WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling based physical

  1. Physics-based models of the plasmasphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierrard, Vivane [BELGIUM; Goldstein, Jerry [SWRI; Andr' e, Nicolas [ESTEC/ESA; Kotova, Galina A [SRI, RUSSIA; Lemaire, Joseph F [BELGIUM; Liemohn, Mike W [U OF MICHIGAN; Matsui, H [UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent progress in physics-based models of the plasmasphere using the Auid and the kinetic approaches. Global modeling of the dynamics and inAuence of the plasmasphere is presented. Results from global plasmasphere simulations are used to understand and quantify (i) the electric potential pattern and evolution during geomagnetic storms, and (ii) the inAuence of the plasmasphere on the excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (ElvIIC) waves a.nd precipitation of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. The interactions of the plasmasphere with the ionosphere a.nd the other regions of the magnetosphere are pointed out. We show the results of simulations for the formation of the plasmapause and discuss the inAuence of plasmaspheric wind and of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves for transport of plasmaspheric material. Theoretical formulations used to model the electric field and plasma distribution in the plasmasphere are given. Model predictions are compared to recent CLUSTER and MAGE observations, but also to results of earlier models and satellite observations.

  2. Physics-Based Pneumatic Hammer Instability Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT) proposes to conduct research necessary to develop a physics-based pneumatic hammer instability model for hydrostatic bearings...

  3. Models Based Practices in Physical Education: A Sociocritical Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Dillon; Fitzpatrick, Katie; McGlashan, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on models-based practices in physical education using a sociocritical lens. Drawing links between neoliberal moves in education, and critical approaches to the body and physicality, we take a view that models are useful tools that are worth integrating into physical education, but we are apprehensive to suggest they…

  4. Physics-Based Pneumatic Hammer Instability Model, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to develop a physics-based pneumatic hammer instability model that accurately predicts the stability of hydrostatic bearings...

  5. A physically based analytical spatial air temperature and humidity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yang; Theodore A. Endreny; David J. Nowak

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation of urban surface air temperature and humidity influences human thermal comfort, the settling rate of atmospheric pollutants, and plant physiology and growth. Given the lack of observations, we developed a Physically based Analytical Spatial Air Temperature and Humidity (PASATH) model. The PASATH model calculates spatial solar radiation and heat...

  6. Weibull Parameters Estimation Based on Physics of Failure Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostandyan, Erik; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Reliability estimation procedures are discussed for the example of fatigue development in solder joints using a physics of failure model. The accumulated damage is estimated based on a physics of failure model, the Rainflow counting algorithm and the Miner’s rule. A threshold model is used...... for degradation modeling and failure criteria determination. The time dependent accumulated damage is assumed linearly proportional to the time dependent degradation level. It is observed that the deterministic accumulated damage at the level of unity closely estimates the characteristic fatigue life of Weibull...

  7. Physical based Schottky barrier diode modeling for THz applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Lei; Krozer, Viktor; Michaelsen, Rasmus Schandorph

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a physical Schottky barrier diode model is presented. The model is based on physical parameters such as anode area, Ohmic contact area, doping profile from epitaxial (EPI) and substrate (SUB) layers, layer thicknesses, barrier height, specific contact resistance, and device...... temperature. The effects of barrier height lowering, nonlinear resistance from the EPI layer, and hot electron noise are all included for accurate characterization of the Schottky diode. To verify the diode model, measured I-V and C-V characteristics are compared with the simulation results. Due to the lack...

  8. Comparison of physically based catchment models for estimating Phosphorus losses

    OpenAIRE

    Nasr, Ahmed Elssidig; Bruen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    As part of a large EPA-funded research project, coordinated by TEAGASC, the Centre for Water Resources Research at UCD reviewed the available distributed physically based catchment models with a potential for use in estimating phosphorous losses for use in implementing the Water Framework Directive. Three models, representative of different levels of approach and complexity, were chosen and were implemented for a number of Irish catchments. This paper reports on (i) the lessons and experience...

  9. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based landslide susceptibility models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capparelli, Giovanna; Formetta, Giuseppe; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause significant damages involving loss of life and properties. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. This paper presents a package of GIS based models for landslide susceptibility analysis. It was integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model using the Object Modeling System (OMS) modeling framework. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices (GOF) by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system offers the possibility to investigate and fairly compare the quality and the robustness of models and models parameters, according a procedure that includes: i) model parameters estimation by optimizing each of the GOF index separately, ii) models evaluation in the ROC plane by using each of the optimal parameter set, and iii) GOF robustness evaluation by assessing their sensitivity to the input parameter variation. This procedure was repeated for all three models. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, Average Index (AI) optimization coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case. This research was funded by PON Project No. 01_01503 "Integrated Systems for Hydrogeological Risk

  10. Advancing reservoir operation description in physically based hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Giudici, Federico; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Last decades have seen significant advances in our capacity of characterizing and reproducing hydrological processes within physically based models. Yet, when the human component is considered (e.g. reservoirs, water distribution systems), the associated decisions are generally modeled with very simplistic rules, which might underperform in reproducing the actual operators' behaviour on a daily or sub-daily basis. For example, reservoir operations are usually described by a target-level rule curve, which represents the level that the reservoir should track during normal operating conditions. The associated release decision is determined by the current state of the reservoir relative to the rule curve. This modeling approach can reasonably reproduce the seasonal water volume shift due to reservoir operation. Still, it cannot capture more complex decision making processes in response, e.g., to the fluctuations of energy prices and demands, the temporal unavailability of power plants or varying amount of snow accumulated in the basin. In this work, we link a physically explicit hydrological model with detailed hydropower behavioural models describing the decision making process by the dam operator. In particular, we consider two categories of behavioural models: explicit or rule-based behavioural models, where reservoir operating rules are empirically inferred from observational data, and implicit or optimization based behavioural models, where, following a normative economic approach, the decision maker is represented as a rational agent maximising a utility function. We compare these two alternate modelling approaches on the real-world water system of Lake Como catchment in the Italian Alps. The water system is characterized by the presence of 18 artificial hydropower reservoirs generating almost 13% of the Italian hydropower production. Results show to which extent the hydrological regime in the catchment is affected by different behavioural models and reservoir

  11. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Eikelboom, Tessa; van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through their tolerance to parasites and diseases. Models used to predict surface water temperature range between physically based deterministic models and statistical approaches. Here we present the initial results of a physically based deterministic model of global freshwater surface temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modeled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff, and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by shortwave and longwave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We use the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global freshwater surface temperature at daily time steps with a spatial resolution of 0.5° on a regular grid for the period 1976-2000. We opt to parameterize the model with globally available data and apply it without calibration in order to preserve its physical basis with the outlook of evaluating the effects of atmospheric warming on freshwater surface temperature. We validate our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), limited to the USA) and compare mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) data set. Results show that the model is able to capture the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations, while the interannual variability as derived from the USGS and NOAA data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for

  12. Simulation of metal cutting using a physically based plasticity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Ales; Lindgren, Lars-Erik; Wedberg, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Metal cutting is one of the most common metal shaping processes. Specified geometrical and surface properties are obtained by break-up of the material removed by the cutting edge into a chip. The chip formation is associated with a large strain, high strain rate and a locally high temperature due to adiabatic heating which make the modelling of cutting processes difficult. This study compares a physically based plasticity model and the Johnson–Cook model. The latter is commonly used for high strain rate applications. Both material models are implemented into the finite element software MSC.Marc and compared with cutting experiments. The deformation behaviour of SANMAC 316L stainless steel during an orthogonal cutting process is studied

  13. Simplified Physics Based Models Research Topical Report on Task #2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Srikanta; Ganesh, Priya

    2014-10-31

    We present a simplified-physics based approach, where only the most important physical processes are modeled, to develop and validate simplified predictive models of CO2 sequestration in deep saline formation. The system of interest is a single vertical well injecting supercritical CO2 into a 2-D layered reservoir-caprock system with variable layer permeabilities. We use a set of well-designed full-physics compositional simulations to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration. Based on these simulations, we have developed correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and the nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. Similar correlations are also developed to predict the average pressure within the injection reservoir, and the pressure buildup within the caprock.

  14. A Physically Based Coupled Chemical and Physical Weathering Model for Simulating Soilscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgoose, G. R.; Welivitiya, D.; Hancock, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    A critical missing link in existing landscape evolution models is a dynamic soil evolution models where soils co-evolve with the landform. Work by the authors over the last decade has demonstrated a computationally manageable model for soil profile evolution (soilscape evolution) based on physical weathering. For chemical weathering it is clear that full geochemistry models such as CrunchFlow and PHREEQC are too computationally intensive to be couplable to existing soilscape and landscape evolution models. This paper presents a simplification of CrunchFlow chemistry and physics that makes the task feasible, and generalises it for hillslope geomorphology applications. Results from this simplified model will be compared with field data for soil pedogenesis. Other researchers have previously proposed a number of very simple weathering functions (e.g. exponential, humped, reverse exponential) as conceptual models of the in-profile weathering process. The paper will show that all of these functions are possible for specific combinations of in-soil environmental, geochemical and geologic conditions, and the presentation will outline the key variables controlling which of these conceptual models can be realistic models of in-profile processes and under what conditions. The presentation will finish by discussing the coupling of this model with a physical weathering model, and will show sample results from our SSSPAM soilscape evolution model to illustrate the implications of including chemical weathering in the soilscape evolution model.

  15. Physics based performance model of a UV missile seeker

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, I.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optically (EO) guided surface to air missiles (SAM) have developed to use Ultraviolet (UV) wavebands supplementary to the more common Infrared (IR) wavebands. Missiles such as the US Stinger have been around for some time, these have been joined recently by Chinese FN-16 and Russian SA-29 (Verba) and there is a much higher potential proliferation risk. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a first-principles, physics based, model of a typical seeker arrangement. The model is constructed from various calculations that aim to characterise the physical effects that will affect the performance of the system. Data has been gathered from a number of sources to provide realism to the variables within the model. It will be demonstrated that many of the variables have the power to dramatically alter the performance of the system as a whole. Further, data will be shown to illustrate the expected performance of a typical UV detector within a SAM in detection range against a variety of target sizes. The trend for the detection range against aircraft size and skin reflectivity will be shown to be non-linear, this should have been expected owing to the exponential decay of a signal through atmosphere. Future work will validate the performance of the model against real world performance data for cameras (when this is available) to ensure that it is operates within acceptable errors.

  16. The Effects of a Model-Based Physics Curriculum Program with a Physics First Approach: A Causal-Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ling L.; Fulmer, Gavin W.; Majerich, David M.; Clevenstine, Richard; Howanski, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a model-based introductory physics curriculum on conceptual learning in a Physics First (PF) Initiative. This is the first comparative study in physics education that applies the Rasch modeling approach to examine the effects of a model-based curriculum program combined with PF in the United…

  17. Application of Physically based landslide susceptibility models in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Vieira, Bianca; Martins, Tiago D.

    2017-04-01

    Shallow landslides and floods are the processes responsible for most material and environmental damages in Brazil. In the last decades, some landslides events induce a high number of deaths (e.g. Over 1000 deaths in one event) and incalculable social and economic losses. Therefore, the prediction of those processes is considered an important tool for land use planning tools. Among different methods the physically based landslide susceptibility models having been widely used in many countries, but in Brazil it is still incipient when compared to other ones, like statistical tools and frequency analyses. Thus, the main objective of this research was to assess the application of some Physically based landslide susceptibility models in Brazil, identifying their main results, the efficiency of susceptibility mapping, parameters used and limitations of the tropical humid environment. In order to achieve that, it was evaluated SHALSTAB, SINMAP and TRIGRS models in some studies in Brazil along with the Geotechnical values, scales, DEM grid resolution and the results based on the analysis of the agreement between predicted susceptibility and the landslide scar's map. Most of the studies in Brazil applied SHALSTAB, SINMAP and to a lesser extent the TRIGRS model. The majority researches are concentrated in the Serra do Mar mountain range, that is a system of escarpments and rugged mountains that extends more than 1,500 km along the southern and southeastern Brazilian coast, and regularly affected by heavy rainfall that generates widespread mass movements. Most part of these studies used conventional topographic maps with scales ranging from 1:2000 to 1:50000 and DEM-grid resolution between 2 and 20m. Regarding the Geotechnical and hydrological values, a few studies use field collected data which could produce more efficient results, as indicated by international literature. Therefore, even though they have enormous potential in the susceptibility mapping, even for comparison

  18. Physics-based Entry, Descent and Landing Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Ken; Huynh, Loc C.; Manning, Ted

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based risk model was developed to assess the risk associated with thermal protection system failures during the entry, descent and landing phase of a manned spacecraft mission. In the model, entry trajectories were computed using a three-degree-of-freedom trajectory tool, the aerothermodynamic heating environment was computed using an engineering-level computational tool and the thermal response of the TPS material was modeled using a one-dimensional thermal response tool. The model was capable of modeling the effect of micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact damage on the TPS thermal response. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the effects of uncertainties in the vehicle state at Entry Interface, aerothermodynamic heating and material properties on the performance of the TPS design. The failure criterion was set as a temperature limit at the bondline between the TPS and the underlying structure. Both direct computation and response surface approaches were used to compute the risk. The model was applied to a generic manned space capsule design. The effect of material property uncertainty and MMOD damage on risk of failure were analyzed. A comparison of the direct computation and response surface approach was undertaken.

  19. A Physically Based Model for Air-Lift Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    FrançOis, Odile; Gilmore, Tyler; Pinto, Michael J.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1996-08-01

    A predictive, physically based model for pumping water from a well using air injection (air-lift pumping) was developed for the range of flow rates that we explored in a series of laboratory experiments. The goal was to determine the air flow rate required to pump a specific flow rate of water in a given well, designed for in-well air stripping of volatile organic compounds from an aquifer. The model was validated against original laboratory data as well as data from the literature. A laboratory air-lift system was constructed that consisted of a 70-foot-long (21-m-long) pipe, 5.5 inches (14 cm) inside diameter, in which an air line of 1.3 inches (3.3 cm) outside diameter was placed with its bottom at different elevations above the base of the long pipe. Experiments were conducted for different levels of submergence, with water-pumping rates ranging from 5 to 70 gallons/min (0.32-4.4 L/s), and air flow ranging from 7 to 38 standard cubic feet/min (0.2-1.1 m3 STP/min). The theoretical approach adopted in the model was based on an analysis of the system as a one-dimensional two-phase flow problem. The expression for the pressure gradient includes inertial energy terms, friction, and gas expansion versus elevation. Data analysis revealed that application of the usual drift-flux model to estimate the air void fraction is not adequate for the observed flow patterns: either slug or churn flow. We propose a modified drift-flux model that accurately predicts air-lift pumping requirements for a range of conditions representative of in-well air-stripping operations.

  20. Physical activity among employee women based on transtheoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Pirzadeh, Asiyeh

    2015-01-01

    Today, many jobs are associated with the inactivity or sedentary lifestyle. Employees' health will be affected by their depriving of the benefits of physical activity (PA). Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the PA among employee women in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on the transtheoretical model. This is a cross-sectional study has been performed in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences employee women (2013). A convenience sample of 100 women was selected. Data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire in three parts (demographics information, PA scale, and TTM constructs). Data were analyzed by SPSS SPSS (version 16.0; SPSS, IBM, Inc, Chicago, IL, USA) and descriptive and analytical statistics such as ANOVA and independent t-test were used. A two-tailed P employee.

  1. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup.Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood.On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/sq cm. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  2. Physics-Based Crystal Plasticity Modeling of Single Crystal Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Tias

    behavior and evolution of crystallographic texture from a physical point of view. Therefore, we aim to develop a physics-based crystal plasticity model that can capture these effects as a function of grain orientations, microstructure parameters, and temperature. To achieve this goal, first, a new dilatational constitutive model is developed for simulating the deformation of non-compact geometries (foams or geometries with free surfaces) using the spectral method. The model has been used to mimic the void-growth behavior of a biaxially loaded plate with a circular inclusion. The results show that the proposed formulation provides a much better description of void-like behavior compared to the pure elastic behavior of voids. Using the developed dilatational framework, periodic boundary conditions arising from the spectral solver has been relaxed to study the tensile deformation behavior of dogbone-shaped Nb single crystals. Second, a dislocation density-based constitutive model with storage and recovery laws derived from Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) is implemented to model multi-stage strain hardening. The influence of pre-deformed dislocation content, dislocation interaction strengths and mean free path on stage II hardening is then simulated and compared with in-situ tensile experiments.

  3. PREFACE: Physics-Based Mathematical Models for Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Lok C. Lew Yan; Melnik, Roderick; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-03-01

    stain-resistant clothing, but with thousands more anticipated. The focus of this interdisciplinary workshop was on determining what kind of new theoretical and computational tools will be needed to advance the science and engineering of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Thanks to the stimulating environment of the BIRS, participants of the workshop had plenty of opportunity to exchange new ideas on one of the main topics of this workshop—physics-based mathematical models for the description of low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures (LDSNs) that are becoming increasingly important in technological innovations. The main objective of the workshop was to bring together some of the world leading experts in the field from each of the key research communities working on different aspects of LDSNs in order to (a) summarize the state-of-the-art models and computational techniques for modeling LDSNs, (b) identify critical problems of major importance that require solution and prioritize them, (c) analyze feasibility of existing mathematical and computational methodologies for the solution of some such problems, and (d) use some of the workshop working sessions to explore promising approaches in addressing identified challenges. With the possibility of growing practically any shape and size of heterostructures, it becomes essential to understand the mathematical properties of quantum-confined structures including properties of bulk states, interface states, and surface states as a function of shape, size, and internal strain. This workshop put strong emphasis on discussions of the new mathematics needed in nanotechnology especially in relation to geometry and material-combination optimization of device properties such as electronic, optical, and magnetic properties. The problems that were addressed at this meeting are of immense importance in determining such quantum-mechanical properties and the group of invited participants covered very well all the relevant disciplines

  4. On Process Modelling Using Physical Oriented And Phenomena Based Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Culea

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a modelling framework based on phenomena description of the process. The approach is taken to easy understand and construct process model in heterogeneous possible distributed modelling and simulation environments. A simplified case study of a heat exchanger is considered and Modelica modelling language to check the proposed concept. The partial results are promising and the research effort will be extended in a computer aided modelling environment based on phenomena.

  5. Forcefields based molecular modeling on the mechanical and physical properties of emeraldine base polyaniline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.A.; Wong, K.Y.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular mechanical (MM) analysis are carried out to provide reliable and accurate model for emeraldine base polyaniline. This study validate the forcefields and model with the physical and mechanical properties of the polyaniline. The temperature effects on non-bond

  6. A Physically-Motivated Deformable Model Based on Fluid Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalba, Andrei C.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Leonardis, A; Bischof, H; Pinz, A

    2006-01-01

    A novel deformable model for image segmentation and shape recovery is presented. The model is inspired by fluid dynamics and is based on a flooding simulation similar to the watershed paradigm. Unlike most watershed methods, our model has a continuous formulation, being described by two partial

  7. Sorption isotherms: A review on physical bases, modeling and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limousin, G. [Atomic Energy Commission, Tracers Technology Laboratory, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France) and Laboratoire d' etude des Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement (CNRS-INPG-IRD-UJF), BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France)]. E-mail: guillaumelimousin@yahoo.fr; Gaudet, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' etude des Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement (CNRS-INPG-IRD-UJF), BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Techtonophysique - CNRS-IRD-LCPC-UJF-Universite de Savoie, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France); Szenknect, S. [Atomic Energy Commission, Tracers Technology Laboratory, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Barthes, V. [Atomic Energy Commission, Tracers Technology Laboratory, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Krimissa, M. [Electricite de France, Division Recherche et Developpement, Laboratoire National d' Hydraulique et d' Environnement - P78, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2007-02-15

    The retention (or release) of a liquid compound on a solid controls the mobility of many substances in the environment and has been quantified in terms of the 'sorption isotherm'. This paper does not review the different sorption mechanisms. It presents the physical bases underlying the definition of a sorption isotherm, different empirical or mechanistic models, and details several experimental methods to acquire a sorption isotherm. For appropriate measurements and interpretations of isotherm data, this review emphasizes 4 main points: (i) the adsorption (or desorption) isotherm does not provide automatically any information about the reactions involved in the sorption phenomenon. So, mechanistic interpretations must be carefully verified. (ii) Among studies, the range of reaction times is extremely wide and this can lead to misinterpretations regarding the irreversibility of the reaction: a pseudo-hysteresis of the release compared with the retention is often observed. The comparison between the mean characteristic time of the reaction and the mean residence time of the mobile phase in the natural system allows knowing if the studied retention/release phenomenon should be considered as an instantaneous reversible, almost irreversible phenomenon, or if reaction kinetics must be taken into account. (iii) When the concentration of the retained substance is low enough, the composition of the bulk solution remains constant and a single-species isotherm is often sufficient, although it remains strongly dependent on the background medium. At higher concentrations, sorption may be driven by the competition between several species that affect the composition of the bulk solution. (iv) The measurement method has a great influence. Particularly, the background ionic medium, the solid/solution ratio and the use of flow-through or closed reactor are of major importance. The chosen method should balance easy-to-use features and representativity of the studied

  8. Physics based Degradation Modeling and Prognostics of Electrolytic Capacitors under Electrical Overstress Conditions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper proposes a physics based degradation modeling and prognostics approach for electrolytic capacitors. Electrolytic capacitors are critical components in...

  9. Physical Model-Based Investigation of Reservoir Sedimentation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chia Huang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation is a serious problem in the operations of reservoirs. In Taiwan, the situation became worse after the Chi-Chi Earthquake recorded on 21 September 1999. The sediment trap efficiency in several regional reservoirs has been sharply increased, adversely affecting the operations on water supplies. According to the field record, the average annual sediment deposition observed in several regional reservoirs in Taiwan has been increased. For instance, the typhoon event recorded in 2008 at the Wushe Reservoir, Taiwan, produced a 3 m sediment deposit upstream of the dam. The remaining storage capacity in the Wushe Reservoir was reduced to 35.9% or a volume of 53.79 million m3 for flood water detention in 2010. It is urgent that research should be conducted to understand the sediment movement in the Wushe Reservoir. In this study, a scale physical model was built to reproduce the flood flow through the reservoir, investigate the long-term depositional pattern, and evaluate sediment trap efficiency. This allows us to estimate the residual life of the reservoir by proposing a modification of Brune’s method. It can be presented to predict the lifespan of Taiwan reservoirs due to higher applicability in both the physical model and the observed data.

  10. Physically based modelling and optimal operation for product drying during post-harvest processing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Lukasse, L.; Farkas, I.; Rendik, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The development of new procedures for crop production and post-harvest processing requires models. Models based on physical backgrounds are most useful for this purpose because of their extrapolation potential. An optimal procedure is developed for alfalfa drying using a physical model. The model

  11. Physically based evaluation of climate models over the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez de Cos, Carmen; Sánchez-Laulhé, Jose M.; Jiménez-Alonso, Carlos; Sancho-Avila, Juan M.; Rodriguez-Camino, Ernesto

    2013-04-01

    A novel approach is proposed for evaluating regional climate models based on the comparison of empirical relationships among model outcome variables. The approach is actually a quantitative adaptation of the method for evaluating global climate models proposed by Betts (Bull Am Meteorol Soc 85:1673-1688, 2004). Three selected relationships among different magnitudes involved in water and energy land surface budgets are firstly established using daily re-analysis data. The selected relationships are obtained for an area encompassing two river basins in the southern Iberian Peninsula corresponding to 2 months, representative of dry and wet seasons. The same corresponding relations are also computed for each of the thirteen regional simulations of the ENSEMBLES project over the same area. The usage of a metric based on the Hellinger coefficient allows a quantitative estimation of how well models are performing in simulating the relations among surface magnitudes. Finally, a series of six rankings of the thirteen regional climate models participating in the ENSEMBLES project is obtained based on their ability to simulate such surface processes.

  12. General Dynamic Equivalent Modeling of Microgrid Based on Physical Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchun Cai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microgrid is a new power system concept consisting of small-scale distributed energy resources; storage devices and loads. It is necessary to employ a simplified model of microgrid in the simulation of a distribution network integrating large-scale microgrids. Based on the detailed model of the components, an equivalent model of microgrid is proposed in this paper. The equivalent model comprises two parts: namely, equivalent machine component and equivalent static component. Equivalent machine component describes the dynamics of synchronous generator, asynchronous wind turbine and induction motor, equivalent static component describes the dynamics of photovoltaic, storage and static load. The trajectory sensitivities of the equivalent model parameters with respect to the output variables are analyzed. The key parameters that play important roles in the dynamics of the output variables of the equivalent model are identified and included in further parameter estimation. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO is improved for the parameter estimation of the equivalent model. Simulations are performed in different microgrid operation conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of the equivalent model of microgrid.

  13. Physics based modeling and control of reactive extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkouss, Paul F.

    2004-11-01

    Kinematic modeling has been shown to be important for the understanding and control of co-rotating twin screw extruders. The residence time distribution (RTD) is often used to characterize the steady-state behavior of an extrusion process. Due to the complex rheological behavior of polymer flow in the extruder, few have felt that the RTD would be independent of changes in operating conditions for the same screw configuration. To investigate, we are asserting that resident distributions could be independent of operating conditions for certain types of polymers. Four different polymers, two polyethylenes and two polypropylenes, were processed on the same 30mm Werner and Pfleiderer co-rotating twin-screw extruder (CoTSE) equipped with reflectance optical probes to compare their RTD's. Additionally, each material was tested to determine its complex viscosity, to better understand the phenomena involved. Using physically motivated models to control reactive extrusion processes is attractive because of the flexibility and robustness it could provide. This thesis uses residence distribution analyses to characterize the material flow through a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Furthermore, we examine the applicability of residence distributions as the basis for kinematic modeling of the extrusion process. This demonstration of using a steady-state model---the residence distribution---as a basis for kinematic behavior is unique. The signals have been deconvoluted to kinematically characterize the flow in the different regions of the extruder, such as the melting, mixing and metering zones. Studies of step changes have shown that the steady state value of extrudate viscosity is dependent on the peroxide concentration, volume mixing, and on the residence time from the specific throughput. This data has also provided plant models of the peroxide initiated degradation reaction using system identification techniques. Although a specific example of vis-breaking of polypropylene is

  14. Physics-based Modeling of Foreign Object Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Firehole Technologies will develop proof-of-concept modeling framework for a multiscale physics-based modeling tool for predicting foreign...

  15. Physics Based Modeling and Prognostics of Electrolytic Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan; Ceyla, Jose R.; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes first principles based modeling and prognostics approach for electrolytic capacitors. Electrolytic capacitors have become critical components in electronics systems in aeronautics and other domains. Degradations and faults in DC-DC converter unit propagates to the GPS and navigation subsystems and affects the overall solution. Capacitors and MOSFETs are the two major components, which cause degradations and failures in DC-DC converters. This type of capacitors are known for its low reliability and frequent breakdown on critical systems like power supplies of avionics equipment and electrical drivers of electromechanical actuators of control surfaces. Some of the more prevalent fault effects, such as a ripple voltage surge at the power supply output can cause glitches in the GPS position and velocity output, and this, in turn, if not corrected will propagate and distort the navigation solution. In this work, we study the effects of accelerated aging due to thermal stress on different sets of capacitors under different conditions. Our focus is on deriving first principles degradation models for thermal stress conditions. Data collected from simultaneous experiments are used to validate the desired models. Our overall goal is to derive accurate models of capacitor degradation, and use them to predict performance changes in DC-DC converters.

  16. Sketching protein aggregation with a physics-based toy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, Marta; Rey, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We explore the applicability of a single-bead coarse-grained molecular model to describe the competition between protein folding and aggregation. We have designed very simple and regular sequences, based on our previous studies on peptide aggregation, that successfully fold into the three main protein structural families (all-α, all-β, and α + β). Thanks to equilibrium computer simulations, we evaluate how temperature and concentration promote aggregation. Aggregates have been obtained for all the amino acid sequences considered, showing that this process is common to all proteins, as previously stated. However, each structural family presents particular characteristics that can be related to its specific balance between hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. The model is very simple and has limitations, yet it is able to reproduce both the cooperative folding of isolated polypeptide chains with regular sequences and the formation of different types of aggregates at high concentrations.

  17. A Hybrid Physics-Based Data-Driven Approach for Point-Particle Force Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Chandler; Akiki, Georges; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    This study improves upon the physics-based pairwise interaction extended point-particle (PIEP) model. The PIEP model leverages a physical framework to predict fluid mediated interactions between solid particles. While the PIEP model is a powerful tool, its pairwise assumption leads to increased error in flows with high particle volume fractions. To reduce this error, a regression algorithm is used to model the differences between the current PIEP model's predictions and the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for an array of monodisperse solid particles subjected to various flow conditions. The resulting statistical model and the physical PIEP model are superimposed to construct a hybrid, physics-based data-driven PIEP model. It must be noted that the performance of a pure data-driven approach without the model-form provided by the physical PIEP model is substantially inferior. The hybrid model's predictive capabilities are analyzed using more DNS. In every case tested, the hybrid PIEP model's prediction are more accurate than those of physical PIEP model. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE-1315138 and the U.S. DOE, NNSA, ASC Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  18. A Physics-Based Modeling Framework for Prognostic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.

    2014-01-01

    Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) methodologies have emerged as one of the key enablers for achieving efficient system level maintenance as part of a busy operations schedule, and lowering overall life cycle costs. PHM is also emerging as a high-priority issue in critical applications, where the focus is on conducting fundamental research in the field of integrated systems health management. The term diagnostics relates to the ability to detect and isolate faults or failures in a system. Prognostics on the other hand is the process of predicting health condition and remaining useful life based on current state, previous conditions and future operating conditions. PHM methods combine sensing, data collection, interpretation of environmental, operational, and performance related parameters to indicate systems health under its actual application conditions. The development of prognostics methodologies for the electronics field has become more important as more electrical systems are being used to replace traditional systems in several applications in the aeronautics, maritime, and automotive fields. The development of prognostics methods for electronics presents several challenges due to the great variety of components used in a system, a continuous development of new electronics technologies, and a general lack of understanding of how electronics fail. Similarly with electric unmanned aerial vehicles, electrichybrid cars, and commercial passenger aircraft, we are witnessing a drastic increase in the usage of batteries to power vehicles. However, for battery-powered vehicles to operate at maximum efficiency and reliability, it becomes crucial to both monitor battery health and performance and to predict end of discharge (EOD) and end of useful life (EOL) events. We develop an electrochemistry-based model of Li-ion batteries that capture the significant electrochemical processes, are computationally efficient, capture the effects of aging, and are of suitable

  19. Characterization and Physics-Based Modeling of Electrochemical Memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    physics of photodoping in ChG materials remain unsolved. For example, the electro- chemistry of photodoping is still not fully understood and accurate... sleep period, the flip flop goes through two phases in order to restore the stored data – Precharge phase followed by Read/Restore phase. During

  20. A physically-based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  1. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, van M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  2. Problem solving based learning model with multiple representations to improve student's mental modelling ability on physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haili, Hasnawati; Maknun, Johar; Siahaan, Parsaoran

    2017-08-01

    Physics is a lessons that related to students' daily experience. Therefore, before the students studying in class formally, actually they have already have a visualization and prior knowledge about natural phenomenon and could wide it themselves. The learning process in class should be aimed to detect, process, construct, and use students' mental model. So, students' mental model agree with and builds in the right concept. The previous study held in MAN 1 Muna informs that in learning process the teacher did not pay attention students' mental model. As a consequence, the learning process has not tried to build students' mental modelling ability (MMA). The purpose of this study is to describe the improvement of students' MMA as a effect of problem solving based learning model with multiple representations approach. This study is pre experimental design with one group pre post. It is conducted in XI IPA MAN 1 Muna 2016/2017. Data collection uses problem solving test concept the kinetic theory of gasses and interview to get students' MMA. The result of this study is clarification students' MMA which is categorized in 3 category; High Mental Modelling Ability (H-MMA) for 7MMA) for 3MMA) for 0 ≤ x ≤ 3 score. The result shows that problem solving based learning model with multiple representations approach can be an alternative to be applied in improving students' MMA.

  3. Physical and JIT Model Based Hybrid Modeling Approach for Building Thermal Load Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Yutaka; Murai, Masahiko; Murayama, Dai; Motoyama, Ichiro

    Energy conservation in building fields is one of the key issues in environmental point of view as well as that of industrial, transportation and residential fields. The half of the total energy consumption in a building is occupied by HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) systems. In order to realize energy conservation of HVAC system, a thermal load prediction model for building is required. This paper propose a hybrid modeling approach with physical and Just-in-Time (JIT) model for building thermal load prediction. The proposed method has features and benefits such as, (1) it is applicable to the case in which past operation data for load prediction model learning is poor, (2) it has a self checking function, which always supervises if the data driven load prediction and the physical based one are consistent or not, so it can find if something is wrong in load prediction procedure, (3) it has ability to adjust load prediction in real-time against sudden change of model parameters and environmental conditions. The proposed method is evaluated with real operation data of an existing building, and the improvement of load prediction performance is illustrated.

  4. Physics-based Modeling Tools for Life Prediction and Durability Assessment of Advanced Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical objectives of this program are: (1) to develop a set of physics-based modeling tools to predict the initiation of hot corrosion and to address pit and...

  5. A Physics-Based Starting Model for Gas Turbine Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing an integrated starting model for gas turbine engines using a new physics-based...

  6. Factors affecting physical activity behavior based on . Transtheoretical Model in the employees of Birjand universitiesin 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Moodi

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Since the majority of employees had a sedentary lifestyle, it is a necessity to conduct some planned interventions in order to promote their physical activity behavior. This, interventions based on transtheoretical model can be helpful.

  7. A physically-based approach to reflection separation: from physical modeling to constrained optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Naejin; Tai, Yu-Wing; Shin, Joseph S

    2014-02-01

    We propose a physically-based approach to separate reflection using multiple polarized images with a background scene captured behind glass. The input consists of three polarized images, each captured from the same view point but with a different polarizer angle separated by 45 degrees. The output is the high-quality separation of the reflection and background layers from each of the input images. A main technical challenge for this problem is that the mixing coefficient for the reflection and background layers depends on the angle of incidence and the orientation of the plane of incidence, which are spatially varying over the pixels of an image. Exploiting physical properties of polarization for a double-surfaced glass medium, we propose a multiscale scheme which automatically finds the optimal separation of the reflection and background layers. Through experiments, we demonstrate that our approach can generate superior results to those of previous methods.

  8. Learning Physics-based Models in Hydrology under the Framework of Generative Adversarial Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpatne, A.; Kumar, V.

    2017-12-01

    Generative adversarial networks (GANs), that have been highly successful in a number of applications involving large volumes of labeled and unlabeled data such as computer vision, offer huge potential for modeling the dynamics of physical processes that have been traditionally studied using simulations of physics-based models. While conventional physics-based models use labeled samples of input/output variables for model calibration (estimating the right parametric forms of relationships between variables) or data assimilation (identifying the most likely sequence of system states in dynamical systems), there is a greater opportunity to explore the full power of machine learning (ML) methods (e.g, GANs) for studying physical processes currently suffering from large knowledge gaps, e.g. ground-water flow. However, success in this endeavor requires a principled way of combining the strengths of ML methods with physics-based numerical models that are founded on a wealth of scientific knowledge. This is especially important in scientific domains like hydrology where the number of data samples is small (relative to Internet-scale applications such as image recognition where machine learning methods has found great success), and the physical relationships are complex (high-dimensional) and non-stationary. We will present a series of methods for guiding the learning of GANs using physics-based models, e.g., by using the outputs of physics-based models as input data to the generator-learner framework, and by using physics-based models as generators trained using validation data in the adversarial learning framework. These methods are being developed under the broad paradigm of theory-guided data science that we are developing to integrate scientific knowledge with data science methods for accelerating scientific discovery.

  9. Structural Acoustic Physics Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    various geometries and materials. This can help drive future research on composite material applications and enhance design methods for future Navy...both the plate and the water is 0.15 inch. The plate elements are eight-node, linear , brick stress/displacement continuum elements (C3D8R) while the...water elements are eight-node, linear , brick acoustic continuum elements (AC3D8). The analyses of the flat plate model were completed using Abaqus

  10. Enhanced Physics-Based Numerical Schemes for Two Classes of Turbulence Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo G. Rebholz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present enhanced physics-based finite element schemes for two families of turbulence models, the NS- models and the Stolz-Adams approximate deconvolution models. These schemes are delicate extensions of a method created for the Navier-Stokes equations in Rebholz (2007, that achieve high physical fidelity by admitting balances of both energy and helicity that match the true physics. The schemes' development requires carefully chosen discrete curl, discrete Laplacian, and discrete filtering operators, in order to permit the necessary differential operator commutations.

  11. Evaluating crown fire rate of spread predictions from physics-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. M. Hoffman; J. Ziegler; J. Canfield; R. R. Linn; W. Mell; C. H. Sieg; F. Pimont

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the behavior of crown fires is challenging due to the complex set of coupled processes that drive the characteristics of a spreading wildfire and the large range of spatial and temporal scales over which these processes occur. Detailed physics-based modeling approaches such as FIRETEC and the Wildland Urban Interface Fire Dynamics Simulator (WFDS) simulate...

  12. Improved Characters and Student Learning Outcomes through Development of Character Education Based General Physics Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlina; Sabani; Mihardi, Satria

    2015-01-01

    Education Research in Indonesia has begun to lead to the development of character education and is no longer fixated on the outcomes of cognitive learning. This study purposed to produce character education based general physics learning model (CEBGP Learning Model) and with valid, effective and practical peripheral devices to improve character…

  13. Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model-Based Programmes in Physical Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Pablo; Grao-Cruces, Alberto; Pérez-Ordás, Raquel

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of research on the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility model-based programme within physical education. Papers selected for analysis were found through searches of Web of Science, SportDiscus (EBSCO), SCOPUS, and ERIC (ProQuest) databases. The keywords "responsibility model" and…

  14. Physics-based statistical model and simulation method of RF propagation in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Dvorak, Steven L.

    2010-09-14

    A physics-based statistical model and simulation/modeling method and system of electromagnetic wave propagation (wireless communication) in urban environments. In particular, the model is a computationally efficient close-formed parametric model of RF propagation in an urban environment which is extracted from a physics-based statistical wireless channel simulation method and system. The simulation divides the complex urban environment into a network of interconnected urban canyon waveguides which can be analyzed individually; calculates spectral coefficients of modal fields in the waveguides excited by the propagation using a database of statistical impedance boundary conditions which incorporates the complexity of building walls in the propagation model; determines statistical parameters of the calculated modal fields; and determines a parametric propagation model based on the statistical parameters of the calculated modal fields from which predictions of communications capability may be made.

  15. Prediction of brittleness based on anisotropic rock physics model for kerogen-rich shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ke-Ran; He, Zhi-Liang; Chen, Ye-Quan; Liu, Xi-Wu; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2017-12-01

    The construction of a shale rock physics model and the selection of an appropriate brittleness index ( BI) are two significant steps that can influence the accuracy of brittleness prediction. On one hand, the existing models of kerogen-rich shale are controversial, so a reasonable rock physics model needs to be built. On the other hand, several types of equations already exist for predicting the BI whose feasibility needs to be carefully considered. This study constructed a kerogen-rich rock physics model by performing the selfconsistent approximation and the differential effective medium theory to model intercoupled clay and kerogen mixtures. The feasibility of our model was confirmed by comparison with classical models, showing better accuracy. Templates were constructed based on our model to link physical properties and the BI. Different equations for the BI had different sensitivities, making them suitable for different types of formations. Equations based on Young's Modulus were sensitive to variations in lithology, while those using Lame's Coefficients were sensitive to porosity and pore fluids. Physical information must be considered to improve brittleness prediction.

  16. Identification of physical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    The problem of identification of physical models is considered within the frame of stochastic differential equations. Methods for estimation of parameters of these continuous time models based on descrete time measurements are discussed. The important algorithms of a computer program for ML or MAP...... design of experiments, which is for instance the design of an input signal that are optimal according to a criterion based on the information provided by the experiment. Also model validation is discussed. An important verification of a physical model is to compare the physical characteristics...... of the model with the available prior knowledge. The methods for identification of physical models have been applied in two different case studies. One case is the identification of thermal dynamics of building components. The work is related to a CEC research project called PASSYS (Passive Solar Components...

  17. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of a dynamic physically based slope stability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieher, Thomas; Rutzinger, Martin; Schneider-Muntau, Barbara; Perzl, Frank; Leidinger, David; Formayer, Herbert; Geitner, Clemens

    2017-06-01

    Physically based modelling of slope stability on a catchment scale is still a challenging task. When applying a physically based model on such a scale (1 : 10 000 to 1 : 50 000), parameters with a high impact on the model result should be calibrated to account for (i) the spatial variability of parameter values, (ii) shortcomings of the selected model, (iii) uncertainties of laboratory tests and field measurements or (iv) parameters that cannot be derived experimentally or measured in the field (e.g. calibration constants). While systematic parameter calibration is a common task in hydrological modelling, this is rarely done using physically based slope stability models. In the present study a dynamic, physically based, coupled hydrological-geomechanical slope stability model is calibrated based on a limited number of laboratory tests and a detailed multitemporal shallow landslide inventory covering two landslide-triggering rainfall events in the Laternser valley, Vorarlberg (Austria). Sensitive parameters are identified based on a local one-at-a-time sensitivity analysis. These parameters (hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, angle of internal friction for effective stress, cohesion for effective stress) are systematically sampled and calibrated for a landslide-triggering rainfall event in August 2005. The identified model ensemble, including 25 behavioural model runs with the highest portion of correctly predicted landslides and non-landslides, is then validated with another landslide-triggering rainfall event in May 1999. The identified model ensemble correctly predicts the location and the supposed triggering timing of 73.0 % of the observed landslides triggered in August 2005 and 91.5 % of the observed landslides triggered in May 1999. Results of the model ensemble driven with raised precipitation input reveal a slight increase in areas potentially affected by slope failure. At the same time, the peak run-off increases more markedly, suggesting that

  18. Physical Modeling of the Polyfrequency Filter-Compensating Device Based on the Capacitor-Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrin, P. A.; Gusev, G. G.; Mikheev, D. V.; Shakirzianov, F. N.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the results of physical modeling and experimental study of the frequency characteristics of the polyfrequency filter-compensating device (PFCD) based on a capacitor-coil. The amplitude- frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of the physical PFCD model were constructed and its equivalent parameters were identified. The feasibility of a PFCD in the form of a single technical device with high technical and economic characteristics was experimentally proven. In the paper, recommendations for practical applications of the capacitor-coil-based PFCD are made and the advantages of the device over known standard passive filter-compensating devices are evaluated.

  19. Empirical and physics based mathematical models of uranium hydride decomposition kinetics with quantified uncertainties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Gharagozloo, Patricia E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Metal particle beds have recently become a major technique for hydrogen storage. In order to extract hydrogen from such beds, it is crucial to understand the decomposition kinetics of the metal hydride. We are interested in obtaining a a better understanding of the uranium hydride (UH3) decomposition kinetics. We first developed an empirical model by fitting data compiled from different experimental studies in the literature and quantified the uncertainty resulting from the scattered data. We found that the decomposition time range predicted by the obtained kinetics was in a good agreement with published experimental results. Secondly, we developed a physics based mathematical model to simulate the rate of hydrogen diffusion in a hydride particle during the decomposition. We used this model to simulate the decomposition of the particles for temperatures ranging from 300K to 1000K while propagating parametric uncertainty and evaluated the kinetics from the results. We compared the kinetics parameters derived from the empirical and physics based models and found that the uncertainty in the kinetics predicted by the physics based model covers the scattered experimental data. Finally, we used the physics-based kinetics parameters to simulate the effects of boundary resistances and powder morphological changes during decomposition in a continuum level model. We found that the species change within the bed occurring during the decomposition accelerates the hydrogen flow by increasing the bed permeability, while the pressure buildup and the thermal barrier forming at the wall significantly impede the hydrogen extraction.

  20. Can We Practically Bring Physics-based Modeling Into Operational Analytics Tools?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granderson, Jessica [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bonvini, Marco [Whisker Labs, Oakland, CA (United States); Piette, Mary Ann [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Page, Janie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lin, Guanjing [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hu, R. Lilly [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-08-11

    We present that analytics software is increasingly used to improve and maintain operational efficiency in commercial buildings. Energy managers, owners, and operators are using a diversity of commercial offerings often referred to as Energy Information Systems, Fault Detection and Diagnostic (FDD) systems, or more broadly Energy Management and Information Systems, to cost-effectively enable savings on the order of ten to twenty percent. Most of these systems use data from meters and sensors, with rule-based and/or data-driven models to characterize system and building behavior. In contrast, physics-based modeling uses first-principles and engineering models (e.g., efficiency curves) to characterize system and building behavior. Historically, these physics-based approaches have been used in the design phase of the building life cycle or in retrofit analyses. Researchers have begun exploring the benefits of integrating physics-based models with operational data analytics tools, bridging the gap between design and operations. In this paper, we detail the development and operator use of a software tool that uses hybrid data-driven and physics-based approaches to cooling plant FDD and optimization. Specifically, we describe the system architecture, models, and FDD and optimization algorithms; advantages and disadvantages with respect to purely data-driven approaches; and practical implications for scaling and replicating these techniques. Finally, we conclude with an evaluation of the future potential for such tools and future research opportunities.

  1. Solar Radiation Received by Slopes Using COMS Imagery, a Physically Based Radiation Model, and GLOBE

    OpenAIRE

    Yeom, Jong-Min; Seo, You-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Kyung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the solar radiation received by slopes for all of Korea, including areas that are not measured by ground station measurements, through using satellites and topographical data. When estimating insolation with satellite, we used a physical model to measure the amount of hourly based solar surface insolation. Furthermore, we also considered the effects of topography using the Global Land One-Kilometer Base Elevation (GLOBE) digital elevation model (DEM) for the actual amount of...

  2. Physics and financial economics (1776–2014): puzzles, Ising and agent-based models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sornette, Didier

    2014-01-01

    This short review presents a selected history of the mutual fertilization between physics and economics—from Isaac Newton and Adam Smith to the present. The fundamentally different perspectives embraced in theories developed in financial economics compared with physics are dissected with the examples of the volatility smile and of the excess volatility puzzle. The role of the Ising model of phase transitions to model social and financial systems is reviewed, with the concepts of random utilities and the logit model as the analog of the Boltzmann factor in statistical physics. Recent extensions in terms of quantum decision theory are also covered. A wealth of models are discussed briefly that build on the Ising model and generalize it to account for the many stylized facts of financial markets. A summary of the relevance of the Ising model and its extensions is provided to account for financial bubbles and crashes. The review would be incomplete if it did not cover the dynamical field of agent-based models (ABMs), also known as computational economic models, of which the Ising-type models are just special ABM implementations. We formulate the ‘Emerging Intelligence Market Hypothesis’ to reconcile the pervasive presence of ‘noise traders’ with the near efficiency of financial markets. Finally, we note that evolutionary biology, more than physics, is now playing a growing role to inspire models of financial markets. (key issues reviews)

  3. Physics and financial economics (1776-2014): puzzles, Ising and agent-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier

    2014-06-01

    This short review presents a selected history of the mutual fertilization between physics and economics—from Isaac Newton and Adam Smith to the present. The fundamentally different perspectives embraced in theories developed in financial economics compared with physics are dissected with the examples of the volatility smile and of the excess volatility puzzle. The role of the Ising model of phase transitions to model social and financial systems is reviewed, with the concepts of random utilities and the logit model as the analog of the Boltzmann factor in statistical physics. Recent extensions in terms of quantum decision theory are also covered. A wealth of models are discussed briefly that build on the Ising model and generalize it to account for the many stylized facts of financial markets. A summary of the relevance of the Ising model and its extensions is provided to account for financial bubbles and crashes. The review would be incomplete if it did not cover the dynamical field of agent-based models (ABMs), also known as computational economic models, of which the Ising-type models are just special ABM implementations. We formulate the ‘Emerging Intelligence Market Hypothesis’ to reconcile the pervasive presence of ‘noise traders’ with the near efficiency of financial markets. Finally, we note that evolutionary biology, more than physics, is now playing a growing role to inspire models of financial markets.

  4. Physics and financial economics (1776-2014): puzzles, Ising and agent-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier

    2014-06-01

    This short review presents a selected history of the mutual fertilization between physics and economics--from Isaac Newton and Adam Smith to the present. The fundamentally different perspectives embraced in theories developed in financial economics compared with physics are dissected with the examples of the volatility smile and of the excess volatility puzzle. The role of the Ising model of phase transitions to model social and financial systems is reviewed, with the concepts of random utilities and the logit model as the analog of the Boltzmann factor in statistical physics. Recent extensions in terms of quantum decision theory are also covered. A wealth of models are discussed briefly that build on the Ising model and generalize it to account for the many stylized facts of financial markets. A summary of the relevance of the Ising model and its extensions is provided to account for financial bubbles and crashes. The review would be incomplete if it did not cover the dynamical field of agent-based models (ABMs), also known as computational economic models, of which the Ising-type models are just special ABM implementations. We formulate the 'Emerging Intelligence Market Hypothesis' to reconcile the pervasive presence of 'noise traders' with the near efficiency of financial markets. Finally, we note that evolutionary biology, more than physics, is now playing a growing role to inspire models of financial markets.

  5. Design and implementation of space physics multi-model application integration based on web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenping; Zou, Ziming

    With the development of research on space environment and space science, how to develop network online computing environment of space weather, space environment and space physics models for Chinese scientific community is becoming more and more important in recent years. Currently, There are two software modes on space physics multi-model application integrated system (SPMAIS) such as C/S and B/S. the C/S mode which is traditional and stand-alone, demands a team or workshop from many disciplines and specialties to build their own multi-model application integrated system, that requires the client must be deployed in different physical regions when user visits the integrated system. Thus, this requirement brings two shortcomings: reducing the efficiency of researchers who use the models to compute; inconvenience of accessing the data. Therefore, it is necessary to create a shared network resource access environment which could help users to visit the computing resources of space physics models through the terminal quickly for conducting space science research and forecasting spatial environment. The SPMAIS develops high-performance, first-principles in B/S mode based on computational models of the space environment and uses these models to predict "Space Weather", to understand space mission data and to further our understanding of the solar system. the main goal of space physics multi-model application integration system (SPMAIS) is to provide an easily and convenient user-driven online models operating environment. up to now, the SPMAIS have contained dozens of space environment models , including international AP8/AE8 IGRF T96 models and solar proton prediction model geomagnetic transmission model etc. which are developed by Chinese scientists. another function of SPMAIS is to integrate space observation data sets which offers input data for models online high-speed computing. In this paper, service-oriented architecture (SOA) concept that divides system into

  6. A physics-based potential and electric field model of a nanoscale ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we have developed a physics-based model for surface potential, channel potential, electric field and drain current for AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor with high-K gate dielectric using two-dimensional Poisson equation under full depletion approximation with the inclusion of effect of polarization ...

  7. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-04-01

    This factsheet describes a project that developed and demonstrated a new manufacturing-informed design framework that utilizes advanced multi-scale, physics-based process modeling to dramatically improve manufacturing productivity and quality in machining operations while reducing the cost of machined components.

  8. A physics-based potential and electric field model of a nanoscale ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... paper, we have developed a physics-based model for surface potential, channel potential, electric field and drain current for AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor with high-K gate dielectric using two-dimensional Poisson equation under full depletion approximation with the inclusion of effect of polarization charges.

  9. A physics-based temperature model for ultrasonic vibration-assisted pelleting of cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoxu; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Meng; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    Temperature in ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting of cellulosic biomass has a significant impact on pellet quality. However, there are no reports on temperature models for UV-A pelleting of cellulosic biomass. The development of a physics-based temperature model can help to explain experimentally determined relations between UV-A pelleting process variables and temperature, and provide guidelines to optimize these process variables in order to produce pellets of good quality. This paper presents such a model for UV-A pelleting of cellulosic biomass. Development of the model is described first. Then temperature distribution is investigated using the model, and temperature difference between the top and the bottom surfaces of a pellet is explained. Based on this model, relations between process variables (ultrasonic power and pelleting duration) and temperature are predicted. Experiments were conducted for model verification, and the results agreed well with model predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A unified dislocation density-dependent physical-based constitutive model for cold metal forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, K.; Motaman, A. H.; Prahl, U.; Bleck, W.

    2017-10-01

    Dislocation-density-dependent physical-based constitutive models of metal plasticity while are computationally efficient and history-dependent, can accurately account for varying process parameters such as strain, strain rate and temperature; different loading modes such as continuous deformation, creep and relaxation; microscopic metallurgical processes; and varying chemical composition within an alloy family. Since these models are founded on essential phenomena dominating the deformation, they have a larger range of usability and validity. Also, they are suitable for manufacturing chain simulations since they can efficiently compute the cumulative effect of the various manufacturing processes by following the material state through the entire manufacturing chain and also interpass periods and give a realistic prediction of the material behavior and final product properties. In the physical-based constitutive model of cold metal plasticity introduced in this study, physical processes influencing cold and warm plastic deformation in polycrystalline metals are described using physical/metallurgical internal variables such as dislocation density and effective grain size. The evolution of these internal variables are calculated using adequate equations that describe the physical processes dominating the material behavior during cold plastic deformation. For validation, the model is numerically implemented in general implicit isotropic elasto-viscoplasticity algorithm as a user-defined material subroutine (UMAT) in ABAQUS/Standard and used for finite element simulation of upsetting tests and a complete cold forging cycle of case hardenable MnCr steel family.

  11. Comparison of a Conceptual Groundwater Model and Physically Based Groundwater Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Zammit, C.; Griffiths, J.; Moore, C.; Woods, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource for human activities including agricultural practice and urban water demand. Hydrologic modelling is an important way to study groundwater recharge, movement and discharge, and its response to both human activity and climate change. To understand the groundwater hydrologic processes nationally in New Zealand, we have developed a conceptually based groundwater flow model, which is fully integrated into a national surface-water model (TopNet), and able to simulate groundwater recharge, movement, and interaction with surface water. To demonstrate the capability of this groundwater model (TopNet-GW), we applied the model to an irrigated area with water shortage and pollution problems in the upper Ruamahanga catchment in Great Wellington Region, New Zealand, and compared its performance with a physically-based groundwater model (MODFLOW). The comparison includes river flow at flow gauging sites, and interaction between groundwater and river. Results showed that the TopNet-GW produced similar flow and groundwater interaction patterns as the MODFLOW model, but took less computation time. This shows the conceptually-based groundwater model has the potential to simulate national groundwater process, and could be used as a surrogate for the more physically based model.

  12. The effects of inquiry based ecopedagogy model on pre-service physics teachers' motivation and achievement in environmental physics instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napitupulu, Nur Dewi; Munandar, Achmad

    2017-05-01

    —Motivation plays a crucial role in learning. Motivation energizes the behavior of the individual. It also directs the behavior towards specific goals. It helps students acquire knowledge, increase initiation, persist in activities, improve achievement, and develop a sense of discipline. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the achievement and motivation of pre-service teacher of the Inquiry based ecopedagogy (In-EcoP) learning process applied to environmental physics instruction. The motivation adapted to Keller's four dimensions, namely attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction. The study involved 66 students which are divided into two classes of an environmental physics instruction. The first class used the traditional lecture format while the In-EcoP model was used in the second. The research data were obtained through the environmental physics concept test and motivation questionnaire. The data analysis was conducted using a quantitative study approach and involved a motivational survey and an academic achievement test. It was found that the experimental group students were achieve more than the students in the control group. An increase in motivation and academic achievement of the students in the experimental group was identified as well. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of the In-EcoP model for enhancing pre-service teacher motivation and academic achievement in environmental physics instruction.

  13. Physics Model-Based Scatter Correction in Multi-Source Interior Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hao; Li, Bin; Jia, Xun; Cao, Guohua

    2018-02-01

    Multi-source interior computed tomography (CT) has a great potential to provide ultra-fast and organ-oriented imaging at low radiation dose. However, X-ray cross scattering from multiple simultaneously activated X-ray imaging chains compromises imaging quality. Previously, we published two hardware-based scatter correction methods for multi-source interior CT. Here, we propose a software-based scatter correction method, with the benefit of no need for hardware modifications. The new method is based on a physics model and an iterative framework. The physics model was derived analytically, and was used to calculate X-ray scattering signals in both forward direction and cross directions in multi-source interior CT. The physics model was integrated to an iterative scatter correction framework to reduce scatter artifacts. The method was applied to phantom data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical experimentation that were designed to emulate the image acquisition in a multi-source interior CT architecture recently proposed by our team. The proposed scatter correction method reduced scatter artifacts significantly, even with only one iteration. Within a few iterations, the reconstructed images fast converged toward the "scatter-free" reference images. After applying the scatter correction method, the maximum CT number error at the region-of-interests (ROIs) was reduced to 46 HU in numerical phantom dataset and 48 HU in physical phantom dataset respectively, and the contrast-noise-ratio at those ROIs increased by up to 44.3% and up to 19.7%, respectively. The proposed physics model-based iterative scatter correction method could be useful for scatter correction in dual-source or multi-source CT.

  14. A randomized trial to promote physical activity during pregnancy based on health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafieian, Mahnaz; Kazemi, Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    The positive effects of physical activities during pregnancy are totally recognized but due to lack of knowledge and negative aspect toward it, physical activities decrease throughout the pregnancy period. To find the appropriate model to enhance physical activity during pregnancy, the education that are focused on health belief constructs about physical activity during pregnancy, were assessed. This was a semi-experimental study conducted on 90 pregnant women in their first trimester that were divided into two groups of control and intervention. After assessing health belief model (HBM) constructs and measuring the duration of severe/moderate-intensity) physical activity through a questionnaire, participants were divided into two groups of 45. The intervention group received education about physical activity based on HBM and the control group received dental health education. In the second trimester again, the constructs of HBM and the duration of physical activities were evaluated. Significant level was set at P health beliefs in pregnant women, but this increase does not reach the adequate level.

  15. A physics-based probabilistic forecasting model for rainfall-induced shallow landslides at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Zhao, Luqiang; Delgado-Tellez, Ricardo; Bao, Hongjun

    2018-03-01

    Conventional outputs of physics-based landslide forecasting models are presented as deterministic warnings by calculating the safety factor (Fs) of potentially dangerous slopes. However, these models are highly dependent on variables such as cohesion force and internal friction angle which are affected by a high degree of uncertainty especially at a regional scale, resulting in unacceptable uncertainties of Fs. Under such circumstances, the outputs of physical models are more suitable if presented in the form of landslide probability values. In order to develop such models, a method to link the uncertainty of soil parameter values with landslide probability is devised. This paper proposes the use of Monte Carlo methods to quantitatively express uncertainty by assigning random values to physical variables inside a defined interval. The inequality Fs forecasting model for rainfall-induced shallow landslides. The prediction ability of this model was tested in a case study, in which simulated forecasting of landslide disasters associated with heavy rainfalls on 9 July 2013 in the Wenchuan earthquake region of Sichuan province, China, was performed. The proposed model successfully forecasted landslides in 159 of the 176 disaster points registered by the geo-environmental monitoring station of Sichuan province. Such testing results indicate that the new model can be operated in a highly efficient way and show more reliable results, attributable to its high prediction accuracy. Accordingly, the new model can be potentially packaged into a forecasting system for shallow landslides providing technological support for the mitigation of these disasters at regional scale.

  16. Physics-Based Identification, Modeling and Risk Management for Aeroelastic Flutter and Limit-Cycle Oscillations (LCO), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research program will develop a physics-based identification, modeling and risk management infrastructure for aeroelastic transonic flutter and...

  17. Real time polymer nanocomposites-based physical nanosensors: theory and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Stefano; Shunin, Yuri; Gopeyenko, Victor; Lobanova-Shunina, Tamara; Burlutskaya, Nataly; Zhukovskii, Yuri

    2017-09-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons nanostructures, serving as the basis for the creation of physical pressure and temperature nanosensors, are considered as tools for ecological monitoring and medical applications. Fragments of nanocarbon inclusions with different morphologies, presenting a disordered system, are regarded as models for nanocomposite materials based on carbon nanoсluster suspension in dielectric polymer environments (e.g., epoxy resins). We have formulated the approach of conductivity calculations for carbon-based polymer nanocomposites using the effective media cluster approach, disordered systems theory and conductivity mechanisms analysis, and obtained the calibration dependences. Providing a proper description of electric responses in nanosensoring systems, we demonstrate the implementation of advanced simulation models suitable for real time control nanosystems. We also consider the prospects and prototypes of the proposed physical nanosensor models providing the comparisons with experimental calibration dependences.

  18. A physics-based probabilistic forecasting model for rainfall-induced shallow landslides at regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional outputs of physics-based landslide forecasting models are presented as deterministic warnings by calculating the safety factor (Fs of potentially dangerous slopes. However, these models are highly dependent on variables such as cohesion force and internal friction angle which are affected by a high degree of uncertainty especially at a regional scale, resulting in unacceptable uncertainties of Fs. Under such circumstances, the outputs of physical models are more suitable if presented in the form of landslide probability values. In order to develop such models, a method to link the uncertainty of soil parameter values with landslide probability is devised. This paper proposes the use of Monte Carlo methods to quantitatively express uncertainty by assigning random values to physical variables inside a defined interval. The inequality Fs < 1 is tested for each pixel in n simulations which are integrated in a unique parameter. This parameter links the landslide probability to the uncertainties of soil mechanical parameters and is used to create a physics-based probabilistic forecasting model for rainfall-induced shallow landslides. The prediction ability of this model was tested in a case study, in which simulated forecasting of landslide disasters associated with heavy rainfalls on 9 July 2013 in the Wenchuan earthquake region of Sichuan province, China, was performed. The proposed model successfully forecasted landslides in 159 of the 176 disaster points registered by the geo-environmental monitoring station of Sichuan province. Such testing results indicate that the new model can be operated in a highly efficient way and show more reliable results, attributable to its high prediction accuracy. Accordingly, the new model can be potentially packaged into a forecasting system for shallow landslides providing technological support for the mitigation of these disasters at regional scale.

  19. Evaluating performance of simplified physically based models for shallow landslide susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Formetta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced shallow landslides can lead to loss of life and significant damage to private and public properties, transportation systems, etc. Predicting locations that might be susceptible to shallow landslides is a complex task and involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geology, hydrogeology, geomorphology, and statistics. Two main approaches are commonly used: statistical or physically based models. Reliable model applications involve automatic parameter calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, and model sensitivity analyses. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify, and compare different models and model performance indicators in order to identify and select the models whose behavior is the most reliable for particular case studies.The procedure was implemented in a package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3 and a component for model verification. It computes eight goodness-of-fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurement data. The integration of the package in NewAge-JGrass uses other components, such as geographic information system tools, to manage input–output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy along the Salerno–Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia. The area is extensively subject to rainfall-induced shallow landslides mainly because of its complex geology and climatology. The analysis was carried out considering all the combinations of the eight optimized indices and the three models. Parameter calibration, verification, and model performance assessment were performed by a comparison with a detailed landslide

  20. Physics-Based Fragment Acceleration Modeling for Pressurized Tank Burst Risk Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Ted A.; Lawrence, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    As part of comprehensive efforts to develop physics-based risk assessment techniques for space systems at NASA, coupled computational fluid and rigid body dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the flow mechanisms that accelerate tank fragments in bursting pressurized vessels. Simulations of several configurations were compared to analyses based on the industry-standard Baker explosion model, and were used to formulate an improved version of the model. The standard model, which neglects an external fluid, was found to agree best with simulation results only in configurations where the internal-to-external pressure ratio is very high and fragment curvature is small. The improved model introduces terms that accommodate an external fluid and better account for variations based on circumferential fragment count. Physics-based analysis was critical in increasing the model's range of applicability. The improved tank burst model can be used to produce more accurate risk assessments of space vehicle failure modes that involve high-speed debris, such as exploding propellant tanks and bursting rocket engines.

  1. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  2. A Model-Based Approach to Support Validation of Medical Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenardo C. Silva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical Cyber-Physical Systems (MCPS are context-aware, life-critical systems with patient safety as the main concern, demanding rigorous processes for validation to guarantee user requirement compliance and specification-oriented correctness. In this article, we propose a model-based approach for early validation of MCPS, focusing on promoting reusability and productivity. It enables system developers to build MCPS formal models based on a library of patient and medical device models, and simulate the MCPS to identify undesirable behaviors at design time. Our approach has been applied to three different clinical scenarios to evaluate its reusability potential for different contexts. We have also validated our approach through an empirical evaluation with developers to assess productivity and reusability. Finally, our models have been formally verified considering functional and safety requirements and model coverage.

  3. A Model-Based Approach to Support Validation of Medical Cyber-Physical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lenardo C; Almeida, Hyggo O; Perkusich, Angelo; Perkusich, Mirko

    2015-10-30

    Medical Cyber-Physical Systems (MCPS) are context-aware, life-critical systems with patient safety as the main concern, demanding rigorous processes for validation to guarantee user requirement compliance and specification-oriented correctness. In this article, we propose a model-based approach for early validation of MCPS, focusing on promoting reusability and productivity. It enables system developers to build MCPS formal models based on a library of patient and medical device models, and simulate the MCPS to identify undesirable behaviors at design time. Our approach has been applied to three different clinical scenarios to evaluate its reusability potential for different contexts. We have also validated our approach through an empirical evaluation with developers to assess productivity and reusability. Finally, our models have been formally verified considering functional and safety requirements and model coverage.

  4. A review of selected topics in physics based modeling for tunnel field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esseni, David; Pala, Marco; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Alper, Cem; Rollo, Tommaso

    2017-08-01

    The research field on tunnel-FETs (TFETs) has been rapidly developing in the last ten years, driven by the quest for a new electronic switch operating at a supply voltage well below 1 V and thus delivering substantial improvements in the energy efficiency of integrated circuits. This paper reviews several aspects related to physics based modeling in TFETs, and shows how the description of these transistors implies a remarkable innovation and poses new challenges compared to conventional MOSFETs. A hierarchy of numerical models exist for TFETs covering a wide range of predictive capabilities and computational complexities. We start by reviewing seminal contributions on direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) modeling in semiconductors, from which most TCAD models have been actually derived. Then we move to the features and limitations of TCAD models themselves and to the discussion of what we define non-self-consistent quantum models, where BTBT is computed with rigorous quantum-mechanical models starting from frozen potential profiles and closed-boundary Schrödinger equation problems. We will then address models that solve the open-boundary Schrödinger equation problem, based either on the non-equilibrium Green’s function NEGF or on the quantum-transmitting-boundary formalism, and show how the computational burden of these models may vary in a wide range depending on the Hamiltonian employed in the calculations. A specific section is devoted to TFETs based on 2D crystals and van der Waals hetero-structures. The main goal of this paper is to provide the reader with an introduction to the most important physics based models for TFETs, and with a possible guidance to the wide and rapidly developing literature in this exciting research field.

  5. Models in physics teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneubil, Fabiana Botelho

    2016-01-01

    In this work we show an approach based on models, for an usual subject in an introductory physics course, in order to foster discussions on the nature of physical knowledge. The introduction of elements of the nature of knowledge in physics lessons has been emphasised by many educators and one uses...... the case of metals to show the theoretical and phenomenological dimensions of physics. The discussion is made by means of four questions whose answers cannot be reached neither for theoretical elements nor experimental measurements. Between these two dimensions it is necessary to realise a series...... of reasoning steps to deepen the comprehension of microscopic concepts, such as electrical resistivity, drift velocity and free electrons. When this approach is highlighted, beyond the physical content, aspects of its nature become explicit and may improve the structuring of knowledge for learners...

  6. A physics-based compact model of ferroelectric tunnel junction for memory and logic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Kang, Wang; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Anes; Zhang, Yue; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Chappert, Claude; Zhang, Youguang

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) is able to store non-volatile data in the spontaneous polarization direction of ferroelectric tunnel barrier. Recent progress has demonstrated its great potential to build up the next generation non-volatile memory and logic (NVM and NVL) thanks to the high OFF/ON resistance ratio, fast operation speed, low write power, non-destructive readout and so on. In this paper, we present the first physics-based compact model for Co/BTO/LSMO FTJ nanopillar, which was reported experimentally to exhibit excellent NVM performance. This model integrates related physical models of tunnel resistance, static switching voltage and dynamic switching delay. Its accuracy is shown by the good agreement between numerical model simulation and experimental measurements. This compact model has been developed in Verilog-A language and validated by single-cell simulation on Cadence Virtuoso Platform. Hybrid simulations based on 40 nm-technology node of FTJ memory arrays and non-volatile full adder were performed to demonstrate the efficiency of our compact model for the simulation and analysis of CMOS/FTJ integrated circuits. (paper)

  7. A physics-based compact model of ferroelectric tunnel junction for memory and logic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Kang, Wang; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Anes; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Youguang; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Chappert, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) is able to store non-volatile data in the spontaneous polarization direction of ferroelectric tunnel barrier. Recent progress has demonstrated its great potential to build up the next generation non-volatile memory and logic (NVM and NVL) thanks to the high OFF/ON resistance ratio, fast operation speed, low write power, non-destructive readout and so on. In this paper, we present the first physics-based compact model for Co/BTO/LSMO FTJ nanopillar, which was reported experimentally to exhibit excellent NVM performance. This model integrates related physical models of tunnel resistance, static switching voltage and dynamic switching delay. Its accuracy is shown by the good agreement between numerical model simulation and experimental measurements. This compact model has been developed in Verilog-A language and validated by single-cell simulation on Cadence Virtuoso Platform. Hybrid simulations based on 40 nm-technology node of FTJ memory arrays and non-volatile full adder were performed to demonstrate the efficiency of our compact model for the simulation and analysis of CMOS/FTJ integrated circuits.

  8. Biodiversity patterns from an individual-based competition model on niche and physical spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort, H; Inchausti, P

    2012-01-01

    We formulate a microscopic (individual-based and spatially explicit) ecological model to assess whether key patterns of community structure, species-packing and the spatial distribution of species are robust to relaxing the mean-field approximation made in classical ecological models. In this model of community dynamics species compete both locally in physical space and along a niche axis and it includes just two free parameters, σ, controlling the extent of competition in niche space, and t, the simulation time. This minimalistic model (1) reproduces with considerable accuracy the dynamic sequence of relative species abundances, biodiversity indices and species–area relationships that are empirically found in censuses of trees in a well-studied tropical forest; (2) shows that the clumpy pattern of niches leading to long-lasting species coexistence obtained by classical competition models is robust to relaxing the mean-field assumption. Nevertheless species that are clumped in niche space are simultaneously spatially segregated

  9. Physically Based Modeling and Simulation with Dynamic Spherical Volumetric Simplex Splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yunhao; Hua, Jing; Qin, Hong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel computational modeling and simulation framework based on dynamic spherical volumetric simplex splines. The framework can handle the modeling and simulation of genus-zero objects with real physical properties. In this framework, we first develop an accurate and efficient algorithm to reconstruct the high-fidelity digital model of a real-world object with spherical volumetric simplex splines which can represent with accuracy geometric, material, and other properties of the object simultaneously. With the tight coupling of Lagrangian mechanics, the dynamic volumetric simplex splines representing the object can accurately simulate its physical behavior because it can unify the geometric and material properties in the simulation. The visualization can be directly computed from the object’s geometric or physical representation based on the dynamic spherical volumetric simplex splines during simulation without interpolation or resampling. We have applied the framework for biomechanic simulation of brain deformations, such as brain shifting during the surgery and brain injury under blunt impact. We have compared our simulation results with the ground truth obtained through intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging and the real biomechanic experiments. The evaluations demonstrate the excellent performance of our new technique. PMID:20161636

  10. Sensor selection of helicopter transmission systems based on physical model and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Kehong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the helicopter transmission systems, it is important to monitor and track the tooth damage evolution using lots of sensors and detection methods. This paper develops a novel approach for sensor selection based on physical model and sensitivity analysis. Firstly, a physical model of tooth damage and mesh stiffness is built. Secondly, some effective condition indicators (CIs are presented, and the optimal CIs set is selected by comparing their test statistics according to Mann–Kendall test. Afterwards, the selected CIs are used to generate a health indicator (HI through sen slop estimator. Then, the sensors are selected according to the monotonic relevance and sensitivity to the damage levels. Finally, the proposed method is verified by the simulation and experimental data. The results show that the approach can provide a guide for health monitoring of helicopter transmission systems, and it is effective to reduce the test cost and improve the system’s reliability.

  11. Modeling and Application of Vehicular Cyber Physical System Based Petri Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mobile cyber physical system (MCPS has been a hot research area, where mobile nodes can mobile, and communicate with each other. As a typical MCPS, vehicular cyber physical system (VCPS plays an important role in intelligent transportation, especially in collision avoidance. There is no, however, a formal modeling and analysis method for VCPS. In the paper, the modeling method based Petri nets (PN is presented. Furthermore, the behavior expression analysis method is also presented which can deal with arbitrary distribution timed transitions. Finally, a case is introduced to verify the effectiveness about proposed method, and the results show that VCPS can greatly reduce the reaction time of vehicles behind when emergent accident occurs and then enhance the traffic safety.

  12. Robust Building Energy Load Forecasting Using Physically-Based Kernel Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Krishnan Prakash

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Robust and accurate building energy load forecasting is important for helping building managers and utilities to plan, budget, and strategize energy resources in advance. With recent prevalent adoption of smart-meters in buildings, a significant amount of building energy consumption data became available. Many studies have developed physics-based white box models and data-driven black box models to predict building energy consumption; however, they require extensive prior knowledge about building system, need a large set of training data, or lack robustness to different forecasting scenarios. In this paper, we introduce a new building energy forecasting method based on Gaussian Process Regression (GPR that incorporates physical insights about load data characteristics to improve accuracy while reducing training requirements. The GPR is a non-parametric regression method that models the data as a joint Gaussian distribution with mean and covariance functions and forecast using the Bayesian updating. We model the covariance function of the GPR to reflect the data patterns in different forecasting horizon scenarios, as prior knowledge. Our method takes advantage of the modeling flexibility and computational efficiency of the GPR while benefiting from the physical insights to further improve the training efficiency and accuracy. We evaluate our method with three field datasets from two university campuses (Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford University for both short- and long-term load forecasting. The results show that our method performs more accurately, especially when the training dataset is small, compared to other state-of-the-art forecasting models (up to 2.95 times smaller prediction error.

  13. Comparison of physically based constitutive models characterizing armor steel over wide temperature and strain rate ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zejian; Huang, Fenglei

    2012-01-01

    Both descriptive and predictive capabilities of five physically based constitutive models (PB, NNL, ZA, VA, and RK) are investigated and compared systematically, in characterizing plastic behavior of the 603 steel at temperatures ranging from 288 to 873 K, and strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 4500 s −1 . Determination of the constitutive parameters is introduced in detail for each model. Validities of the established models are checked by strain rate jump tests performed under different loading conditions. The results show that the RK and NNL models have better performance in the description of material behavior, especially the work-hardening effect, while the PB and VA models predict better. The inconsistency that is observed between the capabilities of description and prediction of the models indicates the existence of the minimum number of required fitting data, reflecting the degree of a model's requirement for basic data in parameter calibration. It is also found that the description capability of a model is dependent to a large extent on both its form and the number of its constitutive parameters, while the precision of prediction relies largely on the performance of description. In the selection of constitutive models, the experimental data and the constitutive models should be considered synthetically to obtain a better efficiency in material behavior characterization

  14. Comparison of physically based constitutive models characterizing armor steel over wide temperature and strain rate ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zejian; Huang, Fenglei

    2012-01-01

    Both descriptive and predictive capabilities of five physically based constitutive models (PB, NNL, ZA, VA, and RK) are investigated and compared systematically, in characterizing plastic behavior of the 603 steel at temperatures ranging from 288 to 873 K, and strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 4500 s-1. Determination of the constitutive parameters is introduced in detail for each model. Validities of the established models are checked by strain rate jump tests performed under different loading conditions. The results show that the RK and NNL models have better performance in the description of material behavior, especially the work-hardening effect, while the PB and VA models predict better. The inconsistency that is observed between the capabilities of description and prediction of the models indicates the existence of the minimum number of required fitting data, reflecting the degree of a model's requirement for basic data in parameter calibration. It is also found that the description capability of a model is dependent to a large extent on both its form and the number of its constitutive parameters, while the precision of prediction relies largely on the performance of description. In the selection of constitutive models, the experimental data and the constitutive models should be considered synthetically to obtain a better efficiency in material behavior characterization.

  15. Solar Radiation Received by Slopes Using COMS Imagery, a Physically Based Radiation Model, and GLOBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Yeom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study mapped the solar radiation received by slopes for all of Korea, including areas that are not measured by ground station measurements, through using satellites and topographical data. When estimating insolation with satellite, we used a physical model to measure the amount of hourly based solar surface insolation. Furthermore, we also considered the effects of topography using the Global Land One-Kilometer Base Elevation (GLOBE digital elevation model (DEM for the actual amount of incident solar radiation according to solar geometry. The surface insolation mapping, by integrating a physical model with the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS Meteorological Imager (MI image, was performed through a comparative analysis with ground-based observation data (pyranometer. Original and topographically corrected solar radiation maps were created and their characteristics analyzed. Both the original and the topographically corrected solar energy resource maps captured the temporal variations in atmospheric conditions, such as the movement of seasonal rain fronts during summer. In contrast, although the original solar radiation map had a low insolation value over mountain areas with a high rate of cloudiness, the topographically corrected solar radiation map provided a better description of the actual surface geometric characteristics.

  16. A Novel, Physics-Based Data Analytics Framework for Reducing Systematic Model Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W.; Liu, Y.; Vandenberghe, F. C.; Knievel, J. C.; Hacker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Most climate and weather models exhibit systematic biases, such as under predicted diurnal temperatures in the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model. General approaches to alleviate the systematic biases include improving model physics and numerics, improving data assimilation, and bias correction through post-processing. In this study, we developed a novel, physics-based data analytics framework in post processing by taking advantage of ever-growing high-resolution (spatial and temporal) observational and modeling data. In the framework, a spatiotemporal PCA (Principal Component Analysis) is first applied on the observational data to filter out noise and information on scales that a model may not be able to resolve. The filtered observations are then used to establish regression relationships with archived model forecasts in the same spatiotemporal domain. The regressions along with the model forecasts predict the projected observations in the forecasting period. The pre-regression PCA procedure strengthens regressions, and enhances predictive skills. We then combine the projected observations with the past observations to apply PCA iteratively to derive the final forecasts. This post-regression PCA reconstructs variances and scales of information that are lost in the regression. The framework was examined and validated with 24 days of 5-minute observational data and archives from the WRF model at 27 stations near Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. The validation shows significant bias reduction in the diurnal cycle of predicted surface air temperature compared to the direct output from the WRF model. Additionally, unlike other post-processing bias correction schemes, the data analytics framework does not require long-term historic data and model archives. A week or two of the data is enough to take into account changes in weather regimes. The program, written in python, is also computationally efficient.

  17. Development of Web-Based Formative Assessment Model to Enhance Physics Concepts of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ediyanto Ediyanto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pengembangan Model Penilaian Formatif Berbasis Web untuk Meningkatkan Pemahaman Konsep Fisika Siswa   Abstract: There are two approaches of learning assessment, called formative and summative. The formative assessment is applicable because it involves students directly during the process, may im-prove these students perceptive. The limited time in class makes this process difficult, then the de-velopment of both online and offline formative assessment, provide responsive feedback for teachers and students, is definitely needed. This research goal is to produce a model of web-based formative assessment for physics. This study used research design and development of the formative assess-ment-model. Questionnaire is used for product validation, consist of validation of textbook,  instrument of pre and post-learning quizzes and web product.The result of quantitative analysis shows that the developed product is valid without any revision. Based on qualitative data, the product revision follows comments and suggestions from expert’s validation, teachers and students. The product testing shows that the formative assessment-model may improve students’ conceptual comprehension. Key Words: formatice assessment-model, students’ conceptual comprehension of physics, web-based   Abstrak: Penilaian terbagi menjadi dua macam yaitu penilaian formatif dan penilaian sumatif. Penilaian formatif tepat digunakan karena prosesnya melibatkan siswa secara langsung di dalam proses pembelajaran dan mampu meningkatkan pemahaman konsep siswa. Keterbatasan waktu di kelas menyebabkan proses ini sulit dilakukan, maka perlu dikembangkan model penilaian formatif secara online dan off-line yang dapat memberikan umpan balik yang cepat bagi siswa dan guru. Tujuan dari penelitian adalah menghasilkan model web-based penilaian formatif untuk pembelajaran fisika. Penelitian menggunakan rancangan penelitian dan pengembangan model penilaian formatif. Instrumen yang digunakan

  18. A Physical Analog Model of Strike-Slip Faulting for Model-Based Inquiry in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, I. S.; Glesener, G.

    2013-12-01

    classroom setting. We hope to encourage discussion from session attendees on the use of physical analog models and real-time quantitative model-based inquiry in the development of the next generation of geoscientists.

  19. Physics-informed machine learning approach for reconstructing Reynolds stress modeling discrepancies based on DNS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Wu, Jin-Long; Xiao, Heng

    2017-03-01

    Turbulence modeling is a critical component in numerical simulations of industrial flows based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. However, after decades of efforts in the turbulence modeling community, universally applicable RANS models with predictive capabilities are still lacking. Large discrepancies in the RANS-modeled Reynolds stresses are the main source that limits the predictive accuracy of RANS models. Identifying these discrepancies is of significance to possibly improve the RANS modeling. In this work, we propose a data-driven, physics-informed machine learning approach for reconstructing discrepancies in RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. The discrepancies are formulated as functions of the mean flow features. By using a modern machine learning technique based on random forests, the discrepancy functions are trained by existing direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases and then used to predict Reynolds stress discrepancies in different flows where data are not available. The proposed method is evaluated by two classes of flows: (1) fully developed turbulent flows in a square duct at various Reynolds numbers and (2) flows with massive separations. In separated flows, two training flow scenarios of increasing difficulties are considered: (1) the flow in the same periodic hills geometry yet at a lower Reynolds number and (2) the flow in a different hill geometry with a similar recirculation zone. Excellent predictive performances were observed in both scenarios, demonstrating the merits of the proposed method.

  20. Simple physics-based models of compensatory plant water uptake: concepts and eco-hydrological consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Jarvis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many land surface schemes and simulation models of plant growth designed for practical use employ simple empirical sub-models of root water uptake that cannot adequately reflect the critical role water uptake from sparsely rooted deep subsoil plays in meeting atmospheric transpiration demand in water-limited environments, especially in the presence of shallow groundwater. A failure to account for this so-called "compensatory" water uptake may have serious consequences for both local and global modeling of water and energy fluxes, carbon balances and climate. Some purely empirical compensatory root water uptake models have been proposed, but they are of limited use in global modeling exercises since their parameters cannot be related to measurable soil and vegetation properties. A parsimonious physics-based model of uptake compensation has been developed that requires no more parameters than empirical approaches. This model is described and some aspects of its behavior are illustrated with the help of example simulations. These analyses demonstrate that hydraulic lift can be considered as an extreme form of compensation and that the degree of compensation is principally a function of soil capillarity and the ratio of total effective root length to potential transpiration. Thus, uptake compensation increases as root to leaf area ratios increase, since potential transpiration depends on leaf area. Results of "scenario" simulations for two case studies, one at the local scale (riparian vegetation growing above shallow water tables in seasonally dry or arid climates and one at a global scale (water balances across an aridity gradient in the continental USA, are presented to illustrate biases in model predictions that arise when water uptake compensation is neglected. In the first case, it is shown that only a compensated model can match the strong relationships between water table depth and leaf area and transpiration observed in riparian forest

  1. Analyzing Cyber Security Threats on Cyber-Physical Systems Using Model-Based Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzhner, Aleksandr; Pomerantz, Marc; Tan, Kymie; Campuzano, Brian; Dinkel, Kevin; Pecharich, Jeremy; Nguyen, Viet; Steele, Robert; Johnson, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    The spectre of cyber attacks on aerospace systems can no longer be ignored given that many of the components and vulnerabilities that have been successfully exploited by the adversary on other infrastructures are the same as those deployed and used within the aerospace environment. An important consideration with respect to the mission/safety critical infrastructure supporting space operations is that an appropriate defensive response to an attack invariably involves the need for high precision and accuracy, because an incorrect response can trigger unacceptable losses involving lives and/or significant financial damage. A highly precise defensive response, considering the typical complexity of aerospace environments, requires a detailed and well-founded understanding of the underlying system where the goal of the defensive response is to preserve critical mission objectives in the presence of adversarial activity. In this paper, a structured approach for modeling aerospace systems is described. The approach includes physical elements, network topology, software applications, system functions, and usage scenarios. We leverage Model-Based Systems Engineering methodology by utilizing the Object Management Group's Systems Modeling Language to represent the system being analyzed and also utilize model transformations to change relevant aspects of the model into specialized analyses. A novel visualization approach is utilized to visualize the entire model as a three-dimensional graph, allowing easier interaction with subject matter experts. The model provides a unifying structure for analyzing the impact of a particular attack or a particular type of attack. Two different example analysis types are demonstrated in this paper: a graph-based propagation analysis based on edge labels, and a graph-based propagation analysis based on node labels.

  2. Prediction of power ramp defects - development of a physically based model and evaluation of existing criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Kohn, E.

    2001-01-01

    Power-ramp induced fuel failure is not a problem in the present CANDU reactors. The current empirical correlations that define probability of failure do not agree one-with-another and do not allow extrapolation outside the database. A new methodology, based on physical processes, is presented and compared to data. The methodology calculates the pre-ramp sheath stress and the incremental stress during the ramp, and whether or not there is a defect is predicted based on a failure threshold stress. The proposed model confirms the deductions made by daSilva from an empirical 'fit' to data from the 1988 PNGS power ramp failure incident. It is recommended that daSilvas' correlation be used as reference for OPG (Ontario Power Generation) power reactor fuel, and that extrapolation be performed using the new model. (author)

  3. Urban Adolescents’ Physical Activity Experience, Physical Activity Levels, and Use of Screen-Based Media during Leisure Time: A Structural Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Scott, Jason L.; Caldwell, Linda L.

    2018-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the relationship between physical activity and use of screen-based media, two important behaviors associated with adolescents’ health outcomes. To understand this relationship, researchers may need to consider not only physical activity level but also physical activity experience (i.e., affective experience obtained from doing physical activity). Using a sample predominantly consisting of African and Latino American urban adolescents, this study examined the interrelationships between physical activity experience, physical activity level, and use of screen-based media during leisure time. Data collected using self-report, paper and pencil surveys was analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results showed that physical activity experience was positively associated with physical activity level and had a direct negative relationship with use of non-active video games for males and a direct negative relationship with use of computer/Internet for both genders, after controlling for physical activity level. Physical activity level did not have a direct relationship with use of non-active video games or computer/Internet. However, physical activity level had a direct negative association with use of TV/movies. This study suggests that physical activity experience may play an important role in promoting physical activity and thwarting use of screen-based media among adolescents. PMID:29410634

  4. Urban Adolescents’ Physical Activity Experience, Physical Activity Levels, and Use of Screen-Based Media during Leisure Time: A Structural Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited understanding of the relationship between physical activity and use of screen-based media, two important behaviors associated with adolescents’ health outcomes. To understand this relationship, researchers may need to consider not only physical activity level but also physical activity experience (i.e., affective experience obtained from doing physical activity. Using a sample predominantly consisting of African and Latino American urban adolescents, this study examined the interrelationships between physical activity experience, physical activity level, and use of screen-based media during leisure time. Data collected using self-report, paper and pencil surveys was analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results showed that physical activity experience was positively associated with physical activity level and had a direct negative relationship with use of non-active video games for males and a direct negative relationship with use of computer/Internet for both genders, after controlling for physical activity level. Physical activity level did not have a direct relationship with use of non-active video games or computer/Internet. However, physical activity level had a direct negative association with use of TV/movies. This study suggests that physical activity experience may play an important role in promoting physical activity and thwarting use of screen-based media among adolescents.

  5. The Determination of Physical Activity among Girl Adolescents based on Trans-theoretical model (TTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Alidosti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background It has been proved that physical activity has positive effects for all people. However, low activity is common among adolescents especially girl teenagers. The present study aimed to determine the condition of physical activity among girl adolescents by use of the stages of change derived from Trantheoretical model (TTM. Materials and Methods: This descriptive- analytical investigation was done (in 2016 and 2017 school year in the first – round girl high school among 324 students studying in state schools of Shahrekord city (Western Iran. They were selected through clustering method. The data were collected by researcher-made questionnaires including demographic characteristics, knowledge construct and the stages of change (pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action and maintenance. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS (version 18.0. Results The mean age of participants was 13.69+ 1.95 years old. The mean score of girls' knowledge about types of physical activity was 53.18± 21.82 (a total of 100 scores, which represents the average level of knowledge among them. The study of physical activity in students based on stages of change showed that 165 ones (43 %, 102 ones (26.6 % and only 22 ones (5.7 % of the studied students were in precontemplation, contemplation and maintenance stages, respectively. There was a significant relation between students' knowledge level and their mothers' age (P

  6. Physics Based Model for Cryogenic Chilldown and Loading. Part I: Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinsky, Dmitry G.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Brown, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We report the progress in the development of the physics based model for cryogenic chilldown and loading. The chilldown and loading is model as fully separated non-equilibrium two-phase flow of cryogenic fluid thermally coupled to the pipe walls. The solution follow closely nearly-implicit and semi-implicit algorithms developed for autonomous control of thermal-hydraulic systems developed by Idaho National Laboratory. A special attention is paid to the treatment of instabilities. The model is applied to the analysis of chilldown in rapid loading system developed at NASA-Kennedy Space Center. The nontrivial characteristic feature of the analyzed chilldown regime is its active control by dump valves. The numerical predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental time traces. The obtained results pave the way to the development of autonomous loading operation on the ground and space.

  7. Comparison of Lithium-Ion Anode Materials Using an Experimentally Verified Physics-Based Electrochemical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujian Fu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are in search of parameters inside Li-ion batteries that can be utilized to control their external behavior. Physics-based electrochemical model could bridge the gap between Li+ transportation and distribution inside battery and battery performance outside. In this paper, two commercially available Li-ion anode materials: graphite and Lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12 or LTO were selected and a physics-based electrochemical model was developed based on half-cell assembly and testing. It is found that LTO has a smaller diffusion coefficient (Ds than graphite, which causes a larger overpotential, leading to a smaller capacity utilization and, correspondingly, a shorter duration of constant current charge or discharge. However, in large current applications, LTO performs better than graphite because its effective particle radius decreases with increasing current, leading to enhanced diffusion. In addition, LTO has a higher activation overpotential in its side reactions; its degradation rate is expected to be much smaller than graphite, indicating a longer life span.

  8. A physically-based parsimonious hydrological model for flash floods in Mediterranean catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Roux

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A spatially distributed hydrological model, dedicated to flood simulation, is developed on the basis of physical process representation (infiltration, overland flow, channel routing. Estimation of model parameters requires data concerning topography, soil properties, vegetation and land use. Four parameters are calibrated for the entire catchment using one flood event. Model sensitivity to individual parameters is assessed using Monte-Carlo simulations. Results of this sensitivity analysis with a criterion based on the Nash efficiency coefficient and the error of peak time and runoff are used to calibrate the model. This procedure is tested on the Gardon d'Anduze catchment, located in the Mediterranean zone of southern France. A first validation is conducted using three flood events with different hydrometeorological characteristics. This sensitivity analysis along with validation tests illustrates the predictive capability of the model and points out the possible improvements on the model's structure and parameterization for flash flood forecasting, especially in ungauged basins. Concerning the model structure, results show that water transfer through the subsurface zone also contributes to the hydrograph response to an extreme event, especially during the recession period. Maps of soil saturation emphasize the impact of rainfall and soil properties variability on these dynamics. Adding a subsurface flow component in the simulation also greatly impacts the spatial distribution of soil saturation and shows the importance of the drainage network. Measures of such distributed variables would help discriminating between different possible model structures.

  9. EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING MODEL TYPE STAD JUST-IN TIME BASED ON THE RESULTS OF LEARNING TEACHING PHYSICS COURSE IN PHYSICS SCHOOL IN PHYSICS PROGRAM FACULTY UNIMED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Febri Sudarma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Research was aimed to determine: (1 Students’ learning outcomes that was taught with just in time teaching based STAD cooperative learning method and STAD cooperative learning method (2 Students’ outcomes on Physics subject that had high learning activity compared with low learning activity. The research sample was random by raffling four classes to get two classes. The first class taught with just in time teaching based STAD cooperative learning method, while the second class was taught with STAD cooperative learning method. The instrument used was conceptual understanding that had been validated with 7 essay questions. The average gain values of students learning results with just in time teaching based STAD cooperative learning method 0,47 higher than average gain values of students learning results with STAD cooperative learning method. The high learning activity and low learning activity gave different learning results. In this case the average gain values of students learning results with just in time teaching based STAD cooperative learning method 0,48 higher than average gain values of students learning results with STAD cooperative learning method. There was interaction between learning model and learning activity to the physics learning result test in students

  10. Teaching and learning hydrogeology using a physically-based modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Dessirier, Benoit; Pannetier, Romain

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogeology involves studying the occurrence, distribution, movement and quality of water in geological formations. Hydrogeology typically enters in the curriculum of physical geography as well as civil and environmental engineering courses, is a multidisciplinary subject which encompasses several scientific areas including mathematics, physics, geology, geochemistry and numerical analysis. For applications such as resource management, decision and policy making, and an understanding and interpretation of uncertainty and risk assessment is also necessary. Teaching hydrogeology is not only challenged by its multidisciplinary nature, but also since groundwater occurrence and movement is hidden from view in the subsurface, and is generally inaccessible to direct observation. Field experiments are often costly and time consuming, and laboratory experiments limited in scale. However, suitably designed computational systems can help address such issues by providing numerical modelling investigations of field conditions. This contribution presents results from a recent project dedicated to develop an open-source, interactive, visual numerical modelling tool for teaching/learning hydrogeology, based on current pedagogical understanding of learning in higher education. It provides physically-based groundwater flow solutions within an intuitive user-friendly interface, which does not require advanced technical skills to operate. The aim is to be able to improve student's learning by providing immediate and visual feedback on groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems. The development and implementation of the tool as part of a teaching framework to address subsurface flow concepts and phenomena is presented, discussed and evaluated. By linking theoretical problem-solving exercises with modelling tasks in a learn-by-doing approach, we further discuss how student's learning experiences can be enhanced.

  11. Settings for Physical Activity – Developing a Site-specific Physical Activity Behavior Model based on Multi-level Intervention Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jens; Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Breum, Lars

    specifies that factors at multiple levels can influence PA behavior, and emphasizes the importance of behavior-specific models. On this theoretical basis the three mentioned multi-level interventions were planned and implemented. Based on the empirical studies we argue that site-specific factors have......Settings for Physical Activity – Developing a Site-specific Physical Activity Behavior Model based on Multi-level Intervention Studies Introduction: Ecological models of health behavior have potential as theoretical framework to comprehend the multiple levels of factors influencing physical...... activity (PA). The potential is shown by the fact that there has been a dramatic increase in application of ecological models in research and practice. One proposed core principle is that an ecological model is most powerful if the model is behavior-specific. However, based on multi-level interventions...

  12. Green roof rainfall-runoff modelling: is the comparison between conceptual and physically based approaches relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Green roofs are commonly considered as efficient tools to mitigate urban runoff as they can store precipitation, and consequently provide retention and detention performances. Designed as a compromise between water holding capacity, weight and hydraulic conductivity, their substrate is usually an artificial media differentiating significantly from a traditional soil. In order to assess green roofs hydrological performances, many models have been developed. Classified into two categories (conceptual and physically based), they are usually applied to reproduce the discharge of a particular monitored green roof considered as homogeneous. Although the resulted simulations could be satisfactory, the question of robustness and consistency of the calibrated parameters is often not addressed. Here, a modeling framework has been developed to assess the efficiency and the robustness of both modelling approaches (conceptual and physically based) in reproducing green roof hydrological behaviour. SWMM and VS2DT models have been used for this purpose. This work also benefits from an experimental setup where several green roofs differentiated by their substrate thickness and vegetation cover are monitored. Based on the data collected for several rainfall events, it has been studied how the calibrated parameters are effectively linked to their physical properties and how they can vary from one green roof configuration to another. Although both models reproduce correctly the observed discharges in most of the cases, their calibrated parameters exhibit a high inconsistency. For a same green roof configuration, these parameters can vary significantly from one rainfall event to another, even if they are supposed to be linked to the green roof characteristics (roughness, residual moisture content for instance). They can also be different from one green roof configuration to another although the implemented substrate is the same. Finally, it appears very difficult to find any

  13. Simulation-based Education for Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy : A Comparison Between Virtual and Physical Training Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breimer, Gerben E.; Haji, Faizal A.; Bodani, Vivek; Cunningham, Melissa S.; Lopez-Rios, Adriana-Lucia; Okrainec, Allan; Drake, James M.

    BACKGROUND: The relative educational benefits of virtual reality (VR) and physical simulation models for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) have not been evaluated "head to head." OBJECTIVE: To compare and identify the relative utility of a physical and VR ETV simulation model for use in

  14. THE DEVELOPMENT OF RESEARCH-BASED PHYSICS LEARNING MODEL WITH SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO DEVELOP STUDENTS’ SCIENTIFIC PROCESSING SKILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usmeldi Usmeldi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Physics learning in SMA N 2 Padang was implemented through theory and practicum for verifying the theories. The results of the initial survey showed that the physics teachers had not yet applied the research-based learning. Supporting facilities such as physics lab and its equipment has been already available, but it has not been utilized optimally. Research-based learning is a model that can improve scientific processing skills and learning outcomes of students. The research aimed to produce a valid, practical, and effective research-based physics learning model and devices. This research was a research and development using the 4D model of Thiagarajan. The instrument of this research are interview guides, observation sheets, sheet of validation of model and learning tools, questionnaire for both teachers’ and learners’ responses, assessment sheets for scientific processing skills, and achievement test. The results showed that the developed model and the learning devices according to the assessment of experts were declared valid. Model and learning devices were practical based on the observation and the questionnaires. The application of research-based physics learning could effectively improve scientific skills and learning outcomes of students. This model is suggested to physics teachers in high school in regard with implementing research-based learning.

  15. Ready to learn physics: a team-based learning model for first year university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parappilly, Maria; Schmidt, Lisa; De Ritter, Samantha

    2015-09-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an established model of group work which aims to improve students' ability to apply discipline-related content. TBL consists of a readiness assurance process (RAP), student groups and application activities. While TBL has not been implemented widely in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines, it has been effective in improving student learning in other disciplines. This paper describes the incorporation of TBL activities into a non-calculus based introductory level physics topic—Physics for the Modern World. Students were given pre-class preparation materials and an individual RAP online test before the workshops. The pre-workshop individual RAP test ensured that all students were exposed to concept-based questions before their workshops and motivated them to use the preparatory materials in readiness for the workshop. The students were placed into random teams and during the first part of the workshop, the teams went through a subset of the quiz questions (team RAP test) and in the remaining time, teams completed an in-class assignment. After the workshop students were allowed another attempt at the individual RAP test to see if their knowledge had improved. The ability of TBL to promote student learning of key concepts was evaluated by experiment using pre- and post- testing. The students’ perception of TBL was monitored by discussion posts and survey responses. Finally, the ability of TBL to support peer-peer interaction was evaluated by video analysis of the class. We found that the TBL process improved student learning; students did interact with each other in class; and the students had a positive view of TBL. To assess the transferability of this model to other topics, we conducted a comparison study with an environmental science topic which produced similar results. Our study supports the use of this TBL model in science topics.

  16. The physics data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, F.D.

    1984-01-01

    The physics data base is introduced along with its associated data base management system. The emphasis is on data and their use and a classification of data and of data bases is developed to distinguish compilation organizations. The characteristics of these organizations are examined briefly and the long term consequences of the physics data base discussed. (orig.)

  17. A variational reconstruction method for undersampled dynamic x-ray tomography based on physical motion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Dirks, Hendrik; Frerking, Lena; Hauptmann, Andreas; Helin, Tapio; Siltanen, Samuli

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we study the reconstruction of moving object densities from undersampled dynamic x-ray tomography in two dimensions. A particular motivation of this study is to use realistic measurement protocols for practical applications, i.e. we do not assume to have a full Radon transform in each time step, but only projections in few angular directions. This restriction enforces a space-time reconstruction, which we perform by incorporating physical motion models and regularization of motion vectors in a variational framework. The methodology of optical flow, which is one of the most common methods to estimate motion between two images, is utilized to formulate a joint variational model for reconstruction and motion estimation. We provide a basic mathematical analysis of the forward model and the variational model for the image reconstruction. Moreover, we discuss the efficient numerical minimization based on alternating minimizations between images and motion vectors. A variety of results are presented for simulated and real measurement data with different sampling strategy. A key observation is that random sampling combined with our model allows reconstructions of similar amount of measurements and quality as a single static reconstruction.

  18. A system model for ultrasonic NDT based on the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmon, M; Dorval, V; Kamta Djakou, A; Fradkin, L; Chatillon, S

    2016-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasonic Non Destructive Testing (NDT) is helpful for evaluating performances of inspection techniques and requires the modelling of waves scattered by defects. Two classical flaw scattering models have been previously usually employed and evaluated to deal with inspection of planar defects, the Kirchhoff approximation (KA) for simulating reflection and the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) for simulating diffraction. Combining them so as to retain advantages of both, the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD) initially developed in electromagnetism has been recently extended to elastodynamics. In this paper a PTD-based system model is proposed for simulating the ultrasonic response of crack-like defects. It is also extended to provide good description of regions surrounding critical rays where the shear diffracted waves and head waves interfere. Both numerical and experimental validation of the PTD model is carried out in various practical NDT configurations, such as pulse echo and Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD), involving both crack tip and corner echoes. Numerical validation involves comparison of this model with KA and GTD as well as the Finite-Element Method (FEM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. On the effects of adaptive reservoir operating rules in hydrological physically-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudici, Federico; Anghileri, Daniela; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Recent years have seen a significant increase of the human influence on the natural systems both at the global and local scale. Accurately modeling the human component and its interaction with the natural environment is key to characterize the real system dynamics and anticipate future potential changes to the hydrological regimes. Modern distributed, physically-based hydrological models are able to describe hydrological processes with high level of detail and high spatiotemporal resolution. Yet, they lack in sophistication for the behavior component and human decisions are usually described by very simplistic rules, which might underperform in reproducing the catchment dynamics. In the case of water reservoir operators, these simplistic rules usually consist of target-level rule curves, which represent the average historical level trajectory. Whilst these rules can reasonably reproduce the average seasonal water volume shifts due to the reservoirs' operation, they cannot properly represent peculiar conditions, which influence the actual reservoirs' operation, e.g., variations in energy price or water demand, dry or wet meteorological conditions. Moreover, target-level rule curves are not suitable to explore the water system response to climate and socio economic changing contexts, because they assume a business-as-usual operation. In this work, we quantitatively assess how the inclusion of adaptive reservoirs' operating rules into physically-based hydrological models contribute to the proper representation of the hydrological regime at the catchment scale. In particular, we contrast target-level rule curves and detailed optimization-based behavioral models. We, first, perform the comparison on past observational records, showing that target-level rule curves underperform in representing the hydrological regime over multiple time scales (e.g., weekly, seasonal, inter-annual). Then, we compare how future hydrological changes are affected by the two modeling

  20. A predictive estimation method for carbon dioxide transport by data-driven modeling with a physically-based data model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jina; Park, Eungyu; Han, Weon Shik; Kim, Kue-Young; Jun, Seong-Chun; Choung, Sungwook; Yun, Seong-Taek; Oh, Junho; Kim, Hyun-Jun

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a data-driven method for predicting CO2 leaks and associated concentrations from geological CO2 sequestration is developed. Several candidate models are compared based on their reproducibility and predictive capability for CO2 concentration measurements from the Environment Impact Evaluation Test (EIT) site in Korea. Based on the data mining results, a one-dimensional solution of the advective-dispersive equation for steady flow (i.e., Ogata-Banks solution) is found to be most representative for the test data, and this model is adopted as the data model for the developed method. In the validation step, the method is applied to estimate future CO2 concentrations with the reference estimation by the Ogata-Banks solution, where a part of earlier data is used as the training dataset. From the analysis, it is found that the ensemble mean of multiple estimations based on the developed method shows high prediction accuracy relative to the reference estimation. In addition, the majority of the data to be predicted are included in the proposed quantile interval, which suggests adequate representation of the uncertainty by the developed method. Therefore, the incorporation of a reasonable physically-based data model enhances the prediction capability of the data-driven model. The proposed method is not confined to estimations of CO2 concentration and may be applied to various real-time monitoring data from subsurface sites to develop automated control, management or decision-making systems.

  1. USE OF TRANS-CONTEXTUAL MODEL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE IN DEVELOPING LEISURE-TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müftüler, Mine; İnce, Mustafa Levent

    2015-08-01

    This study examined how a physical activity course based on the Trans-Contextual Model affected the variables of perceived autonomy support, autonomous motivation, determinants of leisure-time physical activity behavior, basic psychological needs satisfaction, and leisure-time physical activity behaviors. The participants were 70 Turkish university students (M age=23.3 yr., SD=3.2). A pre-test-post-test control group design was constructed. Initially, the participants were randomly assigned into an experimental (n=35) and a control (n=35) group. The experimental group followed a 12 wk. trans-contextual model-based intervention. The participants were pre- and post-tested in terms of Trans-Contextual Model constructs and of self-reported leisure-time physical activity behaviors. Multivariate analyses showed significant increases over the 12 wk. period for perceived autonomy support from instructor and peers, autonomous motivation in leisure-time physical activity setting, positive intention and perceived behavioral control over leisure-time physical activity behavior, more fulfillment of psychological needs, and more engagement in leisure-time physical activity behavior in the experimental group. These results indicated that the intervention was effective in developing leisure-time physical activity and indicated that the Trans-Contextual Model is a useful way to conceptualize these relationships.

  2. A Physically Based Runoff Model Analysis of the Querétaro River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Javier Villa Alvarado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the knowledge of physical parameters of a basin is essential to know adequately the rainfall-runoff process; it is well known that the specific characteristics of each basin such as temperature, geographical location, and elevation above sea level affect the maximum discharge and the basin time response. In this paper a physically based model has been applied, to analyze water balance by evaluating the volume rainfall-runoff using SHETRAN and hydrometric data measurements in 2003. The results have been compared with five ETp different methodologies in the Querétaro river basin in central Mexico. With these results the main effort of the authorities should be directed to better control of land-use changes and to working permanently in the analysis of the related parameters, which will have a similar behavior to changes currently being introduced and presented in observed values in this basin. This methodology can be a strong base for sustainable water management in a basin, the prognosis and effect of land-use changes, and availability of water and also can be used to determine application of known basin parameters, basically depending on land-use, land-use changes, and climatological database to determine the water balance in a basin.

  3. Dielectric Relaxation of Lanthanide-Based Ternary Oxides: Physical and Mathematical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium-doped hafnium oxides (CexHf1−xO2 and lanthanum-doped zirconium oxides (LaxZr1−xO2 were investigated. The highest dielectric constants, k, were obtained from lightly doped oxides with an La content of x=0.09 and a Ce content of x=0.1, for which k-values of 33~40 were obtained. The dielectric relaxation appears to be related to the size of crystal grains formed during annealing, which was dependent on the doping level. The physical and mathematical models were used to analyze the relationship between k-values and frequencies. The variations in the k-values up to megahertz frequencies for both CexHf1−xO2 and LaxZr1−xO2 are simulated based on the Curie-von Schweidler (CS or Havriliak-Negami (HN relationships. Concerning the lightly doped CexHf1−xO2 and LaxZr1−xO2, the data extracted are best modeled by the HN law, while LaxZr1−xO2 with doping level from x=0.22 to 0.63 are best modelled based on the CS law.

  4. High resolution global flood hazard map from physically-based hydrologic and hydraulic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begnudelli, L.; Kaheil, Y.; McCollum, J.

    2017-12-01

    The global flood map published online at http://www.fmglobal.com/research-and-resources/global-flood-map at 90m resolution is being used worldwide to understand flood risk exposure, exercise certain measures of mitigation, and/or transfer the residual risk financially through flood insurance programs. The modeling system is based on a physically-based hydrologic model to simulate river discharges, and 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic model to simulate inundation. The model can be applied to large-scale flood hazard mapping thanks to several solutions that maximize its efficiency and the use of parallel computing. The hydrologic component of the modeling system is the Hillslope River Routing (HRR) hydrologic model. HRR simulates hydrological processes using a Green-Ampt parameterization, and is calibrated against observed discharge data from several publicly-available datasets. For inundation mapping, we use a 2D Finite-Volume Shallow-Water model with wetting/drying. We introduce here a grid Up-Scaling Technique (UST) for hydraulic modeling to perform simulations at higher resolution at global scale with relatively short computational times. A 30m SRTM is now available worldwide along with higher accuracy and/or resolution local Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) in many countries and regions. UST consists of aggregating computational cells, thus forming a coarser grid, while retaining the topographic information from the original full-resolution mesh. The full-resolution topography is used for building relationships between volume and free surface elevation inside cells and computing inter-cell fluxes. This approach almost achieves computational speed typical of the coarse grids while preserving, to a significant extent, the accuracy offered by the much higher resolution available DEM. The simulations are carried out along each river of the network by forcing the hydraulic model with the streamflow hydrographs generated by HRR. Hydrographs are scaled so that the peak

  5. Collaborative Model-based Systems Engineering for Cyber-Physical Systems, with a Building Automation Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzgerald, John; Gamble, Carl; Payne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We describe an approach to the model-based engineering of cyber-physical systems that permits the coupling of diverse discrete-event and continuous-time models and their simulators. A case study in the building automation domain demonstrates how such co-models and co-simulation can promote early...

  6. Problem-Based Learning Model Used to Scientific Approach Based Worksheet for Physics to Develop Senior High School Students Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, D.

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the application of Problem Based Learning(PBL) model aided withscientific approach and character integrated physics worksheets (LKS). Another purpose is to investigate the increase in cognitive and psychomotor learning outcomes and to know the character development of students. The method used in this study was the quasi-experiment. The instruments were observation and cognitive test. Worksheets can improve students’ cognitive, psychomotor learning outcomes. Improvements in cognitive learning results of students who have learned using worksheets are higher than students who received learning without worksheets. LKS can also develop the students’ character.

  7. Modeling and Analysis of Safety Messages Propagation in Platoon-Based Vehicular Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Qiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety messages propagation is the major task for Vehicular Cyber-Physical Systems in order to improve the safety of roads and passengers. However, reducing traffic and car accidents can only be achieved by disseminating safety messages in a timely manner with high reliability. Although mathematical modeling of the delay of safety messages is extremely beneficial, analyzing the safety messages propagation is considerably complex due to the high dynamics of vehicles. Moreover, most previous works assume vehicles drive independently and the interaction between vehicles is not taken into consideration. In this paper, we proposed an analytical model to describe the performance of safety messages propagation in the VCPSs under platoon-based driving pattern. Infrastructure-less and RSU-supported scenarios are evaluated independently. The analytical model also takes into account different transmission situations and various system parameters, such as communication range, traffic flow, and platoon size. The effectiveness of the analytical model is verified through simulation and the impacts of different parameters on the expected transmission delay are investigated. The results will help determine the system design parameters to satisfy the delay requirement for safety applications in VCPSs.

  8. Physics based model of D-region variability related to VLF propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, S. C.

    2012-07-01

    D-region (~60-85 km) electron density profiles measured using large number of sounding rocket experiments carried out from two Indian low latitude stations show large variations with solar zenith angle, season and solar activity. Similarly the ground based multi frequency radio wave absorption technique has provided continuous data on the morphology of the hourly electron density variations. However suitable models of the D-region electron density profile variations both during quiet and disturbed solar conditions over the Indian region are lacking. The renewed interest in the study of the VLF/LF propagation anomalies taking place through perturbations in the D-region electron densities due to various geophysical phenomena requires the availability of a baseline D-region model over low latitudes. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the physical processes of D-region production and loss of free electrons, dynamical coupling due to variety of vertically propagating atmospheric waves, sudden changes brought about by the solar energetic events like CMEs and different categories of X-ray flares. Low latitude region is not likely to be affected by the PMSE or PCA type of events but the changes due to lightning induced mesospheric red sprites and LEPs need to be considered. Based on this analysis, a preliminary low latitude D-region electron density profile model development is proposed. Sample results would illustrate key requirements from such a model in terms of its effectiveness to simulate the low latitude observations of VLF/LF amplitude and phase variations using waveguide propagation models like LWPC.

  9. A novel physical eco-hydrological model concept for preferential flow based on experimental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; van Schaik, Loes; Graeff, Thomas; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    Preferential flow through macropores often determines hydrological characteristics - especially regarding runoff generation and fast transport of solutes. Macropore settings may yet be very different in nature and dynamics, depending on their origin. While biogenic structures follow activity cycles (e.g. earth worms) and population conditions (e.g. roots), pedogenic and geogenic structures may depend on water stress (e.g. cracks) or large events (e.g. flushed voids between skeleton and soil pipes) or simply persist (e.g. bedrock interface). On the one hand, such dynamic site characteristics can be observed in seasonal changes in its reaction to precipitation. On the other hand, sprinkling experiments accompanied by tracers or time-lapse 3D Ground-Penetrating-Radar are suitable tools to determine infiltration patterns and macropore configuration. However, model representation of the macropore-matrix system is still problematic, because models either rely on effective parameters (assuming well-mixed state) or on explicit advection strongly simplifying or neglecting interaction with the diffusive flow domain. Motivated by the dynamic nature of macropores, we present a novel model approach for interacting diffusive and advective water, solutes and energy transport in structured soils. It solely relies on scale- and process-aware observables. A representative set of macropores (data from sprinkling experiments) determines the process model scale through 1D advective domains. These are connected to a 2D matrix domain which is defined by pedo-physical retention properties. Water is represented as particles. Diffusive flow is governed by a 2D random walk of these particles while advection may take place in the macropore domain. Macropore-matrix interaction is computed as dissipation of the advective momentum of a particle by its experienced drag from the matrix domain. Through a representation of matrix and macropores as connected diffusive and advective domains for water

  10. Linkage of a Physically Based Distributed Watershed Model and a Dynamic Plant Growth Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Billy E; Coldren, Cade L

    2006-01-01

    The impact of hydrological alteration on vegetation and of vegetation on water quality can be greatly facilitated by linking existing water engines with general ecosystem models designed to make long...

  11. CyberShake: A Physics-Based Seismic Hazard Model for Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, R.; Jordan, T.H.; Callaghan, S.; Deelman, E.; Field, E.; Juve, G.; Kesselman, C.; Maechling, P.; Mehta, G.; Milner, K.; Okaya, D.; Small, P.; Vahi, K.

    2011-01-01

    CyberShake, as part of the Southern California Earthquake Center's (SCEC) Community Modeling Environment, is developing a methodology that explicitly incorporates deterministic source and wave propagation effects within seismic hazard calculations through the use of physics-based 3D ground motion simulations. To calculate a waveform-based seismic hazard estimate for a site of interest, we begin with Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2.0 (UCERF2.0) and identify all ruptures within 200 km of the site of interest. We convert the UCERF2.0 rupture definition into multiple rupture variations with differing hypocenter locations and slip distributions, resulting in about 415,000 rupture variations per site. Strain Green Tensors are calculated for the site of interest using the SCEC Community Velocity Model, Version 4 (CVM4), and then, using reciprocity, we calculate synthetic seismograms for each rupture variation. Peak intensity measures are then extracted from these synthetics and combined with the original rupture probabilities to produce probabilistic seismic hazard curves for the site. Being explicitly site-based, CyberShake directly samples the ground motion variability at that site over many earthquake cycles (i. e., rupture scenarios) and alleviates the need for the ergodic assumption that is implicitly included in traditional empirically based calculations. Thus far, we have simulated ruptures at over 200 sites in the Los Angeles region for ground shaking periods of 2 s and longer, providing the basis for the first generation CyberShake hazard maps. Our results indicate that the combination of rupture directivity and basin response effects can lead to an increase in the hazard level for some sites, relative to that given by a conventional Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE). Additionally, and perhaps more importantly, we find that the physics-based hazard results are much more sensitive to the assumed magnitude-area relations and

  12. Improving Simulations of Extreme Flows by Coupling a Physically-based Hydrologic Model with a Machine Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, K.; Islam, A. S.; Khan, M. J. U.; Das, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    With the large number of hydrologic models presently available along with the global weather and geographic datasets, streamflows of almost any river in the world can be easily modeled. And if a reasonable amount of observed data from that river is available, then simulations of high accuracy can sometimes be performed after calibrating the model parameters against those observed data through inverse modeling. Although such calibrated models can succeed in simulating the general trend or mean of the observed flows very well, more often than not they fail to adequately simulate the extreme flows. This causes difficulty in tasks such as generating reliable projections of future changes in extreme flows due to climate change, which is obviously an important task due to floods and droughts being closely connected to people's lives and livelihoods. We propose an approach where the outputs of a physically-based hydrologic model are used as an input to a machine learning model to try and better simulate the extreme flows. To demonstrate this offline-coupling approach, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was selected as the physically-based hydrologic model, the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) as the machine learning model and the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) river system as the study area. The GBM river system, located in South Asia, is the third largest in the world in terms of freshwater generated and forms the largest delta in the world. The flows of the GBM rivers were simulated separately in order to test the performance of this proposed approach in accurately simulating the extreme flows generated by different basins that vary in size, climate, hydrology and anthropogenic intervention on stream networks. Results show that by post-processing the simulated flows of the SWAT models with ANN models, simulations of extreme flows can be significantly improved. The mean absolute errors in simulating annual maximum/minimum daily flows were minimized from 4967

  13. A spatially distributed and physically based tool to modelling rainfall-triggered landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.; Lepore, C.; Bras, R. L.

    2009-09-01

    Landslides are a serious threat to lives and property throughout the world. Over the last few years the need to provide consistent tools and support to decision-makers and land managers have led to significant progress in the analysis and understanding of the occurrence of landslides. The causes of landslides are varied. Multiple dynamic processes are involved in driving slope failures. One of these causes is prolonged rainfall, which affect slope stability in different ways. Water entering the ground beneath a slope always causes a rise of the piezometric surface, which in turn involves an increase of the pore-water pressure and a decrease of the soil shear resistance. For this reason, knowledge of spatio-temporal dynamics of soil water content, groundwater and infiltration processes is of considerable importance in the understanding and prediction of landslides dynamics. Many methods and techniques have been proposed to estimate when and where rainfall could trigger slope failure. In this paper a spatially distributed and physically based approach is presented, which integrates of a failure model with an hydrological one. The hydrological model used in the study is the tRIBS model (Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN-based) Real-Time Integrated Basin Simulator) that allows simulation of spatial and temporal hydrological dynamics influencing the landsliding, in particular infiltration, evapotranspiration, groundwater dynamics and soil moisture conditions. In order to evaluate the slope stability, the infinite slope model has been implemented in tRIBS, making up a new component of the model. For each computational element, the model is able to verify the stability condition as a function of the safety factor, splitting between the unconditionally stable and the conditionally stable computational cells. The amount of detached soil and its possible path are also estimated. The variations in elevation due to the landslides modify the basin morphology. The

  14. Simulation-based Education for Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy: A Comparison Between Virtual and Physical Training Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breimer, Gerben E; Haji, Faizal A; Bodani, Vivek; Cunningham, Melissa S; Lopez-Rios, Adriana-Lucia; Okrainec, Allan; Drake, James M

    2017-02-01

    The relative educational benefits of virtual reality (VR) and physical simulation models for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) have not been evaluated "head to head." To compare and identify the relative utility of a physical and VR ETV simulation model for use in neurosurgical training. Twenty-three neurosurgical residents and 3 fellows performed an ETV on both a physical and VR simulation model. Trainees rated the models using 5-point Likert scales evaluating the domains of anatomy, instrument handling, procedural content, and the overall fidelity of the simulation. Paired t tests were performed for each domain's mean overall score and individual items. The VR model has relative benefits compared with the physical model with respect to realistic representation of intraventricular anatomy at the foramen of Monro (4.5, standard deviation [SD] = 0.7 vs 4.1, SD = 0.6; P = .04) and the third ventricle floor (4.4, SD = 0.6 vs 4.0, SD = 0.9; P = .03), although the overall anatomy score was similar (4.2, SD = 0.6 vs 4.0, SD = 0.6; P = .11). For overall instrument handling and procedural content, the physical simulator outperformed the VR model (3.7, SD = 0.8 vs 4.5; SD = 0.5, P educational objectives. Training focused on learning anatomy or decision-making for anatomic cues may be aided with the VR simulation model. A focus on developing manual dexterity and technical skills using endoscopic equipment in the operating room may be better learned on the physical simulation model. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  15. A generic framework for individual-based modelling and physical-biological interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Mariani, Patrizio; Payne, Mark R.

    2018-01-01

    , comparison of physical circulation models, model ensemble runs and recently posterior Eulerian simulations using the IBMlib framework. We present the code design ideas behind the longevity of the code, our implementation experiences, as well as code performance benchmarking. The framework may contribute...

  16. Assessing spatio-temporal variability of rainfall using a simple physically based statistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, M. F.; Xu, T.; Kesteven, J.

    2010-12-01

    Reliable assessment of spatio-temporal variability of observed rainfall is difficult in the current climate because of the complex spatial variability displayed by daily and shorter time scale rainfall data. As demonstrated in a recent analysis of Canadian daily precipitation data by Hutchinson et al. (2009), direct interpolation of short time scale precipitation data is a poor way to address spatial patterns of rainfall extremes. Addressing the behaviour of projected future precipitation extremes is made even more difficult by the limited temporal and spatial resolution of precipitation as simulated by global climate models. The “uniform drizzle” that tends to be produced by these models makes the assessment of even straightforward statistics, such as daily rainfall occurrence, problematic. Putting aside significant inter-model variability, the more reliable outputs of global models include mean fluxes, such as monthly rainfall amounts, and associated insight into the nature of the modelled precipitation in relation to forcing synoptic systems. The truncated power of normal distribution, as described by Hutchinson (1995), offers a relatively simple way to make progress. Two of the three model parameters are simply calibrated in terms of monthly mean fluxes and the model is able to accurately describe precipitation extremes. These model parameters can also be robustly determined from serially incomplete data. It can be argued that the model has a broad physical process basis by modelling rainfall as an event that occurs as an appropriate threshold is exceeded. This analysis extends the approach of Stidd (1954, 1973) who suggested the cube root as a universal normalising power. We show that the power parameter, once robustly calibrated, displays a broadly spatially varying distribution of around 0.5. This corresponds well with the two dimensional synoptic convergence that is required to produce precipitation. The power parameter appears to be related to the

  17. Development and evaluation of a physics-based windblown dust emission scheme implemented in the CMAQ modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new windblown dust emission treatment was incorporated in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. This new model treatment has been built upon previously developed physics-based parameterization schemes from the literature. A distinct and novel feature of t...

  18. Physical-based analytical model of flexible a-IGZO TFTs accounting for both charge injection and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghittorelli, M.; Torricelli, F.; Steen, J.L. van der; Garripoli, C.; Tripathi, A.; Gelinck, G.H.; Cantatore, E.; Kovacs-Vajna, Z.M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we show a new physical-based analytical model of a-IGZO TFTs. TFTs scaling from L=200 μm to L=15 μm and fabricated on plastic foil are accurately reproduced with a unique set of parameters. The model is used to design a zero-VGS inverter. It is a valuable tool for circuit design and technology

  19. Evaluation of physics-based numerical modelling for diverse design architecture of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A. K.; Catalan, Jorge; Camacho, Diana; Martinez, Miguel; Hodges, D.

    2017-08-01

    Solution processed organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite based solar cells are emerging as a new cost effective photovoltaic technology. In the context of increasing the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and sustainability of perovskite solar cells (PSC) devices, we comprehensively analyzed a physics-based numerical modelling for doped and un-doped PSC devices. Our analytics emphasized the role of different charge carrier layers from the view point of interfacial adhesion and its influence on charge extraction rate and charge recombination mechanism. Morphological and charge transport properties of perovskite thin film as a function of device architecture are also considered to investigate the photovoltaic properties of PSC. We observed that photocurrent is dominantly influenced by interfacial recombination process and photovoltage has functional relationship with defect density of perovskite absorption layer. A novel contour mapping method to understand the characteristics of current density-voltage (J-V) curves for each device as a function of perovskite layer thickness provide an important insight about the distribution spectrum of photovoltaic properties. Functional relationship of device efficiency and fill factor with absorption layer thickness are also discussed.

  20. Physical Modeling Modular Boxes: PHOXES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Serafin, Stefania

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a set of musical instruments, which are based on known physical modeling sound synthesis techniques. The instruments are modular, meaning that they can be combined in various ways. This makes it possible to experiment with physical interaction and sonic...

  1. The effectiveness of collaborative problem based physics learning (CPBPL) model to improve student’s self-confidence on physics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahani, B. K.; Suprapto, N.; Suliyanah; Lestari, N. A.; Jauhariyah, M. N. R.; Admoko, S.; Wahyuni, S.

    2018-03-01

    In the previous research, Collaborative Problem Based Physic Learning (CPBPL) model has been developed to improve student’s science process skills, collaborative problem solving, and self-confidence on physics learning. This research is aimed to analyze the effectiveness of CPBPL model towards the improvement of student’s self-confidence on physics learning. This research implemented quasi experimental design on 140 senior high school students who were divided into 4 groups. Data collection was conducted through questionnaire, observation, and interview. Self-confidence measurement was conducted through Self-Confidence Evaluation Sheet (SCES). The data was analyzed using Wilcoxon test, n-gain, and Kruskal Wallis test. Result shows that: (1) There is a significant score improvement on student’s self-confidence on physics learning (α=5%), (2) n-gain value student’s self-confidence on physics learning is high, and (3) n-gain average student’s self-confidence on physics learning was consistent throughout all groups. It can be concluded that CPBPL model is effective to improve student’s self-confidence on physics learning.

  2. A Physically-based Model for Predicting Soil Moisture Dynamics in Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, L.; Rezaeianzadeh, M.; Hantush, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands are promoted as green infrastructures because of their characteristics in retaining and filtering water. In wetlands going through wetting/drying cycles, simulation of nutrient processes and biogeochemical reactions in both ponded and unsaturated wetland zones are needed for an improved understanding of wetland functioning for water quality improvement. The physically-based WetQual model can simulate the hydrology and nutrient and sediment cycles in natural and constructed wetlands. WetQual can be used in continuously flooded environments or in wetlands going through wetting/drying cycles. Currently, WetQual relies on 1-D Richards' Equation (RE) to simulate soil moisture dynamics in unponded parts of the wetlands. This is unnecessarily complex because as a lumped model, WetQual only requires average moisture contents. In this paper, we present a depth-averaged solution to the 1-D RE, called DARE, to simulate the average moisture content of the root zone and the layer below it in unsaturated parts of wetlands. DARE converts the PDE of the RE into ODEs; thus it is computationally more efficient. This method takes into account the plant uptake and groundwater table fluctuations, which are commonly overlooked in hydrologic models dealing with wetlands undergoing wetting and drying cycles. For verification purposes, DARE solutions were compared to Hydrus-1D model, which uses full RE, under gravity drainage only assumption and full-term equations. Model verifications were carried out under various top boundary conditions: no ponding at all, ponding at some point, and no rain. Through hypothetical scenarios and actual atmospheric data, the utility of DARE was demonstrated. Gravity drainage version of DARE worked well in comparison to Hydrus-1D, under all the assigned atmospheric boundary conditions of varying fluxes for all examined soil types (sandy loam, loam, sandy clay loam, and sand). The full-term version of DARE offers reasonable accuracy compared to the

  3. Effect of an intervention based on socio-ecological model in promoting physical activity of female employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amineh Sahranavard Gargari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Although active life style is one of the main determining factors of health, the level of regular physical activities in women is less than in men and even this level decreases with aging. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an intervention based on the social ecological model on promotion of physical activity among female employees. In this study, 160 women employed at Shabestar universities were selected, and randomly divided into two groups of control (n=80 and intervention (n=80. The intervention group received an instructional program according to the model, including one session for general instruction and four sessions for group discussion along with daily walking for 30 minutes within 8 weeks. In order to objectively measure the physical activity, the pedometer was used and to measure the perceived physical activity, the long form of International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ was applied. The variables related to the components of socio-ecological model were measured using the socio-ecological model questionnaire. A significant difference was found between two groups after the intervention in terms of That is, the average number of steps in walking in the intervention group increased significantly (from 4204 to 7882 steps per day, while it did not significantly increase in the control group. Thus, it can be argued that designing and implementing the interventional programs based on the socio-ecological model can promote physical activity behavior among employed women

  4. Modeling radiocesium transport from a river catchment based on a physically-based distributed hydrological and sediment erosion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinouchi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Omata, Teppei

    2015-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in March 2011 resulted in the deposition of large quantities of radionuclides, such as (134)Cs and (137)Cs, over parts of eastern Japan. Since then high levels of radioactive contamination have been detected in large areas, including forests, agricultural land, and residential areas. Due to the strong adsorption capability of radiocesium to soil particles, radiocesium migrates with eroded sediments, follows the surface flow paths, and is delivered to more populated downstream regions and eventually to the Pacific Ocean. It is therefore important to understand the transport of contaminated sediments in the hydrological system and to predict changes in the spatial distribution of radiocesium concentrations by taking the land-surface processes related to sediment migration into consideration. In this study, we developed a distributed model to simulate the transport of water and contaminated sediment in a watershed hydrological system, and applied this model to a partially forested mountain catchment located in an area highly contaminated by the radioactive fallout. Observed discharge, sediment concentration, and cesium concentration measured from June 2011 until December 2012 were used for calibration of model parameters. The simulated discharge and sediment concentration both agreed well with observed values, while the cesium concentration was underestimated in the initial period following the accident. This result suggests that the leaching of radiocesium from the forest canopy, which was not considered in the model, played a significant role in its transport from the catchment. Based on the simulation results, we quantified the long-term fate of radiocesium over the study area and estimated that the effective half-life of (137)Cs deposited in the study area will be approximately 22 y due to the export of contaminated sediment by land-surface processes, and the amount of (137)Cs remaining in the

  5. Physics-Based Computational Algorithm for the Multi-Fluid Plasma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    equations for the limiting case of a collisionless plasma with only two species, ions and electrons, the two-fluid plasma model is presented in Ref. [22...055911, 2007. [45] J. Loverich and U. Shumlak. Nonlinear full two-fluid study of m = 0 sausage instabilities in an axisymmetric Z pinch. Physics of

  6. A compact physical model for the simulation of pNML-based architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Turvani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Among emerging technologies, perpendicular Nanomagnetic Logic (pNML seems to be very promising because of its capability of combining logic and memory onto the same device, scalability, 3D-integration and low power consumption. Recently, Full Adder (FA structures clocked by a global magnetic field have been experimentally demonstrated and detailed characterizations of the switching process governing the domain wall (DW nucleation probability Pnuc and time tnuc have been performed. However, the design of pNML architectures represent a crucial point in the study of this technology; this can have a remarkable impact on the reliability of pNML structures. Here, we present a compact model developed in VHDL which enables to simulate complex pNML architectures while keeping into account critical physical parameters. Therefore, such parameters have been extracted from the experiments, fitted by the corresponding physical equations and encapsulated into the proposed model. Within this, magnetic structures are decomposed into a few basic elements (nucleation centers, nanowires, inverters etc. represented by the according physical description. To validate the model, we redesigned a FA and compared our simulation results to the experiment. With this compact model of pNML devices we have envisioned a new methodology which makes it possible to simulate and test the physical behavior of complex architectures with very low computational costs.

  7. A compact physical model for the simulation of pNML-based architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvani, G.; Riente, F.; Plozner, E.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.; Breitkreutz-v. Gamm, S.

    2017-05-01

    Among emerging technologies, perpendicular Nanomagnetic Logic (pNML) seems to be very promising because of its capability of combining logic and memory onto the same device, scalability, 3D-integration and low power consumption. Recently, Full Adder (FA) structures clocked by a global magnetic field have been experimentally demonstrated and detailed characterizations of the switching process governing the domain wall (DW) nucleation probability Pnuc and time tnuc have been performed. However, the design of pNML architectures represent a crucial point in the study of this technology; this can have a remarkable impact on the reliability of pNML structures. Here, we present a compact model developed in VHDL which enables to simulate complex pNML architectures while keeping into account critical physical parameters. Therefore, such parameters have been extracted from the experiments, fitted by the corresponding physical equations and encapsulated into the proposed model. Within this, magnetic structures are decomposed into a few basic elements (nucleation centers, nanowires, inverters etc.) represented by the according physical description. To validate the model, we redesigned a FA and compared our simulation results to the experiment. With this compact model of pNML devices we have envisioned a new methodology which makes it possible to simulate and test the physical behavior of complex architectures with very low computational costs.

  8. Physics-based Models for Aeroservoelasticity Prediction and Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop and demonstrate computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based, reduced-order aeroservoelasticity modeling and simulation...

  9. Physics-Based Models for Aeroservoelasticity Prediction and Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop and demonstrate computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based, reduced-order aeroservoelasticity modeling and simulation...

  10. Prognostics Health Management and Physics based failure Models for Electrolytic Capacitors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper proposes first principles based modeling and prognostics approach for electrolytic capacitors. Electrolytic capacitors and MOSFETs are the two major...

  11. Comparison among physical process based snow models in estimating SWE and upwelling microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Durand, M. T.; Margulis, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Snowpack serves as a critical water resource and an important climate indicator. Accurately estimating snow water equivalent (SWE) and melt timing has both civil and scientific merits. Physical process based multi-layer land surface models (LSM) characterize snowpack by tracking the energy balance and mass balance in each layer. However, in terms of the number of layers used to model the snowpack stratigraphy, as well as the complexity of the simulated mass/energy exchanges in each single layer, significant variances exist among different LSMs. Previous work has largely focused on assessing the impact of layering and stratigraphy representation on mass and energy balance, with little attention paid to the implications of these factors on predicted microwave brightness temperature (Tb). In this paper, three LSMs with varying snow layer schemes: SSiB (3-layer), CoLM (5-layer), and SNOWPACK (N-layer), are coupled to the Microwave Emission from Multi-Layer Snowpacks (MEMLS) radiative transfer model (RTM) to simulate the snowpack mass/energy budgets and microwave signature over a full season. The simulations are performed at five in-situ gage locations in the Kern River Basin, Sierra Nevada, CA where it is known that large snow events occur that can be problematic to represent using a small number of snow layers. A particular emphasis is placed on assessment of the impact of layering scheme on the results. Preliminary results show that even for SSiB which has a relative simple empirical layering scheme, the modeled annual SWE could be highly correlated with the in-situ SWE (r¬2=0.91) if the precipitation bias is corrected, also, the comparison between the Tb simulated by SSiB+MEMLS and the downscaled AMSR-E Tb measurements shows a correlation coefficient of 0.94 during the snow accumulation season (Oct to Apr) if the grain growth parameters and the soil snow reflectivity is properly calibrated. Future work includes comparing SWE and Tb from all threemodels and

  12. A Model for the Design of Puzzle-Based Games Including Virtual and Physical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Javier; Hernandez-Leo, Davinia

    2014-01-01

    Multiple evidences in the Technology-Enhanced Learning domain indicate that Game-Based Learning can lead to positive effects in students' performance and motivation. Educational games can be completely virtual or can combine the use of physical objects or spaces in the real world. However, the potential effectiveness of these approaches…

  13. The evolution of process-based hydrologic models: historical challenges and the collective quest for physical realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Clark

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The diversity in hydrologic models has historically led to great controversy on the correct approach to process-based hydrologic modeling, with debates centered on the adequacy of process parameterizations, data limitations and uncertainty, and computational constraints on model analysis. In this paper, we revisit key modeling challenges on requirements to (1 define suitable model equations, (2 define adequate model parameters, and (3 cope with limitations in computing power. We outline the historical modeling challenges, provide examples of modeling advances that address these challenges, and define outstanding research needs. We illustrate how modeling advances have been made by groups using models of different type and complexity, and we argue for the need to more effectively use our diversity of modeling approaches in order to advance our collective quest for physically realistic hydrologic models.

  14. Intertwining evidence- and model-based reasoning in physics sensemaking: An example from electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Rosemary S.; Odden, Tor Ole B.

    2017-12-01

    Our field has long valued the goal of teaching students not just the facts of physics, but also the thinking and reasoning skills of professional physicists. The complexity inherent in scientific reasoning demands that we think carefully about how we conceptualize for ourselves, enact in our classes, and encourage in our students the relationship between the multifaceted practices of professional science. The current study draws on existing research in the philosophy of science and psychology to advocate for intertwining two important aspects of scientific reasoning: using evidence from experimentation and modeling. We present a case from an undergraduate physics course to illustrate how these aspects can be intertwined productively and describe specific ways in which these aspects of reasoning can mutually reinforce one another in student learning. We end by discussing implications for this work for instruction in introductory physics courses and for research on scientific reasoning at the undergraduate level.

  15. Review-Research on the physical training model of human body based on HQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junjie, Liu

    2016-11-01

    Health quotient (HQ) is the newest health culture and concept in the 21st century, and the analysis of the human body sports model is not enough mature at present, what's more, the purpose of this paper is to study the integration of the two subjects the health quotient and the sport model. This paper draws the conclusion that physical training and education in colleges and universities can improve the health quotient, and it will make students possess a more healthy body and mind. Then through a new rigid body model of sports to simulate the human physical exercise. After that this paper has an in-depth study on the dynamic model of the human body movement on the basis of establishing the matrix and equation. The simulation results of the human body bicycle riding and pole throwing show that the human body joint movement simulation can be realized and it has a certain operability as well. By means of such simulated calculation, we can come to a conclusion that the movement of the ankle joint, knee joint and hip joint's motion law and real motion are basically the same. So it further verify the accuracy of the motion model, which lay the foundation of other research movement model, also, the study of the movement model is an important method in the study of human health in the future.

  16. Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Sanborn, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    This is a working report drafted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, describing statistical models of passives component reliabilities. The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). The methodology emerging from the RISMC pathway is not a conventional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-based one; rather, it relies on a reactor systems simulation framework in which physical conditions of normal reactor operations, as well as accident environments, are explicitly modeled subject to uncertainty characterization. RELAP 7 (R7) is the platform being developed at Idaho National Laboratory to model these physical conditions. Adverse effects of aging systems could be particularly significant in those SSCs for which management options are limited; that is, components for which replacement, refurbishment, or other means of rejuvenation are least practical. These include various passive SSCs, such as piping components. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing passive component reliability models intended to be compatible with the R7 framework. In the R7 paradigm, component reliability must be characterized in the context of the physical environments that R7 predicts. So, while conventional reliability models are parametric, relying on the statistical analysis of service data, RISMC reliability models must be physics-based and driven by the physical boundary conditions that R7 provides, thus allowing full integration of passives into the R7 multi-physics environment. The model must also be cast in a form compatible with the cumulative damage framework that R7

  17. Towards a physics-based multiscale modelling of the electro-mechanical coupling in electro-active polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noy; Menzel, Andreas; deBotton, Gal

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the increasing number of industrial applications of electro-active polymers (EAPs), there is a growing need for electromechanical models which accurately capture their behaviour. To this end, we compare the predicted behaviour of EAPs undergoing homogeneous deformations according to three electromechanical models. The first model is a phenomenological continuum-based model composed of the mechanical Gent model and a linear relationship between the electric field and the polarization. The electrical and the mechanical responses according to the second model are based on the physical structure of the polymer chain network. The third model incorporates a neo-Hookean mechanical response and a physically motivated microstructurally based long-chains model for the electrical behaviour. In the microstructural-motivated models, the integration from the microscopic to the macroscopic levels is accomplished by the micro-sphere technique. Four types of homogeneous boundary conditions are considered and the behaviours determined according to the three models are compared. For the microstructurally motivated models, these analyses are performed and compared with the widely used phenomenological model for the first time. Some of the aspects revealed in this investigation, such as the dependence of the intensity of the polarization field on the deformation, highlight the need for an in-depth investigation of the relationships between the structure and the behaviours of the EAPs at the microscopic level and their overall macroscopic response.

  18. A Comparison between Physics-based and Polytropic MHD Models for Stellar Coronae and Stellar Winds of Solar Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, O. [Lowell Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The development of the Zeeman–Doppler Imaging (ZDI) technique has provided synoptic observations of surface magnetic fields of low-mass stars. This led the stellar astrophysics community to adopt modeling techniques that have been used in solar physics using solar magnetograms. However, many of these techniques have been neglected by the solar community due to their failure to reproduce solar observations. Nevertheless, some of these techniques are still used to simulate the coronae and winds of solar analogs. Here we present a comparative study between two MHD models for the solar corona and solar wind. The first type of model is a polytropic wind model, and the second is the physics-based AWSOM model. We show that while the AWSOM model consistently reproduces many solar observations, the polytropic model fails to reproduce many of them, and in the cases where it does, its solutions are unphysical. Our recommendation is that polytropic models, which are used to estimate mass-loss rates and other parameters of solar analogs, must first be calibrated with solar observations. Alternatively, these models can be calibrated with models that capture more detailed physics of the solar corona (such as the AWSOM model) and that can reproduce solar observations in a consistent manner. Without such a calibration, the results of the polytropic models cannot be validated, but they can be wrongly used by others.

  19. Simulated western spruce budworm defoliation reduces torching and crowning potential: A sensitivity analysis using a physics-based fire model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory M. Cohn; Russell A. Parsons; Emily K. Heyerdahl; Daniel G. Gavin; Aquila Flower

    2014-01-01

    The widespread, native defoliator western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) reduces canopy fuels, which might affect the potential for surface fires to torch (ignite the crowns of individual trees) or crown (spread between tree crowns). However, the effects of defoliation on fire behaviour are poorly understood. We used a physics-based fire model to...

  20. Physics-based modeling of live wildland fuel ignition experiments in the Forced Ignition and Flame Spread Test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Anand; B. Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; S. McAllister; D. R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    A computational study was performed to improve our understanding of the ignition of live fuel in the forced ignition and flame spread test apparatus, a setup where the impact of the heating mode is investigated by subjecting the fuel to forced convection and radiation. An improvement was first made in the physics-based model WFDS where the fuel is treated as fixed...

  1. A Simple Physics-Based Model Predicts Oil Production from Thousands of Horizontal Wells in Shales

    KAUST Repository

    Patzek, Tadeusz

    2017-10-18

    Over the last six years, crude oil production from shales and ultra-deep GOM in the United States has accounted for most of the net increase of global oil production. Therefore, it is important to have a good predictive model of oil production and ultimate recovery in shale wells. Here we introduce a simple model of producing oil and solution gas from the horizontal hydrofractured wells. This model is consistent with the basic physics and geometry of the extraction process. We then apply our model thousands of wells in the Eagle Ford shale. Given well geometry, we obtain a one-dimensional nonlinear pressure diffusion equation that governs flow of mostly oil and solution gas. In principle, solutions of this equation depend on many parameters, but in practice and within a given oil shale, all but three can be fixed at typical values, leading to a nonlinear diffusion problem we linearize and solve exactly with a scaling

  2. Stolen Base Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    Few plays in baseball are as consistently close and exciting as the stolen base. While there are several studies of sprinting, the art of base stealing is much more nuanced. This article describes the motion of the base-stealing runner using a very basic kinematic model. The model will be compared to some data from a Major League game. The…

  3. Physical Protection System Design Analysis against Insider Threat based on Game Theoretic Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyo-Nam; Suh, Young-A; Yim, Man-Sung; Schneider, Erich

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the use of game-theoretic modeling of physical protection analysis by incorporating the implications of an insider threat. The defender-adversary interaction along with the inclusion of an insider is demonstrated using a simplified test case problem at an experimental fast reactor system. Non-detection probability and travel time are used as a baseline of physical protection parameters in this model. As one of the key features of the model is its ability to choose among security upgrades given the constraints of a budget, the study also performed cost benefit analysis for security upgrades options. In this study, we analyzed the expected adversarial path and security upgrades with a limited budget with insider threat modeled as increasing the non-detection probability. Our test case problem categorized three types of adversary paths assisted by the insider and derived the largest insider threat in terms of the budget for security upgrades. More work needs to be done to incorporate complex dimensions of insider threats, which include but are not limited to: a more realistic mapping of insider threat, accounting for information asymmetry between the adversary, insider, and defenders, and assignment of more pragmatic parameter values

  4. Ensemble regression model-based anomaly detection for cyber-physical intrusion detection in smart grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, Anna Magdalena; Gehrke, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    on an ensemble of non-linear artificial neural network DER models which detect and evaluate anomalies in DER operation. The proposed method is validated against measurement data which yields a precision of 0.947 and an accuracy of 0.976. This improves the precision and accuracy of a classic model-based anomaly...

  5. Investigation on the geological structures obstructing the propagation of seismic waves - Based on physical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Yul; Hyun, Hye ja; Kim, Yoo Sung [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    In petroleum exploration seismic reflection method is by far the most widely used. The resulting seismogram or seismic trace consists of many wavelets with different strengths and arrival times, due to the wavefront that have traveled different source-to receiver paths. In this sense, the seismic trace may be represented as a convolution of a wavelet with an impulse response denoting the various wavelet amplitudes and arrival times present in the trace. However, the wavelet suffers different attenuations while traveling through the earth layers. For example, the weathered layer (near-surface structure : e.g. valley) affect the propagating seismic wave in ways that cannot be simply modeled, but rather described in terms of an overall time delay and significant distortion of the source wavelet as it travels downward. Of course, the weathered layer will also affect the upgoing wave. Thus, the reflection method does not always lead to a desirable resolution in reflection section, because some specific constraints on the illumination of the deeper reflectors can be often imposed by the near-surface effect. Among other things, the mechanism for attenuation in many types of rocks is not very well understood. The present work is then mostly focussed on studying problems of wave propagation especially dealing with the near-surface structure problem by using physical modeling. An attempt was made to compare the measured data in detail with those from numerical method (ray theory). Besides, various kinds of physical models were additionally built to simulate the complex geological structures comprising wavy layer, coal seam structure, absorbing inhomogeneities, gradient layer that are not simply amenable to theory. Hereby, an attention was given on the reflection and transmission responses. The results illustrated in this work will provide a basis for the future oil exploration in Korea and demonstrate the potential of physical modeling as well. (author). 7 refs., 4 tabs., 62

  6. A Model-Based Virtual Sensor for Condition Monitoring of Li-Ion Batteries in Cyber-Physical Vehicle Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A model-based virtual sensor for assessing the health of rechargeable batteries for cyber-physical vehicle systems (CPVSs is presented that can exploit coarse data streamed from on-vehicle sensors of current, voltage, and temperature. First-principle-based models are combined with knowledge acquired from data in a semiphysical arrangement. The dynamic behaviour of the battery is embodied in the parametric definition of a set of differential equations, and fuzzy knowledge bases are embedded as nonlinear blocks in these equations, providing a human understandable reading of the State of Health of the CPVS that can be easily integrated in the fleet through-life management.

  7. Towards a complete physically based forecast model for underwater noise related to impact pile driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Moritz B; Rolfes, Raimund

    2015-03-01

    An approach for the prediction of underwater noise caused by impact pile driving is described and validated based on in situ measurements. The model is divided into three sub-models. The first sub-model, based on the finite element method, is used to describe the vibration of the pile and the resulting acoustic radiation into the surrounding water and soil column. The mechanical excitation of the pile by the piling hammer is estimated by the second sub-model using an analytical approach which takes the large vertical dimension of the ram into account. The third sub-model is based on the split-step Padé solution of the parabolic equation and targets the long-range propagation up to 20 km. In order to presume realistic environmental properties for the validation, a geoacoustic model is derived from spatially averaged geological information about the investigation area. Although it can be concluded from the validation that the model and the underlying assumptions are appropriate, there are some deviations between modeled and measured results. Possible explanations for the observed errors are discussed.

  8. Modeling Optical Lithography Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neureuther, Andrew R.; Rubinstein, Juliet; Chin, Eric; Wang, Lynn; Miller, Marshal; Clifford, Chris; Yamazoe, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Key physical phenomena associated with resists, illumination, lenses and masks are used to show the progress in models and algorithms for modeling optical projection printing as well as current simulation challenges in managing process complexity for manufacturing. The amazing current capability and challenges for projection printing are discussed using the 22 nm device generation. A fundamental foundation for modeling resist exposure, partial coherent imaging and defect printability is given. The technology innovations of resolution enhancement and chemically amplified resist systems and their modeling challenges are overviewed. Automated chip-level applications in pattern pre-compensation and design-anticipation of residual process variations require new simulation approaches.

  9. Translation of an Action Learning Collaborative Model Into a Community-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity and Healthy Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Karen E; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M; Butcher, Rebecca L; O'Connor, Sharon; Li, Zhigang; Bazos, Dorothy A

    2016-01-01

    Action Learning Collaboratives (ALCs), whereby teams apply quality improvement (QI) tools and methods, have successfully improved patient care delivery and outcomes. We adapted and tested the ALC model as a community-based obesity prevention intervention focused on physical activity and healthy eating. The intervention used QI tools (e.g., progress monitoring) and team-based activities and was implemented in three communities through nine monthly meetings. To assess process and outcomes, we used a longitudinal repeated-measures and mixed-methods triangulation approach with a quasi-experimental design including objective measures at three time points. Most of the 97 participants were female (85.4%), White (93.8%), and non-Hispanic/Latino (95.9%). Average age was 52 years; 28.0% had annual household income of $20,000 or less; and mean body mass index was 35. Through mixed-effects models, we found some physical activity outcomes improved. Other outcomes did not significantly change. Although participants favorably viewed the QI tools, components of the QI process such as sharing goals and data on progress in teams and during meetings were limited. Participants' requests for more education or activities around physical activity and healthy eating, rather than progress monitoring and data sharing required for QI activities, challenged ALC model implementation. An ALC model for community-based obesity prevention may be more effective when applied to preexisting teams in community-based organizations. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. Enabling full-field physics-based optical proximity correction via dynamic model generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael; Clifford, Chris; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Fenger, Germain; Adam, Kostas

    2017-07-01

    As extreme ultraviolet lithography becomes closer to reality for high volume production, its peculiar modeling challenges related to both inter and intrafield effects have necessitated building an optical proximity correction (OPC) infrastructure that operates with field position dependency. Previous state-of-the-art approaches to modeling field dependency used piecewise constant models where static input models are assigned to specific x/y-positions within the field. OPC and simulation could assign the proper static model based on simulation-level placement. However, in the realm of 7 and 5 nm feature sizes, small discontinuities in OPC from piecewise constant model changes can cause unacceptable levels of edge placement errors. The introduction of dynamic model generation (DMG) can be shown to effectively avoid these dislocations by providing unique mask and optical models per simulation region, allowing a near continuum of models through the field. DMG allows unique models for electromagnetic field, apodization, aberrations, etc. to vary through the entire field and provides a capability to precisely and accurately model systematic field signatures.

  11. Modeling and simulation of tumor-influenced high resolution real-time physics-based breast models for model-guided robotic interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylon, John; Hasse, Katelyn; Sheng, Ke; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2016-03-01

    Breast radiation therapy is typically delivered to the patient in either supine or prone position. Each of these positioning systems has its limitations in terms of tumor localization, dose to the surrounding normal structures, and patient comfort. We envision developing a pneumatically controlled breast immobilization device that will enable the benefits of both supine and prone positioning. In this paper, we present a physics-based breast deformable model that aids in both the design of the breast immobilization device as well as a control module for the device during every day positioning. The model geometry is generated from a subject's CT scan acquired during the treatment planning stage. A GPU based deformable model is then generated for the breast. A mass-spring-damper approach is then employed for the deformable model, with the spring modeled to represent a hyperelastic tissue behavior. Each voxel of the CT scan is then associated with a mass element, which gives the model its high resolution nature. The subject specific elasticity is then estimated from a CT scan in prone position. Our results show that the model can deform at >60 deformations per second, which satisfies the real-time requirement for robotic positioning. The model interacts with a computer designed immobilization device to position the breast and tumor anatomy in a reproducible location. The design of the immobilization device was also systematically varied based on the breast geometry, tumor location, elasticity distribution and the reproducibility of the desired tumor location.

  12. Promoting physical activity through video games based on self-behavioral models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abreu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is an essential component of a healthy lifestyle, promoting health and preventing various chronic diseases. Despite this evidence, it is known that the younger generations invest much time in sedentary activities such as television viewing, videogames or reading, which potentially can lead to an increase in the prevalence of sedentary behaviors in adulthood. These behaviors have been identified as factors of disturbance in the balance between intake and energy expenditure, contributing to the increasing number of overweight and obese people and, further downstream, the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and cancer (among others. The emergence of the Exergames (videogames that involve physical activity, either light, moderate or intense and games whose narrative alters pathogenic beliefs, contrary to the potential risk effect of gaming, by combining the playful context of videogames with physical activity (mild to intense. This study discusses some salutogenic principles of a new generation of videogames where virtual and real come together, ipromoting salutogenic behavioral patterns, namely through greater energy expenditure. The ideas are based on theoretical and empirical contributions from health psychology, in addition to the potential of computer technology applicable to traditional videogames and Exergames.

  13. AMITIS: A 3D GPU-Based Hybrid-PIC Model for Space and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Shahab; Poppe, Andrew R.; Delory, Gregory T.; Farrell, William M.

    2017-05-01

    We have developed, for the first time, an advanced modeling infrastructure in space simulations (AMITIS) with an embedded three-dimensional self-consistent grid-based hybrid model of plasma (kinetic ions and fluid electrons) that runs entirely on graphics processing units (GPUs). The model uses NVIDIA GPUs and their associated parallel computing platform, CUDA, developed for general purpose processing on GPUs. The model uses a single CPU-GPU pair, where the CPU transfers data between the system and GPU memory, executes CUDA kernels, and writes simulation outputs on the disk. All computations, including moving particles, calculating macroscopic properties of particles on a grid, and solving hybrid model equations are processed on a single GPU. We explain various computing kernels within AMITIS and compare their performance with an already existing well-tested hybrid model of plasma that runs in parallel using multi-CPU platforms. We show that AMITIS runs ∼10 times faster than the parallel CPU-based hybrid model. We also introduce an implicit solver for computation of Faraday’s Equation, resulting in an explicit-implicit scheme for the hybrid model equation. We show that the proposed scheme is stable and accurate. We examine the AMITIS energy conservation and show that the energy is conserved with an error < 0.2% after 500,000 timesteps, even when a very low number of particles per cell is used.

  14. Design of Soil Salinity Policies with Tinamit, a Flexible and Rapid Tool to Couple Stakeholder-Built System Dynamics Models with Physically-Based Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malard, J. J.; Baig, A. I.; Hassanzadeh, E.; Adamowski, J. F.; Tuy, H.; Melgar-Quiñonez, H.

    2016-12-01

    Model coupling is a crucial step to constructing many environmental models, as it allows for the integration of independently-built models representing different system sub-components to simulate the entire system. Model coupling has been of particular interest in combining socioeconomic System Dynamics (SD) models, whose visual interface facilitates their direct use by stakeholders, with more complex physically-based models of the environmental system. However, model coupling processes are often cumbersome and inflexible and require extensive programming knowledge, limiting their potential for continued use by stakeholders in policy design and analysis after the end of the project. Here, we present Tinamit, a flexible Python-based model-coupling software tool whose easy-to-use API and graphical user interface make the coupling of stakeholder-built SD models with physically-based models rapid, flexible and simple for users with limited to no coding knowledge. The flexibility of the system allows end users to modify the SD model as well as the linking variables between the two models themselves with no need for recoding. We use Tinamit to couple a stakeholder-built socioeconomic model of soil salinization in Pakistan with the physically-based soil salinity model SAHYSMOD. As climate extremes increase in the region, policies to slow or reverse soil salinity buildup are increasing in urgency and must take both socioeconomic and biophysical spheres into account. We use the Tinamit-coupled model to test the impact of integrated policy options (economic and regulatory incentives to farmers) on soil salinity in the region in the face of future climate change scenarios. Use of the Tinamit model allowed for rapid and flexible coupling of the two models, allowing the end user to continue making model structure and policy changes. In addition, the clear interface (in contrast to most model coupling code) makes the final coupled model easily accessible to stakeholders with

  15. Development of a Corrosion Potential Measuring System Based on the Generalization of DACS Physical Scale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Dalei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A feasible method in evaluating the protection effect and corrosion state of marine cathodic protection (CP systems is collecting sufficient electric potential data around a submarine pipeline and then establishing the mapping relations between these data and corrosion states of pipelines. However, it is difficult for scientists and researchers to obtain those data accurately due to the harsh marine environments and absence of dedicated potential measurement device. In this paper, to alleviate these two problems, firstly, the theory of dimension and conductivity scaling (DACS physical scale modeling of marine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP systems is generalized to marine CP systems, secondly, a potential measurement device is developed specially and analogue experiment is designed according to DACS physical scale modeling to verify the feasibility of the measuring system. The experimental results show that 92 percent of the measurement errors are less than 0.25mv, thereby providing an economical and feasible measuring system to get electric potential data around an actual submarine pipeline under CP.

  16. 3D constitutive model of anisotropic damage for unidirectional ply based on physical failure mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2010-01-01

    A 3D anisotropic continuum damage model is developed for the computational analysis of the elastic–brittle behaviour of fibre-reinforced composite. The damage model is based on a set of phenomenological failure criteria for fibre-reinforced composite, which can distinguish the matrix and fibre...... failure under tensile and compressive loading. The homogenized continuum theory is adopted for the anisotropic elastic damage constitutive model. The damage modes occurring in the longitudinal and transverse directions of a ply are represented by a damage vector. The elastic damage model is implemented...... in a computational finite element framework, which is capable of predicting initial failure, subsequent progressive damage up to final collapse. Crack band model and viscous regularization are applied to depress the convergence difficulties associated with strain softening behaviours. To verify the accuracy...

  17. Finite Element Based Physical Chemical Modeling of Corrosion in Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Vijayaraghavan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have found widespread applications in diverse fields such as aerospace, automotive, bio-medical and electronics industries due to its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. However, stress corrosion cracking of these alloys severely restricts their applications in several novel technologies. Hence, it will be useful to identify the corrosion mechanics of magnesium alloys under external stresses as it can provide further insights on design of these alloys for critical applications. In the present study, the corrosion mechanics of a commonly used magnesium alloy, AZ31, is studied using finite element simulation with a modified constitutive material damage model. The data obtained from the finite element modeling were further used to formulate a mathematical model using computational intelligence algorithm. Sensitivity and parametric analysis of the derived model further corroborated the mechanical response of the alloy in line with the corrosion physics. The proposed approach is anticipated to be useful for materials engineers for optimizing the design criteria for magnesium alloys catered for high temperature applications.

  18. Predicting the Water Level Fluctuation in an Alpine Lake Using Physically Based, Artificial Neural Network, and Time Series Forecasting Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of water level fluctuation is important in lake management due to its significant impacts in various aspects. This study utilizes four model approaches to predict water levels in the Yuan-Yang Lake (YYL in Taiwan: a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, an artificial neural network (ANN model (back propagation neural network, BPNN, a time series forecasting (autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs, ARMAX model, and a combined hydrodynamic and ANN model. Particularly, the black-box ANN model and physically based hydrodynamic model are coupled to more accurately predict water level fluctuation. Hourly water level data (a total of 7296 observations was collected for model calibration (training and validation. Three statistical indicators (mean absolute error, root mean square error, and coefficient of correlation were adopted to evaluate model performances. Overall, the results demonstrate that the hydrodynamic model can satisfactorily predict hourly water level changes during the calibration stage but not for the validation stage. The ANN and ARMAX models better predict the water level than the hydrodynamic model does. Meanwhile, the results from an ANN model are superior to those by the ARMAX model in both training and validation phases. The novel proposed concept using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model in conjunction with an ANN model has clearly shown the improved prediction accuracy for the water level fluctuation.

  19. Beyond Standard Model Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellantoni, L.

    2009-11-01

    There are many recent results from searches for fundamental new physics using the TeVatron, the SLAC b-factory and HERA. This talk quickly reviewed searches for pair-produced stop, for gauge-mediated SUSY breaking, for Higgs bosons in the MSSM and NMSSM models, for leptoquarks, and v-hadrons. There is a SUSY model which accommodates the recent astrophysical experimental results that suggest that dark matter annihilation is occurring in the center of our galaxy, and a relevant experimental result. Finally, model-independent searches at D0, CDF, and H1 are discussed.

  20. Simulating Fire Disturbance and Plant Mortality Using Antecedent Eco-hydrological Conditions to Inform a Physically Based Combustion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, A. L.; Linn, R.; Middleton, R. S.; Runde, I.; Coon, E.; Michaletz, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    Wildfire is a complex agent of change that both affects and depends on eco-hydrological systems, thereby constituting a tightly linked system of disturbances and eco-hydrological conditions. For example, structure, build-up, and moisture content of fuel are dependent on eco-hydrological regimes, which impacts fire spread and intensity. Fire behavior, on the other hand, determines the severity and extent of eco-hydrological disturbance, often resulting in a mosaic of untouched, stressed, damaged, or completely destroyed vegetation within the fire perimeter. This in turn drives new eco-hydrological system behavior. The cycles of disturbance and recovery present a complex evolving system with many unknowns especially in the face of climate change that has implications for fire risk, water supply, and forest composition. Physically-based numerical experiments that attempt to capture the complex linkages between eco-hydrological regimes that affect fire behavior and the echo-hydrological response from those fire disturbances help build the understanding required to project how fire disturbance and eco-hydrological conditions coevolve over time. Here we explore the use of FIRETEC—a physically-based 3D combustion model that solves conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species—to resolve fire spread over complex terrain and fuel structures. Uniquely, we couple a physically-based plant mortality model with FIRETEC and examine the resultant hydrologic impact. In this proof of concept demonstration we spatially distribute fuel structure and moisture content based on the eco-hydrological condition to use as input for FIRETEC. The fire behavior simulation then produces localized burn severity and heat injures which are used as input to a spatially-informed plant mortality model. Ultimately we demonstrate the applicability of physically-based models to explore integrated disturbance and eco-hydrologic response to wildfire behavior and specifically map how fire

  1. Estimating Crop Albedo in the Application of a Physical Model Based on the Law of Energy Conservation and Spectral Invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Albedo characterizes the radiometric interface of land surfaces, especially vegetation, and the atmosphere. Albedo is a critical input to many models, such as crop growth models, hydrological models and climate models. For the extensive attention to crop monitoring, a physical albedo model for crops is developed based on the law of energy conservation and spectral invariants, which is derived from a prior forest albedo model. The model inputs have been efficiently and physically parameterized, including the dependency of albedo on the solar zenith/azimuth angle, the fraction of diffuse skylight in the incident radiance, the canopy structure, the leaf reflectance/transmittance and the soil reflectance characteristics. Both the anisotropy of soil reflectance and the clumping effect of crop leaves at the canopy scale are considered, which contribute to the improvement of the model accuracy. The comparison between the model results and Monte Carlo simulation results indicates that the canopy albedo has high accuracy with an RMSE < 0.005. The validation using ground measurements has also demonstrated the reliability of the model and that it can reflect the interaction mechanism between radiation and the canopy-soil system.

  2. Improving predictive power of physically based rainfall-induced shallow landslide models: a probabilistic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Raia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Distributed models to forecast the spatial and temporal occurrence of rainfall-induced shallow landslides are based on deterministic laws. These models extend spatially the static stability models adopted in geotechnical engineering, and adopt an infinite-slope geometry to balance the resisting and the driving forces acting on the sliding mass. An infiltration model is used to determine how rainfall changes pore-water conditions, modulating the local stability/instability conditions. A problem with the operation of the existing models lays in the difficulty in obtaining accurate values for the several variables that describe the material properties of the slopes. The problem is particularly severe when the models are applied over large areas, for which sufficient information on the geotechnical and hydrological conditions of the slopes is not generally available. To help solve the problem, we propose a probabilistic Monte Carlo approach to the distributed modeling of rainfall-induced shallow landslides. For this purpose, we have modified the transient rainfall infiltration and grid-based regional slope-stability analysis (TRIGRS code. The new code (TRIGRS-P adopts a probabilistic approach to compute, on a cell-by-cell basis, transient pore-pressure changes and related changes in the factor of safety due to rainfall infiltration. Infiltration is modeled using analytical solutions of partial differential equations describing one-dimensional vertical flow in isotropic, homogeneous materials. Both saturated and unsaturated soil conditions can be considered. TRIGRS-P copes with the natural variability inherent to the mechanical and hydrological properties of the slope materials by allowing values of the TRIGRS model input parameters to be sampled randomly from a given probability distribution. The range of variation and the mean value of the parameters can be determined by the usual methods used for preparing the TRIGRS input parameters. The outputs

  3. Physics Based Model for Cryogenic Chilldown and Loading. Part IV: Code Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinsky, D. G.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Brown, B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the fourth report in a series of technical reports that describe separated two-phase flow model application to the cryogenic loading operation. In this report we present the structure of the code. The code consists of five major modules: (1) geometry module; (2) solver; (3) material properties; (4) correlations; and finally (5) stability control module. The two key modules - solver and correlations - are further divided into a number of submodules. Most of the physics and knowledge databases related to the properties of cryogenic two-phase flow are included into the cryogenic correlations module. The functional form of those correlations is not well established and is a subject of extensive research. Multiple parametric forms for various correlations are currently available. Some of them are included into correlations module as will be described in details in a separate technical report. Here we describe the overall structure of the code and focus on the details of the solver and stability control modules.

  4. Development of a Logic Model for a Physical Activity–Based Employee Wellness Program for Mass Transit Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Bhibha M.; Petruzzello, Steven J.; Ryan, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation workers, who constitute a large sector of the workforce, have worksite factors that harm their health. Worksite wellness programs must target this at-risk population. Although physical activity is often a component of worksite wellness logic models, we consider it the cornerstone for improving the health of mass transit employees. Program theory was based on in-person interviews and focus groups of employees. We identified 4 short-term outcome categories, which provided a chain...

  5. Capturing the complex behavior of hydraulic fracture stimulation through multi-physics modeling, field-based constraints, and model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S.; Chiaramonte, L.; Cruz, L.; Izadi, G.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in the accuracy and fidelity of numerical methods have significantly improved our understanding of coupled processes in unconventional reservoirs. However, such multi-physics models are typically characterized by many parameters and require exceptional computational resources to evaluate systems of practical importance, making these models difficult to use for field analyses or uncertainty quantification. One approach to remove these limitations is through targeted complexity reduction and field data constrained parameterization. For the latter, a variety of field data streams may be available to engineers and asset teams, including micro-seismicity from proximate sites, well logs, and 3D surveys, which can constrain possible states of the reservoir as well as the distributions of parameters. We describe one such workflow, using the Argos multi-physics code and requisite geomechanical analysis to parameterize the underlying models. We illustrate with a field study involving a constraint analysis of various field data and details of the numerical optimizations and model reduction to demonstrate how complex models can be applied to operation design in hydraulic fracturing operations, including selection of controllable completion and fluid injection design properties. The implication of this work is that numerical methods are mature and computationally tractable enough to enable complex engineering analysis and deterministic field estimates and to advance research into stochastic analyses for uncertainty quantification and value of information applications.

  6. Development of a physically-based planar inductors VHDL-AMS model for integrated power converter design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammouri, Aymen; Ben Salah, Walid; Khachroumi, Sofiane; Ben Salah, Tarek; Kourda, Ferid; Morel, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Design of integrated power converters needs prototype-less approaches. Specific simulations are required for investigation and validation process. Simulation relies on active and passive device models. Models of planar devices, for instance, are still not available in power simulator tools. There is, thus, a specific limitation during the simulation process of integrated power systems. The paper focuses on the development of a physically-based planar inductor model and its validation inside a power converter during transient switching. The planar inductor model remains a complex device to model, particularly when the skin, the proximity and the parasitic capacitances effects are taken into account. Heterogeneous simulation scheme, including circuit and device models, is successfully implemented in VHDL-AMS language and simulated in Simplorer platform. The mixed simulation results has been favorably tested and compared with practical measurements. It is found that the multi-domain simulation results and measurements data are in close agreement.

  7. Improving predictive power of physically based rainfall-induced shallow landslide models: a probablistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, S.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Baum, R.L.; Godt, J.W.; Guzzetti, F.

    2013-01-01

    Distributed models to forecast the spatial and temporal occurrence of rainfall-induced shallow landslides are deterministic. These models extend spatially the static stability models adopted in geotechnical engineering and adopt an infinite-slope geometry to balance the resisting and the driving forces acting on the sliding mass. An infiltration model is used to determine how rainfall changes pore-water conditions, modulating the local stability/instability conditions. A problem with the existing models is the difficulty in obtaining accurate values for the several variables that describe the material properties of the slopes. The problem is particularly severe when the models are applied over large areas, for which sufficient information on the geotechnical and hydrological conditions of the slopes is not generally available. To help solve the problem, we propose a probabilistic Monte Carlo approach to the distributed modeling of shallow rainfall-induced landslides. For the purpose, we have modified the Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Analysis (TRIGRS) code. The new code (TRIGRS-P) adopts a stochastic approach to compute, on a cell-by-cell basis, transient pore-pressure changes and related changes in the factor of safety due to rainfall infiltration. Infiltration is modeled using analytical solutions of partial differential equations describing one-dimensional vertical flow in isotropic, homogeneous materials. Both saturated and unsaturated soil conditions can be considered. TRIGRS-P copes with the natural variability inherent to the mechanical and hydrological properties of the slope materials by allowing values of the TRIGRS model input parameters to be sampled randomly from a given probability distribution. The range of variation and the mean value of the parameters can be determined by the usual methods used for preparing the TRIGRS input parameters. The outputs of several model runs obtained varying the input parameters

  8. Future body mass index modelling based on macronutrient profiles and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cundiff David K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An accurate system of determining the relationship of macronutrient profiles of foods and beverages to the long-term weight impacts of foods is necessary for evidence-based, unbiased front-of-the-package food labels. Methods Data sets on diet, physical activity, and BMI came from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO, the World Health Organization (WHO, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT, and Epidemiology Diabetes Intervention and Complications (EDIC. To predict future BMI of individuals, multiple regression derived FAO/WHO and DCCT/EDIC formulas related macronutrient profiles and physical activity (independent variables to BMI change/year (dependent variable. Similar formulas without physical activity related macronutrient profiles of individual foods and beverages to four-year weight impacts of those items and compared those forecasts to published food group profiling estimates from three large prospective studies by Harvard nutritional epidemiologists. Results FAO/WHO food and beverage formula: four-year weight impact (pounds=(0.07710 alcohol g+11.95 (381.7+carbohydrates g per serving*4/(2,613+kilocalories per serving–304.9 (30.38+dietary fiber g per serving/(2,613+kilocalories per serving+19.73 (84.44+total fat g*9/(2,613+kilocalories per serving–68.57 (20.45+PUFA g per serving*9/(2,613+kilocalories per serving*2.941–12.78 (n=334, R2=0.29, P 2=0.03, P P = 0.0004. Formula predictions did not correlate with food group profiling findings for potatoes and dairy products (n=10, r= −0.33 P=0.36. A formula based diet and exercise analysis tool is available to researchers and individuals: http://thehealtheconomy.com/healthTool/. Conclusions Two multiple regression derived formulas from dissimilar databases produced markedly similar estimates of future BMI for 1,055 individuals with type 1 diabetes and female and male cohorts from 167 countries. These formulas predicted the long-term weight impacts of

  9. Physics Based Electrolytic Capacitor Degradation Models for Prognostic Studies under Thermal Overstress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose R.; Goebel, Kai; Biswas, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Electrolytic capacitors are used in several applications ranging from power supplies on safety critical avionics equipment to power drivers for electro-mechanical actuators. This makes them good candidates for prognostics and health management research. Prognostics provides a way to assess remaining useful life of components or systems based on their current state of health and their anticipated future use and operational conditions. Past experiences show that capacitors tend to degrade and fail faster under high electrical and thermal stress conditions that they are often subjected to during operations. In this work, we study the effects of accelerated aging due to thermal stress on different sets of capacitors under different conditions. Our focus is on deriving first principles degradation models for thermal stress conditions. Data collected from simultaneous experiments are used to validate the desired models. Our overall goal is to derive accurate models of capacitor degradation, and use them to predict performance changes in DC-DC converters.

  10. Model-based approach for cyber-physical attack detection in water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housh, Mashor; Ohar, Ziv

    2018-03-17

    Modern Water Distribution Systems (WDSs) are often controlled by Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) which manage their operation and maintain a reliable water supply. As such, and with the cyber layer becoming a central component of WDS operations, these systems are at a greater risk of being subjected to cyberattacks. This paper offers a model-based methodology based on a detailed hydraulic understanding of WDSs combined with an anomaly detection algorithm for the identification of complex cyberattacks that cannot be fully identified by hydraulically based rules alone. The results show that the proposed algorithm is capable of achieving the best-known performance when tested on the data published in the BATtle of the Attack Detection ALgorithms (BATADAL) competition (http://www.batadal.net). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. 2008 GEM Modeling Challenge: Metrics Study of the Dst Index in Physics-Based Magnetosphere and Ring Current Models and in Statistical and Analytic Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M.; Hesse, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Glocer, A.; Yu, Y.; Meng, X.; Raeder, J.; Wiltberger, M.; Welling, D.; hide

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the metrics-based results of the Dst part of the 2008-2009 GEM Metrics Challenge are reported. The Metrics Challenge asked modelers to submit results for 4 geomagnetic storm events and 5 different types of observations that can be modeled by statistical or climatological or physics-based (e.g. MHD) models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We present the results of over 25 model settings that were run at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) and at the institutions of various modelers for these events. To measure the performance of each of the models against the observations we use comparisons of one-hour averaged model data with the Dst index issued by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism, Kyoto, Japan, and direct comparison of one-minute model data with the one-minute Dst index calculated by the United States Geologic Survey (USGS).

  12. Models of Individual Dietary Behavior Based on Smartphone Data: The Influence of Routine, Physical Activity, Emotion, and Food Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Seto

    Full Text Available Smartphone applications (apps facilitate the collection of data on multiple aspects of behavior that are useful for characterizing baseline patterns and for monitoring progress in interventions aimed at promoting healthier lifestyles. Individual-based models can be used to examine whether behavior, such as diet, corresponds to certain typological patterns. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate individual-based modeling methods relevant to a person's eating behavior, and the value of such approach compared to typical regression models.Using a mobile app, 2 weeks of physical activity and ecological momentary assessment (EMA data, and 6 days of diet data were collected from 12 university students recruited from a university in Kunming, a rapidly developing city in southwest China. Phone GPS data were collected for the entire 2-week period, from which exposure to various food environments along each subject's activity space was determined. Physical activity was measured using phone accelerometry. Mobile phone EMA was used to assess self-reported emotion/feelings. The portion size of meals and food groups was determined from voice-annotated videos of meals. Individual-based regression models were used to characterize subjects as following one of 4 diet typologies: those with a routine portion sizes determined by time of day, those with portion sizes that balance physical activity (energy balance, those with portion sizes influenced by emotion, and those with portion sizes associated with food environments.Ample compliance with the phone-based behavioral assessment was observed for all participants. Across all individuals, 868 consumed food items were recorded, with fruits, grains and dairy foods dominating the portion sizes. On average, 218 hours of accelerometry and 35 EMA responses were recorded for each participant. For some subjects, the routine model was able to explain up to 47% of the variation in portion sizes, and the energy

  13. Models of Individual Dietary Behavior Based on Smartphone Data: The Influence of Routine, Physical Activity, Emotion, and Food Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Edmund; Hua, Jenna; Wu, Lemuel; Shia, Victor; Eom, Sue; Wang, May; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Smartphone applications (apps) facilitate the collection of data on multiple aspects of behavior that are useful for characterizing baseline patterns and for monitoring progress in interventions aimed at promoting healthier lifestyles. Individual-based models can be used to examine whether behavior, such as diet, corresponds to certain typological patterns. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate individual-based modeling methods relevant to a person's eating behavior, and the value of such approach compared to typical regression models. Using a mobile app, 2 weeks of physical activity and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) data, and 6 days of diet data were collected from 12 university students recruited from a university in Kunming, a rapidly developing city in southwest China. Phone GPS data were collected for the entire 2-week period, from which exposure to various food environments along each subject's activity space was determined. Physical activity was measured using phone accelerometry. Mobile phone EMA was used to assess self-reported emotion/feelings. The portion size of meals and food groups was determined from voice-annotated videos of meals. Individual-based regression models were used to characterize subjects as following one of 4 diet typologies: those with a routine portion sizes determined by time of day, those with portion sizes that balance physical activity (energy balance), those with portion sizes influenced by emotion, and those with portion sizes associated with food environments. Ample compliance with the phone-based behavioral assessment was observed for all participants. Across all individuals, 868 consumed food items were recorded, with fruits, grains and dairy foods dominating the portion sizes. On average, 218 hours of accelerometry and 35 EMA responses were recorded for each participant. For some subjects, the routine model was able to explain up to 47% of the variation in portion sizes, and the energy balance model was

  14. Assessment of nitrate pollution in the Grand Morin aquifers (France): Combined use of geostatistics and physically based modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flipo, Nicolas [Centre de Geosciences, UMR Sisyphe, ENSMP, 35 rue Saint-Honore, F-77305 Fontainebleau (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.flipo@ensmp.fr; Jeannee, Nicolas [Geovariances, 49 bis, avenue Franklin Roosevelt, F-77212 Avon (France); Poulin, Michel [Centre de Geosciences, UMR Sisyphe, ENSMP, 35 rue Saint-Honore, F-77305 Fontainebleau (France); Even, Stephanie [Centre de Geosciences, UMR Sisyphe, ENSMP, 35 rue Saint-Honore, F-77305 Fontainebleau (France); Ledoux, Emmanuel [Centre de Geosciences, UMR Sisyphe, ENSMP, 35 rue Saint-Honore, F-77305 Fontainebleau (France)

    2007-03-15

    The objective of this work is to combine several approaches to better understand nitrate fate in the Grand Morin aquifers (2700 km{sup 2}), part of the Seine basin. CAWAQS results from the coupling of the hydrogeological model NEWSAM with the hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model of river PROSE. CAWAQS is coupled with the agronomic model STICS in order to simulate nitrate migration in basins. First, kriging provides a satisfactory representation of aquifer nitrate contamination from local observations, to set initial conditions for the physically based model. Then associated confidence intervals, derived from data using geostatistics, are used to validate CAWAQS results. Results and evaluation obtained from the combination of these approaches are given (period 1977-1988). Then CAWAQS is used to simulate nitrate fate for a 20-year period (1977-1996). The mean nitrate concentrations increase in aquifers is 0.09 mgN L{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, resulting from an average infiltration flux of 3500 kgN.km{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. - Combined use of geostatistics and physically based modeling allows assessment of nitrate concentrations in aquifer systems.

  15. Assessment of nitrate pollution in the Grand Morin aquifers (France): Combined use of geostatistics and physically based modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flipo, Nicolas; Jeannee, Nicolas; Poulin, Michel; Even, Stephanie; Ledoux, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to combine several approaches to better understand nitrate fate in the Grand Morin aquifers (2700 km 2 ), part of the Seine basin. CAWAQS results from the coupling of the hydrogeological model NEWSAM with the hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model of river PROSE. CAWAQS is coupled with the agronomic model STICS in order to simulate nitrate migration in basins. First, kriging provides a satisfactory representation of aquifer nitrate contamination from local observations, to set initial conditions for the physically based model. Then associated confidence intervals, derived from data using geostatistics, are used to validate CAWAQS results. Results and evaluation obtained from the combination of these approaches are given (period 1977-1988). Then CAWAQS is used to simulate nitrate fate for a 20-year period (1977-1996). The mean nitrate concentrations increase in aquifers is 0.09 mgN L -1 yr -1 , resulting from an average infiltration flux of 3500 kgN.km -2 yr -1 . - Combined use of geostatistics and physically based modeling allows assessment of nitrate concentrations in aquifer systems

  16. Physically-based modeling of topographic effects on spatial evapotranspiration and soil moisture patterns through radiation and wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, simulations with the Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP model are performed to quantify the spatial variability of both potential and actual evapotranspiration (ET, and soil moisture content (SMC caused by topography-induced spatial wind and radiation differences. To obtain the spatially distributed ET/SMC patterns, the field scale SWAP model is applied in a distributed way for both pointwise and catchment wide simulations. An adapted radiation model from r.sun and the physically-based meso-scale wind model METRAS PC are applied to obtain the spatial radiation and wind patterns respectively, which show significant spatial variation and correlation with aspect and elevation respectively. Such topographic dependences and spatial variations further propagate to ET/SMC. A strong spatial, seasonal-dependent, scale-relevant intra-catchment variability in daily/annual ET and less variability in SMC can be observed from the numerical experiments. The study concludes that topography has a significant effect on ET/SMC in the humid region where ET is a energy limited rather than water availability limited process. It affects the spatial runoff generation through spatial radiation and wind, therefore should be applied to inform hydrological model development. In addition, the methodology used in the study can serve as a general method for physically-based ET estimation for data sparse regions.

  17. The effects of training based on BASNEF model and acupressure at GB21 point on the infants’ physical growth indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marzieh akbarzadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available objective: Educational models are used to study the behavior and plan for changing and determining the factors that affect the individuals’ decision making for conducting a behavior. This study aimed to compare the effects of the educational program based on BASNEF model and acupressure at GB21 point on the infants’ physical growth indicators. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 150 (50 per group pregnant women in 2011-2012. The interventions included educational program based on the BASNEF model and application of acupressure at GB21 point. The infants’ physical indicators were compared to the control group one and three months after birth. The study data were analyzed using repeated measurement test, paired sample T-Test, one-way ANOVA, and Tukey’s test. finding: The results showed a significant difference between the intervention and the control group regarding the infants’ weight and height one and three months after birth (p0.05. Also, no significant difference was observed among the three groups concerning the infants’ head and arm circumference (P>0.05. Conclusion: BASNEF model improved the infants’ height and weight. Application of acupressure also improved the infants’ height, weight, and head and arm circumference compared to the control group. Hence, learning and application of techniques and models by the medical team are highly essential.

  18. Finite-element modelling of physics-based hillslope hydrology, Keith Beven, and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loague, Keith; Ebel, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Keith Beven is a voice of reason on the intelligent use of models and the subsequent acknowledgement/assessment of the uncertainties associated with environmental simula-tion. With several books and hundreds of papers, Keith’s work is widespread, well known, and highly referenced. Four of Keith’s most notable contributions are the iconic TOPMODEL (Beven and Kirkby, 1979), classic papers on macropores and preferential flow (Beven and Germann, 1982, 2013), two editions of the rainfall-runoff modelling bible (Beven, 2000a, 2012), and the selection/commentary for the first volume from the Benchmark Papers in Hydrology series (Beven, 2006b). Remarkably, the thirty-one papers in his benchmark volume, entitled Streamflow Generation Processes, are not tales of modelling wizardry but describe measurements designed to better understand the dynamics of near-surface systems (quintessential Keith). The impetus for this commentary is Keith’sPhD research (Beven, 1975), where he developed a new finite-element model and conducted concept-development simu-lations based upon the processes identified by, for example, Richards (1931), Horton (1933), Hubbert (1940), Hewlett and Hibbert (1963), and Dunne and Black (1970a,b). Readers not familiar with the different mechanisms of streamflow generation are referred to Dunne (1978).

  19. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Up-scaling from physically based numerical simulations at hillslope scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Melkamu; Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fiori, Aldo; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-19

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep forested regions. However; its contribution is poorly represented in current generation of land surface hydrological models (LSMs) and catchment-scale rainfall-runoff models. The lack of physical basis of common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global models. This paper is aimed at deriving physically based parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface flow. These parameterizations are derived through a two-step up-scaling procedure: firstly, through simulations with a physically based (Darcian) subsurface flow model for idealized three dimensional rectangular hillslopes, accounting for within-hillslope random heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties, and secondly, through subsequent up-scaling to the catchment scale by accounting for between-hillslope and within-catchment heterogeneity of topographic features (e.g., slope). These theoretical simulation results produced parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship in terms of soil hydraulic properties, topographic slope and their heterogeneities, which were consistent with results of previous studies. Yet, regionalization of the resulting storage-discharge relations across 50 actual catchments in eastern United States, and a comparison of the regionalized results with equivalent empirical results obtained on the basis of analysis of observed streamflow recession curves, revealed a systematic inconsistency. It was found that the difference between the theoretical and empirically derived results could be explained, to first order, by climate in the form of climatic aridity index. This suggests a possible codependence of climate, soils, vegetation and topographic properties, and suggests that subsurface flow parameterization needed for ungauged locations must

  20. The Trick Simulation Toolkit: A NASA/Opensource Framework for Running Time Based Physics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The Trick Simulation Toolkit is a simulation development environment used to create high fidelity training and engineering simulations at the NASA Johnson Space Center and many other NASA facilities. Its purpose is to generate a simulation executable from a collection of user-supplied models and a simulation definition file. For each Trick-based simulation, Trick automatically provides job scheduling, numerical integration, the ability to write and restore human readable checkpoints, data recording, interactive variable manipulation, a run-time interpreter, and many other commonly needed capabilities. This allows simulation developers to concentrate on their domain expertise and the algorithms and equations of their models. Also included in Trick are tools for plotting recorded data and various other supporting utilities and libraries. Trick is written in C/C++ and Java and supports both Linux and MacOSX computer operating systems. This paper describes Trick's design and use at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  1. A model-based examination of multivariate physical modes in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, A. J.; Ladd, C.; Cheng, W.; Curchitser, E. N.; Hedstrom, K.

    2016-10-01

    We use multivariate output from a hydrodynamic model of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) to explore the covariance among its physical state and air/sea fluxes. We attempt to summarize this coupled variability using a limited set of patterns, and examine their correlation to three large-scale climate indices relevant to the Northeast Pacific. This analysis is focused on perturbations from monthly climatology of the following attributes of the GOA: sea surface temperature, sea surface height, mixed layer depth, sea surface salinity, latent heat flux, sensible heat flux, shortwave irradiance, net long wave irradiance, currents at 40 m depth, and wind stress. We identified two multivariate modes, both substantially correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Multivariate El Nino (MEI) indices on interannual timescales, which together account for 30% of the total normalized variance of the perturbation time series. These two modes indicate the following covarying events during periods of positive PDO/MEI: (1) anomalously warm, wet and windy conditions (typically in winter), with elevated coastal SSH, followed 2-5 months later by (2) reduced cloud cover, with emerging shelf-break eddies. Similar modes are found when the analysis is performed separately on the eastern and western GOA; in general, modal amplitudes appear stronger in the western GOA.

  2. Simulation of the Beating Heart Based on Physically Modeling aDeformable Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-07-18

    The motion of the beating heart is complex and createsartifacts in SPECT and x-ray CT images. Phantoms such as the JaszczakDynamic Cardiac Phantom are used to simulate cardiac motion forevaluationof acquisition and data processing protocols used for cardiacimaging. Two concentric elastic membranes filled with water are connectedto tubing and pump apparatus for creating fluid flow in and out of theinner volume to simulate motion of the heart. In the present report, themovement of two concentric balloons is solved numerically in order tocreate a computer simulation of the motion of the moving membranes in theJaszczak Dynamic Cardiac Phantom. A system of differential equations,based on the physical properties, determine the motion. Two methods aretested for solving the system of differential equations. The results ofboth methods are similar providing a final shape that does not convergeto a trivial circular profile. Finally,a tomographic imaging simulationis performed by acquiring static projections of the moving shape andreconstructing the result to observe motion artifacts. Two cases aretaken into account: in one case each projection angle is sampled for ashort time interval and the other case is sampled for a longer timeinterval. The longer sampling acquisition shows a clear improvement indecreasing the tomographic streaking artifacts.

  3. A physically based 3-D model of ice cliff evolution over debris-covered glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Pascal; Miles, Evan S.; Steiner, Jakob F.; Immerzeel, Walter W.; Wagnon, Patrick; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    We use high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) from unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) surveys to document the evolution of four ice cliffs on the debris-covered tongue of Lirung Glacier, Nepal, over one ablation season. Observations show that out of four cliffs, three different patterns of evolution emerge: (i) reclining cliffs that flatten during the ablation season; (ii) stable cliffs that maintain a self-similar geometry; and (iii) growing cliffs, expanding laterally. We use the insights from this unique data set to develop a 3-D model of cliff backwasting and evolution that is validated against observations and an independent data set of volume losses. The model includes ablation at the cliff surface driven by energy exchange with the atmosphere, reburial of cliff cells by surrounding debris, and the effect of adjacent ponds. The cliff geometry is updated monthly to account for the modifications induced by each of those processes. Model results indicate that a major factor affecting the survival of steep cliffs is the coupling with ponded water at its base, which prevents progressive flattening and possible disappearance of a cliff. The radial growth observed at one cliff is explained by higher receipts of longwave and shortwave radiation, calculated taking into account atmospheric fluxes, shading, and the emission of longwave radiation from debris surfaces. The model is a clear step forward compared to existing static approaches that calculate atmospheric melt over an invariant cliff geometry and can be used for long-term simulations of cliff evolution and to test existing hypotheses about cliffs' survival.

  4. An educational approach based on a non-injury model compared with individual symptom-based physical training in chronic LBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Pia H; Bendix, Tom; Manniche, Claus

    2010-01-01

    In the treatment of chronic back pain, cognitive methods are attracting increased attention due to evidence of effectiveness similar to that of traditional therapies. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of performing a cognitive intervention based on a non-injury model with...... with that of a symptom-based physical training method on the outcomes of low back pain (LBP), activity limitation, LBP attitudes (fear-avoidance beliefs and back beliefs), physical activity levels, sick leave, and quality of life, in chronic LBP patients....

  5. A threat-vulnerability based risk analysis model for cyber physical system security

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ledwaba, Lehlogonolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to network machinery and devices that are otherwise isolated is highly attractive to industry. This has led to growth in the use of cyber-physical systems (CPSs) with existing infrastructure. However, coupling physical and cyber...

  6. A Method for Cyber-Physical System Behavior Modeling and Safety Verification Based on Extended Hybrid System Description Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuo Ming Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of Cyber-physical system(CPS is up to its behavior, and it is a key property for CPS to be applied in critical application fields. A method for CPS behavior modeling and safety verification is put forward in this paper. The behavior model of CPS is described by extended hybrid system description language(EHYSDEL. The formal definition of hybrid program(HP is given, and the behavior model is transformed to HP based on the definition. The safety of CPS is verified by inputting the HP to KeYmarea. The advantage of the approach is that it models CPS intuitively and verify it’s safety strictly avoiding the state space explosion

  7. (U) Physics Validation of the RMI-Based Ejecta Source Model Implementation in FLAG: L2 Milestone #6035 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tregillis, I. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-14

    The Los Alamos Physics and Engineering Models (PEM) program has developed a model for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) based ejecta production from shock-melted surfaces, along with a prescription for a self-similar velocity distribution (SSVD) of the resulting ejecta particles. We have undertaken an effort to validate this source model using data from explosively driven tin coupon experiments. The model’s current formulation lacks a crucial piece of physics: a method for determining the duration of the ejecta production interval. Without a mechanism for terminating ejecta production, the model is not predictive. Furthermore, when the production interval is hand-tuned to match time-integrated mass data, the predicted time-dependent mass accumulation on a downstream sensor rises too sharply at early times and too slowly at late times because the SSVD overestimates the amount of mass stored in the fastest particles and underestimates the mass stored in the slowest particles. The functional form of the resulting m(t) is inconsistent with the available time-dependent data; numerical simulations and analytic studies agree on this point. Simulated mass tallies are highly sensitive to radial expansion of the ejecta cloud. It is not clear if the same effect is present in the experimental data but if so, depending on the degree, this may challenge the model’s compatibility with tin coupon data. The current implementation of the model in FLAG is sensitive to the detailed interaction between kinematics (hydrodynamic methods) and thermodynamics (material models); this sensitivity prohibits certain physics modeling choices. The appendices contain an extensive analytic study of piezoelectric ejecta mass measurements, along with test problems, excerpted from a longer work (LA-UR-17-21218).

  8. A local-community-level, physically-based model of end-use energy consumption by Australian housing stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhengen; Paevere, Phillip; McNamara, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    We developed a physics based bottom-up model to estimate annual housing stock energy consumption at a local community level (Census Collection District—CCD) with an hourly resolution. Total energy consumption, including space heating and cooling, water heating, lighting and other household appliances, was simulated by considering building construction and materials, equipment and appliances, local climates and occupancy patterns. The model was used to analyse energy use by private dwellings in more than five thousand CCDs in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The predicted results focus on electricity consumption (natural gas and other fuel sources were excluded as the data are not available) and track the actual electricity consumption at CCD level with an error of 9.2% when summed to state level. For NSW and Victoria 2006, the predicted state electricity consumption is close to the published model (within 6%) and statistical data (within 10%). A key feature of the model is that it can be used to predict hourly electricity consumption and peak demand at fine geographic scales, which is important for grid planning and designing local energy efficiency or demand response strategies. - Highlights: ► We developed a physics-based model to estimate housing stock energy consumption. ► House type and vintage, family type and occupancy time were considered. ► The model results are close to actual energy consumption at local community level. ► Its’ results agree well with the published model and statistical data at state level. ► It shows the model could provide from hourly to annual residential energy consumption.

  9. Liquefaction of Tangier soils by using physically based reliability analysis modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubujet P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approaches that are widely used to characterize propensity of soils to liquefaction are mainly of empirical type. The potential of liquefaction is assessed by using correlation formulas that are based on field tests such as the standard and the cone penetration tests. These correlations depend however on the site where they were derived. In order to adapt them to other sites where seismic case histories are not available, further investigation is required. In this work, a rigorous one-dimensional modelling of the soil dynamics yielding liquefaction phenomenon is considered. Field tests consisting of core sampling and cone penetration testing were performed. They provided the necessary data for numerical simulations performed by using DeepSoil software package. Using reliability analysis, the probability of liquefaction was estimated and the obtained results were used to adapt Juang method to the particular case of sandy soils located in Tangier.

  10. Minding the Cyber-Physical Gap: Model-Based Analysis and Mitigation of Systemic Perception-Induced Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Mordecai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cyber-physical gap (CPG is the difference between the ‘real’ state of the world and the way the system perceives it. This discrepancy often stems from the limitations of sensing and data collection technologies and capabilities, and is inevitable at some degree in any cyber-physical system (CPS. Ignoring or misrepresenting such limitations during system modeling, specification, design, and analysis can potentially result in systemic misconceptions, disrupted functionality and performance, system failure, severe damage, and potential detrimental impacts on the system and its environment. We propose CPG-Aware Modeling & Engineering (CPGAME, a conceptual model-based approach to capturing, explaining, and mitigating the CPG. CPGAME enhances the systems engineer’s ability to cope with CPGs, mitigate them by design, and prevent erroneous decisions and actions. We demonstrate CPGAME by applying it for modeling and analysis of the 1979 Three Miles Island 2 nuclear accident, and show how its meltdown could be mitigated. We use ISO-19450:2015—Object Process Methodology as our conceptual modeling framework.

  11. Learning Design of Problem Based Learning Model Based on Recommendations of Sintax Study and Contents Issues on Physics Impulse Materials with Experimental Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristia Agustina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to design learning Problem Based Learning Model based on syntax study recommendations and content issues on Physics Impulse materials through experiments. This research is a development research with Kemp model. The reference for making the learning design is the result of the syntax study and the content of existing PBL implementation problems from Agustina research. This instructional design is applied to the physics material about Impulse done through experimental activity. Limited trials were conducted on the SWCU Physics Education Study Program students group Salatiga, while the validity test was conducted by high school teachers and physics education lecturers. The results of the trial evaluation are limited and the validity test is used to improve the designs that have been made. The conclusion of this research is the design of learning by using PBL model on Impuls material by referring the result of syntax study and the problem content of existing PBL implementation can be produced by learning activity designed in laboratory experiment activity. The actual problem for Impuls material can be used car crash test video at factory. The results of validation tests and limited trials conducted by researchers assessed that the design of learning made by researchers can be used with small revisions. Suggestions from this research are in making learning design by using PBL model to get actual problem can by collecting news that come from newspaper, YouTube, internet, and television.

  12. An educational approach based on a non-injury model compared with individual symptom-based physical training in chronic LBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Pia H; Bendix, Tom; Manniche, Claus

    2010-01-01

    In the treatment of chronic back pain, cognitive methods are attracting increased attention due to evidence of effectiveness similar to that of traditional therapies. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of performing a cognitive intervention based on a non-injury model with...... with that of a symptom-based physical training method on the outcomes of low back pain (LBP), activity limitation, LBP attitudes (fear-avoidance beliefs and back beliefs), physical activity levels, sick leave, and quality of life, in chronic LBP patients.......In the treatment of chronic back pain, cognitive methods are attracting increased attention due to evidence of effectiveness similar to that of traditional therapies. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of performing a cognitive intervention based on a non-injury model...

  13. Physically based modeling of rainfall-triggered landslides: a case study in the Luquillo forest, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lepore

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a rainfall-triggered landslide module within an existing physically based spatially distributed ecohydrologic model. The model, tRIBS-VEGGIE (Triangulated Irregular Networks-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator and Vegetation Generator for Interactive Evolution, is capable of a sophisticated description of many hydrological processes; in particular, the soil moisture dynamics are resolved at a temporal and spatial resolution required to examine the triggering mechanisms of rainfall-induced landslides. The validity of the tRIBS-VEGGIE model to a tropical environment is shown with an evaluation of its performance against direct observations made within the study area of Luquillo Forest. The newly developed landslide module builds upon the previous version of the tRIBS landslide component. This new module utilizes a numerical solution to the Richards' equation (present in tRIBS-VEGGIE but not in tRIBS, which better represents the time evolution of soil moisture transport through the soil column. Moreover, the new landslide module utilizes an extended formulation of the factor of safety (FS to correctly quantify the role of matric suction in slope stability and to account for unsaturated conditions in the evaluation of FS. The new modeling framework couples the capabilities of the detailed hydrologic model to describe soil moisture dynamics with the infinite slope model, creating a powerful tool for the assessment of rainfall-triggered landslide risk.

  14. Physically based modeling of rainfall-triggered landslides: a case study in the Luquillo forest, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, C.; Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.; Sivandran, G.; Bras, R. L.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rainfall-triggered landslide module within an existing physically based spatially distributed ecohydrologic model. The model, tRIBS-VEGGIE (Triangulated Irregular Networks-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator and Vegetation Generator for Interactive Evolution), is capable of a sophisticated description of many hydrological processes; in particular, the soil moisture dynamics are resolved at a temporal and spatial resolution required to examine the triggering mechanisms of rainfall-induced landslides. The validity of the tRIBS-VEGGIE model to a tropical environment is shown with an evaluation of its performance against direct observations made within the study area of Luquillo Forest. The newly developed landslide module builds upon the previous version of the tRIBS landslide component. This new module utilizes a numerical solution to the Richards' equation (present in tRIBS-VEGGIE but not in tRIBS), which better represents the time evolution of soil moisture transport through the soil column. Moreover, the new landslide module utilizes an extended formulation of the factor of safety (FS) to correctly quantify the role of matric suction in slope stability and to account for unsaturated conditions in the evaluation of FS. The new modeling framework couples the capabilities of the detailed hydrologic model to describe soil moisture dynamics with the infinite slope model, creating a powerful tool for the assessment of rainfall-triggered landslide risk.

  15. Modelling decomposition, intermolecular protection and physical aggregation based on organic matter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Sarker, Tushar Chandra; Giannino, Francesco; Cartenì, Fabrizio; Peressotti, Alessandro; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Modelling organic matter decomposition is fundamental to predict biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Current models use C/N or Lignin/N ratios to describe susceptibility to decomposition, or implement separate C pools decaying with different rates, disregarding biomolecular transformations and interactions and their effect on decomposition dynamics. We present a new process-based model of decomposition that includes a description of biomolecular dynamics obtained by 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Baseline decay rates for relevant molecular classes and intermolecular protection were calibrated by best fitting of experimental data from leaves of 20 plant species decomposing for 180 days in controlled optimal conditions. The model was validated against field data from leaves of 32 plant species decomposing for 1-year at four sites in Mediterranean ecosystems. Our innovative approach accurately predicted decomposition of a wide range of litters across different climates. Simulations correctly reproduced mass loss data and variations of selected molecular classes both in controlled conditions and in the field, across different plant molecular compositions and environmental conditions. Prediction accuracy emerged from the species-specific partitioning of molecular types and from the representation of intermolecular interactions. The ongoing model implementation and calibration are oriented at representing organic matter dynamics in soil, including processes of interaction between mineral and organic soil fractions as a function of soil texture, physical aggregation of soil organic particles, and physical protection of soil organic matter as a function of aggregate size and abundance. Prospectively, our model shall satisfactorily reproduce C sequestration as resulting from experimental data of soil amended with a range of organic materials with different biomolecular quality, ranging from biochar to crop residues. Further application is also planned based on

  16. Development of the physical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zunqi; Morsy, Samir

    2001-01-01

    descriptions in the categories of especially-designed or prepared equipment, dual-use equipment, non-nuclear material, nuclear material, technology/training/R and D, other observables, by-products/effluents and end products. The most distinguished feature of the Physical Model is to characterize each technology and process in terms of indicators specifying the existence or development of the specific technology or process. The specificity of indicators for a given nuclear technology or process is assessed, based on which relative strength is designated to each indicator as strong, medium or weak. The objectives of the development of the Physical Model are three-fold: (i) provide a general and easily accessible reference for fuel cycle activities; (ii) to provide a model for a State's nuclear program which would be a subset of the Physical Model and (iii) to provide a simple mapping function from the indicators to the existence or development of specific nuclear activities. It is intended to be used as a technical tool in implementing the enhanced information analysis. For example, it provides a model template to organize the consistency evaluation to justify the internal consistency of a State's nuclear program. The Physical Model indicators provide a means to associate a question or inconsistency with a specific nuclear activity. The designated strength of an indicator provides a reference to assess the proliferation significance of the question or inconsistency. The indicators and designated strengths will also help determine clarification or follow-up actions to respond to a given situation. In developing and implementing State-level safeguards approaches, the Physical Model will help to characterize a State's fuel cycle program and assess its potential to acquire weapons-usable materials based on identification of the acquisition paths at the State level. Originally issued in eight volumes in October 1998, the need to include Spent Fuel Management, Intermediate and High

  17. Effects of a School-Based Intervention on the Basis of Pender’s Health Promotion Model to Improve Physical Activity among High School Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Teymouri

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Participation in regular physical activity is associated with a variety of positive outcomes for young people. Physical activity (PA rates decline precipitously during the high school years and are consistently lower among adolescent girls than among adolescent boys. In order to stop or diverse this negative trend, there are necessary interventions based on various theories and models to promote physical activity in girls. Materials & Methods: This randomized control study evaluated the effectiveness of a 24-week exercise education program based on Pender’s Health Promotion model to improve cognitive and psychosocial factors associated with physical activity and to promote physical activity in adolescent girls (n =106. The program included educational sessions and tailored counseling. Results: There was an increase of 45 minutes for daily physical activity in the experimental group compared to their baseline. After intervention, the training group had a positive significant progression in stages along with significant improvements in self efficacy, enjoyment of physical activity, interpersonal influences, planning for physical activity, and also a decrease in perceived barriers to physical activity and competing preferences (p ≤ .0001-0.04. Conclusion: Findings of this study showed the positive effect of program on stage of change and potential determinants of the behavior of physical activity. The high proportion of the people in action and maintenance in experimental group compared to the baseline and the attainment of recommend criteria for physical activity are promising findings of school-based intervention based on Pender’s health promotion model.

  18. Physical models of cell motility

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book surveys the most recent advances in physics-inspired cell movement models. This synergetic, cross-disciplinary effort to increase the fidelity of computational algorithms will lead to a better understanding of the complex biomechanics of cell movement, and stimulate progress in research on related active matter systems, from suspensions of bacteria and synthetic swimmers to cell tissues and cytoskeleton.Cell motility and collective motion are among the most important themes in biology and statistical physics of out-of-equilibrium systems, and crucial for morphogenesis, wound healing, and immune response in eukaryotic organisms. It is also relevant for the development of effective treatment strategies for diseases such as cancer, and for the design of bioactive surfaces for cell sorting and manipulation. Substrate-based cell motility is, however, a very complex process as regulatory pathways and physical force generation mechanisms are intertwined. To understand the interplay between adhesion, force ...

  19. Investigating ice cliff evolution and contribution to glacier mass-balance using a physically-based dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Pascal; Miles, Evan; Ragettli, Silvan; Brun, Fanny; Steiner, Jakob; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Supraglacial cliffs are a surface feature typical of debris-covered glaciers, affecting surface evolution, glacier downwasting and mass balance by providing a direct ice-atmosphere interface. As a result, melt rates can be very high and ice cliffs may account for a significant portion of the total glacier mass loss. However, their contribution to glacier mass balance has rarely been quantified through physically-based models. Most cliff energy balance models are point scale models which calculate energy fluxes at individual cliff locations. Results from the only grid based model to date accurately reflect energy fluxes and cliff melt, but modelled backwasting patterns are in some cases unrealistic, as the distribution of melt rates would lead to progressive shallowing and disappearance of cliffs. Based on a unique multitemporal dataset of cliff topography and backwasting obtained from high-resolution terrestrial and aerial Structure-from-Motion analysis on Lirung Glacier in Nepal, it is apparent that cliffs exhibit a range of behaviours but most do not rapidly disappear. The patterns of evolution cannot be explained satisfactorily by atmospheric melt alone, and are moderated by the presence of supraglacial ponds at the base of cliffs and by cliff reburial with debris. Here, we document the distinct patterns of evolution including disappearance, growth and stability. We then use these observations to improve the grid-based energy balance model, implementing periodic updates of the cliff geometry resulting from modelled melt perpendicular to the ice surface. Based on a slope threshold, pixels can be reburied by debris or become debris-free. The effect of ponds are taken into account through enhanced melt rates in horizontal direction on pixels selected based on an algorithm considering distance to the water surface, slope and lake level. We use the dynamic model to first study the evolution of selected cliffs for which accurate, high resolution DEMs are available

  20. Intertwining Evidence- and Model-Based Reasoning in Physics Sensemaking: An Example from Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Rosemary S.; Odden, Tor Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    Our field has long valued the goal of teaching students not just the facts of physics, but also the thinking and reasoning skills of professional physicists. The complexity inherent in scientific reasoning demands that we think carefully about how we conceptualize for ourselves, enact in our classes, and encourage in our students the relationship…

  1. Estimation of Ion temperatures in the Ionosphere using Swarm Langmuir Probe data and a Physics-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomidze, L.; Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Kouznetsov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Ion temperature is one of the key parameters that provides insight into the thermal balance of the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere system. Together with the temperatures of neutral and electron gases it controls various physical and chemical processes in the upper atmosphere. These include the ion-neutral collision frequencies, chemical reaction rates and plasma scale height, all of which affect the variation and distribution of the electron density. Yet, the modeling of ionospheric ion temperature has received relatively little attention compared to other parameters. The Electric Field Instruments on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) polar orbiting Swarm satellites consist of a pair of Thermal Ion Imagers (TII) and a pair of Langmuir probes (LP) measuring ionospheric plasma parameters at around 500 km. The TII was designed to image ion velocity distribution functions and provide ionospheric electric fields and ion temperatures along the satellites' orbits. Currently, the TII instruments are operating only during limited time intervals, while the measurements of ionospheric electron temperatures and densities are carried out continuously. In this work we estimate the ion temperatures along the orbits of Swarm satellites at low and middle latitudes using a heat balance equation for the ions gas under steady-state conditions. The physics-based ion temperature model assumes ions are heated by the hotter electron gas through elastic Coulomb collisions and cooled by resonance charge transfer collisions with the parent atoms and by elastic collisions with unlike atoms and molecules. The corrected Swarm LP data represent key input parameters for the model. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, we perform two types of analysis. The first is based on the synthetic (model-generated) inputs by a physics-based ionosphere model which solves the complete ion heat balance equation. In another, the estimates of ion temperatures are obtained using actual data for those

  2. Reactors physics. Bases of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diop, Ch.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of nuclear reactor physics is to quantify the relevant macroscopic data for the characterization of the neutronic state of a reactor core and to evaluate the effects of radiations (neutrons and gamma radiations) on organic matter and on inorganic materials. This first article presents the bases of nuclear physics in the context of nuclear reactors: 1 - reactor physics and nuclear physics; 2 - atomic nucleus - basic definitions: nucleus constituents, dimensions and mass of the atomic nucleus, mass defect, binding energy and stability of the nucleus, strong interaction, nuclear momentums of nucleons and nucleus; 3 - nucleus stability and radioactivity: equation of evolution with time - radioactive decay law; alpha decay, stability limit of spontaneous fission, beta decay, electronic capture, gamma emission, internal conversion, radioactivity, two-body problem and notion of radioactive equilibrium. (J.S.)

  3. A Cyber Physical Model Based on a Hybrid System for Flexible Load Control in an Active Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To strengthen the integration of the primary and secondary systems, a concept of Cyber Physical Systems (CPS is introduced to construct a CPS in Power Systems (Power CPS. The most basic work of the Power CPS is to build an integration model which combines both a continuous process and a discrete process. The advanced form of smart grid, the Active Distribution Network (ADN is a typical example of Power CPS. After designing the Power CPS model architecture and its application in ADN, a Hybrid System based model and control method of Power CPS is proposed in this paper. As an application example, ADN flexible load is modeled and controlled with ADN feeder power control by a control strategy which includes the normal condition and the underpowered condition. In this model and strategy, some factors like load power consumption and load functional demand are considered and optimized. In order to make up some of the deficiencies of centralized control, a distributed control method is presented to reduce model complexity and improve calculation speed. The effectiveness of all the models and methods are demonstrated in the case study.

  4. A New Physics-Based Modeling of Multiple Non-Planar Hydraulic Fractures Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jing [University of Utah; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Deo, Milind [University of Utah; Jiang, Shu [Energy & Geoscience Institute

    2015-10-01

    Because of the low permeability in shale plays, closely spaced hydraulic fractures and multilateral horizontal wells are generally required to improve production. Therefore, understanding the potential fracture interaction and stress evolution is critical in optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multi-stage horizontal wells. In this paper, a novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple non-planar fractures propagation. The numerical model from Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to simulate the mechanics of fracture propagations and interactions, while a conjugate irregular lattice network is generated to represent fluid flow in both fractures and formation. The fluid flow in the formation is controlled by Darcy’s law, but within fractures it is simulated by using cubic law for laminar flow through parallel plates. Initiation, growth and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. We investigate the fracture propagation path in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs using the simulator developed. Stress shadow caused by the transverse fracture will change the orientation of principal stress in the fracture neighborhood, which may inhibit or alter the growth direction of nearby fracture clusters. However, the initial in-situ stress anisotropy often helps overcome this phenomenon. Under large in-situ stress anisotropy, the hydraulic fractures are more likely to propagate in a direction that is perpendicular to the minimum horizontal stress. Under small in-situ stress anisotropy, there is a greater chance for fractures from nearby clusters to merge with each other. Then, we examine the differences in fracture geometry caused by fracturing in cemented or uncemented wellbore. Moreover, the impact of

  5. An instructional model for the teaching of physics, based on a meaningful learning theory and class experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chrobak

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Practically all research studies concerning the teaching of Physics point out the fact that conventional instructional models fail to achieve their objectives. Many attempts have been done to change this situation, frequently with disappointing results. This work, which is the experimental stage in a research project of a greater scope, represents an effort to change to a model based on a cognitive learning theory, known as the Ausubel-Novak-Gowin theory, making use of the metacognitive tools that emerge from this theory. The results of this work indicate that the students react positively to the goals of meaningful learning, showing substantial understanding of Newtonian Mechanics. An important reduction in the study time required to pass the course has also been reported.

  6. Simulating stick-slip failure in a sheared granular layer using a physics-based constitutive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Daub, Eric G.; Guyer, Robert A.; Ecke, Robert E.; Marone, Chris; Johnson, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    We model laboratory earthquakes in a biaxial shear apparatus using the Shear-Transformation-Zone (STZ) theory of dense granular flow. The theory is based on the observation that slip events in a granular layer are attributed to grain rearrangement at soft spots called STZs, which can be characterized according to principles of statistical physics. We model lab data on granular shear using STZ theory and document direct connections between the STZ approach and rate-and-state friction. We discuss the stability transition from stable shear to stick-slip failure and show that stick slip is predicted by STZ when the applied shear load exceeds a threshold value that is modulated by elastic stiffness and frictional rheology. We also show that STZ theory mimics fault zone dilation during the stick phase, consistent with lab observations.

  7. Analysis of the physical properties of trehalose-water-lithium iodide based on the bond strength coordination number fluctuation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahara; Jean L Ndeugueu; Masaru Aniya

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of trehalose-water-lithium iodide system has been investigated by the mean of the Bond Strength Coordination Number Fluctuation (BSCNF) model. The result indicates that by increasing the trehalose content, maintaining the content of LiI constant, the fragility decreases due to the increase of the connectivity between the structural units. Our analysis suggests also that the fragility of the system is controlled by the amount of water in the composition. By increasing the water content, the total bond strength decreases and its fluctuation increases, resulting in the increase of the fragility. Based on the analysis of the obtained parameters of the BSCNF model, a physical interpretation of the VFT parameters reported in a previous study has been given. (author)

  8. Physics Based Model for Online Fault Detection in Autonomous Cryogenic Loading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Ali; Devine, Ekaterina Viktorovna P; Luchinsky, Dmitry Georgievich; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Sass, Jared P.; Brown, Barbara L.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2013-01-01

    We report the progress in the development of the chilldown model for rapid cryogenic loading system developed at KSC. The nontrivial characteristic feature of the analyzed chilldown regime is its active control by dump valves. The two-phase flow model of the chilldown is approximated as one-dimensional homogeneous fluid flow with no slip condition for the interphase velocity. The model is built using commercial SINDAFLUINT software. The results of numerical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental time traces. The obtained results pave the way to the application of the SINDAFLUINT model as a verification tool for the design and algorithm development required for autonomous loading operation.

  9. A method for physically based model analysis of conjunctive use in response to potential climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.; Dettinger, M.D.; Faunt, C.C.; Cayan, D.; Schmid, W.

    2012-01-01

    Potential climate change effects on aspects of conjunctive management of water resources can be evaluated by linking climate models with fully integrated groundwater-surface water models. The objective of this study is to develop a modeling system that links global climate models with regional hydrologic models, using the California Central Valley as a case study. The new method is a supply and demand modeling framework that can be used to simulate and analyze potential climate change and conjunctive use. Supply-constrained and demand-driven linkages in the water system in the Central Valley are represented with the linked climate models, precipitation-runoff models, agricultural and native vegetation water use, and hydrologic flow models to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Simulated precipitation and temperature were used from the GFDL-A2 climate change scenario through the 21st century to drive a regional water balance mountain hydrologic watershed model (MHWM) for the surrounding watersheds in combination with a regional integrated hydrologic model of the Central Valley (CVHM). Application of this method demonstrates the potential transition from predominantly surface water to groundwater supply for agriculture with secondary effects that may limit this transition of conjunctive use. The particular scenario considered includes intermittent climatic droughts in the first half of the 21st century followed by severe persistent droughts in the second half of the 21st century. These climatic droughts do not yield a valley-wide operational drought but do cause reduced surface water deliveries and increased groundwater abstractions that may cause additional land subsidence, reduced water for riparian habitat, or changes in flows at the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The method developed here can be used to explore conjunctive use adaptation options and hydrologic risk assessments in regional hydrologic systems throughout the world.

  10. Modelling technical snow production for skiing areas in the Austrian Alps with the physically based snow model AMUNDSEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzer, F.; Marke, T.; Steiger, R.; Strasser, U.

    2012-04-01

    Tourism and particularly winter tourism is a key factor for the Austrian economy. Judging from currently available climate simulations, the Austrian Alps show a particularly high vulnerability to climatic changes. To reduce the exposure of ski areas towards changes in natural snow conditions as well as to generally enhance snow conditions at skiing sites, technical snowmaking is widely utilized across Austrian ski areas. While such measures result in better snow conditions at the skiing sites and are important for the local skiing industry, its economic efficiency has also to be taken into account. The current work emerges from the project CC-Snow II, where improved future climate scenario simulations are used to determine future natural and artificial snow conditions and their effects on tourism and economy in the Austrian Alps. In a first step, a simple technical snowmaking approach is incorporated into the process based snow model AMUNDSEN, which operates at a spatial resolution of 10-50 m and a temporal resolution of 1-3 hours. Locations of skiing slopes within a ski area in Styria, Austria, were digitized and imported into the model environment. During a predefined time frame in the beginning of the ski season, the model produces a maximum possible amount of technical snow and distributes the associated snow on the slopes, whereas afterwards, until to the end of the ski season, the model tries to maintain a certain snow depth threshold value on the slopes. Due to only few required input parameters, this approach is easily transferable to other ski areas. In our poster contribution, we present first results of this snowmaking approach and give an overview of the data and methodology applied. In a further step in CC-Snow, this simple bulk approach will be extended to consider actual snow cannon locations and technical specifications, which will allow a more detailed description of technical snow production as well as cannon-based recordings of water and energy

  11. Usage of Parameterized Fatigue Spectra and Physics-Based Systems Engineering Models for Wind Turbine Component Sizing: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Taylor; Guo, Yi; Veers, Paul; Dykes, Katherine; Damiani, Rick

    2016-01-26

    Software models that use design-level input variables and physics-based engineering analysis for estimating the mass and geometrical properties of components in large-scale machinery can be very useful for analyzing design trade-offs in complex systems. This study uses DriveSE, an OpenMDAO-based drivetrain model that uses stress and deflection criteria to size drivetrain components within a geared, upwind wind turbine. Because a full lifetime fatigue load spectrum can only be defined using computationally-expensive simulations in programs such as FAST, a parameterized fatigue loads spectrum that depends on wind conditions, rotor diameter, and turbine design life has been implemented. The parameterized fatigue spectrum is only used in this paper to demonstrate the proposed fatigue analysis approach. This paper details a three-part investigation of the parameterized approach and a comparison of the DriveSE model with and without fatigue analysis on the main shaft system. It compares loads from three turbines of varying size and determines if and when fatigue governs drivetrain sizing compared to extreme load-driven design. It also investigates the model's sensitivity to shaft material parameters. The intent of this paper is to demonstrate how fatigue considerations in addition to extreme loads can be brought into a system engineering optimization.

  12. A physics-based model for maintenance of the pH gradient in the gastric mucus layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Owen L; Keener, James P; Fogelson, Aaron L

    2017-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the gastric mucus layer provides a protective barrier between the lumen and the mucosa, shielding the mucosa from acid and digestive enzymes and preventing autodigestion of the stomach epithelium. However, the precise mechanisms that contribute to this protective function are still up for debate. In particular, it is not clear what physical processes are responsible for transporting hydrogen protons, secreted within the gastric pits, across the mucus layer to the lumen without acidifying the environment adjacent to the epithelium. One hypothesis is that hydrogen may be bound to the mucin polymers themselves as they are convected away from the mucosal surface and eventually degraded in the stomach lumen. It is also not clear what mechanisms prevent hydrogen from diffusing back toward the mucosal surface, thereby lowering the local pH. In this work we investigate a physics-based model of ion transport within the mucosal layer based on a Nernst-Planck-like equation. Analysis of this model shows that the mechanism of transporting protons bound to the mucus gel is capable of reproducing the trans-mucus pH gradients reported in the literature. Furthermore, when coupled with ion exchange at the epithelial surface, our analysis shows that bicarbonate secretion alone is capable of neutralizing the epithelial pH, even in the face of enormous diffusive gradients of hydrogen. Maintenance of the pH gradient is found to be robust to a wide array of perturbations in both physiological and phenomenological model parameters, suggesting a robust physiological control mechanism. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This work combines modeling techniques based on physical principles, as well as novel numerical simulations to test the plausibility of one hypothesized mechanism for proton transport across the gastric mucus layer. Results show that this mechanism is able to maintain the extreme pH gradient seen in in vivo experiments and suggests a highly robust regulation

  13. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  14. Bayesian seismic inversion based on rock-physics prior modeling for the joint estimation of acoustic impedance, porosity and lithofacies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos de Figueiredo, Leandro, E-mail: leandrop.fgr@gmail.com [Physics Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Grana, Dario [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie (United States); Santos, Marcio; Figueiredo, Wagner [Physics Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Roisenberg, Mauro [Informatic and Statistics Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Schwedersky Neto, Guenther [Petrobras Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    We propose a Bayesian approach for seismic inversion to estimate acoustic impedance, porosity and lithofacies within the reservoir conditioned to post-stack seismic and well data. The link between elastic and petrophysical properties is given by a joint prior distribution for the logarithm of impedance and porosity, based on a rock-physics model. The well conditioning is performed through a background model obtained by well log interpolation. Two different approaches are presented: in the first approach, the prior is defined by a single Gaussian distribution, whereas in the second approach it is defined by a Gaussian mixture to represent the well data multimodal distribution and link the Gaussian components to different geological lithofacies. The forward model is based on a linearized convolutional model. For the single Gaussian case, we obtain an analytical expression for the posterior distribution, resulting in a fast algorithm to compute the solution of the inverse problem, i.e. the posterior distribution of acoustic impedance and porosity as well as the facies probability given the observed data. For the Gaussian mixture prior, it is not possible to obtain the distributions analytically, hence we propose a Gibbs algorithm to perform the posterior sampling and obtain several reservoir model realizations, allowing an uncertainty analysis of the estimated properties and lithofacies. Both methodologies are applied to a real seismic dataset with three wells to obtain 3D models of acoustic impedance, porosity and lithofacies. The methodologies are validated through a blind well test and compared to a standard Bayesian inversion approach. Using the probability of the reservoir lithofacies, we also compute a 3D isosurface probability model of the main oil reservoir in the studied field.

  15. Deep-depletion physics-based analytical model for scanning capacitance microscopy carrier profile extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K. M.; Chim, W. K.

    2007-01-01

    An approach for fast and accurate carrier profiling using deep-depletion analytical modeling of scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) measurements is shown for an ultrashallow p-n junction with a junction depth of less than 30 nm and a profile steepness of about 3 nm per decade change in carrier concentration. In addition, the analytical model is also used to extract the SCM dopant profiles of three other p-n junction samples with different junction depths and profile steepnesses. The deep-depletion effect arises from rapid changes in the bias applied between the sample and probe tip during SCM measurements. The extracted carrier profile from the model agrees reasonably well with the more accurate carrier profile from inverse modeling and the dopant profile from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements

  16. The Use of Physics-Based Models to Predict Fragmentation of Ordnance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ott, Garland

    1997-01-01

    .... These same data collected from arena tests are also used as input for models used by other technical communities such as effectiveness, collateral damage, force protection, and weapon design. (1...

  17. Creating physically-based three-dimensional microstructures: Bridging phase-field and crystal plasticity models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Owen, Steven J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abdeljawad, Fadi F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanks, Byron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In order to better incorporate microstructures in continuum scale models, we use a novel finite element (FE) meshing technique to generate three-dimensional polycrystalline aggregates from a phase field grain growth model of grain microstructures. The proposed meshing technique creates hexahedral FE meshes that capture smooth interfaces between adjacent grains. Three dimensional realizations of grain microstructures from the phase field model are used in crystal plasticity-finite element (CP-FE) simulations of polycrystalline a -iron. We show that the interface conformal meshes significantly reduce artificial stress localizations in voxelated meshes that exhibit the so-called "wedding cake" interfaces. This framework provides a direct link between two mesoscale models - phase field and crystal plasticity - and for the first time allows mechanics simulations of polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional hexahedral finite element meshes with realistic topological features.

  18. Physical model of voltage sensing in sodium channels based on the sliding helix complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancey, C. C.; George, S. A.

    1996-05-01

    We have modeled voltage sensing in the sodium channel by evaluating forces on the S4 α-helix portion of the channel molecule, which we assume moves outward during activation. The interaction between the S4 α-helix segment and its environment was modeled by (i) nearest-neighbor Coulombic forces, (ii) the electric force due to an external electric field, and (iii) static mechanical and electrostatic forces. These terms collectively describe a depolarization-dependent effective potential within which the S4 segment moves. Thermal transitions between center-of-mass energy states of the segment were modeled starting from the Boltzmann distribution, and the time evolution of the segment's position relative to the membrane was simulated. Combining the histories of four such processes models the activation history of the channel molecule. The model simulation is in good qualitative agreement with batrachotoxin-modified single channel open and closed dwell time distributions and with such a channel's open probability as a function of depolarization. The model also qualitatively agrees with site-specific mutagenesis experiments, which show the different effects of eliminating positive charges on the cytoplasmic and extracellular ends of the S4 segment.

  19. Exploratory and Creative Properties of Physical-Modeling-based Musical Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven

    be supported and even challenged by the instruments they use. What is it that makes one musical instrument more creatively inspiring than another, and how do we evaluate how well it succeeds? In order to present answers to these questions, the thesis focusses on the sound synthesis technique of physical......Digital musical instruments are developed to enable musicians to find new ways of expressing themselves. The development and evaluation of these instruments can be approached from many different perspectives depending on which capabilities one wants the musicians to have. This thesis attempts...... to approach development and evaluation of these instruments with the notion that instruments today are able to facilitate the creative process that is so crucial for creating music. The fundamental question pursued throughout the thesis is how creative work processes of composers of electronic music can...

  20. Building Mental Models by Dissecting Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to…

  1. Physics-Based Modeling and Assessment of Mobile Landing Platform System Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Christopher G

    2008-01-01

    .... An initial study was conducted using a variety of air and surface connectors considering the various technologies being developed for the Sea Base concept and the use of a T-AKE class ship acting as a warehouse...

  2. A Graphical Representation of Multiple Stressor Effects on River Eutrophication as Simulated by a Physics-Based River Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, O.; Hutchins, M.

    2016-12-01

    UK river waters face considerable future pressures, primarily from population growth and climate change. In understanding controls on river water quality, experimental studies have successfully identified response to single or paired stressors under controlled conditions. Generalised Linear Model (GLM) approaches are commonly used to quantify stressor-response relationships. To explore a wider variety of stressors physics-based models are used. Our objective is to evaluate how five different types of stressor influence the severity of river eutrophication and its impact on Dissolved Oxygen (DO) an integrated measure of river ecological health. This is done by applying a physics-based river quality model for 4 years at daily time step to a 92 km stretch in the 3445 km2 Thames (UK) catchment. To understand the impact of model structural uncertainty we present results from two alternative formulations of the biological response. Sensitivity analysis carried out using the QUESTOR model (QUality Evaluation and Simulation TOol for River systems) considered gradients of various stressors: river flow, water temperature, urbanisation (abstractions and sewage/industrial effluents), phosphate concentrations in effluents and tributaries and riparian tree shading (modifying the light input). Scalar modifiers applied to the 2009-12 time-series inputs define the gradients. The model has been run for each combination of the values of these 5 variables. Results are analysed using graphical methods in order to identify variation in the type of relationship between different pairs of stressors on the system response. The method allows for all outputs from each combination of stressors to be displayed in one graphic and so showing the results of hundreds of model runs simultaneously. This approach can be carried out for all stressor pairs, and many locations/determinands. Supporting statistical analysis (GLM) reinforces the findings from the graphical analysis. Analysis suggests that

  3. A physical based equivalent circuit modeling approach for ballasted InP DHBT multi-finger devices at millimeter-wave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midili, Virginio; Squartecchia, Michele; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2016-01-01

    Multifinger InP DHBTs can be designed with a ballasting resistor to improve power capability. However accurate modeling is needed to predict high frequency behavior of the device. This paper presents two distinct modeling approaches: one based on EM simulations and one based on a physical...

  4. A physically based 3-D model of ice cliff evolution over debris-covered glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buri, Pascal; Miles, Evan S.; Steiner, J.F.; Immerzeel, W.W.; Wagnon, Patrick; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We use high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) from unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) surveys to document the evolution of four ice cliffs on the debris-covered tongue of Lirung Glacier, Nepal, over one ablation season. Observations show that out of four cliffs, three different patterns of

  5. Models-Based Practice in Physical Education: The Case for Sport Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Peter A.; Wallhead, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper provides a potential roadmap for the future development of research on Sport Education. In the first part of the paper, research on each of the elements of competence, literacy and enthusiasm are reviewed, with the aim of providing evidence to support the idea that the model can achieve its goals. For each of these goals we…

  6. Physically based dynamic modeling of planar anode-supported sofc cogeneration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Kevin J.

    Abstract Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) have been a key area of academic research interest over the past decade due to their high electrical efficiency, fuel flexibility, and high quality waste heat. These benefits suggest that SOFCs could play a significant role as a future distributed generation, combined heat and power source if life cycle cost can be reduced or significant incentives such as a carbon tax are implemented. At the current point in SOFC development, degradation effects limit the operational lifetime of SOFCs. Other research efforts have suggested that the dynamic operation of SOFCs could improve the economics in addition to reducing degradation. Thus the development of high fidelity modeling tools for the assessment of dynamic SOFC system operation is important to determine the potential load-following ability of SOFC systems. One of the goals of this research is to identify the required level of fidelity necessary for a dynamic SOFC system-level simulation tool. The channel-level steady-state simulation and dynamic response to step changes in current density are presented for a one-dimensional and `quasi' two-dimensional model. The results indicate the predicted temperature gradient is less severe when implementing a higher fidelity `quasi' two-dimensional model. Additionally, the modeling and sizing of the balance of plant components to simulate off-design and system dynamics are presented. The effects of dynamic balance of plant components are compared to the typically accepted steady-state models. The incorporation of the dynamic balance of plant components are shown to have a significant effect on the dynamics of the waste heat recovery, where the power dynamics are only minimally affected. Finally, the steady-state performance at off-design conditions and dynamic response to step changes in the net system power are presented to assess the potential load-following ability of a combined heat and power SOFC system.

  7. Physics of the Mind:. Opinion Dynamics and Decision Making Processes Based on a Binary Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartsev, F. V.; Kürten, Karl E.

    2009-12-01

    We propose a new theory of the human mind. The formation of human mind is considered as a collective process of the mutual interaction of people via exchange of opinions and formation of collective decisions. We investigate the associated dynamical processes of the decision making when people are put in different conditions including risk situations in natural catastrophes when the decision must be made very fast or at national elections. We also investigate conditions at which the fast formation of opinion is arising as a result of open discussions or public vote. Under a risk condition the system is very close to chaos and therefore the opinion formation is related to the order disorder transition. We study dramatic changes which may happen with societies which in physical terms may be considered as phase transitions from ordered to chaotic behavior. Our results are applicable to changes which are arising in various social networks as well as in opinion formation arising as a result of open discussions. One focus of this study is the determination of critical parameters, which influence a formation of stable mind, public opinion and where the society is placed "at the edge of chaos". We show that social networks have both, the necessary stability and the potential for evolutionary improvements or self-destruction. We also show that the time needed for a discussion to take a proper decision depends crucially on the nature of the interactions between the entities as well as on the topology of the social networks.

  8. Modelling and Analysis for Cyber-Physical Systems: An SMT-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dung, Phan Anh

    Calculus has shown its potential as a domain specific language in a Smart Meter case study. Moreover, counting semantics has proven useful in connection with tool-based support for Duration Calculus. To extend SMT techniques towards better support for analysis of CPS, we proposed algorithms for handling...

  9. A physics-based potential and electric field model of a nanoscale ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nm between GaN and AlGaN and hafnium oxide (HfO2) as high-K gate dielectric having thickness tox = 10 nm and permittivity εox = 22 under the metal gate. Gate metal used is tantalum nitride (work function = 4.8 eV). Source and drain regions are modelled as heavily doped regions with concentration Nd+ = 1022 cm. −3.

  10. Effects of a School-Based Intervention on the Basis of Pender’s Health Promotion Model to Improve Physical Activity among High School Girls

    OpenAIRE

    P Teymouri; SH Niknami; F Ghofranipour

    2007-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Participation in regular physical activity is associated with a variety of positive outcomes for young people. Physical activity (PA) rates decline precipitously during the high school years and are consistently lower among adolescent girls than among adolescent boys. In order to stop or diverse this negative trend, there are necessary interventions based on various theories and models to promote physical activity in girls. Materials & Methods: This randomized...

  11. Boundary-condition analysis for physics-based modeling of ionic-polymer metal composite electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Patrick S.; Zhang, Lin; Cheng, Zhongyang

    2017-04-01

    Ionic-polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are a subset of ionic electroactive polymers (EAPs). They produce an actuation response based on the electrically induced flux of mobile ions through a parent-polymer matrix. This response is a result of the accumulation of cations and anions on opposing sides of the matrix and is directly related to the size disparity between the two types of ions. These factors impose a differential expansion across the matrix, which generates the macroscopic bending that is observed. It is well known that the motion of these EAPs is highly nonlinear and time dependent, making for a process that is difficult to model. A simplistic approach to modeling the physics behind this phenomenon and correlating that to experimental results is outlined, herein. This new methodology enables a comprehensive analysis of the boundary conditions (BCs) needed to be considered in order to accurately characterize the IPMC actuation response. The subsequent series of equations developed, which depict the ionic motion under these BCs, is presented. Empirical data for model analysis was acquired from IPMCs created using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), a well-known, biodegradable, solid-polymer electrolyte infused with lithium perchlorate, as the ionic salt. Experimental results fitted with this new model returned a favorable average adjusted-R2, goodness-of-fit, of 0.987, 0.994, and 0.992 when PEO films were tested under varying conditions, including: ionic concentration, applied voltage, and testing temperature, respectively.

  12. Physics-Based Modeling and Measurement of High-Flux Condensation Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Incropera and Dewitt, 2002) h ffspfsp fsp D LGf P , 2 , , 2  , (3.9) where  5432,, 2537.09564.07012.19467.13553.1124Re  fspfspf...are defined, respectively, as ( Incropera and Dewitt, 2002)   Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory 37 Fluid Lexan Cover Copper Block q...3.34) where X is the Martinelli parameter. The Fanning friction factor based on liquid flow can be determined from (Shah and London, 1978; Incropera

  13. It's the parameters, stupid! Moving beyond multi-model and multi-physics approaches to characterize and reduce predictive uncertainty in process-based hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Martyn; Samaniego, Luis; Freer, Jim

    2014-05-01

    Multi-model and multi-physics approaches are a popular tool in environmental modelling, with many studies focusing on optimally combining output from multiple model simulations to reduce predictive errors and better characterize predictive uncertainty. However, a careful and systematic analysis of different hydrological models reveals that individual models are simply small permutations of a master modeling template, and inter-model differences are overwhelmed by uncertainty in the choice of the parameter values in the model equations. Furthermore, inter-model differences do not explicitly represent the uncertainty in modeling a given process, leading to many situations where different models provide the wrong results for the same reasons. In other cases, the available morphological data does not support the very fine spatial discretization of the landscape that typifies many modern applications of process-based models. To make the uncertainty characterization problem worse, the uncertain parameter values in process-based models are often fixed (hard-coded), and the models lack the agility necessary to represent the tremendous heterogeneity in natural systems. This presentation summarizes results from a systematic analysis of uncertainty in process-based hydrological models, where we explicitly analyze the myriad of subjective decisions made throughout both the model development and parameter estimation process. Results show that much of the uncertainty is aleatory in nature - given a "complete" representation of dominant hydrologic processes, uncertainty in process parameterizations can be represented using an ensemble of model parameters. Epistemic uncertainty associated with process interactions and scaling behavior is still important, and these uncertainties can be represented using an ensemble of different spatial configurations. Finally, uncertainty in forcing data can be represented using ensemble methods for spatial meteorological analysis. Our systematic

  14. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated matrix

  15. School beverage environment and children's energy expenditure associated with physical education class: an agent-based model simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H-J; Xue, H; Kumanyika, S; Wang, Y

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity contributes to children's energy expenditure and prevents excess weight gain, but fluid replacement with sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) may diminish this benefit. The aim of this study was to explore the net energy expenditure (EE) after physical education (PE) class given the competition between water and SSB consumption for rehydration and explore environmental factors that may influence the net EE, e.g. PE duration, affordability of SSB and students' SSB preference. We built an agent-based model that simulates the behaviour of 13-year-old children in a PE class with nearby water fountains and SSB vending machines available. A longer PE class contributed to greater prevalence of dehydration and required more time for rehydration. The energy cost of a PE class with activity intensity equivalent to 45 min of jogging is about 300 kcal on average, i.e. 10-15% of average 13-year-old children's total daily EE. Adding an SSB vending machine could offset PE energy expenditure by as much as 90 kcal per child, which was associated with PE duration, students' pocket money and SSB preference. Sugar-sweetened beverage vending machines in school may offset some of the EE in PE classes. This could be avoided if water is the only readily available source for children's fluid replacement after class. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  16. A Model-Based Approach for Bridging Virtual and Physical Sensor Nodes in a Hybrid Simulation Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mozumdar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Model Based Design (MBD approach is a popular trend to speed up application development of embedded systems, which uses high-level abstractions to capture functional requirements in an executable manner, and which automates implementation code generation. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are an emerging very promising application area for embedded systems. However, there is a lack of tools in this area, which would allow an application developer to model a WSN application by using high level abstractions, simulate it mapped to a multi-node scenario for functional analysis, and finally use the refined model to automatically generate code for different WSN platforms. Motivated by this idea, in this paper we present a hybrid simulation framework that not only follows the MBD approach for WSN application development, but also interconnects a simulated sub-network with a physical sub-network and then allows one to co-simulate them, which is also known as Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL simulation.

  17. Physically-based modeling of the cyclic macroscopic behaviour of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauzay, M.; Evrard, P.; Steckmeyer, A.; Ferrie, E. [CEA Saclay, DEN DMN SRMA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2010-07-01

    Grain size seems to have only a minor influence on the cyclic strain strain curves (CSSCs) of metallic polycrystals of medium to high stacking fault energy (SFE). That is why many authors tried to deduce the macroscopic CSSCs curves from the single crystals ones. Either crystals oriented for single slip or crystals oriented for multiple slip could be considered. In addition, a scale transition law should be used (from the grain scale to the macroscopic scale). Authors generally used either the Sachs rule (homogeneous single slip) or the Taylor one (homogeneous plastic strain, multiple slip). But the predicted macroscopic CSSCs do not generally agree with the experimental data for metals and alloys, presenting various SFE values. In order to avoid the choice of a particular scale transition rule, many finite element (FE) computations have been carried out using meshes of polycrystals including more than one hundred grains without texture. This allows the study of the influence of the crystalline constitutive laws on the macroscopic CSSCs. Activation of a secondary slip system in grains oriented for single slip is either allowed or hindered (slip planarity), which affects strongly the macroscopic CSSCs. The more planar the slip, the higher the predicted macroscopic stress amplitudes. If grains oriented for single slip obey slip planarity and two crystalline CSSCs are used (one for single slip grains and one for multiple slip grains), then the predicted macroscopic CSSCs agree well with experimental data provided the SFE is not too low (316L, copper, nickel, aluminium). Finally, the incremental self-consistent Hill-Hutchinson homogenization model is used for predicting CSS curves and partially validated with respect to the curves computed by the FE method. (authors)

  18. Parameter estimation in physically-based integrated hydrological models with the ensemble Kalman filter: a practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botto, Anna; Camporese, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological models allow scientists to predict the response of water systems under varying forcing conditions. In particular, many physically-based integrated models were recently developed in order to understand the fundamental hydrological processes occurring at the catchment scale. However, the use of this class of hydrological models is still relatively limited, as their prediction skills heavily depend on reliable parameter estimation, an operation that is never trivial, being normally affected by large uncertainty and requiring huge computational effort. The objective of this work is to test the potential of data assimilation to be used as an inverse modeling procedure for the broad class of integrated hydrological models. To pursue this goal, a Bayesian data assimilation (DA) algorithm based on a Monte Carlo approach, namely the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), is combined with the CATchment HYdrology (CATHY) model. In this approach, input variables (atmospheric forcing, soil parameters, initial conditions) are statistically perturbed providing an ensemble of realizations aimed at taking into account the uncertainty involved in the process. Each realization is propagated forward by the CATHY hydrological model within a parallel R framework, developed to reduce the computational effort. When measurements are available, the EnKF is used to update both the system state and soil parameters. In particular, four different assimilation scenarios are applied to test the capability of the modeling framework: first only pressure head or water content are assimilated, then, the combination of both, and finally both pressure head and water content together with the subsurface outflow. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in a real-world scenario, an artificial hillslope was designed and built to provide real measurements for the DA analyses. The experimental facility, located in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering of the

  19. A neural network construction method for surrogate modeling of physics-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Woong Je

    In this thesis existing methodologies related to the developmental methods of neural networks have been surveyed and their approaches to network sizing and structuring are carefully observed. This literature review covers the constructive methods, the pruning methods, and the evolutionary methods and questions about the basic assumption intrinsic to the conventional neural network learning paradigm, which is primarily devoted to optimization of connection weights (or synaptic strengths) for the pre-determined connection structure of the network. The main research hypothesis governing this thesis is that, without breaking a prevailing dichotomy between weights and connectivity of the network during learning phase, the efficient design of a task-specific neural network is hard to achieve because, as long as connectivity and weights are searched by separate means, a structural optimization of the neural network requires either repetitive re-training procedures or computationally expensive topological meta-search cycles. The main contribution of this thesis is designing and testing a novel learning mechanism which efficiently learns not only weight parameters but also connection structure from a given training data set, and positioning this learning mechanism within the surrogate modeling practice. In this work, a simple and straightforward extension to the conventional error Back-Propagation (BP) algorithm has been formulated to enable a simultaneous learning for both connectivity and weights of the Generalized Multilayer Perceptron (GMLP) in supervised learning tasks. A particular objective is to achieve a task-specific network having reasonable generalization performance with a minimal training time. The dichotomy between architectural design and weight optimization is reconciled by a mechanism establishing a new connection for a neuron pair which has potentially higher error-gradient than one of the existing connections. Interpreting an instance of the absence of

  20. Simulation of green roof runoff under different substrate depths and vegetation covers by coupling a simple conceptual and a physically based hydrological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulis, Konstantinos X; Valiantzas, John D; Ntoulas, Nikolaos; Kargas, George; Nektarios, Panayiotis A

    2017-09-15

    In spite of the well-known green roof benefits, their widespread adoption in the management practices of urban drainage systems requires the use of adequate analytical and modelling tools. In the current study, green roof runoff modeling was accomplished by developing, testing, and jointly using a simple conceptual model and a physically based numerical simulation model utilizing HYDRUS-1D software. The use of such an approach combines the advantages of the conceptual model, namely simplicity, low computational requirements, and ability to be easily integrated in decision support tools with the capacity of the physically based simulation model to be easily transferred in conditions and locations other than those used for calibrating and validating it. The proposed approach was evaluated with an experimental dataset that included various green roof covers (either succulent plants - Sedum sediforme, or xerophytic plants - Origanum onites, or bare substrate without any vegetation) and two substrate depths (either 8 cm or 16 cm). Both the physically based and the conceptual models matched very closely the observed hydrographs. In general, the conceptual model performed better than the physically based simulation model but the overall performance of both models was sufficient in most cases as it is revealed by the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency index which was generally greater than 0.70. Finally, it was showcased how a physically based and a simple conceptual model can be jointly used to allow the use of the simple conceptual model for a wider set of conditions than the available experimental data and in order to support green roof design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determinants of physical activity based on Health Promotion Model (HPM in diabetic women of Karaj diabetic institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Norouzi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of non pharmacologic strategies influencing diabetes is physical activity which is not easy to change and maintain due to its complexity. The main objective of the present study is to identify the factors which influence physical activities on the basis of health promotion model. Methods: In this study 350 women suffering from diabetes responded to the standard questionnaires related to the perceived self efficacy (belief about capabilities for doing physical activity under different sets of conditions , perceived barrier and benefit, family and friend support and perceived health status constructs. Linear and logistic regressions, t tests, and chi square tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The results of the present study indicated that self efficacy has positive and direct impacts on physical activities and the perceived benefits, the perceived health status, and the body mass index (BMI has indirect impacts on physical activities. Moreover, the perceived health status in addition to the indirect impacts has direct and positive impacts on physical activities and influence by factors such as job and duration of disease. Conclusion: The perceived health status is one of the most influential factors on physical activities of diabetic patients which is necessary to be taken into consideration especially for patients with long term disease. It is also urgent that through increasing self efficacy with using different techniques and emphasizing different aspects of physical activity benefits, resulted to promote the activity level of the patients.

  2. A physically based framework for modeling the organic fractionation of sea spray aerosol from bubble film Langmuir equilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely sensed chlorophyll a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC, a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semilabile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecules. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll a and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical

  3. Physics-based simulation modeling and optimization of microstructural changes induced by machining and selective laser melting processes in titanium and nickel based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisoy, Yigit Muzaffer

    Manufacturing processes may significantly affect the quality of resultant surfaces and structural integrity of the metal end products. Controlling manufacturing process induced changes to the product's surface integrity may improve the fatigue life and overall reliability of the end product. The goal of this study is to model the phenomena that result in microstructural alterations and improve the surface integrity of the manufactured parts by utilizing physics-based process simulations and other computational methods. Two different (both conventional and advanced) manufacturing processes; i.e. machining of Titanium and Nickel-based alloys and selective laser melting of Nickel-based powder alloys are studied. 3D Finite Element (FE) process simulations are developed and experimental data that validates these process simulation models are generated to compare against predictions. Computational process modeling and optimization have been performed for machining induced microstructure that includes; i) predicting recrystallization and grain size using FE simulations and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model, ii) predicting microhardness using non-linear regression models and the Random Forests method, and iii) multi-objective machining optimization for minimizing microstructural changes. Experimental analysis and computational process modeling of selective laser melting have been also conducted including; i) microstructural analysis of grain sizes and growth directions using SEM imaging and machine learning algorithms, ii) analysis of thermal imaging for spattering, heating/cooling rates and meltpool size, iii) predicting thermal field, meltpool size, and growth directions via thermal gradients using 3D FE simulations, iv) predicting localized solidification using the Phase Field method. These computational process models and predictive models, once utilized by industry to optimize process parameters, have the ultimate potential to improve performance of

  4. Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2009-01-01

    The Standard Model is in good shape, apart possibly from g_\\mu - 2 and some niggling doubts about the electroweak data. Something like a Higgs boson is required to provide particle masses, but theorists are actively considering alternatives. The problems of flavour, unification and quantum gravity will require physics beyond the Standard Model, and astrophysics and cosmology also provide reasons to expect physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular to provide the dark matter and explain the origin of the matter in the Universe. Personally, I find supersymmetry to be the most attractive option for new physics at the TeV scale. The LHC should establish the origin of particle masses has good prospects for discovering dark matter, and might also cast light on unification and even quantum gravity. Important roles may also be played by lower-energy experiments, astrophysics and cosmology in the searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  5. The use of the SCEM-UA optimization algorithm in the calibration of the physically based hydrological model SWAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzner, Michele; Facchi, Arianna; Cesari de Maria, Sandra; Gandolfi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    In the agricultural seasons 2010 and 2011, an intensive monitoring activity aimed at quantifying fluxes and storage of water in a maize agroecosystem of the Po Valley plain (Northern Italy) was carried out. In the experimental site, instruments for the measurement of water fluxes with the eddy covariance technique were installed. Additionally, in order to measure the terms of the H2O budget also investigating their variability at the field scale, six Intensive Monitoring Plots (IMPs in the following) were identified in the field and instrumentation for the continuous monitoring of water status of the soil (moisture, water potential, groundwater table depth) was installed in each of them. In the two seasons, also periodic campaigns for the determination of biometric parameters of the crop, hydrological parameters of the soil, fluxes of water from maize leaves and from soil were conducted. The experimental field was characterized by a shallow groundwater table depth (0.6 to 1.5 m). In 2010 it was watered by border irrigation, while in 2011 no irrigation events were applied. Monitored data were used to carry out simulations with the physically based hydrological model SWAP (Soil Water Atmosphere Plant model, Kroes and Van Dam, 2003), with the aim of assessing the relative contribution of the various water fluxes (rainfall, irrigation, capillary rise) to maize water requirements. In particular, the SWAP model was implemented using the basis of observational data collected for the two IMPs showing the main differences in terms of soil types, vegetation growth and, limited to 2010, irrigation supply. The two selected IMPs were located at the ends of a transect placed perpendicularly to the irrigation channel. While many parameters and water fluxes necessary for the SWAP implementation and validation were measured directly, it was impossible to detect with sufficient accuracy the saturated hydraulic conductivity at different depths for the two IMPs during the two years of

  6. A physics based compact model of I?V and C?V characteristics in AlGaN/GaN HEMT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Sourabh; Fjeldly, T. A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we present a physics-based compact model for drain current Id and intrinsic gate-drain and gate-source capacitances CGS and CGD in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. An analytical expression for the 2-DEG charge density ns, valid in all the regions of device operation is developed and applied to derive current and capacitances. The drain current model includes important physical effects like velocity saturation, channel length modulation, short channel effect, mobility degradation effect, and self-heating. The expression for ns is used to derive a model for CGS and CGD applicable in all the regions of device operation. The parameters introduced in the model have a clear link to the physical effects facilitating easy extraction of parameter values. The model is in excellent agreement with experimental data for both drain current and capacitances over a typical range of applied voltages and device geometries.

  7. Standard Model physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Altarelli, Guido

    1999-01-01

    Introduction structure of gauge theories. The QEDand QCD examples. Chiral theories. The electroweak theory. Spontaneous symmetry breaking. The Higgs mechanism Gauge boson and fermion masses. Yukawa coupling. Charges current couplings. The Cabibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and CP violation. Neutral current couplings. The Glasow-Iliopoulos-Maiani mechanism. Gauge boson and Higgs coupling. Radiative corrections and loops. Cancellation of the chiral anomaly. Limits on the Higgs comparaison. Problems of the Standard Model. Outlook.

  8. Quasi standard model physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peccei, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Possible small extensions of the standard model are considered, which are motivated by the strong CP problem and by the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. Phenomenological arguments are given which suggest that imposing a PQ symmetry to solve the strong CP problem is only tenable if the scale of the PQ breakdown is much above M W . Furthermore, an attempt is made to connect the scale of the PQ breakdown to that of the breakdown of lepton number. It is argued that in these theories the same intermediate scale may be responsible for the baryon number of the Universe, provided the Kuzmin Rubakov Shaposhnikov (B+L) erasing mechanism is operative. (orig.)

  9. Uncertainty Analysis Using Optimization and Direct Parameter Sampling With Correlation for a Physically Based Contaminant Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J. F.; Yin, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Due to the ill-posed nature of contaminant transport models, inverse modeling and traditional gradient-based optimization approaches often encounter difficulties when applied to real case studies. The correlation of the transport parameters must be included in uncertainty analyses. In this study, a physically based transient groundwater flow model was developed to establish the historical relationship between a contaminant site and the down gradient municipal well field. The parameters for the three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model were calibrated using both punctual data over a thirty-year time period and approximately nine years of head data from continuous well records. Spatially and temporally varying recharge was incorporated in the model to account for water level fluctuations in observation wells. Given the spatially and temporally varying velocities, the six contaminant transport parameters of dispersivities, retardation, initial source concentration and source decay coefficient were estimated using a multi-start PEST algorithm that combined the traditional gradient search approach with a heuristic technique. The feature of multi-start partially resolved the issue of the locality of optimum. The study also compared a Dynamically Dimensioned Search (DDS) algorithm to the multi-start PEST algorithm. A modified Latin Hypercube (LHC) sampling approach accounting for correlation between parameters was employed to conduct an uncertainty analysis for contaminant concentration breakthrough at pumping wells. The LHC sampling can be operated using the multivariate normal distribution for each parameter in which correlations among parameters are specified through optimization and form part of the corresponding probability space. Because of the non-uniqueness issue for ill-posed problems, multiple feasible transport parameter sets and covariance matrices were generated using the mutli-start PEST algorithm. The likelihood for each parameter set was estimated

  10. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR TOLUENE IN THE LONG EVANS RAT: BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhaled toluene was developed for Long-Evans rats as a component of an exposure-dose-response (EDR) model for volatile organic compounds. The PBPK model was needed to link airborne toluene exposure to its concentration in b...

  11. [Assessment of accelerated aging among automobile drivers using model of the biological age based on physical work capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkireva, A S

    2012-01-01

    The studies of biological age, aging rate, physical work capacity in professional drivers were conducted. The examination revealed peculiarities of system organization of functions, which determine the physical work capacity levels. Dynamics of the aging process of professional driver's organism in relation with calendar age and driving experience were shown using the biological age on physical work capacity model. The results point at the premature decrease of the physical work capacity in professional drivers. The premature contraction of the range of cardio-vascular system adaptive reactions on submaximum physical load in the drivers as compared with control group was revealed. It was proved that premature age-related changes of physiologic indices in drivers are just "risk indicators", while long driving experience is a real risk factor, accelerating the ageing process. The "risk group" with manifestations of accelerating ageing was observed in 40-49-year old drivers with 15-19 years of professional experience. The expediency of using the following methods for the age rate estimation according to biologic age indices and necessity of prophylactic measures for premature and accelerated ageing prevention among working population was demonstrated.

  12. Potential Teachers' Appropriate and Inappropriate Application of Pedagogical Resources in a Model-Based Physics Course: A "Knowledge in Pieces" Perspective on Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Bianchini, Julie A.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Dwyer, Hilary A.

    2013-01-01

    We used a "knowledge in pieces" perspective on teacher learning to document undergraduates' pedagogical resources in a model-based physics course for potential teachers. We defined pedagogical resources as small, discrete ideas about teaching science that are applied appropriately or inappropriately in specific contexts. Neither…

  13. Simplified Models for LHC New Physics Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Daniele; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Buckley, Matthew; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Chivukula, R.Sekhar; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig, Rouven; Evans, Jared A.; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto; Freitas, Ayres; Gainer, James S.; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Gregoire, Thomas; Gripaios, Ben; Gunion, Jack; Han, Tao; Haas, Andy; Hansson, Per; Hewett, JoAnne; Hits, Dmitry; Hubisz, Jay; Izaguirre, Eder; Kaplan, Jared; Katz, Emanuel; Kilic, Can; Kim, Hyung-Do; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Koay, Sue Ann; Ko, Pyungwon; Krohn, David; Kuflik, Eric; Lewis, Ian; Lisanti, Mariangela; Liu, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Lu, Ran; Luty, Markus; Meade, Patrick; Morrissey, David; Mrenna, Stephen; Nojiri, Mihoko; Okui, Takemichi; Padhi, Sanjay; Papucci, Michele; Park, Michael; Park, Myeonghun; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael; Phalen, Daniel; Rehermann, Keith; Rentala, Vikram; Roy, Tuhin; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Sanz, Veronica; Schmaltz, Martin; Schnetzer, Stephen; Schuster, Philip; Schwaller, Pedro; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Schwartzman, Ariel; Shao, Jing; Shelton, Jessie; Shih, David; Shu, Jing; Silverstein, Daniel; Simmons, Elizabeth; Somalwar, Sunil; Spannowsky, Michael; Spethmann, Christian; Strassler, Matthew; Su, Shufang; Tait, Tim; Thomas, Brooks; Thomas, Scott; Toro, Natalia; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Yavin, Itay; Yu, Felix; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the "Topologies for Early LHC Searches" workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a...

  14. Application of regional physically-based landslide early warning model: tuning of the input parameters and validation of the results

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Michele; Tofani, Veronica; Rossi, Guglielmo; Salvatici, Teresa; Tacconi Stefanelli, Carlo; Rosi, Ascanio; Benedetta Masi, Elena; Pazzi, Veronica; Vannocci, Pietro; Catani, Filippo; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    The Aosta Valley region is located in North-West Alpine mountain chain. The geomorphology of the region is characterized by steep slopes, high climatic and altitude (ranging from 400 m a.s.l of Dora Baltea's river floodplain to 4810 m a.s.l. of Mont Blanc) variability. In the study area (zone B), located in Eastern part of Aosta Valley, heavy rainfall of about 800-900 mm per year is the main landslides trigger. These features lead to a high hydrogeological risk in all territory, as mass movements interest the 70% of the municipality areas (mainly shallow rapid landslides and rock falls). An in-depth study of the geotechnical and hydrological properties of hillslopes controlling shallow landslides formation was conducted, with the aim to improve the reliability of deterministic model, named HIRESS (HIgh REsolution Stability Simulator). In particular, two campaigns of on site measurements and laboratory experiments were performed. The data obtained have been studied in order to assess the relationships existing among the different parameters and the bedrock lithology. The analyzed soils in 12 survey points are mainly composed of sand and gravel, with highly variable contents of silt. The range of effective internal friction angle (from 25.6° to 34.3°) and effective cohesion (from 0 kPa to 9.3 kPa) measured and the median ks (10E-6 m/s) value are consistent with the average grain sizes (gravelly sand). The data collected contributes to generate input map of parameters for HIRESS (static data). More static data are: volume weight, residual water content, porosity and grain size index. In order to improve the original formulation of the model, the contribution of the root cohesion has been also taken into account based on the vegetation map and literature values. HIRESS is a physically based distributed slope stability simulator for analyzing shallow landslide triggering conditions in real time and in large areas using parallel computational techniques. The software

  15. Physical model of Nernst element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    1998-08-01

    Generation of electric power by the Nernst effect is a new application of a semiconductor. A key point of this proposal is to find materials with a high thermomagnetic figure-of-merit, which are called Nernst elements. In order to find candidates of the Nernst element, a physical model to describe its transport phenomena is needed. As the first model, we began with a parabolic two-band model in classical statistics. According to this model, we selected InSb as candidates of the Nernst element and measured their transport coefficients in magnetic fields up to 4 Tesla within a temperature region from 270 K to 330 K. In this region, we calculated transport coefficients numerically by our physical model. For InSb, experimental data are coincident with theoretical values in strong magnetic field. (author)

  16. Planning Model of Physics Learning In Senior High School To Develop Problem Solving Creativity Based On National Standard Of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, A.; Masril, M.; Yurnetti, Y.

    2018-04-01

    One of the causes of low achievement of student’s competence in physics learning in high school is the process which they have not been able to develop student’s creativity in problem solving. This is shown that the teacher’s learning plan is not accordance with the National Eduction Standard. This study aims to produce a reconstruction model of physics learning that fullfil the competency standards, content standards, and assessment standards in accordance with applicable curriculum standards. The development process follows: Needs analysis, product design, product development, implementation, and product evaluation. The research process involves 2 peers judgment, 4 experts judgment and two study groups of high school students in Padang. The data obtained, in the form of qualitative and quantitative data that collected through documentation, observation, questionnaires, and tests. The result of this research up to the product development stage that obtained the physics learning plan model that meets the validity of the content and the validity of the construction in terms of the fulfillment of Basic Competence, Content Standards, Process Standards and Assessment Standards.

  17. Contextual anomaly detection for cyber-physical security in Smart Grids based on an artificial neural network model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, Anna Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a contextual anomaly detection method and its use in the discovery of malicious voltage control actions in the low voltage distribution grid. The model-based anomaly detection uses an artificial neural network model to identify a distributed energy resource’s behaviour under...

  18. Physics beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, José W F

    1991-01-01

    We discuss some of the signatures associated with extensions of the Standard Model related to the neutrino and electroweak symmetry breaking sectors, with and without supersymmetry. The topics include a basic discussion of the theory of neutrino mass and the corresponding extensions of the Standard Model that incorporate massive neutrinos; an overview of the present observational status of neutrino mass searches, with emphasis on solar neutrinos, as well the as cosmological data on the amplitude of primordial density fluctuations; the implications of neutrino mass in cosmological nucleosynthesis, non-accelerator, as well as in high energy particle collider experiments. Turning to the electroweak breaking sector, we discuss the physics potential for Higgs boson searches at LEP200, including Majoron extensions of the Standard Model, and the physics of invisibly decaying Higgs bosons. We discuss the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model phenomenology, as well as some of the laboratory signatures that would be as...

  19. Physically realistic modeling of maritime training simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cieutat , Jean-Marc

    2003-01-01

    Maritime training simulation is an important matter of maritime teaching, which requires a lot of scientific and technical skills.In this framework, where the real time constraint has to be maintained, all physical phenomena cannot be studied; the most visual physical phenomena relating to the natural elements and the ship behaviour are reproduced only. Our swell model, based on a surface wave simulation approach, permits to simulate the shape and the propagation of a regular train of waves f...

  20. A physical model for dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Gaggero-Sager, L. M.; Becker, J. T.; Maestu, F.; Sotolongo-Grau, O.

    2017-04-01

    Aging associated brain decline often result in some kind of dementia. Even when this is a complex brain disorder a physical model can be used in order to describe its general behavior. A probabilistic model for the development of dementia is obtained and fitted to some experimental data obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. It is explained how dementia appears as a consequence of aging and why it is irreversible.

  1. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsa, Z. [ed.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  2. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsa, Z. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  3. Wave Generation in Physical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    The present book describes the most important aspects of wave generation techniques in physical models. Moreover, the book serves as technical documentation for the wave generation software AwaSys 6, cf. Aalborg University (2012). In addition to the two main authors also Tue Hald and Michael...

  4. Stationary flow fields prediction of variable physical domain based on proper orthogonal decomposition and kriging surrogate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasong Qiu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new flow field prediction method which is independent of the governing equations, is developed to predict stationary flow fields of variable physical domain. Predicted flow fields come from linear superposition of selected basis modes generated by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD. Instead of traditional projection methods, kriging surrogate model is used to calculate the superposition coefficients through building approximate function relationships between profile geometry parameters of physical domain and these coefficients. In this context, the problem which troubles the traditional POD-projection method due to viscosity and compressibility has been avoided in the whole process. Moreover, there are no constraints for the inner product form, so two forms of simple ones are applied to improving computational efficiency and cope with variable physical domain problem. An iterative algorithm is developed to determine how many basis modes ranking front should be used in the prediction. Testing results prove the feasibility of this new method for subsonic flow field, but also prove that it is not proper for transonic flow field because of the poor predicted shock waves.

  5. Impacts of a health belief model-based education program about osteoporosis prevention on junior high school students’ physical activity, Kalaleh, Iran, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Osteoporosis, a current silent epidemic, is of high importance due to its high prevalence and complications among women. It is a preventable disease whose high-risk population includes young girls. This study investigated the impacts of a health belief model-based education program about osteoporosis prevention on physical activity of junior high school students in in Kalaleh (Iran during 2012.Method: The present experimental study was conducted on 140 female students of the second-grade of junior high school in Kalaleh. The subjects were selected and allocated to the case and control groups (n = 70 each using multistage random sampling. Data were collected through standard questionnaires on the application of health belief model in osteoporosis and physical activity. The collected data were analyzed with independent and paired t-tests in SPSS 16 version.Results: There were no significant differences between the case and control groups in terms of household size and parents’ demographic characteristics. Before the intervention, the two groups had no significant differences in the mean scores of awareness and the health belief model constructs. However, the intervention could significantly increase the case group’s scores (P < 0.001. In addition, two months after the intervention, the mean scores of physical activity significantly increased in the case group (P < 0.001.Conclusion: The health belief model-based education program was efficient in increasing the students’ awareness which in turn created a favorable attitude toward physical activity among the participants.

  6. Big data-based data mining modeling for nuclear security analysis in the modified physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the social networking-related strategies have been developed to prepare against the terror. The conventional PPS is composed of detection, delay, and response. In the systems, each stage has particular characteristics where the detection state is to find out the intrusion and unauthorized behavior by some devices, the delay stage is to slow the malicious acts by some barriers, and finally the response stage is to interrupt the actions by several kinds of methods like the arms response. It is said there are some data mining activities by the department of homeland security in the United States. The Automated Targeting System (ATS) compares several factors like traveler, cargo, and conveyance information against intelligence and other enforcement data, which is managed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and includes modules for inbound (ATS-N) and outbound (ATS-AT) cargo, land border crossings (ATS-L), and passengers (ATS-P). The Data Analysis and Research for Trade Transparency System (DARTTS) analyzes possible data like the trade and financial stuff, which is administered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).The modeling has accomplished successfully the random number generation-based quantifications for nuclear security incorporated with several complex algorithms, which is one of popular strategies in the technological-social science areas. In the calculations, the data are processed in every 7.5 minutes in which this means the calculation is done as 8 times in one hour. So, the graph has 100 hours with 800 times data processing. This means that 35,673.516 graphs are available by the big data processing. That is, 1 tera byte = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes = 800 2,500,000,000 bytes So, it is needed to process 2,500,000,000 bytes more for 1 tera byte. In the similar way, 2,500,000,000 bytes are done for 8 times in 1 hour. Then, 312,500,000 bytes are done for 24 hours in 1 day. Then, 13,020,833.33 bytes are done for 365 days in 1 year

  7. Big data-based data mining modeling for nuclear security analysis in the modified physical protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Systemix Global Co. Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the social networking-related strategies have been developed to prepare against the terror. The conventional PPS is composed of detection, delay, and response. In the systems, each stage has particular characteristics where the detection state is to find out the intrusion and unauthorized behavior by some devices, the delay stage is to slow the malicious acts by some barriers, and finally the response stage is to interrupt the actions by several kinds of methods like the arms response. It is said there are some data mining activities by the department of homeland security in the United States. The Automated Targeting System (ATS) compares several factors like traveler, cargo, and conveyance information against intelligence and other enforcement data, which is managed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and includes modules for inbound (ATS-N) and outbound (ATS-AT) cargo, land border crossings (ATS-L), and passengers (ATS-P). The Data Analysis and Research for Trade Transparency System (DARTTS) analyzes possible data like the trade and financial stuff, which is administered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).The modeling has accomplished successfully the random number generation-based quantifications for nuclear security incorporated with several complex algorithms, which is one of popular strategies in the technological-social science areas. In the calculations, the data are processed in every 7.5 minutes in which this means the calculation is done as 8 times in one hour. So, the graph has 100 hours with 800 times data processing. This means that 35,673.516 graphs are available by the big data processing. That is, 1 tera byte = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes = 800 2,500,000,000 bytes So, it is needed to process 2,500,000,000 bytes more for 1 tera byte. In the similar way, 2,500,000,000 bytes are done for 8 times in 1 hour. Then, 312,500,000 bytes are done for 24 hours in 1 day. Then, 13,020,833.33 bytes are done for 365 days in 1 year

  8. Instream Physical Habitat Modelling Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conallin, John; Boegh, Eva; Krogsgaard, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) is providing member state water resource managers with significant challenges in relation to meeting the deadline for 'Good Ecological Status' by 2015. Overall, instream physical habitat modelling approaches have advantages...... and disadvantages as management tools for member states in relation to the requirements of the WFD, but due to their different model structures they are distinct in their data needs, transferability, user-friendliness and presentable outputs. Water resource managers need information on what approaches will best...... management tools, but require large amounts of data and the model structure is complex. It is concluded that the use of habitat suitability indices (HSIs) and fuzzy rules in hydraulic-habitat modelling are the most ready model types to satisfy WFD demands. These models are well documented, transferable, user...

  9. Community-Based Adaptive Physical Activity Program for Chronic Stroke: Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy of the Empoli Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary; Benvenuti, Francesco; Macko, Richard; Taviani, Antonio; Segenni, Lucianna; Mayer, Federico; Sorkin, John D.; Stanhope, Steven J.; Macellari, Velio; Weinrich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether Adaptive Physical Activity (APA-stroke), a community-based exercise program for participants with hemiparetic stroke, improves function in the community. Methods Nonrandomized controlled study in Tuscany, Italy, of participants with mild to moderate hemiparesis at least 9 months after stroke. Forty-nine participants in a geographic health authority (Empoli) were offered APA-stroke (40 completed the study). Forty-four control participants in neighboring health authorities (Florence and Pisa) received usual care (38 completed the study). The APA intervention was a community-based progressive group exercise regimen that included walking, strength, and balance training for 1 hour, thrice a week, in local gyms, supervised by gym instructors. No serious adverse clinical events occurred during the exercise intervention. Outcome measures included the following: 6-month change in gait velocity (6-Minute Timed Walk), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Berg Balance Scale, Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), Barthel Index, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Index of Caregivers Strain. Results After 6 months, the intervention group improved whereas controls declined in gait velocity, balance, SPPB, and SIS social participation domains. These between-group comparisons were statistically significant at P < .00015. Individuals with depressive symptoms at baseline improved whereas controls were unchanged (P < .003). Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on a subset of participants in the intervention group. For these individuals, insulin secretion declined 29% after 6 months (P = .01). Conclusion APA-stroke appears to be safe, feasible, and efficacious in a community setting. PMID:19318465

  10. Assessing three fish species ecological status in Colorado River, Grand Canyon based on physical habitat and population models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weiwei; Chen, Yuansheng

    2018-04-01

    Colorado River is a unique ecosystem and provides important ecological services such as habitat for fish species as well as water power energy supplies. River management for this ecosystem requires assessment and decision support tools for fish which involves protecting, restoring as well as forecasting of future conditions. In this paper, a habitat and population model was developed and used to determine the levels of fish habitat suitability and population density in Colorado River between Lees Ferry and Lake Mead. The short term target fish populations are also predicted based on native fish recovery strategy. This model has been developed by combining hydrodynamics, heat transfer and sediment transport models with a habitat suitability index model and then coupling with habitat model into life stage population model. The fish were divided into four life stages according to the fish length. Three most abundant and typical native and non-native fish were selected as target species, which are rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), brown trout (Salmo trutta) and flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis). Flow velocity, water depth, water temperature and substrates were used as the suitability indicators in habitat model and overall suitability index (OSI) as well as weight usable area (WUA) was used as an indicator in population model. A comparison was made between simulated fish population alteration and surveyed fish number fluctuation during 2000 to 2009. The application of this habitat and population model indicates that this model can be accurate present habitat situation and targets fish population dynamics of in the study areas. The analysis also indicates the flannelmouth sucker population will steadily increase while the rainbow trout will decrease based on the native fish recovery scheme. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. New agrophysics divisions: application of ANFIS, fuzzy indicator modeling, physic-technical bases of plant breeding, and materials based on humic acids (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work is devoted to review the new scientific divisions that emerged in agrophysics in the last 10-15 years. Among them are the following: 1) application of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), 2) development and application of fuzzy indicator modeling, 3) agrophysical and physic-tech...

  12. Toward Inverse Control of Physics-Based Sound Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalz, A.; Berdahl, E.

    2017-05-01

    Long Short-Term Memory networks (LSTMs) can be trained to realize inverse control of physics-based sound synthesizers. Physics-based sound synthesizers simulate the laws of physics to produce output sound according to input gesture signals. When a user's gestures are measured in real time, she or he can use them to control physics-based sound synthesizers, thereby creating simulated virtual instruments. An intriguing question is how to program a computer to learn to play such physics-based models. This work demonstrates that LSTMs can be trained to accomplish this inverse control task with four physics-based sound synthesizers.

  13. Physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, J.W.F. [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica]. E-mail: valle@flamenco.uv.es

    1996-07-01

    We discuss some of the signatures associated with extensions of the Standard Model related to the neutrino and electroweak symmetry breaking sectors, with and without supersymmetry. The topics include a basic discussion of the theory of neutrino mass and the corresponding extensions of the Standard Model that incorporate massive neutrinos; an overview of the present observational status of neutrino mass searches, with emphasis on solar neutrinos, as well as cosmological data on the amplitude of primordial density fluctuations; the implications of neutrino mass in cosmological nucleosynthesis, non-accelerator, as well as in high energy particle collider experiments. Turning to the electroweak breaking sector, we discuss the physics potential for Higgs boson searches at LEP200, including Majorana extensions of the Standard Model, and the physics of invisibly decaying Higgs bosons. We discuss the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model phenomenology, as well as some of the laboratory signatures that would be associated to models with R parity violation, especially in Z and scalar boson decays. (author)

  14. A physics-based model of gate-tunable metal–graphene contact resistance benchmarked against experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Ferney A; Jiménez, David; Sagade, Abhay A; Neumaier, Daniel; Kim, Wonjae; Riikonen, Juha; Lipsanen, Harri

    2015-01-01

    Metal–graphene contact resistance is a technological bottleneck in the realization of viable graphene-based electronics. We report a model that is useful for finding the gate-tunable components of this resistance, determined by the tunneling of carriers between the 3D metal and 2D graphene underneath, followed by Klein tunneling to the graphene in the channel. This model quantifies the intrinsic factors that control that resistance, including the effect of unintended chemical doping. Our results agree with experimental results for several metals. (paper)

  15. Investigation of Higher Brain Functions in Music Composition Using Models of the Cortex Based on Physical System Analogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaodan

    The trion model was developed using the Mountcastle organizational principle for the column as the basic neuronal network in the cortex and the physical system analogy of Fisher's ANNNI spin model. An essential feature is that it is highly structured in time and in spatial connections. Simulations of a network of trions have shown that large numbers of quasi-stable, periodic spatial-temporal firing patterns can be excited. Characteristics of these patterns include the quality of being readily enhanced by only a small change in connection strengths, and that the patterns evolve in certain natural sequences from one to another. With only somewhat different parameters than used for studying memory and pattern recognition, much more flowing and intriguing patterns emerged from the simulations. The results were striking when these probabilistic evolutions were mapped onto pitches and instruments to produce music: For example different simple mappings of the same evolution give music having the "flavor" of a minuet, a waltz, folk music, or styles of specific periods. A theme can be learned so that evolutions have this theme and its variations reoccurring more often. That the trion model is a viable model for the coding of musical structure in human composition and perception is suggested. It is further proposed that model is relevant for examining creativity in the higher cognitive functions of mathematics and chess, which are similar to music. An even higher level of cortical organization was modeled by coupling together several trion networks. Further, one of the crucial features of higher brain function, especially in music composition or appreciation, is the role of emotion and mood as controlled by the many neuromodulators or neuropeptides. The MILA model whose underlying basis is zero-level representation of Kac-Moody algebra is used to modulate periodically the firing threshold of each network. Our preliminary results show that the introduction of "neuromodulation

  16. A physics-based crystallographic modeling framework for describing the thermal creep behavior of Fe-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Wei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    This Report addresses the Milestone M2MS-16LA0501032 of NEAMS Program (“Develop hardening model for FeCrAl cladding), with a deadline of 09/30/2016. Here we report a constitutive law for thermal creep of FeCrAl. This Report adds to and complements the one for Milestone M3MS-16LA0501034 (“Interface hardening models with MOOSE-BISON”), where we presented a hardening law for irradiated FeCrAl. The last component of our polycrystal-based constitutive behavior, namely, an irradiation creep model for FeCrAl, will be developed as part of the FY17 Milestones, and the three regimes will be coupled and interfaced with MOOSE-BISON.

  17. Simplified Models for LHC New Physics Searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Daniele; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig, Rouven; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the 'Topologies for Early LHC Searches' workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first ∼ 50-500 pb -1 of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  18. Simplified Models for LHC New Physics Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Daniele; /SLAC; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Arora, Sanjay; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Bai, Yang; /SLAC; Baumgart, Matthew; /Johns Hopkins U.; Berger, Joshua; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Buckley, Matthew; /Fermilab; Butler, Bart; /SLAC; Chang, Spencer; /Oregon U. /UC, Davis; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; /UC, Davis; Cheung, Clifford; /UC, Berkeley; Chivukula, R.Sekhar; /Michigan State U.; Cho, Won Sang; /Tokyo U.; Cotta, Randy; /SLAC; D' Alfonso, Mariarosaria; /UC, Santa Barbara; El Hedri, Sonia; /SLAC; Essig, Rouven, (ed.); /SLAC; Evans, Jared A.; /UC, Davis; Fitzpatrick, Liam; /Boston U.; Fox, Patrick; /Fermilab; Franceschini, Roberto; /LPHE, Lausanne /Pittsburgh U. /Argonne /Northwestern U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Carleton U. /CERN /UC, Davis /Wisconsin U., Madison /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Syracuse U. /SLAC /SLAC /Boston U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Seoul Natl. U. /Tohoku U. /UC, Santa Barbara /Korea Inst. Advanced Study, Seoul /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Michigan U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Princeton U. /UC, Santa Barbara /Wisconsin U., Madison /Michigan U. /UC, Davis /SUNY, Stony Brook /TRIUMF; /more authors..

    2012-06-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the 'Topologies for Early LHC Searches' workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first {approx} 50-500 pb{sup -1} of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  19. Cabin Environment Physics Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattenberger, Christopher J.; Mathias, Donovan Leigh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a Cabin Environment Physics Risk (CEPR) model that predicts the time for an initial failure of Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) functionality to propagate into a hazardous environment and trigger a loss-of-crew (LOC) event. This physics-of failure model allows a probabilistic risk assessment of a crewed spacecraft to account for the cabin environment, which can serve as a buffer to protect the crew during an abort from orbit and ultimately enable a safe return. The results of the CEPR model replace the assumption that failure of the crew critical ECLSS functionality causes LOC instantly, and provide a more accurate representation of the spacecraft's risk posture. The instant-LOC assumption is shown to be excessively conservative and, moreover, can impact the relative risk drivers identified for the spacecraft. This, in turn, could lead the design team to allocate mass for equipment to reduce overly conservative risk estimates in a suboptimal configuration, which inherently increases the overall risk to the crew. For example, available mass could be poorly used to add redundant ECLSS components that have a negligible benefit but appear to make the vehicle safer due to poor assumptions about the propagation time of ECLSS failures.

  20. Nonlinear piezoelectric effects—towards physics-based computational modelling of micro-cracking, fatigue, and switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, A.; Utzinger, J.; Arockiarajan, A.

    2008-07-01

    Piezoelectric ceramics—as one widely commercialised group of smart materials—exhibit a great potential for various engineering applications. Their high-frequency capabilities are in particular attractive for actuator and sensor devices, which nowadays are present in daily-life-technologies such as cellular phones, fuel injection systems, and so forth. At high loading levels however, severely nonlinear behaviour of these materials is observed which, from the control point of view, must be further investigated in order to be able to precisely account for such effects within the design of intelligent systems. The reasons for these nonlinearities are manifold and, even investigated within the last decades, not fully understood. Nevertheless, two important sources for these observations are so-called micro-cracking, together with fatigue phenomena, as well as switching or rather phase transformations. Accordingly, the main goal of this contribution is to study these effects by means of developing related constitutive models that can be embedded into iterative algorithmic schemes such as the finite element method. One the one hand, the grain-structure of a piezoceramic specimen will be modelled via the direct incorporation of the grain-boundaries as so-called interface elements. The underlying cohesive-like constitutive law of this layer includes both degrees of freedom of the surrounding bulk material—or rather the jumps in these fields—namely displacements and the electric potential. Based on the resulting traction-separation-type relations, micro-cracking is directly accounted for on this microlevel. Moreover, the constitutive law of the interfacial layer is supplemented by additional variables that enable the formulation of fatigue under cyclic loading conditions. On the other hand, phase transformations—modelled in terms of an energy-based switching criterion—are discussed and embedded into an iterative finite element context. Symmetry relations of the

  1. A UNIFIED EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR INFRARED GALAXY COUNTS BASED ON THE OBSERVED PHYSICAL EVOLUTION OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Béthermin, Matthieu; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.; Elbaz, David; Mullaney, James; Pannella, Maurilio; Magdis, Georgios; Hezaveh, Yashar; Le Borgne, Damien; Buat, Véronique; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Lagache, Guilaine; Scott, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    We reproduce the mid-infrared to radio galaxy counts with a new empirical model based on our current understanding of the evolution of main-sequence (MS) and starburst (SB) galaxies. We rely on a simple spectral energy distribution (SED) library based on Herschel observations: a single SED for the MS and another one for SB, getting warmer with redshift. Our model is able to reproduce recent measurements of galaxy counts performed with Herschel, including counts per redshift slice. This agreement demonstrates the power of our 2-Star-Formation Modes (2SFM) decomposition in describing the statistical properties of infrared sources and their evolution with cosmic time. We discuss the relative contribution of MS and SB galaxies to the number counts at various wavelengths and flux densities. We also show that MS galaxies are responsible for a bump in the 1.4 GHz radio counts around 50 μJy. Material of the model (predictions, SED library, mock catalogs, etc.) is available online.

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF LEARNING INSTRUMENTS PROBLEM BASED LEARNING MODEL TO IMPROVE PHYSICS LEARNING OUTCOMES IN STATIC FLUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pretti T. M. Ambarita

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research were to produce a lesson plans and worksheets learning instrument design that corresponded to problem based learning models and analyze whether it was can improve student learning outcomes. This research development was done in classroom by using development research methods of Analysis Design Development Implementation and Evaluation (ADDIE. ADDIE method was used as a method for designing a lesson plans and worksheets that corresponded to it. Three stages of development of lesson plans and worksheets such as an assessment by a team of experts, small group, and a field test. Assessment by a team of experts based on theree aspects such as format, content, and language. In small group and field test based on a response of students sheet. The student response sheet contains of teacher's ability to teach. Worksheet assessment based on aspects of the format, content, and language. Assessment of student learning outcomes based on pretest and posttest were analyzed by ngain. The results of development of lesson plans and worksheets were validated by a team of experts on aspects of format, content, and language. The result both of development of lesson plans and worksheets in small group and field test produced good categories. There was an increased student learning outcomes of  first to third meeting with categories of low to moderate.

  3. A Physically-Based and Distributed Tool for Modeling the Hydrological and Mechanical Processes of Shallow Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.; Dialynas, Y. G.; Caracciolo, D.; Bras, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the capabilities of a model, i.e. the tRIBS-VEGGIE-Landslide, in two different versions, i.e. developed within a probabilistic framework and coupled with a root cohesion module. The probabilistic model treats geotechnical and soil retention curve parameters as random variables across the basin and estimates theoretical probability distributions of slope stability and the associated "factor of safety" commonly used to describe the occurrence of shallow landslides. The derived distributions are used to obtain the spatio-temporal dynamics of probability of failure, conditioned on soil moisture dynamics at each watershed location. The framework has been tested in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (Puerto Rico) where shallow landslides are common. In particular, the methodology was used to evaluate how the spatial and temporal patterns of precipitation, whose variability is significant over the basin, affect the distribution of probability of failure. Another version of the model accounts for the additional cohesion exerted by vegetation roots. The approach is to use the Fiber Bundle Model (FBM) framework that allows for the evaluation of the root strength as a function of the stress-strain relationships of bundles of fibers. The model requires the knowledge of the root architecture to evaluate the additional reinforcement from each root diameter class. The root architecture is represented with a branching topology model based on Leonardo's rule. The methodology has been tested on a simple case study to explore the role of both hydrological and mechanical root effects. Results demonstrate that the effects of root water uptake can at times be more significant than the mechanical reinforcement; and that the additional resistance provided by roots depends heavily on the vegetation root structure and length.

  4. Development Instrument’s Learning of Physics Through Scientific Inquiry Model Based Batak Culture to Improve Science Process Skill and Student’s Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, Derlina; Syahreni Harahap, Putri; Harahap, Marabangun

    2018-03-01

    This research aims to: (1) developed a instrument’s learning (lesson plan, worksheet, student’s book, teacher’s guide book, and instrument test) of physics learning through scientific inquiry learning model based Batak culture to achieve skills improvement process of science students and the students’ curiosity; (2) describe the quality of the result of develop instrument’s learning in high school using scientific inquiry learning model based Batak culture (lesson plan, worksheet, student’s book, teacher’s guide book, and instrument test) to achieve the science process skill improvement of students and the student curiosity. This research is research development. This research developed a instrument’s learning of physics by using a development model that is adapted from the development model Thiagarajan, Semmel, and Semmel. The stages are traversed until retrieved a valid physics instrument’s learning, practical, and effective includes :(1) definition phase, (2) the planning phase, and (3) stages of development. Test performed include expert test/validation testing experts, small groups, and test classes is limited. Test classes are limited to do in SMAN 1 Padang Bolak alternating on a class X MIA. This research resulted in: 1) the learning of physics static fluid material specially for high school grade 10th consisted of (lesson plan, worksheet, student’s book, teacher’s guide book, and instrument test) and quality worthy of use in the learning process; 2) each component of the instrument’s learning meet the criteria have valid learning, practical, and effective way to reach the science process skill improvement and curiosity in students.

  5. Physical-Mechanisms Based Reliability Analysis For Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0095 PHYSICAL -MECHANISMS BASED RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES Ron Schrimpf VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY 110 21ST...SUBTITLE PHYSICAL -MECHANISMS BASED RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-11-1-0307 5c.  PROGRAM...which reliability models can be built. Thus, it is important to develop more predictive reliability models for advanced technologies, based on physical

  6. Assimilation of a knowledge base and physical models to reduce errors in passive-microwave classifications of sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.

    1992-01-01

    An expert system framework has been developed to classify sea ice types using satellite passive microwave data, an operational classification algorithm, spatial and temporal information, ice types estimated from a dynamic-thermodynamic model, output from a neural network that detects the onset of melt, and knowledge about season and region. The rule base imposes boundary conditions upon the ice classification, modifies parameters in the ice algorithm, determines a `confidence' measure for the classified data, and under certain conditions, replaces the algorithm output with model output. Results demonstrate the potential power of such a system for minimizing overall error in the classification and for providing non-expert data users with a means of assessing the usefulness of the classification results for their applications.

  7. Component- and system-level degradation modeling of digital Instrumentation and Control systems based on a Multi-State Physics Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Di Maio, Francesco; Zio, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Multi-State Physics Modeling (MSPM) framework for reliability assessment is proposed. • Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is utilized to estimate the degradation state probability. • Due account is given to stochastic uncertainty and deterministic degradation progression. • The MSPM framework is applied to the reliability assessment of a digital I&C system. • Results are compared with the results obtained with a Markov Chain Model (MCM). - Abstract: A system-level degradation modeling is proposed for the reliability assessment of digital Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). At the component level, we focus on the reliability assessment of a Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD), which is an important digital I&C component used to guarantee the safe operation of NPPs. A Multi-State Physics Model (MSPM) is built to describe this component degradation progression towards failure and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to estimate the probability of sojourn in any of the previously defined degradation states, by accounting for both stochastic and deterministic processes that affect the degradation progression. The MC simulation relies on an integrated modeling of stochastic processes with deterministic aging of components that results to be fundamental for estimating the joint cumulative probability distribution of finding the component in any of the possible degradation states. The results of the application of the proposed degradation model to a digital I&C system of literature are compared with the results obtained by a Markov Chain Model (MCM). The integrated stochastic-deterministic process here proposed to drive the MC simulation is viable to integrate component-level models into a system-level model that would consider inter-system or/and inter-component dependencies and uncertainties.

  8. Excellence in Physics Education Award: Modeling Theory for Physics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestenes, David

    2014-03-01

    All humans create mental models to plan and guide their interactions with the physical world. Science has greatly refined and extended this ability by creating and validating formal scientific models of physical things and processes. Research in physics education has found that mental models created from everyday experience are largely incompatible with scientific models. This suggests that the fundamental problem in learning and understanding science is coordinating mental models with scientific models. Modeling Theory has drawn on resources of cognitive science to work out extensive implications of this suggestion and guide development of an approach to science pedagogy and curriculum design called Modeling Instruction. Modeling Instruction has been widely applied to high school physics and, more recently, to chemistry and biology, with noteworthy results.

  9. Student Teachers' Modeling of Acceleration Using a Video-Based Laboratory in Physics Education: A Multimodal Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Trudel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study intends to model kinematics learning of a pair of student teachers when exposed to prescribed teaching strategies in a video-based laboratory. Two student teachers were chosen from the Francophone B.Ed. program of the Faculty of Education of a Canadian university. The study method consisted of having the participants interact with a video-based laboratory to complete two activities for learning properties of acceleration in rectilinear motion. Time limits were placed on the learning activities during which the researcher collected detailed multimodal information from the student teachers' answers to questions, the graphs they produced from experimental data, and the videos taken during the learning sessions. As a result, we describe the learning approach each one followed, the evidence of conceptual change and the difficulties they face in tackling various aspects of the accelerated motion. We then specify advantages and limits of our research and propose recommendations for further study.

  10. The Physical Clogging of the Landfill Leachate Collection System in China: Based on Filtration Test and Numerical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clogging of the leachate collection system (LCS has been a common operation problem in municipal solid waste (MSW landfills in China, which can result in high water levels that threaten the safety of landfill operations. To determine the cause of failure in an LCS, raw leachate from a municipal solid waste transfer station was collected and the high content of particulate matter was characterized. Based on the parameters obtained in a filtration test, a numerical simulation was performed to estimate the influence of particle deposition on drainage system clogging. The results showed that LCSs were confronted with the risk of clogging due to the deposition of particulate matter resulting from the higher concentration of total suspended solids (TSS level > 2200 mg L−1 and larger particle size (>30% TSS particles > 15 μm in the leachate. On one hand, the non-woven geotextile, as the upper layer of the LCS, retained most particulate matter of large diameters, reducing its hydraulic conductivity to approximately 10−8 to 10−9 m s−1 after 1–2 years of operation and perching significant leachate above it (0.6–0.7 m. On the other hand, the geotextile prevented the gravel layer from physically clogging and minimized the leachate head above the bottom liner. Therefore, the role of geotextile should be balanced to optimize the LCS in MSW landfills in China.

  11. Use of satellite-derived data for characterization of snow cover and simulation of snowmelt runoff through a distributed physically based model of runoff generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Kuchment

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A technique of using satellite-derived data for constructing continuous snow characteristics fields for distributed snowmelt runoff simulation is presented. The satellite-derived data and the available ground-based meteorological measurements are incorporated in a physically based snowpack model. The snowpack model describes temporal changes of the snow depth, density and water equivalent (SWE, accounting for snow melt, sublimation, refreezing melt water and snow metamorphism processes with a special focus on forest cover effects. The remote sensing data used in the model consist of products include the daily maps of snow covered area (SCA and SWE derived from observations of MODIS and AMSR-E instruments onboard Terra and Aqua satellites as well as available maps of land surface temperature, surface albedo, land cover classes and tree cover fraction. The model was first calibrated against available ground-based snow measurements and then applied to calculate the spatial distribution of snow characteristics using satellite data and interpolated ground-based meteorological data. The satellite-derived SWE data were used for assigning initial conditions and the SCA data were used for control of snow cover simulation. The simulated spatial distributions of snow characteristics were incorporated in a distributed physically based model of runoff generation to calculate snowmelt runoff hydrographs. The presented technique was applied to a study area of approximately 200 000 km2 including the Vyatka River basin with catchment area of 124 000 km2. The correspondence of simulated and observed hydrographs in the Vyatka River are considered as an indicator of the accuracy of constructed fields of snow characteristics and as a measure of effectiveness of utilizing satellite-derived SWE data for runoff simulation.

  12. Models and structures: mathematical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers research activities along 5 main directions. 1) Quantum chaos and dynamical systems. Recent results concern the extension of the exact WKB method that has led to a host of new results on the spectrum and wave functions. Progress have also been made in the description of the wave functions of chaotic quantum systems. Renormalization has been applied to the analysis of dynamical systems. 2) Combinatorial statistical physics. We see the emergence of new techniques applied to various such combinatorial problems, from random walks to random lattices. 3) Integrability: from structures to applications. Techniques of conformal field theory and integrable model systems have been developed. Progress is still made in particular for open systems with boundary conditions, in connection to strings and branes physics. Noticeable links between integrability and exact WKB quantization to 2-dimensional disordered systems have been highlighted. New correlations of eigenvalues and better connections to integrability have been formulated for random matrices. 4) Gravities and string theories. We have developed aspects of 2-dimensional string theory with a particular emphasis on its connection to matrix models as well as non-perturbative properties of M-theory. We have also followed an alternative path known as loop quantum gravity. 5) Quantum field theory. The results obtained lately concern its foundations, in flat or curved spaces, but also applications to second-order phase transitions in statistical systems

  13. Models and structures: mathematical physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers research activities along 5 main directions. 1) Quantum chaos and dynamical systems. Recent results concern the extension of the exact WKB method that has led to a host of new results on the spectrum and wave functions. Progress have also been made in the description of the wave functions of chaotic quantum systems. Renormalization has been applied to the analysis of dynamical systems. 2) Combinatorial statistical physics. We see the emergence of new techniques applied to various such combinatorial problems, from random walks to random lattices. 3) Integrability: from structures to applications. Techniques of conformal field theory and integrable model systems have been developed. Progress is still made in particular for open systems with boundary conditions, in connection to strings and branes physics. Noticeable links between integrability and exact WKB quantization to 2-dimensional disordered systems have been highlighted. New correlations of eigenvalues and better connections to integrability have been formulated for random matrices. 4) Gravities and string theories. We have developed aspects of 2-dimensional string theory with a particular emphasis on its connection to matrix models as well as non-perturbative properties of M-theory. We have also followed an alternative path known as loop quantum gravity. 5) Quantum field theory. The results obtained lately concern its foundations, in flat or curved spaces, but also applications to second-order phase transitions in statistical systems.

  14. The Development of Cooperative Learning Model Based on Local Wisdom of Bali for Physical Education, Sport and Health Subject in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, I. K.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a cooperative learning model based on local wisdom (PKBKL) of Bali (Tri Pramana’s concept), for physical education, sport, and health learning in VII grade of Junior High School in Singaraja-Buleleng Bali. This research is the development research of the development design chosen refers to the development proposed by Dick and Carey. The development of model and learning devices was conducted through four stages, namely: (1) identification and needs analysis stage (2) the development of design and draft of PKBKL and RPP models, (3) testing stage (expert review, try out, and implementation). Small group try out was conducted on VII-3 grade of Undiksha Laboratory Junior High School in the academic year 2013/2014, large group try out was conducted on VIIb of Santo Paulus Junior High School Singaraja in the academic year 2014/2015, and the implementation of the model was conducted on three (3) schools namely SMPN 2 Singaraja, SMPN 3 Singaraja, and Undiksha laboratory Junior High School in the academic year 2014/2015. Data were collected using documentation, testing, non-testing, questionnaire, and observation. The data were analyzed descriptively. The findings of this research indicate that: (1) PKBKL model has met the criteria of the operation of a learning model namely: syntax, social system, principles of reaction, support system, as well as instructional and nurturing effects, (2) PKBKL model is a valid, practical, and effective model, (3) the practicality of the learning devices (RPP), is at the high category. Based on the research results, there are two things recommended: (1) in order that learning stages (syntax) of PKBKL model can be performed well, then teachers need to have an understanding of the cooperative learning model of Student Team Achievement Division (STAD) type and the concepts of scientifically approach well, (2) PKBKL model can be performed well on physical education, sport and health learning, if the

  15. A physics-based fractional order model and state of energy estimation for lithium ion batteries. Part I: Model development and observability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Fan, Guodong; Pan, Ke; Wei, Guo; Zhu, Chunbo; Rizzoni, Giorgio; Canova, Marcello

    2017-11-01

    The design of a lumped parameter battery model preserving physical meaning is especially desired by the automotive researchers and engineers due to the strong demand for battery system control, estimation, diagnosis and prognostics. In light of this, a novel simplified fractional order electrochemical model is developed for electric vehicle (EV) applications in this paper. In the model, a general fractional order transfer function is designed for the solid phase lithium ion diffusion approximation. The dynamic characteristics of the electrolyte concentration overpotential are approximated by a first-order resistance-capacitor transfer function in the electrolyte phase. The Ohmic resistances and electrochemical reaction kinetics resistance are simplified to a lumped Ohmic resistance parameter. Overall, the number of model parameters is reduced from 30 to 9, yet the accuracy of the model is still guaranteed. In order to address the dynamics of phase-change phenomenon in the active particle during charging and discharging, variable solid-state diffusivity is taken into consideration in the model. Also, the observability of the model is analyzed on two types of lithium ion batteries subsequently. Results show the fractional order model with variable solid-state diffusivity agrees very well with experimental data at various current input conditions and is suitable for electric vehicle applications.

  16. Physical Model Method for Seismic Study of Concrete Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Roşca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamic behaviour of concrete dams by means of the physical model method is very useful to understand the failure mechanism of these structures to action of the strong earthquakes. Physical model method consists in two main processes. Firstly, a study model must be designed by a physical modeling process using the dynamic modeling theory. The result is a equations system of dimensioning the physical model. After the construction and instrumentation of the scale physical model a structural analysis based on experimental means is performed. The experimental results are gathered and are available to be analysed. Depending on the aim of the research may be designed an elastic or a failure physical model. The requirements for the elastic model construction are easier to accomplish in contrast with those required for a failure model, but the obtained results provide narrow information. In order to study the behaviour of concrete dams to strong seismic action is required the employment of failure physical models able to simulate accurately the possible opening of joint, sliding between concrete blocks and the cracking of concrete. The design relations for both elastic and failure physical models are based on dimensional analysis and consist of similitude relations among the physical quantities involved in the phenomenon. The using of physical models of great or medium dimensions as well as its instrumentation creates great advantages, but this operation involves a large amount of financial, logistic and time resources.

  17. Life Cycle Assessment of Vehicle Lightweighting: A Physics-Based Model To Estimate Use-Phase Fuel Consumption of Electrified Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Chul; Wallington, Timothy J

    2016-10-18

    Assessing the life-cycle benefits of vehicle lightweighting requires a quantitative description of mass-induced fuel consumption (MIF) and fuel reduction values (FRVs). We have extended our physics-based model of MIF and FRVs for internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs) to electrified vehicles (EVs) including hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles (BEVs). We illustrate the utility of the model by calculating MIFs and FRVs for 37 EVs and 13 ICEVs. BEVs have much smaller MIF and FRVs, both in the range 0.04-0.07 L e /(100 km 100 kg), than those for ICEVs which are in the ranges 0.19-0.32 and 0.16-0.22 L/(100 km 100 kg), respectively. The MIF and FRVs for HEVs and PHEVs mostly lie between those for ICEVs and BEVs. Powertrain resizing increases the FRVs for ICEVs, HEVs and PHEVs. Lightweighting EVs is less effective in reducing greenhouse gas emissions than lightweighting ICEVs, however the benefits differ substantially for different vehicle models. The physics-based approach outlined here enables model specific assessments for ICEVs, HEVs, PHEVs, and BEVs required to determine the optimal strategy for maximizing the life-cycle benefits of lightweighting the light-duty vehicle fleet.

  18. Bayesian inversion of data from effusive volcanic eruptions using physics-based models: Application to Mount St. Helens 2004--2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kyle; Segall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Physics-based models of volcanic eruptions can directly link magmatic processes with diverse, time-varying geophysical observations, and when used in an inverse procedure make it possible to bring all available information to bear on estimating properties of the volcanic system. We develop a technique for inverting geodetic, extrusive flux, and other types of data using a physics-based model of an effusive silicic volcanic eruption to estimate the geometry, pressure, depth, and volatile content of a magma chamber, and properties of the conduit linking the chamber to the surface. A Bayesian inverse formulation makes it possible to easily incorporate independent information into the inversion, such as petrologic estimates of melt water content, and yields probabilistic estimates for model parameters and other properties of the volcano. Probability distributions are sampled using a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We apply the technique using GPS and extrusion data from the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens. In contrast to more traditional inversions such as those involving geodetic data alone in combination with kinematic forward models, this technique is able to provide constraint on properties of the magma, including its volatile content, and on the absolute volume and pressure of the magma chamber. Results suggest a large chamber of >40 km3 with a centroid depth of 11–18 km and a dissolved water content at the top of the chamber of 2.6–4.9 wt%.

  19. Two modelling approaches to water-quality simulation in a flooded iron-ore mine (Saizerais, Lorraine, France): a semi-distributed chemical reactor model and a physically based distributed reactive transport pipe network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, V; Collon-Drouaillet, P; Fabriol, R

    2008-02-19

    The flooding of abandoned mines in the Lorraine Iron Basin (LIB) over the past 25 years has degraded the quality of the groundwater tapped for drinking water. High concentrations of dissolved sulphate have made the water unsuitable for human consumption. This problematic issue has led to the development of numerical tools to support water-resource management in mining contexts. Here we examine two modelling approaches using different numerical tools that we tested on the Saizerais flooded iron-ore mine (Lorraine, France). A first approach considers the Saizerais Mine as a network of two chemical reactors (NCR). The second approach is based on a physically distributed pipe network model (PNM) built with EPANET 2 software. This approach considers the mine as a network of pipes defined by their geometric and chemical parameters. Each reactor in the NCR model includes a detailed chemical model built to simulate quality evolution in the flooded mine water. However, in order to obtain a robust PNM, we simplified the detailed chemical model into a specific sulphate dissolution-precipitation model that is included as sulphate source/sink in both a NCR model and a pipe network model. Both the NCR model and the PNM, based on different numerical techniques, give good post-calibration agreement between the simulated and measured sulphate concentrations in the drinking-water well and overflow drift. The NCR model incorporating the detailed chemical model is useful when a detailed chemical behaviour at the overflow is needed. The PNM incorporating the simplified sulphate dissolution-precipitation model provides better information of the physics controlling the effect of flow and low flow zones, and the time of solid sulphate removal whereas the NCR model will underestimate clean-up time due to the complete mixing assumption. In conclusion, the detailed NCR model will give a first assessment of chemical processes at overflow, and in a second time, the PNM model will provide more

  20. Protein Folding: Search for Basic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Y. Torshin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available How a unique three-dimensional structure is rapidly formed from the linear sequence of a polypeptide is one of the important questions in contemporary science. Apart from biological context of in vivo protein folding (which has been studied only for a few proteins, the roles of the fundamental physical forces in the in vitro folding remain largely unstudied. Despite a degree of success in using descriptions based on statistical and/or thermodynamic approaches, few of the current models explicitly include more basic physical forces (such as electrostatics and Van Der Waals forces. Moreover, the present-day models rarely take into account that the protein folding is, essentially, a rapid process that produces a highly specific architecture. This review considers several physical models that may provide more direct links between sequence and tertiary structure in terms of the physical forces. In particular, elaboration of such simple models is likely to produce extremely effective computational techniques with value for modern genomics.

  1. The Effectiveness Of Physics Based Research In Learning Engineering Physics

    OpenAIRE

    -, Usmeldi

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to know the effect of implementation the research based learning to master properly physics concepts and students' generic ability. This research used experiment method with pretest-posttest group control design. The results of this research were the research based learning was effective to improving students' mastery of physics concepts and it was also developing the students' generic ability. The recommendation suggested to lecturer of engineering physics is implementing ...

  2. Correlating electroluminescence characterization and physics-based models of InGaN/GaN LEDs: Pitfalls and open issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Calciati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electroluminescence (EL characterization of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs, coupled with numerical device models of different sophistication, is routinely adopted not only to establish correlations between device efficiency and structural features, but also to make inferences about the loss mechanisms responsible for LED efficiency droop at high driving currents. The limits of this investigative approach are discussed here in a case study based on a comprehensive set of current- and temperature-dependent EL data from blue LEDs with low and high densities of threading dislocations (TDs. First, the effects limiting the applicability of simpler (closed-form and/or one-dimensional classes of models are addressed, like lateral current crowding, vertical carrier distribution nonuniformity, and interband transition broadening. Then, the major sources of uncertainty affecting state-of-the-art numerical device simulation are reviewed and discussed, including (i the approximations in the transport description through the multi-quantum-well active region, (ii the alternative valence band parametrizations proposed to calculate the spontaneous emission rate, (iii the difficulties in defining the Auger coefficients due to inadequacies in the microscopic quantum well description and the possible presence of extra, non-Auger high-current-density recombination mechanisms and/or Auger-induced leakage. In the case of the present LED structures, the application of three-dimensional numerical-simulation-based analysis to the EL data leads to an explanation of efficiency droop in terms of TD-related and Auger-like nonradiative losses, with a C coefficient in the 10−30 cm6/s range at room temperature, close to the larger theoretical calculations reported so far. However, a study of the combined effects of structural and model uncertainties suggests that the C values thus determined could be overestimated by about an order of magnitude. This preliminary

  3. Correlating electroluminescence characterization and physics-based models of InGaN/GaN LEDs: Pitfalls and open issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calciati, Marco; Vallone, Marco; Zhou, Xiangyu; Ghione, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Goano, Michele, E-mail: michele.goano@polito.it; Bertazzi, Francesco [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); IEIIT-CNR, Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Università di Padova, Via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, 02215 Boston, MA (United States); Verzellesi, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Electroluminescence (EL) characterization of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), coupled with numerical device models of different sophistication, is routinely adopted not only to establish correlations between device efficiency and structural features, but also to make inferences about the loss mechanisms responsible for LED efficiency droop at high driving currents. The limits of this investigative approach are discussed here in a case study based on a comprehensive set of current- and temperature-dependent EL data from blue LEDs with low and high densities of threading dislocations (TDs). First, the effects limiting the applicability of simpler (closed-form and/or one-dimensional) classes of models are addressed, like lateral current crowding, vertical carrier distribution nonuniformity, and interband transition broadening. Then, the major sources of uncertainty affecting state-of-the-art numerical device simulation are reviewed and discussed, including (i) the approximations in the transport description through the multi-quantum-well active region, (ii) the alternative valence band parametrizations proposed to calculate the spontaneous emission rate, (iii) the difficulties in defining the Auger coefficients due to inadequacies in the microscopic quantum well description and the possible presence of extra, non-Auger high-current-density recombination mechanisms and/or Auger-induced leakage. In the case of the present LED structures, the application of three-dimensional numerical-simulation-based analysis to the EL data leads to an explanation of efficiency droop in terms of TD-related and Auger-like nonradiative losses, with a C coefficient in the 10{sup −30} cm{sup 6}/s range at room temperature, close to the larger theoretical calculations reported so far. However, a study of the combined effects of structural and model uncertainties suggests that the C values thus determined could be overestimated by about an order of magnitude. This preliminary

  4. An integrated approach coupling physically based models and probabilistic method to assess quantitatively landslide susceptibility at different scale: application to different geomorphological environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandromme, Rosalie; Thiéry, Yannick; Sedan, Olivier; Bernardie, Séverine

    2016-04-01

    Landslide hazard assessment is the estimation of a target area where landslides of a particular type, volume, runout and intensity may occur within a given period. The first step to analyze landslide hazard consists in assessing the spatial and temporal failure probability (when the information is available, i.e. susceptibility assessment). Two types of approach are generally recommended to achieve this goal: (i) qualitative approach (i.e. inventory based methods and knowledge data driven methods) and (ii) quantitative approach (i.e. data-driven methods or deterministic physically based methods). Among quantitative approaches, deterministic physically based methods (PBM) are generally used at local and/or site-specific scales (1:5,000-1:25,000 and >1:5,000, respectively). The main advantage of these methods is the calculation of probability of failure (safety factor) following some specific environmental conditions. For some models it is possible to integrate the land-uses and climatic change. At the opposite, major drawbacks are the large amounts of reliable and detailed data (especially materials type, their thickness and the geotechnical parameters heterogeneity over a large area) and the fact that only shallow landslides are taking into account. This is why they are often used at site-specific scales (> 1:5,000). Thus, to take into account (i) materials' heterogeneity , (ii) spatial variation of physical parameters, (iii) different landslide types, the French Geological Survey (i.e. BRGM) has developed a physically based model (PBM) implemented in a GIS environment. This PBM couples a global hydrological model (GARDENIA®) including a transient unsaturated/saturated hydrological component with a physically based model computing the stability of slopes (ALICE®, Assessment of Landslides Induced by Climatic Events) based on the Morgenstern-Price method for any slip surface. The variability of mechanical parameters is handled by Monte Carlo approach. The

  5. Semi-physical Simulation of the Airborne InSAR based on Rigorous Geometric Model and Real Navigation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changyong, Dou; Huadong, Guo; Chunming, Han; yuquan, Liu; Xijuan, Yue; Yinghui, Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Raw signal simulation is a useful tool for the system design, mission planning, processing algorithm testing, and inversion algorithm design of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Due to the wide and high frequent variation of aircraft's trajectory and attitude, and the low accuracy of the Position and Orientation System (POS)'s recording data, it's difficult to quantitatively study the sensitivity of the key parameters, i.e., the baseline length and inclination, absolute phase and the orientation of the antennas etc., of the airborne Interferometric SAR (InSAR) system, resulting in challenges for its applications. Furthermore, the imprecise estimation of the installation offset between the Global Positioning System (GPS), Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and the InSAR antennas compounds the issue. An airborne interferometric SAR (InSAR) simulation based on the rigorous geometric model and real navigation data is proposed in this paper, providing a way for quantitatively studying the key parameters and for evaluating the effect from the parameters on the applications of airborne InSAR, as photogrammetric mapping, high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generation, and surface deformation by Differential InSAR technology, etc. The simulation can also provide reference for the optimal design of the InSAR system and the improvement of InSAR data processing technologies such as motion compensation, imaging, image co-registration, and application parameter retrieval, etc.

  6. Semi-physical Simulation of the Airborne InSAR based on Rigorous Geometric Model and Real Navigation Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changyong, Dou; Huadong, Guo; Chunming, Han; Yuquan, Liu; Xijuan, Yue; Yinghui, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Raw signal simulation is a useful tool for the system design, mission planning, processing algorithm testing, and inversion algorithm design of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Due to the wide and high frequent variation of aircraft's trajectory and attitude, and the low accuracy of the Position and Orientation System (POS)'s recording data, it's difficult to quantitatively study the sensitivity of the key parameters, i.e., the baseline length and inclination, absolute phase and the orientation of the antennas etc., of the airborne Interferometric SAR (InSAR) system, resulting in challenges for its applications. Furthermore, the imprecise estimation of the installation offset between the Global Positioning System (GPS), Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and the InSAR antennas compounds the issue. An airborne interferometric SAR (InSAR) simulation based on the rigorous geometric model and real navigation data is proposed in this paper, providing a way for quantitatively studying the key parameters and for evaluating the effect from the parameters on the applications of airborne InSAR, as photogrammetric mapping, high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generation, and surface deformation by Differential InSAR technology, etc. The simulation can also provide reference for the optimal design of the InSAR system and the improvement of InSAR data processing technologies such as motion compensation, imaging, image co-registration, and application parameter retrieval, etc

  7. Assessment of 21st century drought conditions at Shasta Dam based on dynamically projected water supply conditions by a regional climate model coupled with a physically-based hydrology model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, T; Ishida, K; Kavvas, M L; Ercan, A; Carr, K

    2017-05-15

    Along with socioeconomic developments, and population increase, natural disasters around the world have recently increased the awareness of harmful impacts they cause. Among natural disasters, drought is of great interest to scientists due to the extraordinary diversity of their severity and duration. Motivated by the development of a potential approach to investigate future possible droughts in a probabilistic framework based on climate change projections, a methodology to consider thirteen future climate projections based on four emission scenarios to characterize droughts is presented. The proposed approach uses a regional climate model coupled with a physically-based hydrology model (Watershed Environmental Hydrology Hydro-Climate Model; WEHY-HCM) to generate thirteen equally likely future water supply projections. The water supply projections were compared to the current water demand for the detection of drought events and estimation of drought properties. The procedure was applied to Shasta Dam watershed to analyze drought conditions at the watershed outlet, Shasta Dam. The results suggest an increasing water scarcity at Shasta Dam with more severe and longer future drought events in some future scenarios. An important advantage of the proposed approach to the probabilistic analysis of future droughts is that it provides the drought properties of the 100-year and 200-year return periods without resorting to any extrapolation of the frequency curve. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modelling and simulation of a solar cooler based on physical adsorption; Modelagem e simulacao de um refrigerador solar por adsorcao fisica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Gerson

    1993-12-31

    This study describes the construction of a simple mathematical model its validation through the simulation in transient state of a real cycle performed by a solar refrigerator based on physical adsorption using an activated carbon/methanol pair. The deviation from experimental results was 4% for the cycled mass of methanol, 2.2 % for maximum collector average temperature, and 3 x 10{sup -3} for the theoretical cycle coefficient of performance. Additional simulations of the same cycle inputting values representing different types and larger amounts of activated carbon showed the possibility of increasing the cycled methanol mass up to about 150%. (author) 26 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Physics-Based Compact Model for CIGS and CdTe Solar Cells: From Voltage-Dependent Carrier Collection to Light-Enhanced Reverse Breakdown: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Raguse, John; Garris, Rebekah; Deline, Chris; Silverman, Timothy

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a physics-based compact model for copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) heterojunction solar cells that attributes the failure of superposition to voltage-dependent carrier collection in the absorber layer, and interprets light-enhanced reverse breakdown as a consequence of tunneling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction. The temperature dependence of the model is validated against both simulation and experimental data for the entire range of bias conditions. The model can be used to characterize device parameters, optimize new designs, and most importantly, predict performance and reliability of solar panels including the effects of self-heating and reverse breakdown due to partial-shading degradation.

  10. Physical Properties of the SKYLAB North Polar Coronal Hole with an Extended Base and its MHD Self-Consistent Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, S.; Ocania, G.

    1991-04-01

    RESUMEN Con base en las observaciones del Skylab del Sol en rayos X que permitieron r la forma de la frontera del hoyo coronal del polo norte y en las observaciones de l 'z que permitieron derivar un perfil de densidad para el flujo de viento solar (IC ese hoyo, Murno yjackson (1977) concluyeron que se requiere una adici6n t l clc energfa al flujo hasta al menos 5 R8. En este trabajo, recalculamos los perfiles de y de temperatura para el mismo hoyo pero considerando una frontera Cs mas ancha en la base, de acuerdo con las observaciones del coron6metro-K del IIAO, los espectroheliogramas en EUV del OSO-7 y las fotografias de la corona solar cerca de los 4 E)()O A. Se tomaron tambien las incertidumbres en el perfil de densidad electr6nica inl & a las observaciones de luz blanca y se consideraron diversos valores posibles dCl fl 'jo (lC masa 1 UA. Encontramos que las diferencias introducidas no son suficientes par clcsc' la necesidad de una energetizaci6n extensa del viento solar, pero una dC las s posibles muestra una concordancia muy buena con el modelado MHD (l( l flujo con el unico t6rmino adicional de la fuerza de Lorentz en la ecuaci6n de # (). ABSTRACT Based on the near to the Sun boundary of the Skylab north polar coroi ' l estimated from the AS & E X-ray photographs and on the density profile fi-C)I white light data, Munro and Jackson (1977) concluded that substantial energy the solar wind flux is required up to at least 5 Rs. In this paper we recalculate `eloci y and temperature profiles for the same hole but considering a different bo ' ry for flux tube which is larger at its base, according to the HAO K- obser"' (i()I0 , the OSO-7 EUV spectroheliograms and pictures of the solar 4500 A. è take into account the uncertainties inherent in the white light observations () electron density profile and consider different possible values of the solar I .' fltix at 1 AU. We that the differences introduced are not sufficient to discard ii y of an extended

  11. Information footprint of different ecohydrological data sources: using multi-objective calibration of a physically-based model as hypothesis testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppel, S.; Soulsby, C.; Maneta, M. P.; Tetzlaff, D.

    2017-12-01

    The utility of field measurements to help constrain the model solution space and identify feasible model configurations has been an increasingly central issue in hydrological model calibration. Sufficiently informative observations are necessary to ensure that the goodness of model-data fit attained effectively translates into more physically-sound information for the internal model parameters, as a basis for model structure evaluation. Here we assess to which extent the diversity of information content can inform on the suitability of a complex, process-based ecohydrological model to simulate key water flux and storage dynamics at a long-term research catchment in the Scottish Highlands. We use the fully-distributed ecohydrological model EcH2O, calibrated against long-term datasets that encompass hydrologic and energy exchanges and ecological measurements: stream discharge, soil moisture, net radiation above canopy, and pine stand transpiration. Diverse combinations of these constraints were applied using a multi-objective cost function specifically designed to avoid compensatory effects between model-data metrics. Results revealed that calibration against virtually all datasets enabled the model to reproduce streamflow reasonably well. However, parameterizing the model to adequately capture local flux and storage dynamics, such as soil moisture or transpiration, required calibration with specific observations. This indicates that the footprint of the information contained in observations varies for each type of dataset, and that a diverse database informing about the different compartments of the domain, is critical to test hypotheses of catchment function and identify a consistent model parameterization. The results foster confidence in using EcH2O to help understanding current and future ecohydrological couplings in Northern catchments.

  12. System-level feature-based modeling of cyber-physical systems : A theoretical framework and methodological fundamentals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourtalebi Hendehkhaleh, S.

    2017-01-01

    Cyber-physical systems are complex trans-disciplinary systems. Designing this kind of systems requires cooperation of several groups of experts with various backgrounds such as mechatronics and robotics, software engineering, data management, knowledge engineering, system on a chip, embedded

  13. Combining users' needs with health behavior models in designing an internet- and mobile-based intervention for physical activity in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypas, Konstantinos; Wangberg, Silje C

    2014-01-10

    Internet-based physical activity interventions have great potential in supporting patients in cardiac rehabilitation. Health behavior change theories and user input are identified as important contributors in the effectiveness of the interventions, but they are rarely combined in a systematic way in the design of the interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the appropriate theoretical framework, along with the needs of the users of a physical activity intervention for cardiac rehabilitation, and to combine them into an effective Internet- and mobile-based intervention. We explain the theoretical framework of the intervention in a narrative overview of the existing health behavior change literature as it applies to physical activity. We also conducted a focus group with 11 participants of a cardiac rehabilitation program and used thematic analysis to identify and analyze patterns of meaning in the transcribed data. We chose stage-based approaches, specifically the transtheoretical model and the health action process approach as our main framework for tailoring, supplemented with other theoretical concepts such as regulatory focus within the appropriate stages. From the thematic analysis of the focus group data, we identified seven themes: (1) social, (2) motivation, (3) integration into everyday life, (4) information, (5) planning, (6) monitoring and feedback, and (7) concerns and potential problems. The final design of the intervention was based on both the theoretical review and the user input, and it is explained in detail. We applied a combination of health behavioral theory and user input in designing our intervention. We think this is a promising design approach with the potential to combine the high efficacy of theory-based interventions with the higher perceived usefulness of interventions designed according to user input. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01223170; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01223170 (Archived by WebCite at http

  14. Physics modeling support contract: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-30

    This document is the final report for the Physics Modeling Support contract between TRW, Inc. and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fiscal year 1987. It consists of following projects: TIBER physics modeling and systems code development; advanced blanket modeling task; time dependent modeling; and free electron maser for TIBER II.

  15. Physics modeling support contract: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document is the final report for the Physics Modeling Support contract between TRW, Inc. and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fiscal year 1987. It consists of following projects: TIBER physics modeling and systems code development; advanced blanket modeling task; time dependent modeling; and free electron maser for TIBER II

  16. A model of scientific attitudes assessment by observation in physics learning based scientific approach: case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusliana Ekawati, Elvin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to produce a model of scientific attitude assessment in terms of the observations for physics learning based scientific approach (case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school). Development of instruments in this study adaptation of the Plomp model, the procedure includes the initial investigation, design, construction, testing, evaluation and revision. The test is done in Surakarta, so that the data obtained are analyzed using Aiken formula to determine the validity of the content of the instrument, Cronbach’s alpha to determine the reliability of the instrument, and construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis with LISREL 8.50 program. The results of this research were conceptual models, instruments and guidelines on scientific attitudes assessment by observation. The construct assessment instruments include components of curiosity, objectivity, suspended judgment, open-mindedness, honesty and perseverance. The construct validity of instruments has been qualified (rated load factor > 0.3). The reliability of the model is quite good with the Alpha value 0.899 (> 0.7). The test showed that the model fits the theoretical models are supported by empirical data, namely p-value 0.315 (≥ 0.05), RMSEA 0.027 (≤ 0.08)

  17. SU-E-T-64: CG-Based Radiation Therapy Simulator with Physical Modeling for Avoidance of Collisions Between Gantry and Couch Or Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanouchi, M; Arimura, H; Yuda, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is time-consuming and might cause re-planning to check couch-gantry and patient-gantry collisions on a radiotherapy machine when using couch rotations for non-coplanar beam angles. The aim of this study was to develop a computer-graphics (CG)-based radiation therapy simulator with physical modeling for avoidance of collisions between gantry and couch or patient on a radiotherapy machine. Methods: The radiation therapy simulator was three-dimensionally constructed including a radiotherapy machine (Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems), couch, and radiation treatment room according to their designs by using a physical-modeling-based computer graphics software (Blender, free and open-source). Each patient was modeled by applying a surface rendering technique to their planning computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 16-slice CT scanner (BrightSpeed, GE Healthcare). Immobilization devices for patients were scanned by the CT equipment, and were rendered as the patient planning CT images. The errors in the collision angle of the gantry with the couch or patient between gold standards and the estimated values were obtained by fixing the gantry angle for the evaluation of the proposed simulator. Results: The average error of estimated collision angles to the couch head side was -8.5% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and -5.5% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Moreover, the average error of estimated collision angles to the couch foot side was -1.1% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and 1.4% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Conclusion: The CG-based radiation therapy simulator could make it possible to estimate the collision angle between gantry and couch or patient on the radiotherapy machine without verifying the collision angles in the radiation treatment room

  18. Complementing data-driven and physically-based approaches for predictive morphologic modeling: Results and implication from the Red River Basin, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R. J.; Bernardi, D.; Bizzi, S.; Castelletti, A.; Soncini-Sessa, R.

    2013-12-01

    During the last 30 years, the delta of the Red River (Song Hong) in northern Vietnam experienced grave morphologic degradation processes which severely impact economic activities and endanger region-wide livelihoods. Rapidly progressing river bed incision, for example, threatens the irrigation of the delta's paddy rice crops which constitute 20% of Vietnam's annual rice production. Morphologic alteration is related to a drastically changed sediment balance due to major upstream impoundments, sediment mining and land use changes, further aggravated by changing hydro-meteorological conditions. Despite the severe impacts, river morphology was so far not included into the current efforts to optimize basin wide water resource planning for a lack of suitable, not overly resource demanding modeling strategies. This paper assesses the suitability of data-driven models to provide insights into complex hydromorphologic processes and to complement and enrich physically-based modeling strategies. Hence, to identify key drivers of morphological change while evaluating impacts of future socio-economic, management and climate scenarios on river morphology and the resulting effects on key social needs (e.g. water supply, energy production and flood mitigation). Most relevant drivers and time-scales for the considered processes (e.g. incision) - from days to decades - were identified from hydrologic and sedimentologic time-series using a feature ranking algorithm based on random trees. The feature ranking pointed out bimodal response characteristics, with important contributions of long-to-medium (5 - 15 yrs.) and rather short (10d - 6 months) timescales. An artificial neural network (ANN), built from identified variables, subsequently quantified in detail how these temporal components control long term trends, inter-seasonal fluctuations and day to day variations in morphologic processes. Whereas the general trajectory of incision relates, for example, to the overall regional

  19. Effects of an intervention based on the Transtheoretical Model on back muscle endurance, physical function and pain in rice farmers with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawat, Thanakorn; Nualnetr, Nomjit

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) can be managed by exercises which should be tailored to an individual's readiness to behavioral change. To evaluate the effects of an intervention program based on the Transtheoretical Model of behavioral change (TTM) on back muscle endurance, physical function and pain in rice farmers with chronic LBP. In a 32-week study, 126 rice farmers were allocated to the TTM (n= 62) and non-TTM (n= 64) groups. Modified Biering-Sorensen test, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire and visual analogue scale were used for evaluating back muscle endurance, physical function and severity of pain, respectively. The evaluations were performed at baseline and at weeks 8, 20 and 32 of the study. Data were analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA. The back muscle endurance was significantly greater in the TTM group than in the non-TTM group at week 32 (p= 0.025). Physical function and severity of pain were significantly improved in the TTM group when compared with the non-TTM group at weeks 20 and 32 (pfarmers with LBP. Further studies should be considered to explore the long-term effects of this intervention.

  20. A multilayer physically based snowpack model simulating direct and indirect radiative impacts of light-absorbing impurities in snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzet, Francois; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Picard, Ghislain; Arnaud, Laurent; Voisin, Didier; Lejeune, Yves; Charrois, Luc; Nabat, Pierre; Morin, Samuel

    2017-11-01

    Light-absorbing impurities (LAIs) decrease snow albedo, increasing the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. Its most intuitive and direct impact is to accelerate snowmelt. Enhanced energy absorption in snow also modifies snow metamorphism, which can indirectly drive further variations of snow albedo in the near-infrared part of the solar spectrum because of the evolution of the near-surface snow microstructure. New capabilities have been implemented in the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus (referred to as Crocus) to account for impurities' deposition and evolution within the snowpack and their direct and indirect impacts. Once deposited, the model computes impurities' mass evolution until snow melts out, accounting for scavenging by meltwater. Taking advantage of the recent inclusion of the spectral radiative transfer model TARTES (Two-stream Analytical Radiative TransfEr in Snow model) in Crocus, the model explicitly represents the radiative impacts of light-absorbing impurities in snow. The model was evaluated at the Col de Porte experimental site (French Alps) during the 2013-2014 snow season against in situ standard snow measurements and spectral albedo measurements. In situ meteorological measurements were used to drive the snowpack model, except for aerosol deposition fluxes. Black carbon (BC) and dust deposition fluxes used to drive the model were extracted from simulations of the atmospheric model ALADIN-Climate. The model simulates snowpack evolution reasonably, providing similar performances to our reference Crocus version in terms of snow depth, snow water equivalent (SWE), near-surface specific surface area (SSA) and shortwave albedo. Since the reference empirical albedo scheme was calibrated at the Col de Porte, improvements were not expected to be significant in this study. We show that the deposition fluxes from the ALADIN-Climate model provide a reasonable estimate of the amount of light-absorbing impurities deposited on the

  1. Creating Evidence-Based Research in Adapted Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Greg; Bouffard, Marcel; MacDonald, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Professional practice guided by the best research evidence is a usually referred to as evidence-based practice. The aim of the present paper is to describe five fundamental beliefs of adapted physical activity practices that should be considered in an 8-step research model to create evidence-based research in adapted physical activity. The five…

  2. Channel representation in physically based models coupling groundwater and surface water: pitfalls and how to avoid them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Daniel; Graf, Tobias; Cochand, Fabien; McLaren, Rob; Therrien, René; Brunner, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Recent models that couple three-dimensional subsurface flow with two-dimensional overland flow are valuable tools for quantifying complex groundwater/stream interactions and for evaluating their influence on watershed processes. For the modeler who is used to defining streams as a boundary condition, the representation of channels in integrated models raises a number of conceptual and technical issues. These models are far more sensitive to channel topography than conventional groundwater models. On all spatial scales, both the topography of a channel and its connection with the floodplain are important. For example, the geometry of river banks influences bank storage and overbank flooding; the slope of the river is a primary control on the behavior of a catchment; and at the finer scale bedform characteristics affect hyporheic exchange. Accurate data on streambed topography, however, are seldom available, and the spatial resolution of digital elevation models is typically too coarse in river environments, resulting in unrealistic or undulating streambeds. Modelers therefore perform some kind of manual yet often cumbersome correction to the available topography. In this context, the paper identifies some common pitfalls, and provides guidance to overcome these. Both aspects of topographic representation and mesh discretization are addressed. Additionally, two tutorials are provided to illustrate: (1) the interpolation of channel cross-sectional data and (2) the refinement of a mesh along a stream in areas of high topographic variability. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  3. Physical models on discrete space and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorente, M.

    1986-01-01

    The idea of space and time quantum operators with a discrete spectrum has been proposed frequently since the discovery that some physical quantities exhibit measured values that are multiples of fundamental units. This paper first reviews a number of these physical models. They are: the method of finite elements proposed by Bender et al; the quantum field theory model on discrete space-time proposed by Yamamoto; the finite dimensional quantum mechanics approach proposed by Santhanam et al; the idea of space-time as lattices of n-simplices proposed by Kaplunovsky et al; and the theory of elementary processes proposed by Weizsaecker and his colleagues. The paper then presents a model proposed by the authors and based on the (n+1)-dimensional space-time lattice where fundamental entities interact among themselves 1 to 2n in order to build up a n-dimensional cubic lattice as a ground field where the physical interactions take place. The space-time coordinates are nothing more than the labelling of the ground field and take only discrete values. 11 references

  4. Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Sanborn, Scott E.

    2011-07-01

    This is a working report drafted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, describing statistical models of passives component reliabilities.

  5. A physical model for the reverse leakage current in (In,Ga)N/GaN light-emitting diodes based on nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musolino, M.; Treeck, D. van, E-mail: treeck@pdi-berlin.de; Tahraoui, A.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Scarparo, L.; De Santi, C.; Meneghini, M.; Zanoni, E. [Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, Via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-01-28

    We investigated the origin of the high reverse leakage current in light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (In,Ga)N/GaN nanowire (NW) ensembles grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. To this end, capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements were performed on a fully processed NW-LED. The DLTS measurements reveal the presence of two distinct electron traps with high concentrations in the depletion region of the p-i-n junction. These band gap states are located at energies of 570 ± 20 and 840 ± 30 meV below the conduction band minimum. The physical origin of these deep level states is discussed. The temperature-dependent I-V characteristics, acquired between 83 and 403 K, show that different conduction mechanisms cause the observed leakage current. On the basis of all these results, we developed a quantitative physical model for charge transport in the reverse bias regime. By taking into account the mutual interaction of variable range hopping and electron emission from Coulombic trap states, with the latter being described by phonon-assisted tunnelling and the Poole-Frenkel effect, we can model the experimental I-V curves in the entire range of temperatures with a consistent set of parameters. Our model should be applicable to planar GaN-based LEDs as well. Furthermore, possible approaches to decrease the leakage current in NW-LEDs are proposed.

  6. A physical model for the reverse leakage current in (In,Ga)N/GaN light-emitting diodes based on nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musolino, M.; Treeck, D. van; Tahraoui, A.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.; Scarparo, L.; De Santi, C.; Meneghini, M.; Zanoni, E.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the origin of the high reverse leakage current in light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (In,Ga)N/GaN nanowire (NW) ensembles grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. To this end, capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements were performed on a fully processed NW-LED. The DLTS measurements reveal the presence of two distinct electron traps with high concentrations in the depletion region of the p-i-n junction. These band gap states are located at energies of 570 ± 20 and 840 ± 30 meV below the conduction band minimum. The physical origin of these deep level states is discussed. The temperature-dependent I-V characteristics, acquired between 83 and 403 K, show that different conduction mechanisms cause the observed leakage current. On the basis of all these results, we developed a quantitative physical model for charge transport in the reverse bias regime. By taking into account the mutual interaction of variable range hopping and electron emission from Coulombic trap states, with the latter being described by phonon-assisted tunnelling and the Poole-Frenkel effect, we can model the experimental I-V curves in the entire range of temperatures with a consistent set of parameters. Our model should be applicable to planar GaN-based LEDs as well. Furthermore, possible approaches to decrease the leakage current in NW-LEDs are proposed

  7. Diagnosis of the hydrology of a small Arctic basin at the tundra-taiga transition using a physically based hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Sebastian A.; Pomeroy, John W.; Marsh, Philip

    2017-07-01

    A better understanding of cold regions hydrological processes and regimes in transitional environments is critical for predicting future Arctic freshwater fluxes under climate and vegetation change. A physically based hydrological model using the Cold Regions Hydrological Model platform was created for a small Arctic basin in the tundra-taiga transition region. The model represents snow redistribution and sublimation by wind and vegetation, snowmelt energy budget, evapotranspiration, subsurface flow through organic terrain, infiltration to frozen soils, freezing and thawing of soils, permafrost and streamflow routing. The model was used to reconstruct the basin water cycle over 28 years to understand and quantify the mass fluxes controlling its hydrological regime. Model structure and parameters were set from the current understanding of Arctic hydrology, remote sensing, field research in the basin and region, and calibration against streamflow observations. Calibration was restricted to subsurface hydraulic and storage parameters. Multi-objective evaluation of the model using observed streamflow, snow accumulation and ground freeze/thaw state showed adequate simulation. Significant spatial variability in the winter mass fluxes was found between tundra, shrubs and forested sites, particularly due to the substantial blowing snow redistribution and sublimation from the wind-swept upper basin, as well as sublimation of canopy intercepted snow from the forest (about 17% of snowfall). At the basin scale, the model showed that evapotranspiration is the largest loss of water (47%), followed by streamflow (39%) and sublimation (14%). The models streamflow performance sensitivity to a set of parameter was analysed, as well as the mean annual mass balance uncertainty associated with these parameters.

  8. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  9. Physically based dynamic run-out modelling for quantitative debris flow risk assessment: a case study in Tresenda, northern Italy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quan Luna, B.; Blahůt, Jan; Camera, C.; Van Westen, C.; Apuani, T.; Jetten, V.; Sterlacchini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 3 (2014), s. 645-661 ISSN 1866-6280 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : debris flow * FLO-2D * run-out * quantitative hazard and risk assessment * vulnerability * numerical modelling Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2014

  10. Integrated Physics-based Modeling and Experiments for Improved Prediction of Combustion Dynamics in Low-Emission Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William E.; Lucht, Robert P.; Mongia, Hukam

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent simulation and experiment was undertaken to assess the ability of a hybrid RANS-LES model to predict combustion dynamics in a single-element lean direct-inject (LDI) combustor showing self-excited instabilities. High frequency pressure modes produced by Fourier and modal decomposition analysis were compared quantitatively, and trends with equivalence ratio and inlet temperature were compared qualitatively. High frequency OH PLIF and PIV measurements were also taken. Submodels for chemical kinetics and primary and secondary atomization were also tested against the measured behavior. For a point-wise comparison, the amplitudes matched within a factor of two. The dependence on equivalence ratio was matched. Preliminary results from simulation using an 18-reaction kinetics model indicated instability amplitudes closer to measurement. Analysis of the simulations suggested a band of modes around 1400 Hz were due to a vortex bubble breakdown and a band of modes around 6 kHz were due to a precessing vortex core hydrodynamic instability. The primary needs are directly coupled and validated ab initio models of the atomizer free surface flow and the primary atomization processes, and more detailed study of the coupling between the 3D swirling flow and the local thermoacoustics in the diverging venturi section.

  11. Assessment of land-use change on streamflow using GIS, remote sensing and a physically-based model, SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. G. Dos Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the impact of the land-use changes between the periods 1967−1974 and 1997−2008 on the streamflow of Tapacurá catchment (northeastern Brazil using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model. The results show that the most sensitive parameters were the baseflow, Manning factor, time of concentration and soil evaporation compensation factor, which affect the catchment hydrology. The model calibration and validation were performed on a monthly basis, and the streamflow simulation showed a good level of accuracy for both periods. The obtained R2 and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values for each period were respectively 0.82 and 0.81 for 1967−1974, and 0.93 and 0.92 for the period 1997−2008. The evaluation of the SWAT model response to the land cover has shown that the mean monthly flow, during the rainy seasons for 1967−1974, decreased when compared to 1997−2008.

  12. Implementation of a physically based water percolation routine in the Crocus/SURFEX (V7.3 snowpack model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. L. D'Amboise

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new water percolation routine added to the one-dimensional snowpack model Crocus as an alternative to the empirical bucket routine. This routine solves the Richards equation, which describes flow of water through unsaturated porous snow governed by capillary suction, gravity and hydraulic conductivity of the snow layers. We tested the Richards routine on two data sets, one recorded from an automatic weather station over the winter of 2013–2014 at Filefjell, Norway, and the other an idealized synthetic data set. Model results using the Richards routine generally lead to higher water contents in the snow layers. Snow layers often reached a point at which the ice crystals' surface area is completely covered by a thin film of water (the transition between pendular and funicular regimes, at which feedback from the snow metamorphism and compaction routines are expected to be nonlinear. With the synthetic simulation 18 % of snow layers obtained a saturation of  >  10 % and 0.57 % of layers reached saturation of  >  15 %. The Richards routine had a maximum liquid water content of 173.6 kg m−3 whereas the bucket routine had a maximum of 42.1 kg m−3. We found that wet-snow processes, such as wet-snow metamorphism and wet-snow compaction rates, are not accurately represented at higher water contents. These routines feed back on the Richards routines, which rely heavily on grain size and snow density. The parameter sets for the water retention curve and hydraulic conductivity of snow layers, which are used in the Richards routine, do not represent all the snow types that can be found in a natural snowpack. We show that the new routine has been implemented in the Crocus model, but due to feedback amplification and parameter uncertainties, meaningful applicability is limited. Updating or adapting other routines in Crocus, specifically the snow compaction routine and the grain metamorphism routine, is needed

  13. A validated physical model of greenhouse climate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, G.P.A.

    1989-01-01

    In the greenhouse model the momentaneous environmental crop growth factors are calculated as output, together with the physical behaviour of the crop. The boundary conditions for this model are the outside weather conditions; other inputs are the physical characteristics of the crop, of the

  14. Impacts of Extreme Space Weather Events on Power Grid Infrastructure: Physics-Based Modelling of Geomagnetically-Induced Currents (GICs) During Carrington-Class Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M. G.; Bent, R.; Chen, Y.; Delzanno, G. L.; Jeffery, C. A.; Jordanova, V. K.; Morley, S.; Rivera, M. K.; Toth, G.; Welling, D. T.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Engel, M.

    2017-12-01

    Large geomagnetic storms can have devastating effects on power grids. The largest geomagnetic storm ever recorded - called the Carrington Event - occurred in 1859 and produced Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GICs) strong enough to set fires in telegraph offices. It has been estimated that if such a storm occurred today, it would have devastating, long-lasting effects on the North American power transmission infrastructure. Acutely aware of this imminent threat, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) was recently instructed to establish requirements for transmission system performance during geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) events and, although the benchmarks adopted were based on the best available data at the time, they suffer from a severely limited physical understanding of the behavior of GMDs and the resulting GICs for strong events. To rectify these deficiencies, we are developing a first-of-its-kind data-informed modelling capability that will provide transformational understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the most harmful intense localized GMDs and their impacts on real power transmission networks. This work is being conducted in two separate modes of operation: (1) using historical, well-observed large storm intervals for which robust data-assimilation can be performed, and (2) extending the modelling into a predictive realm in order to assess impacts of poorly and/or never-before observed Carrington-class events. Results of this work are expected to include a potential replacement for the current NERC benchmarking methodology and the development of mitigation strategies in real power grid networks. We report on progress to date and show some preliminary results of modeling large (but not yet extreme) events.

  15. Extrapolative prediction using physically-based QSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2016-02-01

    Surflex-QMOD integrates chemical structure and activity data to produce physically-realistic models for binding affinity prediction . Here, we apply QMOD to a 3D-QSAR benchmark dataset and show broad applicability to a diverse set of targets. Testing new ligands within the QMOD model employs automated flexible molecular alignment, with the model itself defining the optimal pose for each ligand. QMOD performance was compared to that of four approaches that depended on manual alignments (CoMFA, two variations of CoMSIA, and CMF). QMOD showed comparable performance to the other methods on a challenging, but structurally limited, test set. The QMOD models were also applied to test a large and structurally diverse dataset of ligands from ChEMBL, nearly all of which were synthesized years after those used for model construction. Extrapolation across diverse chemical structures was possible because the method addresses the ligand pose problem and provides structural and geometric means to quantitatively identify ligands within a model's applicability domain. Predictions for such ligands for the four tested targets were highly statistically significant based on rank correlation. Those molecules predicted to be highly active (pK_i ≥ 7.5) had a mean experimental pK_i of 7.5, with potent and structurally novel ligands being identified by QMOD for each target.

  16. Mechanics of hip dysplasia reductions in infants using the Pavlik harness: a physics-based computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Orlando J; Divo, Eduardo A; Moslehy, Faissal A; Rab, George T; Kassab, Alain J; Price, Charles T

    2013-05-31

    Biomechanical factors influencing the reduction of dislocated hips with the Pavlik harness in patients of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) were studied using a three-dimensional computer model simulating hip reduction dynamics in (1) subluxated and (2) fully dislocated hip joints. Five hip adductor muscles were identified as key mediators of DDH prognosis, and the non-dimensional force contribution of each in the direction necessary to achieve concentric hip reductions was determined. Results point to the adductor muscles as mediators of subluxated hip reductions, as their mechanical action is a function of the degree of hip dislocation. For subluxated hips in abduction and flexion, the Pectineus, Adductor Brevis, Adductor Longus, and proximal Adductor Magnus contribute positively to reduction, while the rest of the Adductor Magnus contributes negatively. In full dislocations all muscles contribute detrimentally to reduction, elucidating the need for traction to reduce Graf IV type dislocations. Reduction of dysplastic hips was found to occur in two distinct phases: (a) release phase and (b) reduction phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Numerical modelling in material physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proville, L.

    2004-12-01

    The author first briefly presents his past research activities: investigation of a dislocation sliding in solid solution by molecular dynamics, modelling of metal film growth by phase field and Monte Carlo kinetics, phase field model for surface self-organisation, phase field model for the Al 3 Zr alloy, calculation of anharmonic photons, mobility of bipolarons in superconductors. Then, he more precisely reports the mesoscopic modelling in phase field, and some atomistic modelling (dislocation sliding, Monte Carlo simulation of metal surface growth, anharmonic network optical spectrum modelling)

  18. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  19. Fundamental Study on Applicability of Powder-Based 3D Printer for Physical Modeling in Rock Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshtenejad, Sayedalireza; Song, Jae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Applications of 3D printing technology become more widespread in many research fields because of its rapid development and valuable capabilities. In rock mechanics and mining engineering, this technology has the potential to become a useful tool that might help implement a number of research studies previously considered impractical. Most commercial 3D printers cannot print prototypes with mechanical properties that match precisely those of natural rock samples. Therefore, some additional enhancements are required for 3D printers to be effectively utilized for rock mechanics applications. In this study, we printed and studied specimens using a powder-based commercial ZPrinter® 450 with ZP® 150 powder and Zb® 63 binder used as raw materials. The specimens printed by this 3D printer exhibited relatively low strength and ductile behavior, implying that it needs further improvements. Hence, we focused on several ways to determine the best combination of printing options and post-processing including the effects of the printing direction, printing layer thickness, binder saturation level, and heating process on the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and stress-strain behavior of the printed samples. The suggested procedures have demonstrated their effectiveness by obtaining the printed samples that behave similarly to the natural rocks with low UCS. Although our optimization methods were particularly successful, further improvements are required to expand 3D printer application in the area of rock mechanics.

  20. Physical model for membrane protrusions during spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamaraux, F; Ali, O; Fourcade, B; Keller, S; Bruckert, F

    2008-01-01

    During cell spreading onto a substrate, the kinetics of the contact area is an observable quantity. This paper is concerned with a physical approach to modeling this process in the case of ameboid motility where the membrane detaches itself from the underlying cytoskeleton at the leading edge. The physical model we propose is based on previous reports which highlight that membrane tension regulates cell spreading. Using a phenomenological feedback loop to mimic stress-dependent biochemistry, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be coupled to the stress which builds up at the margin of the contact area between the cell and the substrate. In the limit of small variation of membrane tension, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be written in a closed form. Our analysis defines characteristic lengths which depend on elastic properties of the membrane–cytoskeleton complex, such as the membrane–cytoskeleton interaction, and on molecular parameters, the rate of actin polymerization. We discuss our model in the case of axi-symmetric and non-axi-symmetric spreading and we compute the characteristic time scales as a function of fundamental elastic constants such as the strength of membrane–cytoskeleton adherence

  1. Physics-Based Simulations of Natural Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kasey William

    Earthquakes and tsunamis are some of the most damaging natural disasters that we face. Just two recent events, the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami and the 2011 Haiti earthquake, claimed more than 400,000 lives. Despite their catastrophic impacts on society, our ability to predict these natural disasters is still very limited. The main challenge in studying the earthquake cycle is the non-linear and multi-scale properties of fault networks. Earthquakes are governed by physics across many orders of magnitude of spatial and temporal scales; from the scale of tectonic plates and their evolution over millions of years, down to the scale of rock fracturing over milliseconds to minutes at the sub-centimeter scale during an earthquake. Despite these challenges, there are useful patterns in earthquake occurrence. One such pattern, the frequency-magnitude relation, relates the number of large earthquakes to small earthquakes and forms the basis for assessing earthquake hazard. However the utility of these relations is proportional to the length of our earthquake records, and typical records span at most a few hundred years. Utilizing physics based interactions and techniques from statistical physics, earthquake simulations provide rich earthquake catalogs allowing us to measure otherwise unobservable statistics. In this dissertation I will discuss five applications of physics-based simulations of natural hazards, utilizing an earthquake simulator called Virtual Quake. The first is an overview of computing earthquake probabilities from simulations, focusing on the California fault system. The second uses simulations to help guide satellite-based earthquake monitoring methods. The third presents a new friction model for Virtual Quake and describes how we tune simulations to match reality. The fourth describes the process of turning Virtual Quake into an open source research tool. This section then focuses on a resulting collaboration using Virtual Quake for a detailed

  2. Future climate change impact assessment of watershed scale hydrologic processes in Peninsular Malaysia by a regional climate model coupled with a physically-based hydrology modelo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M Z M; Shaaban, A J; Ercan, A; Ishida, K; Kavvas, M L; Chen, Z Q; Jang, S

    2017-01-01

    Impacts of climate change on the hydrologic processes under future climate change conditions were assessed over Muda and Dungun watersheds of Peninsular Malaysia by means of a coupled regional climate and physically-based hydrology model utilizing an ensemble of future climate change projections. An ensemble of 15 different future climate realizations from coarse resolution global climate models' (GCMs) projections for the 21st century was dynamically downscaled to 6km resolution over Peninsular Malaysia by a regional climate model, which was then coupled with the watershed hydrology model WEHY through the atmospheric boundary layer over Muda and Dungun watersheds. Hydrologic simulations were carried out at hourly increments and at hillslope-scale in order to assess the impacts of climate change on the water balances and flooding conditions in the 21st century. The coupled regional climate and hydrology model was simulated for a duration of 90years for each of the 15 realizations. It is demonstrated that the increase in mean monthly flows due to the impact of expected climate change during 2040-2100 is statistically significant from April to May and from July to October at Muda watershed. Also, the increase in mean monthly flows is shown to be significant in November during 2030-2070 and from November to December during 2070-2100 at Dungun watershed. In other words, the impact of the expected climate change will be significant during the northeast and southwest monsoon seasons at Muda watershed and during the northeast monsoon season at Dungun watershed. Furthermore, the flood frequency analyses for both watersheds indicated an overall increasing trend in the second half of the 21st century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulations of future runoff conditions for glacierized catchments in the Ötztal Alps (Austria) using the physically based hydroclimatological model AMUNDSEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzer, Florian; Förster, Kristian; Marke, Thomas; Strasser, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Assessing the amount of water resources stored in mountain catchments as snow and ice as well as the timing of meltwater production and the resulting streamflow runoff is of high interest for glaciohydrological investigations and hydropower production. Climate change induced seasonal shifts in snow and ice melt will alter the hydrological regimes in glacierized catchments in terms of both timing and magnitude of discharge. We present the setup of the hydroclimatological model AMUNDSEN for a highly glacierized (24 %) 558 km2 large study area (1760-3768 m a.s.l.) in the Ötztal Alps (Austria), and first results of simulated future runoff conditions. The study region comprises the headwater catchments of the valleys Ötztal, Pitztal, and Kaunertal, which contribute to the streamflow of the river Inn. AMUNDSEN is a fully distributed physically based model designed to quantify the energy and mass balance of snow and ice surfaces in complex topography as well as streamflow generation for a given catchment. The model has been extensively validated for past conditions and has been extended by an empirical glacier evolution model (Δh approach) for the present study. Statistically downscaled EURO-CORDEX climate simulations covering the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios are used as the meteorological forcing for the period 2006-2050. Model results are evaluated in terms of magnitude and change of the contributions of the individual runoff components (snowmelt, ice melt, rain) in the subcatchments as well as the change in glacier volume and area.

  4. A Vulnerability-Based, Bottom-up Assessment of Future Riverine Flood Risk Using a Modified Peaks-Over-Threshold Approach and a Physically Based Hydrologic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, James; Steinschneider, Scott; Walter, M. Todd

    2017-12-01

    There is a chronic disconnection among purely probabilistic flood frequency analysis of flood hazards, flood risks, and hydrological flood mechanisms, which hamper our ability to assess future flood impacts. We present a vulnerability-based approach to estimating riverine flood risk that accommodates a more direct linkage between decision-relevant metrics of risk and the dominant mechanisms that cause riverine flooding. We adapt the conventional peaks-over-threshold (POT) framework to be used with extreme precipitation from different climate processes and rainfall-runoff-based model output. We quantify the probability that at least one adverse hydrologic threshold, potentially defined by stakeholders, will be exceeded within the next N years. This approach allows us to consider flood risk as the summation of risk from separate atmospheric mechanisms, and supports a more direct mapping between hazards and societal outcomes. We perform this analysis within a bottom-up framework to consider the relevance and consequences of information, with varying levels of credibility, on changes to atmospheric patterns driving extreme precipitation events. We demonstrate our proposed approach using a case study for Fall Creek in Ithaca, NY, USA, where we estimate the risk of stakeholder-defined flood metrics from three dominant mechanisms: summer convection, tropical cyclones, and spring rain and snowmelt. Using downscaled climate projections, we determine how flood risk associated with a subset of mechanisms may change in the future, and the resultant shift to annual flood risk. The flood risk approach we propose can provide powerful new insights into future flood threats.

  5. Trend analysis of runoff and sediment fluxes in the Upper Blue Nile basin: A combined analysis of statistical tests, physically-based models and landuse maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremicael, T. G.; Mohamed, Y. A.; Betrie, G. D.; van der Zaag, P.; Teferi, E.

    2013-03-01

    SummaryThe landuse/cover changes in the Ethiopian highlands have significantly increased the variability of runoff and sediment fluxes of the Blue Nile River during the last few decades. The objectives of this study were (i) to understand the long-term variations of runoff and sediment fluxes using statistical models, (ii) to interpret and corroborate the statistical results using a physically-based hydrological model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), and (iii) to validate the interpretation of SWAT results by assessing changes of landuse maps. Firstly, Mann-Kendall and Pettitt tests were used to test the trends of Blue Nile flow (1970-2009) and sediment load (1980-2009) at the outlet of the Upper Blue Nile basin at El Diem station. These tests showed statistically significant increasing trends of annual stream flow, wet season stream flow and sediment load at 5% confidence level. The dry season flow showed a significant decrease in the trend. However, during the same period the annual rainfall over the basin showed no significant trends. The results of the statistical tests were sensitive to the time domain. Secondly, the SWAT model was used to simulate the runoff and sediment fluxes in the early 1970s and at the end of the time series in 2000s in order to interpret the physical causes of the trends and corroborate the statistical results. A comparison of model parameter values between the 1970s and 2000s shows significant change, which could explain catchment response changes over the 28 years of record. Thirdly, a comparison of landuse maps of 1970s against 2000s shows conversion of vegetation cover into agriculture and grass lands over wide areas of the Upper Blue Nile basin. The combined results of the statistical tests, the SWAT model, and landuse change detection are consistent with the hypothesis that landuse change has caused a significant change of runoff and sediment load from the Upper Blue Nile during the last four decades. This is an important

  6. Modellus: Learning Physics with Mathematical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Vitor

    Computers are now a major tool in research and development in almost all scientific and technological fields. Despite recent developments, this is far from true for learning environments in schools and most undergraduate studies. This thesis proposes a framework for designing curricula where computers, and computer modelling in particular, are a major tool for learning. The framework, based on research on learning science and mathematics and on computer user interface, assumes that: 1) learning is an active process of creating meaning from representations; 2) learning takes place in a community of practice where students learn both from their own effort and from external guidance; 3) learning is a process of becoming familiar with concepts, with links between concepts, and with representations; 4) direct manipulation user interfaces allow students to explore concrete-abstract objects such as those of physics and can be used by students with minimal computer knowledge. Physics is the science of constructing models and explanations about the physical world. And mathematical models are an important type of models that are difficult for many students. These difficulties can be rooted in the fact that most students do not have an environment where they can explore functions, differential equations and iterations as primary objects that model physical phenomena--as objects-to-think-with, reifying the formal objects of physics. The framework proposes that students should be introduced to modelling in a very early stage of learning physics and mathematics, two scientific areas that must be taught in very closely related way, as they were developed since Galileo and Newton until the beginning of our century, before the rise of overspecialisation in science. At an early stage, functions are the main type of objects used to model real phenomena, such as motions. At a later stage, rates of change and equations with rates of change play an important role. This type of equations

  7. Modeling the ionosphere-thermosphere response to a geomagnetic storm using physics-based magnetospheric energy input: OpenGGCM-CTIM results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Hyunju Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetosphere is a major source of energy for the Earth’s ionosphere and thermosphere (IT system. Current IT models drive the upper atmosphere using empirically calculated magnetospheric energy input. Thus, they do not sufficiently capture the storm-time dynamics, particularly at high latitudes. To improve the prediction capability of IT models, a physics-based magnetospheric input is necessary. Here, we use the Open Global General Circulation Model (OpenGGCM coupled with the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Model (CTIM. OpenGGCM calculates a three-dimensional global magnetosphere and a two-dimensional high-latitude ionosphere by solving resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD equations with solar wind input. CTIM calculates a global thermosphere and a high-latitude ionosphere in three dimensions using realistic magnetospheric inputs from the OpenGGCM. We investigate whether the coupled model improves the storm-time IT responses by simulating a geomagnetic storm that is preceded by a strong solar wind pressure front on August 24, 2005. We compare the OpenGGCM-CTIM results with low-earth-orbit satellite observations and with the model results of Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe. CTIPe is an up-to-date version of CTIM that incorporates more IT dynamics such as a low-latitude ionosphere and a plasmasphere, but uses empirical magnetospheric input. OpenGGCM-CTIM reproduces localized neutral density peaks at ~ 400 km altitude in the high-latitude dayside regions in agreement with in situ observations during the pressure shock and the early phase of the storm. Although CTIPe is in some sense a much superior model than CTIM, it misses these localized enhancements. Unlike the CTIPe empirical input models, OpenGGCM-CTIM more faithfully produces localized increases of both auroral precipitation and ionospheric electric fields near the high-latitude dayside region after the pressure shock and after the storm onset

  8. The Physical Internet and Business Model Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Poulin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Building on the analogy of data packets within the Digital Internet, the Physical Internet is a concept that dramatically transforms how physical objects are designed, manufactured, and distributed. This approach is open, efficient, and sustainable beyond traditional proprietary logistical solutions, which are often plagued by inefficiencies. The Physical Internet redefines supply chain configurations, business models, and value-creation patterns. Firms are bound to be less dependent on operational scale and scope trade-offs because they will be in a position to offer novel hybrid products and services that would otherwise destroy value. Finally, logistical chains become flexible and reconfigurable in real time, thus becoming better in tune with firm strategic choices. This article focuses on the potential impact of the Physical Internet on business model innovation, both from the perspectives of Physical-Internet enabled and enabling business models.

  9. Physically-based slope stability modelling and parameter sensitivity: a case study in the Quitite and Papagaio catchments, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Neves Seefelder, Carolina; Mergili, Martin

    2016-04-01

    conservative than those yielded with the infinite slope stability model. The sensitivity of AUCROC to variations in the geohydraulic parameters remains small as long as the calculated degree of saturation of the soils is sufficient to result in the prediction of a significant amount of landslide release pixels. Due to the poor sensitivity of AUCROC to variations of the geotechnical and geohydraulic parameters it is hard to optimize the parameters by means of statistics. Instead, the results produced with many different combinations of parameters correspond reasonably well with the distribution of the observed landslide release areas, even though they vary considerably in terms of their conservativeness. Considering the uncertainty inherent in all geotechnical and geohydraulic data, and the impossibility to capture the spatial distribution of the parameters by means of laboratory tests in sufficient detail, we conclude that landslide susceptibility maps yielded by catchment-scale physically-based models should not be interpreted in absolute terms. Building on the assumption that our findings are generally valid, we suggest that efforts to develop better strategies for dealing with the uncertainties in the spatial variation of the key parameters should be given priority in future slope stability modelling efforts.

  10. An educational approach based on a non-injury model compared with individual symptom-based physical training in chronic LBP. A pragmatic, randomised trial with a one-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsholm Lars

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the treatment of chronic back pain, cognitive methods are attracting increased attention due to evidence of effectiveness similar to that of traditional therapies. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of performing a cognitive intervention based on a non-injury model with that of a symptom-based physical training method on the outcomes of low back pain (LBP, activity limitation, LBP attitudes (fear-avoidance beliefs and back beliefs, physical activity levels, sick leave, and quality of life, in chronic LBP patients. Methods The study was a pragmatic, single-blind, randomised, parallel-group trial. Patients with chronic/recurrent LBP were randomised to one of the following treatments: 1. Educational programme : the emphasis was on creating confidence that the back is strong, that loads normally do not cause any damage despite occasional temporary pain, that reducing the focus on the pain might facilitate more natural and less painful movements, and that it is beneficial to stay physically active. 2. Individual symptom-based physical training programme : directional-preference exercises for those centralising their pain with repetitive movements; 'stabilising exercises' for those deemed 'unstable' based on specific tests; or intensive dynamic exercises for the remaining patients. Follow-up questionnaires (examiner-blinded were completed at 2, 6 and 12 months. The main statistical test was an ANCOVA adjusted for baseline values. Results A total of 207 patients participated with the median age of 39 years (IQR 33-47; 52% were female, 105 were randomised to the educational programme and 102 to the physical training programme. The two groups were comparable at baseline. For the primary outcome measures, there was a non-significant trend towards activity limitation being reduced mostly in the educational programme group, although of doubtful clinical relevance. Regarding secondary outcomes, improvement in

  11. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  12. Propulsion Physics Using the Chameleon Density Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will require a new theory of propulsion. Specifically one that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. The Chameleon Density Model (CDM) is one such model that could provide new paths in propulsion toward this end. The CDM is based on Chameleon Cosmology a dark matter theory; introduced by Khrouy and Weltman in 2004. Chameleon as it is hidden within known physics, where the Chameleon field represents a scalar field within and about an object; even in the vacuum. The CDM relates to density changes in the Chameleon field, where the density changes are related to matter accelerations within and about an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to its environment. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the environmental coupling about an object. As a demonstration to show that the CDM fits within known propulsion physics, this paper uses the model to estimate the thrust from a solid rocket motor. Under the CDM, a solid rocket constitutes a two body system, i.e., the changing density of the rocket and the changing density in the nozzle arising from the accelerated mass. Whereby, the interactions between these systems cause a differential coupling to the local gravity environment of the earth. It is shown that the resulting differential in coupling produces a calculated value for the thrust near equivalent to the conventional thrust model used in Sutton and Ross, Rocket Propulsion Elements. Even though imbedded in the equations are the Universe energy scale factor, the reduced Planck mass and the Planck length, which relates the large Universe scale to the subatomic scale.

  13. An Efficient Upscaling Process Based on a Unified Fine-scale Multi-Physics Model for Flow Simulation in Naturally Fracture Carbonate Karst Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Linfeng

    2009-01-01

    The main challenges in modeling fluid flow through naturally-fractured carbonate karst reservoirs are how to address various flow physics in complex geological architectures due to the presence of vugs and caves which are connected via fracture networks at multiple scales. In this paper, we present a unified multi-physics model that adapts to the complex flow regime through naturally-fractured carbonate karst reservoirs. This approach generalizes Stokes-Brinkman model (Popov et al. 2007). The fracture networks provide the essential connection between the caves in carbonate karst reservoirs. It is thus very important to resolve the flow in fracture network and the interaction between fractures and caves to better understand the complex flow behavior. The idea is to use Stokes-Brinkman model to represent flow through rock matrix, void caves as well as intermediate flows in very high permeability regions and to use an idea similar to discrete fracture network model to represent flow in fracture network. Consequently, various numerical solution strategies can be efficiently applied to greatly improve the computational efficiency in flow simulations. We have applied this unified multi-physics model as a fine-scale flow solver in scale-up computations. Both local and global scale-up are considered. It is found that global scale-up has much more accurate than local scale-up. Global scale-up requires the solution of global flow problems on fine grid, which generally is computationally expensive. The proposed model has the ability to deal with large number of fractures and caves, which facilitate the application of Stokes-Brinkman model in global scale-up computation. The proposed model flexibly adapts to the different flow physics in naturally-fractured carbonate karst reservoirs in a simple and effective way. It certainly extends modeling and predicting capability in efficient development of this important type of reservoir.

  14. Modeling Cyber Physical War Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    of rogue wireless device. The Red cell would give the coerced plant employee a Raspberry Pi-based device (for example) to plug into unused switch...ports or workstation USB ports. This Raspberry Pi-based device would setup a rogue wireless access point using WiFi. For an additional level of...covertness, the WiFi radio access could be replaced with a cellular radio, and the Raspberry Pi connection to the plant network could be made with a

  15. Bridging physics and biology teaching through modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Anne-Marie; Couch, Brian A.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hinko, Kathleen A.; Caballero, Marcos D.

    2014-05-01

    As the frontiers of biology become increasingly interdisciplinary, the physics education community has engaged in ongoing efforts to make physics classes more relevant to life science majors. These efforts are complicated by the many apparent differences between these fields, including the types of systems that each studies, the behavior of those systems, the kinds of measurements that each makes, and the role of mathematics in each field. Nonetheless, physics and biology are both sciences that rely on observations and measurements to construct models of the natural world. In this article, we propose that efforts to bridge the teaching of these two disciplines must emphasize shared scientific practices, particularly scientific modeling. We define modeling using language common to both disciplines and highlight how an understanding of the modeling process can help reconcile apparent differences between the teaching of physics and biology. We elaborate on how models can be used for explanatory, predictive, and functional purposes and present common models from each discipline demonstrating key modeling principles. By framing interdisciplinary teaching in the context of modeling, we aim to bridge physics and biology teaching and to equip students with modeling competencies applicable in any scientific discipline.

  16. Physics of the Quark Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  17. A physical data model for fields and agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Kor; de Bakker, Merijn; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Two approaches exist in simulation modeling: agent-based and field-based modeling. In agent-based (or individual-based) simulation modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by objects, which are bounded in space and time. Individual objects, like an animal, a house, or a more abstract entity like a country's economy, have properties representing their state. In an agent-based model this state is manipulated. In field-based modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by fields. Fields capture the state of a continuous property within a spatial extent, examples of which are elevation, atmospheric pressure, and water flow velocity. With respect to the technology used to create these models, the domains of agent-based and field-based modeling have often been separate worlds. In environmental modeling, widely used logical data models include feature data models for point, line and polygon objects, and the raster data model for fields. Simulation models are often either agent-based or field-based, even though the modeled system might contain both entities that are better represented by individuals and entities that are better represented by fields. We think that the reason for this dichotomy in kinds of models might be that the traditional object and field data models underlying those models are relatively low level. We have developed a higher level conceptual data model for representing both non-spatial and spatial objects, and spatial fields (De Bakker et al. 2016). Based on this conceptual data model we designed a logical and physical data model for representing many kinds of data, including the kinds used in earth system modeling (e.g. hydrological and ecological models). The goal of this work is to be able to create high level code and tools for the creation of models in which entities are representable by both objects and fields. Our conceptual data model is capable of representing the traditional feature data

  18. Inquiry based learning in physical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars Domino

    2014-01-01

    The present project is a case study founded on the decreasing motivation and engagement in physical education. The project suggests inquiry based learning (IBL) as an educational methodology. This may help to turn the trend as IBL has shown to engage and motivate students at different educational...... levels and within different subjects. In this pilot research project performed at a physical education teacher education program, qualitative methods were chosen to investigate students’ motivation and engagement within an IBL-unit in physical education and to accentuate challenges, advantages...... and disadvantages within the IBL-methodology in relation to students’ motivation. Instructed in guided inquiry, 32 students of physical education in a teacher training college worked with inquiry based learning in physical education over a four week period. During the IBL-unit, qualitative data such as the students...

  19. Interactive physically-based sound simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, Nikunj

    The realization of interactive, immersive virtual worlds requires the ability to present a realistic audio experience that convincingly compliments their visual rendering. Physical simulation is a natural way to achieve such realism, enabling deeply immersive virtual worlds. However, physically-based sound simulation is very computationally expensive owing to the high-frequency, transient oscillations underlying audible sounds. The increasing computational power of desktop computers has served to reduce the gap between required and available computation, and it has become possible to bridge this gap further by using a combination of algorithmic improvements that exploit the physical, as well as perceptual properties of audible sounds. My thesis is a step in this direction. My dissertation concentrates on developing real-time techniques for both sub-problems of sound simulation: synthesis and propagation. Sound synthesis is concerned with generating the sounds produced by objects due to elastic surface vibrations upon interaction with the environment, such as collisions. I present novel techniques that exploit human auditory perception to simulate scenes with hundreds of sounding objects undergoing impact and rolling in real time. Sound propagation is the complementary problem of modeling the high-order scattering and diffraction of sound in an environment as it travels from source to listener. I discuss my work on a novel numerical acoustic simulator (ARD) that is hundred times faster and consumes ten times less memory than a high-accuracy finite-difference technique, allowing acoustic simulations on previously-intractable spaces, such as a cathedral, on a desktop computer. Lastly, I present my work on interactive sound propagation that leverages my ARD simulator to render the acoustics of arbitrary static scenes for multiple moving sources and listener in real time, while accounting for scene-dependent effects such as low-pass filtering and smooth attenuation

  20. Physical model for recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstić, Predrag; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recognition tunneling (RT) identifies target molecules trapped between tunneling electrodes functionalized with recognition molecules that serve as specific chemical linkages between the metal electrodes and the trapped target molecule. Possible applications include single molecule DNA and protein sequencing. This paper addresses several fundamental aspects of RT by multiscale theory, applying both all-atom and coarse-grained DNA models: (1) we show that the magnitude of the observed currents are consistent with the results of non-equilibrium Green’s function calculations carried out on a solvated all-atom model. (2) Brownian fluctuations in hydrogen bond-lengths lead to current spikes that are similar to what is observed experimentally. (3) The frequency characteristics of these fluctuations can be used to identify the trapped molecules with a machine-learning algorithm, giving a theoretical underpinning to this new method of identifying single molecule signals. (paper)

  1. Reconstructing Macroeconomics Based on Statistical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masanao; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    We believe that time has come to integrate the new approach based on statistical physics or econophysics into macroeconomics. Toward this goal, there must be more dialogues between physicists and economists. In this paper, we argue that there is no reason why the methods of statistical physics so successful in many fields of natural sciences cannot be usefully applied to macroeconomics that is meant to analyze the macroeconomy comprising a large number of economic agents. It is, in fact, weird to regard the macroeconomy as a homothetic enlargement of the representative micro agent. We trust the bright future of the new approach to macroeconomies based on statistical physics.

  2. Assessing ecohydrological controls on catchment water storage, flux and age dynamics using tracers in a physically-based, spatially distributed model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppel, S.; Tetzlaff, D.; Maneta, M. P.; Soulsby, C.

    2017-12-01

    Stable water isotope tracing has been extensively used in a wide range of geographical environments as a means to understand the sources, flow paths and ages of water stored and exiting a landscape via evapotranspiration, surface runoff and/or stream flow. Comparisons of isotopic signatures of precipitation and water in streams, soils, groundwater and plant xylem facilitates the assessment of how plant water use may affect preferential hydrologic pathways, storage dynamics and transit times in the critical zone. While tracers are also invaluable for testing model structure and accuracy, in most cases the measured isotopic signatures have been used to guide the calibration of conceptual runoff models with simplified vegetation and energy balance representation, which lacks sufficient detail to constrain key ecohydrological controls on flow paths and water ages. Here, we use a physically-based, distributed ecohydrological model (EcH2O) which we have extended to track 2H and 18O (including fractionation processes), and water age. This work is part of the "VeWa" project which aims at understanding ecohydrological couplings across climatic gradients in the wider North, where the hydrological implications of projected environmental change are essentially unknown though expected to be high. EcH2O combines a hydrologic scheme with an explicit representation of plant growth and phenology while resolving the energy balance across the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. We focus on a montane catchment in Scotland, where unique long-term, high resolution hydrometric, ecohydrological and isotopic data allows for extensive model testing and projections. Results show the importance of incorporating soil fractionation processes to explain stream isotope dynamics, particularly seasonal enrichment in this humid, energy-limited catchment. This generic process-based approach facilitates analysis of dynamics in isotopes, storage and ages for the different hydrological compartments

  3. Ontology modeling in physical asset integrity management

    CERN Document Server

    Yacout, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge applications of, and up-to-date research on, ontology engineering techniques in the physical asset integrity domain. Though a survey of state-of-the-art theory and methods on ontology engineering, the authors emphasize essential topics including data integration modeling, knowledge representation, and semantic interpretation. The book also reflects novel topics dealing with the advanced problems of physical asset integrity applications such as heterogeneity, data inconsistency, and interoperability existing in design and utilization. With a distinctive focus on applications relevant in heavy industry, Ontology Modeling in Physical Asset Integrity Management is ideal for practicing industrial and mechanical engineers working in the field, as well as researchers and graduate concerned with ontology engineering in physical systems life cycles. This book also: Introduces practicing engineers, research scientists, and graduate students to ontology engineering as a modeling techniqu...

  4. Enhancing the Predicting Accuracy of the Water Stage Using a Physical-Based Model and an Artificial Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm in a River System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate simulations of river stages during typhoon events are critically important for flood control and are necessary for disaster prevention and water resources management in Taiwan. This study applies two artificial neural network (ANN models, including the back propagation neural network (BPNN and genetic algorithm neural network (GANN techniques, to improve predictions from a one-dimensional flood routing hydrodynamic model regarding the water stages during typhoon events in the Danshuei River system in northern Taiwan. The hydrodynamic model is driven by freshwater discharges at the upstream boundary conditions and by the water levels at the downstream boundary condition. The model provides a sound physical basis for simulating water stages along the river. The simulated results of the hydrodynamic model show that the model cannot reproduce the water stages at different stations during typhoon events for the model calibration and verification phases. The BPNN and GANN models can improve the simulated water stages compared with the performance of the hydrodynamic model. The GANN model satisfactorily predicts water stages during the training and verification phases and exhibits the lowest values of mean absolute error, root-mean-square error and peak error compared with the simulated results at different stations using the hydrodynamic model and the BPNN model. Comparison of the simulated results shows that the GANN model can be successfully applied to predict the water stages of the Danshuei River system during typhoon events.

  5. Utilities for high performance dispersion model PHYSIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazawa, Hiromi

    1992-09-01

    The description and usage of the utilities for the dispersion calculation model PHYSIC were summarized. The model was developed in the study of developing high performance SPEEDI with the purpose of introducing meteorological forecast function into the environmental emergency response system. The procedure of PHYSIC calculation consists of three steps; preparation of relevant files, creation and submission of JCL, and graphic output of results. A user can carry out the above procedure with the help of the Geographical Data Processing Utility, the Model Control Utility, and the Graphic Output Utility. (author)

  6. An acoustic glottal source for vocal tract physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannukainen, Antti; Kuortti, Juha; Malinen, Jarmo; Ojalammi, Antti

    2017-11-01

    A sound source is proposed for the acoustic measurement of physical models of the human vocal tract. The physical models are produced by fast prototyping, based on magnetic resonance imaging during prolonged vowel production. The sound source, accompanied by custom signal processing algorithms, is used for two kinds of measurements from physical models of the vocal tract: (i) amplitude frequency response and resonant frequency measurements, and (ii) signal reconstructions at the source output according to a target pressure waveform with measurements at the mouth position. The proposed source and the software are validated by computational acoustics experiments and measurements on a physical model of the vocal tract corresponding to the vowels [] of a male speaker.

  7. Physically-Derived Dynamical Cores in Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Richard B.; Lin, Shian-Kiann

    1999-01-01

    The algorithm chosen to represent the advection in atmospheric models is often used as the primary attribute to classify the model. Meteorological models are generally classified as spectral or grid point, with the term grid point implying discretization using finite differences. These traditional approaches have a number of shortcomings that render them non-physical. That is, they provide approximate solutions to the conservation equations that do not obey the fundamental laws of physics. The most commonly discussed shortcomings are overshoots and undershoots which manifest themselves most overtly in the constituent continuity equation. For this reason many climate models have special algorithms to model water vapor advection. This talk focuses on the development of an atmospheric general circulation model which uses a consistent physically-based advection algorithm in all aspects of the model formulation. The shallow-water model of Lin and Rood (QJRMS, 1997) is generalized to three dimensions and combined with the physics parameterizations of NCAR's Community Climate Model. The scientific motivation for the development is to increase the integrity of the underlying fluid dynamics so that the physics terms can be more effectively isolated, examined, and improved. The expected benefits of the new model are discussed and results from the initial integrations will be presented.

  8. PHYSICAL EDUCATION - PHYSICAL CULTURE. TWO MODELS, TWO DIDACTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Vizuete Carrizosa

    2014-11-01

    The survival of these conflicting positions and their interests and different views on education, in a lengthy space of time, as a consequence threw two teaching approaches and two different educational models, in which the objectives and content of education differ , and with them the forms and methods of teaching. The need to define the cultural and educational approach, in every time and place, is now a pressing need and challenge the processes of teacher training, as responsible for shaping an advanced physical education, adjusted to the time and place, the interests and needs of citizens and the democratic values of modern society.

  9. Distributed Prognostics Based on Structural Model Decomposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Within systems health management, prognostics focuses on predicting the remaining useful life of a system. In the model-based prognostics paradigm, physics-based...

  10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION - PHYSICAL CULTURE. TWO MODELS, TWO DIDACTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Vizuete Carrizosa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education is currently facing a number of problems that are rooted in the identity crisis prompted by the spread of the professional group, the confrontation of ideas from the scientific community and the competing interests of different political and social areas, compared to which physical education has failed, or unable, to react in time. The political and ideological confrontation that characterized the twentieth century gave us two forms, each with a consistent ideological position, in which the body as a subject of education was understood from two different positions: one set from the left and communism and another, from Western democratic societies.The survival of these conflicting positions and their interests and different views on education, in a lengthy space of time, as a consequence threw two teaching approaches and two different educational models, in which the objectives and content of education differ , and with them the forms and methods of teaching. The need to define the cultural and educational approach, in every time and place, is now a pressing need and challenge the processes of teacher training, as responsible for shaping an advanced physical education, adjusted to the time and place, the interests and needs of citizens and the democratic values of modern society.

  11. Quantifying bioalbedo: a new physically based model and discussion of empirical methods for characterising biological influence on ice and snow albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Joseph M.; Hodson, Andrew J.; Gardner, Alex S.; Flanner, Mark; Tedstone, Andrew J.; Williamson, Christopher; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.; Nilsson, Johan; Bryant, Robert; Tranter, Martyn

    2017-11-01

    The darkening effects of biological impurities on ice and snow have been recognised as a control on the surface energy balance of terrestrial snow, sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. With a heightened interest in understanding the impacts of a changing climate on snow and ice processes, quantifying the impact of biological impurities on ice and snow albedo (bioalbedo) and its evolution through time is a rapidly growing field of research. However, rigorous quantification of bioalbedo has remained elusive because of difficulties in isolating the biological contribution to ice albedo from that of inorganic impurities and the variable optical properties of the ice itself. For this reason, isolation of the biological signature in reflectance data obtained from aerial/orbital platforms has not been achieved, even when ground-based biological measurements have been available. This paper provides the cell-specific optical properties that are required to model the spectral signatures and broadband darkening of ice. Applying radiative transfer theory, these properties provide the physical basis needed to link biological and glaciological ground measurements with remotely sensed reflectance data. Using these new capabilities we confirm that biological impurities can influence ice albedo, then we identify 10 challenges to the measurement of bioalbedo in the field with the aim of improving future experimental designs to better quantify bioalbedo feedbacks. These challenges are (1) ambiguity in terminology, (2) characterising snow or ice optical properties, (3) characterising solar irradiance, (4) determining optical properties of cells, (5) measuring biomass, (6) characterising vertical distribution of cells, (7) characterising abiotic impurities, (8) surface anisotropy, (9) measuring indirect albedo feedbacks, and (10) measurement and instrument configurations. This paper aims to provide a broad audience of glaciologists and biologists with an overview of radiative transfer and

  12. Quantifying bioalbedo: a new physically based model and discussion of empirical methods for characterising biological influence on ice and snow albedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Cook

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The darkening effects of biological impurities on ice and snow have been recognised as a control on the surface energy balance of terrestrial snow, sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. With a heightened interest in understanding the impacts of a changing climate on snow and ice processes, quantifying the impact of biological impurities on ice and snow albedo (bioalbedo and its evolution through time is a rapidly growing field of research. However, rigorous quantification of bioalbedo has remained elusive because of difficulties in isolating the biological contribution to ice albedo from that of inorganic impurities and the variable optical properties of the ice itself. For this reason, isolation of the biological signature in reflectance data obtained from aerial/orbital platforms has not been achieved, even when ground-based biological measurements have been available. This paper provides the cell-specific optical properties that are required to model the spectral signatures and broadband darkening of ice. Applying radiative transfer theory, these properties provide the physical basis needed to link biological and glaciological ground measurements with remotely sensed reflectance data. Using these new capabilities we confirm that biological impurities can influence ice albedo, then we identify 10 challenges to the measurement of bioalbedo in the field with the aim of improving future experimental designs to better quantify bioalbedo feedbacks. These challenges are (1 ambiguity in terminology, (2 characterising snow or ice optical properties, (3 characterising solar irradiance, (4 determining optical properties of cells, (5 measuring biomass, (6 characterising vertical distribution of cells, (7 characterising abiotic impurities, (8 surface anisotropy, (9 measuring indirect albedo feedbacks, and (10 measurement and instrument configurations. This paper aims to provide a broad audience of glaciologists and biologists with an overview of

  13. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of delta f particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future

  14. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y. [and others

    2000-01-19

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of delta f particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future.

  15. Topos models for physics and topos theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, Sander, E-mail: s.wolters@math.ru.nl [Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen, Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics, and Particle Physics (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    What is the role of topos theory in the topos models for quantum theory as used by Isham, Butterfield, Döring, Heunen, Landsman, Spitters, and others? In other words, what is the interplay between physical motivation for the models and the mathematical framework used in these models? Concretely, we show that the presheaf topos model of Butterfield, Isham, and Döring resembles classical physics when viewed from the internal language of the presheaf topos, similar to the copresheaf topos model of Heunen, Landsman, and Spitters. Both the presheaf and copresheaf models provide a “quantum logic” in the form of a complete Heyting algebra. Although these algebras are natural from a topos theoretic stance, we seek a physical interpretation for the logical operations. Finally, we investigate dynamics. In particular, we describe how an automorphism on the operator algebra induces a homeomorphism (or isomorphism of locales) on the associated state spaces of the topos models, and how elementary propositions and truth values transform under the action of this homeomorphism. Also with dynamics the focus is on the internal perspective of the topos.

  16. ENA of heterocyclic hydrocarbons by adding hydrogen peroxide in groundwater circulation wells - a field-based study on a large physical model scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagner, A.; Tiehm, A.; Trotschler, O.; Haslwimmer, Th.; Koschitzky, H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Heterocyclic Hydrocarbons (NSO-HET) are ingredients of tar oil, commonly found down-gradient of former gasworks sites. Typical NSO-HET are benzofurans, methyl-benzofurans, methylquinoline, acridine or carbazole. During investigations of MNA (monitored natural attenuation) remediation strategies, it was found that most NSO-HET are highly mobile due to their high water solubility and low biodegradation rates. In addition, some were found to be highly toxic and carcinogenic. In particular under anaerobic conditions, NSO-HET biodegradation rates are low. However, aerobic biological degradation was found to be effective. Based on the extension and contaminant distribution of the plume (∼ 800 m long) down-gradient of a former gasworks 'Testfeld Sued' (TFS) in Southern Germany, the most applicable technology for enhancing the natural degradation of PAH, BTEX and NSO-HET was selected and tested under controlled conditions in a large physical model (Large Flume of VEGAS). The investigations focused on a technology for a homogeneous infiltration of electron acceptor solutions such as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide to provide the bacteria with molecular oxygen. An initial infiltration of oxygen (air-saturated water) during the adaptation of microorganism to aerobic biodegradation was followed by a time-limited addition of hydrogen peroxide to achieve an oxygen concentration up to 23 mg/L in the model aquifer. An almost complete degradation of NSO-HET was found. On the basis of numerical simulations and lab experiments, it was found that natural dispersion will not lead to a wide-ranging homogeneous distribution and mixing of the oxygen in the aquifer. The Groundwater Circulation Wells technology (GCW) can be applied to achieve a maximum mixing of the electron acceptor solution with the groundwater. A spherical groundwater circulation is induced by means of ex- and infiltration ports in vertical wells. Infiltration and ex-filtration ports are located in hydraulically separated

  17. Physical and mathematical modelling of extrusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Gronostajski, Z.; Niechajowics, A.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the work is to study the extrusion process using physical modelling and to compare the findings of the study with finite element predictions. The possibilities and advantages of the simultaneous application of both of these methods for the analysis of metal forming processes...

  18. Why supersymmetry? Physics beyond the standard model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Naturalness Principle as a requirement that the heavy mass scales decouple from the physics of light mass scales is reviewed. In quantum field theories containing {\\em elementary} scalar fields, such as the StandardModel of electroweak interactions containing the Higgs particle, mass of the scalar field is not a natural ...

  19. A physical model of the intrathoracic stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelman, W. A.; Verburg, J.; Brummelkamp, W. H.; Klopper, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether duodenogastric reflux into the thoracic stomach could be caused by the transmission of negative intrapleural pressure fluctuations into the gastric lumen, a physical model is described and an equation calculated Pm + Pa - Pmb - (Sv.Pmb.Vmb/Pm) = Ppl - Sv.Vmb where Pm is

  20. Why supersymmetry? Physics beyond the standard model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... Abstract. The Naturalness Principle as a requirement that the heavy mass scales decouple from the physics of light mass scales is reviewed. In quantum field theories containing elementary scalar fields, such as the Standard. Model of electroweak interactions containing the Higgs particle, mass of the ...

  1. Continuum Modeling in the Physical Sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groesen, van E.; Molenaar, J.

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical modeling—the ability to apply mathematical concepts and techniques to real-life systems—has expanded considerably over the last decades, making it impossible to cover all of its aspects in one course or textbook. Continuum Modeling in the Physical Sciences provides an extensive

  2. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  3. Physics Instruction Utilizing Culture-Based Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerrie E. Malaluan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research assessed topics in physics where culture-based pedagogy may be utilized and the applicability of Batangueño culture to these topics. It also determined the visual presentations which canbe prepared by teachers to incorporate Batangueñoculture in physics instruction. The end purpose of the study was to develop a teaching guide using culture-based pedagogy to reinforce the student’s learning, and help them achieve high academic performance. Descriptive method was adopted with questionnaire as tool in gathering data. Interviews and focus group discussions were also conducted. Thirty physics teachers in public secondary schools of the Division of Batangas City served as respondents. Purposive sampling was applied in determining the respondents. Frequency, percentage, ranking and weighted mean were statistical tools applied. Findings revealed that the culture-based pedagogy that could be utilized in teaching physics was on topics: Constant and Uniformly Acceleration; Work, Power and Energy; Laws of Motion; Projectile Motion; Heat and Light. Batangueño culture was found applicable in teaching physics. The visual presentations which could be used were pictures, powerpoint and video clips. Moreover, the proposed teaching guide utilizing culture-based pedagogy may be used by teachersto heighten students’ interest and motivation and to attain active participation and high achievement. It may be a reference of employing Batangueño culture in teaching the topics. It was recommended that the output be presented to the school heads and supervisors for their comments and suggestions for enrichment of content and application of culture-based pedagogy not only in science but in other learning areas.

  4. Multi-Physics MRI-Based Two-Layer Fluid-Structure Interaction Anisotropic Models of Human Right and Left Ventricles with Different Patch Materials: Cardiac Function Assessment and Mechanical Stress Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Geva, Tal; Gaudette, Glenn; Del Nido, Pedro J

    2011-06-01

    Multi-physics right and left ventricle (RV/LV) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models were introduced to perform mechanical stress analysis and evaluate the effect of patch materials on RV function. The FSI models included three different patch materials (Dacron scaffold, treated pericardium, and contracting myocardium), two-layer construction, fiber orientation, and active anisotropic material properties. The models were constructed based on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images acquired from a patient with severe RV dilatation and solved by ADINA. Our results indicate that the patch model with contracting myocardium leads to decreased stress level in the patch area, improved RV function and patch area contractility.

  5. Physical trust-based persistent authentication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fujita, Masahiro; Jensen, Christian D.; Arimura, Shiori

    2015-01-01

    Recently companies have applied two-factor user authentication. Persistent Authentication is one of the interesting authentication mechanisms to establish security and usability of two-factor authentication systems. However, there is room to improve its feasibility and usability. In this paper, we...... propose a new type of persistent authentication, called Persistent Authentication Based On physical Trust (PABOT). PABOT uses a context of “physical trust relationship” that is built by visual contact between users, and thus can offer a persistent authentication mechanism with better usability and higher...

  6. Model-implementation fidelity in cyber physical system design

    CERN Document Server

    Fabre, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This book puts in focus various techniques for checking modeling fidelity of Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), with respect to the physical world they represent. The authors' present modeling and analysis techniques representing different communities, from very different angles, discuss their possible interactions, and discuss the commonalities and differences between their practices. Coverage includes model driven development, resource-driven development, statistical analysis, proofs of simulator implementation, compiler construction, power/temperature modeling of digital devices, high-level performance analysis, and code/device certification. Several industrial contexts are covered, including modeling of computing and communication, proof architectures models and statistical based validation techniques. Addresses CPS design problems such as cross-application interference, parsimonious modeling, and trustful code production Describes solutions, such as simulation for extra-functional properties, extension of cod...

  7. Technical Manual for the SAM Physical Trough Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.; Gilman, P.

    2011-06-01

    NREL, in conjunction with Sandia National Lab and the U.S Department of Energy, developed the System Advisor Model (SAM) analysis tool for renewable energy system performance and economic analysis. This paper documents the technical background and engineering formulation for one of SAM's two parabolic trough system models in SAM. The Physical Trough model calculates performance relationships based on physical first principles where possible, allowing the modeler to predict electricity production for a wider range of component geometries than is possible in the Empirical Trough model. This document describes the major parabolic trough plant subsystems in detail including the solar field, power block, thermal storage, piping, auxiliary heating, and control systems. This model makes use of both existing subsystem performance modeling approaches, and new approaches developed specifically for SAM.

  8. Physics in the model for a eurobachelor syllabus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    of contact (teaching) hours amounts to 75. These hours are devoted to fundamentals of physics that enables the student to understand the principles of functionality of laboratory equipment and allow the student to operate such instruments at the user level. Details of the contents comprise elements......According to the decision of the 34th DAC meeting in Thessalonica, Eurocurriculum II is fully based on the Chemistry Eurobachelor model. 5 credit points (CP’s) is allocated to physics requirements for the degree of the European Chemical Thematic Network (ECTN) Chemistry Eurobachelor. Physics...

  9. Photonic Crystals Physics and Practical Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhoivanov, Igor A

    2009-01-01

    The great interest in photonic crystals and their applications in the past decade requires a thorough training of students and professionals who can practically apply the knowledge of physics of photonic crystals together with skills of independent calculation of basic characteristics of photonic crystals and modelling of various photonic crystal elements for application in all-optical communication systems. This book combines basic backgrounds in fiber and integrated optics with detailed analysis of mathematical models for 1D, 2D and 3D photonic crystals and microstructured fibers, as well as with descriptions of real algorithms and codes for practical realization of the models.

  10. Statistical physics of pairwise probability models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roudi, Yasser; Aurell, Erik; Hertz, John

    2009-01-01

    (dansk abstrakt findes ikke) Statistical models for describing the probability distribution over the states of biological systems are commonly used for dimensional reduction. Among these models, pairwise models are very attractive in part because they can be fit using a reasonable amount of  data......: knowledge of the means and correlations between pairs of elements in the system is sufficient. Not surprisingly, then, using pairwise models for studying neural data has been the focus of many studies in recent years. In this paper, we describe how tools from statistical physics can be employed for studying...... and using pairwise models. We build on our previous work on the subject and study the relation between different methods for fitting these models and evaluating their quality. In particular, using data from simulated cortical networks we study how the quality of various approximate methods for inferring...

  11. "Let's get physical": advantages of a physical model over 3D computer models and textbooks in learning imaging anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Daniel; Williams, Sarah B; Lam, Richard; Weller, Renate

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information plays an important part in medical and veterinary education. Appreciating complex 3D spatial relationships requires a strong foundational understanding of anatomy and mental 3D visualization skills. Novel learning resources have been introduced to anatomy training to achieve this. Objective evaluation of their comparative efficacies remains scarce in the literature. This study developed and evaluated the use of a physical model in demonstrating the complex spatial relationships of the equine foot. It was hypothesized that the newly developed physical model would be more effective for students to learn magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomy of the foot than textbooks or computer-based 3D models. Third year veterinary medicine students were randomly assigned to one of three teaching aid groups (physical model; textbooks; 3D computer model). The comparative efficacies of the three teaching aids were assessed through students' abilities to identify anatomical structures on MR images. Overall mean MRI assessment scores were significantly higher in students utilizing the physical model (86.39%) compared with students using textbooks (62.61%) and the 3D computer model (63.68%) (P < 0.001), with no significant difference between the textbook and 3D computer model groups (P = 0.685). Student feedback was also more positive in the physical model group compared with both the textbook and 3D computer model groups. Our results suggest that physical models may hold a significant advantage over alternative learning resources in enhancing visuospatial and 3D understanding of complex anatomical architecture, and that 3D computer models have significant limitations with regards to 3D learning. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Two-Polarisation Physical Model of Bowed Strings with Nonlinear Contact and Friction Forces, and Application to Gesture-Based Sound Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Desvages

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent bowed string sound synthesis has relied on physical modelling techniques; the achievable realism and flexibility of gestural control are appealing, and the heavier computational cost becomes less significant as technology improves. A bowed string sound synthesis algorithm is designed, by simulating two-polarisation string motion, discretising the partial differential equations governing the string’s behaviour with the finite difference method. A globally energy balanced scheme is used, as a guarantee of numerical stability under highly nonlinear conditions. In one polarisation, a nonlinear contact model is used for the normal forces exerted by the dynamic bow hair, left hand fingers, and fingerboard. In the other polarisation, a force-velocity friction curve is used for the resulting tangential forces. The scheme update requires the solution of two nonlinear vector equations. The dynamic input parameters allow for simulating a wide range of gestures; some typical bow and left hand gestures are presented, along with synthetic sound and video demonstrations.

  13. Integrated landscape-based approach of remote sensing, GIS, and physical modelling to study the hydrological connectivity of wetlands to the downstream water: progress and challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We report the recent progress on our effort to improve the mapping of wetland dynamics and the modelling of its functioning and hydrological connection to the downstream waters. Our study focused on the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), the Delmarva Peninsula, where the most of wetlands in CBW are densely distributed. The wetland ecosystem plays crucial roles in improving water quality and ecological integrity for the downstream waters and the Chesapeake Bay, and headwater wetlands in the region, such as Delmarva Bay, are now subject to the legal protection under the Clean Water Rules. We developed new wetland maps using time series Landsat images and a highly accurate LiDAR map over last 30 years. These maps show the changes in surface water fraction at a 30-m grid cell at annual time scale. Using GIS, we analyse these maps to characterize changing dynamics of wetland inundation due to the physical environmental factors (e.g., weather variability, tide) and assessed the hydrological connection of wetlands to the downstream water at the watershed scale. Focusing on the two adjacent watersheds in the upper region of the Choptank River Basin, we study how wetland inundation dynamics and the hydrologic linkage of wetlands to downstream water would vary by the local hydrogeological setting and attempt to identify the key landscape factors affecting the wetland ecosystems and functioning. We then discuss the potential of using remote sensing products to improve the physical modelling of wetlands from our experience with SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool).

  14. On Practising in Physical Education: Outline for a Pedagogical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggerholm, K.; Standal, O.; Barker, D. M.; Larsson, H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Models-based approaches to physical education have in recent years developed as a way for teachers and students to concentrate on a manageable number of learning objectives, and align pedagogical approaches with learning subject matter and context. This paper draws on Hannah Arendt's account of "vita activa" to map existing…

  15. Characterizing, modeling, and addressing gender disparities in introductory college physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost-Smith, Lauren Elizabeth

    2011-12-01

    The underrepresentation and underperformance of females in physics has been well documented and has long concerned policy-makers, educators, and the physics community. In this thesis, we focus on gender disparities in the first- and second-semester introductory, calculus-based physics courses at the University of Colorado. Success in these courses is critical for future study and careers in physics (and other sciences). Using data gathered from roughly 10,000 undergraduate students, we identify and model gender differences in the introductory physics courses in three areas: student performance, retention, and psychological factors. We observe gender differences on several measures in the introductory physics courses: females are less likely to take a high school physics course than males and have lower standardized mathematics test scores; males outscore females on both pre- and post-course conceptual physics surveys and in-class exams; and males have more expert-like attitudes and beliefs about physics than females. These background differences of males and females account for 60% to 70% of the gender gap that we observe on a post-course survey of conceptual physics understanding. In analyzing underlying psychological factors of learning, we find that female students report lower self-confidence related to succeeding in the introductory courses (self-efficacy) and are less likely to report seeing themselves as a "physics person". Students' self-efficacy beliefs are significant predictors of their performance, even when measures of physics and mathematics background are controlled, and account for an additional 10% of the gender gap. Informed by results from these studies, we implemented and tested a psychological, self-affirmation intervention aimed at enhancing female students' performance in Physics 1. Self-affirmation reduced the gender gap in performance on both in-class exams and the post-course conceptual physics survey. Further, the benefit of the self

  16. The limitations of mathematical modeling in high school physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forjan, Matej

    The theme of the doctoral dissertation falls within the scope of didactics of physics. Theoretical analysis of the key constraints that occur in the transmission of mathematical modeling of dynamical systems into field of physics education in secondary schools is presented. In an effort to explore the extent to which current physics education promotes understanding of models and modeling, we analyze the curriculum and the three most commonly used textbooks for high school physics. We focus primarily on the representation of the various stages of modeling in the solved tasks in textbooks and on the presentation of certain simplifications and idealizations, which are in high school physics frequently used. We show that one of the textbooks in most cases fairly and reasonably presents the simplifications, while the other two half of the analyzed simplifications do not explain. It also turns out that the vast majority of solved tasks in all the textbooks do not explicitly represent model assumptions based on what we can conclude that in high school physics the students do not develop sufficiently a sense of simplification and idealizations, which is a key part of the conceptual phase of modeling. For the introduction of modeling of dynamical systems the knowledge of students is also important, therefore we performed an empirical study on the extent to which high school students are able to understand the time evolution of some dynamical systems in the field of physics. The research results show the students have a very weak understanding of the dynamics of systems in which the feedbacks are present. This is independent of the year or final grade in physics and mathematics. When modeling dynamical systems in high school physics we also encounter the limitations which result from the lack of mathematical knowledge of students, because they don't know how analytically solve the differential equations. We show that when dealing with one-dimensional dynamical systems

  17. Predictive modeling of coupled multi-physics systems: II. Illustrative application to reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel; Badea, Madalina Corina

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied the PMCMPS methodology to a paradigm neutron diffusion model. • We underscore the main steps in applying PMCMPS to treat very large coupled systems. • PMCMPS reduces the uncertainties in the optimally predicted responses and model parameters. • PMCMPS is for sequentially treating coupled systems that cannot be treated simultaneously. - Abstract: This work presents paradigm applications to reactor physics of the innovative mathematical methodology for “predictive modeling of coupled multi-physics systems (PMCMPS)” developed by Cacuci (2014). This methodology enables the assimilation of experimental and computational information and computes optimally predicted responses and model parameters with reduced predicted uncertainties, taking fully into account the coupling terms between the multi-physics systems, but using only the computational resources that would be needed to perform predictive modeling on each system separately. The paradigm examples presented in this work are based on a simple neutron diffusion model, chosen so as to enable closed-form solutions with clear physical interpretations. These paradigm examples also illustrate the computational efficiency of the PMCMPS, which enables the assimilation of additional experimental information, with a minimal increase in computational resources, to reduce the uncertainties in predicted responses and best-estimate values for uncertain model parameters, thus illustrating how very large systems can be treated without loss of information in a sequential rather than simultaneous manner

  18. B physics beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, J.A.L.

    1997-12-01

    The ability of present and future experiments to test the Standard Model in the B meson sector is described. The authors examine the loop effects of new interactions in flavor changing neutral current B decays and in Z → b anti b, concentrating on supersymmetry and the left-right symmetric model as specific examples of new physics scenarios. The procedure for performing a global fit to the Wilson coefficients which describe b → s transitions is outlined, and the results of such a fit from Monte Carlo generated data is compared to the predictions of the two sample new physics scenarios. A fit to the Zb anti b couplings from present data is also given

  19. LHC Higgs physics beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spannowsky, M.

    2007-09-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be able to perform proton collisions at a much higher center-of-mass energy and luminosity than any other collider. Its main purpose is to detect the Higgs boson, the last unobserved particle of the Standard Model, explaining the riddle of the origin of mass. Studies have shown, that for the whole allowed region of the Higgs mass processes exist to detect the Higgs at the LHC. However, the Standard Model cannot be a theory of everything and is not able to provide a complete understanding of physics. It is at most an effective theory up to a presently unknown energy scale. Hence, extensions of the Standard Model are necessary which can affect the Higgs-boson signals. We discuss these effects in two popular extensions of the Standard Model: the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and the Standard Model with four generations (SM4G). Constraints on these models come predominantly from flavor physics and electroweak precision measurements. We show, that the SM4G is still viable and that a fourth generation has strong impact on decay and production processes of the Higgs boson. Furthermore, we study the charged Higgs boson in the MSSM, yielding a clear signal for physics beyond the Standard Model. For small tan {beta} in minimal flavor violation (MFV) no processes for the detection of a charged Higgs boson do exist at the LHC. However, MFV is just motivated by the experimental agreement of results from flavor physics with Standard Model predictions, but not by any basic theoretical consideration. In this thesis, we calculate charged Higgs boson production cross sections beyond the assumption of MFV, where a large number of free parameters is present in the MSSM. We find that the soft-breaking parameters which enhance the charged-Higgs boson production most are just bound to large values, e.g. by rare B-meson decays. Although the charged-Higgs boson cross sections beyond MFV turn out to be sizeable, only a detailed

  20. LHC Higgs physics beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spannowsky, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be able to perform proton collisions at a much higher center-of-mass energy and luminosity than any other collider. Its main purpose is to detect the Higgs boson, the last unobserved particle of the Standard Model, explaining the riddle of the origin of mass. Studies have shown, that for the whole allowed region of the Higgs mass processes exist to detect the Higgs at the LHC. However, the Standard Model cannot be a theory of everything and is not able to provide a complete understanding of physics. It is at most an effective theory up to a presently unknown energy scale. Hence, extensions of the Standard Model are necessary which can affect the Higgs-boson signals. We discuss these effects in two popular extensions of the Standard Model: the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and the Standard Model with four generations (SM4G). Constraints on these models come predominantly from flavor physics and electroweak precision measurements. We show, that the SM4G is still viable and that a fourth generation has strong impact on decay and production processes of the Higgs boson. Furthermore, we study the charged Higgs boson in the MSSM, yielding a clear signal for physics beyond the Standard Model. For small tan β in minimal flavor violation (MFV) no processes for the detection of a charged Higgs boson do exist at the LHC. However, MFV is just motivated by the experimental agreement of results from flavor physics with Standard Model predictions, but not by any basic theoretical consideration. In this thesis, we calculate charged Higgs boson production cross sections beyond the assumption of MFV, where a large number of free parameters is present in the MSSM. We find that the soft-breaking parameters which enhance the charged-Higgs boson production most are just bound to large values, e.g. by rare B-meson decays. Although the charged-Higgs boson cross sections beyond MFV turn out to be sizeable, only a detailed

  1. Statistical physics of pairwise probability models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Roudi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Statistical models for describing the probability distribution over the states of biological systems are commonly used for dimensional reduction. Among these models, pairwise models are very attractive in part because they can be fit using a reasonable amount of data: knowledge of the means and correlations between pairs of elements in the system is sufficient. Not surprisingly, then, using pairwise models for studying neural data has been the focus of many studies in recent years. In this paper, we describe how tools from statistical physics can be employed for studying and using pairwise models. We build on our previous work on the subject and study the relation between different methods for fitting these models and evaluating their quality. In particular, using data from simulated cortical networks we study how the quality of various approximate methods for inferring the parameters in a pairwise model depends on the time bin chosen for binning the data. We also study the effect of the size of the time bin on the model quality itself, again using simulated data. We show that using finer time bins increases the quality of the pairwise model. We offer new ways of deriving the expressions reported in our previous work for assessing the quality of pairwise models.

  2. Evaluation of the Effect of Physical Activity Programs on Self-Esteem and Body Mass Index of Overweight Adolescent Girls, based on Health Belief Model with School-Centered Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Rabiei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity in adolescents leads to physical and mental complications. Exercise is one of the main components of weight control programs. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of physical activity programs on self-esteem and Body Mass Index of overweight adolescent girls. Materials and Methods: This study was a semi experimental study.The subjects were 140 second grade student girls from two high schools in 5th district of Isfahan. Data collection scales included: tape measure, carriage scale, questionnaire to collect background and personal information, designed questionnaire based on Health Belief Model, weekly physical self- reportedand adolescent weekly food record form, parent’s nutritional performance questionnaire, teachers’ attitude on adolescents’ nutrition questionnaire and Cooper Smith's Standard Self-esteem questionnaire. Education based program on Health Belief Model for improving nutritional status consistent with model structures during six sessions each 60-minute was conducted with emphasis on diet to control weight in overweight and at-risk adolescents. Questionnaires were compared immediately afterand two months after intervention. Results: Average score of model structures and self-esteem of students in both groups had no significant difference at baseline, but immediately after and 2 months after the intervention, the mean component scores were significantly higher in intervention group in comparison with the control group. There was a significant difference in component scores at different times in the experimental group. Significant difference in BMI scores was seen at different times in experimental group. Conclusion: Findings of this study showed that school based approach of physical activity training leads to increase in knowledge, sensitivity, severity and perceived benefits and eventually increase in self- esteem and physical activity in students.

  3. Model-Based Enterprise Summit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Models Become Much More Efficient and Effective When Coupled With Knowledge Design Advisors CAD Fit Machine Motion KanBan Trigger Models Tolerance...Based Enterprise Geometry Kinematics Design Advisors Control Physics Planning System Models CAD Fit Machine Motion KanBan Trigger Models Tolerance

  4. Generomak: Fusion physics, engineering and costing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.

    1988-06-01

    A generic fusion physics, engineering and economics model (Generomak) was developed as a means of performing consistent analysis of the economic viability of alternative magnetic fusion reactors. The original Generomak model developed at Oak Ridge by Sheffield was expanded for the analyses of the Senior Committee on Environmental Safety and Economics of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM). This report describes the Generomak code as used by ESECOM. The input data used for each of the ten ESECOM fusion plants and the Generomak code output for each case is given. 14 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs

  5. First accelerator-based physics of 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Experiments in the East Area received their first beams from the PS this week. Theirs is CERN's first accelerator-based physics since LS1 began last year.   For the East Area, the PS performs a so-called slow extraction, where beam is extracted during many revolution periods (the time it take for particles to go around the PS, ~2.1 μs). The yellow line shows the circulating beam current in the PS, decreasing slowly during the slow extraction, which lasts 350 ms. The green line is the measured proton intensity in the transfer line toward the East Area target. Although LHC physics is still far away, we can now confirm that the injectors are producing physics! In the East Area - the experimental area behind the PS - the T9 and T10 beam lines are providing beams for physics. These beam lines serve experiments such as AIDA - which looks at new detector solutions for future accelerators - and the ALICE Inner Tracking System - which tests components for the ALICE experiment. &qu...

  6. "Theory Based Health Education: Application of Health Belief Model for Iranian Obese and Overweight Students about Physical Activity" in Urmia, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour, Baratali; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Khalkhali, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major problem in both developed and underdeveloped countries. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a physical education program (PEP) on promoting health belief model (HBM) scores, increasing physical activity (PA), and reducing obesity among Iranian high school students. This quasi-experimental study was accomplished at four high schools that were randomly divided into two groups of experiment (forty) and control (forty) male students in junior high schools in Urmia, Iran. Students in the experimental group received a PEP during 6 months. The essential parameters were used for evaluating the effects of educational program on HBM, PA, and body mass index (BMI) of students. After the intervention of 3 and 6 months, the experimental group showed a significant difference on the results of HBM constructs. According to the result of repeated-measures ANOVA, there is a significant difference between the experimental and control groups about the components of PA constructs. Analysis of covariance showed that although BMI reduced in 6 months after intervention, there was no significant difference in BMI. Results of the study revealed that implementation of PEP was effective on increasing the score of the components of HBM and PA of students.

  7. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu

    2012-01-01

    Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Accelerating physical rainbow model with CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinsen; Zheng, Changwen

    2017-07-01

    Currently Lorenz-Mie theory is the most accurate technique to simulate rainbows. However, it is still very attractive to use a model based on geometric optics to simulate rainbows, even methods based on geometric optics are not accurate enough. Since the droplets in the nature are non-spherical due to gravity and surface tension, Lorenz-Mie theory has difficult in handling non-spherical droplets, but they are easy for ray tracers. Sadeghi et al. develop a model based on geometric optics and do some extra work to match the prediction of Lorenz-Mie theory. However, the model takes much time on calculating to get sufficiently accurate phase function of droplets. In this paper, we firstly implement the model on PBRT, and then accelerate it with CUDA. The experiment results demonstrate that our acceleration algorithm greatly improves the speed of the model.

  9. Application of physical scaling towards downscaling climate model precipitation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Abhishek; Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    2018-04-01

    Physical scaling (SP) method downscales climate model data to local or regional scales taking into consideration physical characteristics of the area under analysis. In this study, multiple SP method based models are tested for their effectiveness towards downscaling North American regional reanalysis (NARR) daily precipitation data. Model performance is compared with two state-of-the-art downscaling methods: statistical downscaling model (SDSM) and generalized linear modeling (GLM). The downscaled precipitation is evaluated with reference to recorded precipitation at 57 gauging stations located within the study region. The spatial and temporal robustness of the downscaling methods is evaluated using seven precipitation based indices. Results indicate that SP method-based models perform best in downscaling precipitation followed by GLM, followed by the SDSM model. Best performing models are thereafter used to downscale future precipitations made by three global circulation models (GCMs) following two emission scenarios: representative concentration pathway (RCP) 2.6 and RCP 8.5 over the twenty-first century. The downscaled future precipitation projections indicate an increase in mean and maximum precipitation intensity as well as a decrease in the total number of dry days. Further an increase in the frequency of short (1-day), moderately long (2-4 day), and long (more than 5-day) precipitation events is projected.

  10. A Comparison of Filter-based Approaches for Model-based Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics approaches use domain knowledge about a system and its failure modes through the use of physics-based models. Model-based prognosis is...

  11. Learning from Sakata's Physics and Philosophy(The Jubilee of the Sakata Model)

    OpenAIRE

    Shoji, SAWADA

    2007-01-01

    The methodology and philosophical aspects of Shoichi Sakata's approach to the particle physics, especially the philosophical background of the Sakata model and his model-based examination on the quark model, are reviewed from the dialectic perspective of nature.

  12. Physical vs. Mathematical Models in Rock Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, I. B.; Deng, W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the less noted challenges in understanding the mechanical behavior of rocks at both in situ and lab conditions is the character of theoretical approaches being used. Currently, the emphasis is made on spatial averaging theories (homogenization and numerical models of microstructure), empirical models for temporal behavior (material memory, compliance functions and complex moduli), and mathematical transforms (Laplace and Fourier) used to infer the Q-factors and 'relaxation mechanisms'. In geophysical applications, we have to rely on such approaches for very broad spatial and temporal scales which are not available in experiments. However, the above models often make insufficient use of physics and utilize, for example, the simplified 'correspondence principle' instead of the laws of viscosity and friction. As a result, the commonly-used time- and frequency dependent (visco)elastic moduli represent apparent properties related to the measurement procedures and not necessarily to material properties. Predictions made from such models may therefore be inaccurate or incorrect when extrapolated beyond the lab scales. To overcome the above challenge, we need to utilize the methods of micro- and macroscopic mechanics and thermodynamics known in theoretical physics. This description is rigorous and accurate, uses only partial differential equations, and allows straightforward numerical implementations. One important observation from the physical approach is that the analysis should always be done for the specific geometry and parameters of the experiment. Here, we illustrate these methods on axial deformations of a cylindrical rock sample in the lab. A uniform, isotropic elastic rock with a thermoelastic effect is considered in four types of experiments: 1) axial extension with free transverse boundary, 2) pure axial extension with constrained transverse boundary, 3) pure bulk expansion, and 4) axial loading harmonically varying with time. In each of these cases, an

  13. Aesthetic Physics Education: A Symmetry Based, Physics and Fine Arts Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Jatila; Lubin, P. M.; Cook-Gumperz, J.; Raley, J. D.; Mazur, E.

    2006-12-01

    Physics education research in the past two decades has focused almost entirely on pedagogical methods, but the curriculum content remains unchanged. In a recent editorial in Physics Today (July, 2006, p. 10) the ability of physicists to “imagine new realities” is correlated with what are traditionally considered non-scientific skills, including imagination and creativity, qualities which are usually associated with fine arts. In view of the new developments in physics of the 21st Century, the importance of developing creativity and imagination through education is gaining recognition. We are investigating the effectiveness of teaching introductory physics from the viewpoint of symmetry, including the foundations of General Relativity and modern cosmology, without the need for the full tensor treatment. We will pilot a new course at UCSB in Winter Quarter, 2007 entitled Symmetry and Aesthetics in Introductory Physics. Our pedagogical model is based on three premises: that the introductory curriculum needs to be modernized; that mathematics should be presented as a language; and that theoretical physics has, at its core, a great deal in common with music, art, and dance. In this talk we will present the contents of our new course, and the means by which we plan to evaluate it in comparison to “regular” introductory courses. It is our hope that this modernized and integrated approach to introductory physics can also serve as a course for future teachers of primary and secondary school. This work is supported by NASA grant #20070268 and the Planck Explorer Mission.

  14. Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojiri, M.M.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Tsukuba, Graduate U. Adv. Studies /Tokyo U.; Plehn, T.; /Edinburgh U.; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Alexander, John M.; /Edinburgh U.; Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U.; Barr, Alan J.; /Oxford U.; Benakli, K.; /Paris U., VI-VII; Boudjema, F.; /Annecy, LAPTH; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.; Gwenlan, C.; /University Coll. London; Jager, S.; /CERN /LPSC, Grenoble

    2008-02-01

    This collection of studies on new physics at the LHC constitutes the report of the supersymmetry working group at the Workshop 'Physics at TeV Colliders', Les Houches, France, 2007. They cover the wide spectrum of phenomenology in the LHC era, from alternative models and signatures to the extraction of relevant observables, the study of the MSSM parameter space and finally to the interplay of LHC observations with additional data expected on a similar time scale. The special feature of this collection is that while not each of the studies is explicitly performed together by theoretical and experimental LHC physicists, all of them were inspired by and discussed in this particular environment.

  15. Physical Therapists' Perceptions of School-Based Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Sheryl L; Kuperstein, Janice; Effgen, Susan K

    2015-01-01

    Surveys have reported that most school-based physical therapists perceive ideal practices are not commonly implemented in their settings. Our aim was to obtain a more in-depth understanding of these perceptions through open-ended inquiry. Qualitative data were derived from voluntary open-ended responses provided upon completion of a survey regarding school-based physical therapy practice. Of the survey's 561 participants, 250 provided open-ended commentaries that were analyzed using interpretive phenomenology. Six qualitative themes emerged from the open-ended responses, including: In quest: Meeting students' school-based needs via physical therapy; Seeking relatedness: Finding working teams in the school system; Building understanding: Developing a voice/identity in the school context; Stretched beyond limits: Managing workloads; Networking: Coordinating services outside school to meet student needs; Defying definition: What does working in an educational model mean? School-based physical therapists seek to meet educationally relevant physical therapy needs of students, ages 3 to 21 years. Successes appear woven of a multitude of factors such as therapist expertise, team dynamics, and district supports.

  16. Physical-Statistical Model of Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Usowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A physical-statistical model for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids is proposed. The volumetric unit of nanofluids in the model consists of solid, liquid, and gas particles and is treated as a system made up of regular geometric figures, spheres, filling the volumetric unit by layers. The model assumes that connections between layers of the spheres and between neighbouring spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of thermal resistors, respectively. This model is expressed in terms of thermal resistance of nanoparticles and fluids and the multinomial distribution of particles in the nanofluids. The results for predicted and measured effective thermal conductivity of several nanofluids (Al2O3/ethylene glycol-based and Al2O3/water-based; CuO/ethylene glycol-based and CuO/water-based; and TiO2/ethylene glycol-based are presented. The physical-statistical model shows a reasonably good agreement with the experimental results and gives more accurate predictions for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids compared to existing classical models.

  17. A physics-based fractional order model and state of energy estimation for lithium ion batteries. Part II: Parameter identification and state of energy estimation for LiFePO4 battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Pan, Ke; Fan, Guodong; Lu, Rengui; Zhu, Chunbo; Rizzoni, Giorgio; Canova, Marcello

    2017-11-01

    State of energy (SOE) is an important index for the electrochemical energy storage system in electric vehicles. In this paper, a robust state of energy estimation method in combination with a physical model parameter identification method is proposed to achieve accurate battery state estimation at different operating conditions and different aging stages. A physics-based fractional order model with variable solid-state diffusivity (FOM-VSSD) is used to characterize the dynamic performance of a LiFePO4/graphite battery. In order to update the model parameter automatically at different aging stages, a multi-step model parameter identification method based on the lexicographic optimization is especially designed for the electric vehicle operating conditions. As the battery available energy changes with different applied load current profiles, the relationship between the remaining energy loss and the state of charge, the average current as well as the average squared current is modeled. The SOE with different operating conditions and different aging stages are estimated based on an adaptive fractional order extended Kalman filter (AFEKF). Validation results show that the overall SOE estimation error is within ±5%. The proposed method is suitable for the electric vehicle online applications.

  18. Body shape model, physical activity and eating behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui Lobera, I; Tomillo Cid, S; Santiago Fernández, M J; Bolaños Ríos, P

    2011-01-01

    Research on the influence of body shape model on adolescent males is scarce. The current study aimed to assess this influence among adult males involved in intense physical activity and to determine its relationship to eating behaviour. Possible variations between 1998 and 2008 were also analysed. A total of 950 males (672 in 1998 and 278 in 2008), all aspiring professional soldiers, were studied using the Questionnaire of Influences on Body Shape Model (CIMEC-V) and the Eating Attitudes Test-40 (EAT-40), as well as by assessing their physical/sporting activity and body mass index (BMI). Scores on the CIMEC-V were significantly correlated with the EAT-40 and BMI. As regards physical activity the only positive correlation referred to gym-based exercise. A cluster analysis revealed two subgroups with respect to physical activity, BMI, and scores on the CIMEC-V and EAT-40. One of them scored higher on these three variables and they also had a BMI > 25. The comparative study of data from 1998 and 2008 showed significant changes in some variables. Generally, the results differ considerably from those reported for younger samples (which would suggest a lower risk of disordered eating behaviour). However, there is a higher risk group in which the influence of body shape models, physical activity and eating behaviour are related to greater body volume. The influence of the body shape model on males has increased, especially as regards the influence of friends and in terms of behaviours aimed at weight loss.

  19. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu, Yijian

    2012-03-01

    Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China’s paper industry based on physical input–output life-cycle assessment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu Yijian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. ► Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. ► Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. ► Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input–output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China’s paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  1. Climate-change driven range shifts of anchovy biomass projected by bio-physical coupling individual based model in the marginal seas of East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sukgeun; Pang, Ig-Chan; Lee, Joon-ho; Lee, Kyunghwan

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies in the western North Pacific reported a declining standing stock biomass of anchovy ( Engraulis japonicus) in the Yellow Sea and a climate-driven southward shift of anchovy catch in Korean waters. We investigated the effects of a warming ocean on the latitudinal shift of anchovy catch by developing and applying individual-based models (IBMs) based on a regional ocean circulation model and an IPCC climate change scenario. Despite the greater uncertainty, our two IBMs projected that, by the 2030s, the strengthened Tsushima warm current in the Korea Strait and the East Sea, driven by global warming, and the subsequent confinement of the relatively cold water masses within the Yellow Sea will decrease larval anchovy biomass in the Yellow Sea, but will increase it in the Korea Strait and the East Sea. The decreasing trend of anchovy biomass in the Yellow Sea was reproduced by our models, but further validation and enhancement of the models is required together with extended ichthyoplankton surveys to understand and reliably project range shifts of anchovy and the impacts such range shifts will have on the marine ecosystems and fisheries in the region.

  2. Health Physics Positions Data Base: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Borges, T.; Stafford, R.S.; Lu, P.Y.; Carter, D.

    1994-02-01

    The Health Physics Positions (HPPOS) Data Base of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is a collection of NRC staff positions on a wide range of topics involving radiation protection (health physics). It consists of 328 documents in the form of letters, memoranda, and excerpts from technical reports. The HPPOS Data Base was developed by the NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices to help ensure uniformity in inspections, enforcement, and licensing actions. Staff members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have assisted the NRC staff in summarizing the documents during the preparation of this NUREG report. These summaries are also being made available as a open-quotes stand aloneclose quotes software package for IBM and IBM-compatible personal computers. The software package for this report is called HPPOS Version 2.0. A variety of indexing schemes were used to increase the usefulness of the NUREG report and its associated software. The software package and the summaries in the report are written in the context of the open-quotes newclose quotes 10 CFR Part 20 (section section 20.1001--20.2401). The purpose of this NUREG report is to allow interested individuals to familiarize themselves with the contents of the HPPOS Data Base and with the basis of many NRC decisions and regulations. The HPPOS summaries and original documents are intended to serve as a source of information for radiation protection programs at nuclear research and power reactors, nuclear medicine, and other industries that either process or use nuclear materials

  3. Durability of cement-based materials: modeling of the influence of physical and chemical equilibria on the microstructure and the residual mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, E.

    2004-09-01

    A large part of mechanical and durability characteristics of cement-based materials comes from the performances of the hydrated cement, cohesive matrix surrounding the granular skeleton. Experimental studies, in situ or in laboratory, associated to models, have notably enhanced knowledge on the cement material and led to adapted formulations to specific applications or particularly aggressive environments. Nevertheless, these models, developed for precise cases, do not permit to specifically conclude for other experimental conclusions. To extend its applicability domain, we propose a new evolutive approach, based on reactive transport expressed at the microstructure scale of the cement. In a general point of view, the evolution of the solid compounds of the cement matrix, by dissolutions or precipitations, during chemical aggressions can be related to the pore solution evolution, and this one relied to the ionic exchanges with the external environment. By the utilization of a geochemical code associated to a thermodynamical database and coupled to a 3D transport model, this approach authorizes the study of all aggressive solution. The approach has been validated by the comparison of experimental observations to simulated degradations for three different environments (pure water, mineralized water, seawater) and on three different materials (CEM I Portland cement with 0.25, 0.4 and 0.5 water-to cement ratio). The microstructural approach permits also to have access to mechanical properties evolutions. During chemical aggressions, the cement matrix evolution is traduced in a microstructure evolution. This one is represented from 3D images similarly to the models developed at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). A new finite-element model, validated on previous tests or models, evaluates the stiffness of the cement paste, using as a mesh these microstructures. Our approach identifies and quantifies the major influence of porosity and its spatial

  4. Web Based VRML Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.; Sarfraz, M.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a method to connect VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java components in a Web page using EAI (External Authoring Interface), which makes it possible to interactively generate and edit VRML meshes. The meshes used are based on regular grids, to provide an interaction and modeling

  5. Web Based VRML Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.; Banissi, E.; Khosrowshahi, F.; Sarfraz, M.; Ursyn, A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a method to connect VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java components in a Web page using EAI (External Authoring Interface), which makes it possible to interactively generate and edit VRML meshes. The meshes used are based on regular grids, to provide an interaction and modeling

  6. Model-based Prognostics with Concurrent Damage Progression Processes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics approaches rely on physics-based models that describe the behavior of systems and their components. These models must account for the several...

  7. Didactic model of the dynamics of motivation for learning Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayalis Baralt-Ramos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the proposal of a didactic model of the dynamics of the motivation for learning of physics, which is based on the theoretical systematization of communicative interdisciplinarity as conception of Barrera (2003 and pedagogical professional pre approach Despaigne (2012 for teachers in training career mathematically Physics. The same is rooted in systemic-structural method. This educational model will be implemented in practice through a strategy of the same nature for motivation for learning physics with what can contribute to the solution of the dialectical contradiction between what is understood, cognitive self-reflection of teachers in training and given the experiences and feelings related to what you learn, invigorated by the method of disclosure teaching of science

  8. Predictive modeling of coupled multi-physics systems: I. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed “predictive modeling of coupled multi-physics systems (PMCMPS)”. • PMCMPS reduces predicted uncertainties in predicted model responses and parameters. • PMCMPS treats efficiently very large coupled systems. - Abstract: This work presents an innovative mathematical methodology for “predictive modeling of coupled multi-physics systems (PMCMPS).” This methodology takes into account fully the coupling terms between the systems but requires only the computational resources that would be needed to perform predictive modeling on each system separately. The PMCMPS methodology uses the maximum entropy principle to construct an optimal approximation of the unknown a priori distribution based on a priori known mean values and uncertainties characterizing the parameters and responses for both multi-physics models. This “maximum entropy”-approximate a priori distribution is combined, using Bayes’ theorem, with the “likelihood” provided by the multi-physics simulation models. Subsequently, the posterior distribution thus obtained is evaluated using the saddle-point method to obtain analytical expressions for the optimally predicted values for the multi-physics models parameters and responses along with corresponding reduced uncertainties. Noteworthy, the predictive modeling methodology for the coupled systems is constructed such that the systems can be considered sequentially rather than simultaneously, while preserving exactly the same results as if the systems were treated simultaneously. Consequently, very large coupled systems, which could perhaps exceed available computational resources if treated simultaneously, can be treated with the PMCMPS methodology presented in this work sequentially and without any loss of generality or information, requiring just the resources that would be needed if the systems were treated sequentially

  9. Constraining magma physical properties and its temporal evolution from InSAR and topographic data only: a physics-based eruption model for the effusive phase of the Cordon Caulle 2011-2012 rhyodacitic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F.; Kubanek, J.; Anderson, K. R.; Lundgren, P.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    The 2011-2012 eruption of Cordón Caulle volcano in Chile is the best scientifically observed rhyodacitic eruption and is thus a key place to understand the dynamics of these rare but powerful explosive rhyodacitic eruptions. Because the volatile phase controls both the eruption temporal evolution and the eruptive style, either explosive or effusive, it is important to constrain the physical parameters that drive these eruptions. The eruption began explosively and after two weeks evolved into a hybrid explosive - lava flow effusion whose volume-time evolution we constrain with a series of TanDEM-X Digital Elevation Models. Our data shows the intrusion of a large volume laccolith or cryptodome during the first 2.5 months of the eruption and lava flow effusion only afterwards, with a total volume of 1.4 km3. InSAR data from the ENVISAT and TerraSAR-X missions shows more than 2 m of subsidence during the effusive eruption phase produced by deflation of a finite spheroidal source at a depth of 5 km. In order to constrain the magma total H2O content, crystal cargo, and reservoir pressure drop we numerically solve the coupled set of equations of a pressurized magma reservoir, magma conduit flow and time dependent density, volatile exsolution and viscosity that we use to invert the InSAR and topographic data time series. We compare the best-fit model parameters with independent estimates of magma viscosity and total gas content measured from lava samples. Preliminary modeling shows that although it is not possible to model both the InSAR and the topographic data during the onset of the laccolith emplacement, it is possible to constrain the magma H2O and crystal content, to 4% wt and 30% which agree well with published literature values.

  10. Modelling of cardiovascular system: development of a hybrid (numerical-physical) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, G; Kozarski, M; De Lazzari, C; Górczyńska, K; Mimmo, R; Guaragno, M; Tosti, G; Darowski, M

    2003-12-01

    Physical models of the circulation are used for research, training and for testing of implantable active and passive circulatory prosthetic and assistance devices. However, in comparison with numerical models, they are rigid and expensive. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a model of the circulation based on the merging of a lumped parameter physical model into a numerical one (producing therefore a hybrid). The physical model is limited to the barest essentials and, in this application, developed to test the principle, it is a windkessel representing the systemic arterial tree. The lumped parameters numerical model was developed in LabVIEW environment and represents pulmonary and systemic circulation (except the systemic arterial tree). Based on the equivalence between hydraulic and electrical circuits, this prototype was developed connecting the numerical model to an electrical circuit--the physical model. This specific solution is valid mainly educationally but permits the development of software and the verification of preliminary results without using cumbersome hydraulic circuits. The interfaces between numerical and electrical circuits are set up by a voltage controlled current generator and a voltage controlled voltage generator. The behavior of the model is analyzed based on the ventricular pressure-volume loops and on the time course of arterial and ventricular pressures and flow in different circulatory conditions. The model can represent hemodynamic relationships in different ventricular and circulatory conditions.

  11. Fluid discrimination based on rock physics templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qian; Yin, Xingyao; Li, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir fluid discrimination is an indispensable part of seismic exploration. Reliable fluid discrimination helps to decrease the risk of exploration and to increase the success ratio of drilling. There are many kinds of fluid indicators that are used in fluid discriminations, most of which are single indicators. But single indicators do not always work well under complicated reservoir conditions. Therefore, combined fluid indicators are needed to increase accuracies of discriminations. In this paper, we have proposed an alternative strategy for the combination of fluid indicators. An alternative fluid indicator, the rock physics template-based indicator (RPTI) has been derived to combine the advantages of two single indicators. The RPTI is more sensitive to the contents of fluid than traditional indicators. The combination is implemented based on the characteristic of the fluid trend in the rock physics template, which means few subjective factors are involved. We also propose an inversion method to assure the accuracy of the RPTI input data. The RPTI profile is an intuitionistic interpretation of fluid content. Real data tests demonstrate the applicability and validity. (paper)

  12. Les Houches Summer School on Theoretical Physics: Session 84: Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lavignac, Stephan; Dalibard, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles and interactions is one of the tested theories in physics. This book presents a collection of lectures given in August 2005 at the Les Houches Summer School on Particle Physics beyond the Standard Model. It provides a pedagogical introduction to the aspects of particle physics beyond the Standard Model

  13. Relativistic nuclear physics with the spectator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1988-01-01

    The spectator model, a general approach to the relativistic treatment of nuclear physics problems in which spectators to nuclear interactions are put on their mass-shell, will be defined nd described. The approach grows out of the relativistic treatment of two and three body systems in which one particle is off-shell, and recent numerical results for the NN interaction will be presented. Two meson-exchange models, one with only 4 mesons (π, σ, /rho/, ω) but with a 25% admixture of γ 5 coupling for the pion, and a second with 6 mesons (π, σ, /rho/, ω, δ, and /eta/) but a pure γ 5 γ/sup mu/ pion coupling, are shown to give very good quantitative fits to NN scattering phase shifts below 400 MeV, and also a good description of the /rho/ 40 Cα elastic scattering observables. 19 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. Physical and Chemical Environmental Abstraction Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, E.

    2000-01-01

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a), Task 1, an overall conceptualization of the physical and chemical environment (P/CE) in the emplacement drift is documented in this Analysis/Model Report (AMR). Included are the physical components of the engineered barrier system (EBS). The intended use of this descriptive conceptualization is to assist the Performance Assessment Department (PAD) in modeling the physical and chemical environment within a repository drift. It is also intended to assist PAD in providing a more integrated and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues raised in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). EBS-related features, events, and processes (FEPs) have been assembled and discussed in ''EBS FEPs/Degradation Modes Abstraction'' (CRWMS M and O 2000a). Reference AMRs listed in Section 6 address FEPs that have not been screened out. This conceptualization does not directly address those FEPs. Additional tasks described in the written development plan are recommended for future work in Section 7.3. To achieve the stated purpose, the scope of this document includes: (1) the role of in-drift physical and chemical environments in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) (Section 6.1); (2) the configuration of engineered components (features) and critical locations in drifts (Sections 6.2.1 and 6.3, portions taken from EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction (CRWMS M and O 2000b)); (3) overview and critical locations of processes that can affect P/CE (Section 6.3); (4) couplings and relationships among features and processes in the drifts (Section 6.4); and (5) identities and uses of parameters transmitted to TSPA by some of the reference AMRs (Section 6.5). This AMR originally considered a design with backfill, and is now being updated (REV 00 ICN1) to address

  15. Detecting physics beyond the Standard Model with the REDTOP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, D.; León, D.; Fabela, B.; Pedraza, M. I.

    2017-10-01

    REDTOP is an experiment at its proposal stage. It belongs to the High Intensity class of experiments. REDTOP will use a 1.8 GeV continuous proton beam impinging on a fixed target. It is expected to produce about 1013 η mesons per year. The main goal of REDTOP is to look for physics beyond the Standard Model by detecting rare η decays. The detector is designed with innovative technologies based on the detection of prompt Cherenkov light, such that interesting events can be observed and the background events are efficiently rejected. The experimental design, the physics program and the running plan of the experiment is presented.

  16. Modelling of physical properties - databases, uncertainties and predictive power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    Physical and thermodynamic property in the form of raw data or estimated values for pure compounds and mixtures are important pre-requisites for performing tasks such as, process design, simulation and optimization; computer aided molecular/mixture (product) design; and, product-process analysis...... in the estimated/predicted property values, how to assess the quality and reliability of the estimated/predicted property values? The paper will review a class of models for prediction of physical and thermodynamic properties of organic chemicals and their mixtures based on the combined group contribution – atom...

  17. Multi-scale validation of a new soil freezing scheme for a land-surface model with physically-based hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gouttevin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil freezing is a major feature of boreal regions with substantial impact on climate. The present paper describes the implementation of the thermal and hydrological effects of soil freezing in the land surface model ORCHIDEE, which includes a physical description of continental hydrology. The new soil freezing scheme is evaluated against analytical solutions and in-situ observations at a variety of scales in order to test its numerical robustness, explore its sensitivity to parameterization choices and confront its performance to field measurements at typical application scales.

    Our soil freezing model exhibits a low sensitivity to the vertical discretization for spatial steps in the range of a few millimetres to a few centimetres. It is however sensitive to the temperature interval around the freezing point where phase change occurs, which should be 1 °C to 2 °C wide. Furthermore, linear and thermodynamical parameterizations of the liquid water content lead to similar results in terms of water redistribution within the soil and thermal evolution under freezing. Our approach does not allow firm discrimination of the performance of one approach over the other.

    The new soil freezing scheme considerably improves the representation of runoff and river discharge in regions underlain by permafrost or subject to seasonal freezing. A thermodynamical parameterization of the liquid water content appears more appropriate for an integrated description of the hydrological processes at the scale of the vast Siberian basins. The use of a subgrid variability approach and the representation of wetlands could help capture the features of the Arctic hydrological regime with more accuracy.

    The modeling of the soil thermal regime is generally improved by the representation of soil freezing processes. In particular, the dynamics of the active layer is captured with more accuracy, which is of crucial importance in the prospect of

  18. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input–output model: A case of Suzhou in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Sai; Zhang Tianzhu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Impacts of solid waste recycling on Suzhou’s urban metabolism in 2015 are analyzed. ► Sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. ► Technical levels of reusing scrap tires and food wastes should be improved. ► Other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. ► Secondary wastes from reusing food wastes and sludge should be concerned. - Abstract: Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input–output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

  19. Physical bases of the generation of short-term earthquake precursors: A complex model of ionization-induced geophysical processes in the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Ouzounov, D. P.; Karelin, A. V.; Davidenko, D. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the current understanding of the interaction between geospheres from a complex set of physical and chemical processes under the influence of ionization. The sources of ionization involve the Earth's natural radioactivity and its intensification before earthquakes in seismically active regions, anthropogenic radioactivity caused by nuclear weapon testing and accidents in nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage, the impact of galactic and solar cosmic rays, and active geophysical experiments using artificial ionization equipment. This approach treats the environment as an open complex system with dissipation, where inherent processes can be considered in the framework of the synergistic approach. We demonstrate the synergy between the evolution of thermal and electromagnetic anomalies in the Earth's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. This makes it possible to determine the direction of the interaction process, which is especially important in applications related to short-term earthquake prediction. That is why the emphasis in this study is on the processes proceeding the final stage of earthquake preparation; the effects of other ionization sources are used to demonstrate that the model is versatile and broadly applicable in geophysics.

  20. On the influence of cell size in physically-based distributed hydrological modelling to assess extreme values in water resource planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Egüen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the influence of changing spatial resolution on the implementation of distributed hydrological modelling for water resource planning in Mediterranean areas. Different cell sizes were used to investigate variations in the basin hydrologic response given by the model WiMMed, developed in Andalusia (Spain, in a selected watershed. The model was calibrated on a monthly basis from the available daily flow data at the reservoir that closes the watershed, for three different cell sizes, 30, 100, and 500 m, and the effects of this change on the hydrological response of the basin were analysed by means of the comparison of the hydrological variables at different time scales for a 3-yr-period, and the effective values for the calibration parameters obtained for each spatial resolution. The variation in the distribution of the input parameters due to using different spatial resolutions resulted in a change in the obtained hydrological networks and significant differences in other hydrological variables, both in mean basin-scale and values distributed in the cell level. Differences in the magnitude of annual and global runoff, together with other hydrological components of the water balance, became apparent. This study demonstrated the importance of choosing the appropriate spatial scale in the implementation of a distributed hydrological model to reach a balance between the quality of results and the computational cost; thus, 30 and 100-m could be chosen for water resource management, without significant decrease in the accuracy of the simulation, but the 500-m cell size resulted in significant overestimation of runoff and consequently, could involve uncertain decisions based on the expected availability of rainfall excess for storage in the reservoirs. Particular values of the effective calibration parameters are also provided for this hydrological model and the study area.

  1. Physical-Socio-Economic Modeling of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Vatan, F.

    2008-12-01

    Because of the global nature of climate change, any assessment of the effects of plans, policies, and response to climate change demands a model that encompasses the entire Earth System, including socio- economic factors. Physics-based climate models of the factors that drive global temperatures, rainfall patterns, and sea level are necessary but not sufficient to guide decision making. Actions taken by farmers, industrialists, environmentalists, politicians, and other policy makers may result in large changes to economic factors, international relations, food production, disease vectors, and beyond. These consequences will not be felt uniformly around the globe or even across a given region. Policy models must comprehend all of these considerations. Combining physics-based models of the Earth's climate and biosphere with societal models of population dynamics, economics, and politics is a grand challenge with high stakes. We propose to leverage our recent advances in modeling and simulation of military stability and reconstruction operations to models that address all these areas of concern. Following over twenty years' experience of successful combat simulation, JPL has started developing Minerva, which will add demographic, economic, political, and media/information models to capabilities that already exist. With these new models, for which we have design concepts, it will be possible to address a very wide range of potential national and international problems that were previously inaccessible. Our climate change model builds on Minerva and expands the geographical horizon from playboxes containing regions and neighborhoods to the entire globe. This system consists of a collection of interacting simulation models that specialize in different aspects of the global situation. They will each contribute to and draw from a pool of shared data. The basic models are: the physical model; the demographic model; the political model; the economic model; and the media

  2. Health Physics Positions Data Base: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, G.D.; Borges, T.; Stafford, R.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-02-01

    The Health Physics Positions (HPPOS) Data Base of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is a collection of NRC staff positions on a wide range of topics involving radiation protection (health physics). It consists of 328 documents in the form of letters, memoranda, and excerpts from technical reports. The HPPOS Data Base was developed by the NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices to help ensure uniformity in inspections, enforcement, and licensing actions. Staff members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have assisted the NRC staff in summarizing the documents during the preparation of this NUREG report. These summaries are also being made available as a {open_quotes}stand alone{close_quotes} software package for IBM and IBM-compatible personal computers. The software package for this report is called HPPOS Version 2.0. A variety of indexing schemes were used to increase the usefulness of the NUREG report and its associated software. The software package and the summaries in the report are written in the context of the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} 10 CFR Part 20 ({section}{section}20.1001--20.2401). The purpose of this NUREG report is to allow interested individuals to familiarize themselves with the contents of the HPPOS Data Base and with the basis of many NRC decisions and regulations. The HPPOS summaries and original documents are intended to serve as a source of information for radiation protection programs at nuclear research and power reactors, nuclear medicine, and other industries that either process or use nuclear materials.

  3. Simple physical-empirical model of the precipitation distribution based on a tropical sea surface temperature threshold and the effects of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Yakelyn R.; Takahashi, Ken

    2018-03-01

    The observed nonlinear relationship between tropical sea surface temperature (T_s) and precipitation ( P) on climate timescales, by which a threshold (T_c) must be exceeded by T_s in order for deep convection to occur, is the basis of a physical-empirical model (PEM) that we fitted to observational data and CMIP5 climate model output and used to show that, with essentially only two constant parameters (T_c and the sensitivity a_1 of P to T_s>T_c), it provides a useful first-order description of the climatological and interannual variability of the large-scale distribution of tropical P given T_s, as well as of the biases of the Global Climate Models (GCMs). A substantial limitation is its underestimation of the peak P in the convergence zones, as the necessary processes associated with the atmospheric circulation are not considered. The pattern of the intermodel correlation between the mean T_s-T_c for each GCM and the average P distribution is in agreement with the double ITCZ bias, featuring roughly zonally-symmetric off-equatorial maxima, rather than being regionally or hemispherically restricted. The inter-comparison of GCMs indicates a relationship between T_c with the near-equatorial low-level (850 hPa) tropospheric temperature, consistent with the interpretation that it is a measure of the convective inhibition (CIN). The underestimation of T_c is linked to the cold free tropospheric bias in the GCMs. However, the discrepancy among the observational datasets is a limitation for assessing the GCM biases from the PEM framework quantitatively. Under the RCP4.5 climate change scenario, T_c increases slightly more than the mean tropical T_s, implying a stabilizing trend consistent with the amplified free tropospheric warming relative to the surface. However, since a_1 increases by 10-50%/°C with the surface warming, its effect dominates and results in generally positive precipitation change (Δ P) in the equatorial regions. In the equatorial eastern

  4. Fuzzy modelling of Atlantic salmon physical habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Hilaire, André; Mocq, Julien; Cunjak, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Fish habitat models typically attempt to quantify the amount of available river habitat for a given fish species for various flow and hydraulic conditions. To achieve this, information on the preferred range of values of key physical habitat variables (e.g. water level, velocity, substrate diameter) for the targeted fishs pecies need to be modelled. In this context, we developed several habitat suitability indices sets for three Atlantic salmon life stages (young-of-the-year (YOY), parr, spawning adults) with the help of fuzzy logic modeling. Using the knowledge of twenty-seven experts, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, we defined fuzzy sets of four variables (depth, substrate size, velocity and Habitat Suitability Index, or HSI) and associated fuzzy rules. When applied to the Romaine River (Canada), median curves of standardized Weighted Usable Area (WUA) were calculated and a confidence interval was obtained by bootstrap resampling. Despite the large range of WUA covered by the expert WUA curves, confidence intervals were relatively narrow: an average width of 0.095 (on a scale of 0 to 1) for spawning habitat, 0.155 for parr rearing habitat and 0.160 for YOY rearing habitat. When considering an environmental flow value corresponding to 90% of the maximum reached by WUA curve, results seem acceptable for the Romaine River. Generally, this proposed fuzzy logic method seems suitable to model habitat availability for the three life stages, while also providing an estimate of uncertainty in salmon preferences.

  5. Modeling Clinically Validated Physical Activity Assessments Using Commodity Hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Kyle N; Dominick, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Consumer-grade wearable activity devices such as Fitbits are increasingly being used in research settings to promote physical activity (PA) due to their low-cost and widespread popularity. However, Fitbit-derived measures of activity intensity are consistently reported to be less accurate than intensity estimates obtained from research-grade accelerometers (i.e., ActiGraph). As such, the potential for using a Fitbit to measure PA intensity within research contexts remains limited. This study aims to model ActiGraph-based intensity estimates from the validated Freedson vector magnitude (VM3) algorithm using measures of steps, metabolic equivalents, and intensity levels obtained from Fitbit. Minute-level data collected from 19 subjects, who concurrently wore the ActiGraph GT3X and Fitbit Flex devices for an average of 1.8 weeks, were used to generate the model. After testing several modeling methods, a naïve Bayes classifier was chosen based on the lowest achieved error rate. Overall, the model reduced Fitbit to ActiGraph errors from 19.97% to 16.32%. Moreover, the model reduced misclassification of Fitbit-based estimates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) by 40%, eliminating a statistically significant difference between MVPA estimates derived from ActiGraph and Fitbit. Study findings support the general utility of the model for measuring MVPA with the Fitbit Flex in place of the more costly ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer for young healthy adults.

  6. Computer Integrated Manufacturing: Physical Modelling Systems Design. A Personal View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) Physical Modeling Systems Design project was undertaken in a time of rapid change in the industrial, business, technological, training, and educational areas in Australia. A specification of a manufacturing physical modeling system was drawn up. Physical modeling provides a flexibility and configurability…

  7. Ontological Knowledge Base of Physical and Technical Effects for Conceptual Design of Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASTRAKHAN CIVIL ENGINEERING INSTITUTE, Astrakhan (Russian Federation))" data-affiliation=" (Department of CAD Systems, State Autonomous Educational Institution of Astrakhan Region of Higher Professional Education ASTRAKHAN CIVIL ENGINEERING INSTITUTE, Astrakhan (Russian Federation))" >Zaripova, V M; ASTRAKHAN CIVIL ENGINEERING INSTITUTE, Astrakhan (Russian Federation))" data-affiliation=" (Department of CAD Systems, State Autonomous Educational Institution of Astrakhan Region of Higher Professional Education ASTRAKHAN CIVIL ENGINEERING INSTITUTE, Astrakhan (Russian Federation))" >Petrova, I Yu

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses design of the knowledge base of physical phenomena based on domain-specific ontology. Classification of various physical phenomena in the knowledge base is based on energy-information model of circuits (EIMC) suggested by the authors. This model is specially aimed at design of new operating principles of sensing elements (sensors). Such a knowledge base can be used to train intended engineers, specialists in sensors design

  8. [Relationship between expectations regarding aging and physical activity among middle aged adults in urban areas: based on the Pender's Health Promotion Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hye; Choi, MoonKi; Lee, JuHee; Cho, Hyewon

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the level of expectations regarding aging (ERA) and identify relationship between ERA and physical activity of middle aged adults. Participants were middle aged adults who resided in the community in three cities in Korea. Data were collected using questionnaires that contained items on individual characteristic, International Physical Activity Questionnaires (IPAQ), and behavior-specific cognitive factors including ERA-12. Hierarchical multiple regression was conducted to examine whether ERA would predict physical activity by controlling other factors. The mean age of the participants was 51.1±6.9 years. The mean score for ERA (possible range=0 to 100) was 40.04±14.31. More than half of the participants (62.6%) were not engaged in health promoting physical activity. Gender, employment status and exercise confidence were associated with level of physical activity (F=7.14, p<.001, R²=.36). After controlling for individual factors and behavior-specific cognitive factors, ERA was independently related to physical activity (F=7.19, p<.001, R²=.38). The results demonstrate that individuals' belief about aging has effects on physical activity in Korean middle aged adults. Thus, nursing interventions which focused on ERA could help enhance physical activity in middle aged adults.

  9. Searches for beyond the Standard Model physics with boosted topologies in the ATLAS experiment using the Grid-based Tier-3 facility at IFIC-Valencia

    CERN Document Server

    Villaplana Pérez, Miguel; Vos, Marcel

    Both the LHC and ATLAS have been performing well beyond expectation since the start of the data taking by the end of 2009. Since then, several thousands of millions of collision events have been recorded by the ATLAS experiment. With a data taking efficiency higher than 95% and more than 99% of its channels working, ATLAS supplies data with an unmatched quality. In order to analyse the data, the ATLAS Collaboration has designed a distributed computing model based on GRID technologies. The ATLAS computing model and its evolution since the start of the LHC is discussed in section 3.1. The ATLAS computing model groups the different types of computing centers of the ATLAS Collaboration in a tiered hierarchy that ranges from Tier-0 at CERN, down to the 11 Tier-1 centers and the nearly 80 Tier-2 centres distributed world wide. The Spanish Tier-2 activities during the first years of data taking are described in section 3.2. Tier-3 are institution-level non-ATLAS funded or controlled centres that participate presuma...

  10. Model Based Temporal Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Marla J.; Spinrad, Paul R.; Fall, Thomas C.

    1988-03-01

    Systems that assess the real world must cope with evidence that is uncertain, ambiguous, and spread over time. Typically, the most important function of an assessment system is to identify when activities are occurring that are unusual or unanticipated. Model based temporal reasoning addresses both of these requirements. The differences among temporal reasoning schemes lies in the methods used to avoid computational intractability. If we had n pieces of data and we wanted to examine how they were related, the worst case would be where we had to examine every subset of these points to see if that subset satisfied the relations. This would be 2n, which is intractable. Models compress this; if several data points are all compatible with a model, then that model represents all those data points. Data points are then considered related if they lie within the same model or if they lie in models that are related. Models thus address the intractability problem. They also address the problem of determining unusual activities if the data do not agree with models that are indicated by earlier data then something out of the norm is taking place. The models can summarize what we know up to that time, so when they are not predicting correctly, either something unusual is happening or we need to revise our models. The model based reasoner developed at Advanced Decision Systems is thus both intuitive and powerful. It is currently being used on one operational system and several prototype systems. It has enough power to be used in domains spanning the spectrum from manufacturing engineering and project management to low-intensity conflict and strategic assessment.

  11. Physically based rendering from theory to implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Pharr, Matt

    2010-01-01

    "Physically Based Rendering, 2nd Edition" describes both the mathematical theory behind a modern photorealistic rendering system as well as its practical implementation. A method - known as 'literate programming'- combines human-readable documentation and source code into a single reference that is specifically designed to aid comprehension. The result is a stunning achievement in graphics education. Through the ideas and software in this book, you will learn to design and employ a full-featured rendering system for creating stunning imagery. This book features new sections on subsurface scattering, Metropolis light transport, precomputed light transport, multispectral rendering, and much more. It includes a companion site complete with source code for the rendering system described in the book, with support for Windows, OS X, and Linux. Code and text are tightly woven together through a unique indexing feature that lists each function, variable, and method on the page that they are first described.

  12. An integrated physical and biological model for anaerobic lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin; Chen, Zhenbin

    2011-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that integrates physical and biological processes for anaerobic lagoons is presented. In the model development, turbulence is represented using a transition k-ω model, heat conduction and solar radiation are included in the thermal model, biological oxygen demand (BOD) reduction is characterized by first-order kinetics, and methane yield rate is expressed as a linear function of temperature. A test of the model applicability is conducted in a covered lagoon digester operated under tropical climate conditions. The commercial CFD software, ANSYS-Fluent, is employed to solve the integrated model. The simulation procedures include solving fluid flow and heat transfer, predicting local resident time based on the converged flow fields, and calculating the BOD reduction and methane production. The simulated results show that monthly methane production varies insignificantly, but the time to achieve a 99% BOD reduction in January is much longer than that in July. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysing the Competency of Mathematical Modelling in Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Redish, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    A primary goal of physics is to create mathematical models that allow both predictions and explanations of physical phenomena. We weave maths extensively into our physics instruction beginning in high school, and the level and complexity of the maths we draw on grows as our students progress through a physics curriculum. Despite much research on the learning of both physics and math, the problem of how to successfully teach most of our students to use maths in physics effectively remains unso...

  14. Outstanding questions: physics beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2012-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics agrees very well with experiment, but many important questions remain unanswered, among them are the following. What is the origin of particle masses and are they due to a Higgs boson? How does one understand the number of species of matter particles and how do they mix? What is the origin of the difference between matter and antimatter, and is it related to the origin of the matter in the Universe? What is the nature of the astrophysical dark matter? How does one unify the fundamental interactions? How does one quantize gravity? In this article, I introduce these questions and discuss how they may be addressed by experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, with particular attention to the search for the Higgs boson and supersymmetry.