; Senden, Theo; van Dulmen-Den Broeder, Eline; van der Velden, Koos; Hermens, Rosella Pmg

    2018-01-16

    Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the "Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model", that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  16. A Central Composite Face-Centered Design for Parameters Estimation of PEM Fuel Cell Electrochemical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled MAMMAR

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new approach based on Experimental of design methodology (DoE is used to estimate the optimal of unknown model parameters proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. This proposed approach combines the central composite face-centered (CCF and numerical PEMFC electrochemical. Simulation results obtained using electrochemical model help to predict the cell voltage in terms of inlet partial pressures of hydrogen and oxygen, stack temperature, and operating current. The value of the previous model and (CCF design methodology is used for parametric analysis of electrochemical model. Thus it is possible to evaluate the relative importance of each parameter to the simulation accuracy. However this methodology is able to define the exact values of the parameters from the manufacture data. It was tested for the BCS 500-W stack PEM Generator, a stack rated at 500 W, manufactured by American Company BCS Technologies FC.

  17. Patient-centered care requires a patient-oriented workflow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Hanauer, David A; Johnson, Sharon; Aarts, Jos; Zheng, Kai; Haque, Saira N

    2013-06-01

    Effective design of health information technology (HIT) for patient-centered care requires consideration of workflow from the patient's perspective, termed 'patient-oriented workflow.' This approach organizes the building blocks of work around the patients who are moving through the care system. Patient-oriented workflow complements the more familiar clinician-oriented workflow approaches, and offers several advantages, including the ability to capture simultaneous, cooperative work, which is essential in care delivery. Patient-oriented workflow models can also provide an understanding of healthcare work taking place in various formal and informal health settings in an integrated manner. We present two cases demonstrating the potential value of patient-oriented workflow models. Significant theoretical, methodological, and practical challenges must be met to ensure adoption of patient-oriented workflow models. Patient-oriented workflow models define meaningful system boundaries and can lead to HIT implementations that are more consistent with cooperative work and its emergent features.

  18. Mathematical model for adaptive control system of ASEA robot at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Omar

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic properties and the mathematical model for the adaptive control of the robotic system presently under investigation at Robotic Application and Development Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center are discussed. NASA is currently investigating the use of robotic manipulators for mating and demating of fuel lines to the Space Shuttle Vehicle prior to launch. The Robotic system used as a testbed for this purpose is an ASEA IRB-90 industrial robot with adaptive control capabilities. The system was tested and it's performance with respect to stability was improved by using an analogue force controller. The objective of this research project is to determine the mathematical model of the system operating under force feedback control with varying dynamic internal perturbation in order to provide continuous stable operation under variable load conditions. A series of lumped parameter models are developed. The models include some effects of robot structural dynamics, sensor compliance, and workpiece dynamics.

  19. Addressing the Global Zika Epidemic Locally: An Interprofessional Model of Universal Screening at One Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Rosha N; Mehta, Pooja K; Louis, Kettie R; Finneseth, Molly K; Yarrington, Christina D

    Escalating evidence for the fetal impact of Zika virus infection required a change in care by all prenatal providers. This article describes an effective model of rapid implementation of universal prenatal screening at one hospital and its network of community health centers for a large and diverse immigrant population exploring the challenges, experiences, and lessons learned. Implementation of national recommendations required a workflow change, challenging a system with a heterogeneity of settings and providers. Using a physician clinical champion and advanced practice nurses in the roles of logistical coordinator and liaison to the network, Zika screening was embedded into prenatal intake visits at both the hospital and community health centers. Challenges addressed include varied medical record systems, acceptance by patients, providers, and community health center leadership, as well as culturally appropriate outreach to diverse ethnic and linguistic communities. In 6 months, the prenatal screening rates increased from 20% to 88%, which resulted in the identification of more than 300 pregnant patients at risk of exposure to Zika virus. This model offers key lessons for emergency preparedness in heterogeneous, safety net hospital settings.

  20. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  1. Modeling Remote I/O versus Staging Tradeoff in Multi-Data Center Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslu, Ibrahim H

    2014-01-01

    In multi-data center computing, data to be processed is not always local to the computation. This is a major challenge especially for data-intensive Cloud computing applications, since large amount of data would need to be either moved the local sites (staging) or accessed remotely over the network (remote I/O). Cloud application developers generally chose between staging and remote I/O intuitively without making any scientific comparison specific to their application data access patterns since there is no generic model available that they can use. In this paper, we propose a generic model for the Cloud application developers which would help them to choose the most appropriate data access mechanism for their specific application workloads. We define the parameters that potentially affect the end-to-end performance of the multi-data center Cloud applications which need to access large datasets over the network. To test and validate our models, we implemented a series of synthetic benchmark applications to simulate the most common data access patterns encountered in Cloud applications. We show that our model provides promising results in different settings with different parameters, such as network bandwidth, server and client capabilities, and data access ratio

  2. Validation of Model Forecasts of the Ambient Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneice, P. J.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Independent and automated validation is a vital step in the progression of models from the research community into operational forecasting use. In this paper we describe a program in development at the CCMC to provide just such a comprehensive validation for models of the ambient solar wind in the inner heliosphere. We have built upon previous efforts published in the community, sharpened their definitions, and completed a baseline study. We also provide first results from this program of the comparative performance of the MHD models available at the CCMC against that of the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. An important goal of this effort is to provide a consistent validation to all available models. Clearly exposing the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different models will enable forecasters to craft more reliable ensemble forecasting strategies. Models of the ambient solar wind are developing rapidly as a result of improvements in data supply, numerical techniques, and computing resources. It is anticipated that in the next five to ten years, the MHD based models will supplant semi-empirical potential based models such as the WSA model, as the best available forecast models. We anticipate that this validation effort will track this evolution and so assist policy makers in gauging the value of past and future investment in modeling support.

  3. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  4. Simplified Dark Matter Models for the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Asher; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by the gamma-ray excess observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center, we explore particle dark matter models that could potentially account for the spectrum and normalization of this signal. Taking a model-independent approach, we consider an exhaustive list of tree-level diagrams for dark matter annihilation, and determine which could account for the observed gamma-ray emission while simultaneously predicting a thermal relic abundance equal to the measured cosmological dark matter density. We identify a wide variety of models that can meet these criteria without conflicting with existing constraints from direct detection experiments or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The prospects for detection in near future dark matter experiments and/or the upcoming 14 TeV LHC appear quite promising.

  5. Assessing a family-centered neighborhood service agency: the Del Paso Heights model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minicucci, C

    1997-01-01

    The author describes the Del Paso Model, a neighborhood-based integrated services effort underway in Sacramento County, California. Del Paso Heights is a community made up of African American, Asian, and white families on the northern side of the City of Sacramento. The County of Sacramento selected Del Paso Heights as a location to pilot a new family-centered holistic way to serve families under county human services programs in a Neighborhood Services Agency. The Del Paso Heights model demonstrates the power of the neighborhood as a focal point of integration of services and how the neighborhood can be used as a concept to overcome bureaucratic turf. Like many other community initiatives, measuring the outcomes of the Del Paso Heights Model remains an elusive goal.

  6. Quality improvement in healthcare delivery utilizing the patient-centered medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Fevzi; Patel, Poonam M

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that the United States dedicates so much of its resources to healthcare, the current healthcare delivery system still faces significant quality challenges. The lack of effective communication and coordination of care services across the continuum of care poses disadvantages for those requiring long-term management of their chronic conditions. This is why the new transformation in healthcare known as the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) can help restore confidence in our population that the healthcare services they receive is of the utmost quality and will effectively enhance their quality of life. Healthcare using the PCMH model is delivered with the patient at the center of the transformation and by reinvigorating primary care. The PCMH model strives to deliver effective quality care while attempting to reduce costs. In order to relieve some of our healthcare system distresses, organizations can modify their delivery of care to be patient centered. Enhanced coordination of services, better provider access, self-management, and a team-based approach to care represent some of the key principles of the PCMH model. Patients that can most benefit are those that require long-term management of their conditions such as chronic disease and behavioral health patient populations. The PCMH is a feasible option for delivery reform as pilot studies have documented successful outcomes. Controversy about the lack of a medical neighborhood has created concern about the overall sustainability of the medical home. The medical home can stand independently and continuously provide enhanced care services as a movement toward higher quality care while organizations and government policy assess what types of incentives to put into place for the full collaboration and coordination of care in the healthcare system.

  7. COLLAGE 360: A Model of Person-Centered Care To Promote Health Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Elizabeth P; Schreiber, Robert; Morris, John N; Russotto, Aline; Flashner-Fineman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Health care leaders and providers have introduced the assumption the typical elder, even in the presence of complex, chronic disease and prevailing illness, is capable of assuming greater personal responsibility for their health care, with a shift from provider-centered to a person-centered model of care. For older adults who often and repeatedly face challenges managing and maintaining their health status, guidance and support is needed. In this study, COLLAGE 360 , a comprehensive assessment system and wellness coaching program that focuses on prevention and wellness, care coordination and self-management of health care was implemented in one continuing care retirement community. Following completion of two assessment tools via directed conversation with a wellness coach, older adults developed an individualized vitality plan that outlined life goals, supporting goals and action plans for goal achievement. Results from this program suggest engagement in the assessment and wellness coaching process via the COLLAGE 360 program translated into sample older adults sensing that they live in a more supportive environment when compared with elders not receiving any wellness coaching. In addition, the older adults had positive effects in the areas of mood, loneliness, social interaction, health status, and life satisfaction. Strategies to improve health and well being need an extended focus beyond the older adult's medical conditions and consider psychological, spiritual and social needs with personal preferences being paramount. These issues are foundational to a person-centered, health promotion approach needed among this population.

  8. Meaningful Use in Chronic Care: Improved Diabetes Outcomes Using a Primary Care Extension Center Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykert, Samuel; Lefebvre, Ann; Bacon, Thomas; Newton, Warren

    The effect of practice facilitation that provides onsite quality improvement (QI) and electronic health record (EHR) coaching on chronic care outcomes is unclear. This study evaluates the effectiveness of such a program-similar to an agricultural extension center model-that provides these services. Through the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers program became the Regional Extension Center for Health Information Technology (REC) for North Carolina. The REC program provides onsite technical assistance to help small primary care practices achieve meaningful use of certified EHRs. While pursuing meaningful use functionality, practices were also offered complementary onsite advice regarding QI issues. We followed the first 50 primary care practices that utilized both EHR and QI advice targeting diabetes care. The achievement of meaningful use of certified EHRs and performance of QI with onsite practice facilitation showed an absolute improvement of 19% in the proportion of patients who achieved excellent diabetes control (hemoglobin A1c 9%) fell steeply in these practices. No control group was available for comparison. Practice facilitation that provided EHR and QI coaching support showed important improvements in diabetes outcomes in practices that achieved meaningful use of their EHR systems. This approach holds promise as a way to help small primary care practices achieve excellent patient outcomes. ©2016 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  9. Analytical Call Center Model with Voice Response Unit and Wrap-Up Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hampl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The last twenty years of computer integration significantly changed the process of service in a call center service systems. Basic building modules of classical call centers – a switching system and a group of humans agents – was extended with other special modules such as skills-based routing module, automatic call distribution module, interactive voice response module and others to minimize the customer waiting time and wage costs. A calling customer of a modern call center is served in the first stage by the interactive voice response module without any human interaction. If the customer requirements are not satisfied in the first stage, the service continues to the second stage realized by the group of human agents. The service time of second stage – the average handle time – is divided into a conversation time and wrap-up time. During the conversation time, the agent answers customer questions and collects its requirements and during the wrap-up time (administrative time the agent completes the task without any customer interaction. The analytical model presented in this contribution is solved under the condition of statistical equilibrium and takes into account the interactive voice response module service time, the conversation time and the wrap-up time.

  10. Modeling and Analysis of a Compliance Model and Rotational Precision for a Class of Remote Center Compliance Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Jie Lai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The remote center compliance (RCC mechanism is of great use for practical designs, especially if a pure rotation about a virtual point is required. The analysis of compliance properties and rotational precision for RCC mechanisms are very important for mechanical design in applications where precision is required. This paper formulates an analytical method for the compliance and rotational precision calculations of a class of RCC mechanisms, combined in parallel with two round beam-based isosceles-trapezoidal flexural pivots. The analytical model of the mechanism is established based on the stiffness matrix method to directly obtain the compliance factors that completely define the elastic response of the mechanism. The rotational precision of the mechanism—That is, the position of rotation center—Is then derived using screw theory and a compliance matrix. The validity of this model is demonstrated using finite element analysis simulation and experimental tests. The results of both simulation and experiment verify that the analytical model has high accuracy and promising practical applications. Moreover, the influences of the geometry parameters on the compliance factors and the center shifts are also graphically evaluated and discussed using the analytical model. The results in this paper provide an effective configuration and analytical method for the design and optimization of RCC mechanisms, and are of great practical significance.

  11. Inbound Call Centers and Emotional Dissonance in the Job Demands – Resources Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Monica; Emanuel, Federica; Zito, Margherita; Ghislieri, Chiara; Colombo, Lara; Cortese, Claudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emotional labor, defined as the process of regulating feelings and expressions as part of the work role, is a major characteristic in call centers. In particular, interacting with customers, agents are required to show certain emotions that are considered acceptable by the organization, even though these emotions may be different from their true feelings. This kind of experience is defined as emotional dissonance and represents a feature of the job especially for call center inbound activities. Aim: The present study was aimed at investigating whether emotional dissonance mediates the relationship between job demands (workload and customer verbal aggression) and job resources (supervisor support, colleague support, and job autonomy) on the one hand, and, on the other, affective discomfort, using the job demands-resources model as a framework. The study also observed differences between two different types of inbound activities: customer assistance service (CA) and information service. Method: The study involved agents of an Italian Telecommunication Company, 352 of whom worked in the CA and 179 in the information service. The hypothesized model was tested across the two groups through multi-group structural equation modeling. Results: Analyses showed that CA agents experience greater customer verbal aggression and emotional dissonance than information service agents. Results also showed, only for the CA group, a full mediation of emotional dissonance between workload and affective discomfort, and a partial mediation of customer verbal aggression and job autonomy, and affective discomfort. Conclusion: This study’s findings contributed both to the emotional labor literature, investigating the mediational role of emotional dissonance in the job demands-resources model, and to call center literature, considering differences between two specific kinds of inbound activities. Suggestions for organizations and practitioners emerged in order to identify

  12. Inbound Call Centers and Emotional Dissonance in the Job Demands – Resources Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Molino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional labor, defined as the process of regulating feelings and expressions as part of the work role, is a major characteristic in call centers. In particular, interacting with customers, agents are required to show certain emotions that are considered acceptable by the organization, even though these emotions may be different from their true feelings. This kind of experience is defined as emotional dissonance and represents a feature of the job especially for call center inbound activities. Aim: The present study was aimed at investigating whether emotional dissonance mediates the relationship between job demands (workload and customer verbal aggression and job resources (supervisor support, colleague support and job autonomy on the one hand, and, on the other, affective discomfort, using the job demands-resources model as a framework. The study also observed differences between two different types of inbound activities: customer assistance service and information service.Method: The study involved agents of an Italian Telecommunication Company, 352 of whom worked in the customer assistance service and 179 in the information service. The hypothesized model was tested across the two groups through multi-group structural equation modeling.Results: Analyses showed that customer assistance service agents experience greater customer verbal aggression and emotional dissonance than information service agents. Results also showed, only for the customer assistance service group, a full mediation of emotional dissonance between workload and affective discomfort, and a partial mediation of customer verbal aggression and job autonomy, and affective discomfort.Conclusion: This study’s findings contributed both to the emotional labor literature, investigating the mediational role of emotional dissonance in the job demands-resources model, and to call center literature, considering differences between two specific kinds of inbound activities

  13. Inbound Call Centers and Emotional Dissonance in the Job Demands - Resources Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Monica; Emanuel, Federica; Zito, Margherita; Ghislieri, Chiara; Colombo, Lara; Cortese, Claudio G

    2016-01-01

    Emotional labor, defined as the process of regulating feelings and expressions as part of the work role, is a major characteristic in call centers. In particular, interacting with customers, agents are required to show certain emotions that are considered acceptable by the organization, even though these emotions may be different from their true feelings. This kind of experience is defined as emotional dissonance and represents a feature of the job especially for call center inbound activities. The present study was aimed at investigating whether emotional dissonance mediates the relationship between job demands (workload and customer verbal aggression) and job resources (supervisor support, colleague support, and job autonomy) on the one hand, and, on the other, affective discomfort, using the job demands-resources model as a framework. The study also observed differences between two different types of inbound activities: customer assistance service (CA) and information service. The study involved agents of an Italian Telecommunication Company, 352 of whom worked in the CA and 179 in the information service. The hypothesized model was tested across the two groups through multi-group structural equation modeling. Analyses showed that CA agents experience greater customer verbal aggression and emotional dissonance than information service agents. RESULTS also showed, only for the CA group, a full mediation of emotional dissonance between workload and affective discomfort, and a partial mediation of customer verbal aggression and job autonomy, and affective discomfort. This study's findings contributed both to the emotional labor literature, investigating the mediational role of emotional dissonance in the job demands-resources model, and to call center literature, considering differences between two specific kinds of inbound activities. Suggestions for organizations and practitioners emerged in order to identify practical implications useful both to support

  14. Falling paper: Navier-Stokes solutions, model of fluid forces, and center of mass elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Umberto; Wang, Z Jane

    2004-10-01

    We investigate the problem of falling paper by solving the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations subject to the motion of a free-falling body at Reynolds numbers around 10(3). The aerodynamic lift on a tumbling plate is found to be dominated by the product of linear and angular velocities rather than velocity squared, as appropriate for an airfoil. This coupling between translation and rotation provides a mechanism for a brief elevation of center of mass near the cusplike turning points. The Navier-Stokes solutions further provide the missing quantity in the classical theory of lift, the instantaneous circulation, and suggest a revised model for the fluid forces.

  15. Nutrition policies at child-care centers and impact on role modeling of healthy eating behaviors of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erinosho, Temitope O; Hales, Derek P; McWilliams, Christina P; Emunah, Josie; Ward, Dianne Stanton

    2012-01-01

    Studies suggest that caregivers influence children's dietary behaviors through role modeling in child-care environments. However, few studies have examined role modeling by caregivers and child-care center policies. This cross-sectional study evaluated the associations between child-care center policies about staff eating practices and caregivers' eating behaviors during mealtime interactions with children. Data were collected in 2008-2009 at 50 North Carolina child-care centers. Caregivers (n=124) reported about modeling healthy eating behaviors to children, trained research staff observed caregivers' (n=112) eating behaviors in classrooms, and directors reported about the presence/absence of center policies on staff eating practices. About 90% of caregivers reported modeling healthy eating behaviors to children. At 80% of centers, caregivers were observed modeling healthy dietary behaviors (eg, sitting with or eating same foods as children), but at fewer centers they were observed consuming unhealthy foods (eg, fast foods, salty snacks: 25%; and sugar-sweetened beverages: 50%). Although no substantial associations were observed between caregiver behaviors and center policies, effect size estimates suggest differences that may be of clinical significance. For example, caregivers were observed modeling healthy dietary behaviors more frequently at centers that had written policies about staff discouraging unhealthy foods for meals/snacks and having informal nutrition talks with children at meals. However, caregivers were observed consuming unhealthy foods and sugar-sweetened beverages more often at centers with policies that promoted healthier foods for meals/snacks. Future research should build on this study by using larger samples to understand why healthy food policies in child-care centers may not translate to eating practices among caregivers. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Designing Excellence and Quality Model for Training Centers of Primary Health Care: A Delphi Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar-Sadegh; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa; Shahgoli, Javad; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Ahadi, Hamid-Reza; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2015-10-01

    Excellence and quality models are comprehensive methods for improving the quality of healthcare. The aim of this study was to design excellence and quality model for training centers of primary health care using Delphi method. In this study, Delphi method was used. First, comprehensive information were collected using literature review. In extracted references, 39 models were identified from 34 countries and related sub-criteria and standards were extracted from 34 models (from primary 39 models). Then primary pattern including 8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards was developed as a Delphi questionnaire and evaluated in four stages by 9 specialists of health care system in Tabriz and 50 specialists from all around the country. Designed primary model (8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards) were concluded with 8 criteria, 45 sub-criteria, and 192 standards after 4 stages of evaluations by specialists. Major criteria of the model are leadership, strategic and operational planning, resource management, information analysis, human resources management, process management, costumer results, and functional results, where the top score was assigned as 1000 by specialists. Functional results had the maximum score of 195 whereas planning had the minimum score of 60. Furthermore the most and the least sub-criteria was for leadership with 10 sub-criteria and strategic planning with 3 sub-criteria, respectively. The model that introduced in this research has been designed following 34 reference models of the world. This model could provide a proper frame for managers of health system in improving quality.

  17. Hidden Sector Dark Matter Models for the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Asher [Chicago U.; Gratia, Pierre [Chicago U.; Hooper, Dan [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; McDermott, Samuel D. [Michigan U., MCTP

    2014-07-24

    The gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic Center can be interpreted as dark matter particles annihilating into Standard Model fermions with a cross section near that expected for a thermal relic. Although many particle physics models have been shown to be able to account for this signal, the fact that this particle has not yet been observed in direct detection experiments somewhat restricts the nature of its interactions. One way to suppress the dark matter's elastic scattering cross section with nuclei is to consider models in which the dark matter is part of a hidden sector. In such models, the dark matter can annihilate into other hidden sector particles, which then decay into Standard Model fermions through a small degree of mixing with the photon, Z, or Higgs bosons. After discussing the gamma-ray signal from hidden sector dark matter in general terms, we consider two concrete realizations: a hidden photon model in which the dark matter annihilates into a pair of vector gauge bosons that decay through kinetic mixing with the photon, and a scenario within the generalized NMSSM in which the dark matter is a singlino-like neutralino that annihilates into a pair of singlet Higgs bosons, which decay through their mixing with the Higgs bosons of the MSSM.

  18. Family-Centered Care As a Western-Centric Model in Developing Countries: Luxury Versus Necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Motlaq, Mohammad A; Shields, Linda

    Family-centered care (FCC) is a model of care that emerged over many years and is broadly defined as promoting a partnership between the parents and health care professionals in the care of the child. Although recognized by many as the ideal way to care for children and families, previous reviews showed a lack of evidence for its efficacy. A recent Cochrane review recommended further rigorous research to assess the model's effect. Other reports emerged to ascertain FCC poor implementation. There is also a paucity of studies investigating the model outside the Western context. This article dissects the literature and provides a comprehensive summary on FCC in the context of limited resources versus best practice. Lessons learned from the literature for the reproducibility of the model in the developing world are provided. Considered a luxury, the autocratic health systems in most of these countries will not easily accept such a model of care except with a greater understanding and support for the model and high-quality research that can guide hospitals, health systems, and policy makers.

  19. Authority Delegation in Boyerahmad Health Centers through Model to Combine Suggestions System and Delphi Method 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Momeninezhad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Authority delegation means to transmit part of organization`s manager and leader`s special authorities and executive duties, regardless its root to subordinates and heads of units and related offices to speed up implementing affairs and organizational purposes quickly and on time. The purpose of this study was to inspect authority delegation in health centers of Boyerahmad district through using model to combine suggestions (to identify process and Delphi method (expert`s opinions . Methods: This cross-sectional study was implemented in two stages at first stage, research community was authorities of Boyerahmad health centers (58 persons, their suggestions about requested processes to delegate were gathered by total count through open questionnaires and in second stage, which was Delphi, suggestions gathered from previous stage judged by 30 experts. Data of both stages analyzed by help of Chi-square, correlation coefficient tests. Results: Findings showed that 73.85% of suggestions were able to be delegated, based on expert`s opinion. 40% of suggestions were in domain of official, 36.92% financial and 23.08% hygienic. 88% less than 6 years management background. 20.69% had no academic studies and only 27% were general physicians. Conclusion: By participation of environmental management levels, several processes may be specified and identify cases which are possible to delegate them executively using Delphi (expert`s opinion and this model can be used as a trust worthy method to delegate authority for decentralization. Key words: Participation Management, Health centers, Authority delegation

  20. Applicability of fiber model in seismic response analysis for center-clamp type bushings on transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshinori; Sato, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A bushing is a device for insulation and support of a conductor. Especially it is called center-clamp type when it is connected with a metal holder through clamping force. As a consequence of damage of center-clamp type bushings in Tohoku Earthquake in 2011, refinement of the response analysis method and review of the seismic design procedure became necessary. In the present report, the fiber model, which can evaluate non-linear behavior in the section subjected to axial force and bending moment, was implemented to the CRIEPI's finite element analysis program 'Mastrd' considering following characteristics of center-clamp type bushings. a) The gasket section between a porcelain tube and a metal holder has a torus shape. b) Springs around the top of the bushing give clamping force, but they lock in excessive base rotation. c) The gasket does not resist against tension. d) Local resistance against compression due to bending increases in use of very thin gaskets. The developed program was verified through comparison with the shaking table test result for real bushings whose voltage classes were 154 kV and 275 kV. Deformation indices as rotation angle and base opening due to bending were influenced by damping conditions. Though there was not the condition which brought about remarkable underestimation, reduction of damping for a fiber model element was preferable for safety. On the other hand, bending moment was consistent with experimental results because it tended not to fluctuate in the non-linear region. (author)

  1. Design Challenges of an Episode-Based Payment Model in Oncology: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Oncology Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Ronald M; Muldoon, L Daniel; Schumacher, Heidi K; Strawbridge, Larisa M; York, Andrew W; Mortimer, Laura K; Falb, Alison F; Cox, Katherine J; Bazell, Carol; Lukens, Ellen W; Kapp, Mary C; Rajkumar, Rahul; Bassano, Amy; Conway, Patrick H

    2017-07-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services developed the Oncology Care Model as an episode-based payment model to encourage participating practitioners to provide higher-quality, better-coordinated care at a lower cost to the nearly three-quarter million fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with cancer who receive chemotherapy each year. Episode payment models can be complex. They combine into a single benchmark price all payments for services during an episode of illness, many of which may be delivered at different times by different providers in different locations. Policy and technical decisions include the definition of the episode, including its initiation, duration, and included services; the identification of beneficiaries included in the model; and beneficiary attribution to practitioners with overall responsibility for managing their care. In addition, the calculation and risk adjustment of benchmark episode prices for the bundle of services must reflect geographic cost variations and diverse patient populations, including varying disease subtypes, medical comorbidities, changes in standards of care over time, the adoption of expensive new drugs (especially in oncology), as well as diverse practice patterns. Other steps include timely monitoring and intervention as needed to avoid shifting the attribution of beneficiaries on the basis of their expected episode expenditures as well as to ensure the provision of necessary medical services and the development of a meaningful link to quality measurement and improvement through the episode-based payment methodology. The complex and diverse nature of oncology business relationships and the specific rules and requirements of Medicare payment systems for different types of providers intensify these issues. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services believes that by sharing its approach to addressing these decisions and challenges, it may facilitate greater understanding of the model within the oncology

  2. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  3. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-15

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  4. Analysis of the Service Quality of Medical Centers Using Servqual Model (Case:Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zare Ahmadabadi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many organizations, especially service oriented ones, relative to their goals and mission, have a special view towards quality phenomena and its management. Methods: This paper analyzes medical service quality in one case; The internal section of Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital Based on the basis of gap analysis model and Servqual technique. A questionnaire was designed and applied to measure expectations and perceptions of patients and personnel of the hospital. Results: On application of non-parametric statistical tests, we propose certain recommendations. These tests drive on five conceptual dimensions of service quality including intangibility, responsiveness, reliability, assurance and empathy. Results show that patients in this section were satisfied from the service provider’s responsiveness, but there are significant differences between expectations and perceptions in other dimensions. Conclusion: The service quality analysis models are useful for managers of medical centers to distinguish gaps between the two sides of service representation; patients and medical centers personnel. Ultimately, they can reinforce strengths and control weaknesses.

  5. Deep Recurrent Model for Server Load and Performance Prediction in Data Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent neural network (RNN has been widely applied to many sequential tagging tasks such as natural language process (NLP and time series analysis, and it has been proved that RNN works well in those areas. In this paper, we propose using RNN with long short-term memory (LSTM units for server load and performance prediction. Classical methods for performance prediction focus on building relation between performance and time domain, which makes a lot of unrealistic hypotheses. Our model is built based on events (user requests, which is the root cause of server performance. We predict the performance of the servers using RNN-LSTM by analyzing the log of servers in data center which contains user’s access sequence. Previous work for workload prediction could not generate detailed simulated workload, which is useful in testing the working condition of servers. Our method provides a new way to reproduce user request sequence to solve this problem by using RNN-LSTM. Experiment result shows that our models get a good performance in generating load and predicting performance on the data set which has been logged in online service. We did experiments with nginx web server and mysql database server, and our methods can been easily applied to other servers in data center.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

  7. Models and algorithm of optimization launch and deployment of virtual network functions in the virtual data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolodurina, I. P.; Parfenov, D. I.

    2017-10-01

    The goal of our investigation is optimization of network work in virtual data center. The advantage of modern infrastructure virtualization lies in the possibility to use software-defined networks. However, the existing optimization of algorithmic solutions does not take into account specific features working with multiple classes of virtual network functions. The current paper describes models characterizing the basic structures of object of virtual data center. They including: a level distribution model of software-defined infrastructure virtual data center, a generalized model of a virtual network function, a neural network model of the identification of virtual network functions. We also developed an efficient algorithm for the optimization technology of containerization of virtual network functions in virtual data center. We propose an efficient algorithm for placing virtual network functions. In our investigation we also generalize the well renowned heuristic and deterministic algorithms of Karmakar-Karp.

  8. Improved cosmic-ray injection models and the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Eric; Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Fermi-LAT observations of the Milky Way Galactic Center (GC) have revealed a spherically symmetric excess of GeV γ rays extending to at least 10° from the dynamical center of the Galaxy. A critical uncertainty in extracting the intensity, spectrum, and morphology of this excess concerns the accuracy of astrophysical diffuse γ -ray emission models near the GC. Recently, it has been noted that many diffuse emission models utilize a cosmic-ray injection rate far below that predicted based on the observed star-formation rate in the Central Molecular Zone. In this study, we add a cosmic-ray injection component which nonlinearly traces the Galactic H2 density determined in three dimensions, and find that the associated γ -ray emission is degenerate with many properties of the GC γ -ray excess. Specifically, in models that utilize a large sideband (4 0 ° ×4 0 ° surrounding the GC) to normalize the best-fitting diffuse emission models, the intensity of the GC excess decreases by approximately a factor of 2, and the morphology of the excess becomes less peaked and less spherically symmetric. In models which utilize a smaller region of interest (1 5 ° ×1 5 ° ) the addition of an excess template instead suppresses the intensity of the best-fit astrophysical diffuse emission, and the GC excess is rather resilient to changes in the details of the astrophysical diffuse modeling. In both analyses, the addition of a GC excess template still provides a statistically significant improvement to the overall fit to the γ -ray data. We also implement advective winds at the GC, and find that the Fermi-LAT data strongly prefer outflows of order several hundred km/s, whose role is to efficiently advect low-energy cosmic rays from the inner-few kpc of the Galaxy. Finally, we perform numerous tests of our diffuse emission models, and conclude that they provide a significant improvement in the physical modeling of the multiwavelength nonthermal emission from the GC region.

  9. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  10. Using Landsat, MODIS, and a Biophysical Model to Evaluate LST in Urban Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Lachir, Asia; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we assessed and compared land surface temperature (LST) in urban centers using data from Landsat, MODIS, and the Simple Biosphere model (SiB2). We also evaluated the sensitivity of the models LST to different land cover types, fractions (percentages), and emissivities compared to reference points derived from Landsat thermal data. This was demonstrated in three climatologically- and morphologically-different cities of Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, and Washington, DC. Our results showed that in these cities SiB2 was sensitive to both the emissivity and the land cover type and fraction, but much more sensitive to the latter. The practical implications of these results are rather significant since they imply that the SiB2 model can be used to run different scenarios for evaluating urban heat island (UHI) mitigation strategies. This study also showed that using detailed emissivities per land cover type and fractions from Landsat-derived data caused a convergence of the model results towards the Landsat-derived LST for most of the studied cases. This study also showed that SiB2 LSTs are closer in magnitude to Landsat-derived LSTs than MODIS-derived LSTs. It is important, however, to emphasize that both Landsat and MODIS LSTs are not direct observations and, as such, do not represent a ground truth. More studies will be needed to compare these results to in situ LST data and provide further validation.

  11. Teaching Scientific Computing: A Model-Centered Approach to Pipeline and Parallel Programming with C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiras Dolgopolovas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present an approach to the introduction into pipeline and parallel computing, using a model of the multiphase queueing system. Pipeline computing, including software pipelines, is among the key concepts in modern computing and electronics engineering. The modern computer science and engineering education requires a comprehensive curriculum, so the introduction to pipeline and parallel computing is the essential topic to be included in the curriculum. At the same time, the topic is among the most motivating tasks due to the comprehensive multidisciplinary and technical requirements. To enhance the educational process, the paper proposes a novel model-centered framework and develops the relevant learning objects. It allows implementing an educational platform of constructivist learning process, thus enabling learners’ experimentation with the provided programming models, obtaining learners’ competences of the modern scientific research and computational thinking, and capturing the relevant technical knowledge. It also provides an integral platform that allows a simultaneous and comparative introduction to pipelining and parallel computing. The programming language C for developing programming models and message passing interface (MPI and OpenMP parallelization tools have been chosen for implementation.

  12. Habitat model for the Florida Scrub Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breininger, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida. The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provides habitat for one of the three largest populations of the Florida Scrub Jay. This threatened bird occupies scrub, slash pine flatwoods, disturbed scrub, and coastal strand on KSC. Densities of Florida Scrub Jays were shown to vary with habitat characteristics but not necessarily with vegetation type. Relationships between Florida Scrub Jay densities and habitat characteristics were used to develop a habitat model to provide a tool to compare alternative sites for new facilities and to quantify environmental impacts. This model is being tested using long term demographic studies of colorbanded Florida Scrub Jays. Optimal habitat predicted by the model has greater than or equal to 50 percent of the shrub canopy comprised of scrub oaks, 20-50 percent open space or scrub oak vegetation within 100 m of a ruderal edge, less than or equal to 15 percent pine canopy cover, a shrub height of 120-170 cm, and is greater than or equal to 100 m from a forest. This document reviews life history, social behavior, food, foraging habitat, cover requirements, characteristics of habitat on KSC, and habitat preferences of the Florida Scrub Jay. Construction of the model and its limitations are discussed.

  13. Care Management Medical Home Center Model: Preliminary Results of a Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Care Quality for Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F; Amofah, St Anthony; McCann, Shelia; Rivo, Julie; Varghese, Asha; James, Terisa; Rivo, Marc; Williams, Mark L

    2015-07-01

    This article presents preliminary findings of the impact of an innovative care management model for diabetic patients. The model was implemented by seven Federally Qualified Health Centers serving 10,000 diabetic patients in Miami-Dade County. A primary intervention of this model is a centralized care management team that makes previsit phone calls to diabetic patients who have scheduled appointments. These previsit phone calls optimize patient knowledge and self-management goals, and provide patient care coordinators with relevant clinical information to optimize the office visit and help to ensure completion of recommended diabetic preventive and chronic care services. Data suggest that following the implementation of this care management model, more diabetic patients are receiving regular care, and compliance with recommended tests and screenings has improved. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Study on Maritime Logistics Warehousing Center Model and Precision Marketing Strategy Optimization Based on Fuzzy Method and Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Kefeng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The bulk commodity, different with the retail goods, has a uniqueness in the location selection, the chosen of transportation program and the decision objectives. How to make optimal decisions in the facility location, requirement distribution, shipping methods and the route selection and establish an effective distribution system to reduce the cost has become a burning issue for the e-commerce logistics, which is worthy to be deeply and systematically solved. In this paper, Logistics warehousing center model and precision marketing strategy optimization based on fuzzy method and neural network model is proposed to solve this problem. In addition, we have designed principles of the fuzzy method and neural network model to solve the proposed model because of its complexity. Finally, we have solved numerous examples to compare the results of lingo and Matlab, we use Matlab and lingo just to check the result and to illustrate the numerical example, we can find from the result, the multi-objective model increases logistics costs and improves the efficiency of distribution time.

  15. Multipayer patient-centered medical home implementation guided by the chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Robert A; Bailit, Michael H; Mauger, David T; Wagner, Edward H; Siminerio, Linda

    2011-06-01

    A unique statewide multipayer ini Pennsylvania was undertaken to implement the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) guided by the Chronic Care Model (CCM) with diabetes as an initial target disease. This project represents the first broad-scale CCM implementation with payment reform across a diverse range of practice organizations and one of the largest PCMH multipayer initiatives. Practices implemented the CCM and PCMH through regional Breakthrough Series learning collaboratives, supported by Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) practice coaches, with required monthly quality reporting enhanced by multipayer infrastructure payments. Some 105 practices, representing 382 primary care providers, were engaged in the four regional collaboratives. The practices from the Southeast region of Pennsylvania focused on diabetes patients (n = 10,016). During the first intervention year (May 2008-May 2009), all practices achieved at least Level 1 National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Physician Practice Connections Patient-Centered Medical Home (PPC-PCMH) recognition. There was significant improvement in the percentage of patients who had evidence-based complications screening and who were on therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality (statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors). In addition, there were small but statistically significant improvements in key clinical parameters for blood pressure and cholesterol levels, with the greatest absolute improvement in the highest-risk patients. Transforming primary care delivery through implementation of the PCMH and CCM supported by multipayer infrastructure payments holds significant promise to improve diabetes care.

  16. Evaluating organizational change in health care: the patient-centered hospital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorio, Carlo V; Gorli, Mara; Verzillo, Stefano

    2018-02-08

    An increasing number of hospitals react to recent demographic, epidemiological and managerial challenges moving from a traditional organizational model to a Patient-Centered (PC) hospital model. Although the theoretical managerial literature on the PC hospital model is vast, quantitative evaluations of the performance of hospitals that moved from the traditional to the PC organizational structure is scarce. However, quantitative analysis of effects of managerial changes is important and can provide additional argument in support of innovation. We take advantage of a quasi-experimental setting and of a unique administrative data set on the population of hospital discharge charts (HDCs) over a period of 9 years of Lombardy, the richest and one of the most populated region of Italy. During this period three important hospitals switched to the PC model in 2010, whereas all the others remained with the functional organizational model. This allowed us to develop a difference-in-difference analysis of some selected measures of efficiency and effectiveness for PC hospitals focusing on the "between-variability" of the 25 major diagnostic categories (MDCs) in each hospital and estimating a difference-in-difference model. We contribute to the literature that addresses the evaluation of healthcare and hospital change by providing a quantitative estimation of efficiency and effectiveness changes following to the implementation of the PC hospital model. Results show that both efficiency and effectiveness have significantly increased in the average MDC of PC hospitals, thus confirming the need for policy makers to invest in new organizational models close to the principles of PC hospital structures. Although an organizational change towards the PC model can be a costly process, implying a rebalancing of responsibilities and power among hospital personnel (e.g. medical and nursing staff), our results suggest that changing towards a PC model can be worthwhile in terms of both

  17. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TRACKING OF AERODYNAMIC SURFACES AND AEROSPACE MODELS AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Shortis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with customisable accuracies. This paper describes data acquisition systems designed and implemented at NASA Langley Research Center to capture surface shapes and 6DoF data. System calibration and data processing techniques are discussed. Examples of experiments and data outputs are described.

  18. Putting patients first: a novel patient-centered model for medical enterprise success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new way of viewing patient-customers. It encourages a greater emphasis on patients' needs and the importance of considering dimensions of the patient experience to better serve them. It also draws from examples in the general business world as they can be applied to medical enterprises. The author introduces a model that directs all business activities toward the end consumer with an underlying guidance by patient needs. A business is advised to understand its customer, design a patient-directed vision, and focus on creating a unique customer experience. The article delineates key action items for physicians and administrators that will allow them to better meet their patient-customers' needs and develop loyalty. By practicing a patient-centered approach and following these guidelines, one may ensure greater success of the medical enterprise.

  19. Thermospheric tides simulated by the national center for atmospheric research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model at equinox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesen, C.G.; Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors use the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere/ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) to model tides and dynamics in the thermosphere. This model incorporates the latest advances in the thermosphere general circulation model. Model results emphasized the 70 degree W longitude region to overlap a series of incoherent radar scatter installations. Data and the model are available on data bases. The results of this theoretical modeling are compared with available data, and with prediction of more empirical models. In general there is broad agreement within the comparisons

  20. VOLUMETRIC ERROR COMPENSATION IN FIVE-AXIS CNC MACHINING CENTER THROUGH KINEMATICS MODELING OF GEOMETRIC ERROR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooyan Vahidi Pashsaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy of a five-axis CNC machine tool is affected by a vast number of error sources. This paper investigates volumetric error modeling and its compensation to the basis for creation of new tool path for improvement of work pieces accuracy. The volumetric error model of a five-axis machine tool with the configuration RTTTR (tilting head B-axis and rotary table in work piece side A΄ was set up taking into consideration rigid body kinematics and homogeneous transformation matrix, in which 43 error components are included. Volumetric error comprises 43 error components that can separately reduce geometrical and dimensional accuracy of work pieces. The machining accuracy of work piece is guaranteed due to the position of the cutting tool center point (TCP relative to the work piece. The cutting tool is deviated from its ideal position relative to the work piece and machining error is experienced. For compensation process detection of the present tool path and analysis of the RTTTR five-axis CNC machine tools geometrical error, translating current position of component to compensated positions using the Kinematics error model, converting newly created component to new tool paths using the compensation algorithms and finally editing old G-codes using G-code generator algorithm have been employed.

  1. Developing Parametric Models for the Assembly of Machine Fixtures for Virtual Multiaxial CNC Machining Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaykin, A. V.; Bezsonov, K. A.; Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Shulepov, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    This paper dwells upon a variance parameterization method. Variance or dimensional parameterization is based on sketching, with various parametric links superimposed on the sketch objects and user-imposed constraints in the form of an equation system that determines the parametric dependencies. This method is fully integrated in a top-down design methodology to enable the creation of multi-variant and flexible fixture assembly models, as all the modeling operations are hierarchically linked in the built tree. In this research the authors consider a parameterization method of machine tooling used for manufacturing parts using multiaxial CNC machining centers in the real manufacturing process. The developed method allows to significantly reduce tooling design time when making changes of a part’s geometric parameters. The method can also reduce time for designing and engineering preproduction, in particular, for development of control programs for CNC equipment and control and measuring machines, automate the release of design and engineering documentation. Variance parameterization helps to optimize construction of parts as well as machine tooling using integrated CAE systems. In the framework of this study, the authors demonstrate a comprehensive approach to parametric modeling of machine tooling in the CAD package used in the real manufacturing process of aircraft engines.

  2. The galactic center region gamma ray excess from a supersymmetric leptophilic Higgs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gardner; Primulando, Reinard

    2011-05-01

    In a recent paper by Hooper and Goodenough, data from the Fermi Gamma Ray Telescope was analyzed and an excess of gamma rays was claimed to be found in the emission spectrum from the Galactic Center Region. Hooper and Goodenough suggest that the claimed excess can be well explained by 7-10 GeV annihilating dark matter with a power law density profile if the dark matter annihilates predominantly to tau pairs. In this paper we present such a dark matter model by extending the MSSM to include four Higgs doublets and one scalar singlet. A {mathbb{Z}_2} symmetry is imposed that enforces a Yukawa structure so that the up quarks, down quarks, and leptons each receive mass from a distinct doublet. This leads to an enhanced coupling of scalars to leptons and allows the model to naturally achieve the required phenomenology in order to explain the gamma ray excess. Our model yields the correct dark matter thermal relic density and avoids collider bounds from measurements of the Z width as well as direct production at LEP.

  3. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  4. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; van Harten, Willem H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations.

  5. Development of a Community-Based Palliative Care Model for Advance Cancer Patients in Public Health Centers in Busan, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Nam; Choi, Soon-Ock; Shin, Seong Hoon; Ryu, Ji-Sun; Baik, Jeong-Won

    2017-07-01

    A feasible palliative care model for advance cancer patients is needed in Korea with its rapidly aging population and corresponding increase in cancer prevalence. This study describes the process involved in the development of a community-based palliative care (CBPC) model implemented originally in a Busan pilot project. The model development included steps I and II of the pilot project, identification of the service types, a survey exploring the community demand for palliative care, construction of an operational infrastructure, and the establishment of a service delivery system. Public health centers (including Busan regional cancer centers, palliative care centers, and social welfare centers) served as the regional hubs in the development of a palliative care model. The palliative care project included the provision of palliative care, establishment of a support system for the operations, improvement of personnel capacity, development of an educational and promotional program, and the establishment of an assessment system to improve quality. The operational infrastructure included a service management team, provision teams, and a support team. The Busan Metropolitan City CBPC model was based on the principles of palliative care as well as the characteristics of public health centers that implemented the community health projects. The potential use of the Busan CBPC model in Korea should be explored further through service evaluations.

  6. Interactions of the IGS reprocessing and the IGS antenna phase center model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, R.; Steigenberger, P.; Dach, R.; Schmitz, M.; Dilssner, F.; Hugentobler, U.

    2009-12-01

    Since November 2006 an absolute phase center correction model for GNSS satellite and receiver antennas has been used within the International GNSS Service (IGS). This model, called igs05.atx, comprises consistent phase center offset (PCO) and variation (PCV) values given in ANTEX format. Generally, these correction values have not been changed in the meantime.For most of the receiver antenna types dominating the IGS network, absolute robot calibrations provided by Geo++ GmbH are available. Those comprise azimuth- and zenith-dependent PCVs down to the horizon. For the remaining antenna types converted field calibrations from the National Geodetic Survey are applied that are purely zenith-dependent. The impact of radomes is taken into account, if calibration results are available. So far, igs05.atx only contains calibrations for the GPS frequencies.The GPS satellite antenna corrections contained in igs05.atx were estimated by Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum and by TUM by reprocessing more than ten years of IGS data. The corresponding GLONASS corrections were provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) after processing more than one year of data. Although azimuth-dependent PCVs are present, the igs05.atx model is limited to block-specific purely nadir-dependent PCVs. In contrast, satellite-specific z-offsets are given.At the time the satellite antenna corrections were estimated, the solutions could only be aligned to IGb00, the IGS realization of ITRF2000, that was based on relative receiver antenna corrections. Moreover, the impact of radomes had to be ignored, as calibration results were not available. So, the IGS reprocessing campaign is an excellent possibility to improve the consistency between both satellite and receiver antenna corrections and the terrestrial reference frame.Several analysis centers (ACs) of the IGS provide z-offset estimates within their weekly SINEX files. By back-solving those files with selected station coordinates fixed

  7. The development of simple survival prediction models for blunt trauma victims treated at Asian emergency centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akio; Nakahara, Shinji; Chadbunchachai, Witaya

    2012-02-02

    For real-time assessment of the probability of survival (Ps) of blunt trauma victims at emergency centers, this study aimed to establish regression models for estimating Ps using simplified coefficients. The data of 10,210 blunt trauma patients not missing both the binary outcome data about survival and the data necessary for Ps calculation by The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) method were extracted from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (2004-2007) and analyzed. Half (5,113) of the data was allocated to a derivation data set, with the other half (5,097) allocated to a validation data set. The data of 6,407 blunt trauma victims from the trauma registry of Khon Kaen Regional Hospital in Thailand were analyzed for validation. The logistic regression models included age, the Injury Severity Score (ISS), the Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS), systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate (RR), and their coded values (cAGE, 0-1; cISS, 0-4; cSBP, 0-4; cGCS, 0-4; cRR, 0-4) as predictor variables. The coefficients were simplified by rounding off after the decimal point or choosing 0.5 if the coefficients varied across 0.5. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROCC) was calculated for each model to measure discriminant ability. A group of formulas (log (Ps/1-Ps) = logit (Ps) = -9 + cISS - cAGE + cSBP + cGCS + cRR/2, where -9 becomes -7 if the predictor variable of cRR or cISS is missing) was developed. Using these formulas, the AUROCCs were between 0.950 and 0.964. When these models were applied to the Khon Kean data, their AUROCCs were greater than 0.91. These equations allow physicians to perform real-time assessments of survival by easy mental calculations at Asian emergency centers, which are overcrowded with blunt injury victims of traffic accidents. © 2012 Kimura et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. The development of simple survival prediction models for blunt trauma victims treated at Asian emergency centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Akio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For real-time assessment of the probability of survival (Ps of blunt trauma victims at emergency centers, this study aimed to establish regression models for estimating Ps using simplified coefficients. Methods The data of 10,210 blunt trauma patients not missing both the binary outcome data about survival and the data necessary for Ps calculation by The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS method were extracted from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (2004-2007 and analyzed. Half (5,113 of the data was allocated to a derivation data set, with the other half (5,097 allocated to a validation data set. The data of 6,407 blunt trauma victims from the trauma registry of Khon Kaen Regional Hospital in Thailand were analyzed for validation. The logistic regression models included age, the Injury Severity Score (ISS, the Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP, respiratory rate (RR, and their coded values (cAGE, 0-1; cISS, 0-4; cSBP, 0-4; cGCS, 0-4; cRR, 0-4 as predictor variables. The coefficients were simplified by rounding off after the decimal point or choosing 0.5 if the coefficients varied across 0.5. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROCC was calculated for each model to measure discriminant ability. Results A group of formulas (log (Ps/1-Ps = logit (Ps = -9 + cISS - cAGE + cSBP + cGCS + cRR/2, where -9 becomes -7 if the predictor variable of cRR or cISS is missing was developed. Using these formulas, the AUROCCs were between 0.950 and 0.964. When these models were applied to the Khon Kean data, their AUROCCs were greater than 0.91. Conclusion: These equations allow physicians to perform real-time assessments of survival by easy mental calculations at Asian emergency centers, which are overcrowded with blunt injury victims of traffic accidents.

  9. The patient centered medical home: mental models and practice culture driving the transformation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronholm, Peter F; Shea, Judy A; Werner, Rachel M; Miller-Day, Michelle; Tufano, Jim; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Gabbay, Robert

    2013-09-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) has become a dominant model of primary care re-design. The PCMH model is a departure from more traditional models of healthcare delivery and requires significant transformation to be realized. To describe factors shaping mental models and practice culture driving the PCMH transformation process in a large multi-payer PCMH demonstration project. Individual interviews were conducted at 17 primary care practices in South Eastern Pennsylvania. A total of 118 individual interviews were conducted with clinicians (N = 47), patient educators (N = 4), office administrators (N = 12), medical assistants (N = 26), front office staff (N = 7), nurses (N = 4), care managers (N = 11), social workers (N = 4), and other stakeholders (N = 3). A multi-disciplinary research team used a grounded theory approach to develop the key constructs describing factors shaping successful practice transformation. Three central themes emerged from the data related to changes in practice culture and mental models necessary for PCMH practice transformation: 1) shifting practice perspectives towards proactive, population-oriented care based in practice-patient partnerships; 2) creating a culture of self-examination; and 3) challenges to developing new roles within the practice through distribution of responsibilities and team-based care. The most tension in shifting the required mental models was displayed between clinician and medical assistant participants, revealing significant barriers towards moving away from clinician-centric care. Key factors driving the PCMH transformation process require shifting mental models at the individual level and culture change at the practice level. Transformation is based upon structural and process changes that support orientation of practice mental models towards perceptions of population health, self-assessment, and the development of shared decision-making. Staff buy-in to the new roles

  10. Comparison of a Psychoanalytic and a Client-Centered Group Treatment Model on Measures of Anxiety and Self-Actualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth, Pamela

    1983-01-01

    Compared the effects of a psychoanalytic or group treatment model in promoting self-actualization in 19 counselor trainees. Results showed significant differences between treatment models: psychoanalytic groups reported higher anxiety, and client-centered groups showed greater initial gains on the Personal Orientation Inventory and maintained…

  11. Modeling of reversible charge separation in reaction centers of photosynthesis: an incoherent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, A G; Shuvalov, V A

    2014-02-21

    Primary charge separation in reaction centers (RCs) of bacterial photosynthesis is modeled in this work. An incoherent population dynamics of RCs states is formulated by kinetic equations. It is assumed that charge separation is accompanied by regular motion of the system along additional coordinates. This motion modulates an energetics of the reactions, and this modulation causes femtosecond oscillations in the population of the states. The best qualitative and quantitative accordance with experimental data on native, modified and mutant RCs of Rba. sphaeroides is achieved in the five states model that includes two excited states P(*)905BAHA and P(*)940BAHA and three charge separated states I, P(+)BA(-)HA and P(+)BAHA(-) (P is a primary electron donor, bacteriochlorophyll dimer, BA and HA are electron acceptors, monomeric bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in active A-branch respectively). The excited states emit at 905 and 940 nm and have approximately the same energy and high interaction rate. The intermediate state I is populated earlier than the P(+)BA(-)HA state and has energy close to the energy of the excited states, a high rate of population and depopulation and spectral identity to the BA(-). A sum of the I and P(+)BA(-)HA populations fits the experimental kinetics of the BA(-) absorption band at 1020 nm. The model explains an oscillatory phenomenon in the kinetics of the P(*) stimulated emission and of the BA(-) absorption. In the schemes without the I state, accordance with the experiment is achieved at unreal parameter values or is not achieved at all. A qualitative agreement of the model with the experiment can be achieved at a wide range of parameter values. The nature of the states I and P(*)940BAHA is discussed in terms of partial charge separation between P and BA and inside P respectively. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Open standards for cascade models for RHIC: Volume 1. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    It is widely recognized that cascade models are potentially effective and powerful tools for interpreting and predicting multi-particle observables in heavy ion physics. However, the lack of common standards, documentation, version control, and accessibility have made it difficult to apply objective scientific criteria for evaluating the many physical and algorithmic assumptions or even to reproduce some published results. The first RIKEN Research Center workshop was proposed by Yang Pang to address this problem by establishing open standards for original codes for applications to nuclear collisions at RHIC energies. The aim of this first workshop is: (1) to prepare a WWW depository site for original source codes and detailed documentation with examples; (2) to develop and perform standardized test for the models such as Lorentz invariance, kinetic theory comparisons, and thermodynamic simulations; (3) to publish a compilation of results of the above work in a journal e.g., ''Heavy Ion Physics''; and (4) to establish a policy statement on a set of minimal requirements for inclusion in the OSCAR-WWW depository

  13. A model for the stabilization of atomic hydrogen centers in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontuschka, W.M.; Isotani, S.; Furtado, W.W.; Piccini, A.; Rabbani, S.R.

    1989-04-01

    A model describing the trapping site of the interstitial atomic hydrogen (H sup(0) sub(i) in borate glasses x-irradiated at 77 K is proposed. The hydrogen atom is stabilized at the centers of oxygen polygons belonging to B-O ring structures in the glass network by van der Waals forces. The previously reported H sup(0) sub(i) isothermal decay experimental data are discussed in the light of this microscopic model. A coupled differential equation system describing the possible reactions was numerically solved by means of Runge-Kutta's method. The parameter best fit was found by trial and error. The untrapping parameter provided an activation energy of 0.7 x 10 sup(-19) J, in good agreement with the calculated results for dispersion interactions between the stabilized atomic hydrogen and the neighbouring oxygen atoms at the vertices of hexagonal and heptagonal structures. The retrapping and recombination parameters were found to be correlated to (T sup1/2) - T sup(1/2) sub(0)) where t sub(0)=179 K is a cutoff temperature for the kinetics process. (author)

  14. Using Carl Rogers' person-centered model to explain interpersonal relationships at a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Venise D; Lindo, Jascinth; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline; Weaver, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Faculty members are viewed as nurturers within the academic setting and may be able to influence students' behaviors through the formation of positive interpersonal relationships. Faculty members' attributes that best facilitated positive interpersonal relationships according to Carl Rogers' Person-Centered Model was studied. Students (n = 192) enrolled in a 3-year undergraduate nursing program in urban Jamaica were randomly selected to participate in this descriptive cross-sectional study. A 38-item questionnaire on interpersonal relationships with nursing faculty and students' perceptions of their teachers was utilized to collect data. Factor analysis was used to create factors of realness, prizing, and empathetic understanding. Multiple linear regression analysis on the interaction of the 3 factors and interpersonal relationship scores was performed while controlling for nursing students' study year and age. One hundred sixty-five students (mean age: 23.18 ± 4.51years; 99% female) responded. The regression model explained over 46% of the variance. Realness (β = 0.50, P < .001) was the only significant predictor of the interpersonal relationship scores assigned by the nursing students. Of the total number of respondents, 99 students (60%) reported satisfaction with the interpersonal relationships shared with faculty. Nursing students' perception of faculty members' realness appeared to be the most significant attribute in fostering positive interpersonal relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementing Innovative Models of Dementia Care: The Healthy Aging Brain Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustani, Malaz A.; Sachs, Greg A.; Alder, Catherine A.; Munger, Stephanie; Schubert, Cathy C.; Guerriero Austrom, Mary; Hake, Ann; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Farlow, Martin; Matthews, Brandy R.; Perkins, Anthony J.; Beck, Robin A.; Callahan, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of the collaborative dementia care model targeting both patients suffering from dementia and their informal caregivers. OBJECTIVE To implement a sustainable collaborative dementia care program in a public health care system in Indianapolis. METHODS We used the framework of Complex Adaptive System and the tool of the Reflective Adaptive Process to translate the results of the dementia care trial into the Healthy Aging Brain Center (HABC). RESULTS Within its first year of operation, the HABC delivered 528 visits to serve 208 patients and 176 informal caregivers. The mean age of HABC patients was 73.8 (SD 9.5), 40% were African Americans, 42% had less than high school education, 14% had normal cognitive status, 39% received a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment, and 46% were diagnosed with dementia. Within 12 months of the initial HABC visit, 28% of patients had at least one visit to an emergency room (ER) and 14% were hospitalized with a mean length of stay of five days. The rate of a one-week ER revisit was 14% and the 30-day re-hospitalization rate was 11%. Only 5% of HABC patients received an order for neuroleptics and only 16% had simultaneous orders for both definite anticholinergic and anti-dementia drugs. CONCLUSION The tools of “implementation science” can be utilized to translate a health care delivery model developed in the research laboratory to a practical, operational, health care delivery program. PMID:21271387

  16. Model for determining logistic distribution center: case study of Mount Merapi eruption disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, T. J.; Wigati, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    As one of the most active volcano in the earth, Mount Merapi is periodically erupted and it is considered as a natural disaster for the surrounding area. Kabupaten Sleman as one of the nearest location to this mount has to be always prepared to this disaster. The local government already set three different groups of region, in which potentially affected by Mount Merapi eruption, called KRB I, KRB II, and KRB III. Region KRB III is the closest area to the mount crater and most often affected by the eruption disaster. Whenever KRB III is affected, people live in that area usually being transfer to the next region set that is KRB II. The case presented in this paper is located at the KRB II region, which is the second closest region to the mount crater. A humanitarian distribution system has to be set in this region, since usually this region is became the location of shelters for KRB III population whenever a ‘big’ eruption is happened. A mathematical model is proposed in this paper, for determining the location of distribution center, vehicle route, and the amount of goods delivered to each customer. Some numerical illustration are presented in order to know the behavior of the proposed model.

  17. The layered sensing operations center: a modeling and simulation approach to developing complex ISR networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Christopher; Lenzo, Matthew; McClure, Matthew; Preiss, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    In order to anticipate the constantly changing landscape of global warfare, the United States Air Force must acquire new capabilities in the field of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR). To meet this challenge, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing a unifying construct of "Layered Sensing" which will provide military decision-makers at all levels with the timely, actionable, and trusted information necessary for complete battlespace awareness. Layered Sensing is characterized by the appropriate combination of sensors and platforms (including those for persistent sensing), infrastructure, and exploitation capabilities to enable this synergistic awareness. To achieve the Layered Sensing vision, AFRL is pursuing a Modeling & Simulation (M&S) strategy through the Layered Sensing Operations Center (LSOC). An experimental ISR system-of-systems test-bed, the LSOC integrates DoD standard simulation tools with commercial, off-the-shelf video game technology for rapid scenario development and visualization. These tools will help facilitate sensor management performance characterization, system development, and operator behavioral analysis. Flexible and cost-effective, the LSOC will implement a non-proprietary, open-architecture framework with well-defined interfaces. This framework will incentivize the transition of current ISR performance models to service-oriented software design for maximum re-use and consistency. This paper will present the LSOC's development and implementation thus far as well as a summary of lessons learned and future plans for the LSOC.

  18. Quantified Risk Ranking Model for Condition-Based Risk and Reliability Centered Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyaya, Pradip Kumar; Basu, Sushil Kumar; Majumdar, Manik Chandra

    2017-06-01

    In the recent past, risk and reliability centered maintenance (RRCM) framework is introduced with a shift in the methodological focus from reliability and probabilities (expected values) to reliability, uncertainty and risk. In this paper authors explain a novel methodology for risk quantification and ranking the critical items for prioritizing the maintenance actions on the basis of condition-based risk and reliability centered maintenance (CBRRCM). The critical items are identified through criticality analysis of RPN values of items of a system and the maintenance significant precipitating factors (MSPF) of items are evaluated. The criticality of risk is assessed using three risk coefficients. The likelihood risk coefficient treats the probability as a fuzzy number. The abstract risk coefficient deduces risk influenced by uncertainty, sensitivity besides other factors. The third risk coefficient is called hazardous risk coefficient, which is due to anticipated hazards which may occur in the future and the risk is deduced from criteria of consequences on safety, environment, maintenance and economic risks with corresponding cost for consequences. The characteristic values of all the three risk coefficients are obtained with a particular test. With few more tests on the system, the values may change significantly within controlling range of each coefficient, hence `random number simulation' is resorted to obtain one distinctive value for each coefficient. The risk coefficients are statistically added to obtain final risk coefficient of each critical item and then the final rankings of critical items are estimated. The prioritization in ranking of critical items using the developed mathematical model for risk assessment shall be useful in optimization of financial losses and timing of maintenance actions.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF CLINICAL SCENARIO’S INFORMATION MODEL IN THE MEDICAL SIMULATION CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Tolmachyov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is the big issue in medical education which is students don’t have enough skills. Often even with theoretical knowledge graduate medical students need to improve their skills by working with patients. Obviously it can be a risk for patients and takes quite long time. This situation could be changed with applying simulation technologies in medical education. Medical education with virtual simulators allows reducing the time of skills development and improving the quality of training. The aims of this work are developing informational model and creating clinical scenarios of emergency states in the Medical Simulation Center.Objectives:– to analyze the process of scenario conducting;– to create clinical scenarios of emergency states (anaphylactic shock, hypovolemic shock, obstructive shock with specialist’s help.The scenarios consist of sections such as main aim, skills, required mannequins, preparation of the mannequins, preparation of medical equipment and instruments for the scenario, preparation of special materials, scenario description, guide for operator, information for trainees.By analyzing the process of scenario conducting the key participants were defined who are operator, assistant, trainer, trainees. Also the main scenario stages were defined. Based on the stages diagram of variants of scenario conducting was designed.As an example there are fragments of scenario “Obstructive shock – a pulmonary embolism” in this article. Learn skills are cognitive, technical, social ones.Results. This paper presents an analysis of the clinical scenario conducting. Information model was developed which based on object-oriented decomposition. The model is the diagram of variants of scenario conducting. Scenario’s structure for emergency states was formulated. The scenarios are anaphylactic shock, hypovolemic shock, obstructive shock (pulmonary embolism, tension pneumothorax, pulmonary edema, hypertensive crisis, respiratory

  20. NCC Simulation Model: Simulating the operations of the network control center, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Paul, Arthur S.; Gill, Tepper L.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation of the network control center (NCC) is in the second phase of development. This phase seeks to further develop the work performed in phase one. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network. The focus of phase two will be the implementation of the network message dialogues and the resources controlled by the NCC. These resources are requested, initiated, monitored and analyzed via network messages. In the NCC network messages are presented in the form of packets that are routed across the network. These packets are generated, encoded, decoded and processed by the network host processors that generate and service the message traffic on the network that connects these hosts. As a result, the message traffic is used to characterize the work done by the NCC and the connected network. Phase one of the model development represented the NCC as a network of bi-directional single server queues and message generating sources. The generators represented the external segment processors. The served based queues represented the host processors. The NCC model consists of the internal and external processors which generate message traffic on the network that links these hosts. To fully realize the objective of phase two it is necessary to identify and model the processes in each internal processor. These processes live in the operating system of the internal host computers and handle tasks such as high speed message exchanging, ISN and NFE interface, event monitoring, network monitoring, and message logging. Inter process communication is achieved through the operating system facilities. The overall performance of the host is determined by its ability to service messages generated by both internal and external processors.

  1. Integration of Latino/a cultural values into palliative health care: a culture centered model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adames, Hector Y; Chavez-Dueñas, Nayeli Y; Fuentes, Milton A; Salas, Silvia P; Perez-Chavez, Jessica G

    2014-04-01

    Culture helps us grapple with, understand, and navigate the dying process. Although often overlooked, cultural values play a critical and influential role in palliative care. The purpose of the present study was two-fold: one, to review whether Latino/a cultural values have been integrated into the palliative care literature for Latinos/as; two, identify publications that provide recommendations on how palliative care providers can integrate Latino/a cultural values into the end-of-life care. A comprehensive systematic review on the area of Latino/a cultural values in palliative care was conducted via an electronic literature search of publications between 1930-2013. Five articles were identified for reviewing, discussing, or mentioning Latino/a cultural values and palliative care. Only one article specifically addressed Latino/a cultural values in palliative care. The four remaining articles discuss or mention cultural values; however, the cultural values were not the main focus of each article's thesis. The results of the current study highlight the lack of literature specifically addressing the importance of integrating Latino/a cultural values into the delivery of palliative care. As a result, this article introduces the Culture-Centered Palliative Care Model (CCPC). The article defines five key traditional Latino/a cultural values (i.e., familismo, personalismo, respeto, confianza, and dignidad), discusses the influence of each value on palliative health care, and ends with practical recommendations for service providers. Special attention is given to the stages of acculturation and ethnic identity.

  2. Modelling of Data Warehouse on Food Distribution Center and Reserves in the Ministry of Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Purnomo Putra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to perform database’s planning that supports Prototype Modeling Data Warehouse in the Ministry of Agriculture, especially in the Distribution Center and Reserves in the field of distribution, reserve and price. With the prototype of Data Warehouse, the process of data analysis anddecision-making process by the top management will be easier and more accurate. Research’s method used was data collection and design method. Data warehouse’s design method was done by using Kimball’s nine stepsmethodology. Database design was done by using the ERD (Entity Relationship Diagram and activity diagram. The data used for the analysis was obtained from an interview with the head of Distribution, Reserve and Food Price. The results obtained through the analysis incorporated into the Data Warehouse Prototype have been designed to support decision-making. To conclude, Prototype Data Warehouse facilitates the analysis of data, the searching of history data and decision-making by the top management.

  3. The ebb and flow model: a philosophy of organizational learning in the academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimario, Francis J

    2012-02-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) have traditionally been a vibrant locale for cutting-edge medical research, androgogic education and innovative clinical care for the most vexing diseases. While these pursuits have coexisted and flourished, the realities of the health-care business environment have demanded reformatting and emulation of a corporate organizational model. This evolution has impacted the core identities of the AHC and challenged individual medical-educators, clinician-scientists and basic science investigators to persist and succeed in this milieu. The AHC has a unique capacity to muster the innate learning drive of these individuals into an organizational mission as it balances the pressures exerted from both the internal and external environments. The AHC as an organization can be viewed as an experimental condition with modifiable variables to which its professionals can react, adapt to, and transform. Organizational learning and change implementation is in essence an experiment in human behavior modification. While all individuals are subject to change, merely assembling them in a single locale determines neither a predictable homogeneous outcome nor the success of their endeavor. This article highlights some of these propositions and offers a philosophical approach to advance the AHC as an organization through the creativity and innovation of its professional ranks.

  4. Designing a crisis management model in Iran’s archival centers: Pre-crisis stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nakhoda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to design a crisis management model in the archival centers of Iran during the pre-crisis phase. The present study was conducted with a qualitative approach using the Grounded theory method. The necessary data was collected using semi-structured interviews. Data saturation was a major factor in determining the sample size. The research population included 20 crisis management specialists and managers of archives in Iran and the data analysis was performed in three stages: open, axial, and selective coding. The paradigmatic model derived from the findings of the research includes the sections of the causal conditions, strategies, intervening conditions and the underlying conditions and their outcomes. The causal conditions are located in two categories of internal crises such as biological crises and lack of proper management, and external crises such as natural disasters, fires and human-made crises. Intervener conditions and backgrounds include cat-egories such as lack of specialist staff training, lack of appropriate environmental conditions and management mechanisms, archival building and human resources issues. To prevent and mitigate the effects of the crisis in archives, some strategies are required such as modern education for resil-ience, teaching how to use documents, standardizing buildings and equipment (non-use of steel skeletons in building archives, use of concrete skeletons Armed or metal, as well as the use of walls and doors and floors of anti-fire covers in the building of archives and the establishment of multi-layer protective systems for the protection of documents.

  5. Building trust and diversity in patient-centered oncology clinical trials: An integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Thelma C; Kaplan, Charles D; Cook, Elise D; Chilton, Janice A; Lytton, Jay S; Hawk, Ernest T; Jones, Lovell A

    2017-04-01

    contract. Contract renegotiation occurs in response to cyclical changes within the trust relationship throughout trial participation. The Integrated Model of Trust offers a novel framework to interrogate the process by which diverse populations and clinical trial teams build trust. To our knowledge, this is the first model of trust-building in clinical trials that frames trust development through integrated clinical and business perspectives. By focusing on the process, rather than outcomes of trust-building diverse trial participants, clinical trials teams, participants, and cancer centers may be able to better understand, measure, and manage their trust relationships in real time. Ultimately, this may foster increased recruitment and retention of diverse populations to clinical trials.

  6. Antimicrobial Stewardship Facetime: Comparison of Two Rounding Models at a Tertiary Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoshu; Smith, Ethan; Marks, Gregory; Ochner, Margaret; Watson, Richard; Krishna, Sneha; Tran, Hai; Shane, Rita; Murthy, Rekha; Grein, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background As an 886-bed tertiary care hospital with both teaching and private physician groups, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center has a unique opportunity to incorporate antimicrobial stewardship pharmacist (ASP) rounds with both a general medicine teaching service (TS) as well as a non-teaching hospitalist group (NTH). The impact of ASP rounds on antimicrobial (ABX) utilization and notable differences in clinical outcomes associated with both rounding models were evaluated. Methods An ASP was incorporated into existing teaching rounds for TS and disposition planning rounds for NTH. ASP-TS and ASP-NTH rounds both occurred once daily on weekdays with facetime of 3-4 hours per day for TS and 0.5-1 hour per day for NTH. Metrics included ASP recommendations and acceptance rates, total ASP time, ABX utilization, and clinical outcomes. Chi-squared and the Student’s t-test were used as appropriate. Results Between November 2016 to April 2017, ASPs reviewed 3184 NTH patients and 1322 TS patients. More opportunities for ASP intervention were identified with TS (40% vs. 26%, P < 0.001). Overall recommendation acceptance rates were higher for TS compared with NTH (95% vs. 79%, P < 0.001). Total recommendations identified per ASP-hour were higher for NTH vs. TS (1.76 vs. 0.93). ASP recommendations targeting ABX de-escalation, unnecessary use of fluoroquinolones, and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria were similar for both groups. Compared with baseline rates, ASP rounds were associated with a significant reduction (-6%, P = 0.01) in ABX days-of-therapy (DOT) for NTH but not for TS (-1%, P = 0.6). Anti-Pseudomonal (PSA) DOT significantly declined in both NTH (-11%,
P = 0.04) and TS (-22%, P = 0.02). No significant changes in mortality, length of stay, and 30-day readmission rates were observed for either group. Conclusion ASP rounds identified ample opportunities for improvement in ABX utilization in both NTH and TS models. Rounds were associated with a significant

  7. EMS call center models with and without function differentiation: a comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, M.; Kommer, G.J.; van der Mei, R.D.; Bhulai, Sandjai

    2017-01-01

    In pre-hospital health care the call center plays an important role in the coordination of emergency medical services (EMS). An EMS call center handles inbound requests for EMS and dispatches an ambulance if necessary. The time needed for triage and dispatch is part of the total response time to the

  8. Wireless Internet and Student-Centered Learning: A Partial Least-Squares Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Eric Y.; Ma, Hongyan; Turner, Sandra; Huang, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Wireless Internet technology is gaining a foothold on more and more campuses, yet few studies have investigated how wireless Internet supports and enhances a student-centered learning environment. This study seeks to fill the gap by developing an instrument to measure how wireless Internet supports student-centered learning. A web survey was…

  9. How to make a hospital-based wound center financially viable: the Georgetown University Hospital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attinger, Christopher E; Hoang, Han; Steinberg, John; Couch, Kara; Hubley, Katherine; Winger, Linda; Kugler, Margaret

    2008-11-01

    As the medical need and expenditure for chronic wound care have increased markedly over the past decade, wound centers have grown exponentially throughout the country. They can be community-based or hospital-based, and in either case, can be run by the facility or by a national chain. The wound center's viability is dependent on generated revenue, and its clinical effectiveness is based on a multidisciplinary approach to wound care. By incorporating the wound center into an existing hospital system, one can take advantage of the hospital's resources to effectively treat the more complex patients. Additionally, by focusing on limb salvage, the hospital attracts the critical limb ischemia and other complex patients that often require inpatient admission. We examined the Georgetown University Hospital Center for Wound Healing performance over the first 6 years of operation. Since opening the wound center in 1999, the number of outpatient visits has doubled, the wound care inpatient census has doubled, and the operative cases have increased 3-fold. Because the outpatient segment of the wound center can at best cover its direct cost, it cannot financially justify its existence. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) can increase the revenue to the point where the indirect costs are covered as well and the wound center can be revenue neutral. Due to the medical complexity of limb salvage patients, the inpatient collections are much higher than those of the outpatient wound center and therefore can serve as justification for the latter's financial viability. More importantly, with the wound center in place, the hospital can provide the local/regional community with a comprehensive service that can effectively treat the most challenging wounds. The success is built on a multidisciplinary team approach, use of evidence-based treatment protocols, efficient clinical structure, and a supportive hospital system. The beneficiaries include the patient with a healed wound, the physician with a

  10. Experimental drug STA-8666 causes complete tumor regression in animal models of pediatric sarcomas | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    New studies from scientists in the NCI Center for Cancer Research’s (CCR) Pediatric Oncology Branch suggest that an experimental drug called STA-8666 could be an effective treatment for the childhood cancers Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. In mouse models of these diseases, STA-8666 eliminated tumors and prolonged survival beyond that of animals treated with a related drug, irinotecan. Read more…

  11. The Three Roots and Papa's Advice. A Puerto Rican Migration Story. A Learner-Centered Model Guide for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herendeen, Noemi Carrera; Mitchell, Alaire; Dinos, Carmen

    This document is part of a series of guides for teachers in which the Division of Bilingual Education of the New York City Board of Education presents a learner-centered model in which the learner sees himself or herself in the story. Learners are able to relive their own experiences or those of their parents or grandparents as they left their own…

  12. The East Bay Center for the Performing Arts: A Model for Community-Based Multicultural Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in Richmond, California, which is one successful model of a community-based arts education organization whose central mission is to provide these deep art-rich experiences for students from low socio-economic status (SES) communities, who in this instance are predominately African…

  13. Centering, Scale Indeterminacy, and Differential Item Functioning Detection in Hierarchical Generalized Linear and Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Yuk Fai; Kamata, Akihito

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss and illustrate two centering and anchoring options available in differential item functioning (DIF) detection studies based on the hierarchical generalized linear and generalized linear mixed modeling frameworks. We compared and contrasted the assumptions of the two options, and examined the properties of their DIF…

  14. Human-centered modeling in human reliability analysis: some trends based on case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosneron-Dupin, F.; Reer, B.; Heslinga, G.; Straeter, O.; Gerdes, V.; Saliou, G.; Ullwer, W.

    1997-01-01

    As an informal working group of researchers from France, Germany and The Netherlands created in 1993, the EARTH association is investigating significant subjects in the field of human reliability analysis (HRA). Our initial review of cases from nuclear operating experience showed that decision-based unrequired actions (DUA) contribute to risk significantly on the one hand. On the other hand, our evaluation of current HRA methods showed that these methods do not cover such actions adequately. Especially, practice-oriented guidelines for their predictive identification are lacking. We assumed that a basic cause for such difficulties was that these methods actually use a limited representation of the stimulus-organism-response (SOR) paradigm. We proposed a human-centered model, which better highlights the active role of the operators and the importance of their culture, attitudes and goals. This orientation was encouraged by our review of current HRA research activities. We therefore decided to envisage progress by identifying cognitive tendencies in the context of operating and simulator experience. For this purpose, advanced approaches for retrospective event analysis were discussed. Some orientations for improvements were proposed. By analyzing cases, various cognitive tendencies were identified, together with useful information about their context. Some of them match psychological findings already published in the literature, some of them are not covered adequately by the literature that we reviewed. Finally, this exploratory study shows that contextual and case-illustrated findings about cognitive tendencies provide useful help for the predictive identification of DUA in HRA. More research should be carried out to complement our findings and elaborate more detailed and systematic guidelines for using them in HRA studies

  15. Evaluating Surgical Residents' Patient-Centered Communication Skills: Practical Alternatives to the "Apprenticeship Model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Anna; Trickey, Amber W; Lita, Elena; Dort, Jonathan

    2017-10-06

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires residency programs to assess communication skills and provide feedback to residents. We aimed to develop a feasible data collection process that generates objective clinical performance information to guide training activities, inform ACGME milestone evaluations, and validate assessment instruments. Residents care for patients in the surgical clinic and in the hospital, and participate in a communication curriculum providing practice with standardized patients (SPs). We measured perception of resident communication using the 14-item Communication Assessment Tool (CAT), collecting data from patients at the surgery clinic and surgical wards in the hospital, and from SP encounters during simulated training scenarios. We developed a handout of CAT example behaviors to guide patients completing the communication assessment. Independent academic medical center. General surgery residents. The primary outcome is the percentage of total items patients rated "excellent;" we collected data on 24 of 25 residents. Outpatient evaluations resulted in significantly higher scores (mean 84.5% vs. 68.6%, p communication assessments in their concurrent patient population (p = 0.017), and (2) receiving CAT example instructions was associated with a lower percentage of excellent ratings by 9.3% (p = 0.047). Our data collection process provides a model for obtaining meaningful information about resident communication proficiency. CAT evaluations of surgical residents by the inpatient population had not previously been described in the literature; our results provide important insight into relationships between the evaluations provided by inpatients, clinic patients, and SPs in simulation. Our example behaviors guide shows promise for addressing a common concern, minimizing ceiling effects when measuring physician-patient communication. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by

  16. Consequences of the center-of-mass correction in nuclear mean-field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.; Maruhn, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    We study the influence of the scheme for the correction for spurious center-of-mass motion on the fit of effective interactions for self-consistent nuclear mean-field calculations. We find that interactions with very simple center-of-mass correction have significantly larger surface coefficients than interactions for which the center-of-mass correction was calculated for the actual many-body state during the fit. The reason for that is that the effective interaction has to counteract the wrong trends with nucleon number of all simplified schemes for center-of-mass correction which puts a wrong trend with mass number into the effective interaction itself. The effect becomes clearly visible when looking at the deformation energy of largely deformed systems, e.g. superdeformed states or fission barriers of heavy nuclei. (orig.)

  17. Performance evaluation of Al-Zahra academic medical center based on Iran balanced scorecard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisi, Ahmad Reza; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Bakhsh, Roghayeh Mohammadi; Gangi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Growth and development in any country's national health system, without an efficient evaluation system, lacks the basic concepts and tools necessary for fulfilling the system's goals. The balanced scorecard (BSC) is a technique widely used to measure the performance of an organization. The basic core of the BSC is guided by the organization's vision and strategies, which are the bases for the formation of four perspectives of BSC. The goal of this research is the performance evaluation of Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, based on Iran BSC model. This is a combination (quantitative-qualitative) research which was done at Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. The research populations were hospital managers at different levels. Sampling method was purposive sampling in which the key informed personnel participated in determining the performance indicators of hospital as the BSC team members in focused discussion groups. After determining the conceptual elements in focused discussion groups, the performance objectives (targets) and indicators of hospital were determined and sorted in perspectives by the group discussion participants. Following that, the performance indicators were calculated by the experts according to the predetermined objectives; then, the score of each indicator and the mean score of each perspective were calculated. Research findings included development of the organizational mission, vision, values, objectives, and strategies. The strategies agreed upon by the participants in the focus discussion group included five strategies, which were customer satisfaction, continuous quality improvement, development of human resources, supporting innovation, expansion of services and improving the productivity. Research participants also agreed upon four perspectives for the Al-Zahra hospital BSC. In the patients and community perspective (customer), two objectives and

  18. Function-centered modeling of engineering systems using the goal tree-success tree technique and functional primitives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, Mohammad; Cheon, Se Woo

    1999-01-01

    Most of the complex systems are formed through some hierarchical evolution. Therefore, those systems can be best described through hierarchical frameworks. This paper describes some fundamental attributes of complex physical systems and several hierarchies such as functional, behavioral, goal/condition, and event hierarchies, then presents a function-centered approach to system modeling. Based on the function-centered concept, this paper describes the joint goal tree-success tree (GTST) and the master logic diagram (MLD) as a framework for developing models of complex physical systems. A function-based lexicon for classifying the most common elements of engineering systems for use in the GTST-MLD framework has been proposed. The classification is based on the physical conservation laws that govern the engineering systems. Functional descriptions based on conservation laws provide a simple and rich vocabulary for modeling complex engineering systems

  19. Pilot Implementation of Human-Centered Model in Disaster Management: A Report From Landslides Area in Semarang City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Triadi Putranto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Semarang has a high potential of landslides occurrences in its almost area that should be noted by the stakeholders. Consider this fact, human as the part of the system should be used as a center of the disaster management system to reduce the risk caused by the disaster. An adapted model of human factor toolkits is developed to represent a specific phase of human-centered disaster management. This model presents four phases including major disaster scenario, human error analysis, safety critical task and performance influence factors (PIFs. As the preliminary implementation, this study takes the pilot implementation of each phase of the model to examine the reliability of the concept in the landslide cases, especially in Semarang city. The result shows that there is quite a high deviation between expected and observed behavior of the community and the government institution regarding the awareness states of the system.

  20. The Effect of Centering Pregnancy versus Traditional Prenatal Care Models on Improved Adolescent Health Behaviors in the Perinatal Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Gylynthia; Chhatre, Gayatri; Darolia, Renuka; Tefera, Eshetu; Damle, Lauren; Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2015-10-01

    To determine if the CenteringPregnancy model of prenatal care improves maternal health behaviors in adolescent pregnancy. We conducted a retrospective chart review comparing 150 pregnant adolescents who received prenatal care between 2008 to 2012 with CenteringPregnancy to those receiving care in traditional prenatal care models with either multiprovider or single-provider visits. Outcome measures included weight gain during pregnancy, compliance to prenatal care appointments, infant feeding method, postpartum follow up and contraceptive use postpartum. A χ(2) analysis was used to compare outcomes between the 3 groups at a 2-tailed α of .05. Fifty individuals were evaluated in each group. Adolescents in the CenteringPregnancy group were more likely to comply with prenatal and postpartum visits and to meet the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight guidelines for weight gain in pregnancy than were adolescents in either multiprovider (62.0% vs 38.0%, P = .02) or single-provider (62.0% vs 38.0%, P = .02) groups. The CenteringPregnancy group was also more likely to solely breastfeed compared with adolescents in the multiprovider group (40.0% vs 20.0%, P = .03) and include breastfeeding in addition to bottle-feeding compared with both multiprovider (32.0% vs 14.0%, P = .03) and single-provider (32.0% vs 12.0%, P = .03) patient groups. Additionally, the CenteringPregnancy group had increased uptake of long-acting reversible contraception and were less likely to suffer from postpartum depression. CenteringPregnancy Prenatal Care program aids in compliance to prenatal visits, appropriate weight gain, increased uptake of highly effective contraception, and breastfeeding among adolescent mothers. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Development of Hand-Centered Visual Representations in the Primate Brain: A Computer Modeling Study Using Natural Visual Scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Neurons that respond to visual targets in a hand-centered frame of reference have been found within various areas of the primate brain. We investigate how hand-centered visual representations may develop in a neural network model of the primate visual system called VisNet, when the model is trained on images of the hand seen against natural visual scenes. The simulations show how such neurons may develop through a biologically plausible process of unsupervised competitive learning and self-organization. In an advance on our previous work, the visual scenes consisted of multiple targets presented simultaneously with respect to the hand. Three experiments are presented. First, VisNet was trained with computerized images consisting of a realistic image of a hand and a variety of natural objects, presented in different textured backgrounds during training. The network was then tested with just one textured object near the hand in order to verify if the output cells were capable of building hand-centered representations with a single localized receptive field. We explain the underlying principles of the statistical decoupling that allows the output cells of the network to develop single localized receptive fields even when the network is trained with multiple objects. In a second simulation we examined how some of the cells with hand-centered receptive fields decreased their shape selectivity and started responding to a localized region of hand-centered space as the number of objects presented in overlapping locations during training increases. Lastly, we explored the same learning principles training the network with natural visual scenes collected by volunteers. These results provide an important step in showing how single, localized, hand-centered receptive fields could emerge under more ecologically realistic visual training conditions.

  2. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

  3. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

  4. Automated and simultaneous fovea center localization and macula segmentation using the new dynamic identification and classification of edges model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Sinan; Chen, Xin; Satamraju, Veeresh; Balasooriya, Maduka; Dabil-Karacal, Humeyra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Detecting the position of retinal structures, including the fovea center and macula, in retinal images plays a key role in diagnosing eye diseases such as optic nerve hypoplasia, amblyopia, diabetic retinopathy, and macular edema. However, current detection methods are unreliable for infants or certain ethnic populations. Thus, a methodology is proposed here that may be useful for infants and across ethnicities that automatically localizes the fovea center and segments the macula on digital fundus images. First, dark structures and bright artifacts are removed from the input image using preprocessing operations, and the resulting image is transformed to polar space. Second, the fovea center is identified, and the macula region is segmented using the proposed dynamic identification and classification of edges (DICE) model. The performance of the method was evaluated using 1200 fundus images obtained from the relatively large, diverse, and publicly available Messidor database. In 96.1% of these 1200 cases, the distance between the fovea center identified manually by ophthalmologists and automatically using the proposed method remained within 0 to 8 pixels. The dice similarity index comparing the manually obtained results with those of the model for macula segmentation was 96.12% for these 1200 cases. Thus, the proposed method displayed a high degree of accuracy. The methodology using the DICE model is unique and advantageous over previously reported methods because it simultaneously determines the fovea center and segments the macula region without using any structural information, such as optic disc or blood vessel location, and it may prove useful for all populations, including infants. PMID:27660803

  5. Community centers of UNESCO-Chernobyl programme-psychological support model for population in a post-catastrophe crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnets, O.

    1998-01-01

    Community Centers for Psycho-social Rehabilitation created within UNESCO - Chernobyl Programme (Project no 64) is aimed at providing psychological support to population suffered from the catastrophe. Centers are located in communities that in different ways suffered from Chernobyl - people evacuated and relocated from the contaminated territories, people who are still living in contaminated regions, employees of the nuclear power plant etc. Centres are providing psychological support to people suffered from Chernobyl catastrophe, trough developing adaptive behavior models under living conditions that changed - both ecological and social and economic crises, developing of personal and social responsibility in community members. The professionals of Community Centers implement activities aimed on coping victimization, on community interaction and communities restructuring. They are working with all age and social groups in the communities, with acute crises and suicide prevention, creating mutual support mechanisms. Centres performance results in decrease of psycho-social tension and anxiety in population. Centers present successfully functioning model of social and psychological support under complicated ecological and social conditions in post soviet countries. They have accumulated unique professional and organizational experience of efficient work in, a post-catastrophe period under social and economic crisis. (author)

  6. Analysis of Gap in Service Quality in Drug Addiction Treatment Centers of Kerman, Iran, Using SERVQUAL Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqavi, Mohammad Reza; Refaiee, Raheleh; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of drug addicts is one of the main strategies of drug control in Iran. Client satisfaction strongly influences the success of any treatment program. This study aimed to explore the difference between customer expectations and perceptions in drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, Iran, using SERVQUAL model. Using a cross-sectional design 260 clients referring to drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, were enrolled in 2012. From among 84 clinics, 20 centers were selected randomly. Based on the number of clients registered in each center, a random sample proportional to the size was selected and 290 subjects were invited for interviews. A well validated 22-item questionnaire, which measured the 5 dimensions of service quality (reliability, assurance, tangibility, empathy, and responsiveness), was completed by participants. Each item measured 2 aspects of service quality; expectations and perceptions. Mean ± SD (Standard deviation) age of the subjects was 37.7 ± 9.4. Most of them were male (87.7%). Less than half of them had an educational level lower than diploma. The total score of clients` expectations was higher than their perceptions (P SERVQUAL model, only 1 dimension (i.e., assurance) showed no difference between perceptions and expectations of the participants (P = 0.134). There was a gap between the clients' expectations and what they actually perceived in the clinics. Thus, more attention should be devoted to the clients' views regarding service quality in addiction treatment clinics.

  7. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  8. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  9. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-world Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    The Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) at www.nrel.gov/tsdc provides free, web-based access to detailed transportation data from a variety of travel surveys conducted across the nation. While preserving the privacy of survey participants, this online repository makes vital transportation data broadly available to users from the comfort of their own desks via a secure online connection.

  10. Usefulness of a collision term for the guiding center-plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Pierre; Baumann, Germain

    1976-01-01

    Difficulties occurring in the treatment of the guiding-center-plasma equations by means of the spectral method, are connected to the finite number of Fourier components which must be retained. It is shown that the introduction of viscosity-like collisions will remove appreciably the numerical difficulties, without destroying the interesting phenomena [fr

  11. A model for the interaction between F centers and H atoms in ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumke, V.R.; Souza, M. de

    1975-01-01

    The interaction between an F center and neutral hydrogen atoms, the most simple paramagnetic defects in ionic crystals, is described in terms of a perturbation theory of two square potential wells. The good agreement with experimental data indicates that lattice distortion due to the presence of the hydrogen atoms is negligible [pt

  12. Fluid Approximation of a Call Center Model with Redials and Reconnects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ding (Sihan); M. Frolkova (Masha); R.D. van der Mei (Rob); A.P. Zwart (Bert)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn many call centers, callers may call multiple times. Some of the calls are re-attempts after abandonments (redials), and some are re-attempts after connected calls (reconnects). The combination of redials and reconnects has not been considered when making staffing decisions, while

  13. Establishing and evaluating bar-code technology in blood sampling system: a model based on human centered human-centered design method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shin-Shang; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Kuo, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This study intended to use a human-centered design study method to develop a bar-code technology in blood sampling process. By using the multilevel analysis to gather the information, the bar-code technology has been constructed to identify the patient's identification, simplify the work process, and prevent medical error rates. A Technology Acceptance Model questionnaire was developed to assess the effectiveness of system and the data of patient's identification and sample errors were collected daily. The average scores of 8 items users' perceived ease of use was 25.21(3.72), 9 items users' perceived usefulness was 28.53(5.00), and 14 items task-technology fit was 52.24(7.09), the rate of patient identification error and samples with order cancelled were down to zero, however, new errors were generated after the new system deployed; which were the position of barcode stickers on the sample tubes. Overall, more than half of nurses (62.5%) were willing to use the new system.

  14. A self-consistent model for the electronic structure of the u-center in alkali-halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koiller, B.; Brandi, H.S.

    1978-01-01

    A simple one-orbital per site model Hamiltonian for the U center in alkali-halides with rock-salt structure where correlation effects are introduced via an Anderson type Hamiltonian is presented. The Cluster-Bethe lattice method is used to determine the local density of states, yielding both localized and extended states. A one-electron approximation is assumed and the problem is solved self consistently in the Hartree-Fock scheme. The optical excitation energy is in fair agreement with experiment. The present approach is compared with other models previously used to describe this center and the results indicate that is adequately incorporates the relevant features of the system indicating the possibility of its application to other physical situations [pt

  15. New Cosmic Center Universe Model Matches Eight of Big Bang's Major Predictions Without The F-L Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, R V

    2003-01-01

    Accompanying disproof of the F-L expansion paradigm eliminates the basis for expansion redshifts, which in turn eliminates the basis for the Cosmological Principle. The universe is not the same everywhere. Instead the spherical symmetry of the cosmos demanded by the Hubble redshift relation proves the universe is isotropic about a nearby universal Center. This is the foundation of the relatively new Cosmic Center Universe (CCU) model, which accounts for, explains, or predicts: (i) The Hubble redshift relation, (ii) a CBR redshift relation that fits all current CBR measurements, (iii) the recently discovered velocity dipole distribution of radiogalaxies, (iv) the well-known time dilation of SNeIa light curves, (v) the Sunyaev-Zeldovich thermal effect, (vi) Olber's paradox, (vii) SN dimming for z 1 an enhanced brightness that fits SN 1997ff measurements, (ix) the existence of extreme redshift (z > 10) objects which, when observed, will further distinguish it from the big bang. The CCU model also plausibly expl...

  16. Formation of supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies. Importance of a multi-scale theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakatsu, Nozomu; Wada, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that most of normal galaxies have their central supermassive black holes (SMBHs). However, the formation and evolution of SMBHs is still open question and a hot topic in astrophysics. In this article, we review recent theoretical studies on the formation of SMBHs in the center of galaxies, and mention the importance of constructing a multi-scale theoretical model. (author)

  17. A Collection-Distribution Center Location and Allocation Optimization Model in Closed-Loop Supply Chain for Chinese Beer Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Kang; Xiaoyu Wang; Yanfang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Recycling waste products is an environmental-friendly activity that can result in manufacturing cost saving and economic efficiency improving. In the beer industry, recycling bottles can reduce manufacturing cost and the industry’s carbon footprint. This paper presents a model for a collection-distribution center location and allocation problem in a closed-loop supply chain for the beer industry under a fuzzy random environment, in which the objectives are to minimize total costs and transpor...

  18. Treatment and Rehabilitation of Abused and Neglected Children an Inpatient Center Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunay Fırat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation and treatment centers are organizations that provide services for children and adolescents, with the main goal being to implement a “mental health” treatment plan for the individuals under their care. These organizations, which provide a continuous 24-hour service, may differ from one another in terms of the specific programs and treatment methods they apply. The Oğuz Kağan Köksal Children and Youth Center was established in the Adana Province to provide for the treatment and rehabilitation of girls between the ages of 8 and 18 who have been subject to abuse or neglect, who suffer from alcohol/substance abuse, who are in need of treatment for mental problems and/or who live on the streets. A study was made of 72 girls who had been admitted to the institution for treatment and rehabilitation since 2004 with a history abuse and neglect. The girls were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-I, the Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-II and the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (MOCI upon being admitted to the institution and at the end of their stay (i.e. their discharge. The differences between the mean admission and discharge scores of the girls in the BDI, STAI-I, STAI-II and MOCI assessments was determined to be statistically significant (p<0.001. According to the duration of stay groups (0–3 months; 4–6 months; 7–9 months and ≥10 months, a statistically significant difference was identified between the mean admission and discharge scores of children who remained in the institution for 3–7 months, with the post-treatment scores of the inventories being significantly lower in comparison to the baseline values (p≤0.05. These results suggest discharging patients from the center prior to their third month of stay or a stay period of longer than seven months does not affect with any significance the scores of the depression, anxiety and obsession inventories. To ensure a

  19. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-01-01 to 2007-09-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) was developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center, the...

  20. Quantum chemical modelling of magnesium centers in LiF crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlyuger, A.L.; Mysovskij, S.N.; Nepomnyashchikh, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that optical absorption at 4.0 eV in LiF irradiated crystals is linked with Mg c + v a + v c - -centers (M-centers) and results from electron transitions from quasi-local staes in valent zone to vetre local state. V k and M-centres resulting from M-centre photodecolorization at low temperatures cause optical absorption with maxima at 3.5 and 5.0 eV. M-centres are transformed into M-centres oriented along axis at temperatures higher than 240 K. Optical excitation of M-centres oriented along axis with 5.5 eV maximum results in the initiation of luminescence at 2 eV

  1. Building a Culture of Authentic Partnership: One Academic Health Center Model for Nursing Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Janie; Swartz, Colleen

    2017-09-01

    Senior nursing leaders from the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Nursing and UK HealthCare have explored the meaning of an authentic partnership. This article quantifies the tangible benefits and outcomes from this maturing academic nursing and clinical practice partnership. Benefits include inaugural academic nursing participation in health system governance, expanded integration of nursing research programs both in the college and in the health science center, and the development of collaborative strategies to address nursing workforce needs.

  2. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraqs Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing: A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues, recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, and descriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  3. UVM Transportation Research Center signature project 1B : integrated land-use, transportation and environmental modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Land use and transportation are inextricably linked. Models that capture the dynamics and interactions : of both systems are indispensable for evaluating alternative courses of action in policy and investment. : These models must be spatially disaggr...

  4. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling/ Transport and Dynamics in Torodial Fusion System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanck, Dalton D.

    2010-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended MHD Modeling, DE-FC02-06ER54870, for the period 7/1/06 to 2/15/08. Principal results for this period are: 1. Development of a model for computational modeling for the primitive form of the extended MMD equations. This was reported as Phys. Plasmas 13, 058103 (2006). 2. Comparison between the NIMROD and M3D codes for simulation of the nonlinear sawtooth crash in the CDXU tokamak. This was reported in Phys. Plasmas 14, 056105 (2006). 3. Demonstration of 2-fluid and gyroviscous stabilization of interchange modes using computational extended MHD models. This was reported in Phys. Rev. Letters 101, 085005 (2008). Each of these publications is attached as an Appendix of this report. They should be consulted for technical details.

  5. 360-degree video and X-ray modeling of the Galactic center's inner parsec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Wang, Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    360-degree videos, which render an image over all 4pi steradian, provide a unique and immersive way to visualize astrophysical simulations. Video sharing sites such as YouTube allow these videos to be shared with the masses; they can be viewed in their 360° nature on computer screens, with smartphones, or, best of all, in virtual-reality (VR) goggles. We present the first such 360° video of an astrophysical simulation: a hydrodynamics calculation of the Wolf-Rayet stars and their ejected winds in the inner parsec of the Galactic center. Viewed from the perspective of the super-massive black hole (SMBH), the most striking aspect of the video, which renders column density, is the inspiraling and stretching of clumps of WR-wind material as they makes their way towards the SMBH. We will brielfy describe how to make 360° videos and how to publish them online in their desired 360° format. Additionally we discuss computing the thermal X-ray emission from a suite of Galactic-center hydrodynamic simulations that have various SMBH feedback mechanisms, which are compared to Chandra X-ray Visionary Program observations of the region. Over a 2-5” ring centered on Sgr A*, the spectral shape is well matched, indicating that the WR winds are the dominant source of the thermal X-ray emission. Furthermore, the X-ray flux depends on the SMBH feedback due to the feedback's ability to clear out material from the central parsec. A moderate outburst is necessary to explain the current thermal X-ray flux, even though the outburst ended ˜100 yr ago.

  6. A reliability centered maintenance model applied to the auxiliary feedwater system of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jefferson Borges

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of maintenance in a nuclear power plant is to assure that structures, systems and components will perform their design functions with reliability and availability in order to obtain a safety and economic electric power generation. Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) is a method of systematic review to develop or optimize Preventive Maintenance Programs. This study presents the objectives, concepts, organization and methods used in the development of RCM application to nuclear power plants. Some examples of this application are included, considering the Auxiliary Feedwater System of a generic two loops PWR nuclear power plant of Westinghouse design. (author)

  7. Determinants of puberty health among female adolescents residing in boarding welfare centers in Tehran: An application of health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadi, Shayesteh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Nadrian, Haidar; Mahmoodi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a critical stage of growth and development. That is associated with changes in body shape and appearance. Issues such as irregular menstrual periods, amenorrhea, and menstrual cycle are major issues in women's health. The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of physical puberty health based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) among female adolescents. Methods: This analytical cross sectional study was conducted in welfare boarding centers in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected in 2011 by a structured and valid questionnaire. Total 61 female adolescents (age range: 12-19 yrs) participated in this study from welfare boarding centers in Iran, Tehran, by using convenience sampling method. The questionnaire consisted of demographic characteristics, health belief model constructs and physical puberty health behaviors gathered by using interview. A series of univariate general linear models were used to assess the relationship between puberty health and health belief model constructs. Results: According to the results of this study there were positive significant relationships between perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action and increased puberty health in female adolescents (p<0.05). Perceived benefits, perceived barriers and cues to action were predictors of physical puberty health behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the results of the study to improve the physical Puberty health behaviors of female adolescents should make them aware of the benefits of health behaviors, and remove or reform the perceived barriers of health behaviors. Also, the appropriate information resources should be introduced for obtaining information about puberty health.

  8. From the model of integral attention to the creation of centers of excellence in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Moreno, Pedro; Castañeda, Oswaldo; Garro, Boris; Flores, Dennis; Sánchez, Guillermo; Castro, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    For the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the care of patients with chronic diseases currently experiences fragmentation in attention, generating poor performance of health services. Thus, comprehensive health care strategies arise to mitigate these problems; one of them are Centers of Excellence (CoEs), which aim to obtain high quality results in health from the adequate and minimum use of resources. The objective of this study was to describe the history and current context of the CoE in comprehensive care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic search of the literature terms (MeSH) was performed. The bases used were PubMed, Ebsco Host, Lilacs, Science Direct, Ovid, and Google (gray literature). The source of the information was evaluated to determine its quality. International standards focus the CoEs starting from comprehensive management of patients with RA and patient volume, continuous improvement, and quality of health care, constituting an interdisciplinary team. The REAL-PANLAR group suggested that the inclusion of the strategy "Treat to Target", and patient education improves patient conditions and understanding of the disease. RA is a prevalent and costly disease. The creation of comprehensive care centers of the CoE type is an initiative that improves the prognosis of RA. This document aims to encourage rheumatologists and scientific societies to structure CoE in an interdisciplinary endeavor.

  9. Ab initio modelling of screw dislocations in body-centered cubic transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezerald, Lucile

    2014-01-01

    We performed electronic structure ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) to study the <111> screw dislocation properties in body-centered cubic transition metals (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W and Fe). In all investigated elements, the nondegenerate easy core is the minimum energy configuration and the split core configuration has a high energy near or above that of the hard core, contrary to interatomic potential predictions. A strong group dependence of the core energy of the easy dislocation is also evidenced, related to the position of the Fermi level with respect to the minimum of the pseudo-gap of the electronic density of states. Our work also reveals an atypical behavior in Fe, with a low relative energy at the hard core position, close to that of the saddle configuration between easy cores, resulting in a flat Peierls potential around the hard core configuration, at variance with other elements. From these DFT calculations, the two-dimensional energetic landscape in the {111} plane (Peierls potential) is constructed and we investigated several properties of dislocation glide and in particular, the kink-pair formation enthalpy, as well as the dependence of the Peierls stress on crystal orientation. We proposed a simple modification to the Schmid law that takes account of the non-straight trajectory of the dislocation and that qualitatively explains why the twinning/anti-twinning asymmetry is less pronounced in Fe than in other body-centered cubic metals. (author) [fr

  10. MODELING THE ROSSITER–MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT: IMPACT OF THE CONVECTIVE CENTER-TO-LIMB VARIATIONS IN THE STELLAR PHOTOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cegla, H. M.; Watson, C. A. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Oshagh, M.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica e Ciências do Espaço, Universidade do Porto, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, PT4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Shelyag, S., E-mail: h.cegla@qub.ac.uk [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2016-03-01

    Observations of the Rossiter–McLaughlin (RM) effect provide information on star–planet alignments, which can inform planetary migration and evolution theories. Here, we go beyond the classical RM modeling and explore the impact of a convective blueshift that varies across the stellar disk and non-Gaussian stellar photospheric profiles. We simulated an aligned hot Jupiter with a four-day orbit about a Sun-like star and injected center-to-limb velocity (and profile shape) variations based on radiative 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of solar surface convection. The residuals between our modeling and classical RM modeling were dependent on the intrinsic profile width and v sin i; the amplitude of the residuals increased with increasing v sin i and with decreasing intrinsic profile width. For slowly rotating stars the center-to-limb convective variation dominated the residuals (with amplitudes of 10 s of cm s{sup −1} to ∼1 m s{sup −1}); however, for faster rotating stars the dominant residual signature was due a non-Gaussian intrinsic profile (with amplitudes from 0.5 to 9 m s{sup −1}). When the impact factor was 0, neglecting to account for the convective center-to-limb variation led to an uncertainty in the obliquity of ∼10°–20°, even though the true v sin i was known. Additionally, neglecting to properly model an asymmetric intrinsic profile had a greater impact for more rapidly rotating stars (e.g., v sin i = 6 km s{sup −1}) and caused systematic errors on the order of ∼20° in the measured obliquities. Hence, neglecting the impact of stellar surface convection may bias star–planet alignment measurements and consequently theories on planetary migration and evolution.

  11. Human Models for Analysis of Pathways (H–MAPs) Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The need for human, organotypic culture models coupled with the requirements of contemporary toxin screening (i.e. reproducibility, high throughput, transferability...

  12. Validation in a Single-Center Cohort of Existing Predictive Models for Delayed Graft Function After Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decruyenaere, Alexander; Decruyenaere, Philippe; Peeters, Patrick; Vermassen, Frank

    2015-09-15

    BACKGROUND Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Delayed graft function (DGF) is a common complication and is associated with short- and long-term outcomes. Several predictive models for DGF have been developed. MATERIAL AND METHODS 497 kidney transplantations from deceased donors at our center between 2005-2011 are included. Firstly, the predictive accuracy of the existing models proposed by Irish et al. (M1), Jeldres et al. (M2), Chapal et al. (M3), and Zaza et al. (M4) was assessed. Secondly, the existing models were aggregated into a meta-model (MM) using stacked regressions. Finally, the association between 47 risk factors and DGF was studied in our -cohort-fitted model (CFM) using logistic regression. The accuracy of all models was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) and Hosmer-Lemeshow test. RESULTS M1, M2, M3, M4, MM, and CFM have AUROCs of 0.78, 0.65, 0.59, 0.67, 0.78, and 0.82, respectively. M1 (P=0.018), M2 (Ppredictive models for DGF overestimate the risk in a cohort with a low incidence of DGF. We have identified 2 recipient parameters that are not included in previous models: cardiac function and preoperative diastolic blood pressure.

  13. Student-centered tutoring as a model for patient-centeredness and empathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirovich A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adaya Meirovich,1 Rosalie Ber,2 Michael Moore,3 Avi Rotschild4 1Department of Management of Service Organizations, Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem, 2Medical Education Unit, Ruth and Bruce Faculty of Medicine, 3Faculty of Education in Science & Technology, 4Department of Neonatology, Carmel Medical Center, Ruth and Bruce Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel Background: Curriculum planners and medical teachers attempt to enhance medical students’ empathy and patient-centeredness. Despite educational efforts, there is stability in medical students’ empathy and patient-centered medicine during the preclinical stage and a decline in both of them throughout the clinical years. Student–tutor relationship plays a key role in students’ learning. This study tests the effect of learner-centered tutoring on students’ empathy, patient-centeredness, and behavior. Participants and methods: The cohort of 55 students was divided into groups of seven or eight. The experimental group’s tutors underwent LC mentoring. Empathy was assessed with the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy for Students; PC attitude was assessed with the Patient–Provider Orientation Scale (PPOS. Behavior was assessed by simulations of doctor–patient encounters with 32 students at the end of the third year. Each student participated in three such simulations, during which we analyzed ten aspects of physician–patient communication via Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS-coded audiotapes. Results: A significant group difference was found for three RIAS categories: building a relationship and patient-centeredness, where the mean percentage of the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and gathering data, where the mean percentage of the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the control group. A significant correlation was found in the experimental group between empathy and

  14. Dynamics of the Cogwheel Instructional Design Model: Integrating a Central Training Center with Subordinate Training Branches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyu

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses an effort to improve training performance in a large corporate conglomerate in South Korea. In particular, focus is placed on a new instructional design (ID) model named the Cogwheel ID model. The cogwheel metaphor is used to illustrate the integrated processes within complex training organizations, including organizational,…

  15. Reference Management Methodologies for Large Structural Models at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey; Bingham, Ryan; Schmidt, Rick

    2011-01-01

    There have been many challenges associated with modeling some of NASA KSC's largest structures. Given the size of the welded structures here at KSC, it was critically important to properly organize model struc.ture and carefully manage references. Additionally, because of the amount of hardware to be installed on these structures, it was very important to have a means to coordinate between different design teams and organizations, check for interferences, produce consistent drawings, and allow for simple release processes. Facing these challenges, the modeling team developed a unique reference management methodology and model fidelity methodology. This presentation will describe the techniques and methodologies that were developed for these projects. The attendees will learn about KSC's reference management and model fidelity methodologies for large structures. The attendees will understand the goals of these methodologies. The attendees will appreciate the advantages of developing a reference management methodology.

  16. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E × Bflows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two......-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E ×B - flows and lowest order finite...... Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge...

  17. The Evaluation of Linear Complementarity Problem Method in Modeling the Fluid Cavitation for Squeeze Film Damper with Off-Centered Whirling Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Tieshu Fan; Kamran Behdinan

    2017-01-01

    For the application of squeeze film damper (SFD) in aero-engine, a cavitation model is evaluated by means of linear complementarity problem (LCP) method. Different from the conventional SFD study that employs circular-center orbits (CCOs), a realistic condition is explored where the shaft whirling center and bearing center are misaligned. Taking into account the fluid as incompressible and compressible, the governing equations, including film cavitation, are respectively solved by developing ...

  18. Student-centered tutoring as a model for patient-centeredness and empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovich, Adaya; Ber, Rosalie; Moore, Michael; Rotschild, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum planners and medical teachers attempt to enhance medical students' empathy and patient-centeredness. Despite educational efforts, there is stability in medical students' empathy and patient-centered medicine during the preclinical stage and a decline in both of them throughout the clinical years. Student-tutor relationship plays a key role in students' learning. This study tests the effect of learner-centered tutoring on students' empathy, patient-centeredness, and behavior. The cohort of 55 students was divided into groups of seven or eight. The experimental group's tutors underwent LC mentoring. Empathy was assessed with the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy for Students; PC attitude was assessed with the Patient-Provider Orientation Scale (PPOS). Behavior was assessed by simulations of doctor-patient encounters with 32 students at the end of the third year. Each student participated in three such simulations, during which we analyzed ten aspects of physician-patient communication via Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS)-coded audiotapes. A significant group difference was found for three RIAS categories: building a relationship and patient-centeredness, where the mean percentage of the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and gathering data, where the mean percentage of the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the control group. A significant correlation was found in the experimental group between empathy and positive talk and between PPOS and three of the RIAS categories: gathering data, psychosocial talk, and patient-centeredness. A significant negative correlation was found in the experimental group between PPOS and two of the RIAS categories: negative talk and doctor-centeredness. Two significant negative correlations were found in the control group: between empathy and patient-centeredness and PPOS and negative talk. The LC approach supports two of the RIAS categories, corresponding

  19. Patient education, nudge, and manipulation: defining the ethical conditions of the person-centered model of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach1,2 1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital AP-HP, 2EA 3412, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Ile-de-France (CRNH-IDF, Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France Abstract: Patient education (PE is expected to help patients with a chronic disease to manage their lives and give them the possibility of adopting, in an appropriate manner, beneficial changes in health behaviors that are prescribed by their physicians. It is aimed at delineating, agreeing on, and implementing a patient’s personal action plan and is therefore an essential constituent of the person-centered model of care. The aim of this article is to examine the idea that PE may sometimes be a manipulation that is organized for the good of patients in a paternalistic framework. Theoretically, PE differs from manipulation by addressing the reflective intelligence of patients in full light and helping them make autonomous choices. In this article, we examined some analogies between PE and nudge (ie, techniques used to push people to make good choices by organizing their environment. This analysis suggests that PE is not always as transparent and reflective as it is supposed to be and that unmasking these issues may be useful for improving the ethical quality of educational practice that must be performed in a framework of a trusting patient–doctor relationship. Under this condition, PE may sometimes represent a form of persuasion without being accused of patient deception and manipulation: trust is therefore the core of the person-centered model of care. Keywords: patient education, adherence, autonomy, nudge, persuasion, manipulation, deception, trust, person-centered care model, shared decision-making

  20. Derivation of centers and axes of rotation for wrist and fingers in a hand kinematic model: methods and reliability results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveri, P; Lopomo, N; Pedotti, A; Ferrigno, G

    2005-03-01

    In the field of 3D reconstruction of human motion from video, model-based techniques have been proposed to increase the estimation accuracy and the degree of automation. The feasibility of this approach is strictly connected with the adopted biomechanical model. Particularly, the representation of the kinematic chain and the assessment of the corresponding parameters play a relevant role for the success of the motion assessment. In this paper, the focus is on the determination of the kinematic parameters of a general hand skeleton model using surface measurements. A novel method that integrates nonrigid sphere fitting and evolutionary optimization is proposed to estimate the centers and the functional axes of rotation of the skeletal joints. The reliability of the technique is tested using real movement data and simulated motions with known ground truth 3D measurement noise and different ranges of motion (RoM). With respect to standard nonrigid sphere fitting techniques, the proposed method performs 10-50% better in the best condition (very low noise and wide RoM) and over 100% better with physiological artifacts and RoM. Repeatability in the range of a couple of millimeters, on the localization of the centers of rotation, and in the range of one degree, on the axis directions is obtained from real data experiments.

  1. Reference Controls Methodologies for Large Structural Models at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey; LaPha, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the methodology behind Model Class Definition--the use of separate model assemblies of the same product, at different fidelities, driven by the same skeleton files. These fidelities can be used to convey only the detail that the end user needs, by allowing the end user to pick and choose between model classes for assembly creation. The usefulness of MPA for the Windchill Release Process will be demonstrated, along with its usefulness in minimizing CPU resources during design. The presentation will include an overview the ML product, how to structure complex products in a flexible modular architecture, and how to maximize system resources.

  2. Building and integrating reliability models in a Reliability-Centered-Maintenance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verite, B.; Villain, B.; Venturini, V.; Hugonnard, S.; Bryla, P.

    1998-03-01

    Electricite de France (EDF) has recently developed its OMF-Structures method, designed to optimize preventive maintenance of passive structures such as pipes and support, based on risk. In particular, reliability performances of components need to be determined; it is a two-step process, consisting of a qualitative sort followed by a quantitative evaluation, involving two types of models. Initially, degradation models are widely used to exclude some components from the field of preventive maintenance. The reliability of the remaining components is then evaluated by means of quantitative reliability models. The results are then included in a risk indicator that is used to directly optimize preventive maintenance tasks. (author)

  3. Statistical modeling of biomedical corpora: mining the Caenorhabditis Genetic Center Bibliography for genes related to life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan MI

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical modeling of biomedical corpora could yield integrated, coarse-to-fine views of biological phenomena that complement discoveries made from analysis of molecular sequence and profiling data. Here, the potential of such modeling is demonstrated by examining the 5,225 free-text items in the Caenorhabditis Genetic Center (CGC Bibliography using techniques from statistical information retrieval. Items in the CGC biomedical text corpus were modeled using the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA model. LDA is a hierarchical Bayesian model which represents a document as a random mixture over latent topics; each topic is characterized by a distribution over words. Results An LDA model estimated from CGC items had better predictive performance than two standard models (unigram and mixture of unigrams trained using the same data. To illustrate the practical utility of LDA models of biomedical corpora, a trained CGC LDA model was used for a retrospective study of nematode genes known to be associated with life span modification. Corpus-, document-, and word-level LDA parameters were combined with terms from the Gene Ontology to enhance the explanatory value of the CGC LDA model, and to suggest additional candidates for age-related genes. A novel, pairwise document similarity measure based on the posterior distribution on the topic simplex was formulated and used to search the CGC database for "homologs" of a "query" document discussing the life span-modifying clk-2 gene. Inspection of these document homologs enabled and facilitated the production of hypotheses about the function and role of clk-2. Conclusion Like other graphical models for genetic, genomic and other types of biological data, LDA provides a method for extracting unanticipated insights and generating predictions amenable to subsequent experimental validation.

  4. Queueing System with Heterogeneous Customers as a Model of a Call Center with a Call-Back for Lost Customers

    OpenAIRE

    Dudin, Sergey; Kim, Chesoong; Dudina, Olga; Baek, Janghyun

    2013-01-01

    A multiserver queueing system with infinite and finite buffers, two types of customers, and two types of servers as a model of a call center with a call-back for lost customers is investigated. Type 1 customers arrive to the system according to a Markovian arrival process. All rejected type 1 customers become type 2 customers. Type r, r=1,2, servers serve type r customers if there are any in the system and serve type r′, r′=1,2,  r′≠r, customers if there are no type r customers in the system....

  5. TeslaCenter: Concepto de interfaz gráfica táctil para el Tesla Model S

    OpenAIRE

    de Diego Valdeavero, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    El presente proyecto "TeslaCenter"se basa en la consola central táctil del vehículo Tesla Model S, y su principal objetivo es la mejora de esta plataforma. Para ello, este proyecto se desarrollará en varias fases. La primera de ellas, de investigación, consistirá en realizar un estudio previo de mercado, esto es, analizar diferentes plataformas existentes en los vehículos de otras marcas para determinar sus fortalezas y debilidades. Dentro de esta fase, también se analizará en profundidad...

  6. A Model of Interdisciplinary Ambulatory Geriatric Care in a Veterans Administration Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Andrea; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model of outpatient interdisciplinary geriatric care provided at a veteran's hospital. Compares characteristics of patients served in this program with those in community-based geriatrics outpatient clinics described in the literature. (Author/ABB)

  7. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/7: A Generic Model for Cooperative Border Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzer, Colonel Gideon

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a generic model for dealing with security problems along borders between countries. It presents descriptions and characteristics of various borders and identifies the threats to border security, while emphasizing cooperative monitoring solutions.

  8. On the Same Page: A Novel Interprofessional Model of Patient-Centered Perinatal Consultation Visits

    OpenAIRE

    Phillippi, Julia C.; Holley, Sharon L.; Schorn, Mavis N.; Lauderdale, Jana; Roumie, Christianne L.; Bennett, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To plan and implement an interprofessional collaborative care clinic for women in midwifery care needing a consultation with a maternal-fetal medicine specialist. DESIGN A community-engaged design was used to develop a new model of collaborative perinatal consultation which was tested with 50 women. Participant perinatal outcomes and semi-structured interviews with 15 women (analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis) and clinic providers were used to evaluate the model. RESULT...

  9. Predicting RNA 3D structure using a coarse-grain helix-centered model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerpedjiev, Peter; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2015-06-01

    A 3D model of RNA structure can provide information about its function and regulation that is not possible with just the sequence or secondary structure. Current models suffer from low accuracy and long running times and either neglect or presume knowledge of the long-range interactions which stabilize the tertiary structure. Our coarse-grained, helix-based, tertiary structure model operates with only a few degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models while preserving the ability to sample tertiary structures given a secondary structure. It strikes a balance between the precision of an all-atom tertiary structure model and the simplicity and effectiveness of a secondary structure representation. It provides a simplified tool for exploring global arrangements of helices and loops within RNA structures. We provide an example of a novel energy function relying only on the positions of stems and loops. We show that coupling our model to this energy function produces predictions as good as or better than the current state of the art tools. We propose that given the wide range of conformational space that needs to be explored, a coarse-grain approach can explore more conformations in less iterations than an all-atom model coupled to a fine-grain energy function. Finally, we emphasize the overarching theme of providing an ensemble of predicted structures, something which our tool excels at, rather than providing a handful of the lowest energy structures. © 2015 Kerpedjiev et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Model-centered approach to early planning and design of an eco-industrial park around an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangping; Strømman, Anders H; Solli, Christian; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2008-07-01

    Industrial symbiosis promises environmental and economic gains through a utilization of the waste of some processes as a resource for other processes. Because of the costs and difficulties of transporting some wastes, the largest theoretical potential for industrial symbiosis is given when facilities are colocated in an eco-industrial park (EIP). This study proposes a model-centered approach with an eight-step procedure for the early planning and design of an eco-industrial park considering technical and environmental factors. Chemical process simulation software was used to model the energy and material flows among the prospective members and to quantify the benefits of integration among different firms in terms of energy and resources saved as compared to a reference situation. Process simulation was based on a combination of physical models of industrial processes and empirical models. The modeling allows for the development and evaluation of different collaboration opportunities and configurations. It also enables testing chosen configurations under hypothetical situations or external conditions. We present a case study around an existing oil and gas refinery in Mongstad, Norway. We used the approach to propose the colocation of a number of industrial facilities around the refinery, focused on integrating energy use among the facilities. An EIP with six main members was designed and simulated, matching new hypothetical members in size to the existing operations, modeling material and energy flows in the EIP, and assessing these in terms of carbon and hydrogen flows.

  11. An improved quasi-steady aerodynamic model for insect wings that considers movement of the center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Seob; Kim, Joong-Kwan; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2015-07-30

    A quasi-steady aerodynamic model in consideration of the center of pressure (C.P.) was developed for insect flight. A dynamically scaled-up robotic hawkmoth wing was used to obtain the translational lift, drag, moment and rotational force coefficients. The translational force coefficients were curve-fitted with respect to the angles of attack such that two coefficients in the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy model were obtained. The rotational force coefficient was also compared to that derived by the standard Kutta-Joukowski theory. In order to build the accurate pitching moment model, the locations of the C.Ps. and its movements depending on the pitching velocity were investigated in detail. We found that the aerodynamic moment model became suitable when the rotational force component was assumed to act on the half-chord. This implies that the approximation borrowed from the conventional airfoil concept, i.e., the 'C.P. at the quarter-chord' may lead to an incorrect moment prediction. In the validation process, the model showed excellent time-course force and moment estimations in comparison with the robotic wing measurement results. A fully nonlinear multibody flight dynamic simulation was conducted to check the effect of the traveling C.P. on the overall flight dynamics. This clearly showed the importance of an accurate aerodynamic moment model.

  12. Cleanup of a HLW nuclear fuel-reprocessing center using 3-D database modeling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    A significant challenge in decommissioning any large nuclear facility is how to solidify the large volume of residual high-level radioactive waste (HLW) without structurally interfering with the existing equipment and piping used at the original facility or would require rework due to interferences which were not identified during the design process. This problem is further compounded when the nuclear facility to be decommissioned is a 35 year old nuclear fuel reprocessing center designed to recover usable uranium and plutonium. Facilities of this vintage usually tend to lack full documentation of design changes made over the years and as a result, crude traps or pockets of high-level contamination may not be fully realized. Any miscalculation in the construction or modification sequences could compound the overall dismantling and decontamination of the facility. This paper reports that development of a 3-dimensional (3-D) computer database tool was considered critical in defining the most complex portions of this one-of-a-kind vitrification facility

  13. Creative user-centered visualization design for energy analysts and modelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah; Dykes, Jason; Jones, Sara; Dillingham, Iain; Dove, Graham; Duffy, Alison; Kachkaev, Alexander; Slingsby, Aidan; Wood, Jo

    2013-12-01

    We enhance a user-centered design process with techniques that deliberately promote creativity to identify opportunities for the visualization of data generated by a major energy supplier. Visualization prototypes developed in this way prove effective in a situation whereby data sets are largely unknown and requirements open - enabling successful exploration of possibilities for visualization in Smart Home data analysis. The process gives rise to novel designs and design metaphors including data sculpting. It suggests: that the deliberate use of creativity techniques with data stakeholders is likely to contribute to successful, novel and effective solutions; that being explicit about creativity may contribute to designers developing creative solutions; that using creativity techniques early in the design process may result in a creative approach persisting throughout the process. The work constitutes the first systematic visualization design for a data rich source that will be increasingly important to energy suppliers and consumers as Smart Meter technology is widely deployed. It is novel in explicitly employing creativity techniques at the requirements stage of visualization design and development, paving the way for further use and study of creativity methods in visualization design.

  14. Extension of Small-Scale Postharvest Horticulture Technologies—A Model Training and Services Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Kitinoja

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A pilot Postharvest Training and Services Center (PTSC was launched in October 2012 in Arusha, Tanzania as part of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID funded project. The five key components of the PTSC are (1 training of postharvest trainers, (2 postharvest training and demonstrations for local small-scale clientele, (3 adaptive research, (4 postharvest services, and (5 retail sales of postharvest tools and supplies. During the years of 2011–2012, a one year e-learning program was provided to 36 young horticultural professionals from seven Sub-Saharan African countries. These postharvest specialists went on to train more than 13,000 local farmers, extension workers, food processors, and marketers in their home countries in the year following completion of their course. Evaluators found that these specialists had trained an additional 9300 people by November 2014. When asked about adoption by their local trainees, 79% reported examples of their trainees using improved postharvest practices. From 2012–2013, the project supported 30 multi-day training programs, and the evaluation found that many of the improved practices being promoted were adopted by the trainees and led to increased earnings. Three PTSC components still require attention. Research activities initiated during the project are incomplete, and successful sales of postharvest goods and services will require commitment and improved partnering.

  15. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-01-19

    The Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) at www.nrel.gov/tsdc provides free, web-based access to detailed transportation data from a variety of travel surveys conducted across the nation. While preserving the privacy of survey participants, this online repository makes vital transportation data broadly available to users from the comfort of their own desks via a secure online connection. Data Available through the TSDC: Maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the TSDC houses data from travel surveys and studies conducted using global positioning system (GPS) devices. It features millions of data points - second-by-second GPS readings, vehicle characteristics (if applicable), and demographics - for all modes of travel. NREL screens the initial data for quality control, translates each data set into a consistent format, and interprets the data for spatial analysis. NREL's processing routines add information on vehicle fuel economy and road grades and join data points to the road network.

  16. On the same page: a novel interprofessional model of patient-centered perinatal consultation visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippi, J C; Holley, S L; Schorn, M N; Lauderdale, J; Roumie, C L; Bennett, K

    2016-11-01

    To plan and implement an interprofessional collaborative care clinic for women in midwifery care needing a consultation with a maternal-fetal medicine specialist. A community-engaged design was used to develop a new model of collaborative perinatal consultation, which was tested with 50 women. Participant perinatal outcomes and semistructured interviews with 15 women (analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis) and clinic providers were used to evaluate the model. Participant perinatal outcomes following a simultaneous consultation visit involving a nurse-midwife and maternal-fetal medicine specialist were similar to practice and hospital averages. Women's comments on their experience were positive and had the theme 'on the same page' with six subcategories: clarity, communication, collaboration, planning, validation and 'above and beyond'. Providers also were pleased with the model. A simultaneous consultation involving the woman, a nurse-midwife and a maternal-fetal medicine specialist improved communication and satisfaction among women and providers.

  17. Exploring the interaction of N/S compounds with a dicopper center: tyrosinase inhibition and model studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Elina; Vuillamy, Alexandra; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Yi, Wei; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Philouze, Christian; Serratrice, Guy; Jamet, Hélène; Réglier, Marius; Belle, Catherine

    2014-12-15

    Tyrosinase (Ty) is a copper-containing enzyme widely present in plants, bacteria, and humans, where it is involved in biosynthesis of melanin-type pigments. Development of Ty inhibitors is an important approach to control the production and the accumulation of pigments in living systems. In this paper, we focused our interest in phenylthiourea (PTU) and phenylmethylene thiosemicarbazone (PTSC) recognized as inhibitors of tyrosinase by combining enzymatic studies and coordination chemistry methods. Both are efficient inhibitors of mushroom tyrosinase and they can be considered mainly as competitive inhibitors. Computational studies verify that PTSC and PTU inhibitors interact with the metal center of the active site. The KIC value of 0.93 μM confirms that PTSC is a much more efficient inhibitor than PTU, for which a KIC value of 58 μM was determined. The estimation of the binding free energies inhibitors/Ty confirms the high inhibitor efficiency of PTSC. Binding studies of PTSC along with PTU to a dinuclear copper(II) complex ([Cu2(μ-BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO4)2 (1); H-BPMP = 2,6-bis-[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) known to be a structural and functional model for the tyrosinase catecholase activity, have been performed. Interactions of the compounds with the dicopper model complex 1 were followed by spectrophotometry and electrospray ionization (ESI). The molecular structure of 1-PTSC and 1-PTU adducts were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis showing for both an unusual bridging binding mode on the dicopper center. These results reflect their adaptable binding mode in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center.

  18. Effects of Model Characteristics on Observational Learning of Inmates in a Pre-Release Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegel, Alan B.

    Subjects were 138 inmates from the pre-release unit of a Southwestern prison system, randomly divided into three groups of 46 each. Each group viewed a video-taped model delivering a speech. The independent variable had three levels: (1) lecturer attired in a shirt and tie; (2) lecturer attired in a correctional officer's uniform; and (3) model…

  19. A grounded patient-centered approach generated the personal and societal burden of osteoarthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busija, Lucy; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    To develop a conceptual model to describe the burden of osteoarthritis in individuals with this condition and on the broader community. Six concept mapping workshops were undertaken: three with patients (n = 26) and three with health professionals (n = 27) in Australia and Sweden. The participants were asked to generate statements describing how osteoarthritis affects individuals with this condition and those around them. The results were used to construct an integrated theoretical model of the personal burden of osteoarthritis (PBO) and its extended version, the personal and societal burden of osteoarthritis (PSBO) model. We identified eight potentially independent aspects of PBO, including physical distress, fatigue, physical limitations, psychosocial distress, physical deconditioning, financial hardship, sleep disturbances, and lost productivity. Physical distress and impaired physical function combined to produce psychosocial problems, reduced work productivity, financial difficulties, and loss of physical fitness at the individual level, and increased health and welfare cost at the societal level. The PBO and PSBO models were developed directly from the views of patients and clinicians and provide new insights for managing the individual and societal burden of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Network model and short circuit program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Assumptions made and techniques used in modeling the power network to the 480 volt level are discussed. Basic computational techniques used in the short circuit program are described along with a flow diagram of the program and operational procedures. Procedures for incorporating network changes are included in this user's manual.

  1. A User-Centered Educational Modeling Language Improving the Controllability of Learning Design Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendi, Asma; Bouhadada, Tahar; Bousbia, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Semiformal EMLs are developed to facilitate the adoption of educational modeling languages (EMLs) and to address practitioners' learning design concerns, such as reusability and readability. In this article, SDLD (Structure Dialogue Learning Design) is presented, which is a semiformal EML that aims to improve controllability of learning design…

  2. Modeling electronic structure and transport properties of graphene with resonant scattering centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical study of the electronic properties of single-layer graphene with resonant (hydrogen) impurities and vacancies within a framework of noninteracting tight-binding model on a honeycomb lattice. The algorithms are based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent

  3. User experience & user-centered design : Health games user research model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jef Folkerts

    2014-01-01

    This poster sketches the outlines of a theoretical research framework to assess whether and on what grounds certain behavioral effects may be attributed to particular game mechanics and game play aspects. It is founded on the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion (ELM), which is quite

  4. Exploring the creation of learner-centered e-training environments among retail workers: a model development perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Sookeun; Mills, Juline E

    2011-01-01

    Current business leaders continue to adopt e-learning technology despite concerns regarding its value. Positing that the effectiveness of e-training depends on how its environment is managed, we argue that a learner-centric approach is necessary in order to achieve workplace training goals. We subsequently develop a theoretical model that is aimed at identifying the key components of learner-centered e-training environments, which serve the function of providing a benchmarked approach for evaluating e-training success. The model was empirically tested using data from an Internet survey of retail industry employees and partial least squares techniques were used for analysis. Based on the findings, this study clarifies what is needed for successful e-training in terms of instructional design, system design, and organizational support.

  5. A socio-technical, probabilistic risk assessment model for surgical site infections in ambulatory surgery centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Ebru K; El-Amine, Hadi; Steighner, Laura A; Slonim, Anthony D

    2014-10-01

    To understand how structural and process elements may affect the risk for surgical site infections (SSIs) in the ambulatory surgery center (ASC) environment, the researchers employed a tool known as socio-technical probabilistic risk assessment (ST-PRA). ST-PRA is particularly helpful for estimating risks in outcomes that are very rare, such as the risk of SSI in ASCs. Study objectives were to (1) identify the risk factors associated with SSIs resulting from procedures performed at ASCs and (2) design an intervention to mitigate the likelihood of SSIs for the most common risk factors that were identified by the ST-PRA for a particular surgical procedure. ST-PRA was used to study the SSI risk in the ASC setting. Both quantitative and qualitative data sources were utilized, and sensitivity analysis was performed to ensure the robustness of the results. The event entitled "fail to protect the patient effectively" accounted for 51.9% of SSIs in the ambulatory care setting. Critical components of this event included several failure risk points related to skin preparation, antibiotic administration, staff training, proper response to glove punctures during surgery, and adherence to surgical preparation rules related to the wearing of jewelry, watches, and artificial nails. Assuming a 75% reduction in noncompliance on any combination of 2 of these 5 components, the risk for an SSI decreased from 0.0044 to between 0.0027 and 0.0035. An intervention that targeted the 5 major components of the major risk point was proposed, and its implications were discussed.

  6. The working out of architectural concept for a new type public building — multi-information and education center by using information technologies and mathematical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Владимирович Боровиков

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Architectural concept of multifunctional information and educational center and its implementation is given in the author's project. Advanced information technology and mathematical models used in the development of the author project.

  7. A Post-Harvest Prediction Mass Loss Model for Tomato Fruit Using A Numerical Methodology Centered on Approximation Error Minimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Bucio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its nutritional and economic value, the tomato is considered one of the main vegetables in terms of production and consumption in the world. For this reason, an important case study is the fruit maturation parametrized by its mass loss in this study. This process develops in the fruit mainly after harvest. Since that parameter affects the economic value of the crop, the scientific community has been progressively approaching the issue. However, there is no a state-of-the-art practical model allowing the prediction of the tomato fruit mass loss yet. This study proposes a prediction model for tomato mass loss in a continuous and definite time-frame using regression methods. The model is based on a combination of adjustment methods such as least squares polynomial regression leading to error estimation, and cross validation techniques. Experimental results from a 50 fruit of tomato sample studied over a 54 days period were compared to results from the model using a second-order polynomial approach found to provide optimal data fit with a resulting efficiency of ~97%. The model also allows the design of precise logistic strategies centered on post-harvest tomato mass loss prediction usable by producers, distributors, and consumers.

  8. Obesity-Linked Mouse Models of Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy Stauffer, Ph.D., and colleagues working with Robert  Wiltrout, Ph.D., in CCR’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, along with collaborators in the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, have developed a novel mouse model that demonstrates how fat-producing phenotypes can influence the development of hepatic cancer.   The team recently reported their findings in Cancer Research.

  9. Efficiency-centered, innovation-enabling business models of high tech SMEs: evidence from Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Loon, M; Chik, R

    2017-01-01

    High technology small and medium-sized enterprises are compelled to innovate to differentiate themselves from their competitors but at the same time be efficient, as they do not have economies of scale enjoyed by larger organizations. This qualitative study explores this paradoxical challenge faced by Hong Kong SMEs in designing their business model to strike such a balance. In doing so, it investigates the competencies of these firms in technology management and their innovation practices. I...

  10. Living on the edge: a toy model for holographic reconstruction of algebras with centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, William; Marolf, Donald; Michel, Ben; Wien, Jason [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-04-18

    We generalize the Pastawski-Yoshida-Harlow-Preskill (HaPPY) holographic quantum error-correcting code to provide a toy model for bulk gauge fields or linearized gravitons. The key new elements are the introduction of degrees of freedom on the links (edges) of the associated tensor network and their connection to further copies of the HaPPY code by an appropriate isometry. The result is a model in which boundary regions allow the reconstruction of bulk algebras with central elements living on the interior edges of the (greedy) entanglement wedge, and where these central elements can also be reconstructed from complementary boundary regions. In addition, the entropy of boundary regions receives both Ryu-Takayanagi-like contributions and further corrections that model the ((δArea)/(4G{sub N})) term of Faulkner, Lewkowycz, and Maldacena. Comparison with Yang-Mills theory then suggests that this ((δArea)/(4G{sub N})) term can be reinterpreted as a part of the bulk entropy of gravitons under an appropriate extension of the physical bulk Hilbert space.

  11. Mathematical model of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst pellet with pointed centers of synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevich, I. V.; Fokina, A. Yu

    2017-11-01

    The productivity of Fischer-Tropsch reactors is determined by the efficiency of heat and mass transfer processes inside the catalyst pellets. To reduce the diffusion resistance, the pellet base is made porous. The porous structure of the granules causes a discrete arrangement of cobalt metallic microparticles whose size can reach tens of microns. The distance between these active centres significantly exceeds their characteristic size and the homogeneous catalyst model is incorrect. A mathematical model of heat and mass transfer processes inside a porous spherical pellet with localised active centres is proposed. The heat of the exothermic synthesis reaction is removed from the surface of the granule to the synthesis gas stream washing the catalyst pellet by heat transfer. The components of the synthesis gas enter the granule surface as a result of mass transfer. On the basis of the self-consistent field method, the values of the temperature and concentration of the synthesis gas components at the active centres were determined. It is shown that there is a critical temperature of the synthesis gas washing the granule, exceeding critical temperature leads to a substantial overheating of the active centres. In this case, the surface of the catalyst pellet is superheated slightly. The principal difference between the homogeneous and heterogeneous models in catalytic reactions is discussed.

  12. Living on the edge: a toy model for holographic reconstruction of algebras with centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, William; Marolf, Donald; Michel, Ben; Wien, Jason

    2017-04-01

    We generalize the Pastawski-Yoshida-Harlow-Preskill (HaPPY) holographic quantum error-correcting code to provide a toy model for bulk gauge fields or linearized gravitons. The key new elements are the introduction of degrees of freedom on the links (edges) of the associated tensor network and their connection to further copies of the HaPPY code by an appropriate isometry. The result is a model in which boundary regions allow the reconstruction of bulk algebras with central elements living on the interior edges of the (greedy) entanglement wedge, and where these central elements can also be reconstructed from complementary bounda ry regions. In addition, the entropy of boundary regions receives both Ryu-Takayanagi-like contributions and further corrections that model the δ Area/4{G_N} term of Faulkner, Lewkowycz, and Maldacena. Comparison with Yang-Mills theory then suggests that this δ Area/4{G_N} term can be reinterpreted as a part of the bulk entropy of gravitons under an appropriate extension of the physical bulk Hilbert space.

  13. [Empowering the family-center health model: the toy library as a health promotion platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chu; Tsai, Yen-Chih

    2011-02-01

    Facing the lowest birth rates in its history, Taiwan is increasingly recognizing the centrality of children's healthcare needs to effective family care. The World Health Organization's goal of health for all emphasizes health promotion. However, little research attention has been given to how families actively promote personal health in everyday life. This article considers 'family-centric' healthcare, with a particular emphasis on children's health and well-being and the mother health promotion model. Authors employ a 'toy library' as the health promotion platform to build community interaction and empower the health enhancement process. Results suggested the following: 1. The fixed-point type toy library may be an effective tool in a health promotion strategy; 2. A model may be developed for rural institution agencies; 3. Cooperation may be facilitated using a medical service vehicle; 4. The love bag program can serve extended purposes. The authors found that the empowerment and growth of tribal mothers is a key element to facilitate the successful development of their children. Based on findings, the implementation of a toy library as the platform to build community-based health promotion model is suggested.

  14. Current Status of Post-combustor Trace Chemistry Modeling and Simulation at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of the current effort at NASA GRC is to evaluate, develop, and apply methodologies suitable for modeling intra-engine trace chemical changes over post combustor flow path relevant to the pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. At the present time, the focus is the high pressure turbine environment. At first, the trace chemistry model of CNEWT were implemented into GLENN-HT as well as NCC. Then, CNEWT, CGLENN-HT, and NCC were applied to the trace species evolution in a cascade of Cambridge University's No. 2 rotor and in a turbine vane passage. In general, the results from these different codes provide similar features. However, the details of some of the quantities of interest can be sensitive to the differences of these codes. This report summaries the implementation effort and presents the comparison of the No. 2 rotor results obtained from these different codes. The comparison of the turbine vane passage results is reported elsewhere. In addition to the implementation of trace chemistry model into existing CFD codes, several pre/post-processing tools that can handle the manipulations of the geometry, the unstructured and structured grids as well as the CFD solutions also have been enhanced and seamlessly tied with NCC, CGLENN-HT, and CNEWT. Thus, a complete CFD package consisting of pre/post-processing tools and flow solvers suitable for post-combustor intra-engine trace chemistry study is assembled.

  15. An interdisciplinary clinical advancement program within a patient-centered care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avirro, J; Dotson, T; LaPierre, B; Marshall, W; Mishler, M B; Tanger, J L

    1996-01-01

    Restructuring in health care does not have to compromise the pursuit of clinical excellence and quality patient care. The clinical advancement program (CAP) at the Hospital for Special Care is a newly developed multidisciplinary reward and recognition program for clinical staff. The program is integrated into the hospital's structure of service line management and, unlike traditional advancement programs, is open to all levels of care providers: professional personnel, technical staff, and aides. This article describes the basic features of the CAP model and how its was developed by a multidisciplinary task force.

  16. Modeling of electricity consumption in the Asian gaming and tourism center - Macao SAR, People's Republic of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, T.M.; To, W.M. [School of Business, Macao Polytechnic Institute, Macao SAR (China); Lo, W.C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR (China); Choy, Y.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2008-05-15

    The use of electricity is indispensable to modern life. As Macao Special Administrative Region becomes a gaming and tourism center in Asia, modeling the consumption of electricity is critical to Macao's economic development. The purposes of this paper are to conduct an extensive literature review on modeling of electricity consumption, and to identify key climatic, demographic, economic and/or industrial factors that may affect the electricity consumption of a country/city. It was identified that the five factors, namely temperature, population, the number of tourists, hotel room occupancy and days per month, could be used to characterize Macao's monthly electricity consumption. Three selected approaches including multiple regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and wavelet ANN were used to derive mathematical models of the electricity consumption. The accuracy of these models was assessed by using the mean squared error (MSE), the mean squared percentage error (MSPE) and the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The error analysis shows that wavelet ANN has a very promising forecasting capability and can reveal the periodicity of electricity consumption. (author)

  17. Environmental systems and management activities on the Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida: results of a modeling workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, David B.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.; Ellison, Richard A.; Farmer, Adrian H.; Roelle, James E.

    1985-01-01

    In the early 1960's, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began purchasing 140,000 acres on Merritt Island, Florida, in order to develop a center for space exploration. Most of this land was acquired to provide a safety and security buffer around NASA facilities. NASA, as the managing agency for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), is responsible for preventing or controlling environmental pollution from the Federal facilities and activities at the Space Center and is committed to use all practicable means to protect and enhance the quality of the surrounding environment. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1963 when management authority for undeveloped lands at KSC was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In addition to manage for 11 Federally-listed threatened and endangered species and other resident and migratory fish and wildlife populations, the Refuge has comanagement responsibility for 19,000 acres of mosquito control impoundments and 2,500 acres of citrus groves. The Canaveral National Seashore was developed in 1975 when management of a portion of the coastal lands was transferred from NASA to the National Park Service. This multiagency jurisdiction on Merritt Island has resulted in a complex management environment. The modeling workshop described in this report was conducted May 21-25, 1984, at the Kennedy Space Center to: (1) enhance communication among the agencies with management responsibilities on Merritt Island; (2) integrate available information concerning the development, management, and ecology of Merritt Island; and (3) identify key research and monitoring needs associated with the management and use of the island's resources. The workshop was structured around the formulation of a model that would simulate primary management and use activities on Merritt Island and their effects on upland, impoundment, and estuarine vegetation and associated wildlife. The simulation model is composed of

  18. A location-inventory model for distribution centers in a three-level supply chain under uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bozorgi-Amiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a location-inventory problem in a three level supply chain network under uncertainty, which leads to risk. The (r,Q inventory control policy is applied for this problem. Besides, uncertainty exists in different parameters such as procurement, transportation costs, supply, demand and the capacity of different facilities (due to disaster, man-made events and etc. We present a robust optimization model, which concurrently specifies: locations of distribution centers to be opened, inventory control parameters (r,Q, and allocation of supply chain components. The model is formulated as a multi-objective mixed-integer nonlinear programming in order to minimize the expected total cost of such a supply chain network comprising location, procurement, transportation, holding, ordering, and shortage costs. Moreover, we develop an effective solution approach on the basis of multi-objective particle swarm optimization for solving the proposed model. Eventually, computational results of different examples of the problem and sensitivity analysis are exhibited to show the model and algorithm's feasibility and efficiency.

  19. A multi-objective model for locating distribution centers in a supply chain network considering risk and inventory decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gharegozloo Hamedani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a multi-objective location problem in a three level supply chain network under uncertain environment considering inventory decisions. The proposed model of this paper considers uncertainty for different parameters including procurement, transportation costs, supply, demand and the capacity of various facilities. The proposed model presents a robust optimization model, which specifies locations of distribution centers to be opened, inventory control parameters (r, Q, and allocation of supply chain components, concurrently. The resulted mixed-integer nonlinear programming minimizes the expected total cost of such a supply chain network comprising location, procurement, transportation, holding, ordering, and shortage costs. The model also minimizes the variability of the total cost of relief chain and minimizes the financial risk or the probability of not meeting a certain budget. We use the ε-constraint method, which is a multi-objective technique with implicit trade-off information given, to solve the problem and using a couple of numerical instances, we examine the performance of the proposed approach.

  20. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  1. BUSINESS MODELS FOR EXTENDING OF 112 EMERGENCY CALL CENTER CAPABILITIES WITH E-CALL FUNCTION INSERTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Dragos Paul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article concerns present status of implementation in Romania and Europe of eCall service and the proposed business models regarding eCall function implementation in Romania. eCall system is used for reliable transmission in case of crush between In Vehicle System and Public Service Answering Point, via the voice channel of cellular and Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN. eCall service could be initiated automatically or manual the driver. All data presented in this article are part of researches made by authors in the Sectorial Contract Implementation study regarding eCall system, having as partners ITS Romania and Electronic Solution, with the Romanian Ministry of Communication and Information Technology as beneficiary.

  2. A teaching skills assessment tool inspired by the Calgary-Cambridge model and the patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Johanna; Lanier, Cédric; Perron, Noelle Junod; Nendaz, Mathieu; Clavet, Diane; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a descriptive tool for peer review of clinical teaching skills. Two analogies framed our research: (1) between the patient-centered and the learner-centered approach; (2) between the structures of clinical encounters (Calgary-Cambridge communication model) and teaching sessions. During the course of one year, each step of the action research was carried out in collaboration with twelve clinical teachers from an outpatient general internal medicine clinic and with three experts in medical education. The content validation consisted of a literature review, expert opinion and the participatory research process. Interrater reliability was evaluated by three clinical teachers coding thirty audiotaped standardized learner-teacher interactions. This tool contains sixteen items covering the process and content of clinical supervisions. Descriptors define the expected teaching behaviors for three levels of competence. Interrater reliability was significant for eleven items (Kendall's coefficient passessment tool has high reliability and can be used to facilitate the acquisition of teaching skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A model for training medical student innovators: the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care Abundance Agents of Change program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Duong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2013, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care established the Abundance Agents of Change (AoC program to promote interprofessional learning and innovation, increase partnership between 15 academic and community health centers (CHCs in Boston's most under-served communities, and increase medical student interest in primary care careers. Methods: The AoC is modeled in the form of a ‘grants challenge’, offering $20,000 to interprofessional student teams to develop an innovative solution that addresses a healthcare delivery need identified by CHCs. The program's initial two years were characterized by a four-stage process which included working with CHCs and crafting a request for proposals, forming interprofessional 20 student teams comprising students from across and outside of Harvard University, training students using a systems-based innovation curriculum, and performing program evaluation. Results: Our evaluation data from cohorts 1 and 2 of the AoC program demonstrate that we succeeded in training students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams. We also learned valuable lessons regarding creating better alignment with CHC priorities, extending the program cycle from 12 to 18 months, and changing the way funding is disbursed to 25 students, which will be incorporated in later versions of the program. Conclusions: Based on our experience and evaluation data, we believe that this program is a replicable way to train students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams to address the current complex healthcare environment.

  4. Kameleon Live: An Interactive Cloud Based Analysis and Visualization Platform for Space Weather Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembroke, A. D.; Colbert, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) provides hosting for many of the simulations used by the space weather community of scientists, educators, and forecasters. CCMC users may submit model runs through the Runs on Request system, which produces static visualizations of model output in the browser, while further analysis may be performed off-line via Kameleon, CCMC's cross-language access and interpolation library. Off-line analysis may be suitable for power-users, but storage and coding requirements present a barrier to entry for non-experts. Moreover, a lack of a consistent framework for analysis hinders reproducibility of scientific findings. To that end, we have developed Kameleon Live, a cloud based interactive analysis and visualization platform. Kameleon Live allows users to create scientific studies built around selected runs from the Runs on Request database, perform analysis on those runs, collaborate with other users, and disseminate their findings among the space weather community. In addition to showcasing these novel collaborative analysis features, we invite feedback from CCMC users as we seek to advance and improve on the new platform.

  5. NCC simulation model. Phase 2: Simulating the operations of the Network Control Center and NCC message manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Gill, Tepper; Charles, Mary

    1994-01-01

    The network control center (NCC) provides scheduling, monitoring, and control of services to the NASA space network. The space network provides tracking and data acquisition services to many low-earth orbiting spacecraft. This report describes the second phase in the development of simulation models for the FCC. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network.Phase two focuses on the implementation of the network message dialogs and the resources controlled by the NCC. Performance measures were developed along with selected indicators of the NCC's operational effectiveness.The NCC performance indicators were defined in terms of the following: (1) transfer rate, (2) network delay, (3) channel establishment time, (4) line turn around time, (5) availability, (6) reliability, (7) accuracy, (8) maintainability, and (9) security. An NCC internal and external message manual is appended to this report.

  6. Ab initio modeling of interactions between screw dislocations and interstitial solutes in body-centered cubic transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthi, Berengere

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of alloy plasticity, it is important to describe at the atomic scale the dislocation-solute interactions and their effect on the dislocation mobility. This work focuses on the body-centered cubic (BCC) transition metals in presence of interstitial solute atoms, in particular the Fe-C system. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, the core structure of the screw dislocation of Burgers vector b=1/2<111> was investigated in iron in presence of boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen solute atoms, and in BCC metals from group 5 (V, Nb, Ta) and 6 (Mo, W) in presence of carbon solutes. A core reconstruction is evidenced in iron and group 6 metals, along with a strong attractive dislocation-solute interaction energy: the dislocation goes from easy to hard configuration where the solute atoms are at the center of trigonal prisms along the dislocation line. A different behavior is observed in group 5 metals, for which the most stable configuration for the carbon atom is an octahedral site in the vicinity of the dislocation, without any core reconstruction. This group tendency is linked to the structure of mono-carbides. Consequences of the strongly attractive dislocation-solute interactions in Fe(C) were then investigated. First the equilibrium segregation close to the dislocation core was studied using a mean-field model and Monte Carlo simulations. Over a wide temperature range, from 200 to 700 K, a strong segregation is predicted with every other prismatic site occupied by a carbon atom. Then, the mobility of the dislocation in presence of carbon atoms was investigated by modeling the double-kink mechanism with DFT, in relation with experimental data obtained with transmission electron microscopy. The activation energy obtained for this atomic scale mechanism is in good agreement with experimental values for the dynamic strain aging. (author) [fr

  7. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach1,2 1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital AP-HP, 2EA 3412, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Ile-de-France (CRNH-IDF, Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France Abstract: According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients’ nonadherence and doctors’ clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. Keywords: person-centered

  8. A New Biobjective Model to Optimize Integrated Redundancy Allocation and Reliability-Centered Maintenance Problems in a System Using Metaheuristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima MohammadZadeh Dogahe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel integrated model is proposed to optimize the redundancy allocation problem (RAP and the reliability-centered maintenance (RCM simultaneously. A system of both repairable and nonrepairable components has been considered. In this system, electronic components are nonrepairable while mechanical components are mostly repairable. For nonrepairable components, a redundancy allocation problem is dealt with to determine optimal redundancy strategy and number of redundant components to be implemented in each subsystem. In addition, a maintenance scheduling problem is considered for repairable components in order to identify the best maintenance policy and optimize system reliability. Both active and cold standby redundancy strategies have been taken into account for electronic components. Also, net present value of the secondary cost including operational and maintenance costs has been calculated. The problem is formulated as a biobjective mathematical programming model aiming to reach a tradeoff between system reliability and cost. Three metaheuristic algorithms are employed to solve the proposed model: Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II, Multiobjective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO, and Multiobjective Firefly Algorithm (MOFA. Several test problems are solved using the mentioned algorithms to test efficiency and effectiveness of the solution approaches and obtained results are analyzed.

  9. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model.

  10. Participation of oxidized sulfur center in intramolecular free radical processes in the model organic compounds of biological importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogocki, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as prion diseases (Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease) and Alzheimer's disease is strongly associated with the presence of β-amyloid peptide (βA) and prion protein (hPrP) in the brain tissue. Both macromolecules contain methionine (Met) residues. Their presence seems to be responsible for unique redox properties of βA and hPrP. These residues may undergo relatively easy autooxidation and/or metal-catalysed oxidation. The presented studies were focused on the potential function of Met residues as antioxidants or pro-oxidants and on their role in radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins. The role of S-, O-, N- and C-centered radicals generated in various oligopeptides containing Met and relevant model compounds has been examined in detail with respect to formation of 2c-3e bonds, redox processes, fragmentation and their mutual interconversion. In order to achieve these goals several experimental radiation, photochemical, and molecular modelling methods were applied. The experimental and molecular modelling results show significant influence of functional neighbouring groups and conformational flexibility of a peptide backbone on the oxidative reduction pathway in oligopeptides containing single and multiple Met residues. The results presented here allow for better understanding of the known propensities of βA and hPrP to reduce transition metals and to form reactive oxygen species and free radicals. (author)

  11. A global fit of the γ-ray galactic center excess within the scalar singlet Higgs portal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Eiteneuer, Benedikt; Heisig, Jan; Krämer, Michael [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University,Sommerfeldstr. 16, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-06-28

    We analyse the excess in the γ-ray emission from the center of our galaxy observed by Fermi-LAT in terms of dark matter annihilation within the scalar Higgs portal model. In particular, we include the astrophysical uncertainties from the dark matter distribution and allow for unspecified additional dark matter components. We demonstrate through a detailed numerical fit that the strength and shape of the γ-ray spectrum can indeed be described by the model in various regions of dark matter masses and couplings. Constraints from invisible Higgs decays, direct dark matter searches, indirect searches in dwarf galaxies and for γ-ray lines, and constraints from the dark matter relic density reduce the parameter space to dark matter masses near the Higgs resonance. We find two viable regions: one where the Higgs-dark matter coupling is of O(10{sup −2}), and an additional dark matter component beyond the scalar WIMP of our model is preferred, and one region where the Higgs-dark matter coupling may be significantly smaller, but where the scalar WIMP constitutes a significant fraction or even all of dark matter. Both viable regions are hard to probe in future direct detection and collider experiments.

  12. A global fit of the γ-ray galactic center excess within the scalar singlet Higgs portal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Eiteneuer, Benedikt; Heisig, Jan; Krämer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the excess in the γ-ray emission from the center of our galaxy observed by Fermi-LAT in terms of dark matter annihilation within the scalar Higgs portal model. In particular, we include the astrophysical uncertainties from the dark matter distribution and allow for unspecified additional dark matter components. We demonstrate through a detailed numerical fit that the strength and shape of the γ-ray spectrum can indeed be described by the model in various regions of dark matter masses and couplings. Constraints from invisible Higgs decays, direct dark matter searches, indirect searches in dwarf galaxies and for γ-ray lines, and constraints from the dark matter relic density reduce the parameter space to dark matter masses near the Higgs resonance. We find two viable regions: one where the Higgs-dark matter coupling is of O(10 −2 ), and an additional dark matter component beyond the scalar WIMP of our model is preferred, and one region where the Higgs-dark matter coupling may be significantly smaller, but where the scalar WIMP constitutes a significant fraction or even all of dark matter. Both viable regions are hard to probe in future direct detection and collider experiments.

  13. Air Flow Modeling in the Wind Tunnel of the FHWA Aerodynamics Laboratory at Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division; Lottes, S. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division; Bojanowski, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division

    2017-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is widely used in industry for design and in the research community to support, compliment, and extend the scope of experimental studies. Analysis of transportation infrastructure using high performance cluster computing with CFD and structural mechanics software is done at the Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) at Argonne National Laboratory. These resources, available at TRACC, were used to perform advanced three-dimensional computational simulations of the wind tunnel laboratory at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC). The goals were to verify the CFD model of the laboratory wind tunnel and then to use versions of the model to provide the capability to (1) perform larger parametric series of tests than can be easily done in the laboratory with available budget and time, (2) to extend testing to wind speeds that cannot be achieved in the laboratory, and (3) to run types of tests that are very difficult or impossible to run in the laboratory. Modern CFD software has many physics models and domain meshing options. Models, including the choice of turbulence and other physics models and settings, the computational mesh, and the solver settings, need to be validated against measurements to verify that the results are sufficiently accurate for use in engineering applications. The wind tunnel model was built and tested, by comparing to experimental measurements, to provide a valuable tool to perform these types of studies in the future as a complement and extension to TFHRC’s experimental capabilities. Wind tunnel testing at TFHRC is conducted in a subsonic open-jet wind tunnel with a 1.83 m (6 foot) by 1.83 m (6 foot) cross section. A three component dual force-balance system is used to measure forces acting on tested models, and a three degree of freedom suspension system is used for dynamic response tests. Pictures of the room are shown in Figure 1-1 to Figure 1-4. A detailed CAD

  14. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a risk prediction model for lung cancer: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvat, Hadrien; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Shimazu, Taichi; Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Inoue, Manami; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sawada, Norie; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2018-03-01

    Although the impact of tobacco consumption on the occurrence of lung cancer is well-established, risk estimation could be improved by risk prediction models that consider various smoking habits, such as quantity, duration, and time since quitting. We constructed a risk prediction model using a population of 59 161 individuals from the Japan Public Health Center (JPHC) Study Cohort II. A parametric survival model was used to assess the impact of age, gender, and smoking-related factors (cumulative smoking intensity measured in pack-years, age at initiation, and time since cessation). Ten-year cumulative probability of lung cancer occurrence estimates were calculated with consideration of the competing risk of death from other causes. Finally, the model was externally validated using 47 501 individuals from JPHC Study Cohort I. A total of 1210 cases of lung cancer occurred during 986 408 person-years of follow-up. We found a dose-dependent effect of tobacco consumption with hazard ratios for current smokers ranging from 3.78 (2.00-7.16) for cumulative consumption ≤15 pack-years to 15.80 (9.67-25.79) for >75 pack-years. Risk decreased with time since cessation. Ten-year cumulative probability of lung cancer occurrence estimates ranged from 0.04% to 11.14% in men and 0.07% to 6.55% in women. The model showed good predictive performance regarding discrimination (cross-validated c-index = 0.793) and calibration (cross-validated χ 2 = 6.60; P-value = .58). The model still showed good discrimination in the external validation population (c-index = 0.772). In conclusion, we developed a prediction model to estimate the probability of developing lung cancer based on age, gender, and tobacco consumption. This model appears useful in encouraging high-risk individuals to quit smoking and undergo increased surveillance. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Assessing the occurrence of the dibromide radical (Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}) in natural waters: Measures of triplet-sensitised formation, reactivity, and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Mailhot, Gilles; Sarakha, Mohamed [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Brigante, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.brigante@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Vione, Davide, E-mail: davide.vione@unito.it [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Torino, Centro Interdipartimentale NatRisk, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    The triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate (AQ2S) is able to oxidise bromide to Br{sup {center_dot}}/Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}, with rate constant (2-4) Dot-Operator 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} that depends on the pH. Similar processes are expected to take place between bromide and the triplet states of naturally occurring chromophoric dissolved organic matter ({sup 3}CDOM*). The brominating agent Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} could thus be formed in natural waters upon oxidation of bromide by both {sup {center_dot}}OH and {sup 3}CDOM*. Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} would be consumed by disproportionation into bromide and bromine, as well as upon reaction with nitrite and most notably with dissolved organic matter (DOM). By using the laser flash photolysis technique, and phenol as model organic molecule, a second-order reaction rate constant of {approx} 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup 2} L (mg C){sup -1} s{sup -1} was measured between Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} and DOM. It was thus possible to model the formation and reactivity of Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} in natural waters, assessing the steady-state [Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}] Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -13}-10{sup -12} M. It is concluded that bromide oxidation by {sup 3}CDOM* would be significant compared to oxidation by {sup {center_dot}}OH. The {sup 3}CDOM*-mediated process would prevail in DOM-rich and bromide-rich environments, the latter because elevated bromide would completely scavenge {sup {center_dot}}OH. Under such conditions, {sup {center_dot}}OH-assisted formation of Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} would be limited by the formation rate of the hydroxyl radical. In contrast, the formation rate of {sup 3}CDOM* is much higher compared to that of {sup {center_dot}}OH in most surface waters and would provide a large {sup 3}CDOM* reservoir for bromide to react with. A further issue is that nitrite oxidation by Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} could be an important source of the nitrating agent {sup {center

  17. Transition Thinking and Business Model Innovation Towards a Transformative Business Model and New Role for the Reuse Centers of Limburg, Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leen Gorissen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current dynamics of change, including climate change, resource depletion, energy transition, internet of things, etc. will have substantial impacts on the functioning of contemporary business models. Most firms and companies, however, still largely focus on efficiency strategies leading to sub-optimal solutions (reducing bad impact, rather than radically changing their business model to develop new transaction models more appropriate for today’s world (doing better things. However, persistent sustainability issues arising from our changing societal systems, require more radical and structural changes both within and between organizations to change the way we do business. There is limited empirically established research literature on how businesses can be more proactive in this regard and how they can move beyond “management of unsustainability”. In this paper, we present a transformative business model innovation approach inspired by transition theory combining elements of systems thinking, value-inspired envisioning, reflexive design and co-creation that was pioneered for a consortia of reuse centers in the province of Limburg, Belgium. We demonstrate that this approach contributed to the development of new business model concepts, was conducive for mobilizing support and resources to ensure follow up activity and holds potential to promote a more proactive role for businesses as agents of transformative change.

  18. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and Ecological Modeling Research and Education at Mid America Remote Sensing Center (MARC): Field and Laboratory Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Haluk

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to establish a new hyperspectral remote sensing laboratory at the Mid-America Remote sensing Center (MARC), dedicated to in situ and laboratory measurements of environmental samples and to the manipulation, analysis, and storage of remotely sensed data for environmental monitoring and research in ecological modeling using hyperspectral remote sensing at MARC, one of three research facilities of the Center of Reservoir Research at Murray State University (MSU), a Kentucky Commonwealth Center of Excellence. The equipment purchased, a FieldSpec FR portable spectroradiometer and peripherals, and ENVI hyperspectral data processing software, allowed MARC to provide hands-on experience, education, and training for the students of the Department of Geosciences in quantitative remote sensing using hyperspectral data, Geographic Information System (GIS), digital image processing (DIP), computer, geological and geophysical mapping; to provide field support to the researchers and students collecting in situ and laboratory measurements of environmental data; to create a spectral library of the cover types and to establish a World Wide Web server to provide the spectral library to other academic, state and Federal institutions. Much of the research will soon be published in scientific journals. A World Wide Web page has been created at the web site of MARC. Results of this project are grouped in two categories, education and research accomplishments. The Principal Investigator (PI) modified remote sensing and DIP courses to introduce students to ii situ field spectra and laboratory remote sensing studies for environmental monitoring in the region by using the new equipment in the courses. The PI collected in situ measurements using the spectroradiometer for the ER-2 mission to Puerto Rico project for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Airborne Simulator (MAS). Currently MARC is mapping water quality in Kentucky Lake and

  19. A Collection-Distribution Center Location and Allocation Optimization Model in Closed-Loop Supply Chain for Chinese Beer Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling waste products is an environmental-friendly activity that can result in manufacturing cost saving and economic efficiency improving. In the beer industry, recycling bottles can reduce manufacturing cost and the industry’s carbon footprint. This paper presents a model for a collection-distribution center location and allocation problem in a closed-loop supply chain for the beer industry under a fuzzy random environment, in which the objectives are to minimize total costs and transportation pollution. Both random and fuzzy uncertainties, for which return rate and disposal rate are considered fuzzy random variables, are jointly handled in this paper to ensure a more practical problem solution. A heuristic algorithm based on priority-based global-local-neighbor particle swarm optimization (pb-glnPSO is applied to ensure reliable solutions for this NP-hard problem. A beer company case study is given to illustrate the application of the proposed model and to demonstrate the priority-based global-local-neighbor particle swarm optimization.

  20. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing - Towards Enhancing OpenMP for Manycore and Heterogeneous Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara Chapman

    2012-02-01

    OpenMP was not well recognized at the beginning of the project, around year 2003, because of its limited use in DoE production applications and the inmature hardware support for an efficient implementation. Yet in the recent years, it has been graduately adopted both in HPC applications, mostly in the form of MPI+OpenMP hybrid code, and in mid-scale desktop applications for scientific and experimental studies. We have observed this trend and worked deligiently to improve our OpenMP compiler and runtimes, as well as to work with the OpenMP standard organization to make sure OpenMP are evolved in the direction close to DoE missions. In the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing project, the HPCTools team at the University of Houston (UH), directed by Dr. Barbara Chapman, has been working with project partners, external collaborators and hardware vendors to increase the scalability and applicability of OpenMP for multi-core (and future manycore) platforms and for distributed memory systems by exploring different programming models, language extensions, compiler optimizations, as well as runtime library support.

  1. The Evaluation of Linear Complementarity Problem Method in Modeling the Fluid Cavitation for Squeeze Film Damper with Off-Centered Whirling Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshu Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For the application of squeeze film damper (SFD in aero-engine, a cavitation model is evaluated by means of linear complementarity problem (LCP method. Different from the conventional SFD study that employs circular-center orbits (CCOs, a realistic condition is explored where the shaft whirling center and bearing center are misaligned. Taking into account the fluid as incompressible and compressible, the governing equations, including film cavitation, are respectively solved by developing an algorithm using the LCP method. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and the effectiveness of the model is verified. The proposed model can provide some references to investigate the competency of this cavitation method in SFDs.

  2. Hastings Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Scientists Join Forces Read more HASTINGS CENTER NEWS Artificial intelligence and brain-computer interfaces could revolutionize the treatment ... more HASTINGS CENTER NEWS With the power of artificial intelligence, machines can perform increasingly complex tasks, such as ...

  3. Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling of the Influences of Family-Centered Care on Parent and Child Psychological Health

    OpenAIRE

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Family-centered care is now practiced throughout the world by physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals. The call for adoption of family-centered care is based on the contention that the physical and psychological health of a child is influenced by parents' psychological health where family-centered care enhances parent well-being which in turn influences child well-being. We empirically assessed whether these relationships are supported by available evidence. M...

  4. Modeling the Impact of Space Suit Components and Anthropometry on the Center of Mass of a Seated Crewmember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Blackledge, Christopher; Ferrer, Mike; Margerum, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The designers of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) utilize an intensive simulation program in order to predict the launch and landing characteristics of the Crew Impact Attenuation System (CIAS). The CIAS is the energy absorbing strut concept that dampens loads to levels sustainable by the crew during landing and consists of the crew module seat pallet that accommodates four to six seated astronauts. An important parameter required for proper dynamic modeling of the CIAS is knowledge of the suited center of mass (COM) variations within the crew population. Significant center of mass variations across suited crew configurations would amplify the inertial effects of the pallet and potentially create unacceptable crew loading during launch and landing. Established suited, whole-body, and posture-based mass properties were not available due to the uncertainty of the final CEV seat posture and suit hardware configurations. While unsuited segmental center of mass values can be obtained via regression equations from previous studies, building them into a model that was posture dependent with custom anthropometry and integrated suit components proved cumbersome and time consuming. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify the effects of posture, suit components, and the expected range of anthropometry on the center of mass of a seated individual. Several elements are required for the COM calculation of a suited human in a seated position: anthropometry; body segment mass; suit component mass; suit component location relative to the body; and joint angles defining the seated posture. Anthropometry and body segment masses used in this study were taken from a selection of three-dimensional human body models, called boundary manikins, which were developed in a previous project. These boundary manikins represent the critical anthropometric dimension extremes for the anticipated astronaut population. Six male manikins and 6 female manikins, representing a

  5. Real-Time Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station High-Resolution Model Implementation and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Watson, Leela R.

    2015-01-01

    Customer: NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP), Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO), and Space Launch System (SLS) programs. NASA's LSP, GSDO, SLS and other programs at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) use the daily and weekly weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) as decision tools for their day-to-day and launch operations on the Eastern Range (ER). For example, to determine if they need to limit activities such as vehicle transport to the launch pad, protect people, structures or exposed launch vehicles given a threat of severe weather, or reschedule other critical operations. The 45 WS uses numerical weather prediction models as a guide for these weather forecasts, particularly the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) 1.67 kilometer Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Considering the 45 WS forecasters' and Launch Weather Officers' (LWO) extensive use of the AFWA model, the 45 WS proposed a task at the September 2013 Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Tasking Meeting requesting the AMU verify this model. Due to the lack of archived model data available from AFWA, verification is not yet possible. Instead, the AMU proposed to implement and verify the performance of an ER version of the AMU high-resolution WRF Environmental Modeling System (EMS) model (Watson 2013) in real-time. The tasking group agreed to this proposal; therefore the AMU implemented the WRF-EMS model on the second of two NASA AMU modeling clusters. The model was set up with a triple-nested grid configuration over KSC/CCAFS based on previous AMU work (Watson 2013). The outer domain (D01) has 12-kilometer grid spacing, the middle domain (D02) has 4-kilometer grid spacing, and the inner domain (D03) has 1.33-kilometer grid spacing. The model runs a 12-hour forecast every hour, D01 and D02 domain outputs are available once an hour and D03 is every 15 minutes during the forecast period. The AMU assessed the WRF-EMS 1

  6. Job satisfaction and its modeling among township health center employees: a quantitative study in poor rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun A; Wang, Qi; Lu, Zu X

    2010-05-10

    Job satisfaction is important to staff management of township health centers (THCs), as it is associated with organizational performance, quality of care and employee retention. The purpose of this study was to measure job satisfaction level of THC employees in poor rural China and to identify relevant features in order to provide policy advice on human resource development of health service institutions in poor regions. A self-completion questionnaire was used to assess the job satisfaction and relevant features (response rate: 90.5%) among 172 employees (i.e., clinic doctors, medico-technical workers and public health workers) of 17 THCs in Anhui and Xinjiang provinces of China. The study covered a time period of two months in 2007. The mean staff job satisfaction scored 83.3, which was in the category of "somewhat satisfied" on a scale ranging from 0 (extremely dissatisfied) to 100 (extremely satisfied) by employing Likert's transformation formula. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) revealed eight domains involved in modeling of job satisfaction, among which, the caregivers were more satisfied with job significance (88.2), job competency (87.9) and teamwork (87.7), as compared with work reward (72.9) and working conditions (79.7). Mean job satisfaction in Xinjiang (89.7) was higher than that in Anhui (75.5). Employees of THCs have moderate job satisfactions in poor areas, which need to be raised further by improving their working conditions and reward.

  7. Job satisfaction and its modeling among township health center employees: a quantitative study in poor rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zu X

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Job satisfaction is important to staff management of township health centers (THCs, as it is associated with organizational performance, quality of care and employee retention. The purpose of this study was to measure job satisfaction level of THC employees in poor rural China and to identify relevant features in order to provide policy advice on human resource development of health service institutions in poor regions. Methods A self-completion questionnaire was used to assess the job satisfaction and relevant features (response rate: 90.5% among 172 employees (i.e., clinic doctors, medico-technical workers and public health workers of 17 THCs in Anhui and Xinjiang provinces of China. The study covered a time period of two months in 2007. Results The mean staff job satisfaction scored 83.3, which was in the category of "somewhat satisfied" on a scale ranging from 0 (extremely dissatisfied to 100 (extremely satisfied by employing Likert's transformation formula. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA revealed eight domains involved in modeling of job satisfaction, among which, the caregivers were more satisfied with job significance (88.2, job competency (87.9 and teamwork (87.7, as compared with work reward (72.9 and working conditions (79.7. Mean job satisfaction in Xinjiang (89.7 was higher than that in Anhui (75.5. Conclusions Employees of THCs have moderate job satisfactions in poor areas, which need to be raised further by improving their working conditions and reward.

  8. Fully aligned academic health centers: a model for 21st-century job creation and sustainable economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, E Albert; Chrencik, Robert A; Miller, Edward D

    2012-07-01

    Alignment is the degree to which component parts of academic health centers (AHCs) work cohesively. Full alignment allows AHCs to act quickly and cohesively toward common goals and to take advantage of opportunities that present themselves, particularly where collaboration is essential. Maryland's two major AHCs-University of Maryland Medicine (UMM) and Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM)-have experienced periods of significant misalignment during each of their histories. Their most recent periods of misalignment caused significant negative economic and academic impacts. However, the process of realigning their clinical and research missions has not only given them a renewed economic vigor but has also paid significant dividends for the state of Maryland, helping it weather the current recession much better than other regions of the country. The two AHCs' continued economic success during the recession has led Maryland lawmakers to increasingly seek out their expertise in attempts to stimulate economic development. Indeed, UMM, JHM, and other fully aligned AHCs have shown that they can be powerful economic engines and offer a model of job growth and economic development in the 21st century.

  9. Educational Intervention on Breast Self-Examination Behavior in Women Referred to Health Centers: Application of Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiyali, Zahra; Aliyan, Farzaneh; Kashfi, Seyyed Hannan; Mansourian, Morteza; Khani Jeihooni, Ali

    2017-10-26

    Introduction and aims: Screening can play a major role in reducing deaths associated with cancer. Breast selfexamination (BSE) is a cheap, non-complicated and non-invasive method for breast cancer screening. This study aimed to examine the effects of an educational intervention based on the health belief model (HBM) on BSE behavior in women referred to health centers in Fasa, Iran. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 92 women, divided into an experimental and a control group. Data were collected using a validated questionnaire covering demographic characteristics, knowledge, HBM constructs and breast self-examination performance. An educational program was performed in five sessions through group discussion with questions and answers and training videos for participants in the experimental group. Questionnaires were filled before and three months after the intervention in the two groups. Data were analyzed with SPSS-22 software for descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The results of this study showed that the mean scores for knowledge, HBM constructs and self-examination behavior in the experimental group were elevated compared to the control group after the intervention (Pmodel are proposed for officers involved in education and health promotion in Iran. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. A wide array research model for providing evidence in person-centered psychotherapies, or what we can learn from LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesum, N.J.; Takens, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the World Association for Person-Centered and Experiential Psychotherapy and Counseling (WAPCEPC) has installed a Scientific Committee to promote empirical research to support the person-centered and experiential (PCE) approach. For this endeavor to be successful, traditional methods may

  11. The quality of health care services provided in health care centers of Khorramabad using SERVQUAL model in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad javad tarrahi

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Expectations of the clients in all aspects of offering services are beyond than their perceptions, and needed to improve the quality of offering services in these centers in all the dimensions especially empathy dimension. It is recommended that the quality of the offering services be assessed periodically in these centers and intervene to improve the delivering of health services.

  12. Meeting the Needs of Chinese English Language Learners at Writing Centers in America: A Proposed Culturally Responsive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peizhen; Machado, Crystal

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the ways in which Writing Centers (WC) currently serve English Language Learners (ELL) at American universities. The authors argue that the pedagogy offered at these centers does not always meet the needs of the Chinese ELLs who make up the largest population of ELLs at American universities. The proposed supplemental model…

  13. Clouds, weather, climate, and modeling for K-12 and public audiences from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Russell, R. M.; Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; Burt, M. A.; Genyuk, J.

    2010-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fifth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  14. Model of Activities of the Resource Training Center of the Russian State Social University in Terms of Professional Orientation and Employment of Persons with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikbulatova A.A.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the importance of professional and vocational guidance for persons with disabilities. It describes the main approaches to providing such type of guidance to the disabled students and reveals the technologies of motivating people with disabilities to seek education and to make informed choices of profession. The research was aimed at developing the model of career guidance offered at resource and training centers established by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation on the basis higher educational institutions. The paper presents the developed model of professional and vocational guidance for persons with disabilities and explains the algorithm of its implementation in the resource and training centers. Also, the paper gives recommendations on how to change the technology of communication between universities, regional job centers and offices of medical and social assessment.

  15. WOFOST 7.1; user's guide for the WOFOST 7.1 crop growth simulation model and WOFOST Control Center 1.5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, H.L.; Diepen, van C.A.; Rotter, R.P.; Cabrera, J.M.C.A.; Laar, van H.H.

    1998-01-01

    WOFOST version 7.1 is a computer model that simulates the growth and production of annual field crops. All the run options are operational through a graphical user interface named WOFOST Control Center version 1.5 (WCC). WCC facilitates selecting the production level, and input data sets on crop,

  16. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people’s health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. Method: a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. Results: people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. Conclusion: a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. PMID:28146179

  17. CenteringPregnancy Smiles: A Community Engagement to Develop and Implement a New Oral Health and Prenatal Care Model in Rural Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Robert E.; Skelton, Judith; Mullins, M. Raynor; Langston, LeAnn; Womack, Sara; Morris, Jack; Martin, Dan; Brooks, Robert; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    CenteringPregnancy Smiles[TM] (CPS) is a partnership between the University of Kentucky, Trover Health System, and Hopkins County Health Department. The purpose of the partnership is to: (1) establish an infrastructure to address health problems requiring research-based solutions, (2) develop a model for community partnership formation, and (3)…

  18. Modeling the Clustering of Distribution Centers around Amsterdam Airport Schiphol: location endowments, economies of agglomeration, locked-in logistics and policy implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.J. Warffemius (Pim)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis deals with the explanation of why European Distribution Centers (EDCs) cluster around Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. We present and test a new model of the clustering of EDCs around the airport. The Netherlands is an attractive location for EDCs. Approximately one-half of all

  19. Mixing of exciton and charge-transfer states in Photosystem II reaction centers: Modeling of stark spectra with modified redfield theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2007-01-01

    We propose an exciton model for the Photosystem II reaction center (RC) based on a quantitative simultaneous fit of the absorption, linear dichroism, circular dichroism, steady-state fluorescence, triplet-minus-singlet, and Stark spectra together with the spectra of pheophytin-modified RCs, and

  20. A multilevel model to estimate the within- and the between-center components of the exposure/disease association in the EPIC study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Sera

    Full Text Available In a multicenter study, the overall relationship between exposure and the risk of cancer can be broken down into a within-center component, which reflects the individual level association, and a between-center relationship, which captures the association at the aggregate level. A piecewise exponential proportional hazards model with random effects was used to evaluate the association between dietary fiber intake and colorectal cancer (CRC risk in the EPIC study. During an average follow-up of 11.0 years, 4,517 CRC events occurred among study participants recruited in 28 centers from ten European countries. Models were adjusted by relevant confounding factors. Heterogeneity among centers was modelled with random effects. Linear regression calibration was used to account for errors in dietary questionnaire (DQ measurements. Risk ratio estimates for a 10 g/day increment in dietary fiber were equal to 0.90 (95%CI: 0.85, 0.96 and 0.85 (0.64, 1.14, at the individual and aggregate levels, respectively, while calibrated estimates were 0.85 (0.76, 0.94, and 0.87 (0.65, 1.15, respectively. In multicenter studies, over a straightforward ecological analysis, random effects models allow information at the individual and ecologic levels to be captured, while controlling for confounding at both levels of evidence.

  1. Dimensioning large call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Mandelbaum; M.I. Reiman

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a framework for asymptotic optimization of a queueing system. The motivation is the staffing problem of call centers with 100's of agents (or more). Such a call center is modeled as an M/M/N queue, where the number of agents~$N$ is large. Within our framework, we determine the

  2. "Her illness is a project we can work on together": developing a collaborative family-centered intervention model for newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintell, David; Melito, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model for intervening with families that are addressing a new diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in one member. The model is collaborative, integrative, and family-centered. It involves both working with the family collaboratively and providing strategies to promote greater collaboration within the family. The model integrates elements of crisis intervention theory, psycho-education, and family-centered approaches. The model was developed with families addressing MS, and was piloted with three families. The intervention was found to improve family members' ability to collaborate with each other. Such increased collaboration may enhance the family's ability to manage long-term illness more effectively, help the family address the impact of the illness on all family members, and generally improve the family's quality of life.

  3. Comprehensive Revenue and Expense Data Collection Methodology for Teaching Health Centers: A Model for Accountable Graduate Medical Education Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenstein, Marsha; Snyder, John E; Jewers, Mariellen Malloy; Nocella, Kiki; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2018-04-01

    Despite considerable federal investment, graduate medical education financing is neither transparent for estimating residency training costs nor accountable for effectively producing a physician workforce that matches the nation's health care needs. The Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program's authorization in 2010 provided an opportunity to establish a more transparent financing mechanism. We developed a standardized methodology for quantifying the necessary investment to train primary care physicians in high-need communities. The THCGME Costing Instrument was designed utilizing guidance from site visits, financial documentation, and expert review. It collects educational outlays, patient service expenses and revenues from residents' ambulatory and inpatient care, and payer mix. The instrument was fielded from April to November 2015 in 43 THCGME-funded residency programs of varying specialties and organizational structures. Of the 43 programs, 36 programs (84%) submitted THCGME Costing Instruments. The THCGME Costing Instrument collected standardized, detailed cost data on residency labor (n = 36), administration and educational outlays (n = 33), ambulatory care visits and payer mix (n = 30), patient service expenses (n =  26), and revenues generated by residents (n = 26), in contrast to Medicare cost reports, which include only costs incurred by residency programs. The THCGME Costing Instrument provides a model for calculating evidence-based costs and revenues of community-based residency programs, and it enhances accountability by offering an approach that estimates residency costs and revenues in a range of settings. The instrument may have feasibility and utility for application in other residency training settings.

  4. Effects of copy center particles on the lungs: a toxicological characterization using a Balb/c mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra; Molina, Ramon; Watson, Christa; Cohen, Joel M; Bello, Dhimiter; Demokritou, Philip; Brain, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Printers and photocopiers release respirable particles into the air. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have been recently incorporated into toner formulations but their potential toxicological effects have not been well studied. To evaluate the biological responses to copier-emitted particles in the lungs using a mouse model. Particulate matter (PM) from a university copy center was sampled and fractionated into three distinct sizes, two of which (PM0.1 and PM0.1-2.5) were evaluated in this study. The particles were extracted and dispersed in deionized water and RPMI/10% FBS. Hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential were evaluated by dynamic light scattering. The toxicological potential of these particles was studied using 8-week-old male Balb/c mice. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 0.2, 0.6, 2.0 mg/kg bw of either the PM0.1 and PM0.1-2.5 size fractions. Fe2O3 and welding fumes were used as comparative materials, while RPMI/10% FBS was used as the vehicle control. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 hours post-instillation. The BAL fluid was analyzed for total and differential cell counts, and biochemical markers of injury and inflammation. Particle size- and dose-dependent pulmonary effects were found. Specifically, mice instilled with PM0.1 (2.0 mg/kg bw) had significant increases in neutrophil number, lactate dehydrogenase and albumin compared to vehicle control. Likewise, pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in mice exposed to PM0.1 (2.0 mg/kg bw) compared to other groups. Our results indicate that exposure to copier-emitted nanoparticles may induce lung injury and inflammation. Further exposure assessment and toxicological investigations are necessary to address this emerging environmental health pollutant.

  5. Adjusting to Random Demands of Patient Care: A Predictive Model for Nursing Staff Scheduling at Naval Medical Center San Diego

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chery, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    ...) required to meet patient care needs at Naval Medical Center San Diego. In order to capture both patient census and patient acuities, the monthly total required workload hours given by the Res-Q system was used...

  6. Improved Outcomes for Hispanic Women with Gestational Diabetes Using the Centering Pregnancy© Group Prenatal Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellinger, Megan M; Abernathy, Mary Pell; Amerman, Barbara; May, Carissa; Foxlow, Leslie A; Carter, Amy L; Barbour, Kelli; Luebbehusen, Erin; Ayo, Katherine; Bastawros, Dina; Rose, Rebecca S; Haas, David M

    2017-02-01

    Objective To determine the impact of Centering Pregnancy © -based group prenatal care for Hispanic gravid diabetics on pregnancy outcomes and postpartum follow-up care compared to those receiving traditional prenatal care. Methods A cohort study was performed including 460 women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who received traditional or Centering Pregnancy © prenatal care. The primary outcome measured was completion of postpartum glucose tolerance testing. Secondary outcomes included postpartum visit attendance, birth outcomes, breastfeeding, and initiation of a family planning method. Results 203 women received Centering Pregnancy © group prenatal care and 257 received traditional individual prenatal care. Women receiving Centering Pregnancy © prenatal care were more likely to complete postpartum glucose tolerance testing than those receiving traditional prenatal care, (83.6 vs. 60.7 %, respectively; p prenatal care (30.2 vs. 42.1 %; p = 0.009), and were less likely to undergo inductions of labor (34.5 vs. 46.2 %; p = 0.014). When only Hispanic women were compared, women in the Centering group continued to have higher rates of breastfeeding and completion of postpartum diabetes screening. Conclusion for Practice Hispanic women with GDM who participate in Centering Pregnancy © group prenatal care may have improved outcomes.

  7. Geodetic observations and modeling of magmatic inflation at the Three Sisters volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Wicks, Charles W.; Poland, Michael P.; Endo, Elliot T.

    2006-01-01

    Tumescence at the Three Sisters volcanic center began sometime between summer 1996 and summer 1998 and was discovered in April 2001 using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Swelling is centered about 5 km west of the summit of South Sister, a composite basaltic-andesite to rhyolite volcano that last erupted between 2200 and 2000 yr ago, and it affects an area ∼20 km in diameter within the Three Sisters Wilderness. Yearly InSAR observations show that the average maximum displacement rate was 3–5 cm/yr through summer 2001, and the velocity of a continuous GPS station within the deforming area was essentially constant from June 2001 to June 2004. The background level of seismic activity has been low, suggesting that temperatures in the source region are high enough or the strain rate has been low enough to favor plastic deformation over brittle failure. A swarm of about 300 small earthquakes (Mmax = 1.9) in the northeast quadrant of the deforming area on March 23–26, 2004, was the first notable seismicity in the area for at least two decades. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established tilt-leveling and EDM networks at South Sister in 1985–1986, resurveyed them in 2001, the latter with GPS, and extended them to cover more of the deforming area. The 2001 tilt-leveling results are consistent with the inference drawn from InSAR that the current deformation episode did not start before 1996, i.e., the amount of deformation during 1995–2001 from InSAR fully accounts for the net tilt at South Sister during 1985–2001 from tilt-leveling. Subsequent InSAR, GPS, and leveling observations constrain the source location, geometry, and inflation rate as a function of time. A best-fit source model derived from simultaneous inversion of all three datasets is a dipping sill located 6.5 ± 2.5 km below the surface with a volume increase of 5.0 × 106 ± 1.5 × 106m3/yr (95% confidence limits). The most likely cause of tumescence is a pulse of

  8. Geodetic observations and modeling of magmatic inflation at the Three Sisters volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Wicks, Charles W.; Poland, Michael P.; Endo, Elliot T.

    2006-02-01

    Tumescence at the Three Sisters volcanic center began sometime between summer 1996 and summer 1998 and was discovered in April 2001 using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Swelling is centered about 5 km west of the summit of South Sister, a composite basaltic-andesite to rhyolite volcano that last erupted between 2200 and 2000 yr ago, and it affects an area ˜20 km in diameter within the Three Sisters Wilderness. Yearly InSAR observations show that the average maximum displacement rate was 3-5 cm/yr through summer 2001, and the velocity of a continuous GPS station within the deforming area was essentially constant from June 2001 to June 2004. The background level of seismic activity has been low, suggesting that temperatures in the source region are high enough or the strain rate has been low enough to favor plastic deformation over brittle failure. A swarm of about 300 small earthquakes ( Mmax = 1.9) in the northeast quadrant of the deforming area on March 23-26, 2004, was the first notable seismicity in the area for at least two decades. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established tilt-leveling and EDM networks at South Sister in 1985-1986, resurveyed them in 2001, the latter with GPS, and extended them to cover more of the deforming area. The 2001 tilt-leveling results are consistent with the inference drawn from InSAR that the current deformation episode did not start before 1996, i.e., the amount of deformation during 1995-2001 from InSAR fully accounts for the net tilt at South Sister during 1985-2001 from tilt-leveling. Subsequent InSAR, GPS, and leveling observations constrain the source location, geometry, and inflation rate as a function of time. A best-fit source model derived from simultaneous inversion of all three datasets is a dipping sill located 6.5 ± 2.5 km below the surface with a volume increase of 5.0 × 10 6 ± 1.5 × 10 6 m 3/yr (95% confidence limits). The most likely cause of tumescence is a pulse of basaltic magma

  9. Provider communication and role modeling related to patients' perceptions and use of a federally qualified health center-based farmers' market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daniela B; Freedman, Darcy A; Choi, Seul Ki; Anadu, Edith C; Brandt, Heather M; Carvalho, Natalia; Hurley, Thomas G; Young, Vicki M; Hébert, James R

    2014-03-01

    Farmers' markets have the potential to improve the health of underserved communities, shape people's perceptions, values, and behaviors about healthy eating, and serve as a social space for both community members and vendors. This study explored the influence of health care provider communication and role modeling for diabetic patients within the context of a farmers' market located at a federally qualified health center. Although provider communication about diet decreased over time, communication strategies included: providing patients with "prescriptions" and vouchers for market purchases; educating patients about diet; and modeling healthy purchases. Data from patient interviews and provider surveys revealed that patients enjoyed social aspects of the market including interactions with their health care provider, and providers distributed prescriptions and vouchers to patients, shopped at the market, and believed that the market had potential to improve the health of staff and patients of the federally qualified health center. Provider modeling of healthy behaviors may influence patients' food-related perceptions and dietary behaviors.

  10. Simulation of changes in heavy metal contamination in farmland soils of a typical manufacturing center through logistic-based cellular automata modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Menglong; Wang, Qi; Li, Fangbai; Chen, Junjian; Yang, Guoyi; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A customized logistic-based cellular automata (CA) model was developed to simulate changes in heavy metal contamination (HMC) in farmland soils of Dongguan, a manufacturing center in Southern China, and to discover the relationship between HMC and related explanatory variables (continuous and categorical). The model was calibrated through the simulation and validation of HMC in 2012. Thereafter, the model was implemented for the scenario simulation of development alternatives for HMC in 2022. The HMC in 2002 and 2012 was determined through soil tests and cokriging. Continuous variables were divided into two groups by odds ratios. Positive variables (odds ratios >1) included the Nemerow synthetic pollution index in 2002, linear drainage density, distance from the city center, distance from the railway, slope, and secondary industrial output per unit of land. Negative variables (odds ratios simulation shows that the government should not only implement stricter environmental regulation but also strengthen the remediation of the current polluted area to effectively mitigate HMC.

  11. High-resolution mineralogical characterization and biogeochemical modeling of uranium reaction pathways at the NABIR field-research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhu

    2006-01-01

    High-Resolution Mineralogical Characterization and Biogeochemical Modeling of Uranium Reduction Pathways at the Oak Ridge Field-Research Center (FRC) Chen Zhu, Indiana University, David R. Veblen, Johns Hopkins University We have successfully completed a proof-of-concept, one-year grant on a three-year proposal from the former NABIR program, and here we seek additional two-year funding to complete and publish the research. Using a state-of-the-art 300-kV, atomic resolution, Field Emission Gun Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), we have successfully identified three categories of mineral hosts for uranium in contaminated soils: (1) iron oxides; (2) mixed manganese-iron oxides; and (3) uranium phosphates. Method development using parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) associated with the TEM shows great promise for characterizing the valence states of immobilized U during bioremediation. We have also collected 27 groundwater samples from two push-pull field biostimulation tests, which form two time series from zero to approximately 600 hours. The temporal evolution in major cations, anions, trace elements, and the stable isotopes 34S, 18O in sulfate, 15N in nitrate, and 13C in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) clearly show that biostimulation resulted in reduction of nitrate, Mn(IV), Fe(III), U(VI), sulfate, and Tc(VII), and these reduction reactions were intimately coupled with a complex network of inorganic reactions evident from alkalinity, pH, Na, K, Mg, and Ca concentrations. From these temporal trends, apparent zero order rates were regressed. However, our extensive suite of chemical and isotopic data sets, perhaps the first and only comprehensive data set available at the FRC, show that the derived rates from these field biostimulation experiments are composite and lump-sum rates. There were several reactions that were occurring at the same time but were masked by these pseudo-zero order rates. A reaction-path model comprising a total of nine

  12. A Selection Model to Logistic Centers Based on TOPSIS and MCGP Methods: The Case of Airline Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kou-Huang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The location selection of a logistics center is a crucial decision relating to cost and benefit analysis in airline industry. However, it is difficult to be solved because there are many conflicting and multiple objectives in location problems. To solve the problem, this paper integrates fuzzy technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS and multichoice goal programming (MCGP to obtain an appropriate logistics center from many alternative locations for airline industry. The proposed method in this paper will offer the decision makers (DMs to set multiple aspiration levels for the decision criteria. A numerical example of application is also presented.

  13. Availability of a pediatric trauma center in a disaster surge decreases triage time of the pediatric surge population: a population kinetics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grikscheit Tracy C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of disaster surge has arisen in recent years to describe the phenomenon of severely increased demands on healthcare systems resulting from catastrophic mass casualty events (MCEs such as natural disasters and terrorist attacks. The major challenge in dealing with a disaster surge is the efficient triage and utilization of the healthcare resources appropriate to the magnitude and character of the affected population in terms of its demographics and the types of injuries that have been sustained. Results In this paper a deterministic population kinetics model is used to predict the effect of the availability of a pediatric trauma center (PTC upon the response to an arbitrary disaster surge as a function of the rates of pediatric patients' admission to adult and pediatric centers and the corresponding discharge rates of these centers. We find that adding a hypothetical pediatric trauma center to the response documented in an historical example (the Israeli Defense Forces field hospital that responded to the Haiti earthquake of 2010 would have allowed for a significant increase in the overall rate of admission of the pediatric surge cohort. This would have reduced the time to treatment in this example by approximately half. The time needed to completely treat all children affected by the disaster would have decreased by slightly more than a third, with the caveat that the PTC would have to have been approximately as fast as the adult center in discharging its patients. Lastly, if disaster death rates from other events reported in the literature are included in the model, availability of a PTC would result in a relative mortality risk reduction of 37%. Conclusions Our model provides a mathematical justification for aggressive inclusion of PTCs in planning for disasters by public health agencies.

  14. Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine (OBOT-B): Statewide Implementation of the Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model in Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBelle, Colleen T; Han, Steve Choongheon; Bergeron, Alexis; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Abuse Services' (BSAS) initiative to disseminate the office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine (OBOT-B) Massachusetts Model from its development at Boston Medical Center (BMC) to its implementation at fourteen community health centers (CHCs) beginning in 2007. The Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model for the delivery of opioid agonist therapy with buprenorphine, in which nurses working with physicians play a central role in the evaluation and monitoring of patients, holds promise for the effective expansion of treatment for opioid use disorders. The training of and technical assistance for the OBOT nurses as well as a limited program assessment are described. Data spanning 6years (2007-2013) report patient demographics, prior treatment for opioid use disorders, history of overdose, housing, and employment. The expansion of OBOT to the fourteen CHCs increased the number of physicians who were "waivered" (i.e., enabling their prescribing of buprenorphine) by 375%, from 24 to 114, within 3years. During this period the annual admissions of OBOT patients to CHCs markedly increased. Dissemination of the Massachusetts Model of the Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine employing a collaborative care model with a central role for nursing enabled implementation of effective treatment for patients with an opioid use disorder at community health centers throughout Massachusetts while effectively engaging primary care physicians in this endeavor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enabling sense-making for patients receiving outpatient palliative treatment: A participatory action research driven model for person-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlén, J; Carlsson, G; Jepsen, A; Lindberg, I; Friberg, F

    2016-06-01

    In clinical palliative cancer care, the diversity of patient concerns over time makes information provision a critical issue, the demands of information-seeking patients presenting a challenge to both the communicative and organizational skills of the health provider. This study puts forward a practice model for communication between patients, their family members, and professional health providers during ongoing palliative chemotherapy; a model which supports the providers in enabling person-centered communication. A constant comparative analysis adapted to participatory action research was applied. The model was developed step-wise in three interrelated cycles, with results from previous studies from palliative cancer care processed in relation to professional health providers' experience-based clinical knowledge. In doing this, focus group discussions were carried out with providers and patients to develop and revise the model. The Enabling Sense Making model for person-centered communication gave rise to three domains (which are also the major communicative actors in palliative care): the patient, the family, and the provider. These actors were placed in the context of a communicative arena. The three respective domains were built up in different layers discriminating between significant aspects of person-centered communication, from the manifest that is most usually explicated in dialogues, to the latent that tends to be implicitly mediated. The model intends to facilitate timely reorientation of care from curative treatment or rehabilitation to palliation, as well as the introduction of appropriate palliative interventions over time during palliative phases. In this way the model is to be regarded a frame for directing the awareness of the professionals, which focuses on how to communicate and how to consider the patient's way of reasoning. The model could be used as a complement to other strategic initiatives for the advancement of palliative care

  16. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create...... value.Design/methodology/approach:This paper provides a conceptual inquiry into the usage center. Findings: This paper delineates the notion of a usage center by way of focal andperipheral resource integrators, as well as focal and peripheral resources thatform part of interdependent resource usage...... processes. The conceptual analysisreveals the need for resources to be accessible and shareable to focal andperipheral actors, with rivalry and emergence central factors influencing theactor’s usage processes.Originality/value: Responding to recent calls for research developing insights intomulti...

  17. Technical Review and Analysis of Center for Night Vision and Electro-Optics Life Cycle Cost Analysis Model (CNVEO LCCAM),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    ADCSPM*ADCPMY/100)*ADPCNT(I,NACNTR(7))+ACAMT ESPM (I) (EDCSPM*EDCPMY/100)*EDPCNT(I,NECNTR(7))+ECAMT ASPM(I) = AD contractor system/project management by...of total AD program cost by year and cost center. ACAMT = AD contractor amount. A-2 V7 ESPM (I) = ED contractor system/project management by year

  18. Prevendo a demanda de ligações em um call center por meio de um modelo de Regressão Múltipla Forecasting a call center demand using a Multiple Regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Carino Bouzada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho descreve - por meio do estudo de um caso - o problema da previsão de demanda de chamadas para um determinado produto no call center de uma grande empresa brasileira do setor - a Contax - e como ele foi abordado com o uso de Regressão Múltipla com variáveis dummy. Depois de destacar e justificar a importância do tema, o estudo apresenta uma breve revisão de literatura acerca de métodos de previsão de demanda e de sua aplicação em call centers. O caso é descrito, contextualizando, inicialmente, a empresa estudada e descrevendo, a seguir, a forma como ela lida com o problema de previsão de demanda de chamadas para o produto 103 - serviços relacionados à telefonia fixa. Um modelo de Regressão Múltipla com variáveis dummy é, então, desenvolvido para servir como base do processo de previsão de demanda proposto. Este modelo utiliza informações disponíveis capazes de influenciar a demanda, tais como o dia da semana, a ocorrência ou não de feriado e a proximidade da data com eventos críticos, como a chegada da conta à residência do cliente e seu vencimento; e apresentou ganhos de acurácia da ordem de 3 pontos percentuais para o período estudado, quando comparado com a ferramenta anteriormente em uso.This work describes - with the aid of a case study -a demand forecast problem for a specific product reported to the call center of a large Brazilian company in an industry called Contax, and the way it was approached with the use of Multiple Regression using dummy variables. After highlighting and justifying the studied matter relevance, the article presents a small literature review regarding demand forecast methods and their use in the call center industry. The case is described presenting the studied company and the way it deals with the Forecasting Demand for a telephone all center regarding telephone services products. Therefore, a Multiple Regression with dummy variables model was developed to work as the

  19. Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System for Water Savings in an Energy-Efficient HPC Data Center: Modeling and Installation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Thomas; Liu, Zan; Sickinger, David; Regimbal, Kevin; Martinez, David

    2017-02-01

    The Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System (TCHS) integrates the control of a dry heat rejection device, the thermosyphon cooler (TSC), with an open cooling tower. A combination of equipment and controls, this new heat rejection system embraces the 'smart use of water,' using evaporative cooling when it is most advantageous and then saving water and modulating toward increased dry sensible cooling as system operations and ambient weather conditions permit. Innovative fan control strategies ensure the most economical balance between water savings and parasitic fan energy. The unique low-pressure-drop design of the TSC allows water to be cooled directly by the TSC evaporator without risk of bursting tubes in subfreezing ambient conditions. Johnson Controls partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories to deploy the TSC as a test bed at NREL's high-performance computing (HPC) data center in the first half of 2016. Located in NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), this HPC data center has achieved an annualized average power usage effectiveness rating of 1.06 or better since 2012. Warm-water liquid cooling is used to capture heat generated by computer systems direct to water; that waste heat is either reused as the primary heat source in the ESIF building or rejected using evaporative cooling. This data center is the single largest source of water and power demand on the NREL campus, using about 7,600 m3 (2.0 million gal) of water during the past year with an hourly average IT load of nearly 1 MW (3.4 million Btu/h) -- so dramatically reducing water use while continuing efficient data center operations is of significant interest. Because Sandia's climate is similar to NREL's, this new heat rejection system being deployed at NREL has gained interest at Sandia. Sandia's data centers utilize an hourly average of 8.5 MW (29 million Btu/h) and are also one of the largest consumers of

  20. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views.

  1. Energetic change of the primary quinone in photosynthetic reaction center. Mutation, delayed fluorescence and model calculations (Theses of the Ph.D. dissertation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinyu, L.

    2007-01-01

    intensities of prompt and delayed fluorescence emitted by the primary donor of the reaction center. By use of the values of the free energy gaps, I calculated the in situ midpoint redox potential of the Q A /Q A - redox couple in the mutants and the wild type and compared these values with each other. Based on the available data of reaction center structures I gave a possible explanation to the substantial change in E m of Q A in case of mutants. The available X-ray structures of reaction center make possible to calculate the thermo- dynamic properties of the mutants with computer simulations. Using docking simulations in wild type and mutant reaction centers, I calculated the binding free energies of the quinone and semiquinone molecules to the Q A packet and estimated the midpoint redox potential of the Q A /Q A - redox couple. Additionally, by use of the free energy perturbation method, I modeled the reductions process of the primary quinone molecule in wild-type and mutant re- action centers. With the application of cardiolipin (diphosphatide-glycerol) as a model-lipid, I investigated the interaction between the reaction center protein and the lipid environment. I described how it affects to the charge-recombination process and how it influences the free energy level of the charge couple (P + Q A - ) relative to the free energy level of the excited primary donor. With the investigation of the delayed fluorescence emission of the reaction center embedded into membrane fragment (chromatophore) I gave further information about the effects of reaction center proteins and lipid membranes on the energetic properties of Q A . In addition to these studies, I characterized the complex kinetics of the decay of delayed fluorescence emitted by chromatophore and also gave a description of the new fastest kinetic component

  2. Magnetic field modeling and optimal operational control of a single-side axial-flux permanent magnet motor with center poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-T.; Lee, S.-C.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed approach for analyzing magnetic field distributions of a single-sided axial-flux permanent magnet motor with center poles will be provided. Based on the devised flux model, the related position-dependent torque and axial force of the motor can be systematically developed. By incorporating adequate control designs, the optimal operational performance of the motor system can be conveniently achieved. Results showed that not only the motor structure is suitable for related military and transportation applications, but also the magnetic field model can provide appropriate mathematical basis for relative operational realizations

  3. Recent developments in the applications of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) for emergency response planning and operational forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, W.A.; Tremback, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors will summarize ten years of developing and applying the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to emergency response and operational dispersion forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). RAMS forms the core of two workstation-based operational systems, ERDAS (the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System) and PROWESS (Parallelized RAMS Operational Weather Simulation System) which are undergoing extensive operational testing prior to potential deployment as part of the range forecasting system at KSC. RAMS has been interfaced with HYPACT (the Hybrid Particle and Concentration Transport Model) to produce detailed 3-D dispersion forecasts from a variety of sources including cold spills, routine launch operations, and explosive conflagrations of launch vehicles

  4. A Reexamination of the Factor Structure of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: Is a One-Factor Model Plausible?

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Michael C.; Cheavens, Jennifer S.; Heiy, Jane E.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES–D) is one of the most widely used measures of depressive symptoms in research today. The original psychometric work in support of the CES–D (Radloff, 1977) described a 4-factor model underlying the 20 items on the scale. Despite a long history of evidence supporting this structure, researchers routinely report single-number summaries from the CES–D. The research described in this article examines the plausibility of 1-factor model usi...

  5. ENERGY RESOURCES CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Virginia

    1979-11-01

    First I will give a short history of this Center which has had three names and three moves (and one more in the offing) in three years. Then I will tell you about the accomplishments made in the past year. And last, I will discuss what has been learned and what is planned for the future. The Energy and Environment Information Center (EEIC), as it was first known, was organized in August 1975 in San Francisco as a cooperative venture by the Federal Energy Administration (FEA), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These three agencies planned this effort to assist the public in obtaining information about energy and the environmental aspects of energy. The Public Affairs Offices of FEA, ERDA and EPA initiated the idea of the Center. One member from each agency worked at the Center, with assistance from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Information Research Group (LBL IRG) and with on-site help from the EPA Library. The Center was set up in a corner of the EPA Library. FEA and ERDA each contributed one staff member on a rotating basis to cover the daily operation of the Center and money for books and periodicals. EPA contributed space, staff time for ordering, processing and indexing publications, and additional money for acquisitions. The LBL Information Research Group received funds from ERDA on a 189 FY 1976 research project to assist in the development of the Center as a model for future energy centers.

  6. Techniques for evaluating optimum data center operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Hendrik F.; Rodriguez, Sergio Adolfo Bermudez; Wehle, Hans-Dieter

    2017-06-14

    Techniques for modeling a data center are provided. In one aspect, a method for determining data center efficiency is provided. The method includes the following steps. Target parameters for the data center are obtained. Technology pre-requisite parameters for the data center are obtained. An optimum data center efficiency is determined given the target parameters for the data center and the technology pre-requisite parameters for the data center.

  7. A model for distribution centers location-routing problem on a multimodal transportation network with a meta-heuristic solving approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazayeli, Saeed; Eydi, Alireza; Kamalabadi, Isa Nakhai

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, organizations have to compete with different competitors in regional, national and international levels, so they have to improve their competition capabilities to survive against competitors. Undertaking activities on a global scale requires a proper distribution system which could take advantages of different transportation modes. Accordingly, the present paper addresses a location-routing problem on multimodal transportation network. The introduced problem follows four objectives simultaneously which form main contribution of the paper; determining multimodal routes between supplier and distribution centers, locating mode changing facilities, locating distribution centers, and determining product delivery tours from the distribution centers to retailers. An integer linear programming is presented for the problem, and a genetic algorithm with a new chromosome structure proposed to solve the problem. Proposed chromosome structure consists of two different parts for multimodal transportation and location-routing parts of the model. Based on published data in the literature, two numerical cases with different sizes generated and solved. Also, different cost scenarios designed to better analyze model and algorithm performance. Results show that algorithm can effectively solve large-size problems within a reasonable time which GAMS software failed to reach an optimal solution even within much longer times.

  8. Development of a 3D cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for the numerical modeling of the gas dynamics and hyper-elasticity systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) flows are multi-material flows characterized by strong shock waves and large changes in the domain shape due to rare faction waves. Numerical schemes based on the Lagrangian formalism are good candidates to model this kind of flows since the computational grid follows the fluid motion. This provides accurate results around the shocks as well as a natural tracking of multi-material interfaces and free-surfaces. In particular, cell-centered Finite Volume Lagrangian schemes such as GLACE (Godunov-type Lagrangian scheme Conservative for total Energy) and EUCCLHYD (Explicit Unstructured Cell-Centered Lagrangian Hydrodynamics) provide good results on both the modeling of gas dynamics and elastic-plastic equations. The work produced during this PhD thesis is in continuity with the work of Maire and Nkonga [JCP, 2009] for the hydrodynamic part and the work of Kluth and Despres [JCP, 2010] for the hyper elasticity part. More precisely, the aim of this thesis is to develop robust and accurate methods for the 3D extension of the EUCCLHYD scheme with a second-order extension based on MUSCL (Monotonic Upstream-centered Scheme for Conservation Laws) and GRP (Generalized Riemann Problem) procedures. A particular care is taken on the preservation of symmetries and the monotonicity of the solutions. The scheme robustness and accuracy are assessed on numerous Lagrangian test cases for which the 3D extensions are very challenging. (author) [fr

  9. Experimental evidence for an associated defect model for the neutron generated As/sub Ga/ center in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golzene, A.; Meyer, B.; Schwab, C.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal dependence of EPR spectra of fast neutron irradiated n-type GaAs over the whole 4.2 to 300 K temperature range has been studied using the decomposition of spectra into a quadruplet of four identical Gaussian lines and a Lorentzian singlet. Quadruplet and singlet spectra as well as their proper parameters (inverse of paramagnetic susceptibility, hyperfine constants) could be determined separately. Experiments give evidence that the neutron generated anionic antisites As/sub Ga/ in GaAs are constituting associated defect centers, most likely of intrinsic nature

  10. A model project in community mental health: Consultation to an urban welfare center serving a single-room occupancy hotel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, L I; Brownlee, W H; Lewars, M H

    1968-12-01

    A continuing consultative relationship between a general hospital department of psychiatry and an urban welfare center serving the residents of a privately owned hotel is described-the relationship is based on biweekly seminars. Individual case study is the method of training, and an activity program the vehicle for development of indigenous resident leadership. Problems in residents' relationship to their community, worker-resident relationships, resistances of residents, anticipating both workers and residents' readiness to assume responsibility, and defining the role of consultant were confronted. The project demonstrates the effectiveness of the technique, pointing up the need for refinement of the process and the development of tools for measurement.

  11. Evaluation of the effects of the family-centered empowerment model on the nutrition style and physical activity of patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Mahmoudi Rad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the most prevalent chronic disease, asthma is associated with restrictions in the diet and physical activity of the patients. Patient empowerment and family support are the methods of choice for adapting to these limitations. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the family-centered empowerment model on the nutrition style and physical activity of asthmatic patients. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients with asthma referring to a hospital in Zabol, Iran in 2015. Samples were selected via randomized convenience sampling and divided into two groups of intervention and control. Family-centered empowerment model was implemented in the intervention group in five educational sessions (45 min each twice a week. Data were collected using a researcher-made nutritional assessment scale and Beck’s physical activity questionnaire during four stages before the intervention, as well as one week, one month and three months after the intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 16 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, repeated measures ANOVA, Friedman’s test, independent t-test, and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Mean score of nutrition style significantly increased from 44.59±2.43 to 26.74±6.25 in the intervention group after the training sessions (P<0.001. Moreover, a significant increase was observed in the mean score of physical activity after the intervention (24.06±3.27 compared to before the intervention (31.20±3.06 (P<0.001. This difference was significant between the groups, with the exception of a one-month interval after the intervention (P<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, implementation of the family-centered empowerment model significantly improved the nutrition style and physical activity of asthmatic patients. Therefore, it is recommended that this model be employed by nurses in different hospital wards.

  12. Strong- and Weak-Universal Critical Behaviour of a Mixed-Spin Ising Model with Triplet Interactions on the Union Jack (Centered Square) Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strečka, Jozef

    2018-01-01

    The mixed spin-1/2 and spin-S Ising model on the Union Jack (centered square) lattice with four different three-spin (triplet) interactions and the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy is exactly solved by establishing a rigorous mapping equivalence with the corresponding zero-field (symmetric) eight-vertex model on a dual square lattice. A rigorous proof of the aforementioned exact mapping equivalence is provided by two independent approaches exploiting either a graph-theoretical or spin representation of the zero-field eight-vertex model. An influence of the interaction anisotropy as well as the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy on phase transitions and critical phenomena is examined in particular. It is shown that the considered model exhibits a strong-universal critical behaviour with constant critical exponents when considering the isotropic model with four equal triplet interactions or the anisotropic model with one triplet interaction differing from the other three. The anisotropic models with two different triplet interactions, which are pairwise equal to each other, contrarily exhibit a weak-universal critical behaviour with critical exponents continuously varying with a relative strength of the triplet interactions as well as the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy. It is evidenced that the variations of critical exponents of the mixed-spin Ising models with the integer-valued spins S differ basically from their counterparts with the half-odd-integer spins S.

  13. Modeling, stability analysis, and computational aspects of some simplest nonlinear fuzzy two-term controllers derived via center of area/gravity defuzzification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, N K; Mohan, B M

    2017-09-01

    The mathematical models reported in the literature so far have been found using Center of Sums (CoS) defuzzification method only. It appears that no one has found models using Center of Area (CoA) or Center of Gravity (CoG) defuzzification method. Although there have been some works reported to deal with modeling of fuzzy controllers via Centroid method, all of them have in fact used CoS method only. In this paper, for the first time mathematical models of the simplest Mamdani type fuzzy Proportional Integral (PI)/Proportional Derivative (PD) controllers via CoG defuzzification are presented. L-type and Γ-type membership functions over different Universes of Discourse (UoDs) are considered for the input variables. L-type, Π-type and Γ-type membership functions are considered for the output variable. Three linear fuzzy control rules relating all four input fuzzy sets to three output fuzzy sets are chosen. Two triangular norms namely Algebraic Product (AP) and Minimum (Min), Maximum (Max) triangular co-norm, and two inference methods, Larsen Product (LP) and Mamdani Minimum (MM), are used. Properties of the models are studied. Stability analysis of closed-loop systems containing one of these controller models in the loop is done using the Small Gain theorem. Since digital controllers are implemented using digital processors, computational and memory requirements of these fuzzy controllers and conventional (nonfuzzy) controllers are compared. A rough estimate of the computational time taken by the digital computer while implementing any of these discrete-time fuzzy controllers is given. Two nonlinear plants are considered to show the superiority of the simplest fuzzy controller obtained using CoA or CoG defuzzification method over the simplest fuzzy controller obtained using CoS method and reported recently. Real-time implementation of one of the developed controller models is done on coupled tank experimental setup to show the feasibility of the developed model

  14. Parameter-free one-center model potential for an effective one-electron description of molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Vanne, Yulian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    For the description of an H2 molecule, an effective one-electron model potential is proposed which is fully determined by the exact ionization potential of the H2 molecule. In order to test the model potential and examine its properties, it is employed to determine excitation energies, transition...

  15. Assessing model-based reasoning using evidence-centered design a suite of research-based design patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Mislevy, Robert J; Riconscente, Michelle; Wise Rutstein, Daisy; Ziker, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    This Springer Brief provides theory, practical guidance, and support tools to help designers create complex, valid assessment tasks for hard-to-measure, yet crucial, science education standards. Understanding, exploring, and interacting with the world through models characterizes science in all its branches and at all levels of education. Model-based reasoning is central to science education and thus science assessment. Current interest in developing and using models has increased with the release of the Next Generation Science Standards, which identified this as one of the eight practices of science and engineering. However, the interactive, complex, and often technology-based tasks that are needed to assess model-based reasoning in its fullest forms are difficult to develop. Building on research in assessment, science education, and learning science, this Brief describes a suite of design patterns that can help assessment designers, researchers, and teachers create tasks for assessing aspects of model-based...

  16. IRASM Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponta, C.C.; Moise, I.V.; Georgescu, R.; Ene, M.

    2003-01-01

    IRASM is a national center for radiation processing developed around an industrial Co60 gamma irradiator. Being a department in an R and D national institute, IRASM Center is dealing with radiation treatment, pre/post microbiological control, validation of irradiation sterilization, detection of irradiated foodstuffs. Training is available for operators of new irradiation facilities focused on radiation technologies, dosimetry, sterilization, food treatment, conservation by irradiation of cultural heritage, quality assurance. Expertise on proper choosing the plastics for packaging versus dose is offered to the potential clients. IRASM Center is also involved in interdisciplinary applied research like chitosan treatment, sterile male technique or implementation of irradiation step in production of pharmaceuticals. All important activities: irradiation treatment, dosimetry, microbiology, detection of irradiated food, radioprotection, nuclear safety, physical protection. are performed in accordance with the proper standards in the frame of a certified quality management system. In this way Co60 industrial sources, a byproduct of certain nuclear power plants like Candu type, appear to be the key of a large technical and R and D domain. (authors)

  17. A distributed model: redefining a robust research subject advocacy program at the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Sabune J; Cagliero, Enrico; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E

    2014-08-01

    The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center ("Harvard Catalyst") Research Subject Advocacy (RSA) Program has reengineered subject advocacy, distributing the delivery of advocacy functions through a multi-institutional, central platform rather than vesting these roles and responsibilities in a single individual functioning as a subject advocate. The program is process-oriented and output-driven, drawing on the strengths of participating institutions to engage local stakeholders both in the protection of research subjects and in advocacy for subjects' rights. The program engages stakeholder communities in the collaborative development and distributed delivery of accessible and applicable educational programming and resources. The Harvard Catalyst RSA Program identifies, develops, and supports the sharing and distribution of expertise, education, and resources for the benefit of all institutions, with a particular focus on the frontline: research subjects, researchers, research coordinators, and research nurses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Probabilistic Matching of Deidentified Data From a Trauma Registry and a Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center: A Follow-up Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj G; Wang, Zhensheng; Kesinger, Matthew R; Newman, Mark; Huynh, Toan T; Niemeier, Janet P; Sperry, Jason L; Wagner, Amy K

    2018-04-01

    In a previous study, individuals from a single Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems and trauma center were matched using a novel probabilistic matching algorithm. The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems is a multicenter prospective cohort study containing more than 14,000 participants with traumatic brain injury, following them from inpatient rehabilitation to the community over the remainder of their lifetime. The National Trauma Databank is the largest aggregation of trauma data in the United States, including more than 6 million records. Linking these two databases offers a broad range of opportunities to explore research questions not otherwise possible. Our objective was to refine and validate the previous protocol at another independent center. An algorithm generation and validation data set were created, and potential matches were blocked by age, sex, and year of injury; total probabilistic weight was calculated based on of 12 common data fields. Validity metrics were calculated using a minimum probabilistic weight of 3. The positive predictive value was 98.2% and 97.4% and sensitivity was 74.1% and 76.3%, in the algorithm generation and validation set, respectively. These metrics were similar to the previous study. Future work will apply the refined probabilistic matching algorithm to the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems and the National Trauma Databank to generate a merged data set for clinical traumatic brain injury research use.

  19. Limb Darkening and Planetary Transits: Testing Center-to-limb Intensity Variations and Limb-darkening Directly from Model Stellar Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Lester, John B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); McNeil, Joseph T.; Ignace, Richard, E-mail: neilson@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Box 70652, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The transit method, employed by Microvariability and Oscillation of Stars ( MOST ), Kepler , and various ground-based surveys has enabled the characterization of extrasolar planets to unprecedented precision. These results are precise enough to begin to measure planet atmosphere composition, planetary oblateness, starspots, and other phenomena at the level of a few hundred parts per million. However, these results depend on our understanding of stellar limb darkening, that is, the intensity distribution across the stellar disk that is sequentially blocked as the planet transits. Typically, stellar limb darkening is assumed to be a simple parameterization with two coefficients that are derived from stellar atmosphere models or fit directly. In this work, we revisit this assumption and compute synthetic planetary-transit light curves directly from model stellar atmosphere center-to-limb intensity variations (CLIVs) using the plane-parallel Atlas and spherically symmetric SAtlas codes. We compare these light curves to those constructed using best-fit limb-darkening parameterizations. We find that adopting parametric stellar limb-darkening laws leads to systematic differences from the more geometrically realistic model stellar atmosphere CLIV of about 50–100 ppm at the transit center and up to 300 ppm at ingress/egress. While these errors are small, they are systematic, and they appear to limit the precision necessary to measure secondary effects. Our results may also have a significant impact on transit spectra.

  20. Clinical Informatics Fellowship Programs: In Search of a Viable Financial Model: An open letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C U; Longhurst, C A; Hersh, W; Mohan, V; Levy, B P; Embi, P J; Finnell, J T; Turner, A M; Martin, R; Williamson, J; Munger, B

    2015-01-01

    In the US, the new subspecialty of Clinical Informatics focuses on systems-level improvements in care delivery through the use of health information technology (HIT), data analytics, clinical decision support, data visualization and related tools. Clinical informatics is one of the first subspecialties in medicine open to physicians trained in any primary specialty. Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers such as Medicare and Medicaid through its potential to reduce errors, increase safety, reduce costs, and improve care coordination and efficiency. Even though Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers, because GME funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not grown at the same rate as training programs, the majority of the cost of training new Clinical Informaticians is currently paid by academic health science centers, which is unsustainable. To maintain the value of HIT investments by the government and health care organizations, we must train sufficient leaders in Clinical Informatics. In the best interest of patients, payers, and the US society, it is therefore critical to find viable financial models for Clinical Informatics fellowship programs. To support the development of adequate training programs in Clinical Informatics, we request that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issue clarifying guidance that would allow accredited ACGME institutions to bill for clinical services delivered by fellows at the fellowship program site within their primary specialty.

  1. [Effect of a tele-care model on self-management and metabolic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care centers in Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Ilta; Campos, Solange; Urrutia, Mila; Bustamante, Claudia; Alcayaga, Claudia; Tellez, Alvaro; Pérez, J Carola; Villarroel, Luis; Chamorro, Gaston; O'Connor, Annette; Piette, John

    2010-06-01

    Telephone based self-management support may improve the metabolic control of patients with type2 (DM2) diabetes if it is coordinated with primary care centers, if telephone protocols and clinical guidelines are used and if it is provided by nurses trained in motivational interviewing. To assess the efficacy of a tele-care self-management support model (ATAS) on metabolic control of patients with DM2 attending primary care centers in a low income area in Santiago, Chile. Two primary care centers were randomly assigned to continue with usual care (control group, CG) or to receive additionally 6 telecare self-management support interventions (IG) during a 15 month period. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to measure metabolic control of DM2; the "Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities Measure" and the "Spanish Diabetes Self-efficacy" scale were used to measure self-management and self efficacy, respectively. Changes in the use of health services were also evaluated. The IG maintained its HbA1c level (baseline and final levels of 8.3 +/- 2.3% and 8.5 +/- 2.2% respectively) whereas it deteriorated in the CG (baseline and final levels of 7.4 +/- 2.3 and 8.8 +/- 2.3% respectively, p < 0.001). The perception of self-efficacy in the IG improved while remaining unchanged in the CG (p < 0.001). Adherence to medication, physical activity and foot care did not change in either group. In the IG, compliance to clinic visits increased while emergency care visits decreased. The ATAS intervention, in low income primary care centers, significantly increased the probability of stabilizing the metabolic control of patients with DM2 and improved their use of health services.

  2. Modelling of road traffic for traffic flow optimization of modern regional center as an example of Odessa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Myronenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available At present sharply there is a problem of traffic management especially in big cities. The increase in the number of vehicles, both personal and public, led to congestion of city roads, many hours of traffic jams, difficulty of movement of pedestrians, increase the number of accidents, etc. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility of using simulation models to solve problems of analysis and optimization of traffic flows. To achieve this goal in a simulation environment the data base of the transport network will be developed. Materials and Methods: The problem of analysis and optimization of traffic flow is considered by the example of the city of Odessa (Ukraine, the results and recommendations can be easily adapted for other cities of Ukraine, and for the cities of most countries of the former socialist bloc. Features of transport systems make it impossible to build an adequate analytical model to explore options for the management of the system and its characteristic in different conditions. At the same time simulation modelling as a method to study such objects is a promising for the solution to this problem. As a simulation environment an OmniTRANS package as a universal tool for modeling of discrete, continuous and hybrid systems. Results: With OmniTRANS programs the model of traffic in Odessa was derived and the intensity of the traffic flow. B first approximation the transport network of the central district of the city was considered and built; without calibration and simulation it was developed a database of elements of the transport network and shown how it can be used to solve problems of analysis and optimization of traffic flows. Models constructed from elements of created database, allows you to change the level of detail of the simulated objects and phenomena, thereby obtaining models as macro and micro level.

  3. Simulations of the September 1987 lower thermospheric tides with the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesen, C.G.; Roble, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) was used to simulate incoherent scatter radar observations of the lower thermosphere tides during the first Lower Thermosphere Coupling Study (LTCS) campaign, September 21-26, 1987. The TIGCM utilized time-varying histories of the model input fields obtained from the World Data Center for the LTCS period. These model inputs included solar flux, total hemispheric power, solar wind data from which the cross-polar-cap potential was derived, and geomagnetic K p index. Calculations were made for the semidiurnal ion temperatures and horizontal neutral winds at locations representative of Arecibo, Millstone Hill, and Sondrestrom. The diurnal tides at Sondrestrom were also simulated. Tidal inputs to the TIGCM lower boundary were obtained from the middle atmosphere model of Forbes and Vial (1989). The TIGCM tidal structures are in fair general agreement with the observations. The amplitudes tended to be better simulated than the phases, and the mid- and high-latitude locations are simulated better than the low-latitude thermosphere. This may indicate a need to incorporate coupling of the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere with the E region dynamo in the equatorial region to obtain a better representation of low-latitude thermospheric tides. The model simulations were used to investigate the daily variability of the tides due to the geomagnetic activity occurring during this period. In general, the ion temperatures were predicted to be affected more than the winds, and the diurnal components more than the semidiurnal. The effects are typically largest at high latitudes and higher altitudes, but discernible differences were produced at low latitudes

  4. Elucidating fluctuating diffusivity in center-of-mass motion of polymer models with time-averaged mean-square-displacement tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Tomoshige

    2017-10-01

    There have been increasing reports that the diffusion coefficient of macromolecules depends on time and fluctuates randomly. Here a method is developed to elucidate this fluctuating diffusivity from trajectory data. Time-averaged mean-square displacement (MSD), a common tool in single-particle-tracking (SPT) experiments, is generalized to a second-order tensor with which both magnitude and orientation fluctuations of the diffusivity can be clearly detected. This method is used to analyze the center-of-mass motion of four fundamental polymer models: the Rouse model, the Zimm model, a reptation model, and a rigid rodlike polymer. It is found that these models exhibit distinctly different types of magnitude and orientation fluctuations of diffusivity. This is an advantage of the present method over previous ones, such as the ergodicity-breaking parameter and a non-Gaussian parameter, because with either of these parameters it is difficult to distinguish the dynamics of the four polymer models. Also, the present method of a time-averaged MSD tensor could be used to analyze trajectory data obtained in SPT experiments.

  5. Toward a Visualization-Supported Workflow for Cyber Alert Management using Threat Models and Human-Centered Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Lyndsey; Pirrung, Megan A.; Blaha, Leslie M.; Dowling, Michelle V.; Feng, Mi

    2017-10-09

    Cyber network analysts follow complex processes in their investigations of potential threats to their network. Much research is dedicated to providing automated tool support in the effort to make their tasks more efficient, accurate, and timely. This tool support comes in a variety of implementations from machine learning algorithms that monitor streams of data to visual analytic environments for exploring rich and noisy data sets. Cyber analysts, however, often speak of a need for tools which help them merge the data they already have and help them establish appropriate baselines against which to compare potential anomalies. Furthermore, existing threat models that cyber analysts regularly use to structure their investigation are not often leveraged in support tools. We report on our work with cyber analysts to understand they analytic process and how one such model, the MITRE ATT&CK Matrix [32], is used to structure their analytic thinking. We present our efforts to map specific data needed by analysts into the threat model to inform our eventual visualization designs. We examine data mapping for gaps where the threat model is under-supported by either data or tools. We discuss these gaps as potential design spaces for future research efforts. We also discuss the design of a prototype tool that combines machine-learning and visualization components to support cyber analysts working with this threat model.

  6. Veteran family reintegration, primary care needs, and the benefit of the patient-centered medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Ramon; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Nelson, Karen; Nelson, David

    2010-01-01

    Men and women returning from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq face a multitude of difficulties while integrating back into civilian life, but the importance of their veteran status is often overlooked in primary care settings. Family physicians have the potential to be the first line of defense to ensure the well-being of veterans and their families because many will turn to nonmilitary and non-Veterans Affairs providers for health care needs. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by this population is critical to providing care. A patient-centered medical home orientation can help the family physician provide veterans and their families the care they need. Specific recommendations for family physicians include screening their patient population; providing timely care; treating the whole family; and integrating care from multiple disciplines and specialties, providing veterans and families with "one-stop shopping" care. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by veterans and their families translates into better overall outcomes for this population.

  7. Accessibility Analysis: Application of Partial Sicogea Model in a Training Center of a Federal Institution of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Edite Freitas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article has the general objective to verify the accessibility of academics with a disability or reduced mobility in a teaching center of a Federal Public University of Santa Catarina. To meet this goal, there are this specific objectives: Check for people with disabilities or reduced mobility; Verify the sustainability of accessibility with a disabled and propose a summary management plan - 5W2H for the deficit issues. The 5W2H is an objective management tool and consists of seven questions to answer to the deficit issues. It is noteworthy that can be used for decision making about issues found after the calculation of sustainability. The methodology of the aims is considered descriptive and exploratory. With regard to the technical procedures this is a case study. The approach to the problem is characterized as qualitative. In the end it was concluded that the overall sustainability of the accessibility obtained the 48.8% rate, considered "regular", "only serves legislation". Thus, it is understood that people according to the law in Brazil have the right to study and all institutions need to provide access and use of environments for people with disabilities or reduced mobility. As a process of continuous improvement the 5W2H suggests as one of the actions: increasing the number of restrooms for accessibility within what the law provides. The study covers analysis of the ten dimensions for evaluation of courses by INEP.

  8. An HL7-FHIR-based Object Model for a Home-Centered Data Warehouse for Ambient Assisted Living Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartze, Jonas; Jansen, Lars; Schrom, Harald; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Haux, Reinhold; Marschollek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current AAL environments focus on assisting a single person with seperated technologies. There is no interoperability between sub-domains in home environments, like building energy management or housing industry services. BASIS (Building Automation by a Scalable and Intelligent System) aims to integrate all sensors and actuators into a single, efficient home bus. First step is to create a semtically enriched data warehouse object model. We choose FHIR and built an object model mainly based on the Observation, Device and Location resources with minor extensions needed by AAL-foreign sub domains. FHIR turned out to be very flexible and complete for other home related sub-domains. The object model is implemented in a separated software-partition storing all structural and procedural data of BASIS.

  9. Center vortex model for the infrared sector of SU(4) Yang-Mills theory: String tensions and deconfinement transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, M.

    2006-01-01

    A random vortex world-surface model for the infrared sector of SU(4) Yang-Mills theory is constructed, focusing on the confinement properties and the behavior at the deconfinement phase transition. Although the corresponding data from lattice Yang-Mills theory can be reproduced, the model requires a more complex action and considerably more tuning than the SU(2) and SU(3) cases studied previously. Its predictive capabilities are accordingly reduced. This behavior has a definite physical origin, which is elucidated in detail in the present work. As the number of colors is raised in Yang-Mills theory, the corresponding infrared effective vortex description cannot indefinitely continue to rely on dynamics determined purely by vortex world-surface characteristics; additional color structures present on the vortices begin to play a role. As evidenced by the modeling effort reported here, definite signatures of this behavior appear in the case of four colors

  10. Improvement of the partial least squares model performance for oral glucose intake experiments by inside mean centering and inside multiplicative signal correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi Ping; Kasemsumran, Sumaporn; Maruo, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Takehiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2005-08-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has become a promising technique for the in vivo monitoring of glucose. Several capillary-rich locations in the body, such as the tongue, forearm, and finger, have been used to collect the in vivo spectra of blood glucose. For such an in vivo determination of blood glucose, collected NIR spectra often show some dependence on the measurement conditions and human body features at the location on which a probe touches. If NIR spectra collected for different oral glucose intake experiments, in which the skin of different patients and the measurement conditions may be quite different, are directly used, partial least squares (PLS) models built by using them would often show a large prediction error because of the differences in the skin of patients and the measurement conditions. In the present study, the NIR spectra in the range of 1300-1900 nm were measured by conveniently touching an optical fiber probe on the forearm skin with a system that was developed for in vivo measurements in our previous work. The spectra were calibrated to resolve the problem derived from the difference of patient skin and the measurement conditions by two proposed methods, inside mean centering and inside multiplicative signal correction (MSC). These two methods are different from the normal mean centering and normal multiplicative signal correction (MSC) that are usually performed to spectra in the calibration set, while inside mean centering and inside MSC are performed to the spectra in every oral glucose intake experiment. With this procedure, spectral variations resulted from the measurement conditions, and human body features will be reduced significantly. More than 3000 NIR spectra were collected during 68 oral glucose intake experiments, and calibrated. The development of PLS calibration models using the spectra show that the prediction errors can be greatly reduced. This is a potential chemometric technique with simplicity, rapidity and efficiency

  11. Educating the Psychology Workforce in the Age of the Affordable Care Act: A Graduate Course Modeled after the Priorities of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) represents a paradigm shift in the U.S. healthcare system, which has implications for psychology programs producing the next generation of trainees. In particular, the ACA has established the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which has been tasked with developing national priorities and funding research aimed at improving healthcare quality by helping patients and providers to make informed healthcare decisions. PCORI's national priorities span five broad domains: person-centered outcomes research, health disparities research, healthcare systems research, communication and dissemination research, and methodologic research. As these national priorities overlap with the knowledge and skills often emphasized in psychology training programs, initiatives by training programs to bolster strengths in these domains could place trainees at the forefront of this emerging research paradigm. As a part of a new Masters program in behavioral health, our program developed a health psychology course modeled around PCORI's five national priorities, and an initial evaluation in a small sample supported student learning in the five PCORI domains. In summary, the current report has implications for familiarizing readers with PCORI's national priorities for U.S. healthcare, stimulating debate surrounding psychology's response to the largest healthcare paradigm shift in recent U.S. history, and providing a working model for programs seeking to implement PCORI-related changes to their curricula. PMID:26843899

  12. The impact of training on women's capabilities in modifying their obesity-related dietary behaviors: applying family-centered empowerment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataji Amirrood, Maryam; Taghdisi, Mohammad Hosein; Shidfar, Farzad; Gohari, Mahmood Reza

    2014-01-01

    Dietary behaviors affect obesity; therefore, it seems necessary to conduct interventions to modify behavioral patterns leading to weight-gain in the family. Our goal was to determine the impact of training on women's capabilities in modifying their obesity-related dietary behaviors in Urmia, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran: applying family-centered empowerment model. A quasi-experimental study with Pretest-Posttest design was conducted on 90 over-weight/obese women in 2012 in two Health Centers of Urmia. Convenience sampling was done and the participants were randomly assigned to two 'test' and 'control' groups. Data collection was done by completing the demographic data questionnaire, the empowerment tool and dietary behavior checklist. The intervention was conducted in the form of 6 educational classes held for the 'test' group. After two months, posttest was performed by completing the forms once again. Data were analyzed with descriptive tests, t-tests, Chi2 and Fischer's test. The dietary behavior scores of the intervention group had risen from 7.4 ± 2.11 to 9.95 ± 2.41 (Pempowerment model in this study was proven effective in women. Hence it is advised to consider it in behavior changing interventions to promote the health of the family and community.

  13. Serving Young Gifted Math Students: Educators Offer an Example of Implementing the Center for Talented Youth Model in Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Luciano; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the implementation in Brooklyn, New York, of the Diagnostic Testing and Prescriptive Instruction mathematics instruction model, which establishes the level of knowledge of each student and then offers instruction at the student's pace. Implementation involves teacher training, student selection, curriculum development, and…

  14. A model for the dynamics of crater-centered intrusion: Application to lunar floor-fractured craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorey, Clément; Michaut, Chloé

    2014-01-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are a class of craters modified by post-impact mechanisms. They are defined by distinctive shallow floors that are convex or plate-like, sometimes with a wide floor moat bordering the wall region. Radial, concentric, and polygonal floor fractures suggest an endogenous process of modification. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for such deformations: viscous relaxation and spreading of a magma intrusion at depth below the crater. To test the second assumption and bring more constraints on the intrusion process, we develop a model for the dynamics of magma spreading below an elastic overlying layer with a crater-like topography. As predicted in earlier more qualitative studies, the increase in lithostatic pressure at the crater wall zone prevents the intrusion from spreading laterally, leading to the thickening of the intrusion. Additionally, our model shows that the final crater floor appearance after the uplift, which can be convex or flat, with or without a circular moat bordering the wall zone, depends on the elastic thickness of the layer overlying the intrusion and on the crater size. Our model provides a simple formula to derive the elastic thickness of the overlying layer hence a minimum estimate for the intrusion depth. Finally, our model suggests that crust redistribution by cratering must have controlled magma ascent below most of these craters.

  15. A Model Formative Assessment Strategy to Promote Student-Centered Self-Regulated Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Rengel, Zed

    2009-01-01

    Adult learners are already involved in the process of self-regulation; hence, higher education institutions should focus on strengthening students' self-regulatory skills. Self-regulation can be facilitated through formative assessment. This paper proposes a model formative assessment strategy that would complement existing university teaching,…

  16. A partnership model for implementing electronic health records in resource-limited primary care settings: experiences from two nurse-managed health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Patricia; White, Mary P; Hamilton, Andrew; Pohl, Joanne M; Tanner, Clare; Onifade, Tiffiani J; Zheng, Kai

    2011-01-01

    To present a partnership-based and community-oriented approach designed to ease provider anxiety and facilitate the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) in resource-limited primary care settings. The approach, referred to as partnership model, was developed and iteratively refined through the research team's previous work on implementing health information technology (HIT) in over 30 safety net practices. This paper uses two case studies to illustrate how the model was applied to help two nurse-managed health centers (NMHC), a particularly vulnerable primary care setting, implement EHR and get prepared to meet the meaningful use criteria. The strong focus of the model on continuous quality improvement led to eventual implementation success at both sites, despite difficulties encountered during the initial stages of the project. There has been a lack of research, particularly in resource-limited primary care settings, on strategies for abating provider anxiety and preparing them to manage complex changes associated with EHR uptake. The partnership model described in this paper may provide useful insights into the work shepherded by HIT regional extension centers dedicated to supporting resource-limited communities disproportionally affected by EHR adoption barriers. NMHC, similar to other primary care settings, are often poorly resourced, understaffed, and lack the necessary expertise to deploy EHR and integrate its use into their day-to-day practice. This study demonstrates that implementation of EHR, a prerequisite to meaningful use, can be successfully achieved in this setting, and partnership efforts extending far beyond the initial software deployment stage may be the key.

  17. Learning Curve in a Western Training Center of the Circumferential En Bloc Esophageal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in an In Vivo Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Tanimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluate the feasibility to overcome the learning curve in a western training center of the en bloc circumferential esophageal (ECE- ESD in an in vivo animal model. Methods. ECE-ESD was performed on ten canine models under general anesthesia on artificial lesions at the esophagus marked with coagulation points. After the ESD each canine model was euthanized and surgical resection of the esophagus and stomach was carried out according to “the Principles of Humane Experimental Technique, Russel and Burch.” The specimen was fixed with needles on cork submerged in formalin with the esophagus and stomach then delivered to the pathology department to be analyzed. Results. ECE-ESD was completed without complications in the last 3/10 animal models. Mean duration for the procedures was 192±35 minutes (range 140–235 minutes. All the procedures were done at the animal lab surgery room with cardio pulmonary monitoring and artificial ventilation by staff surgery members and a staff member of the Gastroenterology department trained during 1999–2001 at the Fujigaoka hospital of the Showa U. in Yokohama, Japan, length (range 15–18 mm and 51±6.99 width (range 40–60 mm. Conclusion. ECE-ESD training is feasible in canine models for postgraduate endoscopy fellows.

  18. Structure of magma reservoirs beneath Merapi and surrounding volcanic centers of Central Java modeled from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Maksotova, Gulzhamal; Jaxybulatov, Kayrly; Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Luehr, Birger-G.; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2016-10-01

    We present a three-dimensional model of the distribution of S-wave velocity in the upper crust to a depth of 20 km beneath Central Java based on the analysis of seismic ambient noise data recorded by more than 100 seismic stations in 2004 associated with the MERAMEX project. To invert the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves to construct 2-D group-velocity maps and 3-D distributions of S-wave velocity, we have used a new tomographic algorithm based on iterative linearized inversion. We have performed a series of synthetic tests that demonstrate significantly higher resolution in the upper crust with this model compared to the local earthquake travel-time tomography (LET) model previously applied for the same station network. Beneath the southern flank of Merapi, we identify a large low-velocity anomaly that can be split into two layers. The upper layer reflects the ˜1 km thick sedimentary cover of volcanoclastic deposits. The deeper anomaly at depths of ˜4-8 km may represent a magma reservoir with partially molten rock that feeds several volcanoes in Central Java. Beneath the Merapi summit, we observe another low-velocity anomaly as deep as 8 km that may be associated with the active magma reservoir that feeds the eruptive activity of Merapi. In the southern portion of the study area, in the lower crust, we identify a low-velocity anomaly that may represent the top of the pathways of volatiles and melts ascending from the slab that was previously inferred from the LET model results. We observe that this anomaly is clearly separate from the felsic magma reservoirs in the upper crust.

  19. The Business Emergency Operations Center (BEOC) - A Model for Inter-Agency and Inter-Sector Communication and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    communication model. The DARPA brainstorming sessions focused on the areas of Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Recovery (HADR) and Stability, Security...of Observe, Orient, Decide, Act (OODA) and Sense, Interpret, Decide, Act ( SIDA ) loops is important to understand and research as part of this...C2 process loops, OODA, developed by John Boyd, (Coram 2002, Lind 1985) and/or SIDA , (Haeckel 2001) are functioning at multiple levels and the

  20. Initial Efforts in Characterizing Radiation and Plasma Effects on Space Assets: Bridging the Space Environment, Engineering and User Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Ganushkina, N. Y.; Guild, T. B.; Jiggens, P.; Jun, I.; Mazur, J. E.; Meier, M. M.; Minow, J. I.; Pitchford, D. A.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Shprits, Y.; Tobiska, W. K.; Xapsos, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Jordanova, V. K.; Kellerman, A. C.; Fok, M. C. H.

    2017-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has been leading the community-wide model validation projects for many years. Such effort has been broadened and extended via the newly-launched International Forum for Space Weather Modeling Capabilities Assessment (https://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/assessment/), Its objective is to track space weather models' progress and performance over time, which is critically needed in space weather operations. The Radiation and Plasma Effects Working Team is working on one of the many focused evaluation topics and deals with five different subtopics: Surface Charging from 10s eV to 40 keV electrons, Internal Charging due to energetic electrons from hundreds keV to several MeVs. Single Event Effects from solar energetic particles (SEPs) and galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) (several MeV to TeVs), Total Dose due to accumulation of doses from electrons (>100 KeV) and protons (> 1 MeV) in a broad energy range, and Radiation Effects from SEPs and GCRs at aviation altitudes. A unique aspect of the Radiation and Plasma Effects focus area is that it bridges the space environments, engineering and user community. This presentation will summarize the working team's progress in metrics discussion/definition and the CCMC web interface/tools to facilitate the validation efforts. As an example, tools in the areas of surface charging/internal charging will be demoed.

  1. ESiWACE: A Center of Excellence for HPC applications to support cloud resolving earth system modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercamp, Joachim; Adamidis, Panagiotis; Neumann, Philipp

    2017-04-01

    With the exa-scale era approaching, length and time scales used for climate research on one hand and numerical weather prediction on the other hand blend into each other. The Centre of Excellence in Simulation of Weather and Climate in Europe (ESiWACE) represents a European consortium comprising partners from climate, weather and HPC in their effort to address key scientific challenges that both communities have in common. A particular challenge is to reach global models with spatial resolutions that allow simulating convective clouds and small-scale ocean eddies. These simulations would produce better predictions of trends and provide much more fidelity in the representation of high-impact regional events. However, running such models in operational mode, i.e with sufficient throughput in ensemble mode clearly will require exa-scale computing and data handling capability. We will discuss the ESiWACE initiative and relate it to work-in-progress on high-resolution simulations in Europe. We present recent strong scalability measurements from ESiWACE to demonstrate current computability in weather and climate simulation. A special focus in this particular talk is on the Icosahedal Nonhydrostatic (ICON) model used for a comparison of high resolution regional and global simulations with high quality observation data. We demonstrate that close-to-optimal parallel efficiency can be achieved in strong scaling global resolution experiments on Mistral/DKRZ, e.g. 94% for 5km resolution simulations using 36k cores on Mistral/DKRZ. Based on our scalability and high-resolution experiments, we deduce and extrapolate future capabilities for ICON that are expected for weather and climate research at exascale.

  2. Integrated model of biopurification system for home sewage. A proposal for peri-urban communities from south center of Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra Pierart, Izaul; Chiang Rojas, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The rapid growth of world population and its impacts has led to search new sources of water supply. Wastewater constitutes an additional source to satisfy the demand of this resource. Diverse researchers have designed alternatives for improve its processing and promote its utilization. This study examines some alternatives of bio-purification and proposes a conceptual design of a hybrid system that combines the use of a bio filter with artificial wetlands. The model designed contributes to improve water resources management and has educational, landscape and environmental benefits for peri-urban communities. Besides constitutes an alternative to promote more efficiently natural resources management at the local level.

  3. Systems innovation model: an integrated interdisciplinary team approach pre- and post-bariatric surgery at a veterans affairs (VA) medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Dan; Lohnberg, Jessica A; Kubat, Eric P; Bates, Cheryl C; Greenberg, Lauren M; Frayne, Susan M

    2017-04-01

    Provision of bariatric surgery in the Veterans Health Administration must account for obese veterans' co-morbidity burden and the geographically dispersed location of patients relative to Veterans Affairs (VA) bariatric centers. To evaluate a collaborative, integrated, interdisciplinary bariatric team of surgeons, bariatricians, psychologists, dieticians, and physical therapists working in a hub-and-spokes care model, for pre- and post-bariatric surgery assessment and management. This is a description of an interdisciplinary clinic and bariatric program at a VA healthcare system and a report on program evaluation findings. Retrospective data of a prospective database was abstracted. For program evaluation, we abstracted charts to characterize patient data and conducted a patient survey. Since 2009, 181 veterans have undergone bariatric surgery. Referrals came from 7 western U.S. states. Mean preoperative body mass index was 46 kg/m 2 (maximum 71). Mean age was 53 years, with 33% aged>60 years; 79% were male. Medical co-morbidity included diabetes (70%), hypertension (85%), and lower back or extremity joint pain (84%). A psychiatric diagnosis was present in 58%. At 12 months, follow-up was 81% and percent excess body mass index loss was 50.5%. Among 54 sequential clinic patients completing anonymous surveys, overall satisfaction with the interdisciplinary team approach and improved quality of life were high (98% and 94%, respectively). The integrated, interdisciplinary team approach using a hub-and-spokes model is well suited to the VA bariatric surgery population, with its heavy burden of medical and mental health co-morbidity and its system of geographically dispersed patients receiving treatment at specialty centers. As the VA seeks to expand the use of bariatric surgery as an option for obese veterans, interdisciplinary models crafted to address case complexity, care coordination, and long-term outcomes should be part of policy planning efforts. Published by

  4. The Study of Pap Smear Conduction and its Related Factors Based on Health Belief Model in Women Referring to Health Care Centers in Qom During 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Mohebi*

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pap smear is a screening test for diagnosing cervical cancer in females. It is considered a health-promotion exam, and it has been shown that this test can prevent up to %60 of all deaths resulting from cervical cancer. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of this test and its related factors based on the health belief model in females referring to health centers in Qom. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 320 females, who had health records and had referred to health centers in Qom in 2014 were selected using the multistage random sampling method and through following inclusion and exclusion criteria. A valid and reliable researcher-made questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics, awareness questions, and questions based on the health belief model was used for data collection. The data were finally analyzed by SPSS software with 0.05 significance level. Results: Overall, %11.25 of the subjects regularly underwent Pap smear screening, %51.87 irregularly participated in cervical cancer screening programs, and %36.88 did not undergo the tests. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA results showed that the mean scores of the health belief model constructs were significantly different in terms of Pap smear screening (P<0.05. Conclusion: The participants did not consider cervical cancer a serious disease. Even women who felt vulnerable tried to hide it. Therefore, while perceived vulnerability and perceived severity of the disease risk was low in them, they perceived more barriers and, for this reason, the level of utilization of Pap smear was undesirable.

  5. A nonresident cardiovascular inpatient service improves residents' experiences in an academic medical center: a new model to meet the challenges of the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Rick A; Linderbaum, Jane A; Naessens, James M; Spurrier, Barbara; Koch, Mark B; Gaines, Kim A

    2004-05-01

    Hospital practices in academic medical centers have fewer medical residents available to provide hospital care, necessitating alternative models for patient care. This article reports a new model for care of inpatients with cardiovascular diseases. In 1998, a new nonresident cardiovascular patient care (Cardiology IV) service was implemented that used a team approach of staff attending cardiologists, cardiovascular fellows, midlevel practitioners (nurse practitioners and physician's assistants), and nurses to evaluate and treat patients. Standard dismissal information was collected for all patients dismissed in 1998 to compare diagnosis-related group, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and 30-day readmission rates for Cardiology IV. These characteristics were compared with those for the remaining resident teaching services. Patients' satisfaction surveys from 1997 and 1998 were compared. Attending physicians' and internal medicine residents' satisfaction before and after the implementation of the new service was also compared. Staff and resident physicians were more satisfied with their hospital rotations after this intervention was introduced. Optimal patient care was maintained, and efficiency enhanced. Patients on Cardiology IV had a shorter length of stay compared with patients on the resident teaching service. This new hospital model has provided an alternative to patient care without the need for residents and protects education on the conventional teaching services. This model maintains optimal patient care and has resulted in enhanced satisfaction of attending staff and residents.

  6. Requirement, balance and energy efficiency under two models of cropping systems in the center-south of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Martin; Barbera, Agustin; Hansson, Alejandro; Carrasco, Natalia; Domenech, Marisa

    2017-04-01

    In a natural ecosystem, the solar energy is the main source. However, in the agro ecosystem we should use others in order to sustain specific processes or to avoid some interactions. This energy is introduced in the agro-system not only as fossil fuel but also as inputs like fertilizers and pesticides or for agricultural machines. Since February 2011, two adjacent fields were set at Barrow Experimental Station (Lat:-38.322844, Lon:-60.25572): one of them adopting agro-ecology principles (AGROE), as biodiversity increase, polyculture with legumes, less use of agrochemicals; while the other one is based on industrial model of agriculture (ACTUAL). This model is defined by its capital intensity and dependence on massive inputs like seeds, fertilizer, and pesticides. In both fields, beef cattle and agriculture production have been implemented with different intensity. The aim of this study was to compare the demand, production, balance and energy efficiency between these two agro-systems. To do this, we use tables of energy associated with different processes and inputs. For both systems, we estimate the energetic demand used in seeds, pesticides, fertilizers and labor during the crop sequence from February 2011 to December 2015; the energy production according to grains and meat yield achieved; the energetic balance calculated as the difference between inputs and outputs of energy in the system and finally, the energy efficiency which is the ratio between the energy produced and consumed. Inputs-outputs ratios of energy were transformed into equivalent units = GJ (Gigajoules). After a sequence of seven crops, ACTUAL consumed 60 GJ, which represents 158% more energy than AGROE. Particularly, ACTUAL consumed a 72% more energy in cultivation labor, 372% more in herbicides and 10 times more energy used in fertilizers than AGROE. Even though ACTUAL produced 37% more energy than AGROE (187 GJ vs 127 GJ) in grain and meat, the energetic balance was only 12% higher. However

  7. Effect of Dynamic Center Region on the Flow and Mixing Efficiency in a New Tri-Screw Extruder Using 3D Finite Element Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Z. Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional finite element modeling of polymer melt flowing in a new co-rotating tri-screw extruder was established with mesh superposition technique. Based on the particle tracking technology, three typical particle trajectories in the tri-screw extruder were calculated using a 4th-order-Runge-Kutta method to study the dynamic motions of the particles. Then the flow visualizations in the local center region were carried out. Moreover, the dispersive, distributive and stretching mixing efficiencies of the tri-screw and twin-screw extruders were compared, respectively. The results show that when the particles move from one screw to another, there are great abrupt changes in the velocities and displacements, which induce the abrupt change in the stress magnitude. Most of particles, which are initially distributed in the inlet plane of the center region, fast flow out the outlet and don’t pass through any screw. This special phenomenon induces a series of new characteristics in the residence time distribution (RTD, flow number, segregation scale and time averaged efficiency. In comparison with the twin-screw extruder, the tri-screw extruder has better mixing efficiency.

  8. Modeling the Impact of Space Suit Components and Anthropometry on the Center of Mass of a Seated Crewmember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackledge, Christopher; Margerum, Sarah; Ferrer, Mike; Morency, Richard; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    The Crew Impact Attenuation System (CIAS) is the energy-absorbing strut concept that dampens Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) landing loads to levels sustainable by the crew. Significant COM variations across suited crew configurations would amplify the inertial effects of the pallet and potentially create unacceptable crew loading during launch and landing. The objective of this study was to obtain data needed for dynamic simulation models by quantifying the effects of posture, suit components, and the expected range of anthropometry on the COM of a seated individual. Several elements are required for the COM calculation of a suited human in a seated position: anthropometry, body segment mass, suit component mass, suit component location relative to the body, and joint angles defining the seated posture. Three-dimensional (3D) human body models, suit mass data, and vector calculus were utilized to compute the COM positions for 12 boundary manikins in two different seated postures. The analysis focused on two objectives: (1) quantify how much the wholebody COM varied from the smallest to largest subject and (2) quantify the effects of the suit components on the overall COM in each seat configuration. The location of the anterior-posterior COM varied across all boundary manikins by about 7 cm, and the vertical COM varied by approximately 9 to 10 cm. The mediolateral COM varied by 1.2 cm from the midline sagittal plane for both seat configurations. The suit components caused an anterior shift of the total COM by approximately 2 cm and a shift to the right along the mediolateral axis of 0.4 cm for both seat configurations. When the seat configuration was in the standard posture the suited vertical COM shifted inferiorly by as much as 1 cm, whereas in the CEV posture the vertical COM had no appreciable change. These general differences were due to the high proportion of suit mass located in the boots and lower legs and their corresponding distance from the body COM

  9. Profiling Patients’ Healthcare Needs to Support Integrated, Person-Centered Models for Long-Term Disease Management (Profile: Research Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne MJ Elissen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article presents the design of PROFILe, a study investigating which (biomedical and non-(biomedical patient characteristics should guide more tailored chronic care. Based on this insight, the project aims to develop and validate ‘patient profiles’ that can be used in practice to determine optimal treatment strategies for subgroups of chronically ill with similar healthcare needs and preferences. Methods/Design: PROFILe is a practice-based research comprising four phases. The project focuses on patients with type 2 diabetes. During the first study phase, patient profiles are drafted based on a systematic literature research, latent class growth modeling, and expert collaboration. In phase 2, the profiles are validated from a clinical, patient-related and statistical perspective. Phase 3 involves a discrete choice experiment to gain insight into the patient preferences that exist per profile. In phase 4, the results from all analyses are integrated and recommendations formulated on which patient characteristics should guide tailored chronic care. Discussion: PROFILe is an innovative study which uses a uniquely holistic approach to assess the healthcare needs and preferences of chronically ill. The patient profiles resulting from this project must be tested in practice to investigate the effects of tailored management on patient experience, population health and costs.

  10. A model project for exploring the role of sustainability science in a citizen-centered, collaborative decision-making process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Herman A.; Turner, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The role of science in society is evolving as we enter the 21st century. The report, Science — The Endless Frontier (Bush 1990[1945]), outlined a model of national scientific research that served the country for 50 years. The contract between science and society established in that report stipulated that science is essential and that basic research meets national needs (Pielke and Byerly 1998). This stipulation and the abundant — seemingly unlimited and unquestioned — funding for research during the Cold War caused many scientists to come to believe that funding for science was an entitlement independent of societal needs. Implicit in this belief is that science alone can solve society’s problems. We now are learning that many policy issues that involve science involve diverse economic, political, social, and aesthetic values as well, and rarely, if ever, is scientific information alone the basis of public policy (e.g., see Sarewitz 1996a, 1996b; Frodeman 1997). Moreover, resources are increasingly more limited and many in society are questioning the value of public-supported science.

  11. A model for restoration of the vegetation complex in the ENEA Trisaia research center; Un modello per il riassetto della vegetazione nel centro di ricerche ENEA della Trisaia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, L.; Pace, S.; Marannino, P. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella, MT (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Cassano, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella, MT (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Cirio, U. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Casaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, RM (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    A model for management of the vegetation complex in the ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) Trisaia research center in Rotondella (Southern Italy), based on the restoration of wild potential vegetation and application of sustainable agriculture practices, is proposed. Benefits on environmental status and vegetation management are discussed. [Italian] Viene presentato un modello di intervento di rsistemazione della vegetazione nel centro di ricerche ENEA della Trisaia di Rotondella (Matera), finalizzato a ricostruire aree di copertura boschiva e a macchia, riconducibili alla vegetazione naturale potenziale del sito, in equilibrio con agrositemi gestiti secondo le tecniche dell'agricoltura sostenibile, e tenendo conto delle esigenze di urbanizzazione del centro. Sono discussi i vantaggi ottenibili dall'applicazione del modello di intervento sull'ambiente locale e sulla gestione del verde.

  12. Territories at the center of energy transition. For a French model of energy decentralisation. Working paper no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Eeckhout, Laetitia; Dell'Oro, Jean-Louis; Fabregat, Sophie; Reju, Emmanuelle

    2013-12-01

    Energy transition constitutes a major challenge in terms of economic competitiveness and employment. The necessary struggle against climate change as well as economic and social challenges related to the lack of resources lead to a logical reversal, made possible by technological developments. What is at stake, for a profound change of production and consumption patterns, is favouring action for energy demand and sustainable development of renewable energies. Such advancement supposes great coordination between European, national and local energy priorities. Beyond aspects that need to remain centralized, more specifically security and networks management, it is in the population's interest, for equal costs, to have local authorities provide for themselves at their best with their energy issues and to develop local solutions for energy production, facing the price increase of global markets. In order for our country? where the choices of centralised productions were so far strongly favoured? to catch up on these topics, energy governance must progress towards an increased decentralisation. On this matter, the recent national debate on energy transition wasn't useless, but proposals that emerged, limited to those that meet consensus, were not up to the issues at stake. This working paper evaluates precisely and exhaustively the states of rules currently relevant to local authorities in such areas, limits and difficulties for their intervention and the challenges of energy decentralisation. Beyond the necessary regulatory simplification, these proposals aim at defining a new French model of national and local governance for energy control and decentralized energies. Regions which wish to do so, could become organizing authorities of decentralized energies. They could hand down this expertise to some local authorities that are skilled on a rather large territory, urban and rural. Their main tool would be composed of regional (and local) companies specialized

  13. Internal audit of a comprehensive IMRT program for prostate cancer: a model for centers in developing countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Wee Yao; Ren, Wei; Mukherjee, Rahul K; Chung, Hans T

    2009-08-01

    With improving regional prosperity, significant capital investments have been made to rapidly expand radiotherapy capacity across Southeast Asia. Yet little has been reported on the implementation of adequate quality assurance (QA) in patient management. The objective of this study is to perform an in-depth QA assessment of our definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) program for prostate cancer since its inception. The department's prostate IMRT program was modeled after that of the University of California San Francisco. A departmental protocol consisting of radiotherapy volume/dose and hormone sequencing/duration and a set of 18 dose objectives to the target and critical organs were developed, and all plans were presented at the weekly departmental QA rounds. All patients treated with definitive IMRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Protocol adherence, dosimetry data, toxicities, and outcomes were evaluated. Since 2005, 76 patients received IMRT: 54 with whole-pelvis and 22 with prostate-only treatment. Of the 1,140 recorded dosimetric end points, 39 (3.3%) did not meet the protocol criteria. At QA rounds, no plans required a revision. Only one major protocol violation was observed. Two and two cases of Grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities, respectively, were observed. Five (8.8%) patients developed proctitis, but only one required argon laser therapy. Our comprehensive, practice-adapted QA measures appeared to ensure that we were able to consistently generate conforming IMRT plans with acceptable toxicities. These measures can be easily integrated into other clinics contemplating on developing such a program.

  14. A student-centered approach for developing active learning: the construction of physical models as a teaching tool in medical physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende-Filho, Flávio Moura; da Fonseca, Lucas José Sá; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Guedes, Glaucevane da Silva; Rabelo, Luiza Antas

    2014-09-15

    Teaching physiology, a complex and constantly evolving subject, is not a simple task. A considerable body of knowledge about cognitive processes and teaching and learning methods has accumulated over the years, helping teachers to determine the most efficient way to teach, and highlighting student's active participation as a means to improve learning outcomes. In this context, this paper describes and qualitatively analyzes an experience of a student-centered teaching-learning methodology based on the construction of physiological-physical models, focusing on their possible application in the practice of teaching physiology. After having Physiology classes and revising the literature, students, divided in small groups, built physiological-physical models predominantly using low-cost materials, for studying different topics in Physiology. Groups were followed by monitors and guided by teachers during the whole process, finally presenting the results in a Symposium on Integrative Physiology. Along the proposed activities, students were capable of efficiently creating physiological-physical models (118 in total) highly representative of different physiological processes. The implementation of the proposal indicated that students successfully achieved active learning and meaningful learning in Physiology while addressing multiple learning styles. The proposed method has proved to be an attractive, accessible and relatively simple approach to facilitate the physiology teaching-learning process, while facing difficulties imposed by recent requirements, especially those relating to the use of experimental animals and professional training guidelines. Finally, students' active participation in the production of knowledge may result in a holistic education, and possibly, better professional practices.

  15. Effectiveness of Nutrition Education Based on Health Belief Model during Pregnancy on Knowledge and Attitude of Women Referred to Health Centers of Gonbad Kavoos City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Ahmadpoor

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aims Pregnancy is a good time for changing the feeding behaviors. Nutritional education plays an important role in maternal and child health promotion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition education based on Health Belief Model during pregnancy on knowledge and attitude of women. Materials and Methods This quasi-experimental study was conducted among pregnant women referred to health centers of Gonbad Kavoos city in 2013. Cluster sampling was used for selection of 80 subjects in each study groups, and data were collected using an unstructured questionnaire. Validity and reliability of questionnaire were evaluated by panel of experts, test-retest and reported as Cronbach’s alpha. Classified information of two groups were compared before and 2 months after intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS v.16. Results After educational intervention, the mean score of knowledge and Health Belief Model constructs, were significantly increased in intervention group than the control. But the mean of cuse to action of the experiment group, was not significantly different compared to the control. Conclusion Education based on Health Belief Model was effective on knowledge and attitude of pregnant women about nutrition and educational interventions in this field are recommended. * Corresponding Author: Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Public Health. Email: Shojae5@yahoo.com

  16. Beliefs and behaviors of breast cancer screening in women referring to health care centers in northwest Iran according to the champion health belief model scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, Nasrin; Pourfarzi, Farhad; Mazaheri, Effat; Asl, Hossein Alimohammadi; Rezaie, Minoo; Amani, Fiouz; Nejad, Masumeh Rostam

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. All ages are susceptible and more than 90% of the patients can be cured with early diagnosis. Breast self-examination (BSE) and mammography can be useful for this aim. In this study we examined the components of the Champion health belief model to identify if they could predict the intentions of women to perform such screening. A total of 380 women aged 30 and above who had referred to health-care centers were assessed for use of breast cancer screening over the past year with a modified health belief model questionnaire. Logistic regression was applied to identify leading independent predictors. In this study 27% of the women performed BSE in the last year but only 6.8% of them used mammography as a way of screening. There were significant differences regarding all components of the model except for perceived severity between women that underwent BSE. over the past year and those that did not. Findings were similar for mammography. Regression analysis revealed that intentions to perform BSE were predicted by perceived self-efficacy and perceived barriers to BSE while intentions to perform mammography were predicted by perceived barriers. This study indicated that self-efficacy can support performance of BSE while perceived barriers are important for not performing both BSE and mammography. Thus we must educate women to increase their self-efficacy and decrease their perceived barriers.

  17. Implementation of an Interdisciplinary, Team-Based Complex Care Support Health Care Model at an Academic Medical Center: Impact on Health Care Utilization and Quality of Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Ritchie

    Full Text Available The Geriatric Resources for the Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE program has been shown to decrease acute care utilization and increase patient self-rated health in low-income seniors at community-based health centers.To describe adaptation of the GRACE model to include adults of all ages (named Care Support and to evaluate the process and impact of Care Support implementation at an urban academic medical center.152 high-risk patients (≥5 ED visits or ≥2 hospitalizations in the past 12 months enrolled from four medical clinics from 4/29/2013 to 5/31/2014.Patients received a comprehensive in-home assessment by a nurse practitioner/social worker (NP/SW team, who then met with a larger interdisciplinary team to develop an individualized care plan. In consultation with the primary care team, standardized care protocols were activated to address relevant key issues as needed.A process evaluation based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research identified key adaptations of the original model, which included streamlining of standardized protocols, augmenting mental health interventions and performing some assessments in the clinic. A summative evaluation found a significant decline in the median number of ED visits (5.5 to 0, p = 0.015 and hospitalizations (5.5 to 0, p<0.001 6 months before enrollment in Care Support compared to 6 months after enrollment. In addition, the percent of patients reporting better self-rated health increased from 31% at enrollment to 64% at 9 months (p = 0.002. Semi-structured interviews with Care Support team members identified patients with multiple, complex conditions; little community support; and mild anxiety as those who appeared to benefit the most from the program.It was feasible to implement GRACE/Care Support at an academic medical center by making adaptations based on local needs. Care Support patients experienced significant reductions in acute care utilization and significant improvements

  18. Hands-on, online, and workshop-based K-12 weather and climate education resources from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Burt, M. A.; Gardiner, L.; Genyuk, J.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; La Grave, M. L.; Russell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fourth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  19. Entanglement with centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chen-Te

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement is a physical phenomenon that each state cannot be described individually. Entanglement entropy gives quantitative understanding to the entanglement. We use decomposition of the Hilbert space to discuss properties of the entanglement. Therefore, partial trace operator becomes important to define the reduced density matrix from different centers, which commutes with all elements in the Hilbert space, corresponding to different entanglement choices or different observations on entangling surface. Entanglement entropy is expected to satisfy the strong subadditivity. We discuss decomposition of the Hilbert space for the strong subadditivity and other related inequalities. The entanglement entropy with centers can be computed from the Hamitonian formulations systematically, provided that we know wavefunctional. In the Hamitonian formulation, it is easier to obtain symmetry structure. We consider massless p-form theory as an example. The massless p-form theory in (2 p + 2)-dimensions has global symmetry, similar to the electric-magnetic duality, connecting centers in ground state. This defines a duality structure in centers. Because it is hard to exactly compute the entanglement entropy from partial trace operator, we propose the Lagrangian formulation from the Hamitonian formulation to compute the entanglement entropy with centers. From the Lagrangian method and saddle point approximation, the codimension two surface term (leading order) in the Einstein gravity theory or holographic entanglement entropy should correspond to non-tensor product decomposition (center is not identity). Finally, we compute the entanglement entropy of the SU( N) Yang-Mills lattice gauge theory in the fundamental representation using the strong coupling expansion in the extended lattice model to obtain spatial area term in total dimensions larger than two for N > 1.

  20. Entanglement with centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chen-Te [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China)

    2016-01-13

    Entanglement is a physical phenomenon that each state cannot be described individually. Entanglement entropy gives quantitative understanding to the entanglement. We use decomposition of the Hilbert space to discuss properties of the entanglement. Therefore, partial trace operator becomes important to define the reduced density matrix from different centers, which commutes with all elements in the Hilbert space, corresponding to different entanglement choices or different observations on entangling surface. Entanglement entropy is expected to satisfy the strong subadditivity. We discuss decomposition of the Hilbert space for the strong subadditivity and other related inequalities. The entanglement entropy with centers can be computed from the Hamitonian formulations systematically, provided that we know wavefunctional. In the Hamitonian formulation, it is easier to obtain symmetry structure. We consider massless p-form theory as an example. The massless p-form theory in (2p+2)-dimensions has global symmetry, similar to the electric-magnetic duality, connecting centers in ground state. This defines a duality structure in centers. Because it is hard to exactly compute the entanglement entropy from partial trace operator, we propose the Lagrangian formulation from the Hamitonian formulation to compute the entanglement entropy with centers. From the Lagrangian method and saddle point approximation, the codimension two surface term (leading order) in the Einstein gravity theory or holographic entanglement entropy should correspond to non-tensor product decomposition (center is not identity). Finally, we compute the entanglement entropy of the SU(N) Yang-Mills lattice gauge theory in the fundamental representation using the strong coupling expansion in the extended lattice model to obtain spatial area term in total dimensions larger than two for N>1.

  1. Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeniuk, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

  2. Statistical Analysis of Model Data for Operational Space Launch Weather Support at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2010-01-01

    The 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) is used by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to support space launch weather operations. The 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct an objective statistics-based analysis of MesoNAM output compared to wind tower mesonet observations and then develop a an operational tool to display the results. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction began running the current version of the MesoNAM in mid-August 2006. The period of record for the dataset was 1 September 2006 - 31 January 2010. The AMU evaluated MesoNAM hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point were compared to the observed values of these parameters from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. The data sets were stratified by model initialization time, month and onshore/offshore flow for each wind tower. Statistics computed included bias (mean difference), standard deviation of the bias, root mean square error (RMSE) and a hypothesis test for bias = O. Twelve wind towers located in close proximity to key launch complexes were used for the statistical analysis with the sensors on the towers positioned at varying heights to include 6 ft, 30 ft, 54 ft, 60 ft, 90 ft, 162 ft, 204 ft and 230 ft depending on the launch vehicle and associated weather launch commit criteria being evaluated. These twelve wind towers support activities for the Space Shuttle (launch and landing), Delta IV, Atlas V and Falcon 9 launch vehicles. For all twelve towers, the results indicate a diurnal signal in the bias of temperature (T) and weaker but discernable diurnal signal in the bias of dewpoint temperature (T(sub d)) in the MesoNAM forecasts. Also, the standard deviation of the bias and RMSE of T, T(sub d), wind speed and wind

  3. The Study of Educational Program Effect Based on BAZNEF Model on Nutritional Performance of Pregnant Women Reffered to Meraj Health Center of Bushehr in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Arabi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy is one of the critical periods in a woman’s life. Pregnancy is a suitable time for nutrition education. Pregnant women pay special attention to various aspects of their health, their fetuses’ health and they are accurate about the amount and type of food who consume. So, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of educational program based on BASNEF model on pregnant women’s performance reffered to Meraj health centers in 2013 in Bushehr. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in two groups including control and experimental group. Before the intervention in both groups, food frequency questionnaires completed, then educational intervention for experimental group was done in four sessions (three sessions for pregnant women and one session for their husbands and educational pamphlets were given to them about suitable nutrition during pregnancy. Data were analyzed by using SPSS18 software. Results: Results showed that 55% of women had an education level until diploma, most of them were housewives (65% or their income (47.5% was more than one million Tomans. The results showed that between nutrition performance of experimental group in food groups of bread and cereals (F=27.11 and p=0.0001, meat and protein group (F=7.647 and p=0.009, fruit group (F=20.9 and p=0.0001, vegetables (F=6.236 and p=0.018 and dairy products (F=3.66 and p=0.048, had a significant difference with control groups. Conclusion: Designing and implementation of BASNEF model can be effective in pregnancy nutrition. This model can be effective with proper and coordinated structure in improving the pregnant women nutrition. Designing intervention and educational programs is inexpensive, functional and applicable by using this model and provide an organizational framework to individuals as well.

  4. The Fermi-LAT gamma-ray excess at the Galactic Center in the singlet-doublet fermion dark matter model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Macias, Oscar [Center for Neutrino Physics, Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Restrepo, Diego; Rivera, Andrés; Zapata, Oscar [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Silverwood, Hamish, E-mail: horiuchi@vt.edu, E-mail: oscar.macias@vt.edu, E-mail: restrepo@udea.edu.co, E-mail: afelipe.rivera@udea.edu.co, E-mail: oalberto.zapata@udea.edu.co, E-mail: h.g.m.silverwood@uva.nl [GRAPPA, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-01

    The singlet-doublet fermion dark matter model (SDFDM) provides a good DM candidate as well as the possibility of generating neutrino masses radiatively. The search and identification of DM requires the combined effort of both indirect and direct DM detection experiments in addition to the LHC. Remarkably, an excess of GeV gamma rays from the Galactic Center (GCE) has been measured with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) which appears to be robust with respect to changes in the diffuse galactic background modeling. Although several astrophysical explanations have been proposed, DM remains a simple and well motivated alternative. In this work, we examine the sensitivities of dark matter searches in the SDFDM scenario using Fermi-LAT, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, LUX, PICO and LHC with an emphasis on exploring the regions of the parameter space that can account for the GCE. We find that DM particles present in this model with masses close to ∼ 99 GeV and ∼ (173–190) GeV annihilating predominantly into the W{sup +}W{sup −} channel and t t-bar channel respectively, provide an acceptable fit to the GCE while being consistent with different current experimental bounds. We also find that much of the obtained parameter space can be ruled out by future direct search experiments like LZ and XENON-1T, in case of null results by these detectors. Interestingly, we show that the most recent data by LUX is starting to probe the best fit region in the SDFDM model.

  5. Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wenning, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thirumaran, Kiran [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    IAC Operations Manual describes organizational model and operations of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC), Center management activities, typical process of energy assessment, and energy assessment data for specific industry sectors.

  6. Experimental evaluation of two turning vane designs for fan drive corner of 0.1-scale model of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldman, Donald R.; Moore, Royce D.; Shyne, Rickey J.

    1987-01-01

    Two turning vane designs were experimentally evaluated for corner 2 of a 0.1 scale model of the NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT). Corner 2 contained a simulated shaft fairing for a fan drive system to be located downstream of the corner. The corner was tested with a bellmouth inlet followed by a 0.1 scale model of the crossleg diffuser designed to connect corners 1 and 2 of the AWT. Vane A was a controlled-diffusion airfoil shape; vane B was a circular-arc airfoil shape. The A vanes were tested in several arrangements which included the resetting of the vane angle by -5 degrees or the removal of the outer vane. The lowest total pressure loss for vane A configuration was obtained at the negative reset angle. The loss coefficient increased slightly with the Mach number, ranging from 0.165 to 0.175 with a loss coefficient of 0.170 at the inlet design Mach number of 0.24. Removal of the outer vane did not alter the loss. Vane B loss coefficients were essentially the same as those for the reset vane A configurations. The crossleg diffuser loss coefficient was 0.018 at the inlet design Mach number of 0.33.

  7. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  8. Center for Extended MHD Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Henry [HRS Fusion, West Orange, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-02

    This research was mostly concerned with asymmetric vertical displacement event (AVDE) disruptions, which are the worst case scenario for producing a large asymmetric wall force. This is potentially a serious problem in ITER.

  9. A lithostratigraphic geo-archaeological 3D model of the subsurface of a medieval mound in the city center of Vlaardingen (The Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozen, Stan; Kluiving, Sjoerd; Soetens, Steven

    2013-04-01

    GSI3D modeling for archaeology A lithostratigraphic geo-archaeological 3D model of the subsurface of a medieval mound in the city center of Vlaardingen (The Netherlands). EGU 2013 Vienna Stan Roozen (UvA), Sjoerd Kluiving (VU), Steven Soetens (VU) In the medieval mound in the city centre of Vlaardingen, in the Netherlands , archaeological material is remarkably well preserved. It is remarkable because this elevated location has a high degree of humidity, which must remain intact to sustain the favourable conditions of the archaeology. For that reason, the centre of the city was cored when and where possible, and subsequently its archaeology and lithostratigraphy was modelled in 3D. In this presentation we demonstrate the difficulties and methodological restraints in 3D modelling to come to a workable method and future prospects. The municipality of Vlaardingen lies north of the Nieuwe Maas in the province of Zuid Holland close to the coast. It is one of the oldest Dutch urban areas known in Holland. The project makes use of coring (n=72), cone penetration test (n=127), C-dating, archaeological and paleogeographic data in order to create interpretative profiles containing both archaeological and lithostratigraphic layers in the mound and its broader context. With the available university's licence of ArcGIS 3D modeling is possible (ArcScene), but it is not an efficient subsurface software, while most ideal 3D software for such project (such as i.e. Petrol, GoCAD, Rockworks) are beyond archaeological budgetary limits. The most ideal software in our context was GSI3D (a software provided by the British Geological survey). Though it strictly is not a 3D model software (there are no 3D interpolation algorithms), it has the advantage that the user can interfere directly in the interpolation by using the profiles as a framework and by defining the extent of each layer. The following methodology is applied: • Based on depth information of coring and cone penetration

  10. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products and World Trade Center particulate induced lung function loss: A case-cohort study and murine model of acute particulate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraher, Erin J; Kwon, Sophia; Haider, Syed H; Crowley, George; Lee, Audrey; Ebrahim, Minah; Zhang, Liqun; Chen, Lung-Chi; Gordon, Terry; Liu, Mengling; Prezant, David J; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Nolan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    World Trade Center-particulate matter(WTC-PM) exposure and metabolic-risk are associated with WTC-Lung Injury(WTC-LI). The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is most highly expressed in the lung, mediates metabolic risk, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the AGER-locus predict forced expiratory volume(FEV). Our objectives were to test the hypotheses that RAGE is a biomarker of WTC-LI in the FDNY-cohort and that loss of RAGE in a murine model would protect against acute PM-induced lung disease. We know from previous work that early intense exposure at the time of the WTC collapse was most predictive of WTC-LI therefore we utilized a murine model of intense acute PM-exposure to determine if loss of RAGE is protective and to identify signaling/cytokine intermediates. This study builds on a continuing effort to identify serum biomarkers that predict the development of WTC-LI. A case-cohort design was used to analyze a focused cohort of male never-smokers with normal pre-9/11 lung function. Odds of developing WTC-LI increased by 1.2, 1.8 and 1.0 in firefighters with soluble RAGE (sRAGE)≥97pg/mL, CRP≥2.4mg/L, and MMP-9≤397ng/mL, respectively, assessed in a multivariate logistic regression model (ROCAUC of 0.72). Wild type(WT) and RAGE-deficient(Ager-/-) mice were exposed to PM or PBS-control by oropharyngeal aspiration. Lung function, airway hyperreactivity, bronchoalveolar lavage, histology, transcription factors and plasma/BAL cytokines were quantified. WT-PM mice had decreased FEV and compliance, and increased airway resistance and methacholine reactivity after 24-hours. Decreased IFN-γ and increased LPA were observed in WT-PM mice; similar findings have been reported for firefighters who eventually develop WTC-LI. In the murine model, lack of RAGE was protective from loss of lung function and airway hyperreactivity and was associated with modulation of MAP kinases. We conclude that in a multivariate adjusted model increased sRAGE is

  11. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products and World Trade Center particulate induced lung function loss: A case-cohort study and murine model of acute particulate exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Caraher

    Full Text Available World Trade Center-particulate matter(WTC-PM exposure and metabolic-risk are associated with WTC-Lung Injury(WTC-LI. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE is most highly expressed in the lung, mediates metabolic risk, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the AGER-locus predict forced expiratory volume(FEV. Our objectives were to test the hypotheses that RAGE is a biomarker of WTC-LI in the FDNY-cohort and that loss of RAGE in a murine model would protect against acute PM-induced lung disease. We know from previous work that early intense exposure at the time of the WTC collapse was most predictive of WTC-LI therefore we utilized a murine model of intense acute PM-exposure to determine if loss of RAGE is protective and to identify signaling/cytokine intermediates. This study builds on a continuing effort to identify serum biomarkers that predict the development of WTC-LI. A case-cohort design was used to analyze a focused cohort of male never-smokers with normal pre-9/11 lung function. Odds of developing WTC-LI increased by 1.2, 1.8 and 1.0 in firefighters with soluble RAGE (sRAGE≥97pg/mL, CRP≥2.4mg/L, and MMP-9≤397ng/mL, respectively, assessed in a multivariate logistic regression model (ROCAUC of 0.72. Wild type(WT and RAGE-deficient(Ager-/- mice were exposed to PM or PBS-control by oropharyngeal aspiration. Lung function, airway hyperreactivity, bronchoalveolar lavage, histology, transcription factors and plasma/BAL cytokines were quantified. WT-PM mice had decreased FEV and compliance, and increased airway resistance and methacholine reactivity after 24-hours. Decreased IFN-γ and increased LPA were observed in WT-PM mice; similar findings have been reported for firefighters who eventually develop WTC-LI. In the murine model, lack of RAGE was protective from loss of lung function and airway hyperreactivity and was associated with modulation of MAP kinases. We conclude that in a multivariate adjusted model increased s

  12. The GEMSIS-Magnetosphere project: New models of the inner magnetosphere to investigate high-energy particle variation and the ERG science center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Amano, T.; Saito, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Umeda, T.; Ebihara, Y.

    2010-12-01

    enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure. Isolated electrons outside of the split have a narrow pitch angle distribution around 90° and are confined to a narrow range of the L shell. The existence of the isolated electrons depends on the large geomagnetic tilt angle. It indicates that the split can be seen during summer and winter after MPS occurs. We suggest that this split in the outer radiation belt during summer and winter is evidence that MPS actually causes the loss of the outer radiation belt. Another important task of the GEMSIS project is contribution to the ERG science center that facilitates the close collaboration between the satellite, ground-based observation, and theory/simulation/modeling for geospace studies by providing integrated data analysis tools and combined database. In this presentation, we report on some of recent studies and activities from the GEMSIS-Magnetosphere project with an emphasis on the models of the ring current and radiation belt.

  13. Business management of headache centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, G; Micieli, G; Cavallini, A; Rossi, G; Rossi, G; Rossi, F

    1998-02-01

    Economic evaluation of the costs and benefits of a headache center or unit has become very important for headache specialists. Many of the problems concerning this "financial" approach to headache derive from the model of organization of the Headache Unit, which is dependent on the various approaches to healthcare practiced in the country considered. So far there are two models of headache center that are generally considered: the hospital-based center and the independent center. An argument favoring hospital-based headache clinics is the lower costs, primarily because of their functional connection with the services of a general hospital, i.e., neuroradiology, neurophysiology, routine laboratory analysis, etc. Another is that the headache specialist has the possibility to visit the patients presenting to the emergency room in the acute phase of headache. Independent clinics have greater costs, but are equally as effective as hospital-based models.

  14. Level I academic trauma center integration as a model for sustaining combat surgical skills: The right surgeon in the right place for the right time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, Rachel A; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Martin, Sean P; Cocanour, Christine S; Utter, Garth; Galante, Joseph M

    2015-06-01

    As North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries begin troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, military medicine needs programs for combat surgeons to retain the required knowledge and surgical skills. Each military branch runs programs at various Level I academic trauma centers to deliver predeployment training and provide a robust trauma experience for deploying surgeons. Outside of these successful programs, there is no system-wide mechanism for nondeploying military surgeons to care for a high volume of critically ill trauma patients on a regular basis in an educational environment that promotes continued professional development. We hypothesize that fully integrated military-civilian relationship regional Level I trauma centers provide a surgical experience more closely mirroring that seen in a Role III hospital than local Level II and Level III trauma center or medical treatment facilities. We characterized the Level I trauma center practice using the number of trauma resuscitations, operative trauma/acute care surgery procedures, number of work shifts, operative density (defined as the ratio of operative procedures/days worked), and frequency of educational conferences. The same parameters were collected from two NATO Role III hospitals in Afghanistan during the peak of Operation Enduring Freedom. Data for two civilian Level II trauma centers, two civilian Level III trauma centers, and a Continental United States Military Treatment Facility without trauma designation were collected. The number of trauma resuscitations, number of 24-hour shifts, operative density, and educational conferences are shown in the table for the Level I trauma center compared with the different institutions. Civilian center trauma resuscitations and operative density were highest at the Level I trauma center and were only slightly lower than what was seen in Afghanistan. Level II and III trauma centers had lower numbers for both. The Level I trauma center provided the most frequent

  15. Lessons learned from recent geomagnetic disturbance model validation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A. A.; Welling, D. T.

    2017-12-01

    Due to concerns pertaining to geomagnetically induced current impact on ground-based infrastructure, there has been significantly elevated interest in applying models for local geomagnetic disturbance or "delta-B" predictions. Correspondingly there has been elevated need for testing the quality of the delta-B predictions generated by the modern empirical and physics-based models. To address this need, community-wide activities were launched under the GEM Challenge framework and one culmination of the activities was the validation and selection of models that were transitioned into operations at NOAA SWPC. The community-wide delta-B action is continued under the CCMC-facilitated International Forum for Space Weather Capabilities Assessment and its "Ground Magnetic Perturbations: dBdt, delta-B, GICs, FACs" working group. The new delta-B working group builds on the past experiences and expands the collaborations to cover the entire international space weather community. In this paper, we discuss the key lessons learned from the past delta-B validation exercises and lay out the path forward for building on those experience under the new delta-B working group.

  16. Patient-centered Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction. © RSNA, 2015.

  17. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: Implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria De Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care.

  18. Model of socio-cultural dimensions involved in adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS in public health care centers in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuardo Ávila, Valeria; Manriquez Urbina, Jose Manuel; Fajreldin Chuaqui, Valentina; Belmar Prieto, Julieta; Valenzuela Santibáñez, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    In Chile, over 14,000 adults are living with HIV receive antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adequate adherence to HAART has a major impact on survival. There is little consensus on the causes of poor adherence, due to the unique and diverse sociocultural parameters involved in the issue. The objective of this study was to identify sociocultural dimensions that serve as barriers or facilitators to HAART adherence among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in Chile. A qualitative study design, with an exploratory followed by a descriptive phase was conducted. The study population consisted of adults living with HIV/AIDS, with and without HAART. A theoretical sample was designed and three gender profiles defined: women, men, and transwomen. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews by anthropologists in seven public health care centers for PLHIV. The model of sociocultural dimensions indicated that factors associated with family, expectations, gender/sexuality, affect, relationship with HIV, HAART, work, social support and networks, and stigma and discrimination influenced adherence, with different patterns among profiles. This study found that adherence is a dynamic category. It is crucial to consider sociocultural factors in developing strategies to improve HAART adherence.

  19. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-30

    this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people's health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. o estudo desenvolveu um modelo de parceria de cuidados centrados nas pessoas (CCP) para uma sociedade que está envelhecendo, com o fim de enfrentar os desafios das mudanças sociais que afetam a saúde das pessoas e o novo papel da prática avançada de enfermagem para sustentar a cobertura universal de saúde. um modelo de parceria de cuidados centrados nas pessoas foi desenvolvido com base na meta-síntese qualitativa da literatura e a avaliação de 14 projetos relacionados. Os projetos em curso resultaram na transformação individual e social, melhorando a alfabetização de saúde da comunidade e comportamentos que usam o cuidado centrado nas pessoas e aumentando a parceria entre os profissionais de saúde e membros da comunidade por meio da prática avançada de enfermagem

  20. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: Implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Maria; Earl, Tara R.

    2014-01-01

    Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans) who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care. PMID:24461570

  1. Increasing HIV testing among pregnant women in Nigeria: evaluating the traditional birth attendant and primary health center integration (TAP-In) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizoba, Amara Frances; Pharr, Jennifer R; Oodo, Gina; Ezeobi, Edith; Ilozumb, Jude; Egharevba, Johnbull; Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Nwandu, Anthea

    2017-09-01

    Engaging Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) may be critical to preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in Nigeria. We integrated TBAs into Primary Health Centers (PHCs) and provided the TBAs with HIV counseling and testing (HCT) training for PMTCT (TAP-In). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of TAP-In on HCT uptake among pregnant women. A quasi-experimental design was used for this study. Twenty PHCs were assigned to the intervention group that integrated TAP-In and 20 were assigned to the control group. Data were collected six months prior to the initiation of TAP-In and six months post, using antenatal clinic registries. Intervention PHCs more than doubled the number of pregnant women who received HCT in their catchment area post TAP-In while control PHCs had no significant change. After initiating TAP-In, intervention PHCs provided almost three times more HCT than the control PHCs (p TAP-In. The TAP-In model was effective for increasing HCT among pregnant women.

  2. KIR alloreactivity based on the receptor-ligand model is associated with improved clinical outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Result of single center prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Silvia; Kim, Kihyun; Jang, Jun Ho; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Kang, Eun-Suk; Jung, Chul Won

    2015-09-01

    Receptors on natural killer (NK) cells, named killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), recognize HLA class I alleles. Patients (n=59) who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from either a related (n=17) or unrelated donor (n=42) in Samsung Medical Center (Seoul, South Korea) were included. KIR mismatch was defined as incompatibility between the donor KIR and recipient KIR ligand (receptor-ligand model), and all cases were classified into the two broad haplotypes of KIR A and B. Patients with acute leukemia (n=51, 86.4%) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n=8, 13.6%) were included. Peripheral blood was used as the source of stem cells in all patients. Kaplan-Meier survival curves for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) favored recipients with a KIR-mismatched donor, although the differences were not statistically significant. In multivariate analysis, KIR mismatch was an independent prognostic indicator of a better OS (P=0.010, HR=0.148, 95% CI 0.034-0.639), DFS (P=0.022, HR=0.237, 95% CI 0.069-0.815), and CIR (P=0.031, HR=0.117, 95% CI 0.017-0.823). OS, DFS, and CIR did not differ significantly between the KIR A and B haplotypes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards controllable in situ self-assembly of artificial pinning centers in RE-123 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Judy; Shi, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Raising critical current density J c in high temperature superconductors (HTSs) is an important strategy towards performance-cost balanced HTS technology for commercialization. The development of strong nanoscale artificial pinning centers (APCs) in HTS, such as YBa2Cu3O7 or RE-123 in general, represents one of the most exciting progressions in HTS material research in the last decade. Significantly raised J c has been demonstrated in APC/RE-123 nanocomposites by enhanced pinning on magnetic vortices in magnetic fields towards that demanded in practical applications. Among other processes, strain-mediated self-organization has been explored extensively for in situ formation of the APCs based on fundamental physics design rules. The desire in controlling the morphology, dimension, orientation, and concentration of APCs has led to a fundamental question on how strains interact in determining APCs at a macroscopic scale. Answering this question demands an interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards a thorough understanding of fundamental physics governing the strain-mediated self-organization of the APCs in the APC/RE-123 nanocomposites. Such an understanding is the key for a leap forward from the traditionally empirical method to materials-by-design to enable an optimal APC landscape to be achieved in epitaxial films of APC/YBCO nanocomposites under a precise guidance of fundamental physics. The paper intends to provide a review of recent progress made in the controllable generation of APCs using the interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach. The emphasis will be given to the understanding so far achieved using such an approach on the collective effect of the strain field on the morphology, dimension, and orientation of APCs in epitaxial APC/RE-123 nanocomposite films.

  4. 3D thermohydraulic modeling of the coupling of surface water bodies to the subsurface below the major urban center of Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Maximilian; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Cacace, Mauro; Schneider, Michael

    2017-04-01

    This study aims at a better understanding of the present-day thermal and hydraulic configuration below the major urban center of Berlin, capital city of Germany. The study area is located in the Northeast German Basin, showing an infill of several kilometers of sediments. Herein, the shallow sedimentary succession is made up of a sequence of alternating aquifers and aquitards, most importantly the local aquitard of the Rupelian clay. This geological unit represents a natural barrier between the deeper saline aquifers and the shallow fresh water aquifers from whom Berlin produces 100% of its drinking water. Additionally, the shallow thermal and hydraulic configuration has been anthropogenically overprinted which may also influence deeper domains to some extent. In this study we make use of 3D thermohydraulic models of the subsurface, focusing on the coupling of surface water bodies to the underground, based on newly available hydraulic data integrated into a 3D hydrogeological model. The results of the study show, that the coupling of surface water bodies and groundwater might lead to significant modifications of predicted subsurface temperatures and fluid flow field. These modifications are most prominent, where differences in hydraulic head between surface water bodies and the adjacent aquifers are highest. Consequently, the predicted surface to groundwater flow field differs most in these areas and it also results in differences in predicted temperatures as a consequence of advective heat transport. Quantitatively, the presence of major lakes may account for temperature differences up to 5°C, while considering rivers only accounts for modifications up to 1°C. Additionally, the models created in this study set up a basis for future thermohaline simulations as saline groundwater may represent a threat to drinking water supply. First results from the models run in this study already indicate, that uprising heated water from deeper domains may rise to shallow

  5. Multifunctional centers in rural areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase

    2009-01-01

    , and facilities for local associations as theatre scenes and sports halls. The centers should be designed to secure both economies of scale and geographic proximity. Empirical evidence indicates that such large meeting places in fact foster physical and social cohesion, as well as human capital and informal...... invest in multifunctional centers in which the local public school is the dynamo. This in order to increase local levels of social as well as human capital. Ideally, such centers should contain both public services such as school, library and health care, private enterprises as hairdressers and banks...... such a model: Multifunctional centers. Such a model reflects a long tradition of local centralization in rural areas, that is, a golden compromise between ruralization and urbanization. First, I argue that governments should actively invest in rural areas rather than practicing laissez-faire. Second, I trace...

  6. The Watergate Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  7. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ROPS Rebate Skin Cancer Screening Zika Virus National Farm Medicine Center The National Farm Medicine Center was established in 1981 in response to occupational health problems seen in farm patients coming to Marshfield Clinic. The center continues ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  9. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Administrative Staff Donate Contact MENU CLOSE back Accredited Birth Centers You are here: Home Accredited Birth Centers ... not CABC-accredited. How do you find a birth center here? Skip Instructions! Get to the Map… ...

  10. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  11. Leveraging Exceptional Teachers as Trainers in Geoscience Education: The National Center for Atmospheric Research Model for K-12 Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Johnson, R. M.; Foster, S.

    2003-12-01

    At the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), we have developed a model for educator professional development that builds upon the existing knowledge base of educators, their training experience, and the support of their educational institution. NCAR hosts two professional development workshops for middle and high school educators each summer - the NCAR Climate and Global Change Workshop and the NCAR Modeling in the Geosciences Workshop. Both of these workshops provide advanced science content, requiring that we select participants that already have significant background in one of the geosciences. In addition, participants are selected based on their demonstrated experience and success in peer training, courses taught, the support of their institution, their geographic distribution, plans for dissemination and outreach to underrepresented groups, and the populations served by their institution. Successful applicants are required to provide training to a minimum of 40 educators in their region in the year following the workshop. Our best practices come from formal program evaluation as well as informal interactions and observations. Ranging from big concepts to minutiae, careful planning and successfully taking care of the details can make the difference between a successful workshop and a disaster. Methodologies include leadership and content training, field experiences, hands-on inquiry-based activities, computer modeling, experience in presentation, preparation for local training sessions, and discussion. Reflection on relevance to national education standards is a necessary underlying theme of a successful workshop. Likewise, involving scientists not only in lecture presentations but also in some of the more informal components of a workshop such as hands-on activities and social events provides additional opportunities for scientists and teachers to get to know each other and build on-going relationships. Follow-up evaluations assess the impact of

  12. Implementation of a collaborative care model for the treatment of depression and anxiety in a community health center: results from a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eghaneyan BH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Brittany H Eghaneyan,1 Katherine Sanchez,2 Diane B Mitschke2 1Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA Background: The collaborative care model is a systematic approach to the treatment of depression and anxiety in primary care settings that involves the integration of care managers and consultant psychiatrists, with primary care physician oversight, to more proactively manage mental disorders as chronic diseases, rather than treating acute symptoms. While collaborative care has been shown to be more effective than usual primary care in improving depression outcomes in a number of studies, less is known about the factors that support the translation of this evidence-based intervention to real-world program implementation. The purpose of this case study was to examine the implementation of a collaborative care model in a community based primary care clinic that primarily serves a low-income, uninsured Latino population, in order to better understand the interdisciplinary relationships and the specific elements that might facilitate broader implementation. Methods: An embedded single-case study design was chosen in order to thoroughly examine the components of one of several programs within a single organization. The main unit of analysis was semi-structured interviews that were conducted with seven clinical and administrative staff members. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the interviews. Line-by-line initial coding resulted in over 150 initial codes, which were clustered together to rebuild the data into preliminary categories and then divided into four final categories, or main themes. Results: Four unique themes about how the implementation of a collaborative care model worked in this setting emerged from the interviews: organizational change, communication, processes and outcomes of the program, and barriers to

  13. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  14. The Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania: an organizational model for clinical research in a school of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Brian L; Kelly, Thomas O; Landis, J Richard; Feldman, Harold I

    2012-01-01

    A new model for the conduct of clinical research was established at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) School of Medicine, now the Perelman School of Medicine, through the development of the interdepartmental Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics in 1993 and the basic science Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in 1994. The authors describe the development and evolution of these novel structures.Five key objectives were achieved with these structures' creation: (1) Clinical faculty have the opportunity to be identified as both clinicians and epidemiologists, (2) nonclinical faculty have an academic "home," (3) clinical trainees are now educated in population medicine, which promotes its incorporation into their clinical practice, (4) population medicine and clinical medicine have become fully integrated, and (5) better epidemiologic research is conducted, informed by clinical insights.Today's center is the primary home for epidemiology and biostatistics at Penn, linking epidemiology, biostatistics, clinical medicine, and the health sciences. The center's core faculty manage their own research programs, conduct primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, serve as members of collaborative research teams, manage cores and service centers that support research projects, and lead graduate training programs in epidemiology and biostatistics. The department provides an academic home and structure for faculty, provides primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, supports the center's mission, and provides training in biostatistics. This organizational approach has wide applicability across schools of medicine in the United States and abroad and has been a model for many.

  15. Demonstration of enhanced human service transportation models: phase 1 - system development and design : the purchase area regional travel management coordination center (TMCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-23

    This report provides a comprehensive review of the policy, operational, and : technical design and development of the Purchase Area Transportation Management Coordination Center (TMCC) for : western Kentucky. The Purchase Area TMCC will facilitate si...

  16. Application of Health Belief Model\\'s constructs for predicting regular consumption of folic acid supplements in pregnant women referred to Borazjan’s health centers in 2014-15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre kafaee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most common disorders in pregnancy is Folic Acid deficiency and its complications. The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of regular use of folic acid supplements based on HBM in pregnant women referred to Borazjan’s health centers. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 228 pregnant women or women with planning of pregnancy referred to health centers of Borazjan with random sampling method evaluated. Data was collected with questionnaire in 4 parts included demographic characteristics, knowledge, health belief model constructs and questions about folic acid supplement use. Data was analyzed by SPSS software with using appropriate statistical tests. Results: The mean age of samples was 27.4±5.41. 144 patients (63.2% consumed Folic Acid pills regularly, and 84 patients (36.8% had irregular use. The awareness of folic acid in 22.8% of women was good, 59.6%  and 17.5% of samples had intermediate and poor awareness, respectively. The perceived barriers (P<0.001, perceived benefits (P=0.002 and self-efficacy (P<0.001 had relation with consumption of folic acid and among demographic variables, only education level (P=0.04 had relation with the consumption of pills. In logistic regression perceived barriers was only predictor. Age and educational level had indirect effect in regular consume pill. Conclusion: Perceived barriers was strongest predictors of folic acid use, therefore intervention based on health belief model, with emphasis on reducing barriers is necessary for improving the use of this medicine during pregnancy.

  17. Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) Water Temperature Models Developed for the Missouri River Recovery Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    ER D C/ EL T R- 17 -1 8 Missouri River Recovery Program (MRRP) Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) Water...library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Missouri River Recovery Program (MRRP) ERDC/EL TR-17-18 September 2017 Hydrologic ...Impact Statement” ERDC/EL TR-17-18 ii Abstract This report describes the Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) water

  18. Procedural Portfolio Planning in Plastic Surgery, Part 2: Collaboration Between Surgeons and Hospital Administrators to Develop a Funds Flow Model for Procedures Performed at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Although plastic surgeons make important contributions to the clinical, educational, and research missions of academic medical centers (AMCs), determining the financial value of a plastic surgery service can be difficult, due to complex cost accounting systems. We analyzed the financial impact of plastic surgery on an AMC, by examining the contribution margins and operating income of surgical procedures. We collaborated with hospital administrators to implement 3 types of strategic changes: (1) growth of areas with high contribution margin, (2) curtailment of high-risk procedures with negative contribution margin, (3) improved efficiency of mission-critical services with high resource consumption. Outcome measures included: facility charges, hospital collections, contribution margin, operating margin, and operating room times. We also studied the top 50 Current Procedural Terminology codes (total case number × charge/case), ranking procedures for profitability, as determined by operating margin. During the 2-year study period, we had no turnover in faculty; did not pursue any formal marketing; did not change our surgical fees, billing system, or payer mix; and maintained our commitment to indigent care. After rebalancing our case mix, through procedural portfolio planning, average hospital operating income/procedure increased from $-79 to $+816. Volume and diversity of cases increased, with no change in payer mix. Although charges/case decreased, both contribution margin and operating margin increased, due to improved throughput and decreased operating room times. The 5 most profitable procedures for the hospital were hernia repair, mandibular osteotomy, hand skin graft, free fibula flap, and head and neck flap, whereas the 5 least profitable were latissimus breast reconstruction, craniosynostosis repair, free-flap breast reconstruction, trunk skin graft, and cutaneous free flap. Total operating income for the hospital, from plastic surgery procedures, increased

  19. Implementation of a program for type 2 diabetes based on the Chronic Care Model in a hospital-centered health care system: "the Belgian experience"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Royen Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most research publications on Chronic Care Model (CCM implementation originate from organizations or countries with a well-structured primary health care system. Information about efforts made in countries with a less well-organized primary health care system is scarce. In 2003, the Belgian National Institute for Health and Disability Insurance commissioned a pilot study to explore how care for type 2 diabetes patients could be organized in a more efficient way in the Belgian healthcare setting, a setting where the organisational framework for chronic care is mainly hospital-centered. Methods Process evaluation of an action research project (2003–2007 guided by the CCM in a well-defined geographical area with 76,826 inhabitants and an estimated number of 2,300 type 2 diabetes patients. In consultation with the region a program for type 2 diabetes patients was developed. The degree of implementation of the CCM in the region was assessed using the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care survey (ACIC. A multimethod approach was used to evaluate the implementation process. The resulting data were triangulated in order to identify the main facilitators and barriers encountered during the implementation process. Results The overall ACIC score improved from 1.45 (limited support at the start of the study to 5.5 (basic support at the end of the study. The establishment of a local steering group and the appointment of a program manager were crucial steps in strengthening primary care. The willingness of a group of well-trained and motivated care providers to invest in quality improvement was an important facilitator. Important barriers were the complexity of the intervention, the lack of quality data, inadequate information technology support, the lack of commitment procedures and the uncertainty about sustainable funding. Conclusion Guided by the CCM, this study highlights the opportunities and the bottlenecks for adapting chronic care

  20. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  1. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  2. Defect model of a tetragonal Sm sup 3 sup + center found from EPR measurements in CaF sub 2 and SrF sub 2 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng Wen Chen; Wu Shao Yi; Tang Sheng

    2003-01-01

    The EPR parameters (g factors g sub p sub a sub r sub a sub l sub l sub e sub l , g sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r sub t sub o and hyperfine structure constants A sub p sub a sub r sub a sub l sub l sub e sub l , A sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r sub t sub o) of a tetragonal (C sub 4 sub v) Sm sup 3 sup + center in CaF sub 2 and SrF sub 2 crystals are calculated by considering the crystal-field J-mixing among the ground sup 6 H sub 5 sub / sub 2 , the first excited sup 6 H sub 7 sub / sub 2 and second excited sup 6 H sub 9 sub / sub 2 state multiplets. In the calculations the free-ion and crystal-field parameters of the tetragonal Sm sup 3 sup + -F sup - center obtained from polarized laser-selective excitation spectroscopy are used. The calculated results suggest that the tetragonal Sm sup 3 sup + -F sup - center is the Sm sup 3 sup + center found by later EPR measurements. The g factors g sub p sub a sub r sub a sub...

  3. Interactive design center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  4. National Health Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About ODPHP Food and Nutrition Physical Activity Health Literacy Health Care Quality Healthy People healthfinder health.gov About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health ...

  5. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  6. New Mexico Convention Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of convention centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using available data...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ... Sitemap RSS E-mail Inside CPSC Accessibility Privacy Policy Budget, Performances & Finance Open Government Freedom of Information ( ...

  9. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  10. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  11. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  12. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  13. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... center; Ischemic ulcer - wound center References Kim PJ, Evans KK, Steinberg JS, Pollard ME, Attinger CE. Critical ... A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  14. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  15. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  16. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  17. Student Perceptions of Learner-Centered Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeDe Wohlfarth

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The learner-centered paradigm departs from traditional teaching models by focusing on students more than teachers and learning more than teaching. Thus, classes are more egalitarian; they emphasize critical thinking, active learning, and real-world assignments. Graduate students in learner-centered classrooms were surveyed about perceptions of their experiences in relation to the key dimensions of the learner-centered paradigm and noted that the approach contributed to their feeling respected as learners, developed their critical thinking skills, and encouraged their self-directedness. Based on these findings, post-secondary instructors are encouraged to experiment with learning-centered approaches to further explore this promising model.

  18. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon ... All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center ... Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More ...

  20. Data Center Tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  1. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Influence of Axial Position of Center of Rotation of a Cervical Total Disc Replacement on Biomechanical Parameters: Simulated 2-Level Replacement Based on a Validated Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Zhenjun; Liao, Zhenhua; Mo, Zhongjun; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-10-01

    Finite element models have been widely used to predict biomechanical parameters of the cervical spine. Previous studies investigated the influence of position of rotational centers of prostheses on cervical biomechanical parameters after 1-level total disc replacement. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of axial position of rotational centers of prostheses on cervical biomechanics after 2-level total disc replacement. A validated finite element model of C3-C7 segments and 2 prostheses, including the rotational center located at the superior endplate (SE) and inferior endplate (IE), was developed. Four total disc replacement models were used: 1) IE inserted at C4-C5 disc space and IE inserted at C5-C6 disc space (IE-IE), 2) IE-SE, 3) SE-IE, and 4) SE-SE. All models were subjected to displacement control combined with a 50 N follower load to simulate flexion and extension motions in the sagittal plane. For each case, biomechanical parameters, including predicted moments, range of rotation at each level, facet joint stress, and von Mises stress on the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene core of the prostheses, were calculated. The SE-IE model resulted in significantly lower stress at the cartilage level during extension and at the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene cores when compared with the SE-SE construct and did not generate hypermotion at the C4-C5 level compared with the IE-SE and IE-IE constructs. Based on the present analysis, the SE-IE construct is recommended for treating cervical disease at the C4-C6 level. This study may provide a useful model to inform clinical operations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modelling the long-range transport. Atmospheric model from the Oslo EMEP-W center; Modelisation du transfert a longue distance modele atmospherique du centre Emep-W- a Oslo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joffre, S. [Institut Meteorolique de Finlande Geographical Research Vuorikatu, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) concerning transfrontier air pollution in Europe, a model has been developed which gives, based on pollution emission and meteorological data, monthly and annual values for the atmospheric content of ten major pollutants, the deposited dry and wet compounds, and the source allocations. Physical principles of the model and its validation are described

  4. Utton Center Scientific and Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marilyn C. O’Leary

    2006-07-01

    Final Report of DOE grant to the Utton Transboundary Resources Center at University of New Mexico School of Law supporting prevention and management of transboundary water conflicts. Describes work of Utton Center and refers to three other documents reported separately. Includes brief description of multidisciplinary collaborative process, understanding cultural values of water and a model water compact.

  5. Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Diane; Harris, Leanna S.

    2017-01-01

    Student-centered coaching is a highly-effective, evidence-based coaching model that shifts the focus from "fixing" teachers to collaborating with them to design instruction that targets student outcomes. But what does this look like in practice? "Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves" shows you the day-to-day coaching moves that…

  6. The guiding center Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion relations determining the guiding center Langrangian Λ and the associated guiding center variables to all orders are derived. We consider some particularly simple forms of Λ obtainable by specific choices of certain arbitrary functions appearing as free parameters in the theory. It is, for example, possible to locally define the guiding center variables so that the expression for the corresponding Langrangian is unchanged by all higher order terms. (orig.)

  7. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  8. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  9. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  10. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  11. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  12. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  13. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  14. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  15. Short range forecasting of sea breeze generated thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center: A real-time experiment using a primitive equation mesoscale numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Moon, Dennis; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William; Arritt, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    The operational efficiency of using guidance from a mesoscale numerical model to improve sea breeze thunderstorm forecasts at and around the Shuttle landing strip was assessed. The Prognostic Three-Dimensional Mesoscale (P3DM) model, developed as a sea breeze model, reveals a strong correlation between regions of mesoscale convergence and the triggering of sea breeze convection thunderstorms. The P3DM was modified to generate stability parameters familiar to the operational forecaster. In addition to the mesoscale fields of wind, vertical motion, moisture, temperature, a stability indicator, a combination of model-predicted K and Lifted Indices and the maximum grid cell vertical motion, were proposed and tested. Results of blind tests indicate that a forecaster, provided with guidance derived from model output, could improve local thunderstorm forecasts.

  16. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  17. Evaluation of 5536 patients treated in an integrative outpatient tinnitus treatment center-immediate effects and a modeling approach for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Thomas; Boehm, Katja; Kusatz, Martin

    2016-08-11

    Tinnitus is an increasingly serious problem for health care systems. According to epidemiological data, 7-14 % of outpatients have asked their physician about tinnitus and management strategies. Integrative outpatient treatments are currently regarded as promising therapeutic approaches for managing tinnitus. In this article we report on the treatment success of an outpatient tinnitus treatment center in Germany. This cohort study included pre-post data of 5536 outpatients which were treated between 2003 and 2010 in the tinnitus-therapy center, Krefeld-Düsseldorf (TTZ). The intervention consisted of psychological immunization training as well as an auditory stimulation therapy component. The main outcome parameter was the score of the Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ) which was assessed before and after a 9 days treatment and (in a small subsample) at a 6 months follow-up. Missing data were multiply imputed. Pre-post effect sizes were calculated and adjusted for regression to the mean (RTM). RTM-adjusted treatment effects at the end of treatment were estimated as -18.6 (CI: -18.9 to 18.2, p < 0.001) score points which corresponds to a standardized effect of d = -1.03 (CI: -1.05 to -1.01). These effects can be corroborated in various subgroups and all subscales of the TQ (d ranging from -0.31 to -0.97). The study suggests the effectiveness of this outpatient tinnitus therapy concept. Multiple imputations techniques and RTM analysis were helpful in carving out true treatment effects.

  18. Evaluating the versatility of EEG models generated from motor imagery tasks: An exploratory investigation on upper-limb elbow-centered motor imagery tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Yong, Xinyi; Menon, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) has recently been considered for use in rehabilitation of people with motor deficits. EEG data from the motor imagery of different body movements have been used, for instance, as an EEG-based control method to send commands to rehabilitation devices that assist people to perform a variety of different motor tasks. However, it is both time and effort consuming to go through data collection and model training for every rehabilitation task. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using an EEG model from one type of motor imagery (e.g.: elbow extension and flexion) to classify EEG from other types of motor imagery activities (e.g.: open a drawer). In order to study the problem, we focused on the elbow joint. Specifically, nine kinesthetic motor imagery tasks involving the elbow were investigated in twelve healthy individuals who participated in the study. While results reported that models from goal-oriented motor imagery tasks had higher accuracy than models from the simple joint tasks in intra-task testing (e.g., model from elbow extension and flexion task was tested on EEG data collected from elbow extension and flexion task), models from simple joint tasks had higher accuracies than the others in inter-task testing (e.g., model from elbow extension and flexion task tested on EEG data collected from drawer opening task). Simple single joint motor imagery tasks could, therefore, be considered for training models to potentially reduce the number of repetitive data acquisitions and model training in rehabilitation applications.

  19. Simple Machine Science Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  1. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email not for emergency use. Ohio Central Texas Poison Center Address Scott and White Memorial Hospital 2401 South 31st Street Temple, TX 76508 Service area: Central Texas Mail donation to: Central Texas Poison Center (Above address) For questions contact: jennifer.watson@ ...

  2. Optoelectronics Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-16

    ipan byr the Naval teuh Laoratoy. Tentative explanations have been put forth [14], but no B. W. Mufins was with the Center for high Tehnology Materia ad...semiconductor laser in an external cavity. CHAOS IN SEMICONDUCTOR LASERS Hua Li , Jun Ye and John (. Mclnemey Center for High Tehnology Materials The

  3. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39 (LC-39) Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) Vent Arm Behavior Prediction Model Review Technical Assessment Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Beech, Geoffrey; Johnston, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The NESC Assessment Team reviewed a computer simulation of the LC-39 External Tank (ET) GH2 Vent Umbilical system developed by United Space Alliance (USA) for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and designated KSC Analytical Tool ID 451 (KSC AT-451). The team verified that the vent arm kinematics were correctly modeled, but noted that there were relevant system sensitivities. Also, the structural stiffness used in the math model varied somewhat from the analytic calculations. Results of the NESC assessment were communicated to the model developers.

  4. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  5. National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP)-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCEP-DOE Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) reanalysis is a follow-on project to the "50-year" (1948-present) NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Project....

  6. Forecast skill of a high-resolution real-time mesoscale model designed for weather support of operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gregory E.; Zack, John W.; Manobianco, John

    1994-01-01

    NASA funded Mesoscale Environmental Simulations and Operations (MESO), Inc. to develop a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS). The model has been modified specifically for short-range forecasting in the vicinity of KSC/CCAS. To accomplish this, the model domain has been limited to increase the number of horizontal grid points (and therefore grid resolution) and the model' s treatment of precipitation, radiation, and surface hydrology physics has been enhanced to predict convection forced by local variations in surface heat, moisture fluxes, and cloud shading. The objective of this paper is to (1) provide an overview of MASS including the real-time initialization and configuration for running the data pre-processor and model, and (2) to summarize the preliminary evaluation of the model's forecasts of temperature, moisture, and wind at selected rawinsonde station locations during February 1994 and July 1994. MASS is a hydrostatic, three-dimensional modeling system which includes schemes to represent planetary boundary layer processes, surface energy and moisture budgets, free atmospheric long and short wave radiation, cloud microphysics, and sub-grid scale moist convection.

  7. Solid state structure and solution thermodynamics of three-centered hydrogen bonds (O∙∙∙H∙∙∙O) using N-(2-benzoyl-phenyl) oxalyl derivatives as model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Castro, Carlos Z; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I; García-Báez, Efrén V; Castrejón-Flores, José L; Peraza-Campos, Ana L; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco J

    2014-09-12

    Intramolecular hydrogen bond (HB) formation was analyzed in the model compounds N-(2-benzoylphenyl)acetamide, N-(2-benzoylphenyl)oxalamate and N1,N2-bis(2-benzoylphenyl)oxalamide. The formation of three-center hydrogen bonds in oxalyl derivatives was demonstrated in the solid state by the X-ray diffraction analysis of the geometric parameters associated with the molecular structures. The solvent effect on the chemical shift of H6 [δH6(DMSO-d6)-δH6(CDCl3)] and Δδ(ΝΗ)/ΔT measurements, in DMSO-d6 as solvent, have been used to establish the energetics associated with intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Two center intramolecular HB is not allowed in N-(2-benzoylphenyl)acetamide either in the solid state or in DMSO-d6 solution because of the unfavorable steric effects of the o-benzoyl group. The estimated ΔHº and ΔSº values for the hydrogen bonding disruption by DMSO-d6 of 28.3(0.1) kJ·mol-1 and 69.1(0.4) J·mol-1·K-1 for oxalamide, are in agreement with intramolecular three-center hydrogen bonding in solution. In the solid, the benzoyl group contributes to develop 1-D and 2-D crystal networks, through C-H∙∙∙A (A = O, π) and dipolar C=O∙∙∙A (A = CO, π) interactions, in oxalyl derivatives. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example where three-center hydrogen bond is claimed to overcome steric constraints.

  8. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  9. A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with missing mass final states at center-of-mass energy 188.6 Gev with the ALEPH detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X

    2000-01-01

    Standard Model has been very successful in describing and predicting particle physics phenomena. So far there is no experimental evidence which contradicts the Standard Model. However, the Higgs boson, which gives masses to the weak gauge bosons and fundamental fermions and is predicted by the theory, so far still eludes physicists. The discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson would be an indispensable proof of the validity of Standard Model. This thesis presents a search for the Standard Model neutral Higgs boson with missing mass final state with the data collected by ALEPH detector at center-of-mass energy 199.6 GeV in 1998. A data set of total integrated luminosity 176.2 pb-1 is used in this search. Neural networks are employed in the selection of missing mass events. When this search is combined with the searches for the Higgs final states, the Standard Model neutral Higgs boson has been excluded below 90.2 GeV /c2 with 95% confidence level.

  10. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presents Enhancing Standards Based Science Curriculum through NASA Content Relevancy: A Model for Sustainable Teaching-Research Integration Dr. Robert Gabrys, Raquel Marshall, Dr. Evelina Felicite-Maurice, Erin McKinley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. H.; Gabrys, R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a systemic educator professional development model for the integration of NASA climate change resources into the K-12 classroom. The desired outcome of this model is to prepare teachers in STEM disciplines to be globally engaged and knowledgeable of current climate change research and its potential for content relevancy alignment to standard-based curriculum. The application and mapping of the model is based on the state education needs assessment, alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and implementation framework developed by the consortium of district superintendents and their science supervisors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate best practices for extending the concept of inquiry-based and project-based learning through the integration of current NASA climate change research into curriculum unit lessons. This model includes a significant teacher development component focused on capacity development for teacher instruction and pedagogy aimed at aligning NASA climate change research to related NGSS student performance expectations and subsequent Crosscutting Concepts, Science and Engineering Practices, and Disciplinary Core Ideas, a need that was presented by the district steering committee as critical for ensuring sustainability and high-impact in the classroom. This model offers a collaborative and inclusive learning community that connects classroom teachers to NASA climate change researchers via an ongoing consultant/mentoring approach. As a result of the first year of implementation of this model, Maryland teachers are implementing NGSS unit lessons that guide students in open-ended research based on current NASA climate change research.

  11. Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freihaut, Jim [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive

  12. The Impact of a Family-Centered Intervention on the Ecology of Adolescent Antisocial Behavior: Modeling Developmental Sequelae and Trajectories During Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN RYZIN, MARK J.; DISHION, THOMAS J.

    2012-01-01

    This study used an experimental, longitudinal field trial involving random assignment to the Family Check-Up (FCU) to explore the social ecology of adolescent antisocial behavior. A sample of 998 youth and their families was followed from early to late adolescence (age 12 to 18–19). In the intervention condition, 115 families (23%) elected to receive the FCU. In general, random assignment to the FCU in middle school was associated with reductions in late adolescence antisocial behavior (age 18–19). Variable-centered analyses revealed that effects were mediated by reductions in family conflict from early to middle adolescence (age 12–15). The link between family conflict and antisocial behavior, in turn, was mediated by association with deviant peers at age 17; parental monitoring at age 17 was also influential but did not attain the status of a mediator. Person-oriented analyses suggested that the FCU was associated with declining trajectories of family conflict and rising trajectories of parental monitoring but was not associated with trajectories of deviant peer association. Dual-trajectory analysis indicated that the pathways to adolescent antisocial behavior were many and varied, suggesting new directions for developmental and intervention research. PMID:22781876

  13. The impact of a family-centered intervention on the ecology of adolescent antisocial behavior: modeling developmental sequelae and trajectories during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Mark J; Dishion, Thomas J

    2012-08-01

    This study used an experimental, longitudinal field trial involving random assignment to the Family Check-Up (FCU) to explore the social ecology of adolescent antisocial behavior. A sample of 998 youths and their families was followed from early to late adolescence (age 12 to 18-19). In the intervention condition, 115 families (23%) elected to receive the FCU. In general, random assignment to the FCU in middle school was associated with reductions in late adolescence antisocial behavior (age 18-19). Variable-centered analyses revealed that the effects were mediated by reductions in family conflict from early to middle adolescence (age 12-15). The link between family conflict and antisocial behavior in turn was mediated by association with deviant peers at age 17; parental monitoring at age 17 was also influential but did not attain the status of a mediator. Person-oriented analyses suggested that the FCU was associated with declining trajectories of family conflict and rising trajectories of parental monitoring but was not associated with trajectories of deviant peer association. A dual-trajectory analysis indicated that the pathways to adolescent antisocial behavior were myriad and varied, suggesting new directions for developmental and intervention research.

  14. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  15. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  16. Uncertainties in modeling of consequences of tritium release from fusion reactors. Plasma Fusion Center No. PFC/TR-79-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    The bases for various models concerned with all phases of estimating doses from routine tritium releases from fusion reactors have been examined. The implications of uncertainties in parameters and assumptions for the uncertainty of the calculated doses and resulting maximum permissible releases are presented. Global dispersion models are most affected by the assumptions made concerning movement, such as the role of the ocean as a sink. Dose models were generally found to agree within a factor of two, with the largest variation due to agricultural data. Plant tritium flow studies are the least developed and require substantial improvement in the data base. Based on two possible arbitrary global standards, the maximum allowable releases were found to range from 1.6 to 20,000 Ci/day. The local criteria imply releases between 5 and 20 Ci/day

  17. Uncertainties in modeling of consequences of tritium release from fusion reactors. Plasma Fusion Center No. PFC/TR-79-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piet, S.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    The bases for various models concerned with all phases of estimating doses from routine tritium releases from fusion reactors have been examined. The implications of uncertainties in parameters and assumptions for the uncertainty of the calculated doses and resulting maximum permissible releases are presented. Global dispersion models are most affected by the assumptions made concerning movement, such as the role of the ocean as a sink. Dose models were generally found to agree within a factor of two, with the largest variation due to agricultural data. Plant tritium flow studies are the least developed and require substantial improvement in the data base. Based on two possible arbitrary global standards, the maximum allowable releases were found to range from 1.6 to 20,000 Ci/day. The local criteria imply releases between 5 and 20 Ci/day.

  18. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of postoperative complications and risk model establishment of gastrectomy for gastric cancer: A single-center cohort report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinzhe; Zhou, Yanbing; Cao, Shougen; Li, Shikuan; Wang, Hao; Niu, Zhaojian; Chen, Dong; Wang, Dongsheng; Lv, Liang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yu; Jiao, Xuelong; Tan, Xiaojie; Zhang, Jianli; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Bingyuan; Lu, Yun; Sun, Zhenqing

    2016-01-01

    Reporting of surgical complications is common, but few provide information about the severity and estimate risk factors of complications. If have, but lack of specificity. We retrospectively analyzed data on 2795 gastric cancer patients underwent surgical procedure at the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University between June 2007 and June 2012, established multivariate logistic regression model to predictive risk factors related to the postoperative complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Twenty-four out of 86 variables were identified statistically significant in univariate logistic regression analysis, 11 significant variables entered multivariate analysis were employed to produce the risk model. Liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, Child classification, invasion of neighboring organs, combined resection, introperative transfusion, Billroth II anastomosis of reconstruction, malnutrition, surgical volume of surgeons, operating time and age were independent risk factors for postoperative complications after gastrectomy. Based on logistic regression equation, p=Exp∑BiXi / (1+Exp∑BiXi), multivariate logistic regression predictive model that calculated the risk of postoperative morbidity was developed, p = 1/(1 + e((4.810-1.287X1-0.504X2-0.500X3-0.474X4-0.405X5-0.318X6-0.316X7-0.305X8-0.278X9-0.255X10-0.138X11))). The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the model to predict the postoperative complications were 86.7%, 76.2% and 88.6%, respectively. This risk model based on Clavien-Dindo grading severity of complications system and logistic regression analysis can predict severe morbidity specific to an individual patient's risk factors, estimate patients' risks and benefits of gastric surgery as an accurate decision-making tool and may serve as a template for the development of risk models for other surgical groups.

  19. Final Report, Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing: Co-Array Fortran, Grant Number DE-FC02-01ER25505

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Numrich

    2008-04-22

    The major accomplishment of this project is the production of CafLib, an 'object-oriented' parallel numerical library written in Co-Array Fortran. CafLib contains distributed objects such as block vectors and block matrices along with procedures, attached to each object, that perform basic linear algebra operations such as matrix multiplication, matrix transpose and LU decomposition. It also contains constructors and destructors for each object that hide the details of data decomposition from the programmer, and it contains collective operations that allow the programmer to calculate global reductions, such as global sums, global minima and global maxima, as well as vector and matrix norms of several kinds. CafLib is designed to be extensible in such a way that programmers can define distributed grid and field objects, based on vector and matrix objects from the library, for finite difference algorithms to solve partial differential equations. A very important extra benefit that resulted from the project is the inclusion of the co-array programming model in the next Fortran standard called Fortran 2008. It is the first parallel programming model ever included as a standard part of the language. Co-arrays will be a supported feature in all Fortran compilers, and the portability provided by standardization will encourage a large number of programmers to adopt it for new parallel application development. The combination of object-oriented programming in Fortran 2003 with co-arrays in Fortran 2008 provides a very powerful programming model for high-performance scientific computing. Additional benefits from the project, beyond the original goal, include a programto provide access to the co-array model through access to the Cray compiler as a resource for teaching and research. Several academics, for the first time, included the co-array model as a topic in their courses on parallel computing. A separate collaborative project with LANL and PNNL showed how to

  20. Towards Understanding Life Cycle Saving Of Boundedly Rational Agents : A Model With Feasibility Goals - Replaced by CentER Discussion Paper 2010-138

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binswanger, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops a new life cycle model that aims to describe the savings and asset allocation decisions of boundedly rational agents. The paper’s main theoretical contribution is the provision of a simple, tractable and parsimonious framework within which agents make forward looking decisions in