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Sample records for modeling candle flame

  1. Modeling Candle Flame Behavior In Variable Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsairafi, A.; Tien, J. S.; Lee, S. T.; Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    The burning of a candle, as typical non-propagating diffusion flame, has been used by a number of researchers to study the effects of electric fields on flame, spontaneous flame oscillation and flickering phenomena, and flame extinction. In normal gravity, the heat released from combustion creates buoyant convection that draws oxygen into the flame. The strength of the buoyant flow depends on the gravitational level and it is expected that the flame shape, size and candle burning rate will vary with gravity. Experimentally, there exist studies of candle burning in enhanced gravity (i.e. higher than normal earth gravity, g(sub e)), and in microgravity in drop towers and space-based facilities. There are, however, no reported experimental data on candle burning in partial gravity (g model of the candle flame, buoyant forces were neglected. The treatment of momentum equation was simplified using a potential flow approximation. Although the predicted flame characteristics agreed well with the experimental results, the model cannot be extended to cases with buoyant flows. In addition, because of the use of potential flow, no-slip boundary condition is not satisfied on the wick surface. So there is some uncertainty on the accuracy of the predicted flow field. In the present modeling effort, the full Navier-Stokes momentum equations with body force term is included. This enables us to study the effect of gravity on candle flames (with zero gravity as the limiting case). In addition, we consider radiation effects in more detail by solving the radiation transfer equation. In the previous study, flame radiation is treated as a simple loss term in the energy equation. Emphasis of the present model is on the gas-phase processes. Therefore, the detailed heat and mass transfer phenomena inside the porous wick are not treated. Instead, it is assumed that a thin layer of liquid fuel coated the entire wick surface during the burning process. This is the limiting case that the mass

  2. Candle flames in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Tien, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    The candle flame in both normal and microgravity is non-propagating. In microgravity, however, the candle flame is also non-convective where (excepting Stefan flow) pure diffusion is the only transport mode. It also shares many characteristics with another classical problem, that of isolated droplet combustion. Given their qualitatively similar flame shapes and the required heat feedback to condensed-phase fuels, the gas-phase flow and temperature fields should be relatively similar for a droplet and a candle in reduced gravity. Unless the droplet diameter is maintained somehow through non-intrusive replenishment of fuel, the quasi-steady burning characteristics of a droplet can be maintained for only a few seconds. In contrast, the candle flame in microgravity may achieve a nearly steady state over a much longer time and is therefore ideal for examining a number of combustion-related phenomena. In this paper, we examine candle flame behavior in both short-duration and long-duration, quiescent, microgravity environments. Interest in this type of flame, especially 'candle flames in weightlessness', is demonstrated by very frequent public inquiries. The question is usually posed as 'will a candle flame burn in zero gravity', or, 'will a candle burn indefinitely (or steadily) in zero gravity in a large volume of quiescent air'. Intuitive speculation suggests to some that, in the absence of buoyancy, the accumulation of products in the vicinity of the flame will cause flame extinction. The classical theory for droplet combustion with its spherically-shaped diffusion flame, however, shows that steady combustion is possible in the absence of buoyancy if the chemical kinetics are fast enough. Previous experimental studies of candle flames in reduced and microgravity environments showed the flame could survive for at least 5 seconds, but did not reach a steady state in the available test time.

  3. Candle Flames in Microgravity: USML-1 Results - 1 Year Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H. D.; Dietrich, D. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the sustained behavior of a candle flame in microgravity determined in the glovebox facility aboard the First United States Microgravity Labomtofy. In a quiescent, microgmvjfy environment, diffusive transport becomes the dominant mode of heat and mass transfer; whether the diffusive transport rate is fast enough to sustain low-gravity candle flames in air was unknown to this series of about 70 tests. After an initial transient in which soot is observed, the microgravity candle flame in air becomes and remains hemispherical and blue (apparently soot-Ne) with a large flame standoff distance. Near flame extinction, spontaneous flame oscillations are regularly observed; these are explained as a flashback of flame through a premixed combustible gas followed by a retreat owed to flame quenching. The frequency of oscillations can be related to diffusive transport rates, and not to residual buoyant convective flow. The fact that the flame tip is the last point of the flame to survive suggests that it is the location of maximum fuel reactivity; this is unlike normal gravity, where the location of maximum fuel reactivity is the flame base. The flame color, size, and shape behaved in a quasi-steady manner; the finite size of the glovebox, combined with the restricted passages of the candlebox, inhibited the observation of true steady-state burning. Nonetheless, through calculations, and inference from the series of shuttle tests, if is concluded that a candle can burn indefinitely in a large enough ambient of air in microgravity. After igniting one candle, a second candle in close pximity could not be lit. This may be due to wax coating the wick and/or local oxygen depletion around the second, unlit candle. Post-mission testing suggests that simultaneous ignition may overcome these behaviors and enable both candles to be ignited.

  4. Electrochemical supercapacitor behaviour of functionalized candle flame carbon soot

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Justin Raj; Byung Chul Kim; Bo-Bae Cho; Won-Je Cho; Sung-Jin Kim; Sang Yeup Park; Kook Hyun Yu

    2016-02-01

    The electrochemical supercapacitor behaviour of bare, washed and nitric acid functionalized candle flame carbon soots were reported. Crystallinity and the morphology of the candle soots were recorded using X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The nitric acid functionalized candle soot showed an improved Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area of 137.93 from 87.495 m$^2$ g$^{−1}$ of washed candle soot. The presence of various functional groups in candle soots and the development of oxygen functionalities in the functionalized candle soot were examined through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Raman spectra showed the characteristic peaks corresponding to the D (diamond) and G (graphite) phase of carbon present in the candle soots. The electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge test and impedance spectroscopy in 1MH2SO4 electrolyte. The functionalized candle soot electrode showed an enhanced specific capacitance value of 187 F g$^{−1}$ at 0.15 A g$^{−1}$ discharge current density, which is much higher than that of bare and washed candle soot electrodes.

  5. Synchronization in flickering of three-coupled candle flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keiko; Kijima, Akifumi; Umeno, Yoshitaka; Shima, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    When two or more candle flames are fused by approaching them together, the resulting large flame often exhibits flickering, i.e., prolonged high-frequency oscillation in its size and luminance. In the present work, we investigate the collective behaviour of three-coupled candle flame oscillators in a triangular arrangement. The system showed four distinct types of syncronised modes as a consequence of spontaneous symmetry breaking. The modes obtained include the in-phase mode, the partial in-phase mode, the rotation mode, and an anomalous one called the “death” mode that causes a sudden stop of the flame oscillation followed by self-sustained stable combustion. We also clarified the correlation between the inter-flame distance and the frequency with which the modes occur.

  6. Demonstrating Sound Wave Propagation with Candle Flame and Loudspeaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrepic, Zdeslav; Nettles, Corey; Bonilla, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    The motion of a candle flame in front of a loudspeaker has been suggested as a productive demonstration of the longitudinal wave nature of sound. The demonstration has been used also as a research tool to investigate students' understanding about sound. The underpinning of both applications is the expectation of a horizontal, back-and-forth…

  7. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidoni, S. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/CUA, Code 674, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Yoshimura, K. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Plowman, J. E., E-mail: silvina.e.guidoni@nasa.gov [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  8. Stereoscopic Observation of Slipping Reconnection in A Double Candle-Flame-Shaped Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Gou, Tingyu; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Zhuang, Bin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 January 28 M1.4 flare exhibits two side-by-side candle-flame-shaped flare loop systems underneath a larger cusp-shaped structure during the decay phase, as observed at the northwestern solar limb by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The northern loop system brightens following the initiation of the flare within the southern loop system, but all three cusp-shaped structures are characterized by ~ 10 MK temperatures, hotter than the arch-shaped loops underneath. The "Ahead" satellite of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) provides a top view, in which the post-flare loops brighten sequentially, with one end fixed while the other apparently slipping eastward. By performing stereoscopic reconstruction of the post-flare loops in EUV and mapping out magnetic connectivities, we found that the footpoints of the post-flare loops are slipping along the footprint of a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) separating the two loop systems, and that the reconstructed loops share similarity with the magne...

  9. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  10. Pulse cleaning flow models and numerical computation of candle ceramic filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Analytical and numerical computed models are developed for reverse pulse cleaning system of candle ceramic filters. A standard turbulent model is demonstrated suitably to the designing computation of reverse pulse cleaning system from the experimental and onedimensional computational result. The computed results can be used to guide the designing of reverse pulse cleaning system, which is optimum Venturi geometry. From the computed results, the general conclusions and the designing methods are obtained.

  11. Burns and injuries resulting from the use of gel candles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickus, E J; Lionelli, G T; Parmele, J B; Lawrence, W T; Korentager, R A

    2001-01-01

    Scented gel candles are common decorative household items composed of gelled mineral oil, fragrances, and dye. Like traditional wax candles, they have an open flame. Because of defective design, there have been several burns and injuries caused by these products. Here we report our experience with a scald burn from a gel candle and describe 34 additional injuries attributed to gel candles previously unreported in the medical literature.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Flow Field in Ceramic Candle Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TaewonSeo; Joo-HongChoi; 等

    1998-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle(IGCC)is one of the candidates to achieve stringent environmental regulation among the clean coal technologies.Advancing the technology of the hot gas cleanup systems is the most critical component in the development of the IGCC.Thus the aim of this study is to understand the flow field in the ceramic filter and the influence of ceramic filter in removal of the particles contained in the hot gas flow.The numerical model based on the Reynolds stress turbulence model with the Darycy's law in the porous region is adopted.It is found that the effect of the porosity in the flowfield is negligibly small while the effect of the filter length is significant.It is also found as the permeability decreases,the reattachment point due to the flow separation moves upstream,This is because the fluid is sucked into the filter region due to the pressure drop before the flow separation occurs.The particle follows well with the fluid stream and the particle is directly sucked into the filter due to the pressure drop even in the flow separation region.

  13. The charge-asymmetric nonlocally-determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model

    CERN Document Server

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2014-01-01

    Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally-determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With only three parameters per solvent, this `CANDLE' model simultaneously reproduce...

  14. Model-independent estimations for the curvature from standard candles and clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhengxiang; Liao, Kai; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Model-independent estimations for the spatial curvature not only provide a test for the fundamental Copernican principle assumption, but also can effectively break the degeneracy between curvature and dark energy properties. In this paper, we propose to achieve model-independent constraints on the spatial curvature from observations of standard candles and standard clocks, without assuming any fiducial cosmology and other priors. We find that, for the popular Union2.1 type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia ) observations, the spatial curvature is constrained to be $\\Omega_K=-0.045_{-0.172}^{+0.176}$. For the latest joint light-curve analysis (JLA) of SNe Ia observations, we obtain $\\Omega_K=-0.140_{-0.158}^{+0.161}$. It is suggested that these results are in excellent agreement with the spatially flat Universe. Moreover, compared to other approaches aiming for model-independent estimations of spatial curvature, this method also achieves constraints with competitive precision.

  15. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2015-10-20

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model\\'s predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  16. Effect of Oxygen Enrichment in Propane Laminar Diffusion Flames under Microgravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Pramod; Singh, Ravinder

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion flames are the most common type of flame which we see in our daily life such as candle flame and match-stick flame. Also, they are the most used flames in practical combustion system such as industrial burner (coal fired, gas fired or oil fired), diesel engines, gas turbines, and solid fuel rockets. In the present study, steady-state global chemistry calculations for 24 different flames were performed using an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics code (UNICORN). Computation involved simulations of inverse and normal diffusion flames of propane in earth and microgravity condition with varying oxidizer compositions (21, 30, 50, 100 % O2, by mole, in N2). 2 cases were compared with the experimental result for validating the computational model. These flames were stabilized on a 5.5 mm diameter burner with 10 mm of burner length. The effect of oxygen enrichment and variation in gravity (earth gravity and microgravity) on shape and size of diffusion flames, flame temperature, flame velocity have been studied from the computational result obtained. Oxygen enrichment resulted in significant increase in flame temperature for both types of diffusion flames. Also, oxygen enrichment and gravity variation have significant effect on the flame configuration of normal diffusion flames in comparison with inverse diffusion flames. Microgravity normal diffusion flames are spherical in shape and much wider in comparison to earth gravity normal diffusion flames. In inverse diffusion flames, microgravity flames were wider than earth gravity flames. However, microgravity inverse flames were not spherical in shape.

  17. Effect of Oxygen Enrichment in Propane Laminar Diffusion Flames under Microgravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Pramod; Singh, Ravinder

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion flames are the most common type of flame which we see in our daily life such as candle flame and match-stick flame. Also, they are the most used flames in practical combustion system such as industrial burner (coal fired, gas fired or oil fired), diesel engines, gas turbines, and solid fuel rockets. In the present study, steady-state global chemistry calculations for 24 different flames were performed using an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics code (UNICORN). Computation involved simulations of inverse and normal diffusion flames of propane in earth and microgravity condition with varying oxidizer compositions (21, 30, 50, 100 % O2, by mole, in N2). 2 cases were compared with the experimental result for validating the computational model. These flames were stabilized on a 5.5 mm diameter burner with 10 mm of burner length. The effect of oxygen enrichment and variation in gravity (earth gravity and microgravity) on shape and size of diffusion flames, flame temperature, flame velocity have been studied from the computational result obtained. Oxygen enrichment resulted in significant increase in flame temperature for both types of diffusion flames. Also, oxygen enrichment and gravity variation have significant effect on the flame configuration of normal diffusion flames in comparison with inverse diffusion flames. Microgravity normal diffusion flames are spherical in shape and much wider in comparison to earth gravity normal diffusion flames. In inverse diffusion flames, microgravity flames were wider than earth gravity flames. However, microgravity inverse flames were not spherical in shape.

  18. Experiments and modelling on vertical flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Mangs, J. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    he principle and some preliminary results are shown of a new vertical flame spread modelling effort. Quick experimental screenings on relevant phenomena are made, some models are evaluated, and a new set of needed measuring instruments is proposed. Finally a single example of FRNC cable is shown as application of the methods. (orig.)

  19. Modeling and simulation of axisymmetric stagnation flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Kazuo

    Laminar flame modeling is an important element in turbulent combustion research. The accuracy of a turbulent combustion model is highly dependent upon our understanding of laminar flames and their behavior in many situations. How much we understand combustion can only be measured by how well the model describes and predicts combustion phenomena. One of the most commonly used methane combustion models is GRI-Mech 3.0. However, how well the model describes the reacting flow phenomena is still uncertain even after many attempts to validate the model or quantify uncertainties. In the present study, the behavior of laminar flames under different aerodynamic and thermodynamic conditions is studied numerically in a stagnation-flow configuration. In order to make such a numerical study possible, the spectral element method is reformulated to accommodate the large density variations in methane reacting flows. In addition, a new axisymmetric basis function set for the spectral element method that satisfies the correct behavior near the axis is developed, and efficient integration techniques are developed to accurately model axisymmetric reacting flow within a reasonable amount of computational time. The numerical method is implemented using an object-oriented programming technique, and the resulting computer program is verified with several different verification methods. The present study then shows variances with the commonly used GRI-Mech 3.0 chemical kinetics model through a direct simulation of laboratory flames that allows direct comparison to experimental data. It is shown that the methane combustion model based on GRI-Mech 3.0 works well for methane-air mixtures near stoichiometry. However, GRI-Mech 3.0 leads to an overprediction of laminar flame speed for lean mixtures and an underprediction for rich mixtures. This result is slightly different from conclusion drawn in previous work, in which experimental data are compared with a one-dimensional numerical solutions

  20. Measurement and Modeling of Particle Radiation in Coal Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Daniel; Johansson, Robert; Andersson, Klas Jerker

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at developing a methodology that can provide information of in-flame particle radiation in industrial-scale flames. The method is based on a combination of experimental and modeling work. The experiments have been performed in the high-temperature zone of a 77 kWth swirling lignite...... properties. The in-flame particle radiation was measured with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer connected to a water-cooled probe via fiber optics. In the cross-section of the flame investigated, the particles were found to be the dominating source of radiation. Apart from giving information...

  1. A Unified Model for GRB Prompt Emission from Optical to Gamma-Rays; a New Type of Standard Candle

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, S; Hartmann, D H; Granot, J; Asano, K; Meszaros, P; Gill, R; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J

    2016-01-01

    The origin of prompt emission from gamma ray bursts remains to be an open question. Correlated prompt optical and gamma-ray emission observed in a handful of GRBs strongly suggests a common emission region, but failure to adequately fit the broadband GRB spectrum prompted the hypothesis of different emission mechanisms for the low- and high-energy radiations. We demonstrate that our multi-component model for GRB gamma-ray prompt emission provides an excellent fit to GRB 110205A from optical to gamma-ray energies. Our results show that the optical and highest gamma-ray emissions have the same spatial and spectral origin, which is different from the bulk of the X- and softest gamma-ray radiation. Finally, our accurate redshift estimate for GRB 110205A demonstrates promise for using GRBs as cosmological standard candles.

  2. Modeling Burns for Pre-Cooled Skin Flame Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgrim Log

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On a television show, a pre-cooled bare-skinned person (TV host passed through engulfing kerosene flames. The assumption was that a water film should protect him during 0.74 s flame exposure in an environment of 86 kW/m2 heat flux. The TV host got light burn inflammation on the back, arms and legs. The present work studies skin temperatures and burn damage integral of such dangerous flame exposure. The skin temperature distribution during water spray pre-cooling, transport to the flames, flame exposure, transport to the water pool, and final water pool cooling is modelled numerically. Details of the temperature development of the skin layers are presented, as well as the associated damage integral. It is shown that 5 °C water spray applied for a 30 s period pre-cooled the skin sufficiently to prevent severe skin injury. Soot marks indicate that the water layer evaporated completely in some areas resulting in skin flame contact. This exposed dry skin directly to the flames contributing significantly to the damage integral. It is further analyzed how higher water temperature, shorter pre-cooling period or longer flame exposure influence the damage integral. It is evident that minor changes in conditions could lead to severe burns and that high heat flux levels at the end of the exposure period are especially dangerous. This flame stunt should never be repeated.

  3. CoFlame: A refined and validated numerical algorithm for modeling sooting laminar coflow diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Nick A.; Zhang, Qingan; Liu, Fengshan; Guo, Hongsheng; Dworkin, Seth B.; Thomson, Murray J.

    2016-10-01

    Mitigation of soot emissions from combustion devices is a global concern. For example, recent EURO 6 regulations for vehicles have placed stringent limits on soot emissions. In order to allow design engineers to achieve the goal of reduced soot emissions, they must have the tools to so. Due to the complex nature of soot formation, which includes growth and oxidation, detailed numerical models are required to gain fundamental insights into the mechanisms of soot formation. A detailed description of the CoFlame FORTRAN code which models sooting laminar coflow diffusion flames is given. The code solves axial and radial velocity, temperature, species conservation, and soot aggregate and primary particle number density equations. The sectional particle dynamics model includes nucleation, PAH condensation and HACA surface growth, surface oxidation, coagulation, fragmentation, particle diffusion, and thermophoresis. The code utilizes a distributed memory parallelization scheme with strip-domain decomposition. The public release of the CoFlame code, which has been refined in terms of coding structure, to the research community accompanies this paper. CoFlame is validated against experimental data for reattachment length in an axi-symmetric pipe with a sudden expansion, and ethylene-air and methane-air diffusion flames for multiple soot morphological parameters and gas-phase species. Finally, the parallel performance and computational costs of the code is investigated.

  4. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  5. Detailed reduction of reaction mechanisms for flame modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai; Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A method for reduction of detailed chemical reaction mechanisms, introduced earlier for ignition system, was extended to laminar premixed flames. The reduction is based on testing the reaction and reaction-enthalpy rates of the 'full' reaction mechanism using a zero-dimensional model with the flame temperature profile as a constraint. The technique is demonstrated with numerical tests performed on the mechanism of methane combustion.

  6. Conditional moment closure modeling of a lifted turbulent flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yong; QIU Rong; ZHOU Wei; FAN Weicheng

    2005-01-01

    Results obtained using conditional moment closure (CMC) approach to modeling a lifted turbulent hydrogen flame are presented. Predictions are based on k-ε-g turbulent closure, a 23-step chemical mechanism and a radially averaged CMC model. The objectives are to find out how radially averaged CMC can represent a lifted flame and which mechanism of flame stabilization can be described by this modeling method. As a first stage of the study of multi-dimensional CMC for large eddy simulation (LES) of the lifted turbulent flames, the effect of turbulence upon combustion is included, the high-order compact finite- difference scheme (Padé) is used and previously developed characteristic-wave-based boundary conditions for multi- component perfect gas mixtures are here extended to their conditional forms but the heat release due to combustion is not part of the turbulent calculations. Attention is focused to the lift-off region of the flame which is commonly considered as a cold flow. Comparison with published experimental data and the computational results shows that the lift-off height can be accurately determined, and Favre averaged radial profiles of temperature and species mole fractions are also reasonably well predicted. Some of the current flame stabilization mechanisms are discussed.

  7. Probing flame chemistry with MBMS, theory, and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westmoreland, P.R. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective is to establish kinetics of combustion and molecular-weight growth in C{sub 3} hydrocarbon flames as part of an ongoing study of flame chemistry. Specific reactions being studied are (1) the growth reactions of C{sub 3}H{sub 5} and C{sub 3}H{sub 3} with themselves and with unsaturated hydrocarbons and (2) the oxidation reactions of O and OH with C{sub 3}`s. This approach combines molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) experiments on low-pressure flat flames; theoretical predictions of rate constants by thermochemical kinetics, Bimolecular Quantum-RRK, RRKM, and master-equation theory; and whole-flame modeling using full mechanisms of elementary reactions.

  8. An evolution equation modeling inversion of tulip flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dold, J.W. [Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics; Joulin, G. [E.N.S.M.A., Poitiers (France). Lab. d`Energetique et de Detonique

    1995-02-01

    The authors attempt to reduce the number of physical ingredients needed to model the phenomenon of tulip-flame inversion to a bare minimum. This is achieved by synthesizing the nonlinear, first-order Michelson-Sivashinsky (MS) equation with the second order linear dispersion relation of Landau and Darrieus, which adds only one extra term to the MS equation without changing any of its stationary behavior and without changing its dynamics in the limit of small density change when the MS equation is asymptotically valid. However, as demonstrated by spectral numerical solutions, the resulting second-order nonlinear evolution equation is found to describe the inversion of tulip flames in good qualitative agreement with classical experiments on the phenomenon. This shows that the combined influences of front curvature, geometric nonlinearity and hydrodynamic instability (including its second-order, or inertial effects, which are an essential result of vorticity production at the flame front) are sufficient to reproduce the inversion process.

  9. Numerical Simulation Model of Laminar Hydrogen/Air Diffusion Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于溯源; 吕雪峰

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation model is developed for a laminar hydrogen/air diffusion flame. Nineteen species and twenty chemical reactions are considered. The chemical kinetics package (CHEMKIN) subroutines are employed to calculate species thermodynamic properties and chemical reaction rate constants. The flow field is calculated by simultaneously solving a continuity equation, an axial momentum equation and an energy equation in a cylindrical coordinate system. Thermal diffusion and Brownian diffusion are considered in the radial direction while they are neglected in the axial direction. The results suggest that the main flame is buoyancy-controlled.

  10. Numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhenghua

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical models have been developed to address several important aspects of numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread. The developed models include a pyrolysis model for charring and non-charring solid materials, a fast narrow band radiation property evaluation model (FASTNB) and a turbulence model for buoyant flow and flame. In the pyrolysis model, a completely new algorithm has been proposed, where a moving dual mesh concept was developed and implemented. With this new concept, it provides proper spatial resolution for both temperature and density and automatically considers the regression of the surface of the non-charring solid material during its pyrolysis. It is simple, very efficient and applicable to both charring and non-charring materials. FASTNB speeds up significantly the evaluation of narrow band spectral radiation properties and thus provides a potential of applying narrow band model in numerical simulations of practical turbulent combustion. The turbulence model was developed to improve the consideration of buoyancy effect on turbulence and turbulent transport. It was found to be simple, promising and numerically stable. It has been tested against both plane and axisymmetric thermal plumes and an axisymmetric buoyant diffusion flame. When compared with the widely used standard buoyancy-modified {kappa} - {epsilon} model, it gives significant improvement on numerical results. These developed models have been fully incorporated into CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code and coupled with other CFD sub-models, including the DT (Discrete Transfer) radiation model, EDC (Eddy Dissipation Concept) combustion model, flamelet combustion model, various soot models and transpired wall function. Comprehensive numerical simulations have been carried out to study soot formation and oxidation in turbulent buoyant diffusion flames, flame heat transfer and flame spread in fires. The gas temperature and velocity, soot volume fraction, wall

  11. An experimental design for the investigation of water repellent property of candle soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Bichitra Nanda; Kandasubramanian, Balasubramanian, E-mail: meetkbs@gmail.com

    2014-11-14

    The mechanistic aspect of candle soot particles under controlled atmosphere has been reported. The soot particles were characterized using Fourier transformation Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hydrophobicity of the candle soot particles was confirmed from the presence of C–H group which enhances water repellency and can be used as filler material for fabrication of superhydrophobic coatings. The layered soot particle on the glass slide exhibits maximum water contact angle of 168°. Roughness of soot particle and various hydrophobic groups involved for obtaining superhydrophobicity were exposed. The Raman spectrum of soot particles revealed the presence of disorder graphene which was confirmed from appearance of D1 band. The agglomeration of candle soot particles has been discussed by measuring fractal dimension (D{sub f}) of the particles. The in-depth investigation for bringing the mechanism of formation of soot particle inside the flame reveals the inception of the first particles, growth of soot particles, particle coalescence, agglomeration and oxidation. Here, we have found that the mechanism of particle formation in candle flame involves various steps, in which the sintering as well as coalescence/collision process plays a major role. - Highlights: • Mechanistic aspect for hydrophobicity of candle soot is demonstrated. • Hydrophobicity of soot particles at different exposure time is described. • Agglomeration of soot particles related to fractal dimension is reported. • Mechanism of formation of soot particles in the candle flame is also described.

  12. Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates for Cooking, Candles and Incense for Use in Modeling of Exposures in Residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tianchao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    recent analysis of health impacts from air pollutant inhalation in homes found that PM2.5 is the most damaging at the population level. Chronic exposure to elevated PM2.5 has the potential to damage human respiratory systems, and may result in premature death. PM2.5 exposures in homes can be mitigated through various approaches including kitchen exhaust ventilation, filtration, indoor pollutant source reduction and designing ventilation systems to reduce the entry of PM2.5 from outdoors. Analysis of the potential benefits and costs of various approaches can be accomplished using computer codes that simulate the key physical processes including emissions, dilution and ventilation. The largest sources of PM2.5 in residences broadly are entry from outdoors and emissions from indoor combustion. The largest indoor sources are tobacco combustion (smoking), cooking and the burning of candles and incense. Data on the magnitude of PM2.5 and other pollutant emissions from these events and processes are required to conduct simulations for analysis. The goal of this study was to produce a database of pollutant emission rates associated with cooking and the burning of candles and incense. The target use of these data is for indoor air quality modeling.

  13. Low-dimensional modelling of flame dynamics in heated microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Federico; Legros, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents simulations of stoichiometric methane/air premixed flames into a microchannel at atmospheric pressure. These simulations result from numerical resolutions of reduced-order models. Indeed, combustion control into microchannels would be allowed by fast simulations that in turn enable real-time adjustments of the device's parameters. Former experimental studies reported the occurrence of a Flame Repetitive Extinction/Ignition (FREI) phenomenon provided that a temperature gradient is sustained at the channel's walls. Conducting unsteady one-dimensional simulations including complex chemistry, a late numerical study tried to explain the occurrence of this phenomenon. The present study therefore explores low-dimensional models that potentially reproduce the FREI phenomenon. Provided a calibration of some empirical constants, an unsteady two-dimensional model including one-step chemical reaction is shown to decently reproduce the FREI regime all along the range of mixture flow rates investigated ...

  14. Unsteady Flame Embedding (UFE) Subgrid Model for Turbulent Premixed Combustion Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    El-Asrag, Hossam

    2010-01-04

    We present a formulation for an unsteady subgrid model for premixed combustion in the flamelet regime. Since chemistry occurs at the unresolvable scales, it is necessary to introduce a subgrid model that accounts for the multi-scale nature of the problem using the information available on the resolved scales. Most of the current models are based on the laminar flamelet concept, and often neglect the unsteady effects. The proposed model\\'s primary objective is to encompass many of the flame/turbulence interactions unsteady features and history effects. In addition it provides a dynamic and accurate approach for computing the subgrid flame propagation velocity. The unsteady flame embedding approach (UFE) treats the flame as an ensemble of locally one-dimensional flames. A set of elemental one dimensional flames is used to describe the turbulent flame structure at the subgrid level. The stretched flame calculations are performed on the stagnation line of a strained flame using the unsteady filtered strain rate computed from the resolved- grid. The flame iso-surface is tracked using an accurate high-order level set formulation to propagate the flame interface at the coarse resolution with minimum numerical diffusion. In this paper the solver and the model components are introduced and used to investigate two unsteady flames with different Lewis numbers in the thin reaction zone regime. The results show that the UFE model captures the unsteady flame-turbulence interactions and the flame propagation speed reasonably well. Higher propagation speed is observed for the lower than unity Lewis number flame because of the impact of differential diffusion.

  15. Tabulated Combustion Model Development For Non-Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prithwish

    Turbulent non-premixed flames play a very important role in the field of engineering ranging from power generation to propulsion. The coupling of fluid mechanics and complicated combustion chemistry of fuels pose a challenge for the numerical modeling of these type of problems. Combustion modeling in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of the most important tools used for predictive modeling of complex systems and to understand the basic fundamentals of combustion. Traditional combustion models solve a transport equation of each species with a source term. In order to resolve the complex chemistry accurately it is important to include a large number of species. However, the computational cost is generally proportional to the cube of number of species. The presence of a large number of species in a flame makes the use of CFD computationally expensive and beyond reach for some applications or inaccurate when solved with simplified chemistry. For highly turbulent flows, it also becomes important to incorporate the effects of turbulence chemistry interaction (TCI). The aim of this work is to develop high fidelity combustion models based on the flamelet concept and to significantly advance the existing capabilities. A thorough investigation of existing models (Finite-rate chemistry and Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF)) and comparative study of combustion models was done initially on a constant volume combustion chamber with diesel fuel injection. The CFD modeling was validated with experimental results and was also successfully applied to a single cylinder diesel engine. The effect of number of flamelets on the RIF model and flamelet initialization strategies were studied. The RIF model with multiple flamelets is computationally expensive and a model was proposed on the frame work of RIF. The new model was based on tabulated chemistry and incorporated TCI effects. A multidimensional tabulated chemistry database generation code was developed based on the 1

  16. Numerical modelling of swirling diffusive flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra-Santos Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to study the mixing and combustion of two confined jets whose setup and operating conditions are those of the benchmark of Roback and Johnson. Numerical model solves 3D transient Navier Stokes for turbulent and reactive flows. Averaged velocity profiles using RNG swirl dominated k-epsilon model have been validated with experimental measurements from other sources for the non reactive case. The combustion model is Probability Density Function. Bearing in mind the annular jet has swirl number over 0.5, a vortex breakdown appears in the axis of the burner. Besides, the sudden expansion with a ratio of 2 in diameter between nozzle exits and the test chamber produces the boundary layer separation with the corresponding torus shape recirculation. Contrasting the mixing and combustion models, the last one produces the reduction of the vortex breakdown.

  17. Modelling of local extinction and reignition of the flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, A.; Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland); Kjaeldman, L. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, K. [Imatran Voima Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The influence of the relations between the chemical time scale and the turbulent time scale on local extinction in turbulent flames has been studied. The results from the numerical investigation of a non-swirling flame in a sudden-expansion combustor was compared with measurements and computations reported in the literature. The turbulence-chemistry interaction was modelled using the Eddy-Dissipation Concept (EDC). In the study, different turbulent time scales were used; the Kolmogorov related time scale proposed in the EDC model and two turbulent time scales related to k/{epsilon}. The chemical time scale has been obtained from a model based on calculations with a comprehensive chemical reaction scheme. The results indicate that the Kolmogorov related time scale of the EDC model is too short to be used as an extinction criterium. The two k/{epsilon} related time scales both resulted in a closer agreement between the numerically obtained and the measured results. The result indicates that the time scale used in the EDC model should be further investigated before confident results from modelling of flows with extinction effects can be obtained. (author)

  18. Modeling of Unsteady Heat Transfer in Flame-Wall Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Ihme, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    An extension of the flamelet/progress variable model is developed to include wall-heat loss effects due to convective heat-transfer. The model introduces a source term in the unsteady flamelet equations, which is modeled based on a modified temperature boundary condition of the counter-flow diffusion flame configuration. The thermochemical composition of the resulting non-adiabatic flamelet structure forms a three-dimensional manifold, which is parameterized in terms of mixture fraction, temperature, and scalar dissipation rate. The performance of the model is evaluated in an a priori study of a H2/O2 diffusion flame that is stabilized at an inert isothermal wall. Comparisons with DNS-data show that the developed non-adiabatic flamelet model accurately represents conditional and unconditional results for temperature, chemical composition, and wall heat transfer. Following this a priori investigation, the model is applied in LES of a coaxial H2/O2 rocket injector, and simulation results from this a posteriori analysis will be compared with experimental data.

  19. A two-dimensional analytical model of laminar flame in lycopodium dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbari, Alireza [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibi, Ashkan [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bidabadi, Mehdi [Combustion Research Laboratory, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    A two-dimensional analytical model is presented to determine the flame speed and temperature distribution of micro-sized lycopodium dust particles. This model is based on the assumptions that the particle burning rate in the flame front is controlled by the process of oxygen diffusion and the flame structure consists of preheat, reaction and post flame zones. In the first step, the energy conservation equations for fuel-lean condition are expressed in two dimensions, and then these differential equations are solved using the required boundary condition and matching the temperature and heat flux at the interfacial boundaries. Consequently, the obtained flame temperature and flame speed distributions in terms of different particle diameters and equivalence ratio for lean mixture are compared with the corresponding experimental data for lycopodium dust particles. Consequently, it is shown that this two-dimensional model demonstrates better agreement with the experimental results compared to the previous models.

  20. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  1. Flame quenching process in cavity based on model scramjet combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Pan; Jing Lei; Jian-Han Liang; Wei-Dong Liu; Zhen-Guo Wang

    2012-01-01

    The flame quenching process in combustors was observed by high speed camera and Schlieren system,at the inflow conditions of Ma =2.64,To =1 483 K,P0 =1.65 MPa,T =724 K and P =76.3 kPa.Changing process of the flame and shock structure in the combustor was clearly observed.The results revealed that the precombustion shock disappeared accompanied with the process in which the flame was blown out and withdrawed from the mainflow into the cavity and vanished after a short while.The rime of quenching process was extended by the cavity flame holder,and the ability of flame holding was enhanced by arranging more cavities in the downstream as well.The flame was blown from the upstream to the downstream,so the flame in the downstream of the cavity was quenched out later than that in the upstream.

  2. Eulerian–Lagrangian RANS Model Simulations of the NIST Turbulent Methanol Spray Flame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Shanglong; Roekaerts, Dirk; Pozarlik, Artur; Meer, van der Theo

    2015-01-01

    A methanol spray flame in a combustion chamber of the NIST was simulated using an Eulerian–Lagrangian RANS model. Experimental data and previous numerical investigations by other researchers on this flame were analyzed to develop methods for more comprehensive model validation. The inlet boundary co

  3. Flameless Candle Batteries Pose Risk to Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162882.html Flameless Candle Batteries Pose Risk to Kids If swallowed, serious damage ... WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Tiny button batteries that light up flameless "tea candles" pose a ...

  4. Sooting Characteristics and Modeling in Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Soot formation is one of the most complex phenomena in combustion science and an understanding of the underlying physico-chemical mechanisms is important. This work adopted both experimental and numerical approaches to study soot formation in laminar counterfl ow diffusion flames. As polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the precursors of soot particles, a detailed gas-phase chemical mechanism describing PAH growth upto coronene for fuels with 1 to 4 carbon atoms was validated against laminar premixed and counter- flow diffusion fl ames. Built upon this gas-phase mechanism, a soot model was then developed to describe soot inception and surface growth. This soot model was sub- sequently used to study fuel mixing effect on soot formation in counterfl ow diffusion flames. Simulation results showed that compared to the baseline case of the ethylene flame, the doping of 5% (by volume) propane or ethane in ethylene tends to increase the soot volume fraction and number density while keeping the average soot size almost unchanged. These results are in agreement with experimental observations. Laser light extinction/scattering as well as laser induced fluorescence techniques were used to study the effect of strain rate on soot and PAH formation in counterfl ow diffusion ames. The results showed that as strain rate increased both soot volume fraction and PAH concentrations decreased. The concentrations of larger PAH were more sensitive to strain rate compared to smaller ones. The effect of CO2 addition on soot formation was also studied using similar experimental techniques. Soot loading was reduced with CO2 dilution. Subsequent numerical modeling studies were able to reproduce the experimental trend. In addition, the chemical effect of CO2 addition was analyzed using numerical data. Critical conditions for the onset of soot were systematically studied in counterfl ow diffusion ames for various gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and at different strain rates. A sooting

  5. The i-V curve characteristics of burner-stabilized premixed flames: detailed and reduced models

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2016-07-17

    The i-V curve describes the current drawn from a flame as a function of the voltage difference applied across the reaction zone. Since combustion diagnostics and flame control strategies based on electric fields depend on the amount of current drawn from flames, there is significant interest in modeling and understanding i-V curves. We implement and apply a detailed model for the simulation of the production and transport of ions and electrons in one-dimensional premixed flames. An analytical reduced model is developed based on the detailed one, and analytical expressions are used to gain insight into the characteristics of the i-Vcurve for various flame configurations. In order for the reduced model to capture the spatial distribution of the electric field accurately, the concept of a dead zone region, where voltage is constant, is introduced, and a suitable closure for the spatial extent of the dead zone is proposed and validated. The results from the reduced modeling framework are found to be in good agreement with those from the detailed simulations. The saturation voltage is found to depend significantly on the flame location relative to the electrodes, and on the sign of the voltage difference applied. Furthermore, at sub-saturation conditions, the current is shown to increase linearly or quadratically with the applied voltage, depending on the flame location. These limiting behaviors exhibited by the reduced model elucidate the features of i-V curves observed experimentally. The reduced model relies on the existence of a thin layer where charges are produced, corresponding to the reaction zone of a flame. Consequently, the analytical model we propose is not limited to the study of premixed flames, and may be applied easily to others configurations, e.g.~nonpremixed counterflow flames.

  6. Transported PDF Modeling of Ethanol Spray in Hot-Diluted Coflow Flame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.; Naud, B.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical modeling study of one ethanol spray flame from the Delft Spray-in-Hot-Coflow (DSHC) database, which has been used to study Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution (MILD) combustion of liquid fuels (Correia Rodrigues et al. Combust. Flame 162(3), 759–773, 2015). A “Lag

  7. When a Standard Candle Flickers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Cherry, Michael L; Case, Gary L;

    2011-01-01

    The Crab Nebula is the only hard X-ray source in the sky that is both bright enough and steady enough to be easily used as a standard candle. As a result, it has been used as a normalization standard by most X-ray/gamma-ray telescopes. Although small-scale variations in the nebula are well known,...

  8. Composition of reaction intermediates for stoichiometric and fuel-rich dimethyl ether flames: flame-sampling mass spectrometry and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Chaos, Marcos; Yang, Bin; Cool, Terrill A; Dryer, Fred L; Kasper, Tina; Hansen, Nils; Osswald, Patrick; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina; Westmoreland, Phillip R

    2009-03-07

    Molecular-beam synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry and electron-ionization mass spectrometry are used for measurements of species mole fraction profiles for low-pressure premixed dimethyl ether (DME) flames with equivalence ratios ranging from near-stoichiometric conditions (Phi = 0.93) to fuel-rich flames near the limits of flat-flame stability (Phi = 1.86). The results are compared with predictions of a recently modified kinetic model for DME combustion [Zhao et al., Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 2008, 40, 1-18] that has been extensively tested against laminar flame speed measurements, jet-stirred reactor experiments, pyrolysis and oxidation experiments in flow reactors, species measurements for burner-stabilized flames and ignition delay measurements in shock tubes. The present comprehensive measurements of the composition of reaction intermediates over a broad range of equivalence ratios considerably extends the range of the previous experiments used for validation of this model and allows for an accurate determination of contributions of individual reactions to the formation or destruction of any given flame species. The excellent agreement between measurements and predictions found for all major and most intermediate species over the entire range of equivalence ratios provides a uniquely sensitive test of details of the kinetic model. The dependence on equivalence ratio of the characteristic reaction paths in DME flames is examined within the framework of reaction path analyses.

  9. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Li, Shan; Wang, Hu; Ren, Zhuyin

    2015-11-01

    Predictive simulations of turbulent premixed flames over a wide range of Damköhler numbers in the framework of Probability Density Function (PDF) method still remain challenging due to the deficiency in current micro-mixing models. In this work, a hybrid micro-mixing model, valid in both the flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime, is proposed. A priori testing of this model is first performed by examining the conditional scalar dissipation rate and conditional scalar diffusion in a 3-D direct numerical simulation dataset of a temporally evolving turbulent slot jet flame of lean premixed H2-air in the thin reaction zone regime. Then, this new model is applied to PDF simulations of the Piloted Premixed Jet Burner (PPJB) flames, which are a set of highly shear turbulent premixed flames and feature strong turbulence-chemistry interaction at high Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. Supported by NSFC 51476087 and NSFC 91441202.

  10. Subfilter Scale Combustion Modelling for Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazian, Nasim

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a powerful computational tool for modelling turbulent combustion processes. However, for reactive flows, LES is still under significant development. In particular, for turbulent premixed flames, a considerable complication of LES is that the flame thickness is generally much smaller than the LES filter width such that the flame front and chemical reactions cannot be resolved on the grid. Accurate and robust subfilter-scale (SFS) models of the unresolved turbulence-chemistry interactions are therefore required and studies are needed to evaluate and improve them. In this thesis, a detailed comparison and evaluation of five different SFS models for turbulence- chemistry interactions in LES of premixed flames is presented. These approaches include both flamelet- and non-flamelet-based models, coupled with simple or tabulated chemistry. The mod- elling approaches considered herein are: algebraic- and transport-equation variants of the flame surface density (FSD) model, the presumed conditional moment (PCM) with flame prolongation of intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (FPI) tabulated chemistry, or PCM-FPI approach, evaluated with two different presumed probability density function (PDF) models; and conditional source-term estimation (CSE) approach. The predicted LES solutions are compared to the existing laboratory-scale experimental observation of Bunsen-type turbulent premixed methane-air flames, corresponding to lean and stoichiometric conditions lying from the upper limit of the flamelet regime to well within the thin reaction zones regime of the standard regimes diagram. Direct comparison of different SFS approaches allows investigation of stability and performance of the models, while the weaknesses and strengths of each approach are identified. Evaluation of algebraic and transported FSD models highlights the importance of non-equilibrium transport in turbulent premixed flames. The effect of the PDF type for the reaction progress

  11. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  12. Numerical modeling of sooting tendencies in a laminar co-flow diffusion flame

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan, Yuan; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to predict the experimental sooting tendencies [Combust. Flame 148 (2007) 210–222] from a detailed chemical mechanism with relatively low computational cost, using a flamelet-based model. Towards that goal, direct numerical simulations using finite-rate chemistry are conducted on a methane–air confined axisymmetric co-flow diffusion flame to provide reference data. Soot transport model is excluded in these direct simulations for both simplicity and to be unbiased f...

  13. Model of hydrogen-flame interactions with water droplets. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, A.E.

    1982-06-01

    A computer model is developed to study the effects of water droplets on laminar hydrogen deflagrations. The model provides a one-dimensional, transient hydrogen-flame capability using a kinetic chemistry mechanism involving a group of thirteen reactions. Transport equations are solved for mass, thermal energy, and individual species for the gas mixture along with equations for droplet continuity, thermal energy, and size. Calculations show significant cooling of stoichiometric flames for small droplet sizes (20 micron diameters).

  14. Great (Flame) Balls of Fire! Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number-2 (SOFBALL-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronney, Paul; Weiland, Karen J.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Everyone knows that an automobile engine wastes fuel and energy when it runs with a fuel-rich mixture. 'Lean' burning, mixing in more air and less fuel, is better for the environment. But lean mixtures also lead to engine misfiring and rough operation. No one knows the ultimate limits for lean operation, for 'weak' combustion that is friendly to the environment while still moving us around. This is where the accidental verification of a decades-old prediction may have strong implications for designing and running low-emissions engines in the 21st century. In 1944, Soviet physicist Yakov Zeldovich predicted that stationary, spherical flames are possible under limited conditions in lean fuel-air mixtures. Dr. Paul Ronney of the University of Southern California accidentally discovered such 'flame balls' in experiments with lean hydrogen-air mixtures in 1984 during drop-tower experiments that provided just 2.2 seconds of near weightlessness. Experiments aboard NASA's low-g aircraft confirmed the results, but a thorough investigation was hampered by the aircraft's bumpy ride. And stable flame balls can only exist in microgravity. The potential for investigating combustion at the limits of flammability, and the implications for spacecraft fire safety, led to the Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL) experiment flown twice aboard the Space Shuttle on the Microgravity Sciences Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) in 1997. Success there led to the planned reflight on STS-107. Flame balls are the weakest fires yet produced in space or on Earth. Typically each flame ball produced only 1 watt of thermal power. By comparison, a birthday candle produces 50 watts. The Lewis-number measures the rate of diffusion of fuel into the flame ball relative to the rate of diffusion of heat away from the flame ball. Lewis-number mixtures conduct heat poorly. Hydrogen and methane are the only fuels that provide low enough Lewis-numbers to produce stable flame balls, and even then only for

  15. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of premixed nitromethane flames at low pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kuiwen; Li, Yuyang; Yuan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and modeling study is reported on three premixed nitromethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with equivalence ratios (ϕ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. The mole fraction profiles of more...... against experimental results of all three flames. The computed predictions showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. Based on a rate-of-production analysis, reaction pathway diagrams were obtained to describe the hydrocarbon oxidation process and nitrogenous species chemistry...

  16. Combustion chemistry of alcohols: Experimental and modeled structure of a premixed 2-methylbutanol flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lucassen, Arnas

    2014-06-14

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of 2-methylbutanol combustion chemistry in low-pressure premixed flames. This chemistry is of particular interest to study because this compound is potentially a lignocellulosic-based, next-generation biofuel. The detailed chemical structure of a stoichiometric low-pressure (25 Torr) flame was determined using flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry. A total of 55 species were identified and subsequently quantitative mole fraction profiles as function of distance from the burner surface were determined. In an independent effort, a detailed flame chemistry model for 2-methylbutanol was assembled based on recent knowledge gained from combustion chemistry studies for butanol isomers ([Sarathy et al. Combust. Flame 159 (6) (2012) 2028-2055]) and iso-pentanol (3-methylbutanol) [Sarathy et al. Combust. Flame 160 (12) (2013) 2712-2728]. Experimentally determined and modeled mole fraction profiles were compared to demonstrate the model\\'s capabilities. Examples of individual mole fraction profiles are discussed together with the most significant fuel consumption pathways to highlight the combustion chemistry of 2-methylbutanol. Discrepancies between experimental and modeling results are used to suggest areas where improvement of the kinetic model would be needed. © 2014.

  17. Candle and candle wax containing metathesis and metathesis-like products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy A; Tupy, Michael J; Abraham, Timothy W; Shafer, Andy

    2014-04-01

    A wax comprises a metathesis product and/or a product that resembles, at least in part, a product which may be formed from a metathesis reaction. The wax may be used to form articles, for example, candles (container candles, votive candles, and/or a pillar candles), crayons, fire logs, or tarts. The wax commonly includes other components in addition to the metathesis product.

  18. Direct simulation and modeling of flame-wall interaction for premixed turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinsot, T.J.; Haworth, D.C.; Bruneaux, G. (CNRS, Toulouse (France). Inst. de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse General Motors Research, Warren, MI (United States) Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France))

    1993-10-01

    The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls is studied using a two-dimensional full Navier-Stokes solver with simple chemistry. The effects of wall distance on the local and global flame structure are investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxes during quenching are computed in laminar cases and are found to be comparable to experimental and analytical results. For turbulent cases, it is shown that quenching distances and maximum heat fluxes remain of the same order as for laminar flames. Based on simulation results, a law-of-the-wall'' model is derived to describe the interaction between a turbulent premixed flame and a wall. This model is constructed to provide reasonable behavior of flame surface density near a wall under the assumption that flame -- wall interaction takes place at scales smaller than the computational mesh. It can be implemented in conjunction with any of several recent flamelet models based on a modeled surface density equation, with no additional constraints on mesh size or time step. Preliminary tests of this model are presented for the case of a spark-ignited piston engine.

  19. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of premixed nitroethane flames at low pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kuiwen; Zhang, Lidong; Xie, Mingfeng

    2013-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study is reported on three premixed nitroethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with the equivalence ratios (Φ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Over 30 flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrome......An experimental and kinetic modeling study is reported on three premixed nitroethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with the equivalence ratios (Φ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Over 30 flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass...... predictions have shown satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. Basing on the rate-of-production analysis, the reaction pathways that feature the combustion of nitroethane were revealed, including the primary decomposition of C–N bond fission, the oxidation of C2 and C1 hydrocarbons...

  20. DNS and modeling of the interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsot, T. J.; Haworth, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls is studied using a two-dimensional full Navier-Stokes solver with simple chemistry. The effects of wall distance on the local and global flame structure are investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxes during quenching are computed in laminar cases and are found to be comparable to experimental and analytical results. For turbulent cases, it is shown that quenching distances and maximum heat fluxes remain of the same order as for laminar flames. Based on simulation results, a 'law-of-the-wall' model is derived to describe the interaction between a turbulent premixed flame and a wall. This model is constructed to provide reasonable behavior of flame surface density near a wall under the assumption that flame-wall interaction takes place at scales smaller than the computational mesh. It can be implemented in conjunction with any of several recent flamelet models based on a modeled surface density equation, with no additional constraints on mesh size or time step.

  1. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent non-premixed methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, J. M.; Chen, J. H.; Day, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulent non-premixed stoichiometric methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics have been studied using the direct numerical simulation approach. The simulations include realistic chemical kinetics, and the molecular transport is modeled with constant Lewis numbers for individual species. The effect of turbulence on the internal flame structure and extinction characteristics of methane-air flames is evaluated. Consistent with earlier DNS with simple one-step chemistry, the flame is wrinkled and in some regions extinguished by the turbulence, while the turbulence is weakened in the vicinity of the flame due to a combination of dilatation and an increase in kinematic viscosity. Unlike previous results, reignition is observed in the present simulations. Lewis number effects are important in determining the local stoichiometry of the flame. The results presented in this work are preliminary but demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating reduced kinetics for the oxidation of methane with direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence to evaluate the limitations of various levels of reduction in the kinetics and to address the formation of thermal and prompt NO(x).

  2. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Timescale Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Kuron, Mike; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-01

    Transported probability density function (TPDF) method features the generality for all combustion regimes, which is attractive for turbulent combustion simulations. However, the modeling of micromixing due to molecular diffusion is still considered to be a primary challenge for TPDF method, especially in turbulent premixed flames. Recently, a hybrid mixing rate model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames has been proposed, which recovers the correct mixing rates in the limits of flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime while at the same time aims to properly account for the transition in between. In this work, this model is employed in TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed methane-air slot burner flames. The model performance is assessed by comparing the results from both direct numerical simulation (DNS) and conventional constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing rate model. This work is Granted by NSFC 51476087 and 91441202.

  3. Chemical kinetic modeling of a methane opposed flow diffusion flame and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N.M., Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vincitore, A.M.; Senka, S.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lutz, A.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of an opposed flow, methane diffusion flame is studied using a chemical kinetic model and the results are compared to experimental measurements. The chemical kinetic paths leading to aromatics and polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the diffusion flame are identified. These paths all involve resonantly stabilized radicals which include propargyl, allyl, cyclopentadienyl, and benzyl radicals. The modeling results show reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements for the large hydrocarbon aliphatic compounds, aromatics, and PAHs. the benzene was predicted to be formed primarily by the reaction sequence of Allyl plus Propargyl equals Fulvene plus H plus H followed by fulvene isomerization to benzene. Naphthalene was modeled using the reaction of benzyl with propargyl, while the combination of cyclopentadienyl radicals were shown to be a minor contributor in the diffusion flame. The agreement between the model and experiment for the four-ring PAHs was poor.

  4. CFD modeling using PDF approach for investigating the flame length in rotary kilns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, H. F.; Specht, E.; Fouda, A.; Bin-Mahfouz, Abdullah S.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are performed to investigate the flame length characteristics in rotary kilns using probability density function (PDF) approach. A commercial CFD package (ANSYS-Fluent) is employed for this objective. A 2-D axisymmetric model is applied to study the effect of both operating and geometric parameters of rotary kiln on the characteristics of the flame length. Three types of gaseous fuel are used in the present work; methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and biogas (50 % CH4 + 50 % CO2). Preliminary comparison study of 2-D modeling outputs of free jet flames with available experimental data is carried out to choose and validate the proper turbulence model for the present numerical simulations. The results showed that the excess air number, diameter of kiln air entrance, radiation modeling consideration and fuel type have remarkable effects on the flame length characteristics. Numerical correlations for the rotary kiln flame length are presented in terms of the studied kiln operating and geometric parameters within acceptable error.

  5. CFD modeling using PDF approach for investigating the flame length in rotary kilns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, H. F.; Specht, E.; Fouda, A.; Bin-Mahfouz, Abdullah S.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are performed to investigate the flame length characteristics in rotary kilns using probability density function (PDF) approach. A commercial CFD package (ANSYS-Fluent) is employed for this objective. A 2-D axisymmetric model is applied to study the effect of both operating and geometric parameters of rotary kiln on the characteristics of the flame length. Three types of gaseous fuel are used in the present work; methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and biogas (50 % CH4 + 50 % CO2). Preliminary comparison study of 2-D modeling outputs of free jet flames with available experimental data is carried out to choose and validate the proper turbulence model for the present numerical simulations. The results showed that the excess air number, diameter of kiln air entrance, radiation modeling consideration and fuel type have remarkable effects on the flame length characteristics. Numerical correlations for the rotary kiln flame length are presented in terms of the studied kiln operating and geometric parameters within acceptable error.

  6. Fabrication of Water Jet Resistant and Thermally Stable Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Spray Coating of Candle Soot Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahtan, Talal F; Gondal, Mohammed A; Alade, Ibrahim O; Dastageer, Mohammed A

    2017-08-08

    A facile synthesis method for highly stable carbon nanoparticle (CNP) dispersion in acetone by incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame is presented. The synthesized CNP dispersion is the mixture of graphitic and amorphous carbon nanoparticles of the size range of 20-50 nm and manifested the mesoporosity with an average pore size of 7 nm and a BET surface area of 366 m(2)g(-1). As an application of this material, the carbon nanoparticle dispersion was spray coated (spray-based coating) on a glass surface to fabricate superhydrophobic (water contact angle > 150° and sliding angle water jet resistance and thermal stability up to 400 °C compared to the surfaces fabricated from direct candle flame soot deposition (candle-based coating). This study proved that water jet resistant and thermally stable superhydrophobic surfaces can be easily fabricated by simple spray coating of CNP dispersion gathered from incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame and this technique can be used for different applications with the potential for the large scale fabrication.

  7. Monte Carlo calculation model for heat radiation of inclined cylindrical flames and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhangyu; Ji, Jingwei; Huang, Yuankai; Wang, Zhiyi; Li, Qingjie

    2017-02-01

    Based on Monte Carlo method, a calculation model and its C++ calculating program for radiant heat transfer from an inclined cylindrical flame are proposed. In this model, the total radiation energy of the inclined cylindrical flame is distributed equally among a certain number of energy beams, which are emitted randomly from the flame surface. The incident heat flux on a surface is calculated by counting the number of energy beams which could reach the surface. The paper mainly studies the geometrical evaluation criterion for validity of energy beams emitted by inclined cylindrical flames and received by other surfaces. Compared to Mudan's formula results for a straight cylinder or a cylinder with 30° tilt angle, the calculated view factors range from 0.0043 to 0.2742 and the predicted view factors agree well with Mudan's results. The changing trend and values of incident heat fluxes computed by the model is consistent with experimental data measured by Rangwala et al. As a case study, incident heat fluxes on a gasoline tank, both the side and the top surface are calculated by the model. The heat radiation is from an inclined cylindrical flame generated by another 1000 m3 gasoline tank 4.6 m away from it. The cone angle of the flame to the adjacent oil tank is 45° and the polar angle is 0°. The top surface and the side surface of the tank are divided into 960 and 5760 grids during the calculation, respectively. The maximum incident heat flux on the side surface is 39.64 and 51.31 kW/m2 on the top surface. Distributions of the incident heat flux on the surface of the oil tank and on the ground around the fire tank are obtained, too.

  8. Human health risk evaluation of selected VOC, SVOC and particulate emissions from scented candles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Thomas; Vitale, Danielle; Joachim, Fred J; Smith, Ben; Cruse, Lynn; Mascarenhas, Reuben; Schneider, Scott; Singal, Madhuri

    2014-06-01

    Airborne compounds in the indoor environment arise from a wide variety of sources such as environmental tobacco smoke, heating and cooking, construction materials as well as outdoor sources. To understand the contribution of scented candles to the indoor load of airborne substances and particulate matter, candle emission testing was undertaken in environmentally controlled small and large emission chambers. Candle emission rates, calculated on the basis of measured chamber concentrations of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC, SVOC) and particulate matter (PM), were used to predict their respective indoor air concentrations in a standard EU-based dwelling using 2 models: the widely accepted ConsExpo 1-box inhalation model and the recently developed RIFM 2-box indoor air dispersion model. The output from both models has been used to estimate more realistic consumer exposure concentrations of specific chemicals and PM in candle emissions. Potential consumer health risks associated with the candle emissions were characterized by comparing the exposure concentrations with existing indoor or ambient air quality guidelines or, where not existent, to established toxicity thresholds. On the basis of this investigation it was concluded that under normal conditions of use scented candles do not pose known health risks to the consumer.

  9. A Priori Assessment of Algebraic Flame Surface Density Models in the Context of Large Eddy Simulation for Nonunity Lewis Number Flames in the Thin Reaction Zones Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Katragadda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of algebraic flame surface density (FSD models has been assessed for flames with nonunity Lewis number (Le in the thin reaction zones regime, using a direct numerical simulation (DNS database of freely propagating turbulent premixed flames with Le ranging from 0.34 to 1.2. The focus is on algebraic FSD models based on a power-law approach, and the effects of Lewis number on the fractal dimension D and inner cut-off scale ηi have been studied in detail. It has been found that D is strongly affected by Lewis number and increases significantly with decreasing Le. By contrast, ηi remains close to the laminar flame thermal thickness for all values of Le considered here. A parameterisation of D is proposed such that the effects of Lewis number are explicitly accounted for. The new parameterisation is used to propose a new algebraic model for FSD. The performance of the new model is assessed with respect to results for the generalised FSD obtained from explicitly LES-filtered DNS data. It has been found that the performance of the most existing models deteriorates with decreasing Lewis number, while the newly proposed model is found to perform as well or better than the most existing algebraic models for FSD.

  10. Impact of chemical kinetic model reduction on premixed turbulent flame characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, Aaron; Niemeyer, Kyle

    2016-11-01

    The use of detailed chemical kinetic models for direct numerical simulations (DNS) is prohibitively expensive. Current best practice for the development of reduced models is to match laminar burning parameters such as flame speed, thickness, and ignition delay time to predictions of the detailed chemical kinetic models. Prior studies using reduced models implicitly assumed that matching the homogeneous and laminar properties of the detailed model will result in similar behavior in a turbulent environment. However, this assumption has not been tested. Fillo et al. recently demonstrated experimentally that real jet fuels with similar chemistry and laminar burning parameters exhibit different turbulent flame speeds under the same flow conditions. This result raises questions about the validity of current best practices for the development of reduced chemical kinetic models for turbulent DNS. This study will investigate the validity of current best practices. Turbulent burning parameters, including flame speed, thickness, and stretch rate, will be compared for three skeletal mechanisms of the Princeton POSF 4658 mechanism, reduced using current best practice methods. DNS calculations of premixed, high-Karlovitz flames will be compared to determine if these methods are valid. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1314109-DGE.

  11. Modeling studies of a turbulent pulsed jet flame using LES/PDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Wang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    The combustion field in a pulsed turbulent piloted jet flame is studied using an advanced large eddy simulation (LES) / probability density function (PDF) method. Measurement data with a joint OH-PLIF/OH* chemiluminescence/LDV system are available including the temporal series of the axial velocity and planar OH images. A time-dependent inflow condition is specified based on the measurement data. A direct comparison of the mean and rms velocities from the calculations and from the measurement shows a satisfactory prediction of the flow fields by using the employed modeling methods. The predicted OH mass fractions are compared qualitatively with the measured OH images at selected temporal and spatial locations. The comparison shows a good agreement. Conditional quantities and flame index are extracted from the simulations to examine the bimodal and multi-regime combustion dynamics in the flame. This paper is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1336075.

  12. DC field response of one-dimensional flames using an ionized layer model

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-11-18

    We develop a simplified model to better explain electric current response when direct current (DC) is applied to a flame. In particular, different current responses have been observed by changing the polarity of the DC in a sub-saturated current regime that results from the presence of ions and electrons in the flame zone. A flame zone was modeled as a thin, ionized layer located in one-dimensional DC electric fields. We derived simplified model-governing equations from species equations by implementing mobility differences dependent on the type of charged particle, particularly between ions and electrons; we performed experiments to substantiate the model. Results showed that the sub-saturated current and local field intensity were significantly influenced by the polarity of the DC because of the combined effect of unequal mobility of charged particles and the position of the ionized layer in the gap relative to two electrodes. When an energized electrode is close to the ionized layer, applying a negative DC causes a more rapid increase in current than by applying a positive DC to the same electrode. Results from our experimental measurement of current using counterflow diffusion flames agreed qualitatively well with the model predictions. A sensitivity analysis using dimensional and non-dimensional parameters also supported the importance of the mobility difference and the relative location of the ionized layer on the electric current response.

  13. Modeling ethanol spray jet flame in hot-diluted coflow with transported PDF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.; Naud, B.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    MILD Combustion, also known as flameless combustion, is attracting wide scientific interest due to its potential of high efficiency and low NOx emission. This paper focuses on the numerical modeling of one of the ethanol spray flame cases from the Delft Spray-in-Hot-Coflow (DSHC) burner, which has

  14. Numerical modeling of turbulent jet diffusion flames in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández, J.; Crespo, A.; Duijm, N.J.

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of turbulent jet diffusion flames of natural gas in air is predicted using a finite-volume procedure for solving the flow equations. The model is three dimensional, elliptic and based on the conserved-scalar approach and the laminar flamelet concept. A laminar flamelet prescription for

  15. Modeling flame structure in wildland fires using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    David O. Lignell; Elizabeth I. Monson; Mark A. Finney

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of flame propagation in wildland fire fuel beds is of critical importance for understanding and quantifying fire spread rates. Recent observations and experiments have indicated the dominance of flame propagation by direct contact between flames and unburnt fuel, as opposed to propagation via radiative heating alone. It is postulated that effects of...

  16. Calculated flame temperature (CFT) modeling of fuel mixture lower flammability limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fuman; Rogers, William J; Mannan, M Sam

    2010-02-15

    Heat loss can affect experimental flammability limits, and it becomes indispensable to quantify flammability limits when apparatus quenching effect becomes significant. In this research, the lower flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures are predicted using calculated flame temperature (CFT) modeling, which is based on the principle of energy conservation. Specifically, the hydrocarbon mixture lower flammability limit is quantitatively correlated to its final flame temperature at non-adiabatic conditions. The modeling predictions are compared with experimental observations to verify the validity of CFT modeling, and the minor deviations between them indicated that CFT modeling can represent experimental measurements very well. Moreover, the CFT modeling results and Le Chatelier's Law predictions are also compared, and the agreement between them indicates that CFT modeling provides a theoretical justification for the Le Chatelier's Law.

  17. When a Standard Candle Flickers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Cherry, Michael L; Case, Gary L

    2011-01-01

    The Crab Nebula is the only hard X-ray source in the sky that is both bright enough and steady enough to be easily used as a standard candle. As a result, it has been used as a normalization standard by most X-ray/gamma-ray telescopes. Although small-scale variations in the nebula are well known......, since the start of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2008 August, a ~ 7% (70 mCrab) decline has been observed in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15-50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline is independently confirmed in the ~ 15-50 ke......-100 keV band with GBM, Swift /BAT, and INTEGRAL /IBIS. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE /PCA since 1999 is consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes are nebular. Correlated variations in the Crab Nebula flux on a ~ 3 year timescale are also seen independently...

  18. When A Standard Candle Flickers

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Baumgartner, Wayne H; Beklen, Elif; Bhat, P Narayana; Briggs, Michael S; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Case, Gary L; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Finger, Mark H; Gehrels, Neil; Greiner, Jochen; Jahoda, Keith; Jenke, Peter; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Krimm, Hans A; Kuulkers, Erik; Meegan, Charles A; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert; Rodi, James C; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; Skinner, Gerald K; Swartz, Doug; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The Crab Nebula is the only hard X-ray source in the sky that is both bright enough and steady enough to be easily used as a standard candle. As a result, it has been used as a normalization standard by most X-ray/gamma ray telescopes. Although small-scale variations in the nebula are well-known, since the start of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in August 2008, a ~ 7% (70 mcrab) decline has been observed in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline is independently confirmed with three other instruments: the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array (RXTE/PCA), and the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory Imager on Board INTEGRAL (IBIS). A similar decline is also observed in the ~3 - 15 keV data from the RXTE/PCA and INTEGRAL Joint European Monitor (JEM-X) and in the 50 - 100 keV band with GBM and INTEGRAL/IBIS. Observations from 100 to 500...

  19. Propagation Limits of High Pressure Cool Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yiguang

    2016-11-01

    The flame speeds and propagation limits of premixed cool flames at elevated pressures with radiative heat loss are numerically modelled using dimethyl ether mixtures. The primary focus is paid on the effects of pressure, mixture dilution, flame size, and heat loss on cool flame propagation. The results showed that cool flames exist on both fuel lean and fuel rich sides and thus dramatically extend the lean and rich flammability limits. There exist three different flame regimes, hot flame, cool flame, and double flame. A new flame flammability diagram including both cool flames and hot flames is obtained at elevated pressure. The results show that pressure significantly changes cool flame propagation. It is found that the increases of pressure affects the propagation speeds of lean and rich cool flames differently due to the negative temperature coefficient effect. On the lean side, the increase of pressure accelerates the cool flame chemistry and shifts the transition limit of cool flame to hot flame to lower equivalence ratio. At lower pressure, there is an extinction transition from hot flame to cool flame. However, there exists a critical pressure above which the cool flame to hot flame transition limit merges with the lean flammability limit of the hot flame, resulting in a direct transition from hot flame to cool flame. On the other hand, the increase of dilution reduces the heat release of hot flame and promotes cool flame formation. Moreover, it is shown that a smaller flame size and a higher heat loss also extend the cool flame transition limit and promote cool flame formation.

  20. Combustion Characterization and Model Fuel Development for Micro-tubular Flame-assisted Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcarek, Ryan J; Garrett, Michael J; Baskaran, Amrish; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2016-10-02

    Combustion based power generation has been accomplished for many years through a number of heat engine systems. Recently, a move towards small scale power generation and micro combustion as well as development in fuel cell research has created new means of power generation that combine solid oxide fuel cells with open flames and combustion exhaust. Instead of relying upon the heat of combustion, these solid oxide fuel cell systems rely on reforming of the fuel via combustion to generate syngas for electrochemical power generation. Procedures were developed to assess the combustion by-products under a wide range of conditions. While theoretical and computational procedures have been developed for assessing fuel-rich combustion exhaust in these applications, experimental techniques have also emerged. The experimental procedures often rely upon a gas chromatograph or mass spectrometer analysis of the flame and exhaust to assess the combustion process as a fuel reformer and means of heat generation. The experimental techniques developed in these areas have been applied anew for the development of the micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cell. The protocol discussed in this work builds on past techniques to specify a procedure for characterizing fuel-rich combustion exhaust and developing a model fuel-rich combustion exhaust for use in flame-assisted fuel cell testing. The development of the procedure and its applications and limitations are discussed.

  1. Study and modeling of finite rate chemistry effects in turbulent non-premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervisch, Luc

    1993-01-01

    The development of numerical models that reflect some of the most important features of turbulent reacting flows requires information about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between turbulent and chemical processes is so strong that it is extremely difficult to isolate the role played by one individual physical phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (hereafter DNS) allows us to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interaction in some restricted but completely defined situations. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting regimes: the fast chemistry case, where the turbulent flame can be pictured as a random distribution of local chemical equilibrium problems; and the slow chemistry case, where the chemistry integrates in time the turbulent fluctuations. The Damkoehler number, ratio of a mechanical time scale to chemical time scale, is used to distinguish between these regimes. Today most of the industrial computer codes are able to perform predictions in the hypothesis of local equilibrium chemistry using a presumed shape for the probability density function (pdt) of the conserved scalar. However, the finite rate chemistry situation is of great interest because industrial burners usually generate regimes in which, at some points, the flame is undergoing local extinction or at least non-equilibrium situations. Moreover, this variety of situations strongly influences the production of pollutants. To quantify finite rate chemistry effect, the interaction between a non-premixed flame and a free decaying turbulence is studied using DNS. The attention is focused on the dynamic of extinction, and an attempt is made to quantify the effect of the reaction on the small scale mixing process. The unequal diffusivity effect is also addressed. Finally, a simple turbulent combustion model based on the DNS observations and tractable in real flow configurations is proposed.

  2. Numerical simulation of turbulent diffusion flames using flamelet models on unstructured meshes

    OpenAIRE

    Ventosa Molina, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis aims at developing numerical methods and algorithms for the efficient simulation of diffusion flames in the flamelet regime. To tackle turbulent chemically reacting flows a double framework is used in the present thesis. On the one hand, flow description is performed in the context of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques. On the other hand, thermochemistry is modelled by means of flamelet models. The flamelet regime is characterised by the split of the combustion process...

  3. Joint PDF Modelling of Local Extinction and Pollutant Formation in Non-premixed Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing; Xu, Jun; Pope, Stephen B.

    2000-11-01

    A velocity-composition-turbulence frequency joint PDF approach is applied to model piloted methane/air turbulent diffusion flames investigated experimentally by Barlow and Frank. These flames exhibit an increasing amount of local extinction with increasing jet velocity, and are good cases to test the capabilities of turbulence-chemistry and combustion-chemistry models to account for local extinction and pollutant formation. In this study, the chemistry is an augmented reduced mechanism (19 species and 15 reaction steps) derived from the GRI2.11 detailed mechanism for methane oxidation by Sung and co-workers. The mechanism takes account of C2 chemistry, and the formation of oxides of nitrogen is treated by the inclusion of NO, NH3 and HCN. The turbulence models include the simplified Langevin model (SLM) for velocity, a stochastic model of Jayesh and Pope for turbulence frequency, the EMST model of Subramaniam and Pope for molecular mixing. The computational method for the solution of the modeled joint PDF equation features moving particles in a Lagrangian framework. The reaction calculations are performed via the in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm of Pope. The calculation results show good agreement with the experimental data, including the minor species NO and CO. The increase of local extinction (quantitatively characterized by a single variable - burning index) with increasing jet velocity is also accurately predicted by the calculations. It is founded that a small change of the inlet pilot temperature has a significant influence on the calculations and a systematic study has been made to investigate this sensitivity. For the flame with lowest velocity, the large influence is mainly observed close to the nozzle, while for the flame close to extinction, the calculated behavior is exquisitely sensitive to the pilot temperature, i.e., a 10K lower pilot temperature may cause global extinction.

  4. Soot and Spectral Radiation Modeling for a High-Pressure Turbulent Spray Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreryo-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Simulations are performed of a transient high-pressure turbulent n-dodecane spray flame under engine-relevant conditions. An unsteady RANS formulation is used, with detailed chemistry, a semi-empirical two-equation soot model, and a particle-based transported composition probability density function (PDF) method to account for unresolved turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature. Results from the PDF model are compared with those from a locally well-stirred reactor (WSR) model to quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry-soot interactions. Computed liquid and vapor penetration versus time, ignition delay, and flame lift-off height are in good agreement with experiment, and relatively small differences are seen between the WSR and PDF models for these global quantities. Computed soot levels and spatial soot distributions from the WSR and PDF models show large differences, with PDF results being in better agreement with experimental measurements. An uncoupled photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution is used to compute the spectral intensity distribution of the radiation leaving the flame. This provides new insight into the relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation, and the importance of turbulent fluctuations on radiative heat transfer.

  5. 75 FR 38121 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Petroleum Wax Candles From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from China... antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from China would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  6. Monte Carlo method of radiative transfer applied to a turbulent flame modeling with LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Gicquel, Olivier; Veynante, Denis; Taine, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Radiative transfer plays an important role in the numerical simulation of turbulent combustion. However, for the reason that combustion and radiation are characterized by different time scales and different spatial and chemical treatments, the radiation effect is often neglected or roughly modelled. The coupling of a large eddy simulation combustion solver and a radiation solver through a dedicated language, CORBA, is investigated. Two formulations of Monte Carlo method (Forward Method and Emission Reciprocity Method) employed to resolve RTE have been compared in a one-dimensional flame test case using three-dimensional calculation grids with absorbing and emitting media in order to validate the Monte Carlo radiative solver and to choose the most efficient model for coupling. Then the results obtained using two different RTE solvers (Reciprocity Monte Carlo method and Discrete Ordinate Method) applied on a three-dimensional flame holder set-up with a correlated-k distribution model describing the real gas medium spectral radiative properties are compared not only in terms of the physical behavior of the flame, but also in computational performance (storage requirement, CPU time and parallelization efficiency). To cite this article: J. Zhang et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  7. Numerical modeling for flame dynamics and combustion processes in a two-sectional porous burner with a detailed chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Jun; Kim, Yong Mo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A two-dimensional model with the detailed chemistry and variable transport properties has been applied to numerically investigate the combustion processes and flame dynamics in the bilayer porous burner. To account for the velocity transition and diffusion influenced by solid matrix, porosity terms are included in the governing equations. Heat transfer coefficient is calculated by Nusselt number to reflect the effect of gas velocity, pore diameter, and material properties. The detailed chemistry is based on GRI 2.11. Numerical results indicate that the present approach is capable of the essential features of the premixed combustion in the porous media in terms of the precise flame structure, pollutant formation, and stabilization characteristics. In this bilayer porous burner, the heat transferred from the downstream flame zone is conducted to the upstream flame region through the solid matrix. This heat transfer process through the solid matrix substantially influences the flame structure and stabilization characteristics in the porous media. The predicted results are compared with experimental data in terms of temperature for gaseous mixture and solid matrix, CO and NO emission level. Based on numerical results, a precise comparison has been made for the freely propagating premixed flames and the premixed flames with a porous media for various inlet velocities.

  8. Sub-grid scale combustion models for large eddy simulation of unsteady premixed flame propagation around obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sarli, Valeria; Di Benedetto, Almerinda; Russo, Gennaro

    2010-08-15

    In this work, an assessment of different sub-grid scale (sgs) combustion models proposed for large eddy simulation (LES) of steady turbulent premixed combustion (Colin et al., Phys. Fluids 12 (2000) 1843-1863; Flohr and Pitsch, Proc. CTR Summer Program, 2000, pp. 61-82; Kim and Menon, Combust. Sci. Technol. 160 (2000) 119-150; Charlette et al., Combust. Flame 131 (2002) 159-180; Pitsch and Duchamp de Lageneste, Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 2001-2008) was performed to identify the model that best predicts unsteady flame propagation in gas explosions. Numerical results were compared to the experimental data by Patel et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 1849-1854) for premixed deflagrating flame in a vented chamber in the presence of three sequential obstacles. It is found that all sgs combustion models are able to reproduce qualitatively the experiment in terms of step of flame acceleration and deceleration around each obstacle, and shape of the propagating flame. Without adjusting any constants and parameters, the sgs model by Charlette et al. also provides satisfactory quantitative predictions for flame speed and pressure peak. Conversely, the sgs combustion models other than Charlette et al. give correct predictions only after an ad hoc tuning of constants and parameters.

  9. Mathematical modelling of flue gas tempered flames produced from pulverised coal fired with oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breussin, A.; Weber, R.; Kamp, W.L. van de

    1997-10-01

    The combustion of pulverised coal in conventional utility boilers contributes significantly to global CO{sub 2} emissions. Because atmospheric air is used as the combustion medium, the exhaust gases of conventional pulverised coal fired utility boilers contain approximately 15 % CO{sub 2}. This relatively low concentration makes separating and recovering CO{sub 2} a very energy-intensive process. This process can be simplified if N{sub 2} is eliminated from the comburent before combustion by firing the pulverised coal with pure oxygen. However, this concept will result in very high flames temperatures. Flue gas recirculation can be used to moderate the flame temperature, whilst generating a flue gas with a CO{sub 2} concentration of 95 %. In this presentation, both experimental and modelling work will be described. The former deals with identifying the issues related to the combustion of pulverised coal in simulated turbine exhaust gas, particularly with respect to stability, burnout and pollutant emissions. The second part of this presentation describes mathematical modelling of type 2 as well as type 1 swirling pulverised coal flames. Future work will concentrate on high CO{sub 2} levels environments. (orig.)

  10. Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Flashback and Flame Stabilization in Hydrogen-Rich Gas Turbines Using a Hierarchical Validation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Noel [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This project was a combined computational and experimental effort to improve predictive capability for boundary layer flashback of premixed swirl flames relevant to gas-turbine power plants operating with high-hydrogen-content fuels. During the course of this project, significant progress in modeling was made on four major fronts: 1) use of direct numerical simulation of turbulent flames to understand the coupling between the flame and the turbulent boundary layer; 2) improved modeling capability for flame propagation in stratified pre-mixtures; 3) improved portability of computer codes using the OpenFOAM platform to facilitate transfer to industry and other researchers; and 4) application of LES to flashback in swirl combustors, and a detailed assessment of its capabilities and limitations for predictive purposes. A major component of the project was an experimental program that focused on developing a rich experimental database of boundary layer flashback in swirl flames. Both methane and high-hydrogen fuels, including effects of elevated pressure (1 to 5 atm), were explored. For this project, a new model swirl combustor was developed. Kilohertz-rate stereoscopic PIV and chemiluminescence imaging were used to investigate the flame propagation dynamics. In addition to the planar measurements, a technique capable of detecting the instantaneous, time-resolved 3D flame front topography was developed and applied successfully to investigate the flow-flame interaction. The UT measurements and legacy data were used in a hierarchical validation approach where flows with increasingly complex physics were used for validation. First component models were validated with DNS and literature data in simplified configurations, and this was followed by validation with the UT 1-atm flashback cases, and then the UT high-pressure flashback cases. The new models and portable code represent a major improvement over what was available before this project was initiated.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Soot Formation in Laminar Axisymmetric Ethylene-Air Coflow Flames at Atmospheric and Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed

    2015-03-30

    A set of coflow diffusion flames are simulated to study the formation, growth, and oxidation of soot in flames of diluted hydrocarbon fuels, with focus on the effects of pressure. Firstly, we assess the ability of a high performance CFD solver, coupled with detailed transport and kinetic models, to reproduce experimental measurements of a series of ethylene-air coflow flames. Detailed finite rate chemistry describing the formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydro-carbons is used. Soot is modeled with a moment method and the resulting moment transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian numerical scheme. Numerical and experimental results are compared for various pressures. Finally, a sensitivity study is performed assessing the effect of the boundary conditions and kinetic mechanisms on the flame structure and stabilization properties.

  12. Type Ia Supernova: Calculations of Turbulent Flames Using the Linear Eddy Model

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E; Sankaran, V; Roepke, F K

    2008-01-01

    The nature of carbon burning flames in Type Ia supernovae is explored as they interact with Kolmogorov turbulence. One-dimensional calculations using the Linear Eddy Model of Kerstein (1991) elucidate three regimes of turbulent burning. In the simplest case, large scale turbulence folds and deforms thin laminar flamelets to produce a flame brush with a total burning rate given approximately by the speed of turbulent fluctuations on the integral scale, U_L. This is the regime where the supernova explosion begins and where most of its pre-detonation burning occurs. As the density declines, turbulence starts to tear the individual flamelets, making broader structures that move faster. For a brief time, these turbulent flamelets are still narrow compared to their spacing and the concept of a flame brush moving with an overall speed of U_L remains valid. However, the typical width of the individual flamelets, which is given by the condition that their turnover time equals their burning time, continues to increase ...

  13. A posteriori testing of algebraic flame surface density models for LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T.; Stein, O. T.; Chakraborty, N.; Kempf, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    In the application of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to premixed combustion, the unknown filtered chemical source term can be modelled by the generalised flame surface density (FSD) using algebraic models for the wrinkling factor Ξ. The present study compares the behaviour of the various models by first examining the effect of sub-grid turbulent velocity fluctuation on Ξ through a one-dimensional analysis and by the LES of the ORACLES burner (Nguyen, Bruel, and Reichstadt, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion Vol. 82 [2009], pp. 155-183) and the Volvo Rig (Sjunnesson, Nelsson, and Max, Laser Anemometry, Vol. 3 [1991], pp. 83-90; Sjunnesson, Henrikson, and Löfström, AIAA Journal, Vol. 28 [1992], pp. AIAA-92-3650). Several sensitivity studies on parameters such as the turbulent viscosity and the grid resolution are also carried out. A statistically 1-D analysis of turbulent flame propagation reveals that counter gradient transport of the progress variable needs to be accounted for to obtain a realistic flame thickness from the simulations using algebraic FSD based closure. The two burner setups are found to operate mainly within the wrinkling/corrugated flamelet regime based on the premixed combustion diagram for LES (Pitsch and Duchamp de Lageneste, Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Vol. 29 [2002], pp. 2001-2008) and this suggests that the models are operating within their ideal range. The performance of the algebraic models are then assessed by comparing velocity statistics, followed by a detailed error analysis for the ORACLES burner. Four of the tested models were found to perform reasonably well against experiments, and one of these four further excels in being the most grid-independent. For the Volvo Rig, more focus is placed upon the comparison of temperature data and identifying changes in flame structure amongst the different models. It is found that the few models which largely over-predict velocities in the ORACLES case and volume averaged ? in a

  14. A priori tests of combustion models based on a CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} Triple Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombard, J.; Naud, B.; Jimenez Sanchez, C.

    2008-07-01

    This document reproduces the final project of Jerome Dombard, presented on June 25, 2008, for the obtention of the Master degree MIMSE (Master Ingenierie Mathematique, Statistique et Economique) of Bordeaux University (Universite Bordeaux 1). We make an a priori study of FPI/FGM-type turbulent combustion models using a 2D DNS of a triple flame. A reduced chemical scheme of 16 species and 12 reactions is used (ARM1, proposed by J.-Y. Chen at Berkeley University). The fuel (CH4/H2 mixture) and oxidizer (air) correspond to the inlet composition of the Sydney bluff-body stabilised flame experiments (flames HM1-3). First, we compute 1D laminar premixed flames. The purpose of those calculations is twofold: 1. check the differences between different computer programs and different treatments of molecular diffusion, and 2. calibrate the 2D-DNS of the laminar triple flame (mainly decide on the grid resolution). Then, the solution of the 2D laminar triple flame is used to test a priori FPI/FGM tables. Finally, preliminary considerations on sub-grid scale modelling in the context of Large Eddy Simulation are made. (Author) 14 refs.

  15. Direct drive ablation front stability: numerical predictions against flame front model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, L. [Phd Student at IRPHE St Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France)]|[CEA/DAM-Ile de France, 91 - Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Hallo, L.; Tallot, C. [CEA/DAM-Ile de France, 91 - Bruyeres Le Chatel (France)

    2000-07-01

    We study the linear stability of flows resulting from constant heating of planar targets by a laser. In the coordinate system of the ablation front there is a flow from the cold to hot region, which is situated in a gravity field oriented from hot to cold region. Similar types of flow can be observed in combustion systems, which involve propagation of flame fronts. A spectral model which studies linear perturbation is directly taken from the combustion community. Here we present the results for state as well as perturbed flows. Growth rate determined from the models are compared to each other, and preliminary numerical results from FC12 simulations are shown. (authors)

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Operation of a Flame Ionization Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, E.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-03-01

    The sensors and controls research group at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is continuing to develop the Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine applications. CCADS uses the electrical conduction of the charged species generated during the combustion process to detect combustion instabilities and monitor equivalence ratio. As part of this effort, combustion models are being developed which include the interaction between the electric field and the transport of charged species. The primary combustion process is computed using a flame wrinkling model (Weller et. al. 1998) which is a component of the OpenFOAM toolkit (Jasak et. al. 2004). A sub-model for the transport of charged species is attached to this model. The formulation of the charged-species model similar that applied by Penderson and Brown (1993) for the simulation of laminar flames. The sub-model consists of an additional flux due to the electric field (drift flux) added to the equations for the charged species concentrations and the solution the electric potential from the resolved charge density. The subgrid interactions between the electric field and charged species transport have been neglected. Using the above procedure, numerical simulations are performed and the results compared with several recent CCADS experiments.

  17. Implementation of REDIM reduced chemistry to model an axisymmetric laminar diffusion methane-air flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique de Almeida Konzen, Pedro; Richter, Thomas; Riedel, Uwe; Maas, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this work is to analyze the use of automatically reduced chemistry by the Reaction-Diffusion Manifold (REDIM) method in simulating axisymmetric laminar coflow diffusion flames. Detailed chemical kinetic models are usually computationally prohibitive for simulating complex reacting flows, and therefore reduced models are required. Automatic reduction model approaches usually exploit the natural multi-scale structure of combustion systems. The novel REDIM approach applies the concept of invariant manifolds to treat also the influence of the transport processes on the reduced model, which overcomes a fundamental problem of model reduction in neglecting the coupling of molecular transport with thermochemical processes. We have considered a previously well studied atmospheric pressure nitrogen-diluted methane-air flame as a test case to validate the methodology presented here. First, one-dimensional and two-dimensional REDIMs were computed and tabulated in lookup tables. Then, the full set of governing equations are projected on the REDIM and implemented in the object-oriented C++ Gascoigne code with a new add-on library to deal with the REDIM tables. The projected set of governing equations have been discretized by the Finite Element Method (FEM) and solved by a GMRES iteration preconditioned by a geometric multigrid method. Local grid refinement, adaptive mesh and parallelization are applied to ensure efficiency and precision. The numerical results obtained using the REDIM approach have shown very good agreement with detailed numerical simulations and experimental data.

  18. Detailed Studies of Soot Formation in Laminar Diffusion Flames for Application to Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-07

    a sooting flame are presented. The predicted integrated soot volume fractions are shown in Fig. 1; they are a measure of the total amount of soot at... sooting flame to a 13 sooting flame quite well as the fuel flow rate is increased. The agreement that is shown in Fig. 1 , along with more detailed...presents radial profiles of the measured and predicted temperatures at two axial locations in the non- sooting flame . The drop in the peak temperature at

  19. The i-V curve curve characteristics of burner-stabilized premixed flames: detailed and reduced models

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jie; Casey, Tiernan A; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Im, Hong G; Chen, Jyh-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The i-V curve describes the current drawn from a flame as a function of the voltage difference applied across the reaction zone. Since combustion diagnostics and flame control strategies based on electric fields depend on the amount of current drawn from flames, there is significant interest in modeling and understanding i-V curves. We implement and apply a detailed model for the simulation of the production and transport of ions and electrons in one dimensional premixed flames. An analytical reduced model is developed based on the detailed one, and analytical expressions are used to gain insight into the characteristics of the i-V curve for various flame configurations. In order for the reduced model to capture the spatial distribution of the electric field accurately, the concept of a dead zone region, where voltage is constant, is introduced, and a suitable closure for the spatial extent of the dead zone is proposed and validated. The results from the reduced modeling framework are found to be in good agre...

  20. Unsteady Flame Embedding

    KAUST Repository

    El-Asrag, Hossam A.

    2011-01-01

    Direct simulation of all the length and time scales relevant to practical combustion processes is computationally prohibitive. When combustion processes are driven by reaction and transport phenomena occurring at the unresolved scales of a numerical simulation, one must introduce a dynamic subgrid model that accounts for the multiscale nature of the problem using information available on a resolvable grid. Here, we discuss a model that captures unsteady flow-flame interactions- including extinction, re-ignition, and history effects-via embedded simulations at the subgrid level. The model efficiently accounts for subgrid flame structure and incorporates detailed chemistry and transport, allowing more accurate prediction of the stretch effect and the heat release. In this chapter we first review the work done in the past thirty years to develop the flame embedding concept. Next we present a formulation for the same concept that is compatible with Large Eddy Simulation in the flamelet regimes. The unsteady flame embedding approach (UFE) treats the flame as an ensemble of locally one-dimensional flames, similar to the flamelet approach. However, a set of elemental one-dimensional flames is used to describe the turbulent flame structure directly at the subgrid level. The calculations employ a one-dimensional unsteady flame model that incorporates unsteady strain rate, curvature, and mixture boundary conditions imposed by the resolved scales. The model is used for closure of the subgrid terms in the context of large eddy simulation. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) data from a flame-vortex interaction problem is used for comparison. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011.

  1. Modeling and numerical simulation of a pilot-stabilized turbulent premixed flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarous, Abdallah [Hassiba Benbouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Abdelkrim, Liazid [National Polytechnic School, Oran (Algeria); Karmed, Djamel [Poitiers University, Chasseneuil Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    The present paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of turbulent reactive flows subjected to spatial variations of equivalence ratio. In such situations, the description of the local thermochemistry requires at least two variables. The mixture fraction and the fuel mass fraction are respectively chosen to describe the composition of the fresh mixture and the chemical reaction progress. In the present contribution, a generalization of the Libby-Williams (LW) approach to four delta probability density function (Pdf) is presented. Transport equations for the first and second-order (variance) of mean scalar quantities are numerically solved. Moreover, the so-called LW-P model solves an additional transport equation for the cross-correlation between the reactive and the passive scalars. The model is applied to the calculation of a turbulent lean-premixed flow of methane and air stabilized by a near-stoichiometric pilot-flame. Numerical results regarding flow dynamics and flame structure are compared with the experimental data of a laboratory-scale burner-chamber device.

  2. LES-Modeling of a Partially Premixed Flame using a Deconvolution Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Hao; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    The modeling of the turbulence/chemistry interaction in partially premixed and multi-stream combustion remains an outstanding issue. By extending a recently developed constrained minimum mean-square error deconvolution (CMMSED) method, to objective of this work is to develop a source-term closure for turbulent multi-stream combustion. In this method, the chemical source term is obtained from a three-stream flamelet model, and CMMSED is used as closure model, thereby eliminating the need for presumed PDF-modeling. The model is applied to LES of a piloted turbulent jet flame with inhomogeneous inlets, and simulation results are compared with experiments. Comparisons with presumed PDF-methods are performed, and issues regarding resolution and conservation of the CMMSED method are examined. The author would like to acknowledge the support of funding from Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  3. Model Validation for Propulsion - On the TFNS and LES Subgrid Models for a Bluff Body Stabilized Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the reacting results of simulating a bluff body stabilized flame experiment of Volvo Validation Rig using a releasable edition of the National Combustion Code (NCC). The turbulence models selected to investigate the configuration are the sub-grid scaled kinetic energy coupled large eddy simulation (K-LES) and the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) simulation. The turbulence chemistry interaction used is linear eddy mixing (LEM).

  4. Modelling of Turbulent Nonpremixed CH4/H2 Flame Using Second-Moment Turbulence Closure Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国岫

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent nonpremixed CH4/H2 flame has been simulated using several typical differential secondmoment turbulence closure (SMTC) models. To clarify the applicability of the various models, the LRR-IP model,JM model, SSG model as well as two modified LRR-IP models were tested. Some of above-mentioned SMTC models cannot provide the overall satisfactory predictions of this challenging case. It is confirmed again that the standard LRR-IP model considerably overpredict the centerline velocity decay rate, and therefore performs not well. Also it is interesting to observe that the JM model does not perform well in this challenging test case, although it has already been proved successful in other cases. The SSG model produces quite satisfactory prediction and performs equally well or better than the two modified LRR-IP models in the reacting case. It can be concluded that the modified LRR-IP models as well as the SSG model are superior to the other SMTC models in the turbulent nonpremixed CH4/H2 flame.

  5. A chemical engineering model for predicting NO emissions and burnout from pulverised coal flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, L.S.; Glarborg, P.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Hepburn, P.W.; Hesselmann, G. [Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-07-01

    This work is concerned with the applicability of modelling swirling pulverised coal flames with ideal chemical reactors. The objectives were to predict the emissions of NO and CO, and the burnout of char. The fluid dynamics were simplified by use of a system of ideal chemical reactors. The near burner zone was modelled as a well-stirred reactor, the jet expansion as a plug flow reactor, the external recirculation zone as a well-stirred reactor, and the down stream zone as a number of well-stirred reactors in series. A reduced model of a detailed reaction mechanism was applied to model gas phase chemistry and a novel model was developed for soot oxidation. A population balance was used to keep track of size and density changes for the char combustion. Individual particle temperatures were calculated for each size fraction. The model includes only one burner specific calibration parameter which is related to the mixing of air and fuel. The model was validated against experimental results from a 160 kH{sub th} pulverised coal burner. For single staged combustion at varying stoichiometries, for two stage combustion, and for different coals good agreement between model and experiment was obtained for NO emissions and carbon in ash. This work also indicates that the interaction between the homogeneous gas phase chemistry and the heterogeneous chemistry (soot and char), due to recombination of radicals on the surfaces, is of importance for the nitrogen chemistry in coal flames, especially for ammonia formation. 84 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Combustion characteristics of spark-ignition and pilot flame ignition systems in a model Wankel stratified charge engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muroki, T. [Kanagawa Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kanagawa (Japan); Moriyoshi, Y. [Chiba Univ., Dept. of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    In a stratified charge engine, a glow plug pilot flame ignition system has been compared with a spark-ignition system for a model stratified charge Wankel combustion chamber. A motored two-stroke diesel engine was operated as a rapid compression and expansion machine with the cylinder head replaced by a model Wankel combustion chamber designed to simulate the temporal changes of air flow and pressure fields inside the chamber of an actual engine. It was found that the pilot flame ignition system had better ignitability and improved combustion characteristics, especially in the lean mixture range, relative to the spark-ignition system. (Author)

  7. Large-eddy simulation/probability density function modeling of local extinction and re-ignition in Sandia Flame E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Popov, Pavel; Hiremath, Varun; Lantz, Steven; Viswanathan, Sharadha; Pope, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES)/probability density function (PDF) code is developed and applied to the study of local extinction and re-ignition in Sandia Flame E. The modified Curl mixing model is used to account for the sub-filter scalar mixing; the ARM1 mechanism is used for the chemical reaction; and the in- situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm is used to accelerate the chemistry calculations. Calculations are performed on different grids to study the resolution requirement for this flame. Then, with sufficient grid resolution, full-scale LES/PDF calculations are performed to study the flame characteristics and the turbulence-chemistry interactions. Sensitivity to the mixing frequency model is explored in order to understand the behavior of sub-filter scalar mixing in the context of LES. The simulation results are compared to the experimental data to demonstrate the capability of the code. Comparison is also made to previous RANS/PDF simulations.

  8. Modelling of flame temperature of solution combustion synthesis of nanocrystalline calcium hydroxyapatite material and its parametric optimization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir K Ghosh; Sukhomay Pal; Sujit K Roy; Surjya K Pal; Debabrata Basu

    2010-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp), an important bio-ceramic was successfully synthesized by combustion in the aqueous system containing calcium nitrate-di-ammonium hydrogen orthophosphate-urea. The combustion flame temperature of solution combustion reaction depends on various process parameters, and it plays a significant role in the phase formation, phase stability and physical characteristics of calcium hydroxyapatite powder. In this work, an attempt has been made to evaluate the influence of each selected process parameters on the flame temperature as well as physical characteristics of powder, and to select an optimal parameters setting using Taguchi method. A regression model has also been developed to correlate the input parameters, viz. batch size, diluents, fuel to oxidizer ratio and initial furnace temperature, with flame temperature of the solution combustion reaction. The adequacy of the developed model has been checked using analysis of variance technique.

  9. Modeling of free and confined turbulent natural gas flames using an extension of CFX-F3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roekaerts, D. [Shell Research and Technology Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hsu, A.

    1997-12-31

    A general form of the fast chemistry / assumed shape probability density function model for turbulent gaseous diffusion flames has been implemented in a new combination of computer programs consisting of the commercial code CFX-F3D (formerly CFDS-FLOW3D) and the program FLAME, developed at Delft University of Technology. Also a mixedness-reactedness model with two independent variables (mixture fraction and reaction progress variable) has been implemented. The main strength of the new program is that it combines the advantages of a general purpose commercial CFD code (applicable to arbitrarily shaped domains, wide range of solvers) with the advantages of special purpose combustion subroutines (more detail in modeling of chemistry and of turbulence-chemistry interaction, flexibility). The new combination of programs has been validated by the application to the prediction of the properties of a labscale turbulent natural gas diffusion flame for which detailed measurements are available. The mixedness-reactedness model has been applied to the case of a confined natural gas diffusion flame at globally rich conditions. In contrast with fast chemistry models, the mixedness-reactedness model can be used to predict the amount of methane at the end of the reactor vessel (`methane slip`) as a function of operating conditions. (author)

  10. Flow-flame interactions causing acoustically coupled heat release fluctuations in a thermo-acoustically unstable gas turbine model combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, A.M.; Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W. [Institute for Combustion Technology, German Aerospace Centre (DLR), 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Carter, C.D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    2010-12-15

    A detailed analysis of the flow-flame interactions associated with acoustically coupled heat-release rate fluctuations was performed for a 10 kW, CH{sub 4}/air, swirl stabilized flame in a gas turbine model combustor exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations at 308 Hz. High-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, OH planar laser induced fluorescence, and OH* chemiluminescence measurements were performed at a sustained repetition rate of 5 kHz, which was sufficient to resolve the relevant combustor dynamics. Using spatio-temporal proper orthogonal decomposition, it was found that the flow-field contained several simultaneous periodic motions: the reactant flux into the combustion chamber periodically oscillated at the thermo-acoustic frequency (308 Hz), a helical precessing vortex core (PVC) circumscribed the burner nozzle at 515 Hz, and the PVC underwent axial contraction and extension at the thermo-acoustic frequency. The global heat release rate fluctuated at the thermo-acoustic frequency, while the heat release centroid circumscribed the combustor at the difference between the thermo-acoustic and PVC frequencies. Hence, the three-dimensional location of the heat release fluctuations depended on the interaction of the PVC with the flame surface. This motivated the compilation of doubly phase resolved statistics based on the phase of both the acoustic and PVC cycles, which showed highly repeatable periodic flow-flame configurations. These include flames stabilized between the inflow and inner recirculation zone, large-scale flame wrap-up by the PVC, radial deflection of the inflow by the PVC, and combustion in the outer recirculation zones. Large oscillations in the flame surface area were observed at the thermo-accoustic frequency that significantly affected the total heat-release oscillations. By filtering the instantaneous reaction layers at different scales, the importance of the various flow-flame interactions affecting the flame area was

  11. Soot modeling of counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene-based binary mixture fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    A soot model was developed based on the recently proposed PAH growth mechanism for C1-C4 gaseous fuels (KAUST PAH Mechanism 2, KM2) that included molecular growth up to coronene (A7) to simulate soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene and its binary mixtures with methane, ethane and propane based on the method of moments. The soot model has 36 soot nucleation reactions from 8 PAH molecules including pyrene and larger PAHs. Soot surface growth reactions were based on a modified hydrogen-abstraction-acetylene-addition (HACA) mechanism in which CH3, C3H3 and C2H radicals were included in the hydrogen abstraction reactions in addition to H atoms. PAH condensation on soot particles was also considered. The experimentally measured profiles of soot volume fraction, number density, and particle size were well captured by the model for the baseline case of ethylene along with the cases involving mixtures of fuels. The simulation results, which were in qualitative agreement with the experimental data in the effects of binary fuel mixing on the sooting structures of the measured flames, showed in particular that 5% addition of propane (ethane) led to an increase in the soot volume fraction of the ethylene flame by 32% (6%), despite the fact that propane and ethane are less sooting fuels than is ethylene, which is in reasonable agreement with experiments of 37% (14%). The model revealed that with 5% addition of methane, there was an increase of 6% in the soot volume fraction. The average soot particle sizes were only minimally influenced while the soot number densities were increased by the fuel mixing. Further analysis of the numerical data indicated that the chemical cross-linking effect between ethylene and the dopant fuels resulted in an increase in PAH formation, which led to higher soot nucleation rates and therefore higher soot number densities. On the other hand, the rates of soot surface growth per unit surface area through the HACA mechanism were

  12. Simulations of localized extinction in turbulent CH 4 jet flames using a Lagrangian model for reactedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutmos, P.

    2000-02-01

    2D Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent CH 4 jet flames exhibiting significant finite-rate chemistry effects are presented. A partial equilibrium/two-scalar exponential PDF combustion submodel is applied at the subgrid level. An anisotropic eddy-viscosity and an equation for the SGS energy model the Subgrid motions. Independence of the PDF scalars is avoided and their correlations are obtained from scale-similarity assumptions. Extinction is accounted by comparing the local Damkohler against a "critical" local limit related to the Gibson scale and the reaction zone thickness. The post-extinction and reignition regimes are modeled via a Lagrangian reactedness equation (IEM). Comparisons between simulations and measurements suggested the capability of the method to represent several trends in the partial extinction and reignition behavior observed in the experiments.

  13. Predicting Radiative Heat Transfer in Oxy-Methane Flame Simulations: An Examination of Its Sensitivities to Chemistry and Radiative Property Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Abdul-Sater

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from confined, laminar oxy-methane flames at different O2/CO2 dilution ratios in the oxidizer are first reported with measurements from methane-air flames included for comparison. Simulations of these flames employing appropriate chemistry and radiative property modeling options were performed to garner insights into the experimental trends and assess prediction sensitivities to the choice of modeling options. The chemistry was modeled employing a mixture-fraction based approach, Eddy dissipation concept (EDC, and refined global finite rate (FR models. Radiative properties were estimated employing four weighted-sum-of-gray-gases (WSGG models formulated from different spectroscopic/model databases. The mixture fraction and EDC models correctly predicted the trends in flame length and OH concentration variations, and the O2, CO2, and temperature measurements outside the flames. The refined FR chemistry model predictions of CO2 and O2 deviated from their measured values in the flame with 50% O2 in the oxidizer. Flame radiant power estimates varied by less than 10% between the mixture fraction and EDC models but more than 60% between the different WSGG models. The largest variations were attributed to the postcombustion gases in the temperature range 500 K–800 K in the upper sections of the furnace which also contributed significantly to the overall radiative transfer.

  14. Application of validated radiation model in flame spread rate over solid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivisic, Ivan

    In this thesis the radiative effects of opposed flow flames spreading over solid fuels are discussed as well as the coupling of a radiation and CFD program. The coupled programs are used to show the radiative heat transfer mechanisms and how they affect the flame globally. A radiation program is used to calculate radiation properties of the flame such as the heat flux distribution, net heat flow, and mean Plank absorptivity constant for a particular flame. The radiation program imports the temperature fields from a CFD program. Trends in the mean Plank absorptivity constant with varying ambient conditions are analyzed and an application of the radiation program to simulate a physical radiometer is demonstrated for a test case. The CFD program can import radiation results to help improve the accuracy of the simulation. A script was written to automate the update process to produce more accurate results for flame simulations. Flux distributions, stability and relative error are analyzed to show the coupled programs are producing results within an acceptable error. Trends in error and stability are discussed and stable regions with low enough error are determined. The coupled programs are used to gather data on flame spread rate and find differences in flame structure and properties of neglecting certain radiation mechanisms. No radiation included produced the hottest fastest moving flame, while no gas to surface radiation produced the coolest flame. Including the gas to surface radiation produced a slightly hotter faster moving flame. This trend was studied across different opposed flow velocities and sample widths. The radiative heat fluxes are analyzed for the cases as well. All the flame simulations in this thesis were run for a microgravity, 21% oxygen, and PMMA fuel.

  15. Combustion and radiation modeling of laminar premixed flames using OpenFOAM: A numerical investigation of radiative heat transfer in the RADIADE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Pang, Kar Mun; Ivarsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    flow and combusting flow cases. The results show that without including radiation modelling, the predicted flame temperature is higher than the measured values. P1 radiation Model is used with sub-models for absorption and emission coefficients. The model using constant values for the absorption...... and emission coefficients gave good agreement with measurements for the regions close to burner outlet. However, the weighted Sum of Gray Gas model (WSGGM) reasonably predicts the flame temperature as the flame height about the burner outlet increases....

  16. LES of the Sandia Flame D Using an FPV Combustion Model

    CERN Document Server

    Di Renzo, Mario; de Tullio, Marco Donato; De Palma, Pietro; Pascazio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The simulation of turbulent combustion phenomena is still an open problem in modern fluid dynamics. Considering the economical importance of hydrocarbon combustion in energy production processes, it is evident the need of an accurate tool with a relatively low computational cost for the prediction of this kind of reacting flows. In the present work, a comparative study is carried out among large eddy simulations, performed with various grid resolutions, a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation, and experimental data concerning the well-known Sandia D flame test case. In all the simulations, a flamelet progress variable model has been employed using various hypotheses for the joint probability density function closure. The filtered approach proved to be more accurate than the averaged one, even for the coarser grid used in this work. In fact both approaches have shown poorly accurate predictions in the first part of the combustion chamber, but only by the large eddy simulation one is capable to recover the...

  17. Implementation of two-equation soot flamelet models for laminar diffusion flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, D.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D. [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor (CTTC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIAT, Colom 11, E-08222, Terrassa (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    The two-equation soot model proposed by Leung et al. [K.M. Leung, R.P. Lindstedt, W.P. Jones, Combust. Flame 87 (1991) 289-305] has been derived in the mixture fraction space. The model has been implemented using both Interactive and Non-Interactive flamelet strategies. An Extended Enthalpy Defect Flamelet Model (E-EDFM) which uses a flamelet library obtained neglecting the soot formation is proposed as a Non-Interactive method. The Lagrangian Flamelet Model (LFM) is used to represent the Interactive models. This model uses direct values of soot mass fraction from flamelet calculations. An Extended version (E-LFM) of this model is also suggested in which soot mass fraction reaction rates are used from flamelet calculations. Results presented in this work show that the E-EDFM predict acceptable results. However, it overpredicts the soot volume fraction due to the inability of this model to couple the soot and gas-phase mechanisms. It has been demonstrated that the LFM is not able to predict accurately the soot volume fraction. On the other hand, the extended version proposed here has been shown to be very accurate. The different flamelet mathematical formulations have been tested and compared using well verified reference calculations obtained solving the set of the Full Transport Equations (FTE) in the physical space. (author)

  18. PDF modelling and particle-turbulence interaction of turbulent spray flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent spray flames can be found in many applications, such as Diesel engines, rocket engines and power plants. The many practical applications are a motivation to investigate the physical phenomena occurring in turbulent spray flames in detail in order to be able to understand, predict and

  19. PDF modelling and particle-turbulence interaction of turbulent spray flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent spray flames can be found in many applications, such as Diesel engines, rocket engines and power plants. The many practical applications are a motivation to investigate the physical phenomena occurring in turbulent spray flames in detail in order to be able to understand, predict and optim

  20. Three—Dimensional Flow Characteristics in One Ceramic Candle Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TaewonSeo; KihyunKeum; 等

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize the three-dimensional fluid flow in the vessel containing one ceramic candle filter.The three-dimensional governing equations are formulated in this study and the turbulent κ-ε model is adopted for the numerical computation.It is found that the viscous force is dominant in the porous region with compared to inertia force.Pressue decreases linearly when the flow passing through the porous medium.When the face velocity is 0.03 m/s,the pressure drop is about 350Pa.It has also been found that the fluid with the spiral motion to be sunk into the filter in the vessel.

  1. Humphrey Davy and the Safety Lamp: The Use of Metal Gauze as a Flame Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2015-01-01

    The "safety lamp" invented by Humphrey Davy in 1815 utilised the cooling effect of metal gauze to prevent the flame of a candle or oil lamp (essential for illumination in mines) from passing through such a screen. It is therefore rendered unable to ignite any potentially explosive mixture of air and methane in the atmosphere surrounding…

  2. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-08-13

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs.

  3. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-07-14

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society.

  4. Presumed PDF Modeling of Early Flame Propagation in Moderate to Intense Turbulence Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen, Christina; Feikema, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper describes the results obtained from a one-dimensional time dependent numerical technique that simulates early flame propagation in a moderate to intense turbulent environment. Attention is focused on the development of a spark-ignited, premixed, lean methane/air mixture with the unsteady spherical flame propagating in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. A Monte-Carlo particle tracking method, based upon the method of fractional steps, is utilized to simulate the phenomena represented by a probability density function (PDF) transport equation. Gaussian distributions of fluctuating velocity and fuel concentration are prescribed. Attention is focused on three primary parameters that influence the initial flame kernel growth: the detailed ignition system characteristics, the mixture composition, and the nature of the flow field. The computational results of moderate and intense isotropic turbulence suggests that flames within the distributed reaction zone are not as vulnerable, as traditionally believed, to the adverse effects of increased turbulence intensity. It is also shown that the magnitude of the flame front thickness significantly impacts the turbulent consumption flame speed. Flame conditions studied have fuel equivalence ratio s in the range phi = 0.6 to 0.9 at standard temperature and pressure.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Soot Formation in Laminar Axisymmetric Ethylene-Air Coflow Flames at Atmospheric and Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Rakha, Ihsan Allah

    2015-05-01

    The steady coflow diffusion flame is a widely used configuration for studying combustion kinetics, flame dynamics, and pollutant formation. In the current work, a set of diluted ethylene-air coflow flames are simulated to study the formation, growth, and oxidation of soot, with a focus on the effects of pressure on soot yield. Firstly, we assess the ability of a high performance CFD solver, coupled with detailed transport and kinetic models, to reproduce experimental measurements, like the temperature field, the species’ concentrations and the soot volume fraction. Fully coupled conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and species mass fractions are solved using a low Mach number formulation. Detailed finite rate chemistry describing the formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons up to cyclopenta[cd]pyrene is used. Soot is modeled using a moment method and the resulting moment transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian numerical scheme. Numerical and experimental results are compared for various pressures. Reasonable agreement is observed for the flame height, temperature, and the concentrations of various species. In each case, the peak soot volume fraction is predicted along the centerline as observed in the experiments. The predicted integrated soot mass at pressures ranging from 4-8 atm, scales as P2.1, in satisfactory agreement with the measured integrated soot pressure scaling (P2.27). Significant differences in the mole fractions of benzene and PAHs, and the predicted soot volume fractions are found, using two well-validated chemical kinetic mechanisms. At 4 atm, one mechanism over-predicts the peak soot volume fraction by a factor of 5, while the other under-predicts it by a factor of 5. A detailed analysis shows that the fuel tube wall temperature has an effect on flame stabilization.

  6. QSAR classification models for the prediction of endocrine disrupting activity of brominated flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarich, Simona; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-06-15

    The identification of potential endocrine disrupting (ED) chemicals is an important task for the scientific community due to their diffusion in the environment; the production and use of such compounds will be strictly regulated through the authorization process of the REACH regulation. To overcome the problem of insufficient experimental data, the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approach is applied to predict the ED activity of new chemicals. In the present study QSAR classification models are developed, according to the OECD principles, to predict the ED potency for a class of emerging ubiquitary pollutants, viz. brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Different endpoints related to ED activity (i.e. aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonism and antagonism, estrogen receptor agonism and antagonism, androgen and progesterone receptor antagonism, T4-TTR competition, E2SULT inhibition) are modeled using the k-NN classification method. The best models are selected by maximizing the sensitivity and external predictive ability. We propose simple QSARs (based on few descriptors) characterized by internal stability, good predictive power and with a verified applicability domain. These models are simple tools that are applicable to screen BFRs in relation to their ED activity, and also to design safer alternatives, in agreement with the requirements of REACH regulation at the authorization step. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Alvin

    2004-04-23

    Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.

  8. A Simple Candle Filter Safeguard Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.

    2002-09-18

    In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal utilization. Two main designs employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBCs) and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCCs). In both designs, the suspended particulates, or dust, must be cleaned from the gas before it enters the turbine to prevent fouling and erosion of the blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in commercial use. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the dust on the surface. The three main configurations are candle, cross-flow, and tube. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are primarily composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer o n the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle, and individual elements can fail, allowing the particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Because of the possibility of occasional filter breakage, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the dust streaming through broken filters from reaching the turbine. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) safeguard device is composed of three main parts: the ceramic substrate, the adhesive coating, and the safeguard device housing. This report describes the development and laboratory testing of each of those parts as well as the bench-scale performance of both types of complete SGDs.

  9. QSAR modeling and prediction of the endocrine-disrupting potencies of brominated flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-17

    In the European Union REACH regulation, the chemicals with particularly harmful behaviors, such as endocrine disruptors (EDs), are subject to authorization, and the identification of safer alternatives to these chemicals is required. In this context, the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) becomes particularly useful to fill the data gap due to the very small number of experimental data available to characterize the environmental and toxicological profiles of new and emerging pollutants with ED behavior such as brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In this study, different QSAR models were developed on different responses of endocrine disruption measured for several BFRs. The multiple linear regression approach was applied to a variety of theoretical molecular descriptors, and the best models, which were identified from all of the possible combinations of the structural variables, were internally validated for their performance using the leave-one-out (Q(LOO)(2) = 73-91%) procedure and scrambling of the responses. External validation was provided, when possible, by splitting the data sets in training and test sets (range of Q(EXT)(2) = 76-90%), which confirmed the predictive ability of the proposed equations. These models, which were developed according to the principles defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development to improve the regulatory acceptance of QSARs, represent a simple tool for the screening and characterization of BFRs.

  10. Consistent Conditional Moment Closure Modelling of a Lifted Turbulent Jet Flame Using the Presumed β-PDF Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad El Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifted H2/N2 turbulent jet flame issuing into a vitiated coflow is investigated using the conditional moment closure. The conditional velocity (CV and the conditional scalar dissipation rate (CSDR submodels are chosen such that they are fully consistent with the moments of the presumed β probability density function (PDF. The CV is modelled using the PDF-gradient diffusion model. Two CSDR submodels based on the double integration of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous mixture fraction PDF transport equations are implemented. The effect of CSDR modelling is investigated over a range of coflow temperatures (Tc and the stabilisation mechanism is determined from the analysis of the transport budgets and the history of radical build-up ahead of the stabilisation height. For all Tc, the balance between chemistry, axial convection, and micromixing, and the absence of axial diffusion upstream of the stabilisation height indicate that the flame is stabilized by autoignition. This conclusion is confirmed from the rapid build-up of HO2 ahead of H, O, and OH. The inhomogeneous CSDR modelling yields higher dissipation levels at the most reactive mixture fraction, which results in longer ignition delays and larger liftoff heights. The effect of the spurious sources arising from homogeneous modelling is found to be small but nonnegligible, mostly notably within the flame zone.

  11. Reduced kinetic mechanism of n-heptane oxidation in modeling polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in opposed-flow diffusion flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beijing ZHONG; Jun XI

    2008-01-01

    A reduced mechanism, which could couple with the multidimensional computational fluid dynamics code for quantitative description of a reacting flow, was developed for chemical kinetic modeling of polycyclic aro-matic hydrocarbon formation in an opposed-flow dif-fusion flame. The complete kinetic mechanism, which comprises 572 reactions and 108 species, was reduced to a simplified mechanism that includes only 83 reactions and 56 species through sensitivity analysis. The results computed via this reduced mechanism are nearly indistin-guishable from those via the detailed mechanism, which demonstrate that the model based on this reduced mech-anism can properly describe n-heptane oxidation chem-istry and quantitatively predict polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (such as benzene, naphthalene, phenan-threne and pyrene) formation in opposed-flow diffusion flames.

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Candle Filters Using Vibration Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Roger H. L.; Kiriakidis, Alejandro C.; Peng, Steve W.

    1997-07-01

    This study aims at the development of an effective nondestructive evaluation technique to predict the remaining useful life of a ceramic candle filter during a power plant's annual maintenance shutdown. The objective of the present on-going study is to establish the vibration signatures of ceramic candle filters at varying degradation levels due to different operating hours, and to study the various factors involving the establishment of the signatures.

  13. EFFECTS OF SIMPLIFIED CHEMICAL KINETIC MODEL ON THE MICRO-FLAME STRUCTURE AND TEMPERATURE OF THE LEAN PREMIXED METHANE-AIR MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNJIE CHEN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of simplified chemical kinetic model on the micro-flame structure, central axis and wall temperatures were investigated with different one-step global chemical kinetic mechanisms following Mantel, Duterque and Fernández-Tarrazo models. Numerical investigations of the premixed methane-air flame in the micro-channel and lean conditions were carried out to compare and analyze the effect of the comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms. The results indicate that one-step global chemical kinetic mechanism affects both the micro-flame shape and the combustion temperature. Among three simulation models, Mantel model allows a stable micro-flame with a bamboo shoot form, which anchor at the inlet. Duterque model gives a stable elongated micro-flame with a considerable ignition delay, and a dead zone with fluid accumulation is observed at the entrance, which may explain the very high combustion temperature and the fast reaction rate obtained, despite the micro-flame development presents a very hot spot and causes a broadening of the combustion zone. Fernández-Tarrazo model results in a rapid extinction and doesn't seem to take all the kinetic behavior into account for the appropriate micro-combustion simulations.

  14. Soot zone structure and sooting limit in diffusion flames: Comparison of counterflow and co-flow flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K.T.; Hwang, J.Y.; Chung, S.H. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Lee, W. [Dankook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-04-01

    Soot zone structures of counterflow and co-flow diffusion flames have been studied experimentally using the soot extinction-scattering, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluorescence, and laser Doppler velocimetry measurements. The counterflow flame has been numerically modelled with detailed chemistry. Results show that two different categories of sooting flame structures can be classified depending on the relative transport of soot particles to flames. These are the soot formation-oxidation flame and the soot formation flame. The soot formation-oxidation flame characteristics are observed in counterflow flames when located on the fuel side and in normal co-flow flames. In this case, soot particles are transported toward the high temperature region or the flame and experience soot inception, coagulation-growth, and oxidation. The soot formation flame characteristics are observed in counterflow flames when located on the oxidizer side and in inverse co-flow flames. In this case, soot particles are transported away from the flame without experiencing oxidation and finally leak through the stagnation plane in counterflow flames or leave the flame in inverse co-flow flames. Sooting limit measurements in both flames also substantiate the two different sooting flame structures and their characteristics.

  15. Comparison of the egg flotation and egg candling techniques for estimating incubation day of Canada Goose nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, M.E.; Andersen, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Both egg flotation and egg candling have been used to estimate incubation day (often termed nest age) in nesting birds, but little is known about the relative accuracy of these two techniques. We used both egg flotation and egg candling to estimate incubation day for Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior) nesting near Cape Churchill, Manitoba, from 2000 to 2007. We modeled variation in the difference between estimates of incubation day using each technique as a function of true incubation day, as well as, variation in error rates with each technique as a function of the true incubation day. We also evaluated the effect of error in the estimated incubation day on estimates of daily survival rate (DSR) and nest success using simulations. The mean difference between concurrent estimates of incubation day based on egg flotation minus egg candling at the same nest was 0.85 ?? 0.06 (SE) days. The positive difference in favor of egg flotation and the magnitude of the difference in estimates of incubation day did not vary as a function of true incubation day. Overall, both egg flotation and egg candling overestimated incubation day early in incubation and underestimated incubation day later in incubation. The average difference between true hatch date and estimated hatch date did not differ from zero (days) for egg flotation, but egg candling overestimated true hatch date by about 1 d (true - estimated; days). Our simulations suggested that error associated with estimating the incubation day of nests and subsequently exposure days using either egg candling or egg flotation would have minimal effects on estimates of DSR and nest success. Although egg flotation was slightly less biased, both methods provided comparable and accurate estimates of incubation day and subsequent estimates of hatch date and nest success throughout the entire incubation period. ?? 2008 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  16. Asymptotic analysis of outwardly propagating spherical flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Chao Wu; Zheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Asymptotic analysis is conducted for outwardly propagating spherical flames with large activation energy.The spherical flame structure consists of the preheat zone,reaction zone,and equilibrium zone.Analytical solutions are separately obtained in these three zones and then asymptotically matched.In the asymptotic analysis,we derive a correlation describing the spherical flame temperature and propagation speed changing with the flame radius.This correlation is compared with previous results derived in the limit of infinite value of activation energy.Based on this correlation,the properties of spherical flame propagation are investigated and the effects of Lewis number on spherical flame propagation speed and extinction stretch rate are assessed.Moreover,the accuracy and performance of different models used in the spherical flame method are examined.It is found that in order to get accurate laminar flame speed and Markstein length,non-linear models should be used.

  17. An analytical model for the prediction of the dynamic response of premixed flames stabilized on a heat-conducting perforated plate

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic response of a premixed flame stabilized on a heat-conducting perforated plate depends critically on their coupled thermal interaction. The objective of this paper is to develop an analytical model to capture this coupling. The model predicts the mean flame base standoff distance; the flame base area, curvature and speed; and the burner plate temperature given the operating conditions; the mean velocity, temperature and equivalence ratio of the reactants; thermal conductivity and the perforation ratio of the burner. This coupled model is combined with our flame transfer function (FTF) model to predict the dynamic response of the flame to velocity perturbations. We show that modeling the thermal coupling between the flame and the burner, while accounting for the two-dimensionality of the former, is critical to predicting the dynamic response characteristics such as the overshoot in the gain curve (resonant condition) and the phase delay. Good agreement with the numerical and experimental results is demonstrated over a range of conditions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Conditional Moment Closure Modelling of a Lifted H2/N2 Turbulent Jet Flame Using the Presumed Mapping Function Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad El Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifted hydrogen/nitrogen turbulent jet flame issuing into a vitiated coflow is investigated using the conditional moment closure (CMC supplemented by the presumed mapping function (PMF approach for the modelling of conditional mixing and velocity statistics. Using a prescribed reference field, the PMF approach yields a presumed probability density function (PDF for the mixture fraction, which is then used in closing the conditional scalar dissipation rate (CSDR and conditional velocity in a fully consistent manner. These closures are applied to a lifted flame and the findings are compared to previous results obtained using β-PDF-based closures over a range of coflow temperatures (Tc. The PMF results are in line with those of the β-PDF and compare well to measurements. The transport budgets in mixture fraction and physical spaces and the radical history ahead of the stabilisation height indicate that the stabilisation mechanism is susceptible to Tc. As in the previous β-PDF calculations, autoignition around the “most reactive” mixture fraction remains the controlling mechanism for sufficiently high Tc. Departure from the β-PDF predictions is observed when Tc is decreased as PMF predicts stabilisation by means of premixed flame propagation. This conclusion is based on the observation that lean mixtures are heated by downstream burning mixtures in a preheat zone developing ahead of the stabilization height. The spurious sources, which stem from inconsistent CSDR modelling, are further investigated. The findings reveal that their effect is small but nonnegligible, most notably within the flame zone.

  19. Novel analytical model for predicting the combustion characteristics of premixed flame propagation in lycopodium dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidabadi, Mehdi; Rahbari, Alireza [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents the effects of the temperature difference between gas and particle, different Lewis numbers, and heat loss from the walls in the structure of premixed flames propagation in a combustible system containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles in an oxidizing gas mixture. It is assumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel, which is oxidized in a gas phase. The analysis is performed in the asymptotic limit, where the value of the characteristic Zeldovich number is large. The structure of the flame is composed of a preheat zone, reaction zone, and convection zone. The governing equations and required boundary conditions are applied in each zone, and an analytical method is used for solving these equations. The obtained results illustrate the effects of the above parameters on the variations of the dimensionless temperature, particle mass friction, flame temperature, and burning velocity for gas and particle

  20. A detailed kinetic modeling study of toluene oxidation in a premixed laminar flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z; Pitz, W J; Fournet, R; Glaude, P; Battin-Leclerc, F

    2009-12-18

    An improved chemical kinetic model for the toluene oxidation based on experimental data obtained in a premixed laminar low-pressure flame with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques has been proposed. The present mechanism consists of 273 species up to chrysene and 1740 reactions. The rate constants of reactions of toluene, decomposition, reaction with oxygen, ipso-additions and metatheses with abstraction of phenylic H-atom are updated; new pathways of C{sub 4} + C{sub 2} species giving benzene and fulvene are added. Based on the experimental observations, combustion intermediates such as fulvenallene, naphtol, methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene, 2-ethynylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, 1-methylphenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene are involved in the present mechanism. The final toluene model leads to an overall satisfactory agreement between the experimentally observed and predicted mole fraction profiles for the major products and most combustion intermediates. The toluene depletion is governed by metathese giving benzyl radicals, ipso-addition forming benzene and metatheses leading to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the unimolecular decomposition via the cleavage of a C-H bond has a strong inhibiting effect, while decomposition via C-C bond breaking, ipso-addition of H-atom to toluene, decomposition of benzyl radicals and reactions related to C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 3} radicals have promoting effect for the consumption of toluene. Moreover, flow rate analysis is performed to illustrate the formation pathways of mono- and polycyclic aromatics.

  1. Evaluation of Common Use Brominated Flame Retardant (BFR Toxicity Using a Zebrafish Embryo Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Y. Usenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Brominated flame retardants (BFRs are used to reduce the flammability of plastics, textiles, and electronics. BFRs vary in their chemical properties and structures, and it is expected that these differences alter their biological interactions and toxicity. Zebrafish were used as the model organism for assessing the toxicity of nine structurally-diverse BFRs. In addition to monitoring for overt toxicity, the rate of spontaneous movement, and acetylcholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST activities were assessed following exposure. The toxicities of BFRs tested can be ranked by LC50 as tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA < 4,4′-isopropylidenebis[2-(2,6-dibromophenoxylethanol] (TBBPA-OHEE < Pentabromochlorocyclohexane (PBCH < 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB < hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD < hexabromobenzene (HBB < Tetrabromophthalic anhydride (PHT4. No adverse effect was observed in di(2-ethylhexyl tetrabromophthalate (TBPH or dibromoneopentyl glycol (DBNPG-treated embryos. The rate of spontaneous movement was decreased in a concentration-dependent manner following exposure to four of the nine compounds. GST activity was elevated following treatment with PBCH, TBBPA, HBCD, and HBB. The results indicate that exposure to several BFRs may activate an antioxidant response and alter behavior during early development. Some of the BFRs, such as TBBPA and TBBPA-OHEE, induced adverse effects at concentrations lower than chemicals that are currently banned. These results suggest that zebrafish are sensitive to exposure to BFRs and can be used as a comparative screening model, as well as to determine alterations in behavior following exposure and probe mechanisms of action.

  2. Eddy break-up based models for industrial diffusion flames with complex gas phase chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, A.

    1998-07-01

    In this thesis, two types of models used in the CFD modeling of practical combustion devices with a turbulent flow are investigated. The models are applied to a number of test cases, but the goal of the investigations are not to demonstrate the ability of the models to simulate practical devices but to investigate them, as well as to propose improvements. The investigated models are all related to the Eddy Break-Up model, but they differ from each other in that one group utilizes the perfectly stirred reactor in the description, whereas the other group compares the reaction rate given by mixing with a kinetically determined reaction rate. The models in the first group are based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept. These models allow for the use of a comprehensive reaction mechanism. In the studies, it is found that the mixing time used in this model is too short to be consistent with the other assumptions the model is based on. The test cases used in the study of this model could be better described if a longer mixing time was used. It was, however, found that there is a connection between the description of the reaction kinetics and the mixing time giving the best results. Finally, a new version of this reactor based model was proposed, where suggestions reported in the literature on how to estimate the mixing time as well as the reacting fraction in a turbulence-chemistry interaction model for the modeling of non-steady spray combustion have been applied. The second group of models consists of various versions of the Eddy Dissipation Combustion Model. In this study, it is found that these models are as reliable as the Eddy Dissipation Concept for the modeling of the main combustion, although the reaction kinetics must be described with simplified mechanisms. It is further found that basing the calculations of the reaction rates on mean quantities is a reasonable approach in hydrocarbon flames. Last, a modification to the Eddy Dissipation Combustion Model is proposed

  3. Experiments and Modeling of Impinging Jets and Premixed Hydrocarbon Stagnation Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-26

    coupling of the acoustic properties of the two jets could lead to oscillations and instabilities in the flames. Impinging-jet flames are found to be more...the Knudsen-Weber slip correction factor [see Eq. (A.10)], τS is the Stokes time, and σ = dup/dx ∼= duf /dx is the (local) velocity gradient [see...that act on a particle in a typical flow are ΣF = FPG + FFI + FUD + FG + FSD + FTP , (A.2) where FPG = ρf ρp mp duf dt (A.3) is the pressure-gradient

  4. Casting light on BSM physics with SM standard candles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, David; Jaiswal, Prerit; Meade, Patrick; Tien, Pin-Ju

    2013-08-01

    The Standard Model (SM) has had resounding success in describing almost every measurement performed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In particular, these experiments have put many beyond the SM models of natural Electroweak Symmetry Breaking into tension with the data. It is therefore remarkable that it is still the LEP experiment, and not the LHC, which often sets the gold standard for understanding the possibility of new color-neutral states at the electroweak (EW) scale. Recently, ATLAS and CMS have started to push beyond LEP in bounding heavy new EW states, but a gap between the exclusions of LEP and the LHC typically remains. In this paper we show that measurements of SM Standard Candles can be repurposed to set entirely complementary constraints on new physics. To demonstrate this, we use W + W -cross section measurements to set bounds on a set of slepton-based simplified models which fill in the gaps left by LEP and dedicated LHC searches. Having demonstrated the sensitivity of the W + W -measurement to light sleptons, we also find regions where sleptons can improve the fit of the data compared to the NLO SM W + W -prediction alone. Remarkably, in those regions the sleptons also provide for the right relic-density of Bino-like Dark Matter and provide an explanation for the longstanding 3 σ discrepancy in the measurement of ( g - 2) μ.

  5. Validation of a Monte Carlo method using a joint PDF of the composition and an ILDM kinetic model for the prediction of turbulent flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurbach, S.; Garreton, D.; Kanniche, M.

    1997-09-01

    The resolution of the joint probability density function (PDF) of the composition and its application to the calculation of turbulent diffusion flames is presented. The numerical method is based on an Eulerian Monte-Carlo solver coupled with the CFD code Hades; an ILDM kinetic model allows the calculation of the chemical source terms. Two configurations are studied: the Masri-Bilger-Dibble flame and the Delft flame. The first turbulent diffusion flame is close to extinction and is a good test for the prediction of the interactions between the turbulence and the chemicals scales. The second one enables the validation of the prediction of an intermediate species taking a super-equilibrium concentration, the OH radical. (author) 9 refs.

  6. Ignition and flame-growth modeling on realistic building and landscape objects in changing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger

    2010-01-01

    Effective mitigation of external fires on structures can be achieved flexibly, economically, and aesthetically by (1) preventing large-area ignition on structures by avoiding close proximity of burning vegetation; and (2) stopping flame travel from firebrands landing on combustible building objects. Using bench-scale and mid-scale fire tests to obtain flammability...

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF METHANE-AIR TURBULENT JET FLAME USING A NEW SECOND-ORDER MOMENT MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xinglong; Zhou Lixing; Zhang Jian

    2000-01-01

    A new second-order moment model for turbulent combustion is applied in the simulation of methane-air turbulent jet flame.The predicted results are compared with the experimental results and with those predicted using the wellknown EBU-Arrhenius model and the original second-order moment model.The comparison shows the advantage of the new model that it requires almost the same computational storage and time as that of the original second-order moment model,but its modeling results are in better agreement with experiments than those using other models.Hence,the new second-order moment model is promising in modeling turbulent combustion with NOx formation with finite reaction rate for engineering application.

  8. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CADLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  9. Flames in vortices & tulip-flame inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, J. W.

    This article summarises two areas of research regarding the propagation of flames in flows which involve significant fluid-dynamical motion [1]-[3]. The major difference between the two is that in the first study the fluid motion is present before the arrival of any flame and remains unaffected by the flame [1, 2] while, in the second study it is the flame that is responsible for all of the fluid dynamical effects [3]. It is currently very difficult to study flame-motion in which the medium is both highly disturbed before the arrival of a flame and is further influenced by the passage of the flame.

  10. Optimized Design and Discussion on Middle and Large CANDLE Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Chai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide number densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor reactors have been intensively researched in the last decades [1–6]. Research shows that this kind of reactor is highly economical, safe and efficiently saves resources, thus extending large scale fission nuclear energy utilization for thousands of years, benefitting the whole of society. For many developing countries with a large population and high energy demands, such as China and India, middle (1000 MWth and large (2000 MWth CANDLE fast reactors are obviously more suitable than small reactors [2]. In this paper, the middle and large CANDLE reactors are investigated with U-Pu and combined ThU-UPu fuel cycles, aiming to utilize the abundant thorium resources and optimize the radial power distribution. To achieve these design purposes, the present designs were utilized, simply dividing the core into two fuel regions in the radial direction. The less active fuel, such as thorium or natural uranium, was loaded in the inner core region and the fuel with low-level enrichment, e.g. 2.0% enriched uranium, was loaded in the outer core region. By this simple core configuration and fuel setting, rather than using a complicated method, we can obtain the desired middle and large CANDLE fast cores with reasonable core geometry and thermal hydraulic parameters that perform safely and economically; as is to be expected from CANDLE. To assist in understanding the CANDLE reactor’s attributes, analysis and discussion of the calculation results achieved are provided.

  11. The Interaction of High-Speed Turbulence with Flames: Global Properties and Internal Flame Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y; 10.1016/j.combustflame.2009.11.018

    2011-01-01

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive-flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H2-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkohler number Da = 0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zon...

  12. Experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study of PAH formation in laminar co-flow methane diffusion flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuoci, Alberto; Frassoldati, Alessio; Faravelli, Tiziano

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry is used to study the detailed chemistry of co-flow methane diffusion flames with different dilution ratios. The experimental results constitute a comprehensive characterization of species important for PAH and soot formation...... an original CFD code based on the operator-splitting technique, specifically conceived to handle large kinetic mechanisms. The detailed kinetic modeling was effectively used to describe and analyze the fuel consumption and the formation of PAH. Experimental measurements and numerical predictions were found...

  13. Structure of a poly(ethylene) opposed flow diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W.J.; Brown, N.J.; Sawyer, R.F.

    1980-08-01

    Structural measurements were obtained and compared with other investigations of diffusion flames. Departures from the commonly assumed collapsed flame model of laminar diffusion flames were observed in terms of excessive CO concentrations and oxygen penetration into the fuel side of the flame. An upper bound on the importance of oxygen diffusion to the fuel surface and subsequent surface oxidation was placed at 20% of the energy required for fuel pyrolysis, with the remainder of the energy being delivered to the surface from the flame through heat transfer processes. As the oxygen concentration in the oxidizer flow was decreased and extinction conditions approached, the CO/CO/sub 2/ ratio at the flame increased slightly, the oxygen concentration at the luminous flame zone decreased, the flame stand-off distance decreased, and the flame temperature decreased. Radial similarity in the composition and temperature profiles was established experimentally which confirms predictions and greatly simplifies the modeling of the opposed flow diffusion flame.

  14. Determination of reactivity parameters of model carbons, cokes and flame-chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Gjernes, Erik; Jessen, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Reactivity profiles are defined and measured with thermogravimetry for a dense metallurgical Longyear coke, a polymer-derived porous active carbon, Carboxen 1000, and three flame-chars, Illinois #6, Pittsburgh #8 and New Mexico Blue #1. For each sample it is found that the reactivity profile can ...... reactivity measure is used to rank fuels with very different structural profiles, at varying levels of burnout, temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Keyword: TGA,Reactivity,Coal...

  15. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Dimethyl Carbonate in an Opposed-Flow Diffusion Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaude, P A; Pitz, W J; Thomson, M J

    2003-12-08

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) has been of interest as an oxygenate additive to diesel fuel because of its high oxygen content. In this study, a chemical kinetic mechanism for DMC was developed for the first time and used to understand its combustion under conditions in an opposed flow diffusion flame. Computed results were compared to experimental results from an opposed flow diffusion flame. It was found that the decomposition rate DMC {yields} H{sub 3}COC(=O)O. + CH{sub 3} in the flame was much slower than originally thought because resonance stabilization in the H{sub 3}COC(=O)O. radical was less than expected. Also, a new molecular elimination path for DMC is proposed and its rate calculated by quantum chemical methods. In the simulations of DMC in the flame, it was determined that much of the oxygen in dimethyl carbonate goes directly to CO{sub 2}. This characteristic indicates that DMC would not be an effective oxygenate additive for reducing soot emissions from diesel engines. In an ideal oxygenate additive for diesel fuel, each oxygen atom stays bonded to one carbon atom in the products thereby preventing the formation of carbon-carbon bonds that can lead to soot. When CO2 is formed directly, two oxygen atoms are bonded to one carbon atom thereby wasting one oxygen atom in the oxygenate additive. To determine how much CO{sub 2} is formed directly, the branching ratio of the key reaction, CH{sub 3}OC.=O going to the products CH{sub 3} + CO{sub 2} or CH{sub 3}O + CO was determined by ab initio methods. The A-factors of the rate constant of this reaction were found to be about 20 times higher than previous factors estimates. The new reaction rate constants obtained can be used as reaction rate rules for all oxygenates that contain the ester moiety including biodiesel.

  16. Modeling of complex physics & combustion dynamics in a combustor with a partially premixed turbulent flame

    OpenAIRE

    Shahi, Mina

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the formation of the high temperature stoichiometric regions in flames in a gas turbine combustor, and hence the formation of nitric oxides, an alternative concept of combustion technology was introduced by means of lean premixed combustion. However, the low emission of nitric oxides and carbon monoxide of the lean premixed combustion of natural gas comes at the cost of increased sensitivity to thermoacoustic instabilities. These are driven by the feedback loop between heat release, ...

  17. The discrete regime of flame propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in iron dust clouds was studied in a low-gravity envi-ronment on-board a parabolic flight aircraft. The elimination of buoyancy-induced convection and particle settling permitted measurements of fundamental combustion parameters such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. The discrete regime of flame propagation was observed by substitut-ing nitrogen present in air with xenon, an inert gas with a significantly lower heat conductivity. Flame propagation in the discrete regime is controlled by the heat transfer between neighbor-ing particles, rather than by the particle burning rate used by traditional continuum models of heterogeneous flames. The propagation mechanism of discrete flames depends on the spa-tial distribution of particles, and thus such flames are strongly influenced by local fluctuations in the fuel concentration. Constant pressure laminar dust flames were observed inside 70 cm long, 5 cm diameter Pyrex tubes. Equally-spaced plate assemblies forming rectangular chan-nels were placed inside each tube to determine the quenching distance defined as the minimum channel width through which a flame can successfully propagate. High-speed video cameras were used to measure the flame speed and a fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure the flame temperature. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained from a numerical model of a three-dimensional flame developed to capture both the discrete nature and the random distribution of particles in the flame. Though good qualitative agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental observations, residual g-jitters and the short reduced-gravity periods prevented further investigations of propagation limits in the dis-crete regime. The full exploration of the discrete flame phenomenon would require high-quality, long duration reduced gravity environment

  18. Flame Reconstruction Using Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Preston; Tree, Dale; Truscott, Tadd

    2011-01-01

    Flames can be formed by burning methane (CH4). When oxygen is scarce, carbon particles nucleate into solid particles called soot. These particles emit photons, making the flame yellow. Later, methane is pre-mixed with air forming a blue flame; burning more efficiently, providing less soot and light. Imaging flames and knowing their temperature are vital to maximizing efficiency and validating numerical models. Most temperature probes disrupt the flame and create differences leading to an inaccurate measurement of the flame temperature. We seek to image the flame in three dimensions using synthetic aperture imaging. This technique has already successfully measured velocity fields of a vortex ring [1]. Synthetic aperture imaging is a technique that views one scene from multiple cameras set at different angles, allowing some cameras to view objects that are obscured by others. As the resulting images are overlapped different depths of the scene come into and out of focus, known as focal planes, similar to tomogr...

  19. An experimental and modeling study of propene oxidation. Part 2: Ignition delay time and flame speed measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Burke, Sinéad M.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental data obtained in this study (Part II) complement the speciation data presented in Part I, but also offer a basis for extensive facility cross-comparisons for both experimental ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) observables. To improve our understanding of the ignition characteristics of propene, a series of IDT experiments were performed in six different shock tubes and two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions not previously studied. This work is the first of its kind to directly compare ignition in several different shock tubes over a wide range of conditions. For common nominal reaction conditions among these facilities, cross-comparison of shock tube IDTs suggests 20-30% reproducibility (2σ) for the IDT observable. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the data available for validation of propene oxidation models to higher pressures (2-40. atm) and lower temperatures (750-1750. K).Propene flames were studied at pressures from 1 to 20. atm and unburned gas temperatures of 295-398. K for a range of equivalence ratios and dilutions in different facilities. The present propene-air LFS results at 1. atm were also compared to LFS measurements from the literature. With respect to initial reaction conditions, the present experimental LFS cross-comparison is not as comprehensive as the IDT comparison; however, it still suggests reproducibility limits for the LFS observable. For the LFS results, there was agreement between certain data sets and for certain equivalence ratios (mostly in the lean region), but the remaining discrepancies highlight the need to reduce uncertainties in laminar flame speed experiments amongst different groups and different methods. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the burning rate characteristics of propene at elevated pressures (>5. atm).IDT and LFS measurements are compared to predictions of the chemical kinetic mechanism presented in Part I and good

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis of natural bio and syngas swirl flames in a model gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, S.; Benim, A. C.; Fischer, S.; Joos, F.; Kluβ, D.; Wiedermann, A.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent reacting flows in a generic swirl gas turbine combustor model are investigated both numerically and experimentally. In the investigation, an emphasis is placed upon the external flue gas recirculation, which is a promising technology for increasing the efficiency of the carbon capture and storage process, which, however, can change the combustion behaviour significantly. A further emphasis is placed upon the investigation of alternative fuels such as biogas and syngas in comparison to the conventional natural gas. Flames are also investigated numerically using the open source CFD software OpenFOAM. In the numerical simulations, a laminar flamelet model based on mixture fraction and reaction progress variable is adopted. As turbulence model, the SST model is used within a URANS concept. Computational results are compared with the experimental data, where a fair agreement is observed.

  1. Using Quasars as Standard Candles for Studying Dark Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denney, Kelly D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Watson, D.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated (Watson et al. 2011, ApJ, 740, L49) that quasars, or more generally active galactic nuclei (AGNs), can be used as standard candles for measuring distances in the universe, similar to Type Ia supernovae (SNe). Here, we present the initial findings of this new method...

  2. A CANDLE for a deeper in vivo insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupé, Pierrick; Munz, Martin; Manjón, Jose V; Ruthazer, Edward S; Louis Collins, D.

    2012-01-01

    A new Collaborative Approach for eNhanced Denoising under Low-light Excitation (CANDLE) is introduced for the processing of 3D laser scanning multiphoton microscopy images. CANDLE is designed to be robust for low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions typically encountered when imaging deep in scattering biological specimens. Based on an optimized non-local means filter involving the comparison of filtered patches, CANDLE locally adapts the amount of smoothing in order to deal with the noise inhomogeneity inherent to laser scanning fluorescence microscopy images. An extensive validation on synthetic data, images acquired on microspheres and in vivo images is presented. These experiments show that the CANDLE filter obtained competitive results compared to a state-of-the-art method and a locally adaptive optimized nonlocal means filter, especially under low SNR conditions (PSNRimaging capabilities enabled by the proposed filter are demonstrated on deep tissue in vivo images of neurons and fine axonal processes in the Xenopus tadpole brain. PMID:22341767

  3. 75 FR 80843 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ....2(f)). Background The Commission instituted this review on July 1, 2010 (75 FR 38121) and determined on October 4, 2010 that it would conduct an expedited review (75 FR 63200, October 14, 2010). The... COMMISSION Petroleum Wax Candles From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in...

  4. Candle Soot Coating for Latent Fingermark Enhancement on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianhui Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a facile method termed candle soot coating (CSC for fast developing latent fingermarks (LFMs on various kinds of surfaces (glass, ceramic, metal, paper and adhesive tape. The CSC method can be considered as simple, fast, and low-cost as well as providing high contrast for LFM visualization in potential forensic applications.

  5. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Thomas Edwin; Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald Joseph; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut.

  6. Proper Use of Candles During a Power Outage

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-08-10

    Home fires are a threat after a natural disaster and fire trucks may have trouble getting to your home. If the power is out, use flashlights or other battery-powered lights if possible, instead of candles.  Created: 8/10/2006 by Emergency Communications System.   Date Released: 8/20/2008.

  7. Dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten flame retardants in a human skin ex vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Martin; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Sørensen, Lars S; Webster, Thomas F; Nielsen, Jesper B

    2016-11-01

    The dermal uptake and percutaneous penetration of ten organic flame retardants was measured using an ex vivo human skin model. The studied compounds were DBDPE, BTBPE, TBP-DBPE, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, α, β and γ-HBCDD as well as syn- and anti-DDC-CO. Little or none of the applied flame retardants was recovered in either type of the receptor fluids used (physiological and worst-case). However, significant fractions were recovered in the skin depot, particularly in the upper skin layers. The primary effect of the worst-case receptor fluid was deeper penetration into the skin. The recovered mass was used to calculate lower- and upper-bound permeability coefficients kp. Despite large structural variation between the studied compounds, a clear, significant decreasing trend of kp was observed with increasing log Kow. The results indicate that the dermis may provide a significant barrier for these highly lipophilic compounds. However, based on our results, dermal uptake should be considered in exposure assessments, though it may proceed in a time-lagged manner compared to less hydrophobic compounds.

  8. 3-D flame temperature field reconstruction with multiobjective neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Wan(万雄); Yiqing Gao(高益庆); Yuanmei Wang(汪元美)

    2003-01-01

    A novel 3-D temperature field reconstruction method is proposed in this paper, which is based on multi-wavelength thermometry and Hopfield neural network computed tomography. A mathematical modelof multi-wavelength thermometry is founded, and a neural network algorithm based on multiobjectiveoptimization is developed. Through computer simulation and comparison with the algebraic reconstructiontechnique (ART) and the filter back-projection algorithm (FBP), the reconstruction result of the newmethod is discussed in detail. The study shows that the new method always gives the best reconstructionresults. At last, temperature distribution of a section of four peaks candle flame is reconstructed with thisnovel method.

  9. Modeling of the formation of short-chain acids in propane flames

    CERN Document Server

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Jaffrezo, J L; Legrand, M

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand their potential formation in combustion systems, a detailed kinetic mechanism for the formation of short-chain monocarboxylic acids, formic (HCOOH), acetic (CH3COOH), propionic (C2H5COOH) and propenic (C2H3COOH)) acids, has been developed. Simulations of lean (equivalence ratios from 0.9 to 0.48) laminar premixed flames of propane stabilized at atmospheric pressure with nitrogen as diluent have been performed. It was found that amounts up to 25 ppm of acetic acid, 15 ppm of formic acid and 1 ppm of C3 acid can be formed for some positions in the flames. Simulations showed that the more abundant C3 acid formed is propenic acid. A quite acceptable agreement has been obtained with the scarce results from the literature concerning oxygenated compounds, including aldehydes (CH2O, CH3CHO) and acids. A reaction pathways analysis demonstrated that each acid is mainly derived from the aldehyde of similar structure.

  10. Modelling of flame propagation in the gasoline fuelled Wankel rotary engine with hydrogen additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanov, E. A.; Zakharov, E. A.; Prikhodkov, K. V.; Levin, Y. V.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, hydrogen has been considered as an alternative fuel for a vehicles power unit. The Wankel engine is the most suitable to be adapted to hydrogen feeding. A hydrogen additive helps to decrease incompleteness of combustion in the volumes near the apex of the rotor. Results of theoretical researches of the hydrogen additives influence on the flame propagation in the combustion chamber of the Wankel rotary engine are presented. The theoretical research shows that the blend of 70% gasoline with 30% hydrogen could accomplish combustion near the T-apex in the stoichiometric mixture and in lean one. Maps of the flame front location versus the angle of rotor rotation and hydrogen fraction are obtained. Relations of a minimum required amount of hydrogen addition versus the engine speed are shown on the engine modes close to the average city driving cycle. The amount of hydrogen addition that could be injected by the nozzle with different flow sections is calculated in order to analyze the capacity of the feed system.

  11. On the transition from a highly turbulent curved flame into a tulip flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzel, T.; Pantow, E.; Fischer, M. [German Aerospace Research Establishment, Stuttgart (Germany). Institute of Technical Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    Experimental and numerical investigations of premixed flame propagation behaviour associated with vortex interactions due to planar pressure waves crossing a curved flame front have been carried out. The resulting ``tulip flame`` formation in such a closed tube has been studied by Schlieren visualization. The ``tulip flame`` phenomenon was observed only closed tubes, while cellular flame fronts appeared in half-open tubes. A physical model has been developed and implemented in a discrete vortex method combined with a flame tracking algorithm. The numerical method has been applied to model and understand the processes that cause the flame to change from a curved to a tulip shape. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with the experimental observations. (author)

  12. Long Gamma-Ray Bursts as standard candles

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzati, D; Ghisellini, G; Nava, L; Firmani, C; Morsony, B; Begelman, M C; Morsony, Brian

    2006-01-01

    As soon as it was realized that long GRBs lie at cosmological distances, attempts have been made to use them as cosmological probes. Besides their use as lighthouses, a task that presents mainly the technological challenge of a rapid deep high resolution follow-up, researchers attempted to find the Holy Grail: a way to create a standard candle from GRB observables. We discuss here the attempts and the discovery of the Ghirlanda correlation, to date the best method to standardize the GRB candle. Together with discussing the promises of this method, we will underline the open issues, the required calibrations and how to understand them and keep them under control. Even though GRB cosmology is a field in its infancy, ongoing work and studies will clarify soon if and how GRBs will be able to keep up to the promises.

  13. Chemical processes in the HNF flame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermolin, N.E.; Zarko, V.E.; Keizers, H.L.J.

    2006-01-01

    Results of modeling the HNF flame structure are presented. From an analysis of literature data on the thermal decomposition and combustion of HNF, it is concluded that the dissociative vaporization of HNF proceeds via the route HNFliq → (N2H4)g + (HC(NO 2)3)g. The flame structure is modeled using a

  14. Temperature Regulation of the Accelerating Section in CANDLE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Tunyan, Sergey; Grigoryan, Bagrat

    2005-01-01

    The temperature of the CANDLE S-Band Linac high-power RF components will be regulated by stand-alone closed loop (SACL) water system. The RF components are made of oxygen-free high conductivity copper and respond quickly to temperature changes. Temperature stabilization better than ± 0.1 C is required to achieve a good RF phase and energy stability. The temperature regulation and control philosophy along with the simulation results are discussed.

  15. Sooting turbulent jet flame: characterization and quantitative soot measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, M.; Geigle, K. P.; Meier, W.; Crosland, B. M.; Thomson, K. A.; Smallwood, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelers require high-quality experimental data sets for validation of their numerical tools. Preferred features for numerical simulations of a sooting, turbulent test case flame are simplicity (no pilot flame), well-defined boundary conditions, and sufficient soot production. This paper proposes a non-premixed C2H4/air turbulent jet flame to fill this role and presents an extensive database for soot model validation. The sooting turbulent jet flame has a total visible flame length of approximately 400 mm and a fuel-jet Reynolds number of 10,000. The flame has a measured lift-off height of 26 mm which acts as a sensitive marker for CFD model validation, while this novel compiled experimental database of soot properties, temperature and velocity maps are useful for the validation of kinetic soot models and numerical flame simulations. Due to the relatively simple burner design which produces a flame with sufficient soot concentration while meeting modelers' needs with respect to boundary conditions and flame specifications as well as the present lack of a sooting "standard flame", this flame is suggested as a new reference turbulent sooting flame. The flame characterization presented here involved a variety of optical diagnostics including quantitative 2D laser-induced incandescence (2D-LII), shifted-vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (SV-CARS), and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Producing an accurate and comprehensive characterization of a transient sooting flame was challenging and required optimization of these diagnostics. In this respect, we present the first simultaneous, instantaneous PIV, and LII measurements in a heavily sooting flame environment. Simultaneous soot and flow field measurements can provide new insights into the interaction between a turbulent vortex and flame chemistry, especially since soot structures in turbulent flames are known to be small and often treated in a statistical manner.

  16. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  17. Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.; Ronney, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number (SOFBALL) experiment explored the behavior of a newly discovered flame phenomena called "flame balls." These spherical, stable, stationary flame structures, observed only in microgravity, provide a unique opportunity to study the interactions of the two most important processes necessary for combustion (chemical reaction and heat and mass transport) in the simplest possible configuration. The previously unobtainable experimental data provided a comparison with models of flame stability and flame propagation limits that are crucial both in assessing fire safety and in designing efficient, clean-burning combustion engines.

  18. Elementary kinetic modelling applied to solid oxide fuel cell pattern anodes and a direct flame fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogler, Marcel

    2009-05-27

    In the course of this thesis a model for the prediction of polarisation characteristics of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was developed. The model is based on an elementary kinetic description of electrochemical reactions and the fundamental conservation principles of mass and energy. The model allows to predict the current-voltage relation of an SOFC and offers ideal possibilities for model validation. The aim of this thesis is the identification of rate-limiting processes and the determination of the elementary pathway during charge transfer. The numerical simulation of experiments with model anodes allowed to identify a hydrogen transfer to be the most probable charge-transfer reaction and revealed the influence of diffusive transport. Applying the hydrogen oxidation kinetics to the direct flame fuel cell system (DFFC) showed that electrochemical oxidation of CO is possible based on the same mechanism. Based on the quantification of loss processes in the DFFC system, improvements on cell design, predicting 80% increase of efficiency, were proposed. (orig.)

  19. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali

    2010-12-01

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (keff) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  20. Candle light-style OLED: a plausibly human-friendly safe night light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Chen, Po-Wei; Hsieh, Chun-Yu; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Tung, F.-C.; Chen, Szu-Hao; Wang, Yi-Shan

    2013-09-01

    Candles emit sensationally-warm light with a very-low color-temperature, comparatively most suitable for use at night. In response to the need for such a human-friendly night light, we demonstrate the employment of a high number of candle light complementary organic emitters to generate mimic candle light based on organic light emitting diode (OLED). One resultant candle light-style OLED shows a very-high color rendering index, with an efficacy at least 300 times that of candles or twice that of an incandescent bulb. The device can be fabricated, for example, by using four candle light complementary emitters, namely: red, yellow, green, and sky-blue phosphorescent dyes, vacuum-deposited into two emission layers, separated by a nano-layer of carrier modulation material to maximize both the desirable very-high color rendering index and energy efficiency, while keeping the blue emission very low and red emission high to obtain the desirable low color temperature. With different layer structures, the OLEDs can also show color tunable between that of candle light and dusk-hue. Importantly, a romantic sensation giving and supposedly physiologically-friendly candle light-style emission can hence be driven by electricity in lieu of the hydrocarbon-burning and greenhouse gas releasing candles that were invented 5,000 years ago.

  1. Design of Safer Flame Retardant Textiles through Inclusion Complex Formation with Cyclodextrins: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nanshan

    Triphenyl phosphate (TPP) is widely used as a phosphorus flame retardant. It is also one component of a commercial flame retardant mixture known as Firemaster 550. TPP is likely to be released into the environment due to its high volatility and has been detected at a concentration as high as 47,000 ng/m3 in air. Recent studies have also indicated that FRs like TPP could contribute to obesity and osteoporosis in humans. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are enzymatic degradation products of starch and consist of several (alpha-1,4)-linked alpha-Dglucopyranose units. CDs own a hydrophilic outside and a hydrophobic inner cavity, which enables the formation of non-covalently bonded cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (CD-ICs) with a vast array of molecules. We hypothesize that the formation of inclusion complexes between TPP and cyclodextrins will reduce its exposure yet also retain flame retarding properties of TPP, since the formation of FR-CD-ICs is expected to eliminate unnecessary loss of FRs, especially volatile FR compounds like TPP, and release them only during a fire when they are actually needed. After creating the TPP-beta-CD-IC, we applied it to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films by a hot press technique. Flame tests indicated TPP-beta-CD-IC exhibited flame resistant performance matching that of neat TPP, even though much less TPP was contained in its beta-CD-IC. Incorporation of FRs and other chemical additives into textile substrates in the form of their crystalline CD-ICs is a promising way to reduce the exposure of hazardous chemicals to humans and to our environment while not impacting their efficacy. Two other parent CDs (alpha-CD and gamma-CD) were applied and their abilities to form ICs with guest TPP were studied. Results from a series of characterization methods, including FTIR, DSC, TGA, XRD and NMR indicated the successful synthesis of TPP-gamma-CD-IC via two routes. However, alpha-CD appears unable to form an IC with TPP, which is likely attributable to a

  2. Entrainment regimes and flame characteristics of wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph M. Nelson; Bret W. Butler; David R. Weise

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports results from a study of the flame characteristics of 22 wind-aided pine litter fires in a laboratory wind tunnel and 32 field fires in southern rough and litter-grass fuels. Flame characteristic and fire behaviour data from these fires, simple theoretical flame models and regression techniques are used to determine whether the data support the...

  3. Luminous Flame Temperature Distribution Measurement Using the Emission Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Flame temperature distribution is one of the most important characteristic parameters in combustion research. The emission method is a good way to measure the luminous flame temperature field. The maximum entropy method is introduced to the temperature distribution measurement of a luminous flame using the emission method. A simplified mathematical model was derived by combining the thermal radiation theory, reconstruction algorithm and maximum entropy method. Suitable parameters were selected in the computing process. Good experimental results were obtained with pulverized coal flames.

  4. High Fidelity Measurement and Modeling of Interactions between Acoustics and Heat Release in Highly-Compact, High-Pressure Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    GRANT NUMBER 106862 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) William E. Anderson Stephen D. Heister 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK...Flames: Their Structure, Radiation, and Temperature, Chapman & Hall Ltd., London, 1960. 13 Gaydon, A. G., The Spectroscopy of Flames, Chapman ...01/2014-08/31/2015 Laboratory Principal Investigator: William Anderson and Stephen Heister, Purdue University Commercial Phone: 765-494-5126

  5. Pulsating instability and self-acceleration of fast turbulent flames

    CERN Document Server

    Poludnenko, A Y

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations is used to study the intrinsic stability of high-speed turbulent flames. Calculations model the interaction of a fully-resolved premixed flame with a highly subsonic, statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. We consider a wide range of turbulent intensities and system sizes, corresponding to the Damk\\"ohler numbers Da = 0.1-6.0. These calculations show that turbulent flames in the regimes considered are intrinsically unstable. In particular, we find three effects. 1) Turbulent flame speed develops pulsations with the observed peak-to-peak amplitude > 10 and a characteristic time scale close to a large-scale eddy turnover time. Such variability is caused by the interplay between turbulence, which continuously creates the flame surface, and highly intermittent flame collisions, which consume the flame surface. 2) Unstable burning results in the periodic pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks, when the flame s...

  6. Experiment and Simulation of Autoignition in Jet Flames and its Relevance to Flame Stabilization and Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Noman, Saeed M.

    2016-06-01

    mainly between the fuel nozzle and the lifted flame edge. On the other hand, they were formed just prior to the flame edge for the non-autoignited lifted flames. The effect of fuel pyrolysis and partial oxidation were found to be important in explaining autoignited liftoff heights, especially in the Mild combustion regime. Flame structures of autoignited flames were investigated numerically for syngas (CO/H2) and methane fuels. The simulations of syngas fuel accounting for the differential diffusion have been performed by adopting several kinetic mechanisms to test the models ability in predicting the flame behaviors observed previously. The results agreed well with the observed nozzle-attached flame characteristics in case of non-autoignited flames. For autoignited lifted flames in high temperature regime, a unique autoignition behavior can be predicted having HO2 and H2O2 radicals in a broad region between the nozzle and stabilized lifted flame edge. Autoignition characteristics of laminar nonpremixed methane jet flames in high- temperature coflow air were studied numerically. Several flame configurations were investigated by varying the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction. Characteristics of chemical kinetics structures for autoignited lifted flames were discussed based on the kinetic structures of homogeneous autoignition and flame propagation of premixed mixtures. Results showed that for autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial structure, a transition from autoignition to flame propagation modes occurs for reasonably stoichiometric mixtures. Characteristics of Mild combustion can be treated as an autoignited lean premixed lifted flame. Transition behavior from Mild combustion to a nozzle-attached flame was also investigated by increasing the fuel mole fraction.

  7. Physical-chemical properties and evaluative fate modelling of 'emerging' and 'novel' brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in the indoor and outdoor environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liagkouridis, Ioannis; Cousins, Anna Palm; Cousins, Ian T

    2015-08-15

    Several groups of flame retardants (FRs) have entered the market in recent years as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), but little is known about their physical-chemical properties or their environmental transport and fate. Here we make best estimates of the physical-chemical properties and undertake evaluative modelling assessments (indoors and outdoors) for 35 so-called 'novel' and 'emerging' brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and 22 organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs). A QSPR (Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship) based technique is used to reduce uncertainty in physical-chemical properties and to aid property selection for modelling, but it is evident that more, high quality property data are required for improving future assessments. Evaluative modelling results show that many of the alternative FRs, mainly alternative BFRs and some of the halogenated OPFRs, behave similarly to the PBDEs both indoors and outdoors. These alternative FRs exhibit high overall persistence (Pov), long-range transport potential (LRTP) and POP-like behaviour and on that basis cannot be regarded as suitable replacements to PBDEs. A group of low molecular weight alternative BFRs and non-halogenated OPFRs show a potentially better environmental performance based on Pov and LRTP metrics. Results must be interpreted with caution though since there are significant uncertainties and limited data to allow for thorough model evaluation. Additional environmental parameters such as toxicity and bioaccumulative potential as well as functionality issues should be considered in an industrial substitution strategy.

  8. Qualifications of Candle Filters for Combined Cycle Combustion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasz Wiltowski

    2008-08-31

    The direct firing of coal produces particulate matter that has to be removed for environmental and process reasons. In order to increase the current advanced coal combustion processes, under the U.S. Department of Energy's auspices, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) has developed ceramic candle filters that can operate at high temperatures. The Coal Research Center of Southern Illinois University (SIUC), in collaboration with SWPC, developed a program for long-term filter testing at the SIUC Steam Plant followed by experiments using a single-filter reactor unit. The objectives of this program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy were to identify and demonstrate the stability of porous candle filter elements for use in high temperature atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) process applications. These verifications were accomplished through extended time slipstream testing of a candle filter array under AFBC conditions using SIUC's existing AFBC boiler. Temperature, mass flow rate, and differential pressure across the filter array were monitored for a duration of 45 days. After test exposure at SIUC, the filter elements were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy and BET surface area analyses. In addition, a single-filter reactor was built and utilized to study long term filter operation, the permeability exhibited by a filter element before and after the slipstream test, and the thermal shock resilience of a used filter by observing differential pressure changes upon rapid heating and cooling of the filter. The data acquired during the slipstream test and the post-test evaluations demonstrated the suitability of filter elements in advanced power generation applications.

  9. Emissions and fate of brominated flame retardants in the indoor environment: A critical review of modelling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liagkouridis, Ioannis, E-mail: ioannis.liagkouridis@ivl.se [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 21060, SE 100 31 Stockholm (Sweden); ITM Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, SE 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Cousins, Ian T. [ITM Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, SE 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Cousins, Anna Palm [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 21060, SE 100 31 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-01

    This review explores the existing understanding and the available approaches to estimating the emissions and fate of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and in particular focuses on the brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Volatilisation, an important emission mechanism for the more volatile compounds can be well described using current emission models. More research is needed, however, to better characterise alternative release mechanisms such as direct material–particle partitioning and material abrasion. These two particle-mediated emissions are likely to result in an increased chemical release from the source than can be accounted for by volatilisation, especially for low volatile compounds, and emission models need to be updated in order to account for these. Air–surface partitioning is an important fate process for SVOCs such as BFRs however it is still not well characterised indoors. In addition, the assumption of an instantaneous air–particle equilibrium adopted by current indoor fate models might not be valid for high-molecular weight, strongly sorbing compounds. A better description of indoor particle dynamics is required to assess the effect of particle-associated transport as this will control the fate of low volatile BFRs. We suggest further research steps that will improve modelling precision and increase our understanding of the factors that govern the indoor fate of a wide range of SVOCs. It is also considered that the appropriateness of the selected model for a given study relies on the individual characteristics of the study environment and scope of the study. - Highlights: • Current emission models likely underestimate the release of low volatile BFRs from products. • Material abrasion and direct material–dust partitioning are important, yet understudied emission mechanisms. • Indoor surfaces can be significant sinks, but the mechanism is poorly understood. • Indoor fate of low volatile BFRs is strongly associated with particle

  10. Asymptotic analysis, direct numerical simulation and modeling of premixed turbulent flame-wall interaction; Etude asymptotique, simulation numerique directe et modelisation de l`interaction flamme turbulente premelangee-paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneaux, G.

    1996-05-20

    Premixed turbulent flame-wall interaction is studied using theoretical and numerical analysis. Laminar interactions are first investigated through a literature review. This gives a characterization of the different configurations of interaction and justifies the use of simplified kinetic schemes to study the interaction. Calculations are then performed using Direct Numerical Simulation with a one-step chemistry model, and are compared with good agreements to asymptotic analysis. Flame-wall distances and wall heat fluxes obtained are compared successfully with those of the literature. Heat losses decrease the consumption rate, leading to extinction at the maximum of wall heat flux. It is followed by a flame retreat, when the fuel diffuses into the reaction zone, resulting in low unburnt hydrocarbon levels. Then, turbulent regime is investigated, using two types of Direct Numerical Simulations: 2D variable density and 3D constant density. Similar results are obtained: the local turbulent flame behavior is identical to a laminar interaction, and tongues of fresh gases are expelled from the wall region, near zones of quenching. In the 2D simulations, minimal flame-wall distances and maximum wall heat fluxes are similar to laminar values. However, the structure of the turbulence in the 3D calculations induces smaller flame-wall distances and higher wall heat fluxes. Finally, a flame-wall interaction model is built and validated. It uses the flamelet approach, where the flame is described in terms of consumption speed and flame surface density. This model is simplified to produce a law of the wall, which is then included in a averaged CFD code (Kiva2-MB). It is validated in an engine calculation. (author) 36 refs.

  11. On Calibrations Using the Crab Nebula as a Standard Candle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin; Guainazzi, Matteo; Jahoda, Keith; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; ODell, Stephen; Zavlin, Vyacheslav; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Elsner, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by a recent paper (Kirsch et al. 2005) on possible use of the Crab Nebula as a standard candle for calibrating X-ray response func tions, we examine possible consequences of intrinsic departures from a single (absorbed) power law upon such calibrations. We limited our analyses to three more modern X-ray instruments -- the ROSAT/PSPC, th e RXTE/PCA, and the XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn. The results are unexpected an d indicate a need to refine two of the three response functions studi ed. The implications for Chandra will be discussed.

  12. Using Quasars as Standard Candles for Studying Dark Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denney, Kelly D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Watson, D.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated (Watson et al. 2011, ApJ, 740, L49) that quasars, or more generally active galactic nuclei (AGNs), can be used as standard candles for measuring distances in the universe, similar to Type Ia supernovae (SNe). Here, we present the initial findings of this new method......, which relies on the technique of reverberation mapping to measure time delays between the quasar continuum and emission line variability signatures. Measuring this time delay effectively measures the radius between the central source and the emission-line gas. The emission line gas is photo...

  13. Autoinflammatory diseases in dermatology: CAPS, TRAPS, HIDS, FMF, Blau, CANDLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shivani V; Leslie, Kieron S

    2013-07-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases, including CAPS, TRAPS, HIDS, FMF, Blau, and CANDLE, have unique dermatologic presentations that can be a clue to diagnosis. Although these conditions are rare, the morbidity and mortality can be severe, and well-informed physicians can place these conditions in their differential diagnosis when familiar with the dermatologic manifestations. This review article presents a brief overview of each condition, clues to diagnosis that focus of dermatologic manifestations and clinical images, basic laboratory tests and follow-up, a brief review of treatments, and concludes with an overview for these autoinflammatory conditions and their differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 吹扫型火焰控制器管路模型的设计%Design of Pipeline Model of Purge Type Flame Controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱利军

    2011-01-01

    The function, connection diagram and correlation element of purge type flame controller are introduced. The pipeline model is designed and connection diagram is given.%介绍吹扫型火焰控制器的功能、接线原理图及相关器件,设计相应的管路模型,并给出接线图。

  15. Flame structure of methane inverse diffusion flame

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents high speed images of OH-PLIF at 10. kHz simultaneously with 2D PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements collected along the entire length of an inverse diffusion flame with circumferentially arranged methane fuel jets. For a fixed fuel flow rate, the central air jet Re was varied, leading to four air to fuel velocity ratios, namely Vr = 20.7, 29, 37.4 and 49.8. A double flame structure could be observed composed of a lower fuel entrainment region and an upper mixing and intense combustion region. The entrainment region was enveloped by an early OH layer, and then merged through a very thin OH neck to an annular OH layer located at the shear layer of the air jet. The two branches of this annular OH layer broaden as they moved downstream and eventfully merged together. Three types of events were observed common to all flames: breaks, closures and growing kernels. In upstream regions of the flames, the breaks were counterbalanced by flame closures. These breaks in OH signal were found to occur at locations where locally high velocity flows were impinging on the flame. As the Vr increased to 37.4, the OH layers became discontinuous over the downstream region of the flame, and these regions of low or no OH moved upstream. With further increases in Vr, these OH pockets act as flame kernels, growing as they moved downstream, and became the main mechanism for flame re-ignition. Along the flame length, the direction of the two dimensional principle compressive strain rate axis exhibited a preferred orientation of approximately 45° with respect to the flow direction. Moreover, the OH zones were associated with elongated regions of high vorticity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Emissions of air pollutants from scented candles burning in a test chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derudi, Marco; Gelosa, Simone; Sliepcevich, Andrea; Cattaneo, Andrea; Rota, Renato; Cavallo, Domenico; Nano, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    Burning of scented candles in indoor environment can release a large number of toxic chemicals. However, in spite of the large market penetration of scented candles, very few works investigated their organic pollutants emissions. This paper investigates volatile organic compounds emissions, with particular reference to the priority indoor pollutants identified by the European Commission, from the burning of scented candles in a laboratory-scale test chamber. It has been found that BTEX and PAHs emission factors show large differences among different candles, possibly due to the raw paraffinic material used, while aldehydes emission factors seem more related to the presence of additives. This clearly evidences the need for simple and cheap methodologies to measure the emission factors of commercial candles in order to foresee the expected pollutant concentration in a given indoor environment and compare it with health safety standards.

  17. 75 FR 70713 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Third...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... order are certain scented or unscented petroleum wax candles made from petroleum wax and having fiber or... International Trade Administration Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of... petroleum wax candles from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). On the basis of a timely notice...

  18. 76 FR 773 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... a reasonably foreseeable future. See Petroleum Wax Candles From China Determination, 75 FR 80843... scented or unscented petroleum wax candles made from petroleum wax and having fiber or paper-cored wicks... International Trade Administration Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Continuation...

  19. 76 FR 46277 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Request for Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... International Trade Administration Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of... request for comments on the scope of antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from the People's... determinations involving the Order. \\1\\ See Petroleum Wax Candles from the People's Republic of China...

  20. SYNTHESIS ALKANOLAMIDE TETRAHIDROXY OCTADECANOATE COMPOUND FROM CANDLE NUT OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Candle nut oil could be transesterificated by methanol with concentrated H2SO4 as a catalyst to form fatty acid methyl esther. Methyl linoleate could be separated by Column Chromatography mechanism technic partition from fatty acid methyl ester (FAME mixture, then it was treated by ethanolamine at base condition in benzene as solvent and sodium methylate as a catalyst at reflux condition for 6 hours to form an alkanolamide. Alkanolamide could be epoxydized by tert-buthyl hydroperoxyde and peroxygenase as a catalyst and it was refluxed for 6 hours at 40 °C and nitrogen gas condition to form the epoxy alkanolamide octadecanoate, and then it was hydrolyzed by HCl 0.1 M to form alkanolamide tetrahidroxy octadecanoate (Polyol. Alkanolamide tetrahidroxy octadecanoate could be separated by Column Chromatography using silica gel H 40 and the eluent was the mixture of chloroform, ethyl acetate, formic acid in a ratio 90:10:1 (v/v/v/. Determination of HLB value from alknolamide tetrahydroxy octadecanoate is 13.096. Therefore, this compound was particularly suitable for application as an o/w emulsifiers. All af the reaction steps were confirmed by using FT-IR, 1H-NMR, GC-MS, Gas Chromatography and TLC.   Keywords: Esterification, Candle nut oil, Surfactant, Amidation, Polyol.

  1. 5 kHz thermometry in a swirl-stabilized gas turbine model combustor using chirped probe pulse femtosecond CARS. Part 1: Temporally resolved swirl-flame thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Dennis, Claresta N.

    2016-06-20

    Single-laser-shot temperature measurements at 5 kHz were performed in a gas turbine model combustor using femtosecond (fs) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The combustor was operated at two conditions; one exhibiting a low level of thermoacoustic instability and the other a high level of instability. Measurements were performed at 73 locations within each flame in order to resolve the spatial flame structure and compare to previously published studies. The measurement procedures, including the procedure for calibrating the laser system parameters, are discussed in detail. Despite the high turbulence levels in the combustor, signals were obtained on virtually every laser shot, and these signals were strong enough for spectral fitting analysis for determination of flames temperatures. The spatial resolution of the single-laser shot temperature measurements was approximately 600 µm, the precision was approximately ±2%, and the estimated accuracy was approximately ±3%. The dynamic range was sufficient for temperature measurements ranging from 300 K to 2200 K, although some detector saturation was observed for low temperature spectra. These results demonstrate the usefulness of fs-CARS for the investigation of highly turbulent combustion phenomena. In a companion paper, the time-resolved fs CARS data are analyzed to provide insight into the temporal dynamics of the gas turbine model combustor flow field.

  2. Direct numerical simulations of non-premixed ethylene-air flames: Local flame extinction criterion

    KAUST Repository

    Lecoustre, Vivien R.

    2014-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of ethylene/air diffusion flame extinctions in decaying two-dimensional turbulence were performed. A Damköhler-number-based flame extinction criterion as provided by classical large activation energy asymptotic (AEA) theory is assessed for its validity in predicting flame extinction and compared to one based on Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis (CEMA) of the detailed chemistry. The DNS code solves compressible flow conservation equations using high order finite difference and explicit time integration schemes. The ethylene/air chemistry is simulated with a reduced mechanism that is generated based on the directed relation graph (DRG) based methods along with stiffness removal. The numerical configuration is an ethylene fuel strip embedded in ambient air and exposed to a prescribed decaying turbulent flow field. The emphasis of this study is on the several flame extinction events observed in contrived parametric simulations. A modified viscosity and changing pressure (MVCP) scheme was adopted in order to artificially manipulate the probability of flame extinction. Using MVCP, pressure was changed from the baseline case of 1 atm to 0.1 and 10 atm. In the high pressure MVCP case, the simulated flame is extinction-free, whereas in the low pressure MVCP case, the simulated flame features frequent extinction events and is close to global extinction. Results show that, despite its relative simplicity and provided that the global flame activation temperature is correctly calibrated, the AEA-based flame extinction criterion can accurately predict the simulated flame extinction events. It is also found that the AEA-based criterion provides predictions of flame extinction that are consistent with those provided by a CEMA-based criterion. This study supports the validity of a simple Damköhler-number-based criterion to predict flame extinction in engineering-level CFD models. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  3. The combustion chemistry of a fuel tracer: Measured flame speeds and ignition delays and a detailed chemical kinetic model for the oxidation of acetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, S.; Black, G.; Simmie, J.M.; Curran, H.J. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Chaumeix, N.; Yahyaoui, M. [Institut de Combustion Aerothermique Reactivite et Environnement, CNRS, Orleans (France); Donohue, R. [Information Technology, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-02-15

    Acetone ignition delay and stretch-free laminar flame speed measurements have been carried out and a kinetic model has been developed to simulate these and literature data for acetone and for ketene, which was found to be an important intermediate in its oxidation. The mechanism has been based on one originally devised for dimethyl ether and modified through validation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane sub-mechanisms. Acetone oxidation in argon was studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1340-1930 K, at 1 atm and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1 and 2; it is also shown that the addition of up to 15% acetone to a stoichiometric n-heptane mixture has no effect on the measured ignition delay times. Flame speeds at 298 K and 1 atm of pure acetone in air were measured in a spherical bomb; a maximum flame speed of {proportional_to}35 cm s{sup -1} at {phi}=1.15 is indicated. (author)

  4. Shapes of Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Methane Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Laminar gas jet diffusion flames represent a fundamental combustion configuration. Their study has contributed to numerous advances in combustion, including the development of analytical and computational combustion tools. Laminar jet flames are pertinent also to turbulent flames by use of the laminar flamelet concept. Investigations into the shapes of noncoflowing microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames have primarily been pursued in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, by Cochran and coworkers and by Bahadori and coworkers. These studies were generally conducted at atmospheric pressure; they involved soot-containing flames and reported luminosity lengths and widths instead of the flame-sheet dimensions which are of Greater value to theory evaluation and development. The seminal model of laminar diffusion flames is that of Burke and Schumann, who solved the conservation of momentum equation for a jet flame in a coflowing ambient by assuming the velocity of fuel, oxidizer and products to be constant throughout. Roper and coworkers improved upon this model by allowing for axial variations of velocity and found flame shape to be independent of coflow velocity. Roper's suggestion that flame height should be independent of gravity level is not supported by past or present observations. Other models have been presented by Klajn and Oppenheim, Markstein and De Ris, Villermaux and Durox, and Li et al. The common result of all these models (except in the buoyant regime) is that flame height is proportional to fuel mass flowrate, with flame width proving much more difficult to predict. Most existing flame models have been compared with shapes of flames containing soot, which is known to obscure the weak blue emission of flame sheets. The present work involves measurements of laminar gas jet diffusion flame shapes. Flame images have been obtained for buoyant and nonbuoyant methane flames burning in quiescent air at various fuel flow-rates, burner diameters and ambient

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADHESIVE CANDLE FILTER SAFEGUARD DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John P. Hurley; Ann K. Henderson; Jan W. Nowok; Michael L. Swanson

    2002-01-01

    In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal conversion. Two main types of systems employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles. In both systems, suspended particulates must be cleaned from the gas stream before it enters the turbine so as to prevent fouling and erosion of the turbine blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in use in several facilities. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the particulates on the surface. The three main configurations of the barrier filters are candle, cross-flow, and tube filters. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer on the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle and individual elements can fail, allowing particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Preventing all failure of individual ceramic filter elements is not possible at the present state of development of the technology. Therefore, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the particulates streaming through occasional broken filters from reaching the turbine. However, the SGD must allow for the free passage of gas when it is not activated. Upon breaking of a filter, the SGD must either mechanically close or quickly plug with filter dust to prevent additional dust from reaching the turbine. Production of a dependable rapidly closing autonomous mechanical

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADHESIVE CANDLE FILTER SAFEGUARD DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John P. Hurley; Ann K. Henderson; Jan W. Nowok; Michael L. Swanson

    2002-01-01

    In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal conversion. Two main types of systems employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles. In both systems, suspended particulates must be cleaned from the gas stream before it enters the turbine so as to prevent fouling and erosion of the turbine blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in use in several facilities. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the particulates on the surface. The three main configurations of the barrier filters are candle, cross-flow, and tube filters. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer on the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle and individual elements can fail, allowing particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Preventing all failure of individual ceramic filter elements is not possible at the present state of development of the technology. Therefore, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the particulates streaming through occasional broken filters from reaching the turbine. However, the SGD must allow for the free passage of gas when it is not activated. Upon breaking of a filter, the SGD must either mechanically close or quickly plug with filter dust to prevent additional dust from reaching the turbine. Production of a dependable rapidly closing autonomous mechanical

  7. On the dynamics of flame edges in diffusion-flame/vortex interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanns, Miguel; Linan, Amable [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Pza. Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vera, Marcos [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    We analyze the local flame extinction and reignition of a counterflow diffusion flame perturbed by a laminar vortex ring. Local flame extinction leads to the appearance of flame edges separating the burning and extinguished regions of the distorted mixing layer. The dynamics of these edges is modeled based on previous numerical results, with heat release effects fully taken into account, which provide the propagation velocity of triple and edge flames in terms of the upstream unperturbed value of the scalar dissipation. The temporal evolution of the mixing layer is determined using the classical mixture fraction approach, with both unsteady and curvature effects taken into account. Although variable density effects play an important role in exothermic reacting mixing layers, in this paper the description of the mixing layer is carried out using the constant density approximation, leading to a simplified analytical description of the flow field. The mathematical model reveals the relevant nondimensional parameters governing diffusion-flame/vortex interactions and provides the parameter range for the more relevant regime of local flame extinction followed by reignition via flame edges. Despite the simplicity of the model, the results show very good agreement with previously published experimental results. (author)

  8. Computationally Efficient Modeling of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Chemistry and Flames Using Constituents and Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    Fig. 10, at the high temperature conditions representative of die- sel, gas turbine and HCCI engines , the model performs very well; the same holds for...predictions are at high pressure which is the regime of choice for the operation of diesel, gas turbine and HCCI engines . As stated above, for the very...temperature conditions representative of diesel, gas turbine and HCCI engines , the model performs very well; the same holds for the very rich conditions

  9. Characterization of hazardous and odorous volatiles emitted from scented candles before lighting and when lit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Bo-Won

    2015-04-01

    Scented candles are known to release various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including both pleasant aromas and toxic components both before lighting (off) and when lit (on). In this study, we explored the compositional changes of volatiles from scented candles under various settings to simulate indoor use. Carbonyl compounds and other VOCs emitted from six different candle types were analyzed under 'on/off' conditions. The six candle types investigated were: (1) Clean cotton (CT), (2) Floral (FL), (3) Kiwi melon (KW), (4) Strawberry (SB), (5) Vanilla (VN), and (6) Plain (PL). Although a large number of chemicals were released both before lighting and when lit, their profiles were noticeably distinguishable. Before lighting, various esters (n = 30) showed the most dominant emissions. When lit, formaldehyde was found to have the highest emission concentration of 2098 ppb (SB), 1022 ppb (CT), and 925 ppb (PL). In most lit scented candles, there was a general tendency to show increased concentrations of low boiling point compounds. For some scented candle products, the emission of volatiles occurred strongly both before lighting and when lit. For instance, in terms of TVOC (ppbC), the highest concentrations were observed from the KW product with their values of 12,742 (on) and 2766 ppbC (off). As such, the results suggest that certain scented candle products should act as potent sources of VOC emission in indoor environment, regardless of conditions--whether being lit or not.

  10. Physical–chemical properties and evaluative fate modelling of ‘emerging’ and ‘novel’ brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in the indoor and outdoor environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liagkouridis, Ioannis, E-mail: ioannis.liagkouridis@aces.su.se [Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), Stockholm University, SE 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 21060, SE 100 31 Stockholm (Sweden); Cousins, Anna Palm [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 21060, SE 100 31 Stockholm (Sweden); Cousins, Ian T. [Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), Stockholm University, SE 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Several groups of flame retardants (FRs) have entered the market in recent years as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), but little is known about their physical–chemical properties or their environmental transport and fate. Here we make best estimates of the physical–chemical properties and undertake evaluative modelling assessments (indoors and outdoors) for 35 so-called ‘novel’ and ‘emerging’ brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and 22 organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs). A QSPR (Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship) based technique is used to reduce uncertainty in physical–chemical properties and to aid property selection for modelling, but it is evident that more, high quality property data are required for improving future assessments. Evaluative modelling results show that many of the alternative FRs, mainly alternative BFRs and some of the halogenated OPFRs, behave similarly to the PBDEs both indoors and outdoors. These alternative FRs exhibit high overall persistence (P{sub ov}), long-range transport potential (LRTP) and POP-like behaviour and on that basis cannot be regarded as suitable replacements to PBDEs. A group of low molecular weight alternative BFRs and non-halogenated OPFRs show a potentially better environmental performance based on P{sub ov} and LRTP metrics. Results must be interpreted with caution though since there are significant uncertainties and limited data to allow for thorough model evaluation. Additional environmental parameters such as toxicity and bioaccumulative potential as well as functionality issues should be considered in an industrial substitution strategy. - Highlights: • ‘Best-estimates’ of physical–chemical properties of alternative FRs are proposed. • The ‘SMURF’ model and the OECD ‘The Tool’ are used to estimate the environmental fate. • Many alternative BFRs and HOPFRs have similar environmental fate to PBDEs. • Among alternative FRs, certain low MW

  11. Flame Holder System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Henry H. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A flame holder system includes a modified torch body and a ceramic flame holder. Catch pin(s) are coupled to and extend radially out from the torch body. The ceramic flame holder has groove(s) formed in its inner wall that correspond in number and positioning to the catch pin(s). Each groove starts at one end of the flame holder and can be shaped to define at least two 90.degree.turns. Each groove is sized to receive one catch pin therein when the flame holder is fitted over the end of the torch body. The flame holder is then manipulated until the catch pin(s) butt up against the end of the groove(s).

  12. Application and Comparison of Different Combustion Models of High Pressure LOX/CH4 Jet Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia De Giorgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the numerical modeling of combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Pressure and temperature are well above thermodynamic critical points of both the propellants and then the reactants show liquid-like characteristics of density and gas-like characteristics for diffusivity. The aim of the work is an efficient numerical description of the phenomena and RANS simulations were performed for this purpose. Hence, in the present work different kinetics, combustion models and thermodynamic approaches were used for combustion modeling first in a trans-critical environment, then in the sub-critical state. For phases treatment the pure Eulerian single phase approach was compared with the Lagrangian/Eulerian description. For modeling combustion, the Probability Density Function (PDF equilibrium and flamelet approaches and the Eddy Dissipation approach, with two different chemical kinetic mechanisms (the Jones-Lindstedt and the Skeletal model, were used. Real Gas (Soave-Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations were applied. To estimate the suitability of different strategies in phenomenon description, a comparison with experimental data from the literature was performed, using the results for different operative conditions of the Mascotte test bench: trans-critical and subcritical condition for oxygen injection. The main result of this study is the individuation of the DPM approach of the most versatile methods to reproduce cryogenic combustion adapted for different operating conditions and producing good results.

  13. Brain in flames – animal models of psychosis: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattei D

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Daniele Mattei,1 Regina Schweibold,1,2 Susanne A Wolf1 1Department of Cellular Neuroscience, Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Helios Clinics, Berlin, Germany Abstract: The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia posits that schizophrenia is a psychopathological condition resulting from aberrations in neurodevelopmental processes caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors which proceed long before the onset of clinical symptoms. Many studies discuss an immunological component in the onset and progression of schizophrenia. We here review studies utilizing animal models of schizophrenia with manipulations of genetic, pharmacologic, and immunological origin. We focus on the immunological component to bridge the studies in terms of evaluation and treatment options of negative, positive, and cognitive symptoms. Throughout the review we link certain aspects of each model to the situation in human schizophrenic patients. In conclusion we suggest a combination of existing models to better represent the human situation. Moreover, we emphasize that animal models represent defined single or multiple symptoms or hallmarks of a given disease. Keywords: inflammation, schizophrenia, microglia, animal models 

  14. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of premixed NH3/CH4/O-2/Ar flames at low pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Z.Y.; Li, Y. Y.; Zhang, L. D.;

    2009-01-01

    spectrometry. Mole fraction profiles of the flame species including reactants, intermediates and products are determined by scanning burner position at some selected photon energies near ionization thresholds. Temperature profiles are measured by a Pt/Pt-13%Rh thermocouple. A comprehensive kinetic mechanism...

  15. Propellant Formulation Development for Future Army Weapons Systems By Means of Advanced Modeling and Flame Kinetics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    PHASE FLAME • Elementary reactions • Thermal conduction • Convection • Molecular diffusion • Multi-component transport • Thermal diffusion LIQUID/FOAM...C-phase reactions • Thermal density changes • Mixture properties • Thermal conduction • Convection • Molecular diffusion • Bubble formation

  16. Turbulent combustion modelling of a confined premixed jet flame including heat loss effects using tabulated chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gövert, S.; Mira, D.; Kok, J.B.W.; Vázquez, M.; Houzeaux, G.

    2015-01-01

    The present work addresses the coupling of a flamelet database, to a low-Mach approximation of the Navier–Stokes equations using scalar controlling variables. The model is characterized by the chemistry tabulation based on laminar premixed flamelets in combination with an optimal choice of the react

  17. The Standardized Candle Method for Type II Plateau Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares E., Felipe; Hamuy, Mario; Pignata, Giuliano; Maza, José; Bersten, Melina; Phillips, Mark M.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Morrel, Nidia I.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Matheson, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we study the "standardized candle method" using a sample of 37 nearby (redshift z color curves, and velocity curves. We find that the V-I color toward the end of the plateau can be used to estimate the host-galaxy reddening with a precision of σ(AV ) = 0.2 mag. The correlation between plateau luminosity and expansion velocity previously reported in the literature is recovered. Using this relation and assuming a standard reddening law (RV = 3.1), we obtain Hubble diagrams (HDs) in the BVI bands with dispersions of ~0.4 mag. Allowing RV to vary and minimizing the spread in the HDs, we obtain a dispersion range of 0.25-0.30 mag, which implies that these objects can deliver relative distances with precisions of 12%-14%. The resulting best-fit value of RV is 1.4 ± 0.1.

  18. Present and future prospects for GRB standard candles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.S. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge (United States); Bloom, J.S. [California Univ., Berkeley (United States). Department of Astronomy; Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge (United States)

    2005-07-15

    Following our previous work, we conclude that a GRB standard candle constructed from the Ghirlanda et al. power-law relation between the geometry-corrected energy (E{sub {gamma}}) and the peak of the rest-frame prompt burst spectrum (E{sub p}) is not yet cosmographically useful, despite holding some potential advantages over SNe la, This is due largely to the small sample of {approx} 20 GRBs with the required measured redshifts, jet-breaks, and peak energies, and to the strong sensitivity of the goodness-of-fit of the power-law to input assumptions. The most important such finding concerns the sensitivity to the generally unknown density (and density profile), of the circumburst medium. Although the E{sub p}-E{sub {gamma}} relation is a highly significant correlation over many cosmologies, until the sample expands to include many low-z events, it will be most sensitive to {omega}M but essentially insensitive to {omega}A and w, with some hope of constraining dw/dt with high-z GRB data alone. The relation clearly represents a significant improvement in the search for an empirical GRB standard candle, but is further hindered by an unknown physical basis for the relation, the lack of a low-z training set to calibrate the relation in a cosmology-independent way, and several major potential systematic uncertainties and selection effects, Until these concerns are addressed, a larger sample is acquired, and attempts are made to marginalize or perform Monte Carlo simulations over the unknown density distribution, we urge caution concerning claims of the utility of GRBs for cosmography and especially the attempts to combine GRBs with SNe Ia.

  19. Numerical assessment of accurate measurements of laminar flame speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulier, Joules; Bizon, Katarzyna; Chaumeix, Nabiha; Meynet, Nicolas; Continillo, Gaetano

    2016-12-01

    In combustion, the laminar flame speed constitutes an important parameter that reflects the chemistry of oxidation for a given fuel, along with its transport and thermal properties. Laminar flame speeds are used (i) in turbulent models used in CFD codes, and (ii) to validate detailed or reduced mechanisms, often derived from studies using ideal reactors and in diluted conditions as in jet stirred reactors and in shock tubes. End-users of such mechanisms need to have an assessment of their capability to predict the correct heat released by combustion in realistic conditions. In this view, the laminar flame speed constitutes a very convenient parameter, and it is then very important to have a good knowledge of the experimental errors involved with its determination. Stationary configurations (Bunsen burners, counter-flow flames, heat flux burners) or moving flames (tubes, spherical vessel, soap bubble) can be used. The spherical expanding flame configuration has recently become popular, since it can be used at high pressures and temperatures. With this method, the flame speed is not measured directly, but derived through the recording of the flame radius. The method used to process the radius history will have an impact on the estimated flame speed. Aim of this work is to propose a way to derive the laminar flame speed from experimental recording of expanding flames, and to assess the error magnitude.

  20. Application and Comparison of Different Combustion Models of High Pressure LOX/CH4 Jet Flames

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Grazia De Giorgi; Aldebara Sciolti; Antonio Ficarella

    2014-01-01

    The present work focuses on the numerical modeling of combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Pressure and temperature are well above thermodynamic critical points of both the propellants and then the reactants show liquid-like characteristics of density and gas-like characteristics for diffusivity. The aim of the work is an efficient numerical description of the phenomena and RANS simulations were performed for this purpose. Hence, in the present work different kinetics, combustion ...

  1. Flame Propagation of Butanol Isomers/Air Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veloo, Peter S.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted on the propagation of flames of saturated butanol isomers. The experiments were performed in the counterflow configuration under atmospheric pressure, unburned mixture temperature of 343 K, and for a wide range of equivalence ratios. The experiments were simulated using a recent kinetic model for the four isomers of butanol. Results indicate that n-butanol/air flames propagate somewhat faster than both sec-butanol/air and iso-butanol/air flames, and that tert-butanol/air flames propagate notably slower compared to the other three isomers. Reaction path analysis of tert-butanol/air flames revealed that iso-butene is a major intermediate, which subsequently reacts to form the resonantly stable iso-butenyl radical retarding thus the overall reactivity of tert-butanol/air flames relatively to the other three isomers. Through sensitivity analysis, it was determined that the mass burning rates of sec-butanol/air and iso-butanol/air flames are sensitive largely to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and C{sub 1}–C{sub 2} hydrocarbon kinetics and not to fuel-specific reactions similarly to n-butanol/air flames. However, for tert-butanol/air flames notable sensitivity to fuel-specific reactions exists. While the numerical results predicted closely the experimental data for n-butanol/air and sec-butanol/air flames, they overpredicted and underpredicted the laminar flame speeds for iso-butanol/air and tert-butanol/air flames respectively. It was demonstrated further that the underprediction of the laminar flame speeds of tert-butanol/air flames by the model was most likely due to deficiencies of the C{sub 4}-alkene kinetics.

  2. Further development of model techniques to study the mixing in gas flame zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaclavinek, J.; Zethraeus, B.

    1985-12-01

    The most widely used quantitative model techniques are tracer-gas analysis and pH-metry. The former has the disadvantage that it is difficult to visualize the flow pattern simultaneous to the measurement and the latter the disadvantage of long response times due to the probe. Conductivity probes are considerably faster than pH-probes. The problem when using conductimetry is to find an acid-base pair that gives a unique correlation between mixing proportions and conductivity. This paper presents an acid-base pair that answers the demands of uniqueness and high resolution over a wide range of mixing proportions. It also suggests methods to simulate oxygen enrichment and varying fuel gas analysis. The paper also presents a block scheme for a flexible conductometer. The suggested layout of the conductometer and conductimetric probes gives a flexible system with calibration curves as close to straight lines as possible. Experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with data reported in the literature as well as with our hot model experiments. (orig.).

  3. Hi-tech Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Modern science plays a crucial role in lighting the Olympic flame on the world’s highest mountain when the world saw live telecasts of the Olympic flame burning onthe top of Mount Qomolangma(Mount Everest) at 9:17 on the morning of May 8, few realized the years of work and high level of technology that had

  4. Using slow-release permanganate candles to remediate PAH-contaminated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, Lindy, E-mail: purplerauscher@neb.rr.com [School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583-0915 (United States); Sakulthaew, Chainarong, E-mail: chainarong@huskers.unl.edu [School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583-0915 (United States); Department of Veterinary Technology, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Comfort, Steve, E-mail: scomfort1@unl.edu [School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583-0915 (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantified the efficacy of slow-release permanganate-paraffin candles to degrade and mineralize PAHs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 14}C-labeled PAHs were used to quantify both adsorption and transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Permanganate-treated PAHs were more biodegradable in soil microcosms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A flow-through candle system was used to quantify PAH removal in urban runoff. - Abstract: Surface waters impacted by urban runoff in metropolitan areas are becoming increasingly contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Slow-release oxidant candles (paraffin-KMnO{sub 4}) are a relatively new technology being used to treat contaminated groundwater and could potentially be used to treat urban runoff. Given that these candles only release permanganate when submerged, the ephemeral nature of runoff events would influence when the permanganate is released for treating PAHs. Our objective was to determine if slow-release permanganate candles could be used to degrade and mineralize PAHs. Batch experiments quantified PAH degradation rates in the presence of the oxidant candles. Results showed most of the 16 PAHs tested were degraded within 2-4 h. Using {sup 14}C-labled phenanthrene and benzo(a)pyrene, we demonstrated that the wax matrix of the candle initially adsorbs the PAH, but then releases the PAH back into solution as transformed, more water soluble products. While permanganate was unable to mineralize the PAHs (i.e., convert to CO{sub 2}), we found that the permanganate-treated PAHs were much more biodegradable in soil microcosms. To test the concept of using candles to treat PAHs in multiple runoff events, we used a flow-through system where urban runoff water was pumped over a miniature candle in repetitive wet-dry, 24-h cycles. Results showed that the candle was robust in removing PAHs by repeatedly releasing permanganate and degrading the PAHs. These results provide

  5. 4H-SiC Schottky photodiodes for ultraviolet flame detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzillo, M.; Sciuto, A.

    2015-10-01

    In the last few years silicon carbide (SiC) has emerged as an appropriate material for the detection of very low ultraviolet photon fluxes even at elevated temperatures. In this paper we report on the electro-optical characteristics of large area interdigit Ni2Si/4H-SiC photodiodes in TO metal can package with a suitable molded cap quartz window with high transmission in the ultraviolet wavelength range. The detectors have been tested for the detection of the ultraviolet component of the yellow flame emitted by a small candle, showing good sensitivity for very weak photon fluxes notwithstanding the linear operation condition of the photodiodes.

  6. Mathematical justification of a nonlinear integral-differential equation for the propagation of spherical flames; Justification mathematique d'une equation integro-differentielle non lineaire pour un modele de flamme spherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederman, C.; Wolanski, N. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Roquejoffre, J.M. [Universite Paul Sabatier, UFR-MIG, UMR CNRS 5640, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2002-04-01

    This Note is devoted to the justification of an asymptotic model for quasisteady three-dimensional spherical flames proposed by G. Joulin. The paper derives, by means of a three-scale matched asymptotic expansion, starting from the classical thermo-diffusive model with high activation energies, an integral-differential equation for the flame radius. In the derivation, it is essential for the Lewis number - i.e., the ratio between thermal and molecular diffusion - to be strictly less than unity. In this Note, we give the main ideas of a rigorous proof of the validity of this model, under the additional restriction that the Lewis number is close to 1. (authors)

  7. Using multiple continuous fine particle monitors to characterize tobacco, incense, candle, cooking, wood burning, and vehicular sources in indoor, outdoor, and in-transit settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Wayne R.; Siegmann, Hans C.

    This study employed two continuous particle monitors operating on different measurement principles to measure concentrations simultaneously from common combustion sources in indoor, outdoor, and in-transit settings. The pair of instruments use (a) photo-charging (PC) operating on the principle ionization of fine particles that responds to surface particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAHs), and (b) diffusion charging (DC) calibrated to measure the active surface area of fine particles. The sources studied included: (1) secondhand smoke (cigarettes, cigars, and pipes), (2) incense (stick and cone), (3) candles used as food warmers, (4) cooking (toasting bread and frying meat), (5) fireplaces and ambient wood smoke, and (6) in-vehicle exposures traveling on California arterials and interstate highways. The ratio of the PC to the DC readings, or the PC/DC ratio, was found to be different for major categories of sources. Cooking, burning toast, and using a "canned heat" food warmer gave PC/DC ratios close to zero. Controlled experiments with 10 cigarettes averaged 0.15 ng mm -2 (ranging from 0.11 to 0.19 ng mm -2), which was similar to the PC/DC ratio for a cigar, although a pipe was slightly lower (0.09 ng mm -2). Large incense sticks had PC/DC ratios similar to those of cigarettes and cigars. The PC/DC ratios for ambient wood smoke averaged 0.29 ng mm -2 on 6 dates, or about twice those of cigarettes and cigars, reflecting a higher ratio of PAH to active surface area. The smoke from two artificial logs in a residential fireplace had a PC/DC ratio of 0.33-0.35 ng mm -2. The emissions from candles were found to vary, depending on how the candles were burned. If the candle flickered and generated soot, a higher PC/DC ratio resulted than if the candle burned uniformly in still air. Inserting piece of metal into the candle's flame caused high PPAH emissions with a record PC/DC reading of 1.8 ng mm -2. In-vehicle exposures measured on 43- and 50-min drives on a

  8. Dark energy constraints from joint analysis of standard rulers and standard candles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Biesiada; Beata Malec; Aleksandra Piórkowska

    2011-01-01

    We performed joint analysis of five cosmological models invoked to explain the accelerating expansion of the Universe.We used the data from strong gravitational lensing systems, locations of cosmic microwave background acoustic peaks and baryon acoustic oscillation data in combination with supernova Ia data (Union2 compilation).The observables we used came from both standard rulers and standard candles, so they had different parameter degeneracies and different restrictive powers in the parameter spaces of cosmological models.The best fits we obtained for the model parameters in joint analysis turned out to prefer cases effectively equivalent to the ACDM model.They were also in agreement with other combined studies performed by other authors on different sets of diagnostic probes.Information theoretic methods used to assess which model is most supported by the data lead to the conclusion that the concordance model ACDM is clearly preferred in joint analysis.The quintessence (both having constant or time varying equation of state) and Chaplygin gas get considerably less support from the data while the brane world (DGP) scenario is practically ruled out.

  9. A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grcar, Joseph F; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Ultra-lean, hydrogen-air mixtures are found to support another kind of laminar flame that is steady and stable beside flat flames and flame balls. Direct numerical simulations are performed of flames that develop into steadily and stably propagating cells. These cells were the original meaning of the word"flamelet'' when they were observed in lean flammability studies conducted early in the development of combustion science. Several aspects of these two-dimensional flame cells are identified and are contrasted with the properties of one-dimensional flame balls and flat flames. Although lean hydrogen-air flames are subject to thermo-diffusive effects, in this case the result is to stabilize the flame rather than to render it unstable. The flame cells may be useful as basic components of engineering models for premixed combustion when the other types of idealized flames are inapplicable.

  10. Analysis of Reaction-Diffusion Systems for Flame Capturing in Type Ia Supernova Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhiglo, Andrey V

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of numerical behavior of a thickened flame used in Flame Capturing (FC, Khokhlov (1995)) for tracking thin unresolved physical flames in deflagration simulations. We develop a steady-state procedure for calibrating the flame model used, and test it against analytical results. We observe numerical noises generated by original realization of the technique. Alternative artificial burning rates are discussed, which produce acceptably quiet flames. Two new quiet models are calibrated to yield required "flame" speed and width, and further studied in 2D and 3D setting. Landau-Darrieus type instabilities of the flames are observed. One model also shows significantly anisotropic propagation speed on the grid, both effects increasingly pronounced at larger matter expansion as a result of burning; this makes the model unacceptable for use in type Ia supernova simulations. Another model looks promising for use in flame capturing at fuel to ash density ratio of order 3 and below. That "Model B" yields f...

  11. Structure of low-stretch methane nonpremixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bai; Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen; T' ien, James S. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The present study experimentally and numerically investigates the structure associated with extremely low-stretch ({proportional_to}2 s{sup -1}) gaseous nonpremixed flames. The study of low-stretch flames aims to improve our fundamental understanding of the flame radiation effects on flame response and extinction limits. Low-stretch flames are also relevant to fire safety in reduced-gravity environments and to large buoyant fires, where localized areas of low stretch are attainable. In this work, ultra-low-stretch flames are established in normal gravity by bottom burning of a methane/nitrogen mixture discharged from a porous spherically symmetric burner of large radius of curvature. The large thickness of the resulting nonpremixed flame allows detailed mapping of the flame structure. Several advanced nonintrusive optical diagnostics are used to study the flame structure. Gas phase temperatures are measured by Raman scattering, while the burner surface temperatures are obtained by IR imaging. In addition, OH-PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging techniques are used to help characterize the extent of the flame reaction zone. These experimental results allow direct comparison with a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model including detailed chemistry, thermodynamic/transport properties, and radiation treatment. In addition, the radiative interactions between the flame and porous burner (modeled as a gray surface) are accounted for in the present model. The numerical modeling is demonstrated to be able to simulate the low-stretch flame structure. Using the current model, the extinction limits under different conditions are also examined. The computational results are consistent with experimental observations. (author)

  12. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschner, Karel, E-mail: karel.marschner@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Albertov 8, 128 43 Prague (Czech Republic); Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH{sub 4} in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l{sup −1} and 1.0 ng l{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l{sup −1}.

  13. Type Ia Supernova as Standard Candles in the Near Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood-Vasey, Michael; Garnavich, Peter; Matheson, Thomas; Jha, Saurabh; Rest, Armin; Allen, Lori

    2011-08-01

    We propose to observe 15 SNeIa in the near infrared (NIR) with WHIRC on the WIYN telescope during 12 nights of bright time in 2011B. These observations will create an infrared Hubble diagram extending to z~0.1 to verify recent evidence that SNIa are excellent standard candles in the NIR. We will observe 15 SNeIa at 0.02color evolution in the near infrared where dust extinction is significantly reduced. In addition these NIR data will allow us to (1) explore the recent correlation between optical luminosity and host galaxy mass; (2) improve our understanding of intrinsic colors of SNeIa, (3) and study the nature of dust in galaxies beyond our Milky Way. Our ideal observing plan would consist of nights spaced every three days in each of four consecutive lunations in 2011B. This is a pilot proposal. If successful, this project will lead to a larger survey to obtain NIR luminosity distances to 100 SNeIa out to z<0.1 to provide a solid anchor for measuring luminosity distances in the Universe. We are not asking for long-term status at this time.

  14. Unbiased constraints on the clumpiness of universe from standard candles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhengxiang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    We perform unbiased tests for the clumpiness of universe by confronting the Zel'dovich-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder luminosity distance which describes the effect of local inhomogeneities on the propagation of light with the observational one estimated from measurements of standard candles, i.e., type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Methodologically, we first determine the light-curve fitting parameters which account for distance estimation in SNe Ia observations and luminosity/energy relations which are responsible for distance estimation of GRBs in the global fit to reconstruct the Hubble diagrams in the context of a clumpy universe. Subsequently, these Hubble diagrams allow us to achieve unbiased constraints on the matter density parameter $\\Omega_m$ as well as clumpiness parameter $\\eta$ which quantifies the fraction of homogeneously distributed matter within a given light cone. At 1$\\sigma$ confidence level, the constraints are $\\Omega_m=0.34\\pm0.02$ and $\\eta=1.00^{+0.00}_{-0.02}$ from the ...

  15. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  16. Real-time Flame Rendering with GPU and CUDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method of flame simulation based on Lagrange process and chemical composition, which was non-grid and the problems associated with there grids were overcome. The turbulence movement of flame was described by Lagrange process and chemical composition was added into flame simulation which increased the authenticity of flame. For real-time applications, this paper simplified the EMST model. GPU-based particle system combined with OpenGL VBO and PBO unique technology was used to accelerate finally, the speed of vertex and pixel data interaction between CPU and GPU increased two orders of magnitude, frame rate of rendering increased by 30%, which achieved fast dynamic flame real-time simulation. For further real-time applications, this paper presented a strategy to implement flame simulation with CUDA on GPU, which achieved a speed up to 2.5 times the previous implementation.

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy of 3% citronella candles and 5% citronella incense for protection against field populations of Aedes mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, L R; Surgeoner, G A; Heal, J D; Gallivan, G J

    1996-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of 3% citronella candles and 5% citronella incense in protecting subjects from bites of Aedes spp. under field conditions. The study was conducted in a deciduous woodlot in Guelph, Ontario, Canada from July 26 to August 10, 1995. Eight subjects, dressed identically, were assigned to one of 8 positions on a grid within the study area. Two citronella candles, 2 citronella incense, 2 plain unscented candles, or no candles (i.e., nontreated controls) were assigned to 2 positions on the grid each evening. Subjects conducted 5-min biting counts at each position and performed 16 biting counts per evening. On average, subjects received 6.2 +/- 0.4, 8.2 +/- 0.5, 8.2 +/- 0.4, and 10.8 +/- 0.5 bites/ 5 min at positions with citronella candles, citronella incense, plain candles, and no candles, respectively. Although significantly fewer bites were received by subjects at positions with citronella candles and incense than at nontreated locations, the overall reduction in bites provided by the citronella candles and incense was only 42.3 and 24.2%, respectively.

  18. Analytical Interaction of the Acoustic Wave and Turbulent Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Hong-Hui; JIANG Zong-Lin

    2007-01-01

    A modified resonance model of a weakly turbulent flame in a high-frequency acoustic wave is derived analytically.Under the mechanism of Darrieus-Landau instability, the amplitude of flame wrinkles, which is as functions of turbulence. The high perturbation wave number makes the resonance easier to be triggered but weakened with respect to the extra acoustic wave. In a closed burning chamber with the acoustic wave induced by the flame itself, the high perturbation wave number is to restrain the resonance for a realistic flame.

  19. Igniting the Paralympic Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Deaf-mute Jiang Xintian lights a small cauldron in the hands of wheelchairbound fencer Jin Jing at the Paralympic Flame Lighting Ceremony in Beijing’s symbolic Temple of Heaven on August 28. For nine days until September 6, when the 13th Paralympics opens in Beijing, a total of 850 torchbearers would relay the Paralympic flame along two routes through 11 Chinese provinces,

  20. Machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates using candle stick drill and multi-facet drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Dong; Qiu, Kun-Xian; Chen, Ming; Cai, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite laminates are widely used in aerospace and aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. However, they are regarded as difficult-to-cut materials because of bad surface quality and low productivity. Drilling is the most common hole making process for CFRP composite laminates and drilling induced delamination damage usually occurs severely at the exit side of drilling holes, which strongly deteriorate holes quality. In this work, the candle stick drill and multi-facet drill are employed to evaluate the machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A CFRP composite laminates in terms of thrust force, delamination, holes diameter and holes surface roughness. S/N ratio is used to characterize the thrust force while an ellipse-shaped delamination model is established to quantitatively analyze the delamination. The best combination of drilling parameters are determined by full consideration of S/N ratios of thrust force and the delamination. The results indicate that candle stick drill will induce the unexpected ellipse-shaped delamination even at its best drilling parameters of spindle speed of 10,000 rpm and feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth. However, the multi-facet drill cutting at the relative lower feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth and lower spindle speed of 6000 rpm can effectively prevent the delamination. Comprehensively, holes quality obtained by multi-facet drill is much more superior to those obtained by candle stick drill.

  1. Chaotic radiation/turbulence interactions in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menguec, M.P.; McDonough, J.M.

    1998-11-01

    In this paper, the authors present a review of their recent efforts to model chaotic radiation-turbulence interactions in flames. The main focus is to characterize soot volume fraction fluctuations in turbulent diffusion flames, as they strongly contribute to these interaction. The approach is based on the hypothesis that the fluctuations of properties in turbulent flames are deterministic in nature, rather than random. The authors first discuss the theoretical details and then they briefly outline the experiments conducted to measure the scattered light signals from fluctuating soot particles along the axis of an ethylene-air diffusion flame. They compare the power spectra and time series obtained from experiments against the ad-hoc and rigorous models derived using a series of logistic maps. These logistic maps can be used in simulation of the fluctuations in these type of flames, without extensive computational effort or sacrifice of physical detail. Availability of accurate models of these kinds allows investigation of radiation-turbulence interactions at a more fundamental level than it was previously possible.

  2. Second Law Analysis of Diffusion Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Gogus

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the sources of volumetric irreversibilities in both laminar and turbulent diffusion flames. The theoretical background of analysis relies on the local exergy transport equation, which allows the microscopic formulation of the well-known Gouy-Stodola theorem. For laminar reacting flows, the volumetric entropy generation rate expression includes the viscous, thermal, diffusion and chemical components. Their expressions show that the corresponding irreversibilities are uncoupled if the combustion process occurs at constant pressure. The numerical simulation of a methane-air combustion process shows that the thermal, chemical and diffusive irreversibilities represent, in order of enumeration, the predominant irreversibilities in the laminar diffusion reacting flows. In the case of turbulent diffusion flames, the viscous, thermal, diffusion and chemical mean components have to be expressed in accordance with the combustion model. Two combustion models are used: the multi-species approach based on the eddy-break formulation of mean reaction rate, and the assumed probability density function for a conserved scalar that relies on the flame sheet model. For a diffusion methane-air jet flame, the distribution of mean irreversibility components is presented. Taking into account the technical importance of diffusion flames, the analysis could serve to improve the combustion geometry and the flow condition.

  3. Simulations of flame generated particles

    KAUST Repository

    Patterson, Robert

    2016-01-05

    The nonlinear structure of the equations describing the evolution of a population of coagulating particles in a flame make the use of stochastic particle methods attractive for numerical purposes. I will present an analysis of the stochastic fluctuations inherent in these numerical methods leading to an efficient sampling technique for steady-state problems. I will also give some examples where stochastic particle methods have been used to explore the effect of uncertain parameters in soot formation models. In conclusion I will try to indicate some of the issues in optimising these methods for the study of uncertain model parameters.

  4. Flame-Vortex Interactions Imaged in Microgravity - To Assess the Theory Flame Stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, James F.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of this research are to: 1) Assess the Theory of Flame Stretch by operating a unique flame-vortex experiment under microgravity conditions in the NASA Glenn 2.2 Second Drop Tower (drops to identify operating conditions have been completed); 2) Obtain high speed shadowgraph images (500-1000 frames/s) using the drop rig (images were obtained at one-g, and the NASA Kodak RO camera is being mounted on the drop rig); 3) Obtain shadowgraph and PIV images at 1-g while varying the effects of buoyancy by controlling the Froude number (completed); 4) Numerically model the inwardly-propagating spherical flame that is observed in the experiment using full chemistry and the RUN 1DL code (completed); 5) Send images of the flame shape to Dr. G. Patniak at NRL who is numerically simulating the entire flame-vortex interaction of the present experiment (data transfer completed); and 6) Assess the feasibility of obtaining PIV velocity field images in the drop rig, which would be useful (but not required) for our assessment of the Theory of Flame Stretch (PIV images were obtained at one-g using same low laser power that is available from fiber optic cable in drop tower). The motivation for the work is to obtain novel measurement needed to develop a physically accurate model of turbulent combustion that can help in the control of engine pollutants. The unique experiment allows, for the first time, the detailed study of a negatively-curved (negatively stretched) flame, which is one of the five fundamental types of premixed flames. While there have been studies of flat flames, positively-curved (outwardly-propagating) cases and positively-strained (counterflow) cases, this is the first detailed study of a negatively-curved (inwardly-propagating) flame. The first set of drops in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower showed that microgravity provides more favorable conditions for achieving inwardly-propagating flames (IPFs) than 1-g. A vortex interacts with a flame and creates a spherical

  5. Flame dynamics in a micro-channeled combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Taaha; Markides, Christos N.; Balachandran, Ramanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    existence of the chaotic flame increases. The frequency of re-ignition of successive flames decreases at higher flow rates and increases at higher temperatures. The data and results from this study will not only help the development of new micro-power generation devices, but they will also serve as a validation case for combustion models capable of predicting flame behavior in the presence of strong thermal and flow boundary layers, a situation common to many industrial applications.

  6. The flame anchoring mechanism and associated flow structure in bluff-body stabilized lean premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Dan; Shanbhogue, Santosh; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We present numerical analysis of a lean premixed flame anchoring on a heat conducting bluff-body. Different mixtures of CH4/H2/air are analyzed in order to systematically vary the burning velocity, adiabatic flame temperature and extinction strain rate. The study was motivated by our experimental measurements in a step combustor which showed that both the recirculation zone length and stability map under acoustically coupled conditions for different fuels and thermodynamic conditions collapse using the extinction strain rate. The model fully resolves unsteady two-dimensional flow with detailed chemistry and species transport, and without artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions. The model includes a low Mach number operator-split projection algorithm, coupled with a block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and an immersed boundary method for the solid body. Calculations reveal that the recirculation zone length correlates with the flame extinction strain rate, consistent with the experimental evidence. It is found that in the vicinity of the bluff body the flame is highly stretched and its leading edge location is controlled by the reactants combustion characteristics under high strain. Moreover, the flame surface location relative to the shear layer influences the vorticity thus impacting the velocity field and the recirculation zone. The study sheds light on the experimentally observed collapse of the combustor dynamics using the reactants extinction strain rate.

  7. Aspects of Cool-Flame Supported Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Williams, Forman A.

    2015-01-01

    Droplet combustion experiments performed on board the International Space Station have shown that normal-alkane fuels with negative temperature coefficient (NTC) chemistry can support quasi-steady, low-temperature combustion without any visible flame. Here we review the results for n-decane, n-heptane, and n-octane droplets burning in carbon dioxidehelium diluted environments at different pressures and initial droplet sizes. Experimental results for cool-flame burning rates, flame standoff ratios, and extinction diameters are compared against simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon. A simplified quasi-steady model based on the partial-burning regime of Lin predicts the burning rate, and flame standoff ratio reasonably well for all three normal alkanes. The second-stage cool-flame burning and extinction following the first-stage hot-flame combustion, however, shows a small dependence on the initial droplet size, thus deviating from the quasi-steady results. An asymptotic model that estimates the oxygen depletion by the hot flame and its influence on cool-flame burning rates is shown to correct the quasi-steady results and provide a better comparison with the measured burning-rate results.This work was supported by the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Program and the International Space Station Program.

  8. Study of the mechanisms of the flame propagation and stabilization in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The CH4/air premixed gas combustion processes in porous media were numerically studied using the two-temperature reacting fluid model with dispersions and detailed chemical reaction mechanism GRI 3.0. The mechanisms of the propagation and stabilization of submerge flames and surface flames in porous media were illuminated distinctly by considering the magnitude of the terms in the two energy equations, analyzing the sensibility of flame propagation speed to flame location, heat exchange coefficient between gas and solid, thermal conductivity and radiative extinction coefficient of porous media. It was concluded that the propagation mechanism of a submerged flame is similar to that of a free flame with an additional preheat zone and that the surface-flame propagation mechanism in porous media is similar to that of a free flame with heat loss in reaction zone.

  9. Standard rulers, candles, and clocks from the low-redshift universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavens, Alan; Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia

    2014-12-12

    We measure the length of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature, and the expansion rate of the recent Universe, from low-redshift data only, almost model independently. We make only the following minimal assumptions: homogeneity and isotropy, a metric theory of gravity, a smooth expansion history, and the existence of standard candles (supernovæ) and a standard BAO ruler. The rest is determined by the data, which are compilations of recent BAO and type IA supernova results. Making only these assumptions, we find for the first time that the standard ruler has a length of 103.9±2.3h⁻¹ Mpc. The value is a measurement, in contrast to the model-dependent theoretical prediction determined with model parameters set by Planck data (99.3±2.1h⁻¹ Mpc). The latter assumes the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, and that the ruler is the sound horizon at radiation drag. Adding passive galaxies as standard clocks or a local Hubble constant measurement allows the absolute BAO scale to be determined (142.8±3.7 Mpc), and in the former case the additional information makes the BAO length determination more precise (101.9±1.9h⁻¹ Mpc). The inverse curvature radius of the Universe is weakly constrained and consistent with zero, independently of the gravity model, provided it is metric. We find the effective number of relativistic species to be N(eff)=3.53±0.32, independent of late-time dark energy or gravity physics.

  10. Flaming on YouTube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, Peter J.; Heuvelman, A.; Verleur, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this explorative study, flaming on YouTube was studied using surveys of YouTube users. Flaming is defined as displaying hostility by insulting, swearing or using otherwise offensive language. Three general conclusions were drawn. First, although many users said that they themselves do not flame,

  11. Flaming on YouTube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, Peter J.; Heuvelman, Ard; Verleur, Ria

    2010-01-01

    In this explorative study, flaming on YouTube was studied using surveys of YouTube users. Flaming is defined as displaying hostility by insulting, swearing or using otherwise offensive language. Three general conclusions were drawn. First, although many users said that they themselves do not flame,

  12. Distributed Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Aspden, A J; Woosley, S E; 10.1088/0004-637X/710/2/1654

    2011-01-01

    In the distributed burning regime, turbulence disrupts the internal structure of the flame, and so the idea of laminar burning propagated by conduction is no longer valid. The nature of the burning depends on the turbulent Damkohler number (Da), which steadily declines from much greater than one to less that one as the density decreases to a few 10^6 g/cc. Scaling arguments predict that the turbulent flame speed s, normalized by the turbulent intensity u, follows s/u=Da^1/2 for Da1, and that localized excursions to as much as five times u can occur. The lambda-flame speed and width can be predicted based on the turbulence in the star and the turbulent nuclear burning time scale of the fuel. We propose a practical method for measuring these based on the scaling relations and small-scale computationally-inexpensive simulations. This suggests that a simple turbulent flame model can be easily constructed suitable for large-scale distributed supernovae flames.

  13. Extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliche, Mounir [LMP2M, Universite de Medea, Quartier Ain Dheb, 26000 Medea (Algeria); M2P2, UMR CNRS 6181, Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Haldenwang, Pierre [M2P2, UMR CNRS 6181, Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Chikh, Salah [LTPMP, Faculte de Genie Mecanique and de Genie des Procedes, USTHB, Bab Ezzouar (Algeria)

    2010-06-15

    A local refinement method is used to numerically predict the propagation and extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel considering a thermodiffusive model. A local refinement method is employed because of the numerous length scales that characterize this phenomenon. The time integration is self adaptive and the solution is based on a multigrid method using a zonal mesh refinement in the flame reaction zone. The objective is to determine the conditions of extinction which are characterized by the flame structure and its properties. We are interested in the following properties: the curvature of the flame, its maximum temperature, its speed of propagation and the distance separating the flame from the wall. We analyze the influence of heat losses at the wall through the thermal conductivity of the wall and the nature of the fuel characterized by the Lewis number of the mixture. This investigation allows us to identify three propagation regimes according to heat losses at the wall and to the channel radius. The results show that there is an intermediate value of the radius for which the flame can bend and propagate provided that its curvature does not exceed a certain limit value. Indeed, small values of the radius will choke the flame and extinguish it. The extinction occurs if the flame curvature becomes too small. Furthermore, this study allows us to predict the limiting values of the heat loss coefficient at extinction as well as the critical value of the channel radius above which the premixed flame may propagate without extinction. A dead zone of length 2-4 times the flame thickness appears between the flame and the wall for a Lewis number (Le) between 0.8 and 2. For small values of Le, local extinctions are observed. (author)

  14. Flame Stretch Analysis in Diffusion Flames with Inert Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ay Su; Ying-Chieh Liu

    2001-01-01

    Experimental investigations of impinging flame with fuel mixed with non-reaction gas were conducted.According to the observations of combustion test and temperature measurement, the non-reaction gas might dilute the local concentration of fuel in the diffusion process. The shape of the flame was symmetrical due to the flame stretch force. Results show that the conical flame might be de-structured by the addition of inert gas in pure methane fuel. The impinging flame became shorter and bluer as nitrogen was added to the fuel. The conditions of N2/CH4 equal to 1/2 and 1/1 show a wider plane in the YZ plane. The effect of inert gas overcomes the flame stretch and destroys the symmetrical column flame as well as the cold flow. Nitrogen addition also enhances the diffusion rate and combustion efficiency.

  15. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  16. Modeling Study of Hydrogen/Oxygen and n-alkane/Oxygen Counterflow Diffusion Flames%氢、碳氢燃料对向扩散火焰

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪小卫; 蔡国飙; Vigor Yang

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of hydrogen/oxygen and hydrocarbon/oxygen counterflow diffusion flames has been conducted using corresponding detailed reaction mechanisms. The hydrocarbon fuels contain n-alkanes from CH4 to C16H34. The basic diffusion flame structures are demonstrated, analyzed, and compared. The effects of pressure, and strain rate on the flame behavior and energy-release rate for each fuel are examined systematically. The detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are employed, and the largest one of them contains 2115 species and 8157 reversible reactions. The results indicate for all of the fuels the flame thickness and heat release rate correlate well with the square root of the pressure multiplied by the strain rate. Under the condition of any strain rate and pressure, H2 has thicker flame than hydrocarbons, while the hydrocarbons have the similar temperature and main products distributions and almost have the same flame thickness and heat release rate. The result indicates that the fuels composed with these hydrocarbons will still have the same flame properties as any pure n-alkane fuel.

  17. An experimental study into the structure of natural gas flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, J.S.; Perrin, M.; Przyszwa, M.; Chaupart, M. (Gaz de France (GDF), 75 - Paris (France))

    1992-05-01

    The recent progress made in the field of electronics, signal processing, optics and in particular lasers, allows a better and easier understanding of the structure of gas flows and flames. The thorough knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of natural gas flames and the understanding of flame stability mechanisms, has as its objective improved burner performance and the development of mathematical models for predicting burner behaviour in different experimental situations. It is therefore of utmost importance for the development of different uses of gas in the residential and industrial sectors. Diagnostic techniques for flames are used on one hand for the development of new thermal equipment and on the other, for the basic study of flame structure in industrial burners. 18 refs., 27 figs.

  18. Numerical solution of an edge flame boundary value problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Benjamin; Freund, Jonathan; Pantano, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    We study edge flames for modeling extinction, reignition, and flame lifting in turbulent non-premixed combustion. An adaptive resolution finite element method is developed for solving a strained laminar edge flame in the intrinsic moving frame of reference of a spatially evolving shear layer. The variable-density zero Mach Navier-Stokes equations are used to solve for both advancing and retreating edge flames. The eigenvalues of the system are determined simultaneously (implicitly) with the scalar fields using a Schur complement strategy. A homotopy transformation over density is used to transition from constant- to variable-density, and pseudo arc-length continuation is used for parametric tracing of solutions. Full details of the edge flames as a function of strain and Lewis numbers will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported [in part] by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number DE-NA0002374.

  19. "Magic Eraser" Flame Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Arthur M.; Davies, Malonne I.; Landis, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Cleaning erasers are used to support methanol-fueled flame tests. This safe demonstration technique requires only small quantities of materials, provides clean colors for up to 45 seconds, and can be used in the classroom or the auditorium. (Contains 1 note.)

  20. Laminar dust flames in a reduced-gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroshin, Samuel; Tang, Francois-David; Higgins, Andrew J.; Lee, John H. S.

    2011-04-01

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in suspensions of iron in gaseous oxidizers was studied in a low-gravity environment onboard a parabolic flight aircraft. The reduction of buoyancy-induced convective flows and particle settling permitted the measurement of fundamental combustion parameters, such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. Experimentally measured flame speeds and quenching distances were found in good agreement with theoretical predictions of a simplified analytical model that assumes particles burning in a diffusive mode. However, the comparison of flame speeds in oxygen-argon and oxygen-helium iron suspensions indicates the possibility that fine micron-sized particles burn in the kinetic mode. Furthermore, when the particle spacing is large compared to the scale of the reaction zone, a theoretical analysis suggests the existence of a new so-called discrete flame propagation regime. Discrete flames are strongly dependent on particle density fluctuations and demonstrate directed percolation behavior near flame propagation limits. The experimental observation of discrete flames in particle suspensions will require low levels of gravity over extended periods available only on orbital platforms.

  1. Burning a Candle in a Vessel, a Simple Experiment with a Long History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The experiment in which a candle is burned inside an inverted vessel partially immersed in water has a history of more than 2,200 years, but even nowadays it is common that students and teachers relate the change in volume of the enclosed air to its oxygen content. Contrary to what many people think, Lavoisier concluded that any change in volume…

  2. Skin contact transfer of three fragrance residues from candles to human hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Api, Anne Marie; Bredbenner, Amy; McGowen, Margaret; Niemiera, David; Parker, Lori; Renskers, Kevin; Selim, Sami; Sgaramella, Richard; Signorelli, Richard; Tedrow, Sebastian; Troy, William

    2007-08-01

    The dermal hand transfer of three fragrance materials (cinnamic aldehyde, d-limonene and eugenol) from scented candles was determined in 10 subjects (i.e., 20 hands) after grasping scented candles for 5 consecutive 20s exposures/grasps. The fragrance materials from each subject's hands were recovered by isopropyl alcohol wipes and subsequent extractions. Removal efficiencies for both cinnamic aldehyde and eugenol placed directly on the hands were not concentration dependent and ranged from 103% to 106%. The removal efficiency of d-limonene showed an inverse relation with 74.3% removed at the low concentration of 50 microg and 63.8% removed at the high concentration of 500 microg. The residue/transfer of d-limonene from the candles to the hands was below the limit of detection of 50 microg. The residue/transfer of cinnamic aldehyde and eugenol to each subject's hands was consistent between subjects as well as between each exposure/grasp. The total mean residues of cinnamic aldehyde and eugenol transferred per grasp from the candles to the hands were 0.255 microg/cm(2) and 0.279 microg/cm(2), respectively.

  3. CANDLES AND INCENSE AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR POLLUTION: MARKET ANALYSIS AND LITERATURE SEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes available information on candles and incense as potential sources of indoor air pollution. It covers market information and a review of the scientific literature. The market information collected focuses on production and sales data, typical uses in the U.S....

  4. The Candle Scheme for Creating an on-line Computer Science Program - Experiences and Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkki SUTINEN

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance learning programs have rapidly increased during the past few decades. In fall 2000 the University of Joensuu started to offer distance Computer Science (CS studies to the high school students in surrounding rural areas of Joensuu. In this program high school students study the first year's university level CS studies over the web simultaneously with their regular high school studies. We describe the creation process of our virtual curriculum which is based the so-called Candle scheme. The Candle scheme search the most essential principles needed in on-line course design, supporting a student locally in her authentic learning needs via electronic tools in a light way. With the Candle scheme we have successfully focused in our design process on the most essential parts of the virtual study process. Our experiences of the Candle scheme in the creation process of the on-line CS program during years 2000-2002 indicate that the scheme is the functional one and expandable to other contexts as well.

  5. Hansa Candle viib küünlad Moskvasse / Väinu Rozental

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rozental, Väinu, 1957-

    2006-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 29. märts lk. 4. AS Hansa Candle paneb Viljandi tootmishoone liinid üles Moskva lähistele, et oma toodanguga jõuda Venemaa turule. Diagramm: Majandusnäitajad. Vt. samas: Küünlatehas otsib parafiinist odavamat tooret

  6. Monitoring Atmospheric Transmission with FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Zirzow, D. C.; Koppa, M.; Buttler-Pena, K.

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of ground-based observations in the optical and near-infrared requires precise and accurate understanding of atmospheric transmission, at least as precise and accurate as that required for the spectral energy distributions of science targets. Traditionally this has used the Langley extrapolation method, observing targets and calibrators over a range of airmass and extrapolating to zero airmass by assuming a plane-parallel homogeneous atmosphere. The technique we present uses direct measurements of the atmosphere to derive the transmission along the line of sight to science targets at a few well-chosen wavelengths. The Facility Lidar Atmospheric Monitor of Extinction (FLAME) is a 0.5m diameter three Nd:YAG wavelength (355nm, 532nm & 1064nm) elastic backscatter lidar system. Laser pulses are transmitted into the atmosphere in the direction of the science target. Photons scattered back toward the receiver by molecules, aerosols and clouds are collected and time-gated so that the backscatter intensity is measured as a function of range to the scattering volume. The system is housed in a mobile calibration lab, which also contains auxiliary instrumentation to provide a NIST traceable calibration of the transmitted laser power and receiver efficiency. FLAME was designed to create a million photons per minute signal from the middle stratosphere, where the atmosphere is relatively calm and dominated by molecules of the well-mixed atmosphere (O2 & N2). Routine radiosonde measurements of the density at these altitudes constrain the scattering efficiency in this region and, combined with calibration of the transmitter and receiver, the only remaining unknown quantity is the two-way transmission to the stratosphere. These measurements can inform atmospheric transmission models to better understand the complex and ever-changing observatory radiative transfer environment. FLAME is currently under active development and we present some of our ongoing measurements.

  7. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2& 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5); Aspden, Andrew J; Aspden, Andrew J.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marc S.; Woosley, Stan E.; Zingale, Mike

    2008-05-27

    The large range of time and length scales involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of flame models. As a prelude to exploring various options for flame models, we consider, in this paper, high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the small-scale dynamics of nuclear flames in the supernova environment in which the details of the flame structure are fully resolved. The range of densities examined, 1 to 8 x 107 g cm-3, spans the transition from the laminar flamelet regime to the distributed burning regime where small scale turbulence disrupts the flame. The use of a low Mach number algorithm facilitates the accurate resolution of the thermal structure of the flame and the inviscid turbulent kinetic energy cascade, while implicitly incorporating kinetic energy dissipation at the grid-scale cutoff. For an assumed background of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence with an energy characteristic of SN Ia, we find a transition density between 1 and 3 x 107 g cm-3 where the nature of the burning changes ualitatively. By 1 x 107 g cm-3, energy diffusion by conduction and radiation is exceeded, on the flame scale, by turbulent advection. As a result, the effective Lewis Number approaches unity. That is, the flame resembles a laminar flame, but is turbulently broadened with an effective diffusion coefficient, D_T \\sim u' l, where u' is the turbulent intensity and l is the integral scale. For the larger integral scales characteristic of a real supernova, the flame structure is predicted to become complex and unsteady. Implications for a possible transition to detonation are discussed.

  8. Structure and stabilization of cryogenic spray flames; Structure et stabilisation des flammes cryotechniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juniper, M.

    2001-11-01

    Cryogenic rocket motors are fueled by liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. The development of design methods is based on reliable numerical simulations, which rely on detailed knowledge of the flame structure and well-defined entry conditions. This research project concerns the region near the fuel injectors. We examine here: (1) The flame structure and injector geometry, (2) The flame stabilization. Tests have been performed on an injector which is similar to those in real motors. Models are developed and their results compared with experimental results in order to study the effect of the injector geometry. A new result of scientific interest is that a wake is more unstable when the outer flow is confined. This mechanism might explain the effect of recess on a cryogenic spray flame. The base of the flame is divided into two parts and a counter-flow flame analysis is applied to the first part. The second part is considered first as a flame in a corner (cross-flow flame). The flame above a porous plate with fuel injection is considered next and we envisage then a flame above a vaporizing fuel. Finally, the flame behind a step over a vaporizing fuel is envisaged. With this progression, the dimensionless parameters which control flame stabilization are identified. (author)

  9. Numerical Simulation of Microgravity Flame Spread Over Solid Combustibles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGXi; FANWeicheng

    1995-01-01

    A computational model of three-dimensional,time-dependent flame spread in microgravity environment is presented.THe solid is assumed to be a thermally-thin,pyrolysing cellulosic sheet.The gas phase model includes the full Navier-Stokes equations with density and pressure variations and six-flus model of radiation heat transfer,The solid phase model consists of continuity and energy equations whose solution provides boundary conditions for the gas phase equatons.In the numerical procedure,the gas-and solid -phase equations are solved separately and iteratively at each time step.Predictions have been made of flame spreas in slow forced flow under gravitational acceleration normal to fuel surface and flame spread in a quiescent environment in an enclosed chamber under gravitational acceleration parallel to fuel surface.Numerical simulations show that,under microgravity,slow-flow conditions,flame spread process is highly unsteady with the upstream flame spreads faster than the downstream flame after a period of ignition,It has also been shown that the level of microgravity has a significant effect on the flame spread process.

  10. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  11. A five-year performance review of field-scale, slow-release permanganate candles with recommendations for second-generation improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Mark; Kambhu, Ann; Reece, James; Comfort, Steve; Brunner, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    In 2009, we identified a TCE plume at an abandoned landfill that was located in a low permeable silty-clay aquifer. To treat the TCE, we manufactured slow-release potassium permanganate cylinders (oxidant candles) that had diameters of either 5.1 or 7.6 cm and were 91.4 cm long. In 2010, we compared two methods of candle installation by inserting equal masses of the oxidant candles (7.6-cm vs 5.1-cm dia). The 5.1-cm dia candles were inserted with direct-push rods while the 7.6-cm candles were housed in screens and lowered into 10 permanent wells. Since installation, the 7.6-cm oxidant candles have been refurbished approximately once per year by gently scraping off surface oxides. In 2012, we reported initial results; in this paper, we provide a 5-yr performance review since installation. Temporal sampling shows oxidant candles placed in wells have steadily reduced migrating TCE concentrations. Moreover, these candles still maintain an inner core of oxidant that has yet to contribute to the dissolution front and should provide several more years of service. Oxidant candles inserted by direct-push have stopped reducing TCE concentrations because a MnO2 scale developed on the outside of the candles. To counteract oxide scaling, we fabricated a second generation of oxidant candles that contain sodium hexametaphosphate. Laboratory experiments (batch and flow-through) show that these second-generation permanganate candles have better release characteristics and are less prone to oxide scaling. This improvement should reduce the need to perform maintenance on candles placed in wells and provide greater longevity for candles inserted by direct-push.

  12. Hydrogen-oxygen flame acceleration and transition to detonation in channels with no-slip walls for a detailed chemical reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M F; Kiverin, A D; Liberman, M A

    2011-05-01

    The features of flame acceleration in channels with wall friction and the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) are investigated theoretically and using high resolution numerical simulations of two-dimensional reactive Navier-Stokes equations, including the effects of viscosity, thermal conduction, molecular diffusion, and a detailed chemical reaction mechanism for hydrogen-oxygen gaseous mixture. It is shown that in a wide channel, from the beginning, the flame velocity increases exponentially for a short time and then flame acceleration decreases, ending up with the abrupt increase of the combustion wave velocity and the actual transition to detonation. In a thin channel with a width smaller than the critical value, the exponential increase of the flame velocity is not bounded and ends up with the transition to detonation. The transition to detonation occurs due to the pressure pulse, which is formed at the tip of the accelerating flame. The amplitude of the pressure pulse grows exponentially due to a positive feedback coupling between the pressure pulse and the heat released in the reaction. Finally, large amplitude pressure pulse steepens into a strong shock coupled with the reaction zone forming the overdriven detonation. The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism and its applicability to the deflagration-to-detonation transition is investigated for combustible materials whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics. The results of the high resolution simulations are fully consistent with experimental observations of the flame acceleration and DDT.

  13. Combustion analysis for flame stability predictions at ground level and altitude in aviation gas turbine engines with low emissions combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Tomas

    Low emissions combustors operating with low fuel/air ratios may have challenges with flame stability. As combustion is made leaner in the primary zone, the flame can lose its stability, resulting in operability problems such as relight, flameout or cold starting. This thesis analyzes combustion processes for the prediction of flame stability in low emissions combustors. A detailed review of the literature on flame stability was conducted and main approaches in flame stability modelling were indicated. Three flame stability models were proposed (Characteristic Time, Loading Parameter, and Combustion Efficiency models) and developed into a unique Preliminary Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization (PMDO) tool. Results were validated with a database of experimental combustor test data and showed that flame stability can be predicted for an arbitrary shape of combustors running at any operational conditions including ground and altitude situations with various jet fuels and nozzles. In conclusion, flame stability can be predicted for newly designed low emission combustors.

  14. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  15. Two-dimensional simulations of steady perforated-plate stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Altay, H. Murat

    2010-03-17

    The objective of this work is to examine the impact of the operating conditions and the perforated-plate design on the steady, lean premixed flame characteristics. We perform two-dimensional simulations of laminar flames using a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for methane-air combustion, consisting of 20 species and 79 reactions. We solve the heat conduction problem within the plate, allowing heat exchange between the gas mixture and the solid plate. The physical model is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the axisymmetric compressible conservation equations. The results suggest that the flame consumption speed, the flame structure, and the flame surface area depend significantly on the equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, the distance between the perforated-plate holes and the plate thermal conductivity. In the case of an adiabatic plate, a conical flame is formed, anchored near the corner of the hole. When the heat exchange between themixture and the plate is finite, the flame acquires a Gaussian shape stabilizing at a stand-off distance, that grows with the plate conductivity. The flame tip is negatively curved; i.e. concave with respect to the reactants. Downstream of the plate, the flame base is positively curved; i.e. convex with respect to the reactants, stabilizing above a stagnation region established between neighboring holes. As the plate\\'s thermal conductivity increases, the heat flux to the plate decreases, lowering its top surface temperature. As the equivalence ratio increases, the flame moves closer to the plate, raising its temperature, and lowering the flame stand-off distance. As the mean inlet velocity increases, the flame stabilizes further downstream, the flame tip becomes sharper, hence raising the burning rate at that location. The curvature of the flame base depends on the distance between the neighboring holes; and the flame there is characterized by high concentration of intermediates, like carbon monoxide. © 2010 Taylor

  16. Antimony: a flame fighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintzer, Niki E.; Guberman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Antimony is a brittle, silvery-white semimetal that conducts heat poorly. The chemical compound antimony trioxide (Sb2O3) is widely used in plastics, rubbers, paints, and textiles, including industrial safety suits and some children’s clothing, to make them resistant to the spread of flames. Also, sodium antimonate (NaSbO3) is used during manufacturing of high-quality glass, which is found in cellular phones.

  17. Investigation on the Accuracy of Flame Height Relation Model for Crude Oil Pool Fire%油池火灾火焰高度关系模型的准确度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李姗姗; 孙建刚; 王振; 王楠楠; 崔利富

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on the flame heights of crude oil pool fires with different pool diameters of 1. 5, 2, 3 and 5 m in daqing oil field, and the experimental values of flame height were compared with the calculated values by the relation models. The results show that the values of flame height calculated by the Thomas relation model agree well with the experi-mental data at the pool diameters of 1. 5 m and 2 m, but have a great deviation at the pool diam-eters of 3 m and 5 m. Also the Thomas relation model is corrected based on the experimental re-sults.%对大庆油田原油池火灾火焰高度进行实验测试,油池直径分别为1.5,2,3和5 m,将测试结果与池火灾关系模型计算结果进行比较。结果表明,当圆盘直径为1.5 m和2 m时,Thomas关系模型火焰高度计算值与实验值较为接近,当圆盘直径为3 m和5 m时,Thomas关系模型火焰高度计算值与实验值偏差较大。基于实验结果对Thomas关系模型进行了修正。

  18. Dynamics of unconfined spherical flames

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, Louis; Dennis, Kadeem; Zhe,; Liang,; Radulescu, Matei I

    2012-01-01

    Using the soap bubble technique, we visualize the dynamics of unconfined hydrogen-air flames using high speed schlieren video. We show that for sufficiently weak mixtures, i.e., low flame speeds, buoyancy effects become important. Flame balls of a critical dimension begin to rise. The experiments are found in very good agreement with the scaling laws proposed by Zingale and Dursi. We report the results in a fluid dynamics video.

  19. Highly Turbulent Counterflow Flames: A Laboratory Scale Benchmark for Practical Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Alessandro

    2013-11-01

    Since the pioneering work of Weinberg's group at Imperial College in the `60s, the counterflow system has been the workhorse of laminar flame studies. Recent developments have shown that it is also a promising benchmark for highly turbulent (Ret ~ 1000) nonpremixed and premixed flames of direct relevance to gasturbine combustion. Case studies will demonstrate the versatility of the system in mimicking real flame effects, such as heat loss and flame stratification in premixed flames, and the compactness of the combustion region. The system may offer significant advantages from a computational viewpoint, including: a) aerodynamic flame stabilization near the interface between the two opposed jets, with ensuing simplifications in the prescription of boundary conditions; b) a fiftyfold reduction of the domain of interest as compared to conventional nonpremixed jet flames at the same Reynolds number; and c) millisecond mean residence times, which is particularly useful for DNS/LES computational modeling, and for soot suppression in the combustion of practical fuels.

  20. PIV Measurements in Weakly Buoyant Gas Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Greenbberg, Paul S.; Urban, David L.; Wernet, Mark P.; Yanis, William

    2001-01-01

    Despite numerous experimental investigations, the characterization of microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames remains incomplete. Measurements to date have included shapes, temperatures, soot properties, radiative emissions and compositions, but full-field quantitative measurements of velocity are lacking. Since the differences between normal-gravity and microgravity diffusion flames are fundamentally influenced by changes in velocities, it is imperative that the associated velocity fields be measured in microgravity flames. Velocity measurements in nonbuoyant flames will be helpful both in validating numerical models and in interpreting past microgravity combustion experiments. Pointwise velocity techniques are inadequate for full-field velocity measurements in microgravity facilities. In contrast, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) can capture the entire flow field in less than 1% of the time required with Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Although PIV is a mature diagnostic for normal-gravity flames , restrictions on size, power and data storage complicate these measurements in microgravity. Results from the application of PIV to gas jet flames in normal gravity are presented here. Ethane flames burning at 13, 25 and 50 kPa are considered. These results are presented in more detail in Wernet et al. (2000). The PIV system developed for these measurements recently has been adapted for on-rig use in the NASA Glenn 2.2-second drop tower.

  1. Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anjan

    1996-01-01

    The influence of soot radiation on diffusion flames was investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. Soot generated in diffusion flames dominate the flame radiation over gaseous combustion products and can significantly lower the temperature of the flame. In low gravity situations there can be significant accumulation of soot and combustion products in the vicinity of the primary reaction zone owing to the absence of any convective buoyant flow. Such situations may result in substantial suppression of chemical activities in a flame, and the possibility of a radiative extinction may also be anticipated. The purpose of this work was to not only investigate the possibility of radiative extinction of a diffusion flame but also to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the influence of soot radiation on a diffusion flame. In this study, first a hypothetical radiative loss profile of the form of a sech(sup 2) was assumed to influence a pure diffusion flame. It was observed that the reaction zone can, under certain circumstances, move through the radiative loss zone and locate itself on the fuel side of the loss zone contrary to our initial postulate. On increasing the intensity and/or width of the loss zone it was possible to extinguish the flame, and extinction plots were generated. In the presence of a convective flow, however, the movement of the temperature and reaction rate peaks indicated that the flame behavior is more complicated compared to a pure diffusional flame. A comprehensive model of soot formation, oxidation and radiation was used in a more involved analysis. The soot model of Syed, Stewart and Moss was used for soot nucleation and growth and the model of Nagle and Strickland-Constable was used for soot oxidation. The soot radiation was considered in the optically thin limit. An analysis of the flame structure revealed that the radiative loss term is countered both by the reaction term and the diffusion term. The essential balance for

  2. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitzman, Jerry [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lieuwen, Timothy [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These

  3. Metabolic fingerprinting of hard and semi-hard natural cheeses using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector for practical sensory prediction modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Hiroshi; Bamba, Takeshi; Naito, Hiroshige; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic fingerprinting using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID) was used to generate a practical metabolomics-based tool for quality evaluation of natural cheese. Hydrophilic low molecular weight components, relating to sensory characteristics, including amino acids, fatty acids, amines, organic acids, and saccharides, were extracted and derivatized prior to the analysis. Data on 12 cheeses, six Cheddar cheeses and six Gouda cheeses, were analyzed by multivariate analysis. Prediction models for two sensory attributes relating to maturation, "Rich flavor" and "Sour flavor", were constructed with 4199 data points from GC/FID, and excellent predictability was validated. Chromatograms from GC/FID and gas chromatography/time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS) were comparable when the same column was used. Although GC/FID alone cannot identify peaks, the mutually complementary relationship between GC/FID and GC/MS does allow peak identification. Compounds contributing significantly to the sensory predictive models included lactose, succinic acid, L-lactic acid, and aspartic acid for "Rich flavor", and lactose, L-lactic acid, and succinic acid for "Sour flavor". Since similar model precision was obtained using GC/FID and GC/TOF-MS, metabolic fingerprinting using GC/FID, which is a relatively inexpensive instrument compared with GC/MS, is easy to maintain and operate, and is a valid alternative when metabolomics (especially using GC/MS) is to be used in a practical setting as a novel quality evaluation tool for manufacturing processes or final products. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity in mice lungs after pulmonary exposure to candle light combustion particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Damiao Gouveia, Ana Cecilia; Koponen, Ismo Kalevi

    2017-01-01

    Candle burning produces a large amount of particles that contribute substantially to the exposure to indoor particulate matter. The exposures to various types of combustion particles, such as diesel exhaust particles, have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer by mechanisms that invo......Candle burning produces a large amount of particles that contribute substantially to the exposure to indoor particulate matter. The exposures to various types of combustion particles, such as diesel exhaust particles, have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer by mechanisms...... a significant influx of alveolar macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes and increased concentrations of proteins and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar fluid. Lower levels of these markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity were observed after i.t. instillation of the same dose of A...

  5. STUDY ON STRUCTURE OF SINGULAR POINTS OF LAMINAR FLAME SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-e; YIN Xian-jun

    2005-01-01

    Under some certain assumptions, the physical model of the air combustion system was simplified to a laminar flame system. The mathematical model of the laminar flame system, which was built according to thermodynamics theory and the corresponding conservative laws, was studied. With the aid of qualitative theory and method of ordinary differential equations, the location of singular points on the Rayleigh curves is determined,the qualitative structure and the stability of the singular points of the laminar flame system,which are located in the areas of deflagration and detonation, are given for different parameter values and uses of combustion. The phase portraits of the laminar flame system in the reaction-stagnation enthalpy and combustion velocity-stagnation enthalpy planes are shown in the corresponding figures.

  6. Status and future prospect of 48Ca double beta decay search in CANDLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, T.; Nakajima, K.; Ajimura, S.; Batpurev, T.; Chan, W. M.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Kakubata, H.; Khai, B. T.; Kishimoto, T.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Masuda, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Morishita, K.; Nakatani, N.; Nomachi, M.; Noshiro, S.; Ogawa, I.; Ohata, T.; Osumi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Tesuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Umehara, S.; Yoshida, S.

    2016-05-01

    The observation of neutrino-less double beta decay (0vßß) would be the most practical way to prove the Majorana nature of the neutrino and lepton number violation. CANDLES studies 48Ca double beta decay using CaF2 scintillator. The main advantage of 48Ca is that it has the highest Q-value (4.27 MeV) among all the isotope candidates for 0vßß. The CANDLES III detector is currently operating with 300kg CaF2 crystals in the Kamioka underground observatory, Japan. In 2014, a detector cooling system and a magnetic cancellation coil was installed with the aim to increase light emission of CaF2 scintillator and photo-electron collection efficiency of the photo-multipliers. After this upgrade, light yield was increased to 1000 p.e./MeV which is 1.6 times larger than before. According to data analysis and simulation, main background source in CANDLES is turned out to be high energy external gamma-ray originating neutron capture on the surrounding materials, so called (n,γ). Upgrading the detector by installing neutron and gamma-ray shield can reduce the remaining main backgrounds by two order magnitude. In this report, we discuss the detail of (n,γ) and background reduction by additional shielding.

  7. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity in mice lungs after pulmonary exposure to candle light combustion particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Damiao Gouveia, Ana Cecilia; Koponen, Ismo Kalevi; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen; Roursgaard, Martin

    2017-07-05

    Candle burning produces a large amount of particles that contribute substantially to the exposure to indoor particulate matter. The exposures to various types of combustion particles, such as diesel exhaust particles, have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer by mechanisms that involve oxidative stress, inflammation and genotoxicity. The aim of this study was to compare pulmonary effects of candle light combustion particles (CP) with two benchmark diesel exhaust particles (A-DEP and SRM2975). Intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of CP (5mg/kg bodyweight) in C57BL/6n mice produced a significant influx of alveolar macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes and increased concentrations of proteins and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar fluid. Lower levels of these markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity were observed after i.t. instillation of the same dose of A-DEP or SRM2975. The i.t. instillation of CP did not generate oxidative damage to DNA in lung tissue, measured as DNA strand breaks and human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-sensitive sites by the comet assay. The lack of genotoxic response was confirmed in lung epithelial (A549) cells, although the exposure to CP increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, pulmonary exposure to particles from burning candles is associated with inflammation and cytotoxicity in the lungs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Granular-bed and ceramic candle filters in commercial plants: A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.B.; Haas, J.C.; Eshelman, M.B.

    1993-04-01

    Advanced coal fired power cycles require the removal of coal ash at high temperature and pressure. Granular-bed and ceramic candle filters can be used for this service. Conceptual designs for commercial size applications are made for each type of filter. The filters are incorporated in the design of a Foster Wheeler 450 MWe second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plant which contains a pressurized fluidized combustor and carbonizer. In a second application, the inters are incorporated in the design of a 100 MWe KRW (air) gasifier based power plant. The candle filter design is state of the art as determined from the open literature with an effort to minimize the cost. The granular-bed filter design is based on test work performed at high temperature and low pressure, tests at New York University performed at high pressure and temperate, and new analysis used to simplify the scale up of the filter and reduce overall cost. The incorporation of chemically reactive granites in the granular-bed filter for the removal of additional coal derived contaminants such as alkali or sulfur is considered. The conceptual designs of the granular-bed inter and the ceramic candle filter are compared in terms of the cost of electricity, capital cost, and operating and maintenance costs for each application.

  9. Studies of Methane Counterflow Flames at Low Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Robert Roe

    Methane is the smallest hydrocarbon molecule, the fuel most widely studied in fundamental flame structure studies, and a major component of natural gas. Despite many decades of research into the fundamental chemical kinetics involved in methane oxidation, ongoing advancements in research suggest that more progress can be made. Though practical combustors of industrial and commercial significance operate at high pressures and turbulent flow conditions, fundamental understanding of combustion chemistry in flames is more readily obtained for low pressure and laminar flow conditions. Measurements were performed from 1 to 0.1 atmospheres for premixed methane/air and non-premixed methane-nitrogen/oxygen flames in a counterflow. Comparative modeling with quasi-one-dimensional strained flame codes revealed bias-induced errors in measured velocities up to 8% at 0.1 atmospheres due to tracer particle phase velocity slip in the low density gas reacting flow. To address this, a numerically-assisted correction scheme consisting of direct simulation of the particle phase dynamics in counterflow was implemented. Addition of reactions describing the prompt dissociation of formyl radicals to an otherwise unmodified USC Mech II kinetic model was found to enhance computed flame reactivity and substantially improve the predictive capability of computed results for measurements at the lowest pressures studied. Yet, the same modifications lead to overprediction of flame data at 1 atmosphere where results from the unmodified USC Mech II kinetic mechanism agreed well with ambient pressure flame data. The apparent failure of a single kinetic model to capture pressure dependence in methane flames motivates continued skepticism regarding the current understanding of pressure dependence in kinetic models, even for the simplest fuels.

  10. Mode Selection in Flame-Vortex driven Combustion Instabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Speth, Ray

    2011-01-04

    In this paper, we investigate flame-vortex interaction in a lean premixed, laboratory scale, backward-facing step combustor. Two series of tests were conducted, using propane/hydrogen mixtures and carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures as fuels, respectively. Pressure measurements and high speed particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) were employed to generate pressure response curves as well as the images of the velocity field and the flame brush. We demonstrate that the step combustor exhibits several operating modes depending on the inlet conditions and fuel composition, characterized by the amplitude and frequency of pressure oscillations along with distinct dynamic flame shapes. We propose a model in which the combustor\\'s selection of the acoustic mode is governed by a combustion-related time delay inversely proportional to the flame speed. Our model predicts the transition between distinct operating modes. We introduce non-dimensional parameters characterizing the flame speed and stretch rate, and develop a relationship between these quantities at the operating conditions corresponding to each mode transition. Based on this relationship, we show that numerically-calculated density-weighted strained flame speed can be used to collapse the combustion dynamics data over the full range of conditions (inlet temperature, fuel composition, and equivalence ratio). Finally, we validate our strain flame based model by measuring the strain rate using the flame image and the velocity field from the PIV measurement. Our results show that the measured strain rates lie in the same range as the critical values at the transitions among distinct modes as those predicted by our model.

  11. 基于二阶矩封闭湍流模型的非预混湍流火焰的数值模拟%Numerical Simulation of the Turbulent Nonpremixed Flame with Second-Moment Turbulence Closure Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国岫; Roekaerts Dirk

    2004-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a bluff-body stabilized nonpremixed flame has been performed with second-moment turbulence closure(SMTC) models.To clarify the applicability of the existing-SMTC models in this complex flame, several typical SMTC models ,including LRR-IP model, JM model,SSC model as well as two modified LRR-IP mode, have been applied and evaluated in the numerical simulation of a bluff-body flame. Some of the above-mentioned SMTC models cannot provide overall satisfactory predictions for this challenging test. The difference in performance between the various SMTC models is quite significant. In the present study, the equilibrium chemistry model is employed and an assumed-shape beta function PDF approach is used to represent the interaction between turbulence and chemistry. It can be concluded that the modified LRR-IP models as well as SSG model are superior to other SMTC models in the turbulent nonpremixed bluff-body stabilized flame.%应用二阶矩封闭湍流模型进行了湍流非预混钝体稳定火焰数值模拟的研究.应用LRR-IP模型,JM模型,SSG模型以及两个修正后的LRR-IP模型等二阶矩封闭湍流模型,进行了钝体稳定火焰数值模拟的研究.对于复杂的钝体稳定火焰,一些模型无法给出令人满意的结果,而且不同模型的结果差异很大.在研究中,湍流燃烧模型采用了化学平衡模型和假设PDF模型.研究结果表明,对于钝体稳定火焰,SSG模型以及两个修正后的LRR-IP模型要优于其他几个二阶矩封闭湍流模型.

  12. Stratified charge combustion system using pilot flame ignition. Application to a model combustion chamber of Wankel-type rotary engine; Pilot kaen chakka ni yoru sojo kyuki nensho hoshiki no kenkyu. Wankel gata rotary kikan no model nenshoshitsu ni okeru nensho kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyoshi, Y.; Muroki, T.; Song, Y. [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-10-25

    The ignition mechanism of a pilot flame in a stratified charge mixture was examined using a model combustion chamber of a Wankel-type rotary engine. Experimental study such as LDV measurement, pressure data analysis, high-speed photography and image analysis provides detailed knowledge concerning the stratified charge combustion, which is complemented by theoretical study of the mixture formation process inside the combustion chamber. Characteristics of the pilot flame as an ignition source and the mixture formation inside the model chamber required for enhanced combustion are determined in this study. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Solid Propellant Flame Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    400 jm to reach the maximum flame temperature, a distance that can be reduced by replacing the HTPB binder with a polyester or CMDB binder. The...the dark zone for propellants similar to HIX2 is 2-2.5 mm at 1.8 MPa (18 atm, 265 psia) (Ref. 22,187). In contrast, the dark zone for HMX CMDB ...propellants eliminates the dark zone is not surprising, since TMETN is a nitrate ester as was the double-base matrix of Kubota’s HMX CMDB propellant. A

  14. Experimental and scale up study of the flame spread over the PMMA sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamourian Mojtaba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the flame spread mechanisms over the solid fuel sheets, downward flame spread over vertical polymethylmethacrylate sheets with thicknesses from 1.75 to 5.75 mm have been examined in the quiescent environment. The dependence of the flame spread rate on the thickness of sheets is obtained by one-dimensional heat transfer model. An equation for the flame spread rate based on the thermal properties and the thickness of the sheet by scale up method is derived from this model. During combustion, temperature within the gas and solid phases is measured by a fine thermocouple. The pyrolysis temperature, the length of the pyrolysis zone, the length of the preheating zone, and the flame temperature are determined from the experimental data. Mathematical analysis has yielded realistic results. This model provides a useful formula to predict the rate of flame spread over any thin solid fuel.

  15. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  16. Computational Flame Diagnostics for Direct Numerical Simulations with Detailed Chemistry of Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Tianfeng [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2017-02-16

    The goal of the proposed research is to create computational flame diagnostics (CFLD) that are rigorous numerical algorithms for systematic detection of critical flame features, such as ignition, extinction, and premixed and non-premixed flamelets, and to understand the underlying physicochemical processes controlling limit flame phenomena, flame stabilization, turbulence-chemistry interactions and pollutant emissions etc. The goal has been accomplished through an integrated effort on mechanism reduction, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flames at engine conditions and a variety of turbulent flames with transport fuels, computational diagnostics, turbulence modeling, and DNS data mining and data reduction. The computational diagnostics are primarily based on the chemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) and a recently developed bifurcation analysis using datasets from first-principle simulations of 0-D reactors, 1-D laminar flames, and 2-D and 3-D DNS (collaboration with J.H. Chen and S. Som at Argonne, and C.S. Yoo at UNIST). Non-stiff reduced mechanisms for transportation fuels amenable for 3-D DNS are developed through graph-based methods and timescale analysis. The flame structures, stabilization mechanisms, local ignition and extinction etc., and the rate controlling chemical processes are unambiguously identified through CFLD. CEMA is further employed to segment complex turbulent flames based on the critical flame features, such as premixed reaction fronts, and to enable zone-adaptive turbulent combustion modeling.

  17. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Marschner, K; Musil, S. (Stanislav); Dědina, J. (Jiří)

    2015-01-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were ...

  18. CANDLES project for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay of 48Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sei

    2014-09-01

    There is, presently, strong evidence that neutrinos undergo flavor oscillations,and hence must have finite masses. Neutrino-less double beta (0 νββ) decay measurement offers a realistic opportunity to establish the Majorana nature of neutrinos and gives the absolute scale of the effective neutrino mass. CANDLES is the project to search for 0 νββ decay of 48Ca. A distinctive characteristic of 48Ca is the highest Q value (4.3 MeV) among 0 νββ isotopes. Therefore it enables us to measure 0 νββ decay signals in background free contribution. The CANDLES system consists of undoped CaF2 scintillators (CaF2),liquid scintillator (LS), and large photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). A large number of CaF2 crystals in the form of 10 cm cubes are immersed in the LS. Scintillating CaF2 crystals work as an active source detector for 0 νββ decay of 48Ca, together with LS as a multi-purpose detector component to both reject backgrounds and to propagate scintillation photons. PMTs are placed around the LS vessel to detect photons from both scintillators. The simple design concept of CANDLES enables us to increase the 48Ca source amount. 48Ca enrichment is also effective for the high sensitive measurement, because natural abundance of 48Ca is very low (0.19%). We have studied 48Ca enrichment and succeeded in obtaining enriched 48Ca although it is a small amount. Now we have developed the CANDLES III system, which contained with 300kg CaF2 crystals without enrichment, at the Kamioka underground laboratory. New light collection system was installed in 2012, and accordingly photo-coverage has been enlarged by about 80%. Further improvement will be expected in 2014 by installing a detector cooling system in order to increase light emission from CaF2 crystals. The detail of the latest CANDLES III (U.G.) system and its performance will be presented. Recently, we found that gamma rays from neutron captures on materials surrounding detector could be dominant background. These

  19. A dynamic multimedia environmental and bioaccumulation model for brominated flame retardants in Lake Huron and Lake Erie, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Hee; Lastoskie, Christian M

    2011-05-01

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) may pose a worldwide pollution problem because of their persistence, long-range transport capability, and predisposition to bioaccumulate. The ubiquitous presence of PBBs and PBDEs has heightened interest in determination of their fate. We report results for a fugacity-based dynamic environmental and bioaccumulation model of the fate of hexabromobiphenyl (hexaBB) discharged into the Saginaw Bay region of Lake Huron, USA. We calculated transient fugacity profiles of hexaBB in Lake Huron and Lake Erie water and sediment during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. The hexaBB concentrations in the environmental compartments were used as inputs for a dynamic bioaccumulation model of Lake Huron and Lake Erie aquatic biota. The model results indicate that the sediment compartments of Lakes Huron and Erie serve as reservoirs for the accumulation and slow transfer of hexaBB to the food web constituents of these lakes. We present bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and compare the predicted hexaBB concentrations in lake trout from the bioaccumulation model with measurements during the period 1980 to 2000. An uncertainty analysis for this model suggests that errors associated with input parameter uncertainty can be reduced by refining estimates of the sediment degradation half-life of hexaBB. The corroborated PBB model has carryover application for modeling the fate of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) contaminants in the Great Lakes. By fitting model outputs to field measurement data using the transformed least square fit method, we report estimations of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) emission rates into the Lake Huron and Lake Erie watershed areas.

  20. Spontaneous Transition of Turbulent Flames to Detonations in Unconfined Media

    CERN Document Server

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y; Oran, Elaine S

    2011-01-01

    Deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) can occur in environments ranging from experimental and industrial systems to astrophysical thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae explosions. Substantial progress has been made in explaining the nature of DDT in confined systems with walls, internal obstacles, or pre-existing shocks. It remains unclear, however, whether DDT can occur in unconfined media. Here we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to show that for high enough turbulent intensities unconfined, subsonic, premixed, turbulent flames are inherently unstable to DDT. The associated mechanism, based on the nonsteady evolution of flames faster than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations, is qualitatively different from the traditionally suggested spontaneous reaction wave model, and thus does not require the formation of distributed flames. Critical turbulent flame speeds, predicted by this mechanism for the onset of DDT, are in agreement with DNS results.

  1. Free Radical Imaging Techniques Applied to Hydrocarbon Flames Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Caldeira-Pires

    2001-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utilization of free radical chemiluminescence imaging and tomographic reconstruction techniques to assess advanced information on reacting flows. Two different laboratory flow configurations were analyzed, including unconfined non-premixed jet flame measurements to evaluate flame fuel/air mixing patterns at the burner-port of a typical glass-furnace burner. The second case characterized the reaction zone of premixed flames within gas turbine combustion chambers, based on a laboratory scale model of a lean prevaporized premixed (LPP) combustion chamber.The analysis shows that advanced imaging diagnosis can provide new information on the characterization of flame mixing and reacting phenomena. The utilization of local C2 and CH chemiluminescence can assess useful information on the quality of the combustion process, which can be used to improve the design of practical combustors.

  2. Thermal Insulation System for Large Flame Buckets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, E. Eugene, Jr.; Gamblin, Tonya Pleshette

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the use of thermal protection coatings, single tiles, and layered insulation systems to protect the walls of the flame buckets used in the testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine, while reducing the cost and maintenance of the system. The physical behavior is modeled by a plane wall boundary value problem with a convective frontface condition and a backface condition designed to provide higher heat rates through the material.

  3. Physical and Chemical Processes in Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    reaction rate constants was developed to model these measured laminar flame speeds as well as a wide spectrum of other experimental data. The kinetic ...temperatures of dimethyl ether ( DME ) and 1,3-butadiene, allowing developments of detailed and reduced reaction mechanisms. A mathematical theory and...and improvement of the existing reaction mechanisms. Furthermore, the ignition temperatures of counterflowing dimethyl ether ( DME ) and 1,3-butadiene

  4. An experimental investigation of the interaction between a Karman vortex street and a premixed laminar flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namer, I.

    1980-12-01

    The interaction of a premixed C2H4-air flame with a Karman vortex street was studied. Laser Doppler anemometry was used for velocity measurements and Rayleigh scattering was used to measure total gas density. A reference hot wire was used to enable phase-locked ensemble averaging to be performed on the data. The velocity measurements for vortex shedding cylinder Reynolds numbers indicated that the vortex street and, hence, the flow field upstream of the flame is deflected by the flame. This is due to the pressure drop across the flame which is necessary to accelerate the flow behind the flame. The vortices were not observed behind the flame. The combination of dilation and increased dissipation consumed the vortices. Density statistics obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements were compared with predictions by the Bray-Moss-Libby (B-M-L) model which neglects intermediate states. Density fluctuations were overpredicted by the B-M-L model by a small amount.

  5. Characteristics of emissions of air pollutants from mosquito coils and candles burning in a large environmental chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. C.; Wang, B.

    The objective of this study was to characterize the emissions of air pollutants from mosquito coils and candles burning in a large environmental test chamber. The target pollutants included particulate matters (PM 10, PM 2.5), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO x), methane (CH 4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyl compounds. The average PM 10 concentrations for all tested mosquito coils exceeded Excellent and Good Classes objectives specified by Indoor Air Quality Objectives for Office Buildings and Public Places (IAQO) [ HKEPD, 2003. Guidance Notes for the Management of Indoor Air Quality in Offices and Public Places. Indoor Air Quality Management Group, The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region]. The emission factors (mg g -1 mosquito coil) of mosquito coils combustion were: PM 2.5, 20.3-47.8; PM 10, 15.9-50.8; CO, 74.6-89.1; NO, 0.1-0.5; NO 2, n.d.-0.1; NO x, 0.1-0.5; CH 4, n.d.-4.7; NMHC, 0.1-5.7. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the most abundant carbonyls species in the coil smoke. The average concentrations of formaldehyde and benzene of all tested mosquito coils exceeded Good Class of IAQO. Nitrogen oxides were the most abundant gas pollutants relating to candle burning among all target air pollutants. The candle made of gel (CAN 4) would emit more air pollutants than the paraffin candles (CAN 1, 2 and 3) and beeswax candle (CAN 5). Among five candles tested, CAN 5, the one made of beeswax, generated relatively smaller amount of air pollutants. It was noted that the concentrations of most VOCs from candles combustion were below the detection limit.

  6. Numerical study of flame structure in the mild combustion regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardani Amir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, turbulent non-premixed CH4+H2 jet flame issuing into a hot and diluted co-flow air is studied numerically. This flame is under condition of the moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD combustion regime and related to published experimental data. The modelling is carried out using the EDC model to describe turbulence-chemistry interaction. The DRM-22 reduced mechanism and the GRI2.11 full mechanism are used to represent the chemical reactions of H2/methane jet flame. The flame structure for various O2 levels and jet Reynolds numbers are investigated. The results show that the flame entrainment increases by a decrease in O2 concentration at air side or jet Reynolds number. Local extinction is seen in the upstream and close to the fuel injection nozzle at the shear layer. It leads to the higher flame entertainment in MILD regime. The turbulence kinetic energy decay at centre line of jet decreases by an increase in O2 concentration at hot Co-flow. Also, increase in jet Reynolds or O2 level increases the mixing rate and rate of reactions.

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of vortical flow-flame interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najm, H.N.; Schefer, R.W.; Milne, R.B.; Mueller, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Devine, K.D.; Kempka, S.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-02-01

    A massively parallel coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian low Mach number reacting flow code is developed and used to study the structure and dynamics of a forced planar buoyant jet flame in two dimensions. The numerical construction uses a finite difference scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the scalar conservation equations, and the vortex method for the momentum equations, with the necessary coupling terms. The numerical model construction is presented, along with computational issues regarding the parallel implementation. An experimental acoustically forced planar jet burner apparatus is also developed and used to study the velocity and scalar fields in this flow, and to provide useful data for validation of the computed jet. Burner design and laser diagnostic details are discussed, along with the measured laboratory jet flame dynamics. The computed reacting jet flow is also presented, with focus on both large-scale outer buoyant structures and the lifted flame stabilization dynamics. A triple flame structure is observed at the flame base in the computed flow, as is theoretically expected, but was not observable with present diagnostic techniques in the laboratory flame. Computed and experimental results are compared, along with implications for model improvements.

  8. Real fuel effects on flame extinction and re-ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Wu, Bifen; Xu, Chao; Lu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-01

    Flame-vortex interactions have significant implications in studying combustion in practical aeronautical engines, and can be used to facilitate the model development in capturing local extinction and re-ignition. To study the interactions between the complex fuel and the intense turbulence that are commonly encountered in engines, direct numerical simulations of the interactions between a flame and a vortex pair are carried out using a recently-developed 24-species reduced chemistry for n-dodecane. Both non-premixed and premixed flames with different initial and inlet thermochemical conditions are studied. Parametric studies of different vortex strengths and orientations are carried out to induce maximum local extinction and re-ignition. Chemical-explosive-mode-analysis based flame diagnostic tools are used to identify different modes of combustion, including auto-ignition and extinction. Results obtained from the reduced chemistry are compared with those obtained from one-step chemistry to quantify the effect of fuel pyrolysis on the extinction limit. Effects of flame curvature, heat loss and unsteadiness on flame extinction are also explored. Finally, the validity of current turbulent combustion models to capture the local extinction and re-ignition will be discussed.

  9. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Aspden, A J; Day, M S; Woosley, S E; Zingale, M

    2008-01-01

    The large range of time and length scales involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of flame models. As a prelude to exploring various options for flame models, we consider, in this paper, high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the small-scale dynamics of nuclear flames in the supernova environment in which the details of the flame structure are fully resolved. The range of densities examined, 1 to $8 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$, spans the transition from the laminar flamelet regime to the distributed burning regime where small scale turbulence disrupts the flame. The use of a low Mach number algorithm facilitates the accurate resolution of the thermal structure of the flame and the inviscid turbulent kinetic energy cascade, while implicitly incorporating kinetic energy dissipation at the grid-scale cutoff. For an assumed background of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence with an energy characteristic of SN Ia, we find a transition density between 1 and $3 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$ where the na...

  10. Subwoofer and nanotube butterfly acoustic flame extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Mayo, Nathanael K.; Baughman, Ray H.; Mills, Brent T.; Habtour, Ed

    2017-07-01

    Nonchemical flame control using acoustic waves from a subwoofer and a lightweight carbon nanotube thermoacoustic projector was demonstrated. The intent was to manipulate flame intensity, direction and propagation. The mechanisms of flame suppression using low frequency acoustic waves were discussed. Laminar flame control and extinction were achieved using a thermoacoustic ‘butterfly’ projector based on freestanding carbon nanotube sheets.

  11. Combustion instability of pilot flame in a pilot bluff body stabilized combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiao; Yang Fujiang; Guo Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability of pilot flame has been investigated in a model pilot bluff body stabilized combustor by running the pilot flame only. The primary objectives are to investigate the pilot flame dynamics and to provide bases for the study of the interaction mechanisms between the pilot flame and the main flame. Dynamic pressures are measured by dynamic pressure transduc-ers. A high speed camera with CH*bandpass filter is used to capture the pilot flame dynamics. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to further analyze the high speed images. With the increase of the pilot fuel mass flow rate, the pilot flame changes from stable to unstable state grad-ually. The combustion instability frequency is 136 Hz when the pilot flame is unstable. Numerical simulation results show that the equivalence ratios in both the shear layer and the recirculation zone increase as the pilot fuel mass flow rate increases. The mechanism of the instability of the pilot flame can be attributed to the coupling between the second order acoustic mode and the unsteady heat release due to symmetric vortex shedding. These results illustrate that the pilot fuel mass flow rate has significant influences on the dynamic stability of the pilot flame.

  12. Dynamics of bluff-body-stabilized lean premixed syngas flames in a meso-scale channel

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Bok Jik

    2016-07-15

    Direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized by a bluff-body in a meso-scale channel at near blow-off conditions, in order to provide fundamental insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the critical phenomena. Flames in a two-dimensional meso-scale channel with a square flame holder are adopted as the model configuration, and a syngas mixture at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 with the CO:H ratio of 1 is considered. As the inlet velocity is increased, the initially stable steady flames undergo a transition to an unsteady mode of regular asymmetric fluctuation. When the inlet velocity is further increased, the flame is eventually blown off. Between the regular fluctuation mode and blow-off limit, there exists a narrow range of the inlet velocity where the flames exhibit periodic local extinction and recovery. Approaching further to the blow-off limit, the recovery mode fails to occur but the flame survives as a short kernel attached to the base of the bluff-body, until it is completely extinguished as the attached flames are gradually shrunk towards the bluff-body. The results are systematically compared with the hydrogen flame results reported in our earlier study. Examination of the characteristic time scales of relevant processes provided understanding of key mechanisms responsible for the observed differences, thereby allowing improved description of the local extinction and re-ignition dynamics that are critical to flame stabilization.

  13. Combustion instability of pilot flame in a pilot bluff body stabilized combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xiao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Combustion instability of pilot flame has been investigated in a model pilot bluff body stabilized combustor by running the pilot flame only. The primary objectives are to investigate the pilot flame dynamics and to provide bases for the study of the interaction mechanisms between the pilot flame and the main flame. Dynamic pressures are measured by dynamic pressure transducers. A high speed camera with CH∗ bandpass filter is used to capture the pilot flame dynamics. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD is used to further analyze the high speed images. With the increase of the pilot fuel mass flow rate, the pilot flame changes from stable to unstable state gradually. The combustion instability frequency is 136 Hz when the pilot flame is unstable. Numerical simulation results show that the equivalence ratios in both the shear layer and the recirculation zone increase as the pilot fuel mass flow rate increases. The mechanism of the instability of the pilot flame can be attributed to the coupling between the second order acoustic mode and the unsteady heat release due to symmetric vortex shedding. These results illustrate that the pilot fuel mass flow rate has significant influences on the dynamic stability of the pilot flame.

  14. Recent Advances in Flame Tomographyt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫勇; 邱天; 卢钢; M.M.Hossain; G.Gilabert; 刘石

    2012-01-01

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel fired power plants,a range of new combustion technologies are being developed or refined,including oxy-fuel combustion,co-firing biomass with coal and fluidized bed combustion.Flame characteristics under such combustion conditions are expected to be different from those in normal air fired combustion processes.Quantified flame characteristics such as temperature distribution,oscillation frequency,and ignition volume play an important part in the optimized design and operation of the environmentally friendly power generation systems.However,it is challenging to obtain such flame characteristics particularly through a three-dimensional and non-intrusive means.Various tomography methods have been proposed to visualize and characterize flames,including passive optical tomography,laser based tomography,and electrical tomography.This paper identifies the challenges in flame tomography and reviews existing techniques for the quantitative characterization of flames.Future trends in flame tomography for industrial applications are discussed.

  15. Turbulence in laminar premixed V-flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xiaoqian(张孝谦); LEI; Yu(雷宇); WANG; Baorui(王宝瑞); WANG; Yue(王岳); WEI; Minggang(韦明罡)

    2003-01-01

    Strong velocity fluctuations had been found in the laminar premixed V-flames. These velocity fluctuations are closely related to the chemical reaction. But the effects of the upstream combustible mixture velocity on the velocity fluctuations inside the flame are quite weak. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the velocity in the centre region of the flame appears "flat top" shaped. By analyzing the experiment results the flame-flow interactions are found to affect the flame not only at large scale in the flow field but also at small scale inside the flame. These effects will give rise to flame generated small scale turbulences.

  16. Numerical simulation of pollutant emission and flame extinction in lean premixed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenspieler, Gilles

    Premixed and partially-premixed combustion and pollutant emissions in full-scale gas turbines has been numerically investigated using a massively-parallel Large-Eddy Simulation Combustion Dynamics Model. Through the use of a flamelet library approach, it was observed that CO (Carbon Oxide) and NO (Nitric Oxide) emission can be predicted and match experimental results. The prediction of the CO emission trend is shown to be possible if the influence of the formation of UHC (Unburnt HydroCarbons) via flame extinction is taken into account. Simulations were repeated with two different combustion approach: the G-equation model and the Linear-Eddy Mixing (LEM) Model. Results are similar for these two set of numerical simulations. The LEM model was used to simulate flame extinction and flame lift-off in a dump combustion chamber. The LEM model is compared to the G-equation model and it was found that the LEM model is more versatile than the G-equation model with regard to accurate simulation of flame propagation in all turbulent premixed combustion regimes. With the addition of heat losses, flame extinction was observed for low equivalence ratio. Numerical simulation of flame propagation with transient inflow conditions were also carried out and demonstrated the ability of the LEM model to accurately simulate flame propagation in the case of a partially-premixed system. In all simulations where flame extinction and flame lift-off was simulated, release of unburnt fuel in the post-flame region through flame extinction was not observed.

  17. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    Analytical treatment of premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations describing quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds, and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by the gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are ide...

  18. Laminar partially premixed flame stability - application to domestic burner; Stabilite de flammes laminaires partiellement premelangees. Application aux bruleurs domestiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacour, C.

    2006-05-15

    Phenomena responsible of partially premixed laminar flame stabilisation are investigated on a rich premixed burner configuration. The structure and aerodynamic of the flame generated by a cooking model burner are characterized by Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence of OH radical and Particle Image Velocimetry. The flame behaviour is studied from a stable reference case toward blow-out by varying the flow inlet conditions, the burner geometry and its thermal properties. The flame can be considered as two neighbour and independent reactive zones, each consisting of a double edge flame. The upper double flame stabilisation is similar to the one of a Bunsen burner with a flame-holder attached base and a flame tip stabilized in the flow according to the ratio of the flow velocity and flame speed of the rich pre-mixture. The bottom double flame is stabilized at the crossing point of the stoichiometric flame speed. The flame is finally blown out when there is no more crossing point. (author)

  19. Operation Behavior of a Multi-Candle Filter with Coupled Pressure Pulse Recleaning during Normal Operation and in the Case of a Filter Candle Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, R.; Leibold, H. Seifert, H.; Heidenreich, S.; Haag, W.

    2002-09-18

    A pilot filter with the CPP recleaning system was installed and commissioned during the first half year of 2000 in ''PYDRA'', the pyrolytic rotary tube facility of the Institute for Technical Chemistry, Research Center Karlsruhe. The filter, with a rated throughput of 50 std.m{sup 3}/h, is equipped with two clusters of three filter candles each (DIA-SCHUMALITH{reg_sign} T 10-20, 1 = 1500 mm), and has been designed for a maximum operating temperature of 550 C. After commissioning, the filter was run in the stand-alone mode, first without pyrolysis, to filter sticky inorganic dust of the type which can arise in waste incineration in the temperature range above 400 C.

  20. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  1. Dynamics of Diffusion Flames in von Karman Swirling Flows Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2002-01-01

    Von Karman swirling flow is generated by the viscous pumping action of a solid disk spinning in a quiescent fluid media. When this spinning disk is ignited in an oxidizing environment, a flat diffusion flame is established adjacent to the disk, embedded in the boundary layer (see the preceding illustration). For this geometry, the conservation equations reduce to a system of ordinary differential equations, enabling researchers to carry out detailed theoretical models to study the effects of varying strain on the dynamics of diffusion flames. Experimentally, the spinning disk burner provides an ideal configuration to precisely control the strain rates over a wide range. Our original motivation at the NASA Glenn Research Center to study these flames arose from a need to understand the flammability characteristics of solid fuels in microgravity where slow, subbuoyant flows can exist, producing very small strain rates. In a recent work (ref. 1), we showed that the flammability boundaries are wider and the minimum oxygen index (below which flames cannot be sustained) is lower for the von Karman flow configuration in comparison to a stagnation-point flow. Adding a small forced convection to the swirling flow pushes the flame into regions of higher strain and, thereby, decreases the range of flammable strain rates. Experiments using downward facing, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) disks spinning in air revealed that, close to the extinction boundaries, the flat diffusion flame breaks up into rotating spiral flames (refs. 2 and 3). Remarkably, the dynamics of these spiral flame edges exhibit a number of similarities to spirals observed in biological systems, such as the electric pulses in cardiac muscles and the aggregation of slime-mold amoeba. The tail of the spiral rotates rigidly while the tip executes a compound, meandering motion sometimes observed in Belousov-Zhabotinskii reactions.

  2. Turbulent Chemical Diffusion in Convectively Bounded Carbon Flames

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot; Bildsten, Lars; Timmes, F X; Burns, Keaton J; Vasil, Geoffrey M; Oishi, Jeffrey S; Brown, Benjamin P

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that mixing induced by convective overshoot can disrupt the inward propagation of carbon deflagrations in super-asymptotic giant branch stars. To test this theory, we study an idealized model of convectively bounded carbon flames with 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the Boussinesq equations using the pseudospectral code Dedalus. Because the flame propagation timescale is $\\sim 10^5$ times longer than the convection timescale, we approximate the flame as fixed in space, and only consider its effects on the buoyancy of the fluid. By evolving a passive scalar field, we derive a turbulent chemical diffusivity produced by the convection as a function of height, $D_t(z)$. Convection can stall a flame if the chemical mixing timescale, set by the turbulent chemical diffusivity, $D_t$, is shorter than the flame propagation timescale, set by the thermal diffusivity, $\\kappa$, i.e., when $D_t>\\kappa$. However, we find $D_t<\\kappa$ for most of the flame because convective plumes are not dense enoug...

  3. Ion measurements in premixed methane-oxygen flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2014-07-25

    Ions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in understanding flame ion chemistry due to the possible application of external electric fields to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of combustion process. In order to predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasma, it is critical to gain a good understanding of the flame ion chemistry. In this work, a Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane-oxygen-argon burner-stabilized flames. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames at atmospheric pressure are used to study the dependence of ion chemistry on equivalence ratio of premixed flames. The relative ion concentration profiles are compared qualitatively with previous methane-oxygen studies and show good agreement. The relative ion concentration data obtained in the present study can be used to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  4. Di-boson signatures as Standard Candles for Partial Compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Alexander; Cai, Haiying; Ferretti, Gabriele; Flacke, Thomas; Parolini, Alberto; Serodio, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Composite Higgs Models are often constructed including fermionic top partners with a mass around the TeV scale, with the top partners playing the role of stabilizing the Higgs potential and enforcing partial compositeness for the top quark. A class of models of this kind can be formulated in terms of fermionic strongly coupled gauge theories. A common feature they all share is the presence of specific additional scalar resonances, namely two neutral singlets and a colored octet, described by a simple effective Lagrangian. We study the phenomenology of these scalars, both in a model independent and model dependent way, including the bounds from all the available searches in the relevant channels with di-boson and di-top final states. We develop a generic framework which can be used to constrain any model containing pseudo-scalar singlets or octets. Using it, we find that such signatures provide strong bounds on the compositeness scale complementary to the traditional EWPT and Higgs couplings deviations. In man...

  5. Di-boson signatures as standard candles for partial compositeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Ferretti, Gabriele; Flacke, Thomas; Parolini, Alberto; Serodio, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Composite Higgs Models are often constructed including fermionic top partners with a mass around the TeV scale, with the top partners playing the role of stabilizing the Higgs potential and enforcing partial compositeness for the top quark. A class of models of this kind can be formulated in terms of fermionic strongly coupled gauge theories. A common feature they all share is the presence of specific additional scalar resonances, namely two neutral singlets and a colored octet, described by a simple effective Lagrangian. We study the phenomenology of these scalars, both in a model independent and model dependent way, including the bounds from all the available searches in the relevant channels with di-boson and di-top final states. We develop a generic framework which can be used to constrain any model containing pseudo-scalar singlets or octets. Using it, we find that such signatures provide strong bounds on the compositeness scale complementary to the traditional EWPT and Higgs couplings deviations. In many cases a relatively light scalar can be on the verge of discovery as a first sign of new physics.

  6. Flame front detection by active contour method from OH-PLIF images under microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yandong Tang; Yue Wang; Christian Eigenbrod

    2006-01-01

    @@ It is difficult and high-cost to detect flame fronts by laser-sheet diagnostics under microgravity (μg),thus image processing is critical to obtain valuable information from the raw data. In the present study,premixed V-flames were detected under μg by OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and an effective method based on active contour model (ACM) is presented for automatic detecting and tracking flame fronts in the PLIF images. ACM can effectively detect the flame front in the images with low contrast and noises. Compared with other methods of flame front detection, the advantage of this method is that the image smoothing and image enhancement are not necessary for the correct detection of flame fronts in raw PLIF images.

  7. Identifying combustion intermediates in premixed MTBE/gasoline/oxygen flame probed via synchrotron radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Chunde; QI Fei; LI Jing; LI Qi; JI Qing; HUANG Chaoqun; WEI Lixia; WANG Jing; TIAN Zhenyu; LI Yuyang

    2007-01-01

    Molecular-beam sampling mass spectrometry (MBMS) combined with tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization technique offers obvious advantages for the study of flame chemistry over other techniques because of the precision measurement of the combustion intermediates and products in flame.In this paper,the results to identify combustion intermediates in low-pressure premixed gasoline/oxygen flame with the synchrotron radiation were reported.Based on the results obtained,the formation process of five products and the difference between gasoline/oxygen and MTBE/gasoline/oxygen flame were emphatically analyzed.The results achieved provide data basis for the analysis of intermediates and radicals in flame,and are helpful to establish the kinetic modeling of gasoline/oxygen and MTBE/gasoline/oxygen flames.

  8. Pulse spectral evolution of GRBs: implication as standard candle

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Rupal

    2012-01-01

    Using an \\emph{empirical} description of a prompt GRB pulse, we analyze the individual pulses of all Fermi/GBM GRBs with known redshifts, till July 2009. This description is simultaneous in time and energy and allows one to determine the peak energy of Band spectrum at zero fluence ($E_{peak,0}$). We demonstrate, for the first time, that the $E_{peak,0}$ bears a very strong correlation with the isotropic energy of the individual pulses, and hence, each pulse can be used as a luminosity indicator. As a physical description is needed in order to use GRB pulses for cosmological purposes, we explore other physical spectral models. As pulses are the building blocks of a GRB, we choose another sample of Fermi/GBM GRBs having bright, long and single/ separable pulse(s) and fit the time-resolved spectra of the individual pulses with the Band model and a model consisting of a blackbody and a power-law. Both these models give acceptable fits. We find that the peak energy/ temperature always decreases exponentially with...

  9. 湍流扩散火焰局部熄火和再燃现象的PDF模拟%PDF Modeling of Local Extinction and Re-ignition Within Turbulent Non-Premixed Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海峰; 陈义良

    2004-01-01

    对一个值班湍流CH2/O2/N2射流扩散火焰(Sandia Flame D)进行了数值模拟研究.所采用的数学物理模型包括双尺度的k-ε湍流模型,标量联合的概率密度函数(PDF)输运方程方法,甲烷氧化的ARM简化化学反应机理(包含16种组分,12步总包反应)和欧几里德最小生成树(EMST)小尺度混合模型.将计算结果和实验数据进行了比较,不仅对于平均量,对于标量的散点分布和条件概率密度分布也是如此.计算结果表明文中采用的模型不仅能够预测宏观的火焰结构,而且预测了湍流燃烧中复杂的局部熄火和再燃过程.%A piloted CH4/O2/N2 turbulent jet non-premixed flame(Sandia flame D)is numerically investigated. The summary of the adopted models contains a two-scale k - ε turbulence model, the scalar joint probability density function (PDF) transport equation approach, the augmented reduced mechanism(ARM)for methane oxidation (consisting of 16 species and 12 lumped reaction steps), the Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST)small scale mixing model etc. The agreements between the numerical results and the experimental data are good, including the scatter plots and conditional PDFs of scalars as well as the scalar averages.The numerical results indicate that the present models are not only able to represent the macro flame structure accurately, but also can successfully predict the complicated local extinction and re-ignition processes in the turbulent combustion.

  10. Effect of fuel mixture fraction and velocity perturbations on the flame transfer function of swirl stabilized flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Stefan; Di-Chiaro, Giacomo; Biagioli, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    A novel methodology is developed to decompose the classic Flame Transfer Function (FTF) used in the thermo-acoustic stability analysis of lean premix combustors into contributions of different types. The approach is applied, in the context of Large Eddy Simulation (LES), to partially-premixed and fully-premixed flames, which are stabilized via a central recirculation zone as a result of the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The first type of decomposition is into contributions driven by fuel mixture fraction and dynamic velocity fluctuations. Each of these two contributions is further split into the components of turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The flame surface area component, driven by the pure dynamic velocity fluctuation, which is shown to be a dominant contribution to the overall FTF, is also additionally decomposed over the coherent flow structures using proper orthogonal decomposition. Using a simplified model for the dynamic response of premixed flames, it is shown that the distribution of the FTF, as obtained from LES, is closely related to the characteristics of the velocity field frequency response to the inlet perturbation. Initially, the proposed method is tested and validated with a well characterized laboratory burner geometry. Subsequently, the method is applied to an industrial gas turbine burner.

  11. The Effect of Noise on the Propagating Speed of Pre-mixed Laminar Flame Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of thermal noise on the propagation speed of a planar flame. We show that this out of equilibrium greatly amplifies the effect of thermal noise to yield macroscopic reductions in the flame speed over what is predicted by the noise-free model. Computations show that noise slows the flame significantly. The flame is modeled using Navier Stokes equations with appropriate diffusive transport terms and chemical kinetic mechanism of hydrogen/oxygen. Thermal noise is modeled within the continuum framework using a system of stochastic partial differential equations, with transport noise from fluctuating hydrodynamics and reaction noise from a poisson model. We use a full chemical kinetics model in order to get quantitatively meaningful results. We compute steady and dynamic flames using an operator split finite volume scheme. New characteristic boundary conditions avoid non-physical boundary layers at computational boundaries. New limiters prevent stochastic terms from introducing non-physical neg...

  12. Role of flame generated flow in the formation of tulip flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeung, I.S.; Cho, K.K.; Jeong, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The role of flame generated flow during the laminar 'tulip' flame formation in a long rectangular combustion vessel was examined by laser Doppler velocimeter measurement, high speed schlieren photographic flame visualization, and combustion vessel pressure measurement. Results of these investigations showed the transition of convex-shaped flame to concave-shaped tulip flame and interactions between the flame shape and flame generated flow in a confined geometry, and gave physical understanding of flow field formation of tulip flame. 15 references.

  13. Measurements of Positively Charged Ions in Premixed Methane-Oxygen Atmospheric Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B. S.

    2016-08-22

    Cations and anions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Electric fields can be applied to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of the combustion process. Detailed flame ion chemistry models are needed to understand and predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasmas. In this work, a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane–oxygen argon burner-stabilized atmospheric flames. Lean and stoichiometric flames are considered to assess the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Relative ion concentration profiles are compared with numerical simulations using various temperature profiles, and good qualitative agreement was observed for the stoichiometric flame. However, for the lean flame, numerical simulations misrepresent the spatial distribution of selected ions greatly. Three modifications are suggested to enhance the ion mechanism and improve the agreement between experiments and simulations. The first two modifications comprise the addition of anion detachment reactions to increase anion recombination at low temperatures. The third modification involves restoring a detachment reaction to its original irreversible form. To our knowledge, this work presents the first detailed measurements of cations and flame temperature in canonical methane–oxygen-argon atmospheric flat flames. The positive ion profiles reported here may be useful to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  14. Supplementary Material for: Measurements of Positively Charged Ions in Premixed Methane-Oxygen Atmospheric Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Cations and anions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Electric fields can be applied to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of the combustion process. Detailed flame ion chemistry models are needed to understand and predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasmas. In this work, a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane–oxygen argon burner-stabilized atmospheric flames. Lean and stoichiometric flames are considered to assess the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Relative ion concentration profiles are compared with numerical simulations using various temperature profiles, and good qualitative agreement was observed for the stoichiometric flame. However, for the lean flame, numerical simulations misrepresent the spatial distribution of selected ions greatly. Three modifications are suggested to enhance the ion mechanism and improve the agreement between experiments and simulations. The first two modifications comprise the addition of anion detachment reactions to increase anion recombination at low temperatures. The third modification involves restoring a detachment reaction to its original irreversible form. To our knowledge, this work presents the first detailed measurements of cations and flame temperature in canonical methane–oxygen-argon atmospheric flat flames. The positive ion profiles reported here may be useful to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  15. The Latest Version of the Standardized Candle Method for Type II Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Hamuy, M

    2003-01-01

    I use the largest available sample of Type II plateau supernovae to examine the previously reported luminosity-velocity relation. This study confirms such relation which permits one to standardize the luminosities of these objects from a spectroscopic measurement of their envelope velocities, and use them as extragalactic distance indicators. The "standard candle method" (SCM) yields a Hubble diagram with a dispersion of 0.3 mag, which implies that the SCM produces distances with a precision of 15%. Using two nearby supernovae with Cepheid distances I find Ho=81+/-10 km/s/Mpc, which compares with Ho=74 derived from Type Ia supernovae.

  16. Characterization of Carbon Deposits Formed During Plasma Pyrolysis of Xinjiang Candle Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guilin; Meng, Yuedong; Shu, Xingsheng; Fang, Shidong

    2009-08-01

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The downward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted.

  17. Characterization of carbon deposits formed during plasma pyrolysis of Xinjiang candle coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G.L.; Meng, Y.D.; Shu, X.S.; Fang, S.D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2009-08-15

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The down ward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND UTILIZATION OF TEST FACILITY FOR THE STUDY OF CANDLE FILTER SURFACE REGENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce S. Kang; Eric K. Johnson

    2003-07-14

    Hot gas particulate filtration is a basic component in advanced power generation systems such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC). These systems require effective particulate removal to protect the downstream gas turbine and also to meet environmental emission requirements. The ceramic barrier filter is one of the options for hot gas filtration. Hot gases flow through ceramic candle filters leaving ash deposited on the outer surface of the filter. A process known as surface regeneration removes the deposited ash periodically by using a high pressure pulse of gas to back flush the filter. After this cleaning process has been completed there may be some residual ash on the filter surface. This residual ash may grow and this may then lead to mechanical failure of the filter. A Room Temperature Test Facility (RTTF) and a High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) were built to investigate the ash characteristics during surface regeneration at room and selected high temperatures. The RTTF system was used to gain experience with the selected instrumentation and develop an operating procedure to be used later at elevated temperatures. The HTTF system is capable of conducting surface regeneration tests of a single candle filter at temperatures up to 1500 F. In order to obtain sequential digital images of ash particle distribution during the surface regeneration process, a high resolution, high speed image acquisition system was integrated into the HTTF system. The regeneration pressure and the transient pressure difference between the inside of the candle filter and the chamber during regeneration were measured using a high speed PC data acquisition system. The control variables for the high temperature regeneration tests were (1) face velocity, (2) pressure of the back pulse, and (3) cyclic ash built-up time. Coal ash sample obtained from the Power System Development Facility (PSDF) at Wilsonville, AL was used at the

  19. Computational and experimental study of laminar flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smooke, Mitchell [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-05-29

    these flames so that this information can be used effectively in combustion modeling.

  20. Role of carbon monoxide in impaired endothelial function mediated by acute second-hand tobacco, incense, and candle smoke exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Lynn P; Al-Dissi, Ahmad; Marit, Jordan S; German, Timothy N; Terletski, Sharilyn D

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if carbon monoxide (CO) is responsible for acute adverse cardiovascular effects of different sources of smoke: second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS), incense and candle smoke. Endothelial function was tested using flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in pigs and was shown to be sensitive to nitric oxide synthase blockade. Subsequent experiments showed that FMD was significantly impaired compared to sham-exposed pigs at 30 min after a 30-min exposure to all three sources of smoke. In contrast, SHS significantly increased systolic, diastolic and pulse pressures compared to sham-exposure, while both incense and candle smoke exposure had no effect. The FMD impairment correlated well with CO levels in the exposure chamber, but not total particulates or venous CO-hemoglobin. Therefore, this study suggests a gas phase component of smoke that accompanies CO, but not CO itself, is responsible for acute endothelial dysfunction after SHS, incense or candle smoke exposure.

  1. Mathematical modeling of velocity and number density profiles of particles across the flame propagation through a micro-iron dust cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Mehdi; Haghiri, Ali; Rahbari, Alireza

    2010-04-15

    In this study, an attempt has been made to analytically investigate the concentration and velocity profiles of particles across flame propagation through a micro-iron dust cloud. In the first step, Lagrangian particle equation of motion during upward flame propagation in a vertical duct is employed and then forces acting upon the particle, such as thermophoretic force (resulted from the temperature gradient), gravitation and buoyancy are introduced; and consequently, the velocity profile as a function of the distance from the leading edge of the combustion zone is extracted. In the resumption, a control volume above the leading edge of the combustion zone is considered and the change in the particle number density in this control volume is obtained via the balance of particle mass fluxes passing through it. This study explains that the particle concentration at the leading edge of the combustion zone is more than the particle agglomeration in a distance far from the flame front. This increase in the particle aggregation above the combustion zone has a remarkable effect on the lower flammability limits of combustible particle cloud. It is worth noticing that the velocity and particle concentration profiles show a reasonable compatibility with the experimental data.

  2. Same sign di-lepton candles of the composite gluons

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Ghosh, Diptimoy; Ray, Tirtha Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Composite Higgs models, where the Higgs boson is identified with the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone-Boson (pNGB) of a strong sector, typically have light composite fermions (top partners) to account for a light Higgs. This type of models generically also predicts the existence of heavy vector fields (composite gluons) which appear as an octet of QCD. These composite gluons generically become very broad resonances once phase-space allows them to decay into two composite fermions. This makes their traditional experimental searches, which are designed to look for narrow resonances, quite ineffective. In this paper we, as an alternative, propose to utilize the impact of composite gluons on the production of top partners to constrain their parameter space. We place constraints on the parameters of the composite resonances using the 8 TeV LHC data and also assess the reach of the 14 TeV LHC. We find that the high luminosity LHC will be able to probe composite gluon masses up to $\\sim 6$ TeV, even in the broad resonance reg...

  3. Are long gamma-ray bursts standard candles?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Wang, Sai; Chang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely proposed as an effective probe to trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe in high redshift range. However, the calibration of GRBs is not as easy as that of type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Most calibrating methods at present take use one or some of the empirical luminosity corrections, e.g., Amati relation. One of the underlying assumptions of these calibrating methods is that the empirical correlation is universal over all redshifts. In this paper, we check to what extent this assumption holds. Assuming that SNe Ia exactly trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe, we re-investigate the Amati relation for low redshift ($z1.4$) GRBs, respectively. It is found that the Amati relation of low-$z$ GRBs differs from that of high-$z$ GRBs at more than $3\\sigma$ confidence level. This result is insensitive to cosmological models.

  4. Dynamics of premixed flames in a narrow channel with a step-wise wall temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdyumov, Vadim N. [Department of Energy, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pizza, Gianmarco [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Frouzakis, Christos E. [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Mantzaras, John [Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    The effect of channel height, inflow velocity and wall temperature on the dynamics and stability of unity Lewis number premixed flames in channels with specified wall temperature is investigated with steady and transient numerical simulations using a two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. The simplified model is capable of capturing many of the transitions and the combustion modes observed experimentally and in direct numerical simulations in micro- and meso-scale channels, and indicates that the thermal flame/wall interaction is the mechanism leading to the observed flame instabilities. Finally, an ad-hoc one-dimensional model based on the flame-sheet approximation is tested in its capacity to reproduce some of the flame dynamics of the two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. (author)

  5. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.

    1993-01-01

    Some fundamentals of the ion chemistry of flames are summarized. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames have been studied using a VG PlasmaQuad, the ICP-system being substituted by a simple quartz burner. Simple hydrocarbon flames as well as sulfur-containing flames have been investigated....... The simple hydrocarbon flames are dominated by a series of hydrocarbonic ions and, to a minor extent, protonated oxo-compounds. The introduction of sulfur to the flames leads to significant changes in the ion composition, as sulfur-containing species become dominant. The ability of the technique to study...

  6. Influence of obstacle-produced turbulence on development of premixed flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Lixin(余立新); SUN; Wenchao(孙文超); WU; Chengkang(吴承康)

    2002-01-01

    An investigation into influence of obstructions on premixed flame propagation has been carried out in a semi-open tube.It is found that there exists flame acceleration and rising overpressure along the path of flame due to obstacles.According to the magnitude of flame speeds,the propagation of flame in the tube can be classified into three regimes:the quenching,the choking and the detonation regimes.In premixed flames near the flammability limits,the flame is observed first to accelerate and then to quench itself after propagating past a certain number of obstacles.In the choking regime,the maximum flame speeds are somewhat below the combustion product sound speeds,and insensitive to the blockage ratio.In the more sensitive mixtures,the transition to detonation (DDT) occurs when the equivalence ratio increases.The transition is not observed for the less sensitive mixtures.The dependence of overpressure on blockage ratio is not monotonous.Furthermore,a numerical study of flame acceleration and overpressure with the unsteady compressible flow model is performed,and the agreement between the simulation and measurements is good.``

  7. Insights from Mendelian Interferonopathies: Comparison of CANDLE, SAVI with AGS, Monogenic Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna; Sanchez, Gina A Montealegre; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2016-10-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders are sterile inflammatory conditions characterized by episodes of early-onset fever and disease-specific patterns of organ inflammation. Recently, the discoveries of monogenic disorders with strong type I interferon (IFN) signatures caused by mutations in proteasome degradation and cytoplasmic RNA and DNA sensing pathways suggest a pathogenic role of IFNs in causing autoinflammatory phenotypes. The IFN response gene signature (IGS) has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. In this review, we compare the clinical presentations and pathogenesis of two IFN-mediated autoinflammatory diseases, CANDLE and SAVI, with Aicardi Goutières syndrome (AGS) and monogenic forms of SLE (monoSLE) caused by loss-of-function mutations in complement 1 (C1q) or the DNA nucleases, DNASE1 and DNASE1L3. We outline differences in intracellular signaling pathways that fuel a pathologic type I IFN amplification cycle. While IFN amplification is caused by predominantly innate immune cell dysfunction in SAVI, CANDLE, and AGS, autoantibodies to modified RNA and DNA antigens interact with tissues and immune cells including neutrophils and contribute to IFN upregulation in some SLE patients including monoSLE, thus justifying a grouping of "autoinflammatory" and "autoimmune" interferonopathies. Understanding of the differences in the cellular sources and signaling pathways will guide new drug development and the use of emerging targeted therapies.

  8. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiawati, Nina; Su'ud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from -0.6695443 % at BOC to -0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  9. Emission characteristics of air pollutants from incense and candle burning in indoor atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukian, A; Quivet, E; Temime-Roussel, B; Nicolas, M; Maupetit, F; Wortham, H

    2013-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particles emitted by incense sticks and candles combustion in an experimental room have been monitored on-line and continuously with a high time resolution using a state-of-the-art high sensitivity-proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (HS-PTR-MS) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), respectively. The VOC concentration-time profiles, i.e., an increase up to a maximum concentration immediately after the burning period followed by a decrease which returns to the initial concentration levels, were strongly influenced by the ventilation and surface interactions. The obtained kinetic data set allows establishing a qualitative correlation between the elimination rate constants of VOCs and their physicochemical properties such as vapor pressure and molecular weight. The emission of particles increased dramatically during the combustion, up to 9.1(±0.2) × 10(4) and 22.0(±0.2) × 10(4) part cm(-3) for incenses and candles, respectively. The performed kinetic measurements highlight the temporal evolution of the exposure level and reveal the importance of ventilation and deposition to remove the particles in a few hours in indoor environments.

  10. New optical method for heat flux measurements in stagnation point laminar methane/air flames and hydrogen/methane/air flames using thermographic phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmnefi, Mohamed Salem

    2010-11-24

    In the present study, a new optical method was implemented to study the heat transfer from flat stagnation point flames which can be regarded as one-dimensional in the central part. Premixed methane-air flames and hydrogen-methane-air flames were investigated. The effects of burner-to-plate distance and the fresh gas mixture velocity on heat transfer were examined. Experiments were performed using light induced phosphorescence from thermographic phosphors to study the wall temperatures and heat fluxes of nearly one-dimensional flat premixed flames impinging upward normally on a horizontal water cooled circular flat plate. The investigated flames were stoichiometric, lean and rich laminar methane/air flames with different equivalence ratios of {phi} =1, {phi} = 0.75 and {phi} = 1.25 and stoichiometric laminar hydrogen/methane/air flames. Mixtures of air with 10, 25, 50 and 75 % hydrogen in methane (CH{sub 4}) as well as a pure hydrogen flames at ambient pressure were investigated. The central part of this plate was an alumina ceramic plate coated from both sides with chromium doped alumina (ruby) and excited with a Nd:YAG laser or a green light emitting diode (LED) array to measure the wall temperature from both sides and thus the heat flux rate from the flame. The outlet velocity of the gases was varied from 0.1 m/s to 1.2 m/s. The burner to plate distance ranged from 0.5 to 2 times the burner exit diameter (d = 30 mm).The accuracy of the method was evaluated. The measured heat flux indicate the change of the flame stabilization mechanism from a burner stabilized to a stagnation plate stabilized flame. The results were compared to modeling results of a one dimensional stagnation point flow, with a detailed reaction mechanism. In order to prove the model, also measured gas phase temperatures by OH LIF for a stoichiometric stagnation point flame were discussed. It turns out that the flame stabilization mechanism and with it the heat fluxes change from low to high

  11. Research on flame retardation of wool fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Ichiro; Ametani, Kazuo; Sawai, Takeshi (Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    Flame retardant, vinyl phosphonate oligomer, was uniformly impregnated in wool fibers, and by irradiating low energy electron beam or cobalt-60 gamma ray, the flame retardation of fabrics was attempted, as the results, the following knowledges were obtained. At the rate of sticking of flame retardant lower than that in cotton fabrics, sufficient flame retarding property can be given. The flame retarding property withstands 30 times of washing. The lowering of strength due to the processing hardly arose. For the flame retardation, gamma-ray was more effective than electron beam. Since the accidents of burning clothes have occurred frequently, their flame retardation has been demanded. So far the flame retardation of cotton fabrics has been advanced, but this time the research on the flame retardation of wool fabrics was carried out by the same method. The experimental method is explained. As for the performance of the processed fabrics, the rate of sticking of the flame retardant, the efficiency of utilization, the flame retarding property, the endurance in washing and the tensile and tearing strength were examined. As the oxygen index was higher, the flame retarding property was higher, and in the case of the index being more than 27, the flame retarding property is sufficient, that is, the rate of sticking of 6% in serge and 5% in muslin. (K.I.).

  12. Chemistry and flow in industrial diffusion flames. Chemie und Stroemung bei technischen Diffusionsflammen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    A total of nine papers were presented at the seminar. The papers have the following titles: laminar flamelet models for describing the combustion characteristics of pre-mixed and non-mixed turbulent flames; testing chemical-kinetic models by laser-optical measurement of concentration paths in flames; the simulation of turbulent CO-air and CH/sub 4/-air diffusion flames in consideration of complex reaction mechanisms; measurement and computer results from turbulent swirling flows; heat transfer by gas and soot formation in turbulent flames; reaction sequences in pulverised-coal flames; mathematical model formation of pulverised-coal combustion in large-scale combustion plants; calculating flows in practical burner and combustion-chamber configurations and groundwork for describing gas radiation in gas-turbine combustion chambers. Three of the papers have been abstracted separately.

  13. Analysis of the flamelet concept in the numerical simulation of laminar partially premixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consul, R.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.; Carbonell, D. [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor (CTTC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Colom 11, E-08222, Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); de Goey, L.P.H. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the application of flamelet models based on the mixture fraction variable and its dissipation rate to the numerical simulation of partially premixed flames. Although the main application of these models is the computation of turbulent flames, this work focuses on the performance of flamelet concept in laminar flame simulations removing, in this way, turbulence closure interactions. A well-known coflow methane/air laminar flame is selected. Five levels of premixing are taken into account from an equivalence ratio {phi}={infinity} (nonpremixed) to {phi}=2.464. Results obtained using the flamelet approaches are compared to data obtained from the detailed solution of the complete transport equations using primitive variables. Numerical simulations of a counterflow flame are also presented to support the discussion of the results. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of the scalar dissipation rate modeling. (author)

  14. Role of the outer-edge flame on flame extinction in nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames with finite burner diameters

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Yong Ho

    2013-03-01

    This study of nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames with finite burner diameters investigates the important role of the outer-edge flame on flame extinction through experimental and numerical analyses. It explores flame stability diagrams mapping the flame extinction response of nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames to varying global strain rates in terms of burner diameter, burner gap, and velocity ratio. A critical nitrogen mole fraction exists beyond which the flame cannot be sustained; the critical nitrogen mole fraction versus global strain rate curves have C-shapes for various burner diameters, burner gaps, and velocity ratios. At sufficiently high strain-rate flames, these curves collapse into one curve; therefore, the flames follow the one-dimensional flame response of a typical diffusion flame. Low strain-rate flames are significantly affected by radial conductive heat loss, and therefore flame length. Three flame extinction modes are identified: flame extinction through shrinkage of the outer-edge flame with or without oscillations at the outer-edge flame prior to the extinction, and flame extinction through a flame hole at the flame center. The extinction modes are significantly affected by the behavior of the outer-edge flame. Detailed explanations are provided based on the measured flame-surface temperature and numerical evaluation of the fractional contribution of each term in the energy equation. Radial conductive heat loss at the flame edge to ambience is the main mechanism of extinction through shrinkage of the outer-edge flame in low strain-rate flames. Reduction of the burner diameter can extend the flame extinction mode by shrinking the outer-edge flame in higher strain-rate flames. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of turbulent flame speed of V-shaped flames in fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, A.A.; Willems, P.A.; Stoffels, G.G.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Meer, van der T.H.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of fractal grids is used to investigate how fractal-grid-generated turbulence affects the turbulent flame speed for premixed flames. The grids are placed inside a rectangular duct and a V-shaped flame is stabilized downstream of the duct, using a metal wire. This flame is characterized usi

  16. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. 154.822 Section 154.822 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a)...

  17. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the current standard-bearers for dark energy but face several hurdles for their continued success in future large surveys. For example, spectroscopic classification of the myriad SNe soon to be discovered will not be possible, and systematics from uncertainties in dust corrections and the evolution of SN demographics and/or empirical calibrations used to standardize SNe Ia must be studied. Through the identification of low-dust host galaxies and through increased understanding of both the SN - progenitor connections and empirical calibrations, host galaxy information may offer opportunities to improve the cosmological utility of SNe Ia. The first half of this thesis analyzes the sample of SNe Ia discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. Correlations between properties of SNe and their host galaxies are examined at high redshift. Using galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters, a model is developed to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, 6 early-type cluster member hosts and 11 SN Ia early-type field hosts are identified. For the first time at z > 0.9, the correlation between host galaxy type and the rise and fall time of SN Ia light curves is confirmed. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions of early-type galaxies also enables stellar mass measurements for these hosts. In combination with literature host mass measurements, these measurements are used to show, at z > 0.9, a hint of the correlation between host mass and Hubble residuals reported at lower redshift. By simultaneously fitting cluster galaxy formation histories and dust content to the scatter of the cluster red sequences, it is shown that dust reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely less

  18. Flame Spread and Extinction Over a Thick Solid Fuel in Low-Velocity Opposed and Concurrent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Lu, Zhanbin; Wang, Shuangfeng

    2016-05-01

    Flame spread and extinction phenomena over a thick PMMA in purely opposed and concurrent flows are investigated by conducting systematical experiments in a narrow channel apparatus. The present tests focus on low-velocity flow regime and hence complement experimental data previously reported for high and moderate velocity regimes. In the flow velocity range tested, the opposed flame is found to spread much faster than the concurrent flame at a given flow velocity. The measured spread rates for opposed and concurrent flames can be correlated by corresponding theoretical models of flame spread, indicating that existing models capture the main mechanisms controlling the flame spread. In low-velocity gas flows, however, the experimental results are observed to deviate from theoretical predictions. This may be attributed to the neglect of radiative heat loss in the theoretical models, whereas radiation becomes important for low-intensity flame spread. Flammability limits using oxygen concentration and flow velocity as coordinates are presented for both opposed and concurrent flame spread configurations. It is found that concurrent spread has a wider flammable range than opposed case. Beyond the flammability boundary of opposed spread, there is an additional flammable area for concurrent spread, where the spreading flame is sustainable in concurrent mode only. The lowest oxygen concentration allowing concurrent flame spread in forced flow is estimated to be approximately 14 % O2, substantially below that for opposed spread (18.5 % O2).

  19. Flame Retardants Used in Flexible Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partnership project on flame retardants in furniture seeks to update the health and environmental profiles of flame-retardant chemicals that meet fire safety standards for upholstered consumer products with polyurethane foam

  20. Response mechanisms of attached premixed flames subjected to harmonic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreekrishna

    The persistent thrust for a cleaner, greener environment has prompted air pollution regulations to be enforced with increased stringency by environmental protection bodies all over the world. This has prompted gas turbine manufacturers to move from nonpremixed combustion to lean, premixed combustion. These lean premixed combustors operate quite fuel-lean compared to the stochiometric, in order to minimize CO and NOx productions, and are very susceptible to oscillations in any of the upstream flow variables. These oscillations cause the heat release rate of the flame to oscillate, which can engage one or more acoustic modes of the combustor or gas turbine components, and under certain conditions, lead to limit cycle oscillations. This phenomenon, called thermoacoustic instabilities, is characterized by very high pressure oscillations and increased heat fluxes at system walls, and can cause significant problems in the routine operability of these combustors, not to mention the occasional hardware damages that could occur, all of which cumulatively cost several millions of dollars. In a bid towards understanding this flow-flame interaction, this research works studies the heat release response of premixed flames to oscillations in reactant equivalence ratio, reactant velocity and pressure, under conditions where the flame preheat zone is convectively compact to these disturbances, using the G-equation. The heat release response is quantified by means of the flame transfer function and together with combustor acoustics, forms a critical component of the analytical models that can predict combustor dynamics. To this end, low excitation amplitude (linear) and high excitation amplitude (nonlinear) responses of the flame are studied in this work. The linear heat release response of lean, premixed flames are seen to be dominated by responses to velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations at low frequencies, and to pressure fluctuations at high frequencies which are in the

  1. Firefighters and flame retardant activism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordner, Alissa; Rodgers, Kathryn M; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, exposure to flame retardant chemicals has become a pressing health concern and widely discussed topic of public safety for firefighters in the United States. Working through local, state, and national unions and independent health and advocacy organizations, firefighters have made important contributions to efforts to restrict the use of certain flame retardants. Firefighters are key members in advocacy coalitions dedicated to developing new environmental health regulations and reforming flammability standards to reflect the best available fire science. Their involvement has been motivated by substantiated health concerns and critiques of deceptive lobbying practices by the chemical industry. Drawing on observations and interviews with firefighters, fire safety experts, and other involved stakeholders, this article describes why firefighters are increasingly concerned about their exposure to flame retardant chemicals in consumer products, and analyzes their involvement in state and national environmental health coalitions.

  2. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  3. 75 FR 49475 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... complaints by some importers prompted another telex to customs on March 20, 1986, in which `candles not... Communication Following the communications with NCA described above, the Department sent a telex to the U.S... Register (February 19, 1986, page 6016) and referenced in our February 20, 1986 telex is as follows:...

  4. Droplet and Supercritical Flame Dynamics in Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    In order to study the stability of a lifted jet flame by nozzle-generated vortexes, we have developed a chemical explosive mode analysis ( CEMA ) to...runaway can consequently be distinguished. CEMA of the lifted flame shows the existence of two premixed flame fronts, which are difficult to detect

  5. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  6. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... § 14.20 Flame resistance. Conveyor belts for use in underground coal mines must be flame-resistant...

  7. Acoustic power measurements of oscillating flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic power of an oscillating flame is measured. A turbulent premixed propane/air flame is situated near a pressure antinode of a standing wave in a laboratory combustion chamber. This standing wave is generated by a piston. The fluctuating heat release of the flame will supply acoustic power

  8. Hysteresis and transition in swirling nonpremixed flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, M.J.; Hübner, A.W.; Veen, van E.H.; Hanjalic, K.; Meer, van der Th.H.

    2009-01-01

    Strongly swirling nonpremixed flames are known to exhibit a hysteresis when transiting from an attached long, sooty, yellow flame to a short lifted blue flame, and vice versa. The upward transition (by increasing the air and fuel flow rates) corresponds to a vortex breakdown, i.e. an abrupt change f

  9. Acoustic power measurements of oscillating flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic power of an oscillating flame is measured. A turbulent premixed propane/air flame is situated near a pressure antinode of a standing wave in a laboratory combustion chamber. This standing wave is generated by a piston. The fluctuating heat release of the flame will supply acoustic power

  10. Environmental Considerations for Flame Resistant Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtually all common textiles will ignite and burn. There are mandatory and voluntary cigarette and open-flame ignition regulations to address unreasonable fire risks associated with textile products that require them to be treated with and/or contain flame retardant chemicals to make them flame res...

  11. Response to acoustic forcing of laminar coflow jet diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin

    2014-04-23

    Toward the goal of understanding and controlling instability in combustion systems, we present a fundamental characterization of the interaction of the buoyancy-induced instability in flickering flames with forced excitation of fuel supply. Laminar coflow diffusion flames were acoustically forced, whose frequency responses were recorded as a function of excitation frequency and amplitude. The evolving structure of such flames was also examined through the use of video analysis and particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). For specific combinations of excitation frequency and amplitude, the frequency response of the flames was found to couple to that of the forcing, where the contribution of natural puffing frequency disappears. Such instances of coupling exhibited many harmonics of the excitation frequency, related indirectly to the natural puffing frequency. We showed how such harmonics form, through application of PIV, and furthermore unveiled insight into the physics of how the flame couples to the forcing under certain conditions. Our frequency response characterization provides quantitative results, which are of utility for both modeling studies and active-control strategies. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Cool flames at terrestrial, partial, and near-zero gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Michael; Pearlman, Howard [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    Natural convection plays an important role in all terrestrial, Lunar, and Martian-based, unstirred, static reactor cool flame and low-temperature autoignitions, since the Rayleigh number (Ra) associated with the self-heating of the reaction exceeds the critical Ra (approximately 600) for onset of convection. At near-zero gravity, Ra<600 can be achieved and the effects of convection suppressed. To systematically vary the Ra without varying the mixture stoichiometry, reactor pressure, or vessel size, cool flames are studied experimentally in a closed, unstirred, static reactor subject to different gravitational accelerations (terrestrial, 1g; Martian, 0.38g; Lunar, 0.16g; and reduced gravity, {approx}10{sup -2}g). Representative results show the evolution of the visible light emission using an equimolar n-butane:oxygen premixture at temperatures ranging from 320 to 350? deg C (593-623 K) at subatmospheric pressures. For representative reduced-gravity, spherically propagating cool flames, the flame radius based on the peak light intensity is plotted as a function of time and the flame radius (and speed) is calculated from a polynomial fit to data. A skeletal chemical kinetic Gray-Yang model developed previously for a one-dimensional, reactive-diffusive system by Fairlie and co-workers is extended to a two-dimensional axisymmetric, spherical geometry. The coupled species, energy, and momentum equations are solved numerically and the spatio-temporal variations in the temperature profiles are presented. A qualitative comparison is made with the experimental results. (author)

  13. Cars Spectroscopy of Propellant Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Harris, K. Aron, and J. Fendell "N2 and 00 Vibrational CARS and H2 Rotational CARS Spectroscopy of CHI/N20 Flames," Proceedings of the Nineteenth...JANNAF Combustion Meeting, CIIA Publication No. 366, 1982, p 123. 21. K. Aron, L. E. Harris, and J. Fendell , "N and CO Vibrational CARS and H2 Rotational...9 6 5 . p 3 8 4 . . . . . 23. J. Fendell , L. E, Harris, and K. Aron, "Theoretical Calculation of 11 CARS S-Branches for Propellant Flames

  14. Experimental characterization of methane inverse diffusion flame

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2014-06-26

    This article presents 10-kHz images of OH-PLIF simultaneously with 2-D PIV measurements in an inverse methane diffusion flame. Under a constant fuel flow rate, the central air jet Re was varied, leading to air to fuel velocity ratio, Vr, to vary from 8.3 to 66.5. Starting from Vr = 20.7, the flame is commonly characterized by three distinct zones. The length of the lower fuel entrainment region is inversely proportional to Vr. The flames investigated resemble a string shear layer confining this zone, and converging into the second distinct region, the flame neck zone. The third region is the rest of the flame, which spreads in a jet-like manner. The inverse diffusion flames exhibit varying degrees of partial premixing, depending upon on the velocity ratio Vr, and this region of partial premixing evolves into a well-mixed reaction zone along the flame centerline. The OH distribution correlated with the changes in the mean characteristics of the flow through reduction in the local Reynolds number due to heat release. The existence of a flame suppresses or laminarizes the turbulence at early axial locations and promotes fluctuations at the flame tip for flames with Vr < 49.8. In addition, the flame jet width can be correlated to the OH distribution. In upstream regions of the flames, the breaks in OH are counterbalanced by flame closures and are governed by edge flame propagation. These local extinctions were found to occur at locations where large flow structures were impinging on the flame and are associated with a locally higher strain rate or correlated to the local high strain rates at the flame hole edges without this flow impinging. Another contributor to re-ignition was found to be growing flame kernels. As the flames approach global blow-off, these kernels become the main mechanism for re-ignition further downstream of the flames. At low Vr, laminarization within the early regions of the flame provides an effective shield, preventing the jet flow from

  15. Using slow-release permanganate candles to remove TCE from a low permeable aquifer at a former landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Mark D; Kambhu, Ann; Comfort, Steve D

    2012-10-01

    Past disposal of industrial solvents into unregulated landfills is a significant source of groundwater contamination. In 2009, we began investigating a former unregulated landfill with known trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. Our objective was to pinpoint the location of the plume and treat the TCE using in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). We accomplished this by using electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to survey the landfill and map the subsurface lithology. We then used the ERI survey maps to guide direct push groundwater sampling. A TCE plume (100-600 μg L(-1)) was identified in a low permeable silty-clay aquifer (K(h)=0.5 md(-1)) that was within 6m of ground surface. To treat the TCE, we manufactured slow-release potassium permanganate candles (SRPCs) that were 91.4 cm long and either 5. cm or 7.6 cm in dia. For comparison, we inserted equal masses of SRPCs (7.6-cm versus 5.1-cm dia) into the low permeable aquifer in staggered rows that intersected the TCE plume. The 5.1-cm dia candles were inserted using direct push rods while the 7.6-cm SRPCs were placed in 10 permanent wells. Pneumatic circulators that emitted small air bubbles were placed below the 7.6-cm SRPCs in the second year. Results 15 months after installation showed significant TCE reductions in the 7.6-cm candle treatment zone (67-85%) and between 10% and 66% decrease in wells impacted by the direct push candles. These results support using slow-release permanganate candles as a means of treating chlorinated solvents in low permeable aquifers.

  16. Investigations of Sooting Laminar Coflow Diffusion Flames at Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmetz, Scott A.

    2016-12-01

    Soot is a common byproduct of hydrocarbon based combustion systems. It poses a risk to human and environmental health, and can negatively or positively affect combustor performance. As a result, there is significant interest in understanding soot formation in order to better control it. More recently, the need to study soot formation in engine relevant conditions has become apparent. One engine relevant parameter that has had little focus is the ambient pressure. This body of work focuses on the formation of soot in elevated pressure environments, and a number of investigations are carried out with this purpose. Laminar coflow diffusion flames are used as steady, simple soot producers. First, a commonly studied flame configuration is further characterized. Coflow flames are frequently used for fundamental flame studies, particularly at elevated pressures. However, they are more susceptible to buoyancy induced instabilities at elevated pressures. The velocity of the coflow is known to have an effect on flame stability and soot formation, though these have not been characterized at elevated pressures. A series of flames are investigated covering a range of flowrates, pressures, and nozzle diameters. The stability limits of coflow flames in this range is investigated. Additionally, an alternative strategy for scaling these flames to elevated pressures is proposed. Finally, the effect of coflow rate on soot formation is evaluated. Identification of fundamental flames for coordinated research can facilitate our understanding of soot formation. The next study of this work focuses on adding soot concentration and particle size information to an existing fundamental flame dataset for the purpose of numerical model validation. Soot volume fraction and average particle diameters are successfully measured in nitrogen-diluted ethylene-air laminar coflow flames at pressures of 4, 8, 12, and 16 atm. An increase in particle size with pressure is found up to 12 atm, where particle

  17. A turbulent premixed flame on fractal-grid generated turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Soulopoulos, Nikos; Beyrau, Frank; Hardalupas, Yannis; Taylor, A M K P; Vassilicos, J Christos

    2010-01-01

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent combustion experiment. In contrast to the power law decay of a standard turbulence grid, the downstream turbulence intensity of the fractal grid increases until it reaches a peak at some distance from the grid before it finally decays. The effective mesh size and the solidity are the same as those of a standard square mesh grid with which it is compared. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry, the fractal generated turbulence enhances the burning rate and causes the flame to further increase its area. Using a flame fractal model, an attempt is made to highlight differences between the flames established at the two different turbulent fields.

  18. Effects of AC Electric Field on Small Laminar Nonpremixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    80 Hz and became saturated at over 80 Hz, which has been explained based on the interaction between the buoyancy and ionic wind. Electrical measurement showed the power consumed by the AC was smaller than 0.01% of the heat release rate from the flame. To improve the understanding on the electric current resulting from applying electric field on flames, a simplified one-dimensional model was developed in that the reaction zone was modeled as a thin ionized layer. Model governing equations were derived from species equations by implementing mobility differences depending on the type of charged particles, especially between ions and electrons. The result showed that the sub-saturated current along with field intensity was significantly influenced by the polarity of DC due to the combined effect of non-equal mobility of charged particles as well as the position of the ionized layer in a gap relative to two electrodes. Experiments with quasi-one-dimensional flames under DC were conducted to substantiate the model and measured currents agreed qualitatively well with the model predictions.

  19. Understanding and predicting soot generation in turbulent non-premixed jet flames.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hai (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Kook, Sanghoon; Doom, Jeffrey; Oefelein, Joseph Charles; Zhang, Jiayao; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2010-10-01

    This report documents the results of a project funded by DoD's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) on the science behind development of predictive models for soot emission from gas turbine engines. Measurements of soot formation were performed in laminar flat premixed flames and turbulent non-premixed jet flames at 1 atm pressure and in turbulent liquid spray flames under representative conditions for takeoff in a gas turbine engine. The laminar flames and open jet flames used both ethylene and a prevaporized JP-8 surrogate fuel composed of n-dodecane and m-xylene. The pressurized turbulent jet flame measurements used the JP-8 surrogate fuel and compared its combustion and sooting characteristics to a world-average JP-8 fuel sample. The pressurized jet flame measurements demonstrated that the surrogate was representative of JP-8, with a somewhat higher tendency to soot formation. The premixed flame measurements revealed that flame temperature has a strong impact on the rate of soot nucleation and particle coagulation, but little sensitivity in the overall trends was found with different fuels. An extensive array of non-intrusive optical and laser-based measurements was performed in turbulent non-premixed jet flames established on specially designed piloted burners. Soot concentration data was collected throughout the flames, together with instantaneous images showing the relationship between soot and the OH radical and soot and PAH. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for ethylene combustion, including fuel-rich chemistry and benzene formation steps, was compiled, validated, and reduced. The reduced ethylene mechanism was incorporated into a high-fidelity LES code, together with a moment-based soot model and models for thermal radiation, to evaluate the ability of the chemistry and soot models to predict soot formation in the jet diffusion flame. The LES results highlight the importance of including an optically-thick radiation

  20. Image Analysis on Detachment Process of Dust Cake on Ceramic Candle Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬忠礼; 焦海青; 陈鸿海

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of high-speed video images, the detachment behavior of dust cake from the ceramic candle filter surface during pulse cleaning process is investigated. The influences of the dust cake loading,the reservoir pressure, and the filtration velocity on the cleaning effectiveness are analyzed. Experimental results show that there exists an optimum dust cake thickness for pulse-cleaning process. For thin dust cake, the patchy cleaning exists and the cleaning efficiency is low; if the dust cake is too thick, the pressure drop across the dust cake becomes higher and a higher reservoir pressure may be needed. At the same time there also exists an optimum reservoir pressure for a given filtration condition.

  1. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  2. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monado, Fiber [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia and Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Su' ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung (Indonesia); Ariani, Menik [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [CRINES, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okoyama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-09-30

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  3. Candle Soot as a Template for a Transparent Robust Superamphiphobic Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xu; Mammen, Lena; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Coating is an essential step in adjusting the surface properties of materials. Superhydrophobic coatings with contact angles greater than 150° and roll-off angles below 10° for water have been developed, based on low-energy surfaces and roughness on the nano- and micrometer scales. However, these surfaces are still wetted by organic liquids such as surfactant-based solutions, alcohols, or alkanes. Coatings that are simultaneously superhydrophobic and superoleophobic are rare. We designed an easily fabricated, transparent, and oil-rebounding superamphiphobic coating. A porous deposit of candle soot was coated with a 25-nanometer-thick silica shell. The black coating became transparent after calcination at 600°C. After silanization, the coating was superamphiphobic and remained so even after its top layer was damaged by sand impingement.

  4. Analysis of flame acceleration in open or vented obstructed pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Sadek, Jad; Akkerman, V'yacheslav

    2017-01-01

    While flame propagation through obstacles is often associated with turbulence and/or shocks, Bychkov et al. [V. Bychkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 164501 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.164501] have revealed a shockless, conceptually laminar mechanism of extremely fast flame acceleration in semiopen obstructed pipes (one end of a pipe is closed; a flame is ignited at the closed end and propagates towards the open one). The acceleration is devoted to a powerful jet flow produced by delayed combustion in the spaces between the obstacles, with turbulence playing only a supplementary role in this process. In the present work, this formulation is extended to pipes with both ends open in order to describe the recent experiments and modeling by Yanez et al. [J. Yanez et al., arXiv:1208.6453] as well as the simulations by Middha and Hansen [P. Middha and O. R. Hansen, Process Safety Prog. 27, 192 (2008) 10.1002/prs.10242]. It is demonstrated that flames accelerate strongly in open or vented obstructed pipes and the acceleration mechanism is similar to that in semiopen ones (shockless and laminar), although acceleration is weaker in open pipes. Starting with an inviscid approximation, we subsequently incorporate hydraulic resistance (viscous forces) into the analysis for the sake of comparing its role to that of a jet flow driving acceleration. It is shown that hydraulic resistance is actually not required to drive flame acceleration. In contrast, this is a supplementary effect, which moderates acceleration. On the other hand, viscous forces are nevertheless an important effect because they are responsible for the initial delay occurring before the flame acceleration onset, which is observed in the experiments and simulations. Accounting for this effect provides good agreement between the experiments, modeling, and the present theory.

  5. Sudden acceleration of flames in open channels driven by hydraulic resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, J; Bykov, V

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-air deflagrations with venting at the end of obstructed tubes are studied experimentally and numerically. A shockless transition to the so-called chocked regime of the flame propagation is reported. Mixtures with 13% vol. of hydrogen were ignited from the open end of the tube at the interface between fuel and the ambient air. Three venting ratios were selected, closed, 40% and 100%. In all cases the flame initially propagates without acceleration at a velocity close to the laminar flame speed. The flame configuration excludes most of conventionally acknowledged phenomena of the DDT, namely, volumetric explosions, igniting shock and shock waves interactions. However, after an induction period, of the order of 1 sec, the flame accelerates more than 100 times, within a period of 3-30 ms, until the steady-state choked regime is established. The mechanism of such rapid acceleration is investigated both numerically and analytically. A one dimensional reduced description was suggested and analyzed to model ...

  6. Probing the dynamics of nanoparticle growth in a flame using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Gregory; Kammler, Hendrik K; Mueller, Roger; Strobel, Reto; Agashe, Nikhil; Pratsinis, Sotiris E; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2004-06-01

    Flame synthesis is one of the most versatile and promising technologies for large-scale production of nanoscale materials. Pyrolysis has recently been shown to be a useful route for the production of single-walled nanotubes, quantum dots and a wide variety of nanostructured ceramic oxides for catalysis and electrochemical applications. An understanding of the mechanisms of nanostructural growth in flames has been hampered by a lack of direct observations of particle growth, owing to high temperatures (2,000 K), rapid kinetics (submillisecond scale), dilute growth conditions (10(-6) volume fraction) and optical emission of synthetic flames. Here we report the first successful in situ study of nanoparticle growth in a flame using synchrotron X-ray scattering. The results indicate that simple growth models, first derived for colloidal synthesis, can be used to facilitate our understanding of flame synthesis. Further, the results indicate the feasibility of studies of nanometre-scale aerosols of toxicological and environmental concern.

  7. Imaging Invisible Flames Without Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    1996-01-01

    Image intensifiers, video cameras, and image-data-processing computers used to study combustion. Possible to view and analyze methane, hydrogen, and other flames dim or invisible to human eye and difficult to image by use of conventional photographic and video cameras.

  8. Olympic Flame Burning In Athens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>At 6:00pm March 25 (Beijing time), 2004 Athens Olympic flame was lit in Greece’s ancient sanctuary, indicating that the torch relay started.The torch relay, established at the Berlin Games in 1936, will for the first time visit all five continents

  9. The VLT FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, C.; Taylor, W.; Sana, H.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Bagnoli, T.; Bastian, N.; Bestenlehner, J.; Bonanos, A.; Bressert, E.; Brott, I.; Campbell, M.; Cantiello, M.; Carraro, G.; Clark, S.; Costa, E.; Crowther, P.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S.; Doran, E.; Dufton, P.; Dunstall, P.; Garcia, M.; Gieles, M.; Gräfener, G.; Herrero, A.; Howarth, I.; Izzard, R.; Köhler, K.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Markova, N.; Najarro, P.; Puls, J.; Ramirez, O.; Sabín-Sanjulián, C.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Smartt, S.; Stroud, V.; van Loon, J.; Vink, J.S.; Walborn, N.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the VLT FLAMES Tarantula Survey, an ESO Large Programme from which we have obtained optical spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the spectacular 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. A key feature is the use of multi-epoch observations to provide strong constraints on

  10. Flame monitoring enhances burner management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, T.; Bailey, R.; Fuller, T.; Daw, S.; Finney, C.; Stallings, J. [Babcock & Wilcox Research Center (USA)

    2003-02-01

    A new burner monitoring and diagnostic system called Flame Doctor offers users a more precise and discriminating understanding of burner conditions. Alpha testing on Unit 4 at AmerenUE's Meramec power plant in St. Louis, MO, USA and Beta testing is underway at plants owned by Dynegy and Allegheny Energy. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  11. The development of a color-magnitude diagram for active galactic nuclei (AGN): hope for a new standard candle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, G.; Chung, S.; Gonzales, E. V.; Gorjian, V.; Pruett, L.

    2015-12-01

    Of the galaxies in our universe, only a small percentage currently have Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). These galaxies tend to be further out in the universe and older, and are different from inactive galaxies in that they emit high amounts of energy from their central black holes. These AGN can be classified as either Seyferts or quasars, depending on the amount of energy emitted from the center (less or more). We are studying the correlation between the ratio of dust emission and accretion disk emission to luminosities of AGN in order to determine if there is a relationship strong enough to act as a predictive model for distance within the universe. This relationship can be used as a standard candle if luminosity is found to determine distances in space. We have created a color-magnitude diagram depicting this relationship between luminosity and wavelengths, similar to the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. The more luminous the AGN, the more dust surface area over which to emit energy, which results in a greater near-infrared (NIR) luminosity. This differs from previous research because we use NIR to differentiate accretion from dust emission. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), we analyzed over one thousand Type 1 Seyferts and quasars. We studied data at different wavelengths in order to show the relationship between color (the ratio of one wavelength to another) and luminosity. It was found that plotting filters i-K (the visible and mid-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum) against the magnitude absolute K (luminosity) showed a strong correlation. Furthermore, the redshift range between 0.14 and 0.15 was the most promising, with an R2 of 0.66.

  12. Enhancements of Impinging Flame by Pulsation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AySu; Ying-ChiehLiu

    2000-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the pulsating jet-impinging diffusion flame were executed.A soleoid valve was aligned upstream of the jet orifice and the methane fuel was controlled in open-closed cycles from 0 Hz to 20Hz.Results show that the open-closed cycles,indeed increase the fluctuations of the methane fuel obviously.The evolutions of pulsating flame therefore develop faster than the continuous impinging flame.The optimized pulating frequencies are near 9 to 11 hz from the Re=170 to 283.The temperature differences between that under optimized pulsating rate and full open condition(no pulsation)are ranging from 100 to 150 degree.The pulsating effect is more singnificant at low Reynolds number.The cross section of continuous impinging flame behaves as elliptic shape with axial ratio equals to 2/3.The tip of the impinging flame obviously crosses at 42mm above the impinging point.ecause of the phenomenon of pulsation flame,the flame sheet or flame front may not be identified clearly in the averaged temperature contours.Results shows that the averaged end-contour of pulsation flame rears at 38mm above the impinging point.By observation and experiment,the pulsating flame behaves more stable and efficient than the continuous impinging flame.

  13. Turbulent Oxygen Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Aspden, A J; Woosley, S E; 10.1088/0004-637X/730/2/144

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies, we examined turbulence-flame interactions in carbon-burning thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae. In this study, we consider turbulence-flame interactions in the trailing oxygen flames. The two aims of the paper are to examine the response of the inductive oxygen flame to intense levels of turbulence, and to explore the possibility of transition to detonation in the oxygen flame. Scaling arguments analogous to the carbon flames are presented and then compared against three-dimensional simulations for a range of Damk\\"ohler numbers ($\\Da_{16}$) at a fixed Karlovitz number. The simulations suggest that turbulence does not significantly affect the oxygen flame when $\\Da_{16}1$, turbulence enhances heat transfer and drives the propagation of a flame that is {\\em narrower} than the corresponding inductive flame would be. Furthermore, burning under these conditions appears to occur as part of a combined carbon-oxygen turbulent flame with complex compound structure. The simulations do not ...

  14. Sooting limit of a double diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Michio; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Nishiki, Nobuhiko (Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Sendai, Japan Sony Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-07-25

    The soot exhaust from the flame of pot type burner for the domestic heating use was basically studied. Inside a fuel (secondary) diffusion flame in air atmosphere, which was an ordinary diffusion flame, an air (primary) diffusion flame in fuel atmosphere, which was reverse in relation between them, was formed by using propane fuel. For the sooting limit of that double diffusion flame, the effect of primary air ratio, distance between primary and secondary flames, thermal condition on wall surface and flow stretch being investigated by use of three different types of burner, the double diffusion flame method was studied in effectiveness on the soot exhaust and known to heighten the control against it, which heightening however depended in degree upon the locative relation between both the flames. The control was more heightened with a more lengthening in the secondary flame. Because the sooting limit is governed by the secondary flame temperature, the establishment of condition so as to heighten the flame temperature is necessary for the effective control against the soot exhaust. 11 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Flex-flame burner and combustion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soupos, Vasilios; Zelepouga, Serguei; Rue, David M.; Abbasi, Hamid A.

    2010-08-24

    A combustion method and apparatus which produce a hybrid flame for heating metals and metal alloys, which hybrid flame has the characteristic of having an oxidant-lean portion proximate the metal or metal alloy and having an oxidant-rich portion disposed above the oxidant lean portion. This hybrid flame is produced by introducing fuel and primary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber containing the metal or metal alloy in a substoichiometric ratio to produce a fuel-rich flame and by introducing a secondary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber above the fuel-rich flame in a manner whereby mixing of the secondary combustion oxidant with the fuel-rich flame is delayed for a portion of the length of the flame.

  16. Triple-flame propagation against a Poiseuille flow in a channel with porous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Malki, Faisal; Daou, Joel

    2013-12-01

    We present an essentially numerical study of triple-flame propagation in a non-strained two-dimensional mixing layer against a Poiseuille flow, within a thermo-diffusive model. The aim of the study is twofold. First, to examine the recent analytical findings derived in the asymptotic limit of infinite Zeldovich number β for flame fronts thin compared with their typical radius of curvature and to extend these to finite-values of β. Second, to gain insight into the influence of the flow on the flame in situations where the flame in not necessarily thin, as assumed analytically. The study has focused on the effect of two main non-dimensional parameters on flame propagation, namely the flow amplitude A and the flame-front thickness ε. For moderate values of A, the flow is found to have a negligible effect on the structure of the flame, while modifying its speed by an amount proportional to A, in agreement with the asymptotic findings. Two new qualitative behaviours are found however. The first is obtained for sufficiently large values of A where the flow is shown to modify the flame structure significantly for small values of ε; more precisely, the concavity of the triple-flame front is found to turn towards the unburnt gas for A larger than a critical value. This inversion of the front curvature, which cannot be captured by the infinitely-large β asymptotic study, is found to be intimately linked to the finite values of β, which are necessarily found in any realistic model or computational study. The second new behaviour, which is also obtained for small ε, is the existence of termination-points on the flame front, or flame-tips. These termination-points are shown to exist for ε ≪ 1 only if A takes on positive values of order unity or larger; in particular they are absent for thin triple-flames without the presence of a non-uniform flow field. Furthermore, several additional novel contributions are made in the present context of triple-flame interaction with

  17. A flame particle tracking analysis of turbulence–chemistry interaction in hydrogen–air premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2015-11-21

    Interactions of turbulence, molecular transport, and energy transport, coupled with chemistry play a crucial role in the evolution of flame surface geometry, propagation, annihilation, and local extinction/re-ignition characteristics of intensely turbulent premixed flames. This study seeks to understand how these interactions affect flame surface annihilation of lean hydrogen–air premixed turbulent flames. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are conducted at different parametric conditions with a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties for hydrogen–air flames. Flame particle tracking (FPT) technique is used to follow specific flame surface segments. An analytical expression for the local displacement flame speed (Sd) of a temperature isosurface is considered, and the contributions of transport, chemistry, and kinematics on the displacement flame speed at different turbulence-flame interaction conditions are identified. In general, the displacement flame speed for the flame particles is found to increase with time for all conditions considered. This is because, eventually all flame surfaces and their resident flame particles approach annihilation by reactant island formation at the end of stretching and folding processes induced by turbulence. Statistics of principal curvature evolving in time, obtained using FPT, suggest that these islands are ellipsoidal on average enclosing fresh reactants. Further examinations show that the increase in Sd is caused by the increased negative curvature of the flame surface and eventual homogenization of temperature gradients as these reactant islands shrink due to flame propagation and turbulent mixing. Finally, the evolution of the normalized, averaged, displacement flame speed vs. stretch Karlovitz number are found to collapse on a narrow band, suggesting that a unified description of flame speed dependence on stretch rate may be possible in the Lagrangian description.

  18. 基于二阶矩封闭湍流模型的非预混湍流火焰的数值模拟%Modelling of Turbulent Nonpremixed CH4/H2 Flame Using Second-Moment Turbulence Closure Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国岫

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent nonpremixed CH.J/H2 flame has been simulated using several typical differential second-moment turbulence closure (SMTC) models. To clarify the applicability of the various models, the LRR-IP model, JM model, SSG model as well as two modified LRR-IP models were tested. Some of above-mentioned SMTC models cannot provide the overall satisfactory predictions of this challenging case. It is confirmed again that the standard LRR-IP model considerably overpredict the centerline velocity decay rate, and therefore performs not well. Also it is interesting to observe that the JM model does not perform well in this challenging test case, although it has already been proved successful in other cases. The SSG model produces quite satisfactory prediction and performs equally well or better than the two modified LRR-IP models in the reacting case. It can be concluded that the modified LRR-IP models as well as the SSG model are superior to the other SMTC models in the turbulent nonpremixed CH4/H2 flame.

  19. Microgravity experiments and numerical studies on ethanol/air spray flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimothée, Romain; Chauveau, Christian; Halter, Fabien; Nicoli, Colette; Haldenwang, Pierre; Denet, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Spray flames are known to exhibit amazing features in comparison with single-phase flames. The weightless situation offers the conditions in which the spray characteristics can be well controlled before and during combustion. The article reports on a joint experimental/numerical work that concerns ethanol/air spray flames observed in a spherical chamber using the condensation technique of expansion cooling (based on the Wilson cloud chamber principle), under microgravity. We describe the experimental set-up and give details on the creation of a homogeneous and nearly monosized aerosol. Different optical diagnostics are employed successfully to measure the relevant parameters of two-phase combustion. A classical shadowgraphy system is used to track the flame speed propagation and allow us to observe the flame front instability. The complete characterization of the aerosol is performed with a laser diffraction particle size analyser by measuring the droplet diameter and the droplet density number, just before ignition. A laser tomography device allows us to measure the temporal evolution of the droplet displacement during flame propagation, as well as to identify the presence of droplets in the burnt gases. The numerical modelling is briefly recalled. In particular, spray-flame propagation is schematized by the combustion spread in a 2-D lattice of fuel droplets surrounded by an initial gaseous mixture of fuel vapour and air. In its spherical expansion, the spray flame presents a corrugated front pattern, while the equivalent single-phase flame does not. From a numerical point of view, the same phenomena of wrinkles are also observed in the simulations. The front pattern pointed out by the numerical approach is identified as of Darrieus-Landau (DL) type. The droplets are found to trigger the instability. Then, we quantitatively compare experimental data with numerical predictions on spray-flame speed. The experimental results show that the spray-flame speed is of the

  20. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  1. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  2. The initial development of a tulip flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matalon, M.; Mcgreevy, J.L. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The initial development of a ``tulip flame``, often observed during flame propagation in closed tubes, is attributed to a combustion instability. The roles of hydrodynamic and of the diffusional-thermal processes on the onset of instability are investigated through a linear stability analysis in which the growth or decay of small disturbances, superimposed on an otherwise smooth and planar flame front, are followed. A range of the Markstein parameter, related to the mixture composition through an appropriately defined Lewis number, has been identified where a tulip flame could be observed. For a given value of the Markstein parameter within this range, a critical wavelength is identified as the most unstable mode. This wavelength is directly related to the minimal aspect ratio of the tube where a tulip flame could be observed. The time of onset of instability is identified as the time when the most unstable disturbance, associated with the critical wavelength, grows at a faster rate than the flame front itself and exceeds a certain threshold. This occurs after the flame has propagated a certain distance down the tube: a value which has been explicitly determined in terms of the relevant parameters. Experimental records on the tulip flame phenomenon support the finding of the analysis. That is, the tulip flame forms after the flame has traveled half the tube`s length, it does not form in short tubes, and its formation depends on the mixture composition and on the initial pressure in the tube.

  3. Quantifying acoustic damping using flame chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujo, E.; Denisov, A.; Schuermans, B.; Noiray, N.

    2016-12-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities in gas turbines and aeroengine combustors falls within the category of complex systems. They can be described phenomenologically using nonlinear stochastic differential equations, which constitute the grounds for output-only model-based system identification. It has been shown recently that one can extract the governing parameters of the instabilities, namely the linear growth rate and the nonlinear component of the thermoacoustic feedback, using dynamic pressure time series only. This is highly relevant for practical systems, which cannot be actively controlled due to a lack of cost-effective actuators. The thermoacoustic stability is given by the linear growth rate, which results from the combination of the acoustic damping and the coherent feedback from the flame. In this paper, it is shown that it is possible to quantify the acoustic damping of the system, and thus to separate its contribution to the linear growth rate from the one of the flame. This is achieved by post-processing in a simple way simultaneously acquired chemiluminescence and acoustic pressure data. It provides an additional approach to further unravel from observed time series the key mechanisms governing the system dynamics. This straightforward method is illustrated here using experimental data from a combustion chamber operated at several linearly stable and unstable operating conditions.

  4. Ultra long-term simulation by the integrated model. 1. Framework and energy system module; Togo model ni yoru tanchoki simulation. 1. Flame work to energy system module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, A.; Yagita, H.; Yanagisawa, Y. [Research Inst. of Innovative Technology for the Earth, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    This paper introduces the study on the ultra long-term energy model `GRAPE` with considering global environment and the results of trial calculation. The GRAPE model is to consist of modules of energy system, climate change, change of land use, food demand/supply, macro economy, and environmental impact. This is a model that divides the world into ten regions, gives 1990 as a base year, and enables the ultra long-term simulation. In this time, emission of carbon is calculated as a trial. In the case of constrained quantity of carbon emission, energy supply in the latter half of 21st century is to compose photovoltaic energy, methanol from coal gasification, and biomass energy. In addition, the shear of nuclear energy is to remarkably increase. For the constitution of power generation, IGCC power generation with carbon recovery, wind power generation, photovoltaic power generation, and nuclear power generation are to extend their shears. In the case of constrained concentration of carbon emission, structural change of power generation option is to be delayed compared with the case of constrained quantity of carbon emission. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Ultra long-term simulation by the integrated model. 1. Framework and energy system module; Togo model ni yoru tanchoki simulation. 1. Flame work to energy system module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, A.; Yagita, H.; Yanagisawa, Y. [Research Inst. of Innovative Technology for the Earth, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    This paper introduces the study on the ultra long-term energy model `GRAPE` with considering global environment and the results of trial calculation. The GRAPE model is to consist of modules of energy system, climate change, change of land use, food demand/supply, macro economy, and environmental impact. This is a model that divides the world into ten regions, gives 1990 as a base year, and enables the ultra long-term simulation. In this time, emission of carbon is calculated as a trial. In the case of constrained quantity of carbon emission, energy supply in the latter half of 21st century is to compose photovoltaic energy, methanol from coal gasification, and biomass energy. In addition, the shear of nuclear energy is to remarkably increase. For the constitution of power generation, IGCC power generation with carbon recovery, wind power generation, photovoltaic power generation, and nuclear power generation are to extend their shears. In the case of constrained concentration of carbon emission, structural change of power generation option is to be delayed compared with the case of constrained quantity of carbon emission. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Flame Propagation Through Concentration Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunyaIINO; MitsuakiTANABE; 等

    2000-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in homogeneous propane-air mixture and in several concentration gradient of mixture.Igniter is put on the upper side of the combustion chamber,In concentration gradient experiment.ixture was ignited from lean side.An experimental study was conducted in a combustion chamber.The combustion chamber has glass windows for optical measurements at any side.For the measurement of distribution of fuel concentration,infraed absorption method using 3.39μm He-Ne laser was used,and for the observation of proagating flams,Schlieren method was employed.As a measurment result of flame propagation velocity and flammable limit,for a mixture of an identical local equivalence ratio.flame propagation velocity in concentration gradient is faster than that in homogeneous mixture,and rich flammable limit in concentration gradient shows a tendency to be higher than that in homogeneous mixture.

  7. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  8. Periodontal Manifestations of Chronic Atypical Neutrophilic Dermatosis With Lipodystrophy and Elevated Temperature (CANDLE) Syndrome in an 11 Year Old Patient

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna, Gerald J; Ziada, Hassan M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) is an auto inflammatory syndrome caused by an autosomal recessive gene mutation. This very rare syndrome has been reported in only 14 patients worldwide. A number of clinical signs have been reported including joint contractures, muscle atrophy, microcytic anaemia, and panniculitis-induced childhood lipodystrophy. Further symptoms include recurrent fevers, purpuric skin lesions, periorb...

  9. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  10. “晨举脂烛”解诂%Gloss and Emendation on“Holding Candles at Dawn”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李朝虹

    2014-01-01

    描述武王克商的“晨举脂烛”一语多次出现在典籍中,而现代辞书对“晨”的解释基本统一为日出前后天色已明的一段时间,此时仍“举脂烛”作战实在令人费解。经过考证,“晨”在古汉语中的时段是凌晨3-5点,天仍未亮,因此才会出现“晨举脂烛”作战一说。%The phrase“holding candles at dawn” appeared many times in the ancient books when describing King Wu’s fights with King Shang .However ,in different modern dictionaries and works ,“dawn” is always explained as the time around sunrise when the sky is already wide bright .It is strange to “hold candles to fight enemy at the sunrise” .By analyzing historical documents ,it is found that the time of “dawn” refers to the early morning around 3-5 o’clock .Thus ,“holding candles at daw n” holds w ater .

  11. Effect of Soret diffusion on lean hydrogen/air flames at normal and elevated pressure and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhen

    2017-04-12

    The influence of Soret diffusion on lean premixed flames propagating in hydrogen/air mixtures is numerically investigated with a detailed chemical and transport models at normal and elevated pressure and temperature. The Soret diffusion influence on the one-dimensional (1D) flame mass burning rate and two-dimensional (2D) flame propagating characteristics is analysed, revealing a strong dependency on flame stretch rate, pressure and temperature. For 1D flames, at normal pressure and temperature, with an increase of Karlovitz number from 0 to 0.4, the mass burning rate is first reduced and then enhanced by Soret diffusion of H2 while it is reduced by Soret diffusion of H. The influence of Soret diffusion of H2 is enhanced by pressure and reduced by temperature. On the contrary, the influence of Soret diffusion of H is reduced by pressure and enhanced by temperature. For 2D flames, at normal pressure and temperature, during the early phase of flame evolution, flames with Soret diffusion display more curved flame cells. Pressure enhances this effect, while temperature reduces it. The influence of Soret diffusion of H2 on the global consumption speed is enhanced at elevated pressure. The influence of Soret diffusion of H on the global consumption speed is enhanced at elevated temperature. The flame evolution is more affected by Soret diffusion in the early phase of propagation than in the long run due to the local enrichment of H2 caused by flame curvature effects. The present study provides new insights into the Soret diffusion effect on the characteristics of lean hydrogen/air flames at conditions that are relevant to practical applications, e.g. gas engines and turbines.

  12. Study of low-pressure premixed laminar n-heptane+ propane/oxygen/nitrogen flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wu; WEI LiXia; MA ZhiHao; HUANG ZuoHua; YUAN Tao; TIAN ZhenYu; LI YuYang

    2009-01-01

    Low-pressure premixed laminar n-heptane+propane/oxygen/nitrogen flames were investigated with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam sampling mass spectrometry. Three flames with different mass percentage of propane in the fuel blends of 0%, 10%, and 20% were studied. The combustion intermediates were identified by comparing the measured IEs with those values in literatures. Mole fraction profiles of the main species were compared among the three flames. The experimental results provide detailed data in understanding the combustion of n-heptane and n-heptane/propane blends in engine. They are also helpful in establishing and verifying the kinetic models.

  13. Numerical simulation of excess-enthalpy combustion flame propagation of coal mine methane in ceramic foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the assumption of a local non-equilibrium of heat transfer between a solid matrix and gas,a mathematic model of coal mine methane combustion in a porous medium was established,as well the solid-gas boundary conditions.We simulated numerically the flame propagation characteristics.The results show that the flame velocity in ceramic foam is higher than that of free laminar flows;the maximum flame velocity depends on the combined effects of a radiation extinction coefficient and convection heat transf...

  14. Comparative Analysis of Flame Characteristics of Castor Oil and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flame Retardants Used in Polyurethane Foam Systems. Polycarp .O. Ikeh ... such as ignition time, flame propagation rate, after glow, char rate, add-on and glow time. These properties .... hours before the flame test to ensure complete curing.

  15. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  16. Hydroxyl time series and recirculation in turbulent nonpremixed swirling flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttenfelder, Walter A.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Ji, Jun; King, Galen B.; Gore, Jay P. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1288 (United States); Renfro, Michael W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3139 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    Time-series measurements of OH, as related to accompanying flow structures, are reported using picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (PITLIF) and particle-imaging velocimetry (PIV) for turbulent, swirling, nonpremixed methane-air flames. The [OH] data portray a primary reaction zone surrounding the internal recirculation zone, with residual OH in the recirculation zone approaching chemical equilibrium. Modeling of the OH electronic quenching environment, when compared to fluorescence lifetime measurements, offers additional evidence that the reaction zone burns as a partially premixed flame. A time-series analysis affirms the presence of thin flamelet-like regions based on the relation between swirl-induced turbulence and fluctuations of [OH] in the reaction and recirculation zones. The OH integral time-scales are found to correspond qualitatively to local mean velocities. Furthermore, quantitative dependencies can be established with respect to axial position, Reynolds number, and global equivalence ratio. Given these relationships, the OH time-scales, and thus the primary reaction zone, appear to be dominated by convection-driven fluctuations. Surprisingly, the OH time-scales for these nominally swirling flames demonstrate significant similarities to previous PITLIF results in nonpremixed jet flames. (author)

  17. Advanced monitoring of industrial burners based on fluctuating flame signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sanz; J. Ballester; R. Hernandez; L.M. Cerecedo [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain). Fluid Mechanics Group/LITEC

    2008-06-15

    The present work explores the potential of pressure and radiation sensors for the advanced monitoring/control of industrial flames. These instruments are rugged, non-intrusive and non-expensive and might be used in routine plant operation to obtain direct information from the flame. However, further research is needed to assess the existence of relationships among their outputs and operating conditions as well as to define suitable methods for signal processing. Those aspects have been addressed by means of a thorough experimental programme in a model industrial burner. Parametric analysis of flame signals recorded for a broad range of operating conditions revealed that they varied widely with the actual combustion state. In order to perform a systematic study, different correlation techniques were tried. Multiple regression methods provided some insight into mutual influences among different variables, although only in case of linear dependences. Artificial neural networks have been used as a more versatile type of algorithms, suitable for complex functional forms between input and output variables. Remarkably good results were obtained when NOx emissions or some burner settings were estimated from selected features of the flame signals, supporting their applicability for the development of advanced diagnostic methods in combustion processes. 40 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Understanding premixed flame chemistry of gasoline fuels by comparing quantities of interest

    KAUST Repository

    Selim, Hatem

    2016-07-23

    Gasoline fuels are complex mixtures that vary in composition depending on crude oil feedstocks and refining processes. Gasoline combustion in high-speed spark ignition engines is governed by flame propagation, so understanding fuel composition effects on premixed flame chemistry is important. In this study, the combustion chemistry of low-pressure, burner-stabilized, premixed flames of two gasoline fuels was investigated under stoichiometric conditions. Flame speciation was conducted using vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron photoionization time-of-flight molecular beam mass spectroscopy. Stable end-products, intermediate hydrocarbons, and free radicals were detected and quantified. In addition, several isomeric species in the reaction pool were distinguished and quantified with the help of the highly tunable synchrotron radiation. A comparison between the products of both flames is presented and the major differences are highlighted. Premixed flame numerical simulations were conducted using surrogate fuel kinetic models for each flame. Furthermore, a new approach was developed to elucidate the main discrepancies between experimental measurements and the numerical predictions by comparing quantities of interest. © 2016.

  19. Asymptotic Analysis of Transport Properties and Burning Velocities for Premixed Hydrocarbon Flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Y. Law; H.K. Ma

    2001-01-01

    Based on premixed flame, the theoretical model of transport properties with temperature variation was established inside a preheated zone. Lewis number of the deficient-to-stoichiometric hydrocarbon/air mixture has been theoretically predicted over a wide range of preheated temperature. These predictions are compared with the experimental data on transport properties that exist in the literature. The response of the burning velocity to flame stretch can be parameterized by the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. Therefore, if the laminar flame speed and Markstein number could be accurately simulated by using an analytic expression of characterized temperature, equivalence ratio, and Lewis number, the results are applicable to the prediction of methane,acetylene, ethylene, ethane, and propane flames. Expanding previous studies on the extinction ofpremixed flames under the influence of stretch and incomplete reaction, the results were further classified and rescaled. Finally, it could be inferred that parameter Pq, the rescaled extinction Karlovitz number could be used to explain the degree of flame quench.

  20. Constraining cosmological parameters when taking into account the distribution of candles

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Y P; Dong, Y M; Zhang, F W; Li, H Z; Jia, L W; Mao, L S; Lu, R J; Yi, T F; Cui, X H; Zhang, Z B; Qin, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Dong, Yun-Ming; Zhang, Fu-Wen; Li, Huai-Zhen; Jia, Lan-Wei; Mao, Li-Sheng; Lu, Rui-Jing; Yi, Ting-Feng; Cui, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Bin

    2005-01-01

    We study in detail the effect of the distribution of cosmological candles. First,we propose to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation to check if the hypothesis that there is not a distribution of the deduced relative luminosity distance moduli of a sample, when the measurement uncertainty is negligible, is true. If there exists such a distribution, the statistic chi2 cannot be defined since the distribution itself is unclear. Second, we suggest replacing the conventional minimizing chi2 2 method with the least square method to find the best estimated cosmological parameters due to this definition problem. Once the cosmological parameters are determined with the least square method, the bare distribution (the intrinsic distribution which is independent of the measurement uncertainty)can be estimated and then a lower and upper limits of chi2 can be determined. With these two extreme values of chi2,we are able to make the confidence contour plot in the conventional way. In addition to the gold SN Ia sample and the GR...

  1. Design Study of Small Pb-Bi Cooled Modified Candle Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this study application of modified CANDLE burnup scheme based long life Pb-Bi Cooled Fast Reactors for small long life reactors with natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. The reactor cores are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2, and 10 years after that it is shifted to region 3. This concept is applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of I'th region into I+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The first region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. Compared to the previous works, in a smaller reactor core the criticality need to be considered more carefully especially at the beginning of life. As an optimized design, a core of 85 cm radius and 150 cm height with 300 MWt power are selected. This core can be operated 10 years without refueling or fuel shuffling. The average discharge burn-up is 350 GWd/ton HM.

  2. Safety Analysis of Pb-208 Cooled 800 MWt Modified CANDLE Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Widiawati, Nina; Sekimoto, H.; Artoto, A.

    2017-01-01

    Safely analysis of 800MWt Pb-208 cooled fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input employing axial-radial combined Modiified CANDLE burnup scheme has been performed. The analysis of unprotected loss of flow(ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient overpower (UTOP) are discussed. Some simulations for 800 MWt Pb-208 cooled fast reactors has been performed and the results show that the reactor can anticipate complete pumping failure inherently by reducing power through reactivity feedback and remove the rest of heat through natural circulations. Compared to the Pb-nat cooled long life Fast Reactors, Pb-208 cooled reactors have smaller Doppler but higher coolant density reactivity coefficient. In the UTOP accident case the analysis has been performed against external reactivity up to 0.003dk/k. And for ULOHS case it is assumed that the secondary cooling system has broken. During all accident the cladding temperature is the most critical. Especially for the case of UTOP accident. In addition the steam generator design has also consider excess power which may reach 50% extra during severe UTOP case..

  3. Flame dynamics of a meso-scale heat recirculating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The dynamics of premixed propane-air flame in a meso-scale ceramic combustor has been examined here. The flame characteristics in the combustor were examined by measuring the acoustic emissions and preheat temperatures together with high-speed cinematography. For the small-scale combustor, the volume to surface area ratio is small and hence the walls have significant effect on the global flame structure, flame location and flame dynamics. In addition to the flame-wall thermal coupling there is a coupling between flame and acoustics in the case of confined flames. Flame-wall thermal interactions lead to low frequency flame fluctuations ({proportional_to}100 Hz) depending upon the thermal response of the wall. However, the flame-acoustic interactions can result in a wide range of flame fluctuations ranging from few hundred Hz to few kHz. Wall temperature distribution is one of the factors that control the amount of reactant preheating which in turn effects the location of flame stabilization. Acoustic emission signals and high-speed flame imaging confirmed that for the present case flame-acoustic interactions have more significant effect on flame dynamics. Based on the acoustic emissions, five different flame regimes have been identified; whistling/harmonic mode, rich instability mode, lean instability mode, silent mode and pulsating flame mode. (author)

  4. Unsteady planar diffusion flames: Ignition, travel, burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendell, F.; Wu, F.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, a thin planar diffusion flame is created and thenceforth travels so that the flame is situated at all times at an interface at which the hydrogen and oxygen meet in stoichiometric proportion. If the initial amount of hydrogen is deficient relative to the initial amount of oxygen, then the planar flame will travel further and further into the half volume initially containing hydrogen, until the hydrogen is (virtually) fully depleted. Of course, when the amount of residual hydrogen becomes small, the diffusion flame is neither vigorous nor thin; in practice, the flame is extinguished before the hydrogen is fully depleted, owing to the finite rate of the actual chemical-kinetic mechanism. The rate of travel of the hydrogen-air diffusion flame is much slower than the rate of laminar flame propagation through a hydrogen-air mixture. This slow travel facilitates diagnostic detection of the flame position as a function of time, but the slow travel also means that the time to burnout (extinction) probably far exceeds the testing time (typically, a few seconds) available in earth-sited facilities for microgravity-environment experiments. We undertake an analysis to predict (1) the position and temperature of the diffusion flame as a function of time, (2) the time at which extinction of the diffusion flame occurs, and (3) the thickness of quench layers formed on side walls (i.e., on lateral boundaries, with normal vectors parallel to the diffusion-flame plane), and whether, prior to extinction, water vapor formed by burning will condense on these cold walls.

  5. Tulip flames: changes in shape of premixed flames propagating in closed tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R. F.

    The experimental results that are the subject of this communication provide high-speed schlieren images of the closed-tube flame shape that has come to be known as the tulip flame. The schlieren images, along with in-chamber pressure records, help demonstrate the effects of chamber length, equivalence ratio, and igniter geometry on formation of the tulip flame. The pressure/time records show distinct features which correlate with flame shape changes during the transition to tulip. The measurements indicate that the basic tulip flame formation is a robust phenomenon that depends on little except the overall geometry of the combustion vessel.

  6. CONTROL OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS IN NATURAL GAS DIFFUSION FLAMES BY USING CASCADE BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ala Qubbaj

    2001-12-30

    The goal of this exploratory research project is to control the pollutant emissions of diffusion flames by modifying the air infusion rate into the flame. The modification was achieved by installing a cascade of venturis around the burning gas jet. The basic idea behind this technique is controlling the stoichiometry of the flame through changing the flow dynamics and rates of mixing in the combustion zone with a set of venturis surrounding the flame. A natural gas jet diffusion flame at burner-exit Reynolds number of 5100 was examined with a set of venturis of specific sizes and spacing arrangement. The thermal and composition fields of the baseline and venturi-cascaded flames were numerically simulated using CFD-ACE+, an advanced computational environment software package. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The concentration of NO was determined through CFD-POST, a post processing utility program for CFD-ACE+. The numerical results showed that, in the near-burner, midflame and far-burner regions, the venturi-cascaded flame had lower temperature by an average of 13%, 19% and 17%, respectively, and lower CO{sub 2} concentration by 35%, 37% and 32%, respectively, than the baseline flame. An opposite trend was noticed for O{sub 2} concentration; the cascaded flame has higher O{sub 2} concentration by 7%, 26% and 44%, in average values, in the near-burner, mid-flame and far-burner regions, respectively, than in the baseline case. The results also showed that, in the near-burner, mid-flame, and far-burner regions, the venturi-cascaded flame has lower NO concentrations by 89%, 70% and 70%, in average values, respectively, compared to the baseline case. The numerical results substantiate that venturi-cascading is a feasible method for controlling the pollutant emissions of a burning gas jet. In addition, the numerical results were useful to understand the thermo-chemical processes involved. The results showed that the prompt-NO mechanism

  7. Nonlinear hydrodynamic and thermoacoustic oscillations of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Yik; Li, Larry Kin Bong; Juniper, Matthew P.; Cant, Robert Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flames often experience thermoacoustic instabilities when the combustion heat release rate is in phase with acoustic pressure fluctuations. Linear methods often assume a priori that oscillations are periodic and occur at a dominant frequency with a fixed amplitude. Such assumptions are not made when using nonlinear analysis. When an oscillation is fully saturated, nonlinear analysis can serve as a useful avenue to reveal flame behaviour far more elaborate than period-one limit cycles, including quasi-periodicity and chaos in hydrodynamically or thermoacoustically self-excited system. In this paper, the behaviour of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed propane/air flame in a model jet-engine afterburner configuration is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is found to be appropriate. Combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic closure for the flame surface density. The results are validated by comparison with existing experimental data and with large eddy simulation, and the observed self-excited oscillations in pressure and heat release are studied using methods derived from dynamical systems theory. A systematic analysis is carried out by increasing the equivalence ratio of the reactant stream supplied to the premixed flame. A strong variation in the global flame structure is observed. The flame exhibits a self-excited hydrodynamic oscillation at low equivalence ratios, becomes steady as the equivalence ratio is increased to intermediate values, and again exhibits a self-excited thermoacoustic oscillation at higher equivalence ratios. Rich nonlinear behaviour is observed and the investigation demonstrates that turbulent premixed flames can exhibit complex dynamical behaviour including quasiperiodicity, limit cycles and period-two limit cycles due to the interactions of various

  8. Numerical Study on Laminar Burning Velocity and Flame Stability of Premixed Methane/Ethylene/Air Flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珊珊; 蒋勇; 邱榕; 安江涛

    2012-01-01

    A numerical study on premixed methane/ethylene/air flames with various ethylene fractions and equivalence ratios was conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effects of ethylene addition on laminar burning velocity, flame structure and flame stability under the condition of lean burning were investigated. The results show that the laminar burning velocity increases with ethylene fraction, especially at a large equivalence ratio. More ethylene addition gives rise to higher concentrations of H, O and OH radicals in the flame, which significantly promotes chemical reactions, and a linear correlation exists between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum H + OH concentration in the reaction zone. With the increase of ethylene fraction, the adiabatic flame temperature is raised, while the inner layer temperature becomes lower, contributing to the enhancement of combustion. Markstein length and Markstein number, representative of the flame stability, increase as more ethylene is added, indicating the tendency of flame stability to improve with ethylene addition.

  9. Physical and Chemical Processing in Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    than the classical Troe formula, and the development of a Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis ( CEMA ) computation algorithm that allows on-the-fly...6-311++G(d,p) method. 3. Flame Stabilization and Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis ( CEMA ) Flame stabilization is essential in the understanding of

  10. Development of PIV for Microgravity Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Wernet, Mark P.; Yanis, William; Urban, David L.; Sunderland, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) to the overfire region of a laminar gas jet diffusion flame in normal gravity. A methane flame burning in air at 0.98 bar was considered. The apparatus demonstrated here is packaged in a drop rig designed for use in the 2.2 second drop tower.

  11. Flaming in CMC: Prometheus' Fire or Inferno's?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Zsuzsanna Ittzes

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a descriptive study with 75 intermediate college learners of German participating in two sessions of synchronous computer mediated communication during the course of a semester that investigated students' flaming behavior--aggressive interpersonal language and rude behavior. Shows that not only is flaming a very infrequent occurrence,…

  12. Flame retardant cotton barrier nonwovens for mattresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to regulation CPSC 16 CFR 1633, every new residential mattress sold in the United States since July 2007 must resist ignition by open flame. An environmentally benign “green”, inexpensive way to meet this regulation is to use a low-cost flame retardant (FR) barrier fabric. In this study, a...

  13. Flame retardant cotton based highloft nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flame retardancy has been a serious bottleneck to develop cotton blended very high specific volume bulky High loft fabrics. Alternately, newer approach to produce flame retardant cotton blended High loft fabrics must be employed that retain soft feel characteristics desirable of furnishings. Hence, ...

  14. Flaming in CMC: Prometheus' Fire or Inferno's?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Zsuzsanna Ittzes

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a descriptive study with 75 intermediate college learners of German participating in two sessions of synchronous computer mediated communication during the course of a semester that investigated students' flaming behavior--aggressive interpersonal language and rude behavior. Shows that not only is flaming a very infrequent occurrence,…

  15. Physical and Chemical Processes in Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ RTE Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research...two-year subject program, conducted through tight coupling between experiment, theory and computation, and reported in high impact journal articles ...The thrust for this program constitutes of three major areas of turbulent combustion: (1) Flame surface statistics , (2) Flame-turbulence interaction

  16. Edge Diffusion Flame Propagation and Stabilization Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2004-01-01

    In most practical combustion systems or fires, fuel and air are initially unmixed, thus forming diffusion flames. As a result of flame-surface interactions, the diffusion flame often forms an edge, which may attach to burner walls, spread over condensed fuel surfaces, jump to another location through the fuel-air mixture formed, or extinguish by destabilization (blowoff). Flame holding in combustors is necessary to achieve design performance and safe operation of the system. Fires aboard spacecraft behave differently from those on Earth because of the absence of buoyancy in microgravity. This ongoing in-house flame-stability research at the NASA Glenn Research Center is important in spacecraft fire safety and Earth-bound combustion systems.

  17. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  18. Soot formation, transport, and radiation in unsteady diffusion flames : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Jensen, Kirk A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Blevins, Linda Gail; Kearney, Sean Patrick (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    Fires pose the dominant risk to the safety and security of nuclear weapons, nuclear transport containers, and DOE and DoD facilities. The thermal hazard from these fires primarily results from radiant emission from high-temperature flame soot. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the local transport and chemical phenomena that determine the distributions of soot concentration, optical properties, and temperature in order to develop and validate constitutive models for large-scale, high-fidelity fire simulations. This report summarizes the findings of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project devoted to obtaining the critical experimental information needed to develop such constitutive models. A combination of laser diagnostics and extractive measurement techniques have been employed in both steady and pulsed laminar diffusion flames of methane, ethylene, and JP-8 surrogate burning in air. For methane and ethylene, both slot and coannular flame geometries were investigated, as well as normal and inverse diffusion flame geometries. For the JP-8 surrogate, coannular normal diffusion flames were investigated. Soot concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals, hydroxyl radical (OH) LIF, acetylene and water vapor concentrations, soot zone temperatures, and the velocity field were all successfully measured in both steady and unsteady versions of these various flames. In addition, measurements were made of the soot microstructure, soot dimensionless extinction coefficient (&), and the local radiant heat flux. Taken together, these measurements comprise a unique, extensive database for future development and validation of models of soot formation, transport, and radiation.

  19. Bounds for the propagation speed of combustion flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, Joaquim [Departament de FIsica, Universitat de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Campos, Daniel [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Departament de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Gonzalez, Josep R [Grup de Mecanica de Fluids, Departament d' Enginyeria Mecanica, Universitat de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Velayos, Joaquim [Grup de Mecanica de Fluids, Departament d' Enginyeria Mecanica, Universitat de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2004-07-23

    We focus on a combustion model for premixed flames based on two coupled equations determining the spatial dynamics of temperature and fuel density. We rewrite these equations as a classical reaction-diffusion model, so that we can apply some known methods for the prediction of lower and upper bounds to the front speed. The predictions are compared to simulations, which show that our new bounds substantially improve those following from the linearization method, used in the previous work of Fort et al (2000 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 33 6953). Radiative losses lead to pulses rather than fronts. We find a bound for their speed which (in contrast to the linearization one) correctly predicts the order of magnitude of the flame speed.

  20. Cool Sooting Flames of Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.A. MANSUROV

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and paramagnetism of soot particles sampled from cool sooting flames of methane and propane in a separately-heated two-sectional reactor under atmospheric pressure at the reactor temperatures of 670-1170 K. The temperature profiles of the flames were studied. The sampling was carried out with a quartz sampler and the samples were frozen with liquid nitrogen. A number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene, fluoranthene, coronene, anthanthrene, 1,12-benzperylene,were identified by spectroscopic methods in the extract of soot. The processes of soot formation at methaneoxygen mixture combustion in the electric field with applied potential changed from 0 to 2,2 kV at different polarity of electrodes have been investigated. It has been stated that at the electrical field application, an increase in soot particle sizes and soot yield occurs; besides, at the application of the field, speeding up the positively charged particles, the interplanar distance decreases. On the basis of investigation of soot particles paramagnetism, it was shown that initially soot particles have high carcinogetic activity and pollute the environment owing to a rapid decrease of the number of these radical centers. The reduction of the radical concentration is connected with radical recombination on soot.

  1. Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the thermal degradation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene and xylene-para) in methane flames; Etude experimentale et modelisation cinetique de la degradation thermique des composes organiques volatils aromatiques benzenes, toluene et para-xylene dans des flammes de methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, L.

    2001-02-01

    This study treats of the thermal degradation of a family of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in laminar premixed methane flames at low pressure. The experimental influence of benzene, toluene and xylene-para on the structure of a reference methane flame has been studied. The molar fraction profiles of the stable and reactive, aliphatic, aromatic and cyclic species have been established by the coupling of the molecular beam sampling/mass spectroscopy technique with the gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy technique. Temperature profiles have been measured using a covered thermocouple. A detailed kinetic mechanism of oxidation of these compounds in flame conditions has been developed. Different available sub-mechanisms have been used as references: the GDF-Kin 1.0 model for the oxidation of methane and the models of Tan and Franck (1996) and of Lindstedt and Maurice (1996) in the case of benzene and toluene. In the case of para-xylene, a model has been developed because no mechanisms was available in the literature. These different mechanisms have been refined, completed or adjusted by comparing the experimental results with those obtained by kinetic modeling. The complete kinetic mechanism, comprising 156 chemical species involved in 1072 reactions allows to reproduce all the experimental observations in a satisfactory manner. The kinetic analysis of reactions velocity has permitted to determine oxidation kinetic schemes for benzene, toluene, xylene-para and for the cyclopentadienyl radical, main species at the origin of the rupture of the aromatic cycle. Reactions of recombination with the methyl radicals formed during methane oxidation, of the different aromatic or aliphatic radicals created during the oxidation of aromatics, play an important role and lead to the formation of several aromatic pollutants (ethyl-benzene for instance) or aliphatic pollutants (butadiene or penta-diene for instance) in flames. (J.S.)

  2. Pyrene measurements in sooting low pressure methane flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartel, M; Pauwels, J-F; Desgroux, P; Mercier, X

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents in detail the study we carried out concerning the pyrene measurement by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (JCLIF) in different sooting low pressure methane flames. The aim of this paper is both to demonstrate the potentialities of this technique for the measurement of such moderately sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under sooting flame conditions and to provide new experimental data for the understanding and the development of chemical models of the soot formation processes. Several concentration profiles of pyrene measured in different sooting flame (various pressure and equivalence ratio) are presented. The validation of the JCLIF method for pyrene measurements is explained in detail as well as the calibration procedure, based on the standard addition method, which has been implemented for the quantification of the concentration profiles. Sensitivity lower than 1 ppb was obtained for the measurement of this species under sooting flame conditions.

  3. Study on peak overpressure and flame propagation speed of gas deflagration in the tube with obstacles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The on-way peak overpressure and flame propagation speed of gas deflagration in the tube with obstacles are important data for process safety. Based on carbon monoxide deflagration experiments, the paper presents a multi-zone integration model for calculation of on-way peak overpressure, in which the tube with obstacles is considered as a series of venting explosion enclosures which link each others. The analysis of experimental data indicates that the on-way peak overpressure of gas deflagration can be correlated as an empirical formula with equivalence ratio of carbon monoxide oxidation, expansion ratio, flame path length, etc., and that the on-way peak overpressure exhibits a linear relationship with turbulence factor and flame propagation speed. An empirical formula of flame propagation speed is given.

  4. Flame Structure and Emissions of Strongly-Pulsed Turbulent Diffusion Flames with Swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying-Hao

    This work studies the turbulent flame structure, the reaction-zone structure and the exhaust emissions of strongly-pulsed, non-premixed flames with co-flow swirl. The fuel injection is controlled by strongly-pulsing the fuel flow by a fast-response solenoid valve such that the fuel flow is completely shut off between pulses. This control strategy allows the fuel injection to be controlled over a wide range of operating conditions, allowing the flame structure to range from isolated fully-modulated puffs to interacting puffs to steady flames. The swirl level is controlled by varying the ratio of the volumetric flow rate of the tangential air to that of the axial air. For strongly-pulsed flames, both with and without swirl, the flame geometry is strongly impacted by the injection time. Flames appear to exhibit compact, puff-like structures for short injection times, while elongated flames, similar in behaviors to steady flames, occur for long injection times. The flames with swirl are found to be shorter for the same fuel injection conditions. The separation/interaction level between flame puffs in these flames is essentially governed by the jet-off time. The separation between flame puffs decreases as swirl is imposed, consistent with the decrease in flame puff celerity due to swirl. The decreased flame length and flame puff celerity are consistent with an increased rate of air entrainment due to swirl. The highest levels of CO emissions are generally found for compact, isolated flame puffs, consistent with the rapid quenching due to rapid dilution with excess air. The imposition of swirl generally results in a decrease in CO levels, suggesting more rapid and complete fuel/air mixing by imposing swirl in the co-flow stream. The levels of NO emissions for most cases are generally below the steady-flame value. The NO levels become comparable to the steady-flame value for sufficiently short jet-off time. The swirled co-flow air can, in some cases, increase the NO

  5. Growth of Y-shaped Carbon Nanofibers from Ethanol Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Y-shaped carbon nanofibers as a multi-branched carbon nanostructure have potential applications in electronic devices. In this article, we report that several types of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers are obtained from ethanol flames. These Y-shaped carbon nanofibers have different morphologies. According to our experimental results, the growth mechanism of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been discussed and a possible growth model of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been proposed.

  6. CFD simulation of vented explosion and turbulent flame propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulach Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Very rapid physical and chemical processes during the explosion require both quality and quantity of detection devices. CFD numerical simulations are suitable instruments for more detailed determination of explosion parameters. The paper deals with mathematical modelling of vented explosion and turbulent flame spread with use of ANSYS Fluent software. The paper is focused on verification of preciseness of calculations comparing calculated data with the results obtained in realised experiments in the explosion chamber.

  7. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a Re_{T,f}^{0.5} scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given Re_{T,f}^{}, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by Re_{T,M}^{0.5} irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames.

  8. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation through Non-Uniform, Premixed Gas Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Easton, John; Ross, Howard D.; Marchese, Anthony; Perry, David; Kulis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Flame propagation through non-uniformly premixed (or layered) gases has importance both in useful combustion systems and in unintentional fires. As summarized previously, non-uniform premixed gas combustion receives scant attention compared to the more usual limiting cases of diffusion or uniformly premixed flames, especially regarding the role gravity plays. This paper summarizes our progress on furthering the knowledge of layered combustion, in which a fuel concentration gradient exists normal to the direction of flame spread. We present experimental and numerical results for flame spread through propanol-air layers formed near the flash point temperature (25 C) or near the stoichiometric temperature (33 C). Both the model and experimental results show that the removal of gravity results in a faster spreading flame, by as much as 80% depending on conditions. This is exactly the opposite effect as that predicted by an earlier model reported. We also found that having a gallery lid results in faster flame spread, an effect more pronounced at normal gravity, demonstrating the importance of enclosure geometry. Also reported here is the beginning of our spectroscopic measurements of fuel vapor.

  9. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  10. Flaming: More than a Necessary Evil for Academic Mailing Lists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjie

    1996-01-01

    States that although Internet "gurus" advocate that users refrain from "flaming," in fact, flaming permeates the Internet. Explores the nature of flaming in its characteristics and forms as seen in academic discussion groups. Argues that flaming educates the ignorant, tames the uncouth, and promotes effective communication. (PA)

  11. Direct numerical simulation of bluff-body-stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Arias, Paul G.

    2014-01-10

    To enable high fidelity simulation of combustion phenomena in realistic devices, an embedded boundary method is implemented into direct numerical simulations (DNS) of reacting flows. One of the additional numerical issues associated with reacting flows is the stable treatment of the embedded boundaries in the presence of multicomponent species and reactions. The implemented method is validated in two test con gurations: a pre-mixed hydrogen/air flame stabilized in a backward-facing step configuration, and reactive flows around a square prism. The former is of interest in practical gas turbine combustor applications in which the thermo-acoustic instabilities are a strong concern, and the latter serves as a good model problem to capture the vortex shedding behind a bluff body. In addition, a reacting flow behind the square prism serves as a model for the study of flame stabilization in a micro-channel combustor. The present study utilizes fluid-cell reconstruction methods in order to capture important flame-to-solid wall interactions that are important in confined multicomponent reacting flows. Results show that the DNS with embedded boundaries can be extended to more complex geometries without loss of accuracy and the high fidelity simulation data can be used to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for the design of practical combustion devices.

  12. Narrow band flame emission from dieseline and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zengyang

    2016-08-18

    smaller average emission area under higher ambient oxygen concentration and temperature for both fuels, while dieseline has a slightly larger average flame emission area than diesel for most cases. The experimental findings were further analyzed and discussed based on an empirical model of the distributions of air and fuel. Both experiment results and theoretical model show that dieseline has wider 430 nm and 470 nm band emissions than diesel under all conditions. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  13. LSQ13fn: A type II-Plateau supernova with a possibly low metallicity progenitor that breaks the standardised candle relation

    CERN Document Server

    Polshaw, J; Dessart, L; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Inserra, C; Sim, S A; Smartt, S J; Sollerman, J; Baltay, C; Rabinowitz, D; Benetti, S; Botticella, M T; Campbell, H; Chen, T -W; Galbany, L; McKinnon, R; Nicholl, M; Smith, K W; Sullivan, M; Takats, K; Valenti, S; Young, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present optical imaging and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) LSQ13fn, a type II supernova with several hitherto-unseen properties. Although it initially showed strong symmetric spectral emission features attributable to \\ion{He}{ii}, \\ion{N}{iii}, and \\ion{C}{iii}, reminiscent of some interacting SNe, it transitioned into an object that would fall more naturally under a type II-Plateau (IIP) classification. However, its spectral evolution revealed several unusual properties: metal lines appeared later than expected, were weak, and some species were conspicuous by their absence. Furthermore, the line velocities were found to be lower than expected given the plateau brightness, breaking the SNe~IIP standardised candle method for distance estimates. We found that, in combination with a short phase of early-time ejecta-circumstellar material interaction, metal-poor ejecta, and a large progenitor radius could reasonably account for the observed behaviour. Comparisons with synthetic model spectra of SNe~IIP of a g...

  14. The dilution effect on the extinction of wall diffusion flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiti Nadjib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic process of the interaction between a turbulent jet diffusion methane flame and a lateral wall was experimentally studied. The evolution of the flame temperature field with the Nitrogen dilution of the methane jet flame was examined. The interaction between the diffusion flame and the lateral wall was investigated for different distance between the wall and the central axes of the jet flame. The dilution is found to play the central role in the flame extinction process. The flame response as the lateral wall approaches from infinity and the increasing of the dilution rate make the flame extinction more rapid than the flame without dilution, when the nitrogen dilution rate increase the flame temperature decrease.

  15. A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

  16. An Experimental and Computational Study on Soot Formation in a Coflow Jet Flame Under Microgravity and Normal Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Cao, Su; Giassi, Davide; Stocker, Dennis P.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Bennett, Beth Anne V.; Smooke, Mitchell D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2014-01-01

    Upon the completion of the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) in March 2012, a comprehensive and unique set of microgravity coflow diffusion flame data was obtained. This data covers a range of conditions from weak flames near extinction to strong, highly sooting flames, and enabled the study of gravitational effects on phenomena such as liftoff, blowout and soot formation. The microgravity experiment was carried out in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on board the International Space Station (ISS), while the normal gravity experiment was performed at Yale utilizing a copy of the flight hardware. Computational simulations of microgravity and normal gravity flames were also carried out to facilitate understanding of the experimental observations. This paper focuses on the different sooting behaviors of CH4 coflow jet flames in microgravity and normal gravity. The unique set of data serves as an excellent test case for developing more accurate computational models.Experimentally, the flame shape and size, lift-off height, and soot temperature were determined from line-of-sight flame emission images taken with a color digital camera. Soot volume fraction was determined by performing an absolute light calibration using the incandescence from a flame-heated thermocouple. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the chemically reacting flow, and the soot evolution was modeled by the sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on an axisymmetric computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting system of fully coupled, highly nonlinear equations was solved by a damped, modified Newtons method. The microgravity sooting flames were found to have lower soot temperatures and higher volume fraction than their normal gravity counterparts. The soot distribution tends to shift from the centerline of the flame to the wings from normal gravity to

  17. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  18. Systems and methods for controlling flame instability

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2016-07-21

    A system (62) for controlling flame instability comprising: a nozzle (66) coupled to a fuel supply line (70), an insulation housing (74) coupled to the nozzle, a combustor (78) coupled to the nozzle via the insulation housing, where the combustor is grounded (80), a pressure sensor (82) coupled to the combustor and configured to detect pressure in the combustor, and an instability controlling assembly coupled to the pressure sensor and to an alternating current power supply (86), where, the instability controlling assembly can control flame instability of a flame in the system based on pressure detected by the pressure sensor.

  19. Traveling circumferential unstable wave of cylindrical flame front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilis, A. V.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The researches of stability of cylindrical front of deflagration combustion in an annular combustion chamber were made using phenomenological model. The flame front is described as discontinuity of gasdynamic parameters. It is considered that the combustion products are under chemical equilibrium. The combustible mixture and the combustion products are ideal gases. The velocity of deflagration combustion is determined using the Chapman-Jouget theory. It depends on the temperature of combustible mixture only. It is found that the combustible flame front is unstable for several types of small disturbances in the system Mechanics of instabilities are examined using both the numeric and analytical methods. The cases of evolution of the unstable waves rotating in circular channel are presented.

  20. Novel Flame-Based Synthesis of Nanowires for Multifunctional Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-13

    laser-based diagnostics for in-situ Raman characterization of as- synthesized nanomaterials, (iv) flame synthesis of graphene , (v) flame synthesis of...laser- based diagnostics for in-situ Raman characterization of as-synthesized nanomaterials, (iv) flame synthesis of graphene , (v) flame synthesis of...Stephen D. Tse, Manish Chhowalla, Bernard H. Kear. Role of substrate, temperature, and hydrogen on the flame synthesis of graphene films, Proceedings

  1. Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-15

    visualized for both reacting and nonreacting cases. The jet flame was studied unforced, without acoustics , and forced, with transverse acoustic waves in...liquid rocket injector flames react to acoustic waves . In this study, a representative coaxial gaseous hydrogen / liquid oxygen (LOX) jet flame is...hydrogen / liquid oxygen (LOX) jet flame is visualized for both reacting and nonreacting cases. The jet flame was studied unforced, without acoustics , and

  2. Heat release and flame structure measurements of self-excited acoustically-driven premixed methane flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin M.; Tuttle, Steven G.; Renfro, Michael W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Rd, U-3139, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); King, Galen B. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    An open-open organ pipe burner (Rijke tube) with a bluff-body ring was used to create a self-excited, acoustically-driven, premixed methane-air conical flame, with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.05. The feed tube velocities corresponded to Re = 1780-4450. Coupled oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release from the flame are naturally encouraged at resonant frequencies in the Rijke tube combustor. This coupling creates sustainable self-excited oscillations in flame front area and shape. The period of the oscillations occur at the resonant frequency of the combustion chamber when the flame is placed {proportional_to}1/4 of the distance from the bottom of the tube. In this investigation, the shape of these acoustically-driven flames is measured by employing both OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and chemiluminescence imaging and the images are correlated to simultaneously measured pressure in the combustor. Past research on acoustically perturbed flames has focused on qualitative flame area and heat release relationships under imposed velocity perturbations at imposed frequencies. This study reports quantitative empirical fits with respect to pressure or phase angle in a self-generated pressure oscillation. The OH-PLIF images were single temporal shots and the chemiluminescence images were phase averaged on chip, such that 15 exposures were used to create one image. Thus, both measurements were time resolved during the flame oscillation. Phase-resolved area and heat release variations throughout the pressure oscillation were computed. A relation between flame area and the phase angle before the pressure maximum was derived for all flames in order to quantitatively show that the Rayleigh criterion was satisfied in the combustor. Qualitative trends in oscillating flame area were found with respect to feed tube flow rates. A logarithmic relation was found between the RMS pressure and both the normalized average area and heat release rate

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A PREMIXED TURBULENT V-SHAPED FLAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M I El Khazen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we simulate a turbulent premixed V-shape flame stabilized on a hot wire. The device used is composed of a vertical combustion chamber where the methane-air mixture is convected upwards with a mean velocity of 4ms-1. The flow was simulated running Fluent 6.3, which numerically solved the stationary Favre-averaged mass balance; Navier-Stokes equations; combustion progress variable, and k-ε equations on a two-dimensional numerical mesh. We model gaseous mixture, ignoring Soret and Dufour effects and radiation heat transfer. The progress variable balance equation was closed using Eddy Break Up model. The results of our simulations allow us to analyze the influence of equivalence ratio and the turbulent intensity on the properties of the flame (velocity, fluctuation, progress variable and Thickness of flame.This work gives us an idea on the part which turbulence can play to decrease the risks of extinction and instabilities caused by the lean premixed combustion.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of hydrogen turbulent lifted jet flame in a vitiated coflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhiHua; FAN JianRen; ZHOU JunHu; CEN KeFa

    2007-01-01

    The direct numerical simulation (DNS) method with 16 steps detailed chemical kinetics was applied to a lifted turbulent jet flame with H2/N2 fuel issuing into a wide hot coflow of lean combustion products, at temperature of 1045 K and low oxygen concentrations. The chemical reactions were handled by the library function of CHEMKIN which was called by the main program in every time step. Parallel computational technology based on message passing interface method (MPI) was used in the simulation. All the cases were run by 12 CPUs on a high performance computer system. Faver-averaged DNS results were obtained by long time averaging the transient profile and compared with the experimental data. The roll-up and evolution of the vortices in jet flame were well captured. The vortices in the same rotating direction attracted each other and those in different rotating directions repulsed each other. Through complex interactions between vortices, the original symmetrical vortex structure could be converted into nonsymmetrical and more complex structures by combination, distortion and splitting of the vortices. The transient profiles of H, OH and H2O mass fraction at 5.76 ms showed the flame structure in jet flame, especially the autoignition regions clearly. The lift-off height was about 9 d-11 d, in agreement with the experimental observation. At the corner point of the flame sheet indicated by OH and H profiles, the combustion was always enhanced by the flame curvature and extended resident time. The profiles of turbulence intensities show that the flames were diffused from the original two outside flame sheets into the core. The DNS results can be considered in developing more accurate and more universal turbulence models.

  5. Effects of gravity on structure and entropy generation of confined laminar diffusion flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, A. [Department of Power Engineering, Jadvapur University, Salt Lake Campus, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2005-05-01

    A numerical prediction of a confined, co-flowing, laminar jet diffusion flame has been made to find the flow and scalar variables under steady state condition. These variables are used for the description of the flame structure and the evaluation of entropy generation rate and the rate of exergy loss. The exergy loss is compared against the exergy coming in, to evaluate the second law efficiency of the combustion process. The model is applied for diffusion flames in a confined geometry at various gravity levels to find the effect of gravity on the rate of entropy generation and second law efficiency. In general, the flame becomes wider in shape at reduced gravity. A correlation of the flame width against Froude number over a wide gravity range has been proposed. It is observed from the local volumetric entropy generation rate that a diffusion flame is more intense at its base than at the tip. The intensity of the flame becomes less at reduced gravity because of the lower rate of entrainment of oxygen. The entropy generation rate due to heat transfer increases considerably at normal gravity compared to that at zero gravity, because of the thermal stratification of the flow under the influence of buoyant acceleration. The rate of entropy generation due to chemical reaction and mass transfer remain almost unaltered at all gravity levels. The lowering of the total entropy generation rate and the corresponding exergy destruction increases the second law efficiency of a confined diffusion flame at reduced gravity compared to that at normal gravity. (authors)

  6. Cool-flame Extinction During N-Alkane Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent droplet combustion experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed that large n-alkane droplets can continue to burn quasi-steadily following radiative extinction in a low-temperature regime, characterized by negative-temperaturecoefficient (NTC) chemistry. In this study we report experimental observations of n-heptane, n-octane, and n-decane droplets of varying initial sizes burning in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/helium/nitrogen environments at 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 atmospheric pressures. The oxygen concentration in these tests varied in the range of 14% to 25% by volume. Large n-alkane droplets exhibited quasi-steady low-temperature burning and extinction following radiative extinction of the visible flame while smaller droplets burned to completion or disruptively extinguished. A vapor-cloud formed in most cases slightly prior to or following the "cool flame" extinction. Results for droplet burning rates in both the hot-flame and cool-flame regimes as well as droplet extinction diameters at the end of each stage are presented. Time histories of radiant emission from the droplet captured using broadband radiometers are also presented. Remarkably the "cool flame" extinction diameters for all the three n-alkanes follow a trend reminiscent of the ignition delay times observed in previous studies. The similarities and differences among the n-alkanes during "cool flame" combustion are discussed using simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon

  7. Time-resolved PIV investigation of flashback in stratified swirl flames of hydrogen-rich fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Clemens, Noel

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen is one of the promising alternative fuels to achieve greener power generation. However, susceptibility of flashback in swirl flames of hydrogen-rich fuels acts as a major barrier to its adoption in gas turbine combustors. The current study seeks to understand the flow-flame interaction during the flashback of the hydrogen-rich flame in stratified conditions. Flashback experiments are conducted with a model combustor equipped with an axial swirler and a center-body. Fuel is injected in the main swirl flow via the fuel ports on the swirler vanes. To achieve mean radial stratification, these fuel ports are located at a radial location closer to the outer wall of the mixing tube. Stratification in the flow is assessed by employing Anisole PLIF imaging. Flashback is triggered by a rapid increase in the global equivalence ratio. The upstream propagation of the flame is investigated by employing time-resolved stereoscopic PIV and chemiluminescence imaging. Stratification leads to substantially different flame propagation behavior as well as increased flame surface wrinkling. We gratefully acknowledge the sponsorship by the DOE NETL under Grant DEFC2611-FE0007107.

  8. Interplay of Darrieus-Landau instability and weak turbulence in premixed flame propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creta, Francesco; Lamioni, Rachele; Lapenna, Pasquale Eduardo; Troiani, Guido

    2016-11-01

    In this study we investigate, both numerically and experimentally, the interplay between the intrinsic Darrieus-Landau (DL) or hydrodynamic instability of a premixed flame and the moderately turbulent flow field in which the flame propagates. The objective is threefold: to establish, unambiguously, through a suitably defined marker, the presence or absence of DL-induced effects on the turbulent flame, to quantify the DL effects on the flame propagation and morphology and, finally, to asses whether such effects are mitigated or suppressed as the turbulence intensity is increased. The numerical simulations are based on a deficient reactant model which lends itself to a wealth of results from asymptotic theory, such as the determination of stability limits. The skewness of the flame curvature probability density function is identified as an unambiguous morphological marker for the presence or absence of DL effects in a turbulent environment. In addition, the turbulent propagation speed is shown to exhibit a distinct dual behavior whereby it is noticeably enhanced in the presence of DL instability while it is unchanged otherwise. Furthermore, increasing the turbulence intensity is found to be mitigating with respect to DL-induced effects such as the mentioned dual behavior which disappears at higher intensities. Experimental propane and/or air Bunsen flames are also investigated, utilizing two distinct diameters, respectively, above and below the estimated DL cutoff wavelength. Curvature skewness is still clearly observed to act as a marker for DL instability while the turbulent propagation speed is concurrently enhanced in the presence of the instability.

  9. Quantitative Measurements of CH* Concentration in Normal Gravity and Microgravity Coflow Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, D.; Cao, S.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Bennett, B. A.; Smooke, M. D.; Long, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    With the conclusion of the SLICE campaign aboard the ISS in 2012, a large amount of data was made available for the analysis of the effect of microgravity on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Previous work focused on the study of sooty flames in microgravity as well as the ability of numerical models to predict its formation in a simplified buoyancy-free environment. The current work shifts the investigation to soot-free flames, putting an emphasis on the chemiluminescence emission from electronically excited CH (CH*). This radical species is of significant interest in combustion studies: it has been shown that the CH* spatial distribution is indicative of the flame front position and, given the relatively simple diagnostic involved with its measurement, several works have been done trying to understand the ability of CH* chemiluminescence to predict the total and local flame heat release rate. In this work, a subset of the SLICE nitrogen-diluted methane flames has been considered, and the effect of fuel and coflow velocity on CH* concentration is discussed and compared with both normal gravity results and numerical simulations. Experimentally, the spectral characterization of the DSLR color camera used to acquire the flame images allowed the signal collected by the blue channel to be considered representative of the CH* emission centered around 431 nm. Due to the axisymmetric flame structure, an Abel deconvolution of the line-of-sight chemiluminescence was used to obtain the radial intensity profile and, thanks to an absolute light intensity calibration, a quantification of the CH* concentration was possible. Results show that, in microgravity, the maximum flame CH* concentration increases with the coflow velocity, but it is weakly dependent on the fuel velocity; normal gravity flames, if not lifted, tend to follow the same trend, albeit with different peak concentrations. Comparisons with numerical simulations display reasonably good agreement between measured and

  10. Quantitative Measurements of Electronically Excited CH Concentration in Normal Gravity and Microgravity Coflow Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, D.; Cao, S.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Smooke, M. D.; Long, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    With the conclusion of the SLICE campaign aboard the ISS in 2012, a large amount of data was made available for the analysis of the effect of microgravity on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Previous work focused on the study of sooty flames in microgravity as well as the ability of numerical models to predict its formation in a simplified buoyancy-free environment. The current work shifts the investigation to soot-free flames, putting an emphasis on the chemiluminescence emission from electronically excited CH (CH*). This radical species is of significant interest in combustion studies: it has been shown that the electronically excited CH spatial distribution is indicative of the flame front position and, given the relatively simple diagnostic involved with its measurement, several works have been done trying to understand the ability of electronically excited CH chemiluminescence to predict the total and local flame heat release rate. In this work, a subset of the SLICE nitrogen-diluted methane flames has been considered, and the effect of fuel and coflow velocity on electronically excited CH concentration is discussed and compared with both normal gravity results and numerical simulations. Experimentally, the spectral characterization of the DSLR color camera used to acquire the flame images allowed the signal collected by the blue channel to be considered representative of the electronically excited CH emission centered around 431 nm. Due to the axisymmetric flame structure, an Abel deconvolution of the line-of-sight chemiluminescence was used to obtain the radial intensity profile and, thanks to an absolute light intensity calibration, a quantification of the electronically excited CH concentration was possible. Results show that, in microgravity, the maximum flame electronically excited CH concentration increases with the coflow velocity, but it is weakly dependent on the fuel velocity; normal gravity flames, if not lifted, tend to follow the same trend

  11. Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Ahsan [Univ. Of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Oxy-fuel combustion has been used previously in a wide range of industrial applications. Oxy- combustion is carried out by burning a hydrocarbon fuel with oxygen instead of air. Flames burning in this configuration achieve higher flame temperatures which present opportunities for significant efficiency improvements and direct capture of CO2 from the exhaust stream. In an effort to better understand and characterize the fundamental flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion this research presents the experimental measurements of flame stability of various oxyfuel flames. Effects of H2 concentration, fuel composition, exhaust gas recirculation ratio, firing inputs, and burner diameters on the flame stability of these fuels are discussed. Effects of exhaust gas recirculation i.e. CO2 and H2O (steam) acting as diluents on burner operability are also presented. The roles of firing input on flame stability are then analyzed. For this study it was observed that many oxy-flames did not stabilize without exhaust gas recirculation due to their higher burning velocities. In addition, the stability regime of all compositions was observed to decrease as the burner diameter increased. A flashback model is also presented, using the critical velocity gradient gF) values for CH4-O2-CO2 flames. The second part of the study focuses on the experimental measurements of the flow field characteristics of premixed CH4/21%O2/79%N2 and CH4/38%O2/72%CO2 mixtures at constant firing input of 7.5 kW, constant, equivalence ratio of 0.8, constant swirl number of 0.92 and constant Reynolds Numbers. These measurements were taken in a swirl stabilized combustor at atmospheric pressure. The flow field visualization using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) technique is implemented to make a better understanding of the turbulence characteristics of

  12. High pressure flame system for pollution studies with results for methane-air diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, I. M.; Maahs, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure flame system was designed and constructed for studying nitrogen oxide formation in fuel air combustion. Its advantages and limitations were demonstrated by tests with a confined laminar methane air diffusion flame over the pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The methane issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port concentrically into a stream of air contained within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. As the combustion pressure is increased, the flame changes in shape from wide and convex to slender and concave, and there is a marked increase in the amount of luminous carbon. The height of the flame changes only moderately with pressure.

  13. Computational Fluid-Particle Dynamics for the Flame Synthesis of Alumina Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Pratsinis, Sotirie E.; Livbjerg, Hans

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model for the dynamics of particle growth during synthesis of ultra fine particles in diffusion flames is presented. The model includes the kinetics of particle coalescence and coagulation, and when combined with a calculation of the temperature, velocity and gas composition...... distribution in the flame, the effuent aerosol characteristics are calculated. The model is validated by comparison with an experimental study of the synthesis of alumina particles by combustion of Al-tri-sec-butoxide. Two parameters of the coalescence kinetics are estimated by regression of the model...

  14. Superluminous Supernovae as Standardizable Candles and High-redshift Distance Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the use of type Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSN Ic) as standardizable candles and distance indicators. Their appeal as cosmological probes stems from their remarkable peak luminosities, hot blackbody temperatures, and bright rest-frame ultraviolet emission. We present a sample of 16 published SLSN, from redshifts 0.1 to 1.2, and calculate accurate K corrections to determine uniform magnitudes in 2 synthetic rest-frame filter bandpasses with central wavelengths at 400 nm and 520 nm. At 400 nm, we find an encouragingly low scatter in their uncorrected, raw mean magnitudes with M(400) = -21.86 ± 0.35 mag for the full sample of 16 objects. We investigate the correlation between their decline rates and peak magnitude and find that the brighter events appear to decline more slowly. In a manner similar to the Phillips relation for type Ia SNe (SNe Ia), we define a ΔM 20 decline relation. This correlates peak magnitude and decline over 20 days and can reduce the scatter in standardized peak magnitudes to ±0.22 mag. We further show that M(400) appears to have a strong color dependence. Redder objects are fainter and also become redder faster. Using this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation, a surprisingly low scatter of between ±0.08 mag and ±0.13 mag can be found in peak magnitudes, depending on sample selection. However, we caution that only 8 to 10 objects currently have enough data to test this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation. We conclude that SLSN Ic are promising distance indicators in the high-redshift universe in regimes beyond those possible with SNe Ia. Although the empirical relationships are encouraging, the unknown progenitor systems, how they may evolve with redshift, and the uncertain explosion physics are of some concern. The two major measurement uncertainties are the limited numbers of low-redshift, well-studied objects available to test these relationships and internal dust extinction in the host galaxies.

  15. Theory of DDT in unconfined flames

    CERN Document Server

    Khokhlov, A M; Wheeler, J C; Wheeler, J Craig

    1996-01-01

    This paper outlines a theoretical approach for predicting the onset of detonation in unconfined turbulent flames which is relevant both to problems of terrestrial combustion and to thermonuclear burning in Type Ia supernovae. Two basic assumuptions are made: 1) the gradient mechanism is the inherent mechanism that leads to DDT in unconfined conditions, and 2) the sole mechanism for preparing the gradient in induction time is by turbulent mixing and local flame quenching. The criterion for DDT is derived in terms of the one-dimensional detonation wave thickness, the laminar flame speed, and the laminar flame thickness in the reactive gas. This approach gives a lower-bound criterion for DDT for conditions where shock preheating, wall effects, and interactions with obstacles are absent. Regions in parameter space where unconfined DDT can and cannot occur are determined. A subsequent paper will address these issues specifically in the astrophysical context.

  16. Flaming Pear Creative Pack1.0

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kane

    2003-01-01

    Flaming Pear是个一直给我留下深刻印象的软件开发公司。我以前评论过很多这个公司的插件,每一次都是不错的经历。同样的优良传统同样体现在Flaming Pear的新品Creative Pack1.0

  17. Scalar measurements and analysis of hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames in normal and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ammar, Khalid Nasser

    -exit Reynolds number, the flame shape normalized by the burner diameter was independent of the burner diameter. Scalar profiles in microgravity were found to extend further in the radial direction as compared to those in normal gravity. The radial expansion was greater for flames with higher jet exit Reynolds numbers. Two pre-existing analytical models for axisymmetric diffusion flames in the far-field of the jet-exit were considered. One model was based on the similarity analysis, while the other model provided a closed-form solution. These models were found to be inapplicable in context of this research, in part, because of the low Reynolds numbers used in experiments. The models, however, predicted correct qualitative trends of the flame shape. Transitional flames were investigated to show the effect of Reynolds number and fuel dilution by helium. Scalar profiles were obtained in the near burner laminar portion of the transitional flame. Both in normal and microgravity, the axial plane where the laminar flame became transitional moved upstream as the Reynolds number was increased. The transition was delayed in microgravity, and adding helium to the fuel delayed transition in both normal and microgravity.

  18. Synthesis of Nano-Particles in Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue

    The scope of this work is to investigate the synthesis of aluminum oxide particles in flames from the combustion of an aluminum alkoxide precursor.A general introduction to particles formation in the gas phase is presented with emphasis on the mechanisms that control the particle morphology after...... for the analysis of particle formation in flames. Good results for a wide range of operating conditions were obtained. Therefore, the method should be useful as a tool for the optimization and/or design of flame processes for particle production.......The scope of this work is to investigate the synthesis of aluminum oxide particles in flames from the combustion of an aluminum alkoxide precursor.A general introduction to particles formation in the gas phase is presented with emphasis on the mechanisms that control the particle morphology after...... flame burner and a premixed burner with a precursor jet. The experimental setups and results are shown and discussed in detail. Alumina powder with specific surface area between 45 m2/g and 190 m2/g was obtained.Temperature and flow fields of the flame processes are analysed by numerical simulations...

  19. Conical quarl swirl stabilized non-premixed flames: flame and flow field interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2017-09-19

    The flame-flow field interaction is studied in non-premixed methane swirl flames stabilized in quartz quarl via simultaneous measurements of the flow field using a stereo PIV and OH-PLIF at 5 KHz repetition rate. Under the same swirl intensity, two flames with different fuel jet velocity were investigated. The time-averaged flow field shows a unique flow pattern at the quarl exit, where two recirculation vortices are formed; a strong recirculation zone formed far from the quarl exit and a larger recirculation zone extending inside the quarl. However, the instantaneous images show that, the flow pattern near the quarl exit plays a vital role in the spatial location and structure of the reaction zone. In the low fuel jet velocity flame, a pair of vortical structures, located precisely at the corners of the quarl exit, cause the flame to roll up into the central region of low speed flow, where the flame sheet then tracks the axial velocity fluctuations. The vorticity field reveals a vortical structure surrounding the reaction zones, which reside on a layer of low compressive strain adjacent to that vortical structure. In the high fuel jet velocity flame, initially a laminar flame sheet resides at the inner shear layer of the main jet, along the interface between incoming fresh gas and high temperature recirculating gas. Further downstream, vortex breakdown alters the flame sheet path toward the central flame region. The lower reaction zones show good correlation to the regions of maximum vorticity and track the regions of low compressive strain associated with the inner shear layer of the jet flow. In both flames the reactions zones conform the passage of the large structure while remaining inside the low speed regions or at the inner shear layer.

  20. Geometrical properties of turbulent premixed flames and other corrugated interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesset, F; Maurice, G; Halter, F; Mazellier, N; Chauveau, C; Gökalp, I

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the geometrical properties of turbulent flame fronts and other interfaces. Toward that end, we use an original tool based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), which is applied to the interface spatial coordinates. The focus is mainly on the degree of roughness of the flame front, which is quantified through the scale dependence of its coverage arclength. POD is first validated by comparing with the caliper technique. Fractal characteristics are extracted in an unambiguous fashion using a parametric expression which appears to be impressively well suited for representing Richardson plots. Then it is shown that, for the range of Reynolds numbers investigated here, the scale-by-scale contribution to the arclength does not comply with scale similarity, irrespectively of the type of similarity which is invoked. The finite ratios between large and small scales, referred to as finite Reynolds number effects, are likely to explain this observation. In this context, the Reynolds number that ought to be achieved for a proper inertial range to be discernible, and for scale similarity to be likely to apply, is calculated. Fractal characteristics of flame folding are compared to available predictions. It is confirmed that the inner cutoff satisfactorily correlates with the Kolmogorov scale while the outer cutoff appears to be proportional to the integral length scale. However, the scaling for the fractal dimension is much less obvious. It is argued that much higher Reynolds numbers have to be reached for drawing firm statements about the evolution (or constancy) of the fractal dimension with respect to flame and flow parameters. Finally, a heuristic phenomenology of corrugated interfaces is highlighted. The degree of generality of the latter phenomenology is confirmed by comparing the folding of different interfaces including a turbulent-nonturbulent interface, a liquid jet destabilized by a surrounding air jet, a cavitating flow, and an isoscalar

  1. Three-dimensional temperature field measurement of flame using a single light field camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Xu, Chuanlong; Zhang, Biao; Hossain, Md Moinul; Wang, Shimin; Qi, Hong; Tan, Heping

    2016-01-25

    Compared with conventional camera, the light field camera takes the advantage of being capable of recording the direction and intensity information of each ray projected onto the CCD (charge couple device) sensor simultaneously. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D) temperature field of a flame based on a single light field camera. A radiative imaging of a single light field camera is also modeled for the flame. In this model, the principal ray represents the beam projected onto the pixel of the CCD sensor. The radiation direction of the ray from the flame outside the camera is obtained according to thin lens equation based on geometrical optics. The intensities of the principal rays recorded by the pixels on the CCD sensor are mathematically modeled based on radiative transfer equation. The temperature distribution of the flame is then reconstructed by solving the mathematical model through the use of least square QR-factorization algorithm (LSQR). The numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to investigate the validity of the proposed method. The results presented in this study show that the proposed method is capable of reconstructing the 3-D temperature field of a flame.

  2. CloudFlame: Cyberinfrastructure for combustion research

    KAUST Repository

    Goteng, Gokop

    2013-12-01

    Combustion experiments and chemical kinetics simulations generate huge data that is computationally and data intensive. A cloud-based cyber infrastructure known as Cloud Flame is implemented to improve the computational efficiency, scalability and availability of data for combustion research. The architecture consists of an application layer, a communication layer and distributed cloud servers running in a mix environment of Windows, Macintosh and Linux systems. The application layer runs software such as CHEMKIN modeling application. The communication layer provides secure transfer/archive of kinetic, thermodynamic, transport and gas surface data using private/public keys between clients and cloud servers. A robust XML schema based on the Process Informatics Model (Prime) combined with a workflow methodology for digitizing, verifying and uploading data from scientific graphs/tables to Prime is implemented for chemical molecular structures of compounds. The outcome of using this system by combustion researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Clean Combustion Research Center and its collaborating partners indicated a significant improvement in efficiency in terms of speed of chemical kinetics and accuracy in searching for the right chemical kinetic data.

  3. Preparation of Flame Retardant Modified with Titanate for Asphalt Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the compatibility between flame retardant and asphalt is a difficult task due to the complex nature of the materials. This study explores a low dosage compound flame retardant and seeks to improve the compatibility between flame retardants and asphalt. An orthogonal experiment was designed taking magnesium hydroxide, ammonium polyphosphate, and melamine as factors. The oil absorption and activation index were tested to determine the effect of titanate on the flame retardant additive. The pavement performance test was conducted to evaluate the effect of the flame retardant additive. Oxygen index test was conducted to confirm the effect of flame retardant on flame ability of asphalt binder. The results of this study showed that the new composite flame retardant is more effective in improving the compatibility between flame retardant and asphalt and reducing the limiting oxygen index of asphalt binder tested in this study.

  4. Ozone Activated Cool Diffusion Flames of Butane Isomers in a Counterflow Facility

    KAUST Repository

    Al Omier, Abdullah Abdulaziz

    2017-04-01

    Proceeding from the aim to reduce global pollution emissions from the continuous burning of hydrocarbons stimulated by increasing energy demand, more efficient and ultra-low emissions’ combustion concepts such as the homogenous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) have been developed. These new engines rely on the low temperature chemistry (LTC) combustion concept. A detailed investigation of the properties of cool flames, governed by LTC, is essential for the design of these new engines. The primary goal of this work was to build a fundamental counterflow experiment for cool flames studies in a diffusive system, to better understand combustion in LTC engines. The project was intended to provide a basic understanding of the low-temperature reactivity and cool flames properties of butane isomers under atmospheric pressure conditions. This was achieved by establishing self-sustaining cool flames through a novel technique of ozone addition to an oxygen stream in a non-premixed counterflow model. The ignition and extinction limits of butane isomers’ cool flames have been investigated under a variety of strain rates. Results revealed that establishment of cool flames are favored at lower strain rates. Iso-butane was less reactive than n-butane by showing higher ignition and extinction limits. Ozone addition showed a significant influence on cool flame ignition and sustenance; it was found that increasing ozone concentration in the oxidizer stream dramatically increased the reactivity of both fuels. Results showed increased fuel reactivity as the temperature of the fuel stream outlet increased. 4 A numerical analysis was performed to simulate ignition and extinction of the cool flame in diffusive systems. The results revealed that ignition and extinction limits of cool flames are predominantly governed by LTC. The model qualitatively captured experimental trends for both fuels; however, it overpredicted both ignition and extinction limits under all strain rates

  5. Effect of pressure on high Karlovitz number lean turbulent premixed hydrogen-enriched methane-air flames using LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicoria, David; Chan, C. K.

    2017-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the effect of pressure on lean CH4-H2-air turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz number for mixtures up to 60% of hydrogen in volume. The subfilter combustion term representing the interaction between turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the PaSR model, along with complex chemistry using a skeletal mechanism based on GRI-MECH3.0. The influence of pressure at high turbulence levels is studied by means of the local flame structure, and the assessment of species formation inside the flame. Results show that the ratio of turbulent flame thickness to laminar flame thickness δt/δu increases faster with pressure, and increases with the fraction of hydrogen in the mixture, leading to higher ratio of turbulent to laminar flame speed. The flame displays smaller structures and higher degree of wrinkling at higher pressure. Final species of CO2 and H2O formation is almost independent of pressure. For intermediate species CO and OH, an increase in pressure at constant volume fraction of hydrogen β leads to a decrease of emission of these species.

  6. Local extinction and reignition of the flame; Liekin paikallinen sammuminen ja uudelleen syttyminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaeldman, L. [VTT Energia, Espoo (Finland); Brink, A. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    A model of the local extinction and reignition of the flame suitable to be used in computational fluid dynamic analysis of primarily multi-burner furnaces is developed. The model is implemented in the computational environment Ardemus of VTT and Imatran Voima Oy, and tested against well defined experiments. The model makes the simulation of especially the near burner processes more realistic. (author)

  7. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Irminger Ring Formation and Boundary–Interior Heat Exchange in FLAME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, M. F.; Bower, A.S.; Furey, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of warm-core anticyclones shed by the Irminger Current offWestGreenland, known asIrminger rings, to the restratification of the upper layers of the Labrador Sea is investigated in the 1/ 128Family of Linked Atlantic Models Experiment (FLAME) model. The model output, covering the 199

  8. Autoignition and flame stabilisation processes in turbulent non-premixed hot coflow flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhof , E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines stabilisation processes in turbulent non-premixed jet flames, created by injecting gaseous fuel into a co-flowing stream of hot, low-oxygen combustion products. Being able to predict whether and how a flame achieves stable and reliable combustion is a matter of great pract

  9. Methane Formation by Flame-Generated Hydrogen Atoms in the Flame Ionization Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1996-01-01

    The precombustion degradation of organic compounds in the flame ionization detector has been studied (1) by heating the additives in hydrogen in a quartz capillary and analyzing the reaction products by GC and (2) by following the degradation of the additives in a hydrogen flame, by means of a th...

  10. Numerical simulations of flame dynamics in the near-field of high-Reynolds number jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Rishikesh

    Recent experiments in diesel jet flames show that flame lift-off has a significant influence on pollutant formation. Lift-off occurs in the near-field of the jet, which is characterized by complex interactions between turbulence and chemistry. Commonly employed modeling approaches based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are limited in their capability to predict transient and steady lift-off phenomena, as they ignore effects due to unsteadiness and curvature that are inherent in the near-field. In the present work, we perform numerical investigations of localized flame dynamics in the near-field (x/d diesel engine applications. The primary focus is on the exploration of unsteady extinction/reignition phenomena. A dual approach involving large-eddy simulation (LES) of a 70,000-Re variable-density isothermal gaseous fuel jet, and studies of flame-vortex interactions and unsteady flamelets, under diesel engine conditions, is employed in this work. Results from flame-vortex interaction studies show that in the near-field (x/d 1.0) in the jet near-field,temporary flame weakening/recovery events are likely to occur. Steady flamelet models provide reasonable estimates of the mean temperature, and mean mass fractions of the major species and unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs), but are inadequate for the prediction of mean NO mass fractions. Extrapolation of the analysis to jets with higher global strain rates shows that unsteady effects on the localized flame dynamics are important for the prediction of transient and steady lift-off behavior.

  11. Simulation and analysis of the soot particle size distribution in a turbulent nonpremixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lucchesi, Marco

    2017-02-05

    A modeling framework based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is employed to simulate the evolution of the soot particle size distribution in turbulent sooting flames. The stochastic reactor describes the evolution of soot in fluid parcels following Lagrangian trajectories in a turbulent flow field. The trajectories are sampled from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a n-heptane turbulent nonpremixed flame. The DSMC method is validated against experimentally measured size distributions in laminar premixed flames and found to reproduce quantitatively the experimental results, including the appearance of the second mode at large aggregate sizes and the presence of a trough at mobility diameters in the range 3–8 nm. The model is then applied to the simulation of soot formation and growth in simplified configurations featuring a constant concentration of soot precursors and the evolution of the size distribution in time is found to depend on the intensity of the nucleation rate. Higher nucleation rates lead to a higher peak in number density and to the size distribution attaining its second mode sooner. The ensemble-averaged PSDF in the turbulent flame is computed from individual samples of the PSDF from large sets of Lagrangian trajectories. This statistical measure is equivalent to time-averaged, scanning mobility particle size (SMPS) measurements in turbulent flames. Although individual trajectories display strong bimodality as in laminar flames, the ensemble-average PSDF possesses only one mode and a long, broad tail, which implies significant polydispersity induced by turbulence. Our results agree very well with SMPS measurements available in the literature. Conditioning on key features of the trajectory, such as mixture fraction or radial locations does not reduce the scatter in the size distributions and the ensemble-averaged PSDF remains broad. The results highlight and explain the important role of turbulence in broadening the size distribution of

  12. A Tracer Method for Computing Type Ia Supernova Yields: Burning Model Calibration, Reconstruction of Thickened Flames, and Verification for Planar Detonations

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, Dean M; Timmes, F X; Calder, Alan C; Brown, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    We refine our previously introduced parameterized model for explosive carbon-oxygen fusion during thermonuclear supernovae (SN Ia) by adding corrections to post-processing of recorded Lagrangian fluid element histories to obtain more accurate isotopic yields. Deflagration and detonation products are verified for propagation in a uniform density medium. A new method is introduced for reconstructing the temperature-density history within the artificially thick model deflagration front. We obtain better than 5\\% consistency between the electron capture computed by the burning model and yields from post-processing. For detonations, we compare to a benchmark calculation of the structure of driven steady-state planar detonations performed with a large nuclear reaction network and error-controlled integration. We verify that, for steady-state planar detonations down to a density of 5x10^6 g/cc, our post processing matches the major abundances in the benchmark solution typically to better than 10% for times greater t...

  13. Auto-ignition and stabilization mechanism of diluted H2 jet flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei FENG; Zhi-jun WU; Jun DENG; Li-guang LI

    2011-01-01

    The controllable active thermo-atmosphere combustor (CATAC) has become a utilizable and effective facility because it benefits the optical diagnostics and modeling.This paper presents the modeling research of the auto-ignition and flames of the H2/N2 (H2/CH4/N2,or H2/H2O2/N2) mixture on a CATAC,and shows curves varying with temperatures of auto-ignition delay,the height of the site of auto-ignition of lifted flames,and flame lift-off height.The results of auto-ignition delay and the lifi-off height are compared the experimental results to validate the model.A turning point can be seen on each curve,identified with criterion temperature.It can be concluded that when the co-flow temperature is higher than the criterion temperature,the auto-ignition and lifted flame of the mixture are not stable.Conversely,below the criterion temperature,the mixture will auto-ignite in a stable fashion.Stabilization mechanisms of auto-ignition and lifted flames are analyzed in terms of the criterion temperature.

  14. Dynamics of flow-soot interaction in wrinkled non-premixed ethylene-air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Paul G.; Lecoustre, Vivien R.; Roy, Somesh; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Daniel C.; Lu, Tianfeng; Trouvé, Arnaud; Im, Hong G.

    2015-09-01

    A two-dimensional simulation of a non-premixed ethylene-air flame was conducted by employing a detailed gas-phase reaction mechanism considering polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, an aerosol-dynamics-based soot model using a method of moments with interpolative closure, and a grey gas and soot radiation model using the discrete transfer method. Interaction of the sooting flame with a prescribed decaying random velocity field was investigated, with a primary interest in the effects of velocity fluctuations on the flame structure and the associated soot formation process for a fuel-strip configuration and a composition with mature soot growth. The temporally evolving simulation revealed a multi-layered soot formation process within the flame, at a level of detail not properly described by previous studies based on simplified soot models utilizing acetylene or naphthalene precursors for initial soot inception. The overall effect of the flame topology on the soot formation was found to be consistent with previous experimental studies, while a unique behaviour of localised strong oxidation was also noted. The imposed velocity fluctuations led to an increase of the scalar dissipation rate in the sooting zone, causing a net suppression in the soot production rate. Considering the complex structure of the soot formation layer, the effects of the imposed fluctuations vary depending on the individual soot reactions. For the conditions under study, the soot oxidation reaction was identified as the most sensitive to the fluctuations and was mainly responsible for the local suppression of the net soot production.

  15. Effect of an external electric field on the propagation velocity of premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez-Sanz, Mario

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. There have been many experimental investigations into the ability of electric fields to enhance combustion by acting upon ion species present in flames [1]. In this work, we examine this phenomenon using a one-dimensional model of a lean premixed flame under the influence of a longitudinal electric field. We expand upon prior two-step chain-branching reaction laminar models with reactions to model the creation and consumption of both a positively-charged radical species and free electrons. Also included are the electromotive force in the conservation equation for ion species and the electrostatic form of the Maxwell equations in order to resolve ion transport by externally applied and internally induced electric fields. The numerical solution of these equations allows us to compute changes in flame speed due to electric fields. Further, the variation of key kinetic and transport parameters modifies the electrical sensitivity of the flame. From changes in flame speed and reactant profiles we are able to gain novel, valuable insight into how and why combustion can be controlled by electric fields.

  16. Turbulence-flame interactions in DNS of a laboratory high Karlovitz premixed turbulent jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiou; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a laboratory premixed turbulent jet flame was performed to study turbulence-flame interactions. The turbulent flame features moderate Reynolds number and high Karlovitz number (Ka). The orientations of the flame normal vector n, the vorticity vector ω and the principal strain rate eigenvectors ei are examined. The in-plane and out-of-plane angles are introduced to quantify the vector orientations, which also measure the flame geometry and the vortical structures. A general observation is that the distributions of these angles are more isotropic downstream as the flame and the flow become more developed. The out-of-plane angle of the flame normal vector, β, is a key parameter in developing the correction of 2D measurements to estimate the corresponding 3D quantities. The DNS results show that the correction factor is unity at the inlet and approaches its theoretical value of an isotropic distribution downstream. The alignment characteristics of n, ω and ei, which reflect the interactions of turbulence and flame, are also studied. Similar to a passive scalar gradient in non-reacting flows, the flame normal has a tendency to align with the most compressive strain rate, e3, in the flame, indicating that turbulence contributes to the production of scalar gradient. The vorticity dynamics are examined via the vortex stretching term, which was found to be the predominant source of vorticity generation balanced by dissipation, in the enstrophy transport equation. It is found that although the vorticity preferentially aligns with the intermediate strain rate, e2, the contribution of the most extensive strain rate, e1, to vortex stretching is comparable with that of the intermediate strain rate, e2. This is because the eigenvalue of the most extensive strain rate, λ1, is always large and positive. It is confirmed that the vorticity vector is preferentially positioned along the flame tangential plane, contributing

  17. Flame Quenching Dynamics of High Velocity Flames in Rectangular Cross-section Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Mahuthannan, Ariff Magdoom

    2017-01-05

    Understanding flame quenching for different conditions is necessary to develop safety devices like flame arrestors. In practical applications, the speed of a deflagration in the lab-fixed reference frame will be a strong function of the geometry through which the deflagration propagates. This study reports on the effect of the flame speed, at the entrance of a quenching section, on the quenching distance. A 2D rectangular channel joining two main spherical vessels is considered for studying this effect. Two different velocity regimes are investigated and referred to as configurations A, and B. For configuration A, the velocity of the flame is 20 m/s, while it is about 100 m/s for configuration B. Methane-air stoichiometric mixtures at 1 bar and 298 K are used. Simultaneous dynamic pressure measurements along with schlieren imaging are used to analyze the quenching of the flame. Risk assessment of re-ignition is also reported and analyzed.

  18. Gasification in pulverized coal flames. Final report (Part I). Pulverized coal combustion and gasification in a cyclone reactor: experiment and model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhart, J. S.; Laurendeau, N. M.

    1979-05-01

    A unified experimental and analytical study of pulverized coal combustion and low-BTU gasification in an atmospheric cyclone reactor was performed. Experimental results include several series of coal combustion tests and a coal gasification test carried out via fuel-rich combustion without steam addition. Reactor stability was excellent over a range of equivalence ratios from .67 to 2.4 and air flowrates from 60 to 220 lb/hr. Typical carbon efficiencies were 95% for air-rich and stoichiometric tests and 80% for gasification tests. The best gasification results were achieved at an equivalence ratio of 2.0, where the carbon, cold gas and hot gas efficiencies were 83, 45 and 75%, respectively. The corresponding product gas heating value was 70 BTU/scf. A macroscopic model of coal combustion in the cyclone has been developed. Fuel-rich gasification can also be modeled through a gas-phase equilibrium treatment. Fluid mechanics are modeled by a particle force balance and a series combination of a perfectly stirred reactor and a plug flow reactor. Kinetic treatments of coal pyrolysis, char oxidation and carbon monoxide oxidation are included. Gas composition and temperature are checked against equilibrium values. The model predicts carbon efficiency, gas composition and temperature and reactor heat loss; gasification parameters, such as cold and hot gas efficiency and make gas heating value, are calculated for fuel-rich conditions. Good agreement exists between experiment and theory for conditions of this investigation.

  19. Modelling of diesel spray flame under engine-like conditions using an accelerated eulerian stochastic fields method: A convergence study of the number of stochastic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Jangi, Mehdi; Bai, X.-S.

    generated similar results. The principal motivation for ESF compared to Lagrangian particle based PDF is the relative ease of implementation of the former into Eulerian computational fluid dynamics(CFD) codes [5]. Several works have attempted to implement the ESF model for the simulations of diesel spray...... temperature combustion regimes, are used. The associated ambient conditions and injection characteristics are provided in Table 1....

  20. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.