WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling assembly phenomena

  1. Mathematical Model for Hit Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Akira; Hayashi, Takefumi; Matsuda, Naoya; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Arakaki, Hisashi; Yoshida, Narihiko

    2010-01-01

    The mathematical model for hit phenomena in entertainments is presented as a nonlinear, dynamical and non-equilibrium phenomena. The purchase intention for each person is introduced and direct and indirect communications are expressed as two-body and three-body interaction in our model. The mathematical model is expressed as coupled nonlinear differential equations. The important factor in the model is the decay time of rumor for the hit. The calculated results agree very well with revenues of recent 25 movies.

  2. Molecular model for chirality phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinwo, Folarin; Stillinger, Frank H; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2016-10-21

    Chirality is a hallmark feature for molecular recognition in biology and chemical physics. We present a three-dimensional continuum model for studying chirality phenomena in condensed phases using molecular simulations. Our model system is based upon a simple four-site molecule and incorporates non-trivial kinetic behavior, including the ability to switch chirality or racemize, as well as thermodynamics arising from an energetic preference for specific chiral interactions. In particular, we introduce a chiral renormalization parameter that can locally favor either homochiral or heterochiral configurations. Using this model, we explore a range of chirality-specific phenomena, including the kinetics of chiral inversion, the mechanism of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the liquid, chirally driven liquid-liquid phase separation, and chiral crystal structures.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Mesoscale and Interfacial Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsev, Nikolai Dimitrov

    we provide a novel and general framework for multiscale modeling of systems featuring one or more dissolved species. This makes it possible to retain molecular detail for parts of the problem that require it while using a simple, continuum description for parts where high detail is unnecessary, reducing the number of degrees of freedom (i.e. number of particles) dramatically. This opens the possibility for modeling ion transport in biological processes and biomolecule assembly in ionic solution, as well as electrokinetic phenomena at interfaces such as corrosion. The number of particles in the system is further reduced through an integrated boundary approach, which we apply to colloidal suspensions. In this thesis, we describe this general framework for multiscale modeling single- and multicomponent systems, provide several simple equilibrium and non-equilibrium case studies, and discuss future applications.

  4. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  5. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  6. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goldak, J.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DebRoy, T.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  7. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an instanta

  8. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  9. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  10. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz;

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  11. Littoral Subsonic Seismoacoustic Phenomena Ultrasonic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Littoral Subsonic Seismoacoustic Phenomena Ultrasonic Modeling Jacques R. Chamuel Sonoquest Advanced Ultrasonics Research P.O. Box 81153 Wellesley... variable water/air content, and benthic shelled animals leading to accurate acoustic modeling of littoral surficial layer and geophysical inversion...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Sonoquest Advanced Ultrasonics Research ,P.O. Box 81153,Wellesley Hills,MA,02481-0001 8

  12. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Hanna, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  13. Modeling electrical dispersion phenomena in Earth materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is illustrated that IP phenomena in rocks can be described using conductivity dispersion models deduced as solutions to a 2nd-order linear differential equation describing the motion of a charged particle immersed in an external electrical field. Five dispersion laws are discussed, namely: the non-resonant positive IP model, which leads to the classical Debye-type dispersion law and by extension to the Cole-Cole model, largely used in current practice; the non-resonant negative IP model, which allows negative chargeability values, known in metals at high frequencies, to be explained as an intrinsic physical property of earth materials in specific field cases; the resonant flat, positive or negative IP models, which can explain the presence of peak effects at specific frequencies superimposed on flat, positive or negative dispersion spectra.

  14. Two-Stage Modelling Of Random Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barańska, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of this publication was to present a two-stage algorithm of modelling random phenomena, based on multidimensional function modelling, on the example of modelling the real estate market for the purpose of real estate valuation and estimation of model parameters of foundations vertical displacements. The first stage of the presented algorithm includes a selection of a suitable form of the function model. In the classical algorithms, based on function modelling, prediction of the dependent variable is its value obtained directly from the model. The better the model reflects a relationship between the independent variables and their effect on the dependent variable, the more reliable is the model value. In this paper, an algorithm has been proposed which comprises adjustment of the value obtained from the model with a random correction determined from the residuals of the model for these cases which, in a separate analysis, were considered to be the most similar to the object for which we want to model the dependent variable. The effect of applying the developed quantitative procedures for calculating the corrections and qualitative methods to assess the similarity on the final outcome of the prediction and its accuracy, was examined by statistical methods, mainly using appropriate parametric tests of significance. The idea of the presented algorithm has been designed so as to approximate the value of the dependent variable of the studied phenomenon to its value in reality and, at the same time, to have it "smoothed out" by a well fitted modelling function.

  15. Modeling in transport phenomena a conceptual approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Modeling in Transport Phenomena, Second Edition presents and clearly explains with example problems the basic concepts and their applications to fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, chemical reaction engineering and thermodynamics. A balanced approach is presented between analysis and synthesis, students will understand how to use the solution in engineering analysis. Systematic derivations of the equations and the physical significance of each term are given in detail, for students to easily understand and follow up the material. There is a strong incentive in science and engineering to

  16. Social phenomena from data analysis to models

    CERN Document Server

    Perra, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the new possibilities and approaches to social modeling currently being made possible by an unprecedented variety of datasets generated by our interactions with modern technologies. This area has witnessed a veritable explosion of activity over the last few years, yielding many interesting and useful results. Our aim is to provide an overview of the state of the art in this area of research, merging an extremely heterogeneous array of datasets and models. Social Phenomena: From Data Analysis to Models is divided into two parts. Part I deals with modeling social behavior under normal conditions: How we live, travel, collaborate and interact with each other in our daily lives. Part II deals with societal behavior under exceptional conditions: Protests, armed insurgencies, terrorist attacks, and reactions to infectious diseases. This book offers an overview of one of the most fertile emerging fields bringing together practitioners from scientific communities as diverse as social sciences, p...

  17. Instability phenomena in plasticity: Modelling and computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, E.; Steinmann, P.; Miehe, C.

    1995-12-01

    We presented aspects and results related to the broad field of strain localization with special focus on large strain elastoplastic response. Therefore, we first re-examined issues related to the classification of discontinuities and the classical description of localization with a particular emphasis on an Eulerian geometric representation. We touched the problem of mesh objectivity and discussed results of a particular regularization method, namely the micropolar approach. Generally, regularization has to preserve ellipticity and to reflect the underlying physics. For example ductile materials have to be modelled including viscous effects whereas geomaterials are adequately described by the micropolar approach. Then we considered localization phenomena within solids undergoing large strain elastoplastic deformations. Here, we documented the influence of isotropic damage on the failure analysis. Next, the interesting influence of an orthotropic yield condition on the spatial orientation of localized zones has been studied. Finally, we investigated the localization condition for an algorithmic model of finite strain single crystal plasticity.

  18. Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A

    2006-01-01

    Nano-science and nano-technology are rapidly developing scientific and technological areas that deal with physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on nano-meter scale – one millionth of a millimeter. Self-organization and pattern formation play crucial role on nano-scales and promise new, effective routes to control various nano-scales processes. This book contains lecture notes written by the lecturers of the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems" that took place in St Etienne de Tinee, France, in the fall 2004. They give examples of self-organization phenomena on micro- and nano-scale as well as examples of the interplay between phenomena on nano- and macro-scales leading to complex behavior in various physical, chemical and biological systems. They discuss such fascinating nano-scale self-organization phenomena as self-assembly of quantum dots in thin solid films, pattern formation in liquid crystals caused by light, self-organi...

  19. MODELS FOR THE COUNTER-GRADIENT TRANSPORT PHENOMENA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋剑波; 卢志明; 刘晓明; 刘宇陆

    2001-01-01

    The counter gradient transport phenomena on momentum, energy and passive scalar in turbulent flows were studied by use of the single response function for TSDIA. As a result, models that can describe qualitatively the phenomena are obtained. Then the results are simplified by use of the inertial range theory, and the results for lower degrees agree with results of predecessor. Finally the counter gradient-transport phenomena in channel flow and circular wake flow are analyzed.

  20. On Process Modelling Using Physical Oriented And Phenomena Based Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Culea

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a modelling framework based on phenomena description of the process. The approach is taken to easy understand and construct process model in heterogeneous possible distributed modelling and simulation environments. A simplified case study of a heat exchanger is considered and Modelica modelling language to check the proposed concept. The partial results are promising and the research effort will be extended in a computer aided modelling environment based on phenomena.

  1. Multi-perspective modelling of complex phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seck, M.D.; Honig, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    This conceptual paper discusses the limitations of a single-perspective hierarchical approach to modelling and proposes multi-perspective modelling as a way to overcome them. As it turns out, multi-perspective modelling is primarily a new methodology, using existing modelling techniques but

  2. Nonlinear dynamic phenomena in the beer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2007-01-01

    The production-distribution system or "beer game" is one of the most well-known system dynamics models. Notorious for the complex dynamics it produces, the beer game has been used for nearly five decades to illustrate how structure generates behavior and to explore human decision making. Here we...

  3. Modeling Radicalization Phenomena in Heterogeneous Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Galam, Serge

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of radicalization is investigated within an heterogeneous population composed of a core subpopulation, sharing a way of life locally rooted, and a recently immigrated subpopulation of different origins with ways of life which can be partly in conflict with the local one. While core agents are embedded in the country prominent culture and identity, they are not likely to modify their way of life, which make them naturally inflexible about it. On the opposite, the new comers can either decide to live peacefully with the core people adapting their way of life, or to keep strictly on their way and oppose the core population, leading eventually to criminal activities. To study the corresponding dynamics of radicalization we introduce a 3-state agent model with a proportion of inflexible agents and a proportion of flexible ones, which can be either peaceful or opponent. Assuming agents interact via weighted pairs within a Lotka-Volterra like Ordinary Differential Equation framework, the problem is an...

  4. Socio-optics: optical knowledge applied in modeling social phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisleag, Radu; Chisleag Losada, Ioana-Roxana

    2011-05-01

    The term "Socio-optics" (as a natural part of Socio-physics), is rather not found in literature or at Congresses. In Optics books, there are not made references to optical models applied to explain social phenomena, in spite of Optics relying on the duality particle-wave which seems convenient to model relationships among society and its members. The authors, who have developed a few models applied to explain social phenomena based on knowledge in Optics, along with a few other models applying, in Social Sciences, knowledge from other branches of Physics, give their own examples of such optical models, f. e., of relationships among social groups and their sub-groups, by using kowledge from partially coherent optical phenomena or to explain by tunnel effect, the apparently impossible penetration of social barriers by individuals. They consider that the term "Socio-optics" may come to life. There is mentioned the authors' expertise in stimulating Socio-optics approach by systematically asking students taken courses in Optics to find applications of the newly got Wave and Photon Optics knowledge, to model social and even everyday life phenomena, eventually engaging in such activities other possibly interested colleagues.

  5. Stochastic Car-Following Model for Explaining Nonlinear Traffic Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianping; Song, Tao; Dong, Liyun; Dai, Shiqiang

    There is a common time parameter for representing the sensitivity or the lag (response) time of drivers in many car-following models. In the viewpoint of traffic psychology, this parameter could be considered as the perception-response time (PRT). Generally, this parameter is set to be a constant in previous models. However, PRT is actually not a constant but a random variable described by the lognormal distribution. Thus the probability can be naturally introduced into car-following models by recovering the probability of PRT. For demonstrating this idea, a specific stochastic model is constructed based on the optimal velocity model. By conducting simulations under periodic boundary conditions, it is found that some important traffic phenomena, such as the hysteresis and phantom traffic jams phenomena, can be reproduced more realistically. Especially, an interesting experimental feature of traffic jams, i.e., two moving jams propagating in parallel with constant speed stably and sustainably, is successfully captured by the present model.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of solar active phenomena via numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical ideal MHD models for the study of solar active phenomena are summarized. Particular attention is given to the following physical phenomena: (1) local heating of a coronal loop in an isothermal and stratified atmosphere, and (2) the coronal dynamic responses due to magnetic field movement. The results suggest that local heating of a magnetic loop will lead to the enhancement of the density of the neighboring loops through MHD wave compression. It is noted that field lines can be pinched off and may form a self-contained magnetized plasma blob that may move outward into interplanetary space.

  7. Nonlinear Hyperbolic-Parabolic System Modeling Some Biological Phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shaohua; CHEN Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study a nonlinear hyperbolic-parabolic system modeling some biological phenomena. By semigroup theory and Leray-Schauder fixed point argument, the local existence and uniqueness of the weak solutions for this system are proved. For the spatial dimension N = 1, the global existence of the weak solution will be established by the bootstrap argument.

  8. Numerical modeling to investigate slopes and mass flow phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heinz Konietzky; Lei NIE; Youhong SUN

    2006-01-01

    An overview is given about up-to-date techniques for slope stability and deformation analysis as well as mass flow phenomena simulation. The paper concentrates on a few aspects in respect to the use of numerical modeling techniques, especially in relation to the shear strength reduction techniques, discontinuum modeling, probabilistic concepts, the combination of GIS and numerical modeling as well as sophisticated hydro-mechanical coupling with time-dependent material behavior. At present these topics are preferred topics of scientific and technical research.

  9. Physics-based prognostic modelling of filter clogging phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eker, Omer F.; Camci, Fatih; Jennions, Ian K.

    2016-06-01

    In industry, contaminant filtration is a common process to achieve a desired level of purification, since contaminants in liquids such as fuel may lead to performance drop and rapid wear propagation. Generally, clogging of filter phenomena is the primary failure mode leading to the replacement or cleansing of filter. Cascading failures and weak performance of the system are the unfortunate outcomes due to a clogged filter. Even though filtration and clogging phenomena and their effects of several observable parameters have been studied for quite some time in the literature, progression of clogging and its use for prognostics purposes have not been addressed yet. In this work, a physics based clogging progression model is presented. The proposed model that bases on a well-known pressure drop equation is able to model three phases of the clogging phenomena, last of which has not been modelled in the literature yet. In addition, the presented model is integrated with particle filters to predict the future clogging levels and to estimate the remaining useful life of fuel filters. The presented model has been implemented on the data collected from an experimental rig in the lab environment. In the rig, pressure drop across the filter, flow rate, and filter mesh images are recorded throughout the accelerated degradation experiments. The presented physics based model has been applied to the data obtained from the rig. The remaining useful lives of the filters used in the experimental rig have been reported in the paper. The results show that the presented methodology provides significantly accurate and precise prognostic results.

  10. Combing and self-assembly phenomena in dry films of Taxol-stabilized microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Franck

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrotubules are filamentous proteins that act as a substrate for the translocation of motor proteins. As such, they may be envisioned as a scaffold for the self-assembly of functional materials and devices. Physisorption, self-assembly and combing are here investigated as a potential prelude to microtubule-templated self-assembly. Dense films of self-assembled microtubules were successfully produced, as well as patterns of both dendritic and non-dendritic bundles of microtubules. They are presented in the present paper and the mechanism of their formation is discussed.

  11. Modeling local chemistry in the presence of collective phenomena.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandross, Michael Evan; Modine, Normand Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Confinement within the nanoscale pores of a zeolite strongly modifies the behavior of small molecules. Typical of many such interesting and important problems, realistic modeling of this phenomena requires simultaneously capturing the detailed behavior of chemical bonds and the possibility of collective dynamics occurring in a complex unit cell (672 atoms in the case of Zeolite-4A). Classical simulations alone cannot reliably model the breaking and formation of chemical bonds, while quantum methods alone are incapable of treating the extended length and time scales characteristic of complex dynamics. We have developed a robust and efficient model in which a small region treated with the Kohn-Sham density functional theory is embedded within a larger system represented with classical potentials. This model has been applied in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of water, ammonia, the hydroxide ion, and the ammonium ion in Zeolite-4a. Understanding this behavior is important to the predictive modeling of the aging of Zeolite-based desiccants. In particular, we have studied the absorption of these molecules, interactions between water and the ammonium ion, and reactions between the hydroxide ion and the zeolite cage. We have shown that interactions with the extended Zeolite cage strongly modifies these local chemical phenomena, and thereby we have proven out hypothesis that capturing both local chemistry and collective phenomena is essential to realistic modeling of this system. Based on our results, we have been able to identify two possible mechanisms for the aging of Zeolite-based desiccants.

  12. Modelling of transport phenomena and defects in crystal growth processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pendurti; H Zhang; V Prasad

    2001-02-01

    A brief review of single crystal growth techniques and the associated problems is presented. Emphasis is placed on models for various transport and defect phenomena involoved in the growth process with the ultimate aim of integrating them into a comprehensive numerical model. The sources of dislocation nucleation in the growing crystal are discussed, and the propagation and multiplication of these under the action of thermal stresses is discussed. A brief description of a high-level numerical technique based on multiple adaptive grid generation and finite volume discretization is presented, followed by the result of a representative numerical simulation.

  13. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, Francesco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica e Alimentare - Università degli studi di Salerno Via Ponte Don Melillo - 84084 Fisciano SA (Italy)

    2015-01-22

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.

  14. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.

  15. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, L. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-IPP Association, Garching (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the W7-AS stellarator. (author)

  16. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, Louis [EURATOM-IPP Association, Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator. (author)

  17. Quantitative phase-field modeling for wetting phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, Arnoldo

    2015-03-01

    A new phase-field model is developed for studying partial wetting. The introduction of a third phase representing a solid wall allows for the derivation of a new surface tension force that accounts for energy changes at the contact line. In contrast to other multi-phase-field formulations, the present model does not need the introduction of surface energies for the fluid-wall interactions. Instead, all wetting properties are included in a unique parameter known as the equilibrium contact angle θeq. The model requires the solution of a single elliptic phase-field equation, which, coupled to conservation laws for mass and linear momentum, admits the existence of steady and unsteady compact solutions (compactons). The representation of the wall by an additional phase field allows for the study of wetting phenomena on flat, rough, or patterned surfaces in a straightforward manner. The model contains only two free parameters, a measure of interface thickness W and β, which is used in the definition of the mixture viscosity μ=μlϕl+μvϕv+βμlϕw. The former controls the convergence towards the sharp interface limit and the latter the energy dissipation at the contact line. Simulations on rough surfaces show that by taking values for β higher than 1, the model can reproduce, on average, the effects of pinning events of the contact line during its dynamic motion. The model is able to capture, in good agreement with experimental observations, many physical phenomena fundamental to wetting science, such as the wetting transition on micro-structured surfaces and droplet dynamics on solid substrates.

  18. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... for studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend...... the present fundamental understanding of direct methanol fuel cell operation by developing a three-dimensional, two-phase, multi-component, non-isotherm mathematical model including detailed non-ideal thermodynamics, non-equilibrium phase change and non-equilibrium sorption-desorption of methanol and water...

  19. Control model for reconfigurable assembly systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jianfeng; Yin Yuehong; Chen Zhaoneng

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes knowledge based object-oriented timed colored Petri net, a modeling method for reconfigurable assembly systems. Combining knowledge and object-oriented method into timed colored Petri net, a comprehensive and powerful representation model for control of RAS is obtained. With object-oriented method the whole system can be decomposed into concrete objects explicitly, and their relationships are constructed according to the system assembly requirements. Finally, a simple assembly system modeled by the KTCOPN is presented.

  20. Observations and Models of Galaxy Assembly Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan A.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly history of dark matter haloes imparts various correlations between a halo’s physical properties and its large scale environment, i.e. assembly bias. It is common for models of the galaxy-halo connection to assume that galaxy properties are only a function of halo mass, implicitly ignoring how assembly bias may affect galaxies. Recently, programs to model and constrain the degree to which galaxy properties are influenced by assembly bias have been undertaken; however, the extent and character of galaxy assembly bias remains a mystery. Nevertheless, characterizing and modeling galaxy assembly bias is an important step in understanding galaxy evolution and limiting any systematic effects assembly bias may pose in cosmological measurements using galaxy surveys.I will present work on modeling and constraining the effect of assembly bias in two galaxy properties: stellar mass and star-formation rate. Conditional abundance matching allows for these galaxy properties to be tied to halo formation history to a variable degree, making studies of the relative strength of assembly bias possible. Galaxy-galaxy clustering and galactic conformity, the degree to which galaxy color is correlated between neighbors, are sensitive observational measures of galaxy assembly bias. I will show how these measurements can be used to constrain galaxy assembly bias and the peril of ignoring it.

  1. Some optical and dynamical phenomena in the Rindler model

    CERN Document Server

    Birsin, E

    2014-01-01

    In Rindler's model of a uniformly accelerated reference frame we analyze the apparent shape of rods and marked light rays for the case that the observers as well as the rods and the sources of light are at rest with respect to the Rindler observers. Contrary to the expectation suggested by the strong principle of equivalence, there is no apparent "bending down" of a light ray with direction transversal to the direction of acceleration, but a straight rod oriented orthogonal to the direction of acceleration appears bended "upwards". These optical phenomena are in accordance with the dynamical experience of observers guided by a straight track or a track curved in the same way as the marked light ray, respectively: While the former observer feels a centrifugal force directed "downwards", the centrifugal force for the latter vanishes. The properties of gyroscope transport along such tracks are correspondingly.

  2. Assembly line performance and modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rane, Arun B; Sunnapwar, Vivek K

    2017-01-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations...

  3. Structural Investigations of Surfaces and Orientation-SpecificPhenomena in Nanocrystals and Their Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruguete, Deborah Michiko [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Studies of colloidal nanocrystals and their assemblies are presented. Two of these studies concern the atomic-level structural characterization of the surfaces, interfaces, and interiors present in II-VI semiconductor nanorods. The third study investigates the crystallographic arrangement of cobalt nanocrystals in self-assembled aggregates. Crystallographically-aligned assemblies of colloidal CdSe nanorods are examined with linearly-polarized Se-EXAFS spectroscopy, which probes bonding along different directions in the nanorod. This orientation-specific probe is used, because it is expected that the presence of specific surfaces in a nanorod might cause bond relaxations specific to different crystallographic directions. Se-Se distances are found to be contracted along the long axis of the nanorod, while Cd-Se distances display no angular dependence, which is different from the bulk. Ab-initio density functional theory calculations upon CdSe nanowires indicate that relaxations on the rod surfaces cause these changes. ZnS/CdS-CdSe core-shell nanorods are studied with Se, Zn, Cd, and S X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is hypothesized that there are two major factors influencing the core and shell structures of the nanorods: the large surface area-to-volume ratio, and epitaxial strain. The presence of the surface may induce bond rearrangements or relaxations to minimize surface energy; epitaxial strain might cause the core and shell lattices to contract or expand to minimize strain energy. A marked contraction of Zn-S bonds is observed in the core-shell nanorods, indicating that surface relaxations may dominate the structure of the nanorod (strain might otherwise drive the Zn-S lattice to accommodate the larger CdS or CdSe lattices via bond expansion). EXAFS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that Cd-Se bond relaxations might be anisotropic, an expected phenomenon for a rod-shaped nanocrystal. Ordered self-assembled aggregates of cobalt nanocrystals are

  4. Theoretical studies of capillarity, phase change and relocation phenomena encountered in a SRS assembly meltdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, M.; Fauske, H.K. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States))

    1990-11-01

    Information available in the literature on the retention and sliding of liquid drops on solid surfaces is reviewed and interpreted in terms of the behavior of liquefied fuel during a decay-heat dominated meltdown event in a Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor. The information strongly suggests that surface tension effects dominate the fuel drainage regime and that the potential for fuel/target contact is high. The two relevant problems analyzed are: the melting of eutectic forming target alloy in contact with a fuel deposit and the sliding and freezing of target- or fuel-melt drops on the vertical assembly structure.

  5. Modeling of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena using charged dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose a charged dissipative particle dynamics (cDPD) model for investigation of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena. In particular, this particle-based method was designed to simulate micro- or nano- flows which governing by Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equation coupled with Navier-Stokes (NS) equation. For cDPD simulations of wall-bounded fluid systems, a methodology for imposing correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for both PNP and NS equations is developed. To validate the present cDPD model and the corresponding boundary method, we perform cDPD simulations of electrostatic double layer (EDL) in the vicinity of a charged wall, and the results show good agreement with the mean-field theoretical solutions. The capacity density of a parallel plate capacitor in salt solution is also investigated with different salt concentration. Moreover, we utilize the proposed methodology to study the electroosmotic and electroosmotic/pressure-driven flow in a micro-channel. In the last, we simulate the dilute polyelectrolyte solution both in bulk and micro-channel, which show the flexibility and capability of this method in studying complex fluids. This work was sponsored by the Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) supported by DOE.

  6. Assembly line performance and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Arun B.; Sunnapwar, Vivek K.

    2017-03-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations. In this thesis, a methodology is proposed to reduce cycle time and time loss due to important factors like equipment failure, shortage of inventory, absenteeism, set-up, material handling, rejection and fatigue to improve output within given cost constraints. Various relationships between these factors, corresponding cost and output are established by scientific approach. This methodology is validated in three different vehicle assembly plants. Proposed methodology may help practitioners to optimize the assembly line using lean techniques.

  7. Modeling brain resonance phenomena using a neural mass model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spiegler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation with rhythmic light flicker (photic driving plays an important role in the diagnosis of schizophrenia, mood disorder, migraine, and epilepsy. In particular, the adjustment of spontaneous brain rhythms to the stimulus frequency (entrainment is used to assess the functional flexibility of the brain. We aim to gain deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying this technique and to predict the effects of stimulus frequency and intensity. For this purpose, a modified Jansen and Rit neural mass model (NMM of a cortical circuit is used. This mean field model has been designed to strike a balance between mathematical simplicity and biological plausibility. We reproduced the entrainment phenomenon observed in EEG during a photic driving experiment. More generally, we demonstrate that such a single area model can already yield very complex dynamics, including chaos, for biologically plausible parameter ranges. We chart the entire parameter space by means of characteristic Lyapunov spectra and Kaplan-Yorke dimension as well as time series and power spectra. Rhythmic and chaotic brain states were found virtually next to each other, such that small parameter changes can give rise to switching from one to another. Strikingly, this characteristic pattern of unpredictability generated by the model was matched to the experimental data with reasonable accuracy. These findings confirm that the NMM is a useful model of brain dynamics during photic driving. In this context, it can be used to study the mechanisms of, for example, perception and epileptic seizure generation. In particular, it enabled us to make predictions regarding the stimulus amplitude in further experiments for improving the entrainment effect.

  8. The tile assembly model is intrinsically universal

    CERN Document Server

    Doty, David; Patitz, Matthew J; Schweller, Robert T; Summers, Scott M; Woods, Damien

    2011-01-01

    We prove that the abstract Tile Assembly Model (aTAM) of nanoscale self-assembly is intrinsically universal. This means that there is a single tile assembly system U that, with proper initialization, simulates any tile assembly system T. The simulation is "intrinsic" in the sense that the self-assembly process carried out by U is exactly that carried out by T, with each tile of T represented by an m x m "supertile" of U. Our construction works for the full aTAM at any temperature, and it faithfully simulates the deterministic or nondeterministic behavior of each T. Our construction succeeds by solving an analog of the cell differentiation problem in developmental biology: Each supertile of U, starting with those in the seed assembly, carries the "genome" of the simulated system T. At each location of a potential supertile in the self-assembly of U, a decision is made whether and how to express this genome, i.e., whether to generate a supertile and, if so, which tile of T it will represent. This decision must ...

  9. Modeling of Multiscale and Multiphase Phenomena in Materials Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Andreas; Kharicha, Abdellah; Wu, Menghuai

    2013-03-01

    In order to demonstrate how CFD can help scientists and engineers to better understand the fundamentals of engineering processes, a number of examples are shown and discussed. The paper covers (i) special aspects of continuous casting of steel including turbulence, motion and entrapment of non-metallic inclusions, and impact of soft reduction; (ii) multiple flow phenomena and multiscale aspects during casting of large ingots including flow-induced columnar-to-equiaxed transition and 3D formation of channel segregation; (iii) multiphase magneto-hydrodynamics during electro-slag remelting; and (iv) melt flow and solidification of thin but large centrifugal castings.

  10. Object-Oriented Modeling of Virtual Assembly Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhengTaixiong; HeYulin; 等

    2002-01-01

    Virtual assembly is a Virtual Reality(VR) based engineering application which allows engineers to evaluate,analyze,and plan the assembly of mechanical systems,To model the virtual assembly process,new methodology must be applied.Based on the idea that the virtual assembly system is an event driven system,the interactive behavior and information model is proposed to describe the dynamic process of virtual assembly.Definition of the objectoriented model of virtual assembly is put forward.

  11. Small-world phenomena in physics: the Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitterman, M. [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan (Israel)

    2000-12-01

    The Ising system with a small fraction of random long-range interactions is the simplest example of small-world phenomena in physics. Considering the latter both in an annealed and in a quenched state we conclude that: (a) the existence of random long-range interactions leads to a phase transition in the one-dimensional case and (b) there is a minimal average number p of these interactions per site (p<1 in the annealed state, and p{approx_equal}1 in the quenched state) needed for the appearance of the phase transition. Note that the average number of these bonds, pN/2, is much smaller than the total number of bonds, N{sup 2}/2. (author)

  12. Asmparts: assembly of biological model parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Carrera, Javier; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2007-12-01

    We propose a new computational tool to produce models of biological systems by assembling models from biological parts. Our software not only takes advantage of modularity, but it also enforces standardisation in part characterisation by considering a model of each part. We have used model parts in SBML to design transcriptional networks. Our software is open source, it works in linux and windows platforms, and it could be used to automatically produce models in a server. Our tool not only facilitates model design, but it will also help to promote the establishment of a registry of model parts.

  13. Modeling of Parameters of Subcritical Assembly SAD

    CERN Document Server

    Petrochenkov, S; Puzynin, I

    2005-01-01

    The accepted conceptual design of the experimental Subcritical Assembly in Dubna (SAD) is based on the MOX core with a nominal unit capacity of 25 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient $k_{\\rm eff} =0.95$ and accelerator beam power 1 kW. A subcritical assembly driven with the existing 660 MeV proton accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research has been modelled in order to make choice of the optimal parameters for the future experiments. The Monte Carlo method was used to simulate neutron spectra, energy deposition and doses calculations. Some of the calculation results are presented in the paper.

  14. Phenomena and computational models of non-proportional fatigue of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Skibicki, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    This book gives an overview on the fatigue of materials under non-proportional loads. It presents the rich spectrum of phenomena and treats various computational models to mathematically describe the non-proportional fatigue of materials.

  15. Modeling of Combined Phenomena Affecting an AUV Stealth Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Gerigk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper some results of research connected with modeling the basic stealth characteristics of an AUV vehicle are presented. First of all a general approach to design of the stealth AUV autonomous underwater vehicles under consideration is introduced. Then the AUV stealth vehicle concept is briefly described. Next a method of modeling of the stealth characteristics is briefly described. As an example of the stealth characteristics investigations some results of modeling the boundary layer and wake are presented. Some remarks regarding the behavior of the AUV stealth vehicle in the submerged conditions are given. The final conclusions are presented.

  16. Unique Phenomena in Preon Model with Preonic Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, H.

    1988-01-01

    Properties of new particles predicted by the recently proposed preon model are discussed based on SU(6)_{wc}. q' and q_{3}'' are expected to be observed in a relatively low energy region. Their experimental signatures are discussed.

  17. Model analysis of edge relaxation phenomena in Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukawa, Shogo [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Sanae I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2000-09-01

    From the view point of the oscillatory characteristics, the heat transport in the plasma edge region is investigated based on a transition transport model with hysteresis nature. A hysteresis type flux-force relation is incorporated into the model by introducing a transition model of the heat diffusivity. For a given influx from the upstream side, the one dimensional heat transport equitation is solved numerically. The time evolution of the heat flux oscillation due to the hysteresis nature and the parameter dependences of its amplitude and frequency are examined. The non-monotonous relation between the frequency of the flux oscillation and the influx is obtained. The critical behavior of the transition between transport mechanisms, i.e., the hysteresis type and the discontinuous one, is expressed as power law relations of them. The self-organized criticality like behavior, i.e., power spectrum obeying power law, is found in a limiting case of the model. (author)

  18. Perspective on Continuum Modeling of Mesoscale/ Macroscale Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bammann, D. J.

    The attempt to model or predict the inelastic response or permanent deformation and failure observed in metals dates back over 180 years. Various descriptions of the post elastic response of metals have been proposed from the fields of physics, materials science (metallurgy), engineering, mechanics, and applied mathematics. The communication between these fields has improved and many of the modeling efforts today involve concepts from most or all of these fields. Early engineering description of post yield response treated the material as perfectly plastic — the material continues to deform with zero additional increase in load. These models became the basis of the mathematical theory of plasticity and were extended to account for hardening, unloading, and directional hardening. In contradistinction, rheological models treated the finite deformation of a solid similar to the deformation of a viscous fluid. In many cases of large deformation, rheological models have provided both adequate and accurate information about the deformed shape of a metal during many manufacturing processes. The treatment of geometric defects in solid bodies initiated within the mathematical theory of elasticity, the dislocation, introduced as an incompatible "cut" in a continuum body. This resulted in a very large body of literature devoted to the linear elastic study of dislocations, dislocation structures, and their interactions, and has provided essential information in the understanding of the "state" of a deformed material.

  19. FDTD modelling of induced polarization phenomena in transient electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commer, Michael; Petrov, Peter V.; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-04-01

    The finite-difference time-domain scheme is augmented in order to treat the modelling of transient electromagnetic signals containing induced polarization effects from 3-D distributions of polarizable media. Compared to the non-dispersive problem, the discrete dispersive Maxwell system contains costly convolution operators. Key components to our solution for highly digitized model meshes are Debye decomposition and composite memory variables. We revert to the popular Cole-Cole model of dispersion to describe the frequency-dependent behaviour of electrical conductivity. Its inversely Laplace-transformed Debye decomposition results in a series of time convolutions between electric field and exponential decay functions, with the latter reflecting each Debye constituents' individual relaxation time. These function types in the discrete-time convolution allow for their substitution by memory variables, annihilating the otherwise prohibitive computing demands. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and practicality of our algorithm.

  20. FDTD modeling of induced polarization phenomena in transient electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commer, Michael; Petrov, Petr V.; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain scheme is augmented in order to treat the modeling of transient electromagnetic signals containing induced polarization effects from three-dimensional distributions of polarizable media. Compared to the non-dispersive problem, the discrete dispersive Maxwell system contains costly convolution operators. Key components to our solution for highly digitized model meshes are Debye decomposition and composite memory variables. We revert to the popular Cole-Cole model of dispersion to describe the frequency-dependent behaviour of electrical conductivity. Its inversely Laplace-transformed Debye decomposition results in a series of time convolutions between electric field and exponential decay functions, with the latter reflecting each Debye constituents' individual relaxation time. These function types in the discrete-time convolution allow for their substitution by memory variables, annihilating the otherwise prohibitive computing demands. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and practicality of our algorithm.

  1. Air flow phenomena in the model of the blind drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaszczur Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the presented paper, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV has been used to investigate flow pattern and turbulent structure in the model of blind drift. The presented model exist in mining, and has been analyzed to resolve ventilation issues. Blind region is particularly susceptible to unsafe methane accumulation. The measurement system allows us to evaluate all components of the velocity vector in channel cross-section simultaneously. First order and second order statistic of the velocity fields from different channel cross-section are computed and analyzed.

  2. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the m

  3. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the

  4. Modelling of Transport Phenomena at Cement Matrix—Aggregate Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Breugel, Klaas; Koenders, Eddie; Ye, Guang

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a heterogeneous material like concrete is largely determined by the many interfaces in this material. This contribution focuses on the potential of numerical simulation models to investigate the character of the matrix-aggregate interfacial zone and to simulate hydration-induce...

  5. Constructive Models of Discrete and Continuous Physical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-08

    time. The hardware description language VHDL has a related model of time, where time is a member of N×N, and the second value is used in a manner...behaviors. Tech. Rep. RR 95–52, rev. RR (96–56), I3S, April 1996. 4. ARMSTRONG, J. R., AND GRAY, F. G. VHDL Design Representation and Synthesis, sec- ond

  6. Modelling toluene oxidation : Incorporation of mass transfer phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; van Soolingen, J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of toluene have been studied in close interaction with the gas-liquid mass transfer occurring in the reactor. Kinetic parameters for a simple model have been estimated on basis of experimental observations performed under industrial conditions. The conclusions for the m

  7. Model Reduction and Coarse-Graining Approaches for Multiscale Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, Alexander N; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2006-01-01

    Model reduction and coarse-graining are important in many areas of science and engineering. How does a system with many degrees of freedom become one with fewer? How can a reversible micro-description be adapted to the dissipative macroscopic model? These crucial questions, as well as many other related problems, are discussed in this book. Specific areas of study include dynamical systems, non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, hydrodynamics and mechanics of continuous media, (bio)chemical kinetics, nonlinear dynamics, nonlinear control, nonlinear estimation, and particulate systems from various branches of engineering. The generic nature and the power of the pertinent conceptual, analytical and computational frameworks helps eliminate some of the traditional language barriers, which often unnecessarily impede scientific progress and the interaction of researchers between disciplines such as physics, chemistry, biology, applied mathematics and engineering. All contributions are authored by ex...

  8. Ultrastrong-coupling phenomena beyond the Dicke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaako, Tuomas; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Garcia-Ripoll, Juan José; Rabl, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We study effective light-matter interactions in a circuit QED system consisting of a single L C resonator, which is coupled symmetrically to multiple superconducting qubits. Starting from a minimal circuit model, we demonstrate that, in addition to the usual collective qubit-photon coupling, the resulting Hamiltonian contains direct qubit-qubit interactions, which have a drastic effect on the ground- and excited-state properties of such circuits in the ultrastrong-coupling regime. In contrast to the superradiant phase transition expected from the standard Dicke model, we find an opposite mechanism, which at very strong interactions completely decouples the photon mode and projects the qubits into a highly entangled ground state. These findings resolve previous controversies over the existence of superradiant phases in circuit QED, but they more generally show that the physics of two- or multiatom cavity QED settings can differ significantly from what is commonly assumed.

  9. Modelling tipping-point phenomena of scientific coauthorship networks

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Zheng; Yi, Dongyun; Zhenzheng, Ouyang; Li, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    In a range of scientific coauthorship networks, tipping points are detected in degree distributions, correlations between degrees and local clustering coefficients, etc. The existence of those tipping points could be treated as a result of the diversity of collaboration behaviours in scientific field. A growing geometric hypergraph built on a cluster of concentric circles is proposed to model two typical collaboration behaviours, namely the behaviour of leaders and that of other members in research teams. The model successfully predicts the tipping points, as well as many common features of coauthorship networks. For example, it realizes a process of deriving the complex scale-free property from the simple yes/no experiments. Moreover, it gives a reasonable explanation for the emergence of tipping points by the difference of collaboration behaviours between leaders and other members, which emerges in the evolution of research teams. The evolution synthetically addresses typical factors of generating collabora...

  10. Modeling friction phenomena and elastomeric dampers in multibody dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Changkuan

    The first part of this dissertation focuses on the development, implementation and validation of models that capture the behavior of joints in a realistic manner. These models are presented within the framework of finite element based, nonlinear multibody dynamics formulations that ensure unconditional nonlinear stability of the computation for complex systems of arbitrary topology. The proposed approach can be divided into three parts. First, the joint configuration: this purely kinematic part deals with the description of the configuration of the joint and the evaluation of the relative distance and relative tangential velocity between the contacting bodies. Second, the contact conditions: in most cases, contact at the joint is of an intermittent nature. The enforcement of the unilateral contact condition is a critical aspect of the computational procedure. And finally, the contact forces: this last part deals with the evaluation of the forces that arise at the interface between contacting bodies. The advantage of the proposed approach is that the three parts of the problem can be formulated and implemented independently. Many articulated rotor helicopters use hydraulic dampers, which provide high levels of damping but are also associated with high maintenance costs and difficulties in evaluating their conditions due to the presence of seals, lubricants and numerous moving parts, all operating in a rotating frame. To avoid problems associated with hydraulic dampers, the industry is now switching to elastomeric lead-lag dampers that feature simpler mechanical design, lower part count, and result in "dry" rotors. However, the design of robust elastomeric dampers is hampered by the lack of reliable analytical tools that can be used to predict their damping behavior in the presence of large multi-frequency motions experienced by the rotor and thus the damper. The second part of this dissertation focuses on the development of an elastomeric damper model which predicts

  11. Overview: Understanding nucleation phenomena from simulations of lattice gas models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in Ising/lattice gas models are reviewed with an emphasis on the general insight gained on the mechanisms by which metastable states decay. Attention is paid to the proper distinction of particles that belong to a cluster (droplet), that may trigger a nucleation event, from particles in its environment, a problem crucial near the critical point. Well below the critical point, the lattice structure causes an anisotropy of the interface tension, and hence nonspherical droplet shapes result, making the treatment nontrivial even within the conventional classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. For temperatures below the roughening transition temperature facetted crystals rather than spherical droplets result. The possibility to find nucleation barriers from a thermodynamic analysis avoiding a cluster identification on the particle level is discussed, as well as the question of curvature corrections to the interfacial tension. For the interpretation of heterogeneous nucleation at planar walls, knowledge of contact angles and line tensions is desirable, and methods to extract these quantities from simulations will be mentioned. Finally, also the problem of nucleation near the stability limit of metastable states and the significance of the spinodal curve will be discussed, in the light of simulations of Ising models with medium range interactions.

  12. Critical flow phenomena and modeling in advanced nuclear safety technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuzhou [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2016-05-15

    The discharge could be non-choking or choking, depending on the break shape, length and conditions. This presents a challenge in the calculation of standard problems. A stable experiment of water was performed to study the break flow rate in nozzles of diameter of 1.41 and 2.0 mm with rounded-edge and sharp-edge. The pressure covered the ranges of 0.5 to 29.5 MPa, inlet quality 0 to 1.0 and subcooling up to 350 C. The results exhibited a close relation of thermal non-equilibrium with pressure. For supercritical pressure a modified equilibrium model in combination with the Bernoulli equation is presented.

  13. Model of Fracture, Friction, and Wear Phenomena of Porous Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shatsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical and tribotechnical features of powdered materials are strongly influenced by pore volume, fracture character, impurities, alloying, concentration inhomogeneity, friction conditions, and other factors. Pores also have influence on acceleration of diffusion processes and reduce undercooled austenite resistance. Annealed in hydrogen, ultra pure iron powder was used to study porous iron features. Toughness fracture and tribotechnical features had nonmonotonic dependence from porosity different from all known dependences got from technical iron powders. Researches brought out the fact that in process of porosity reduction by pressing and annealing cycles, the average dimension of porous is changed. According to the analysis of porous structure were created models of friction, wear, and fracture of pure porous iron.

  14. Modeling of the Transport Phenomena in Passive Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Using a Two-Phase Anisotropic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Miao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The transport phenomena in a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC were numerically simulated by the proposed two-dimensional two-phase nonisothermal mass transport model. The anisotropic transport characteristic and deformation of the gas diffusion layer (GDL were considered in this model. The natural convection boundary conditions were adopted for the transport of methanol, oxygen, and heat at the GDL outer surface. The effect of methanol concentration in the reservoir on cell performance was examined. The distribution of multiphysical fields in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA, especially in the catalyst layers (CLs, was obtained and analyzed. The results indicated that transport resistance for the methanol mainly existed in the MEA while that for oxygen and heat was primarily due to natural convection at the GDL outer surface. Because of the relatively high methanol concentration, the local reaction rate in CLs was mainly determined by the overpotential. Methanol concentration between 3 M and 4 M was recommended for passive liquid feed DMFC in order to achieve a balance between the cell performance and the methanol crossover.

  15. Student Modeling of Physical Phenomena as They Derive Integral Formulae: One Way To Reduce Proof Phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancis, Jerome

    2001-01-01

    Students in a freshmen calculus course should become fluent in modeling physical phenomena represented by integrals, in particular geometric formulas for volumes and arc length and physical formulas for work. Describes how to train students to became fluent in such modeling and derivation of standard integral formulas. Indicates that these lessons…

  16. Characterization of thermal-hydraulic and ignition phenomena in prototypic, full-length boiling water reactor spent fuel pool assemblies after a complete loss-of-coolant accident.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric Richard; Durbin, Samuel G

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this project was to provide basic thermal-hydraulic data associated with a SFP complete loss-of-coolant accident. The accident conditions of interest for the SFP were simulated in a full-scale prototypic fashion (electrically-heated, prototypic assemblies in a prototypic SFP rack) so that the experimental results closely represent actual fuel assembly responses. A major impetus for this work was to facilitate code validation (primarily MELCOR) and reduce questions associated with interpretation of the experimental results. It was necessary to simulate a cluster of assemblies to represent a higher decay (younger) assembly surrounded by older, lower-power assemblies. Specifically, this program provided data and analysis confirming: (1) MELCOR modeling of inter-assembly radiant heat transfer, (2) flow resistance modeling and the natural convective flow induced in a fuel assembly as it heats up in air, (3) the potential for and nature of thermal transient (i.e., Zircaloy fire) propagation, and (4) mitigation strategies concerning fuel assembly management.

  17. Significance of radiation models in investigating the flow phenomena around a Jovian entry body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Subramanian, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    Formulation is presented to demonstrate the significance of a simplified radiation model in investigating the flow-phenomena in the viscous radiating shock layer of a Jovian entry body. For this, a nongray absorption model for hydrogen-helium gas is developed which consists of 30 steps over the spectral range of 0-20 eV. By employing this model results were obtained for temperature, pressure, density, and radiative flux in the shock layer and along the body surface. These are compared with results of two sophisticated radiative transport models available in the literature. Use of the present radiation model results in significant reduction in computational time. Results of this model are found to be in general agreement with results of other models. It is concluded that use of the present model is justified in investigating the flow phenomena around a Jovian entry body because it is relatively simple, computationally fast, and yields fairly accurate results.

  18. Solution processed self-assembled monolayer gate dielectrics for low-voltage organic transistors. : Section Title: Electric Phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ball, James; Wobkenberg, Paul H.; Colleaux, Florian; Kooistra, Floris B.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Low-voltage org. transistors are sought for implementation in high vol. low-power portable electronics of the future. Here we assess the suitability of three phosphonic acid based self-assembling mols. for use as ultra-thin gate dielecs. in low-voltage soln. processable org. field-effect

  19. CAD Parts-Based Assembly Modeling by Probabilistic Reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Kai-Ke

    2016-04-11

    Nowadays, increasing amount of parts and sub-assemblies are publicly available, which can be used directly for product development instead of creating from scratch. In this paper, we propose an interactive design framework for efficient and smart assembly modeling, in order to improve the design efficiency. Our approach is based on a probabilistic reasoning. Given a collection of industrial assemblies, we learn a probabilistic graphical model from the relationships between the parts of assemblies. Then in the modeling stage, this probabilistic model is used to suggest the most likely used parts compatible with the current assembly. Finally, the parts are assembled under certain geometric constraints. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework through a variety of assembly models produced by our prototype system. © 2015 IEEE.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Transport Phenomena in Solidification of Multicomponent Ingot Using a Continuum Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A continuum model proposed for dendrite solidification of multicomponent alloys, with any partial solid back diffusion, was used to numerically simulate the macroscopic solidification transport phenomena and macrosegregations in an upwards directionally solidified plain carbon steel ingot. The computational results of each macroscopic field of the physical variables involved in the solidification process at a middle solidification stage were presented.

  1. Modeling strategy for clinched joints in assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, A.; Coppieters, S.; Debruyne, D.

    2016-08-01

    Clinching is a mechanical joining technique which involves severe local plastic deformation of two or more metal sheet parts resulting in a permanent mechanical interlock. Today, it is a reliable joining technique used in automotive, HVAC and general steel constructions whilst still gaining interest. As it is not computationally feasible to include detailed sub models of these type of joints in FE simulations of real-life clinched assemblies, this paper proposes a methodology to represent these connections with simplified elements. In order to calibrate the parameters governing the equivalent model, a simple shear lap and pullout test is used. This methodology is applied to clinched configurations and validated using a modified Arcan test in which both shear and pull-out loads are considered.

  2. Numerical modelling of tools steel hardening. A thermal phenomena and phase transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Domański

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper the model hardening of tool steel takes into considerations of thermal phenomena and phase transformations in the solid state are presented. In the modelling of thermal phenomena the heat equations transfer has been solved by Finite Elements Method. The graph of continuous heating (CHT and continuous cooling (CCT considered steel are used in the model of phase transformations. Phase altered fractions during the continuous heating austenite and continuous cooling pearlite or bainite are marked in the model by formula Johnson-Mehl and Avrami. For rate of heating >100 K/s the modified equation Koistinen and Marburger is used. Modified equation Koistinen and Marburger identify the forming fraction of martensite.

  3. A mesoscopic model for microscale hydrodynamics and interfacial phenomena: Slip, films, and contact angle hysteresis

    OpenAIRE

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Kavousanakis, Michail E.; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2012-01-01

    We present a model based on the lattice Boltzmann equation that is suitable for the simulation of dynamic wetting. The model is capable of exhibiting fundamental interfacial phenomena such as weak adsorption of fluid on the solid substrate and the presence of a thin surface film within which a disjoining pressure acts. Dynamics in this surface film, tightly coupled with hydrodynamics in the fluid bulk, determine macroscopic properties of primary interest: the hydrodynamic slip; the equilibriu...

  4. Mereological concepts for modelling parthood relations between אלהים and natural phenomena in the Hebrew Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus W. Gericke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Hebrew Bible, some texts represent what we would call �natural� phenomena as being in some way related to entities classed to be אלהים in some sense of the Hebrew term; that is, God, gods, divine, deity, etc. Although various perspectives on these relations already exist in the available research on the topic, no philosophical approach to the data has of yet been conceived. In order to facilitate the latter, this study brackets the question as to what the relations between אלהים and natural phenomena in any given biblical context actually were. Yet its contribution lies in the way it aims to offer an introductory overview of some of the potentially relevant core concepts in mereology (parthood theory in metaphysics that may be of aid in any future attempt at modelling such relations, however they were conceived.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This article challenges the tradition of non-philosophical discourse in Old Testament theology, particularly with reference to the relational properties of Yhwh vis-a-vis natural phenomena. Its meta-theoretical application of concepts in formal descriptive mereological analysis represents an interdisciplinary supplementation of current ways of modelling God/World in the text.Keywords: Hebrew Bible; natural phenomena; philosophy; mereology; parthood; relations

  5. Quantitative physical models of volcanic phenomena for hazards assessment of critical infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazards may have destructive effects on economy, transport, and natural environments at both local and regional scale. Hazardous phenomena include pyroclastic density currents, tephra fall, gas emissions, lava flows, debris flows and avalanches, and lahars. Volcanic hazards assessment is based on available information to characterize potential volcanic sources in the region of interest and to determine whether specific volcanic phenomena might reach a given site. Volcanic hazards assessment is focussed on estimating the distances that volcanic phenomena could travel from potential sources and their intensity at the considered site. Epistemic and aleatory uncertainties strongly affect the resulting hazards assessment. Within the context of critical infrastructures, volcanic eruptions are rare natural events that can create severe hazards. In addition to being rare events, evidence of many past volcanic eruptions is poorly preserved in the geologic record. The models used for describing the impact of volcanic phenomena generally represent a range of model complexities, from simplified physics based conceptual models to highly coupled thermo fluid dynamical approaches. Modelling approaches represent a hierarchy of complexity, which reflects increasing requirements for well characterized data in order to produce a broader range of output information. In selecting models for the hazard analysis related to a specific phenomenon, questions that need to be answered by the models must be carefully considered. Independently of the model, the final hazards assessment strongly depends on input derived from detailed volcanological investigations, such as mapping and stratigraphic correlations. For each phenomenon, an overview of currently available approaches for the evaluation of future hazards will be presented with the aim to provide a foundation for future work in developing an international consensus on volcanic hazards assessment methods.

  6. 3D numerical modeling of coupled phenomena in induced processes of heat treatment with malice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwong Peeteenut

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a multi-method Malice package for three dimension coupled phenomena in induced processes of heat treatment by an algorithm weakly coupled with the Migen package integral method defining the electromagnetic model and the Flux-Expert package finite element method defining the thermal model. The integral method is well suited to inductive systems undergoing sinusoidal excitation at midrange or high frequency. The unknowns of both models are current density, scalar potential and temperature. Joule power in the electromagnetic model is generated by Eddy currents. It becomes the heat source in the thermal model.

  7. Probabilistic reasoning for assembly-based 3D modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Chaudhuri, Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    Assembly-based modeling is a promising approach to broadening the accessibility of 3D modeling. In assembly-based modeling, new models are assembled from shape components extracted from a database. A key challenge in assembly-based modeling is the identification of relevant components to be presented to the user. In this paper, we introduce a probabilistic reasoning approach to this problem. Given a repository of shapes, our approach learns a probabilistic graphical model that encodes semantic and geometric relationships among shape components. The probabilistic model is used to present components that are semantically and stylistically compatible with the 3D model that is being assembled. Our experiments indicate that the probabilistic model increases the relevance of presented components. © 2011 ACM.

  8. Continuum modelling of pedestrian flows - Part 2: Sensitivity analysis featuring crowd movement phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duives, Dorine C.; Daamen, Winnie; Hoogendoorn, Serge P.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years numerous pedestrian simulation tools have been developed that can support crowd managers and government officials in their tasks. New technologies to monitor pedestrian flows are in dire need of models that allow for rapid state-estimation. Many contemporary pedestrian simulation tools model the movements of pedestrians at a microscopic level, which does not provide an exact solution. Macroscopic models capture the fundamental characteristics of the traffic state at a more aggregate level, and generally have a closed form solution which is necessary for rapid state estimation for traffic management purposes. This contribution presents a next step in the calibration and validation of the macroscopic continuum model detailed in Hoogendoorn et al. (2014). The influence of global and local route choice on the development of crowd movement phenomena, such as dissipation, lane-formation and stripe-formation, is studied. This study shows that most self-organization phenomena and behavioural trends only develop under very specific conditions, and as such can only be simulated using specific parameter sets. Moreover, all crowd movement phenomena can be reproduced by means of the continuum model using one parameter set. This study concludes that the incorporation of local route choice behaviour and the balancing of the aptitude of pedestrians with respect to their own class and other classes are both essential in the correct prediction of crowd movement dynamics.

  9. Solvent-free, molecular-level modeling of self-assembling amphiphiles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Somajit; Saha, Jayashree

    2017-02-01

    Aggregation mesophases of self-assembling amphiphiles in water are highly important in the context of biology (biomembranes), therapy (liposomes), industry (polymer surfactants), and condensed-matter physics (lyotropic liquid crystals). Besides helping to increase fundamental understanding of collective molecular behavior, simulations of these lyotropic phases are pivotal to technological and medical developments such as smart drug carriers for gene therapy. Implicit-solvent, coarse-grained, low resolution modeling with a simple pair potential is the key to realizing the larger length and time scales associated with such mesoscopic phenomena during a computer simulation. Modeling amphiphiles by directed, soft, ellipsoidal cores interacting via a computationally simple yet tunable anisotropic pair potential, we have come to such a single-site model amphiphile that can rapidly self-assemble to give diverse lyotropic phases (such as fluid bilayers, micelles, etc.) without requiring the explicit incorporation of solvent particles. The model directly represents a tunable packing parameter that manifests in the spontaneous curvature of the amphiphile aggregates. Besides the all-important hydrophobic interaction, the hydration force is also treated implicitly. Thanks to the efficient solvent-free molecular-level coarse graining, this model is suitable for generic mesoscale studies of phenomena such as self-assembly, amphiphile mixing, domain formation, fusion, elasticity, etc., in amphiphile aggregates.

  10. Modelling reverse characteristics of power LEDs with thermal phenomena taken into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Przemysław; Górecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This paper refers to modelling characteristics of power LEDs with a particular reference to thermal phenomena. Special attention is paid to modelling characteristics of the circuit protecting the considered device against the excessive value of the reverse voltage and to the description of the temperature influence on optical power. The network form of the worked out model is presented and some results of experimental verification of this model for the selected diodes operating at different cooling conditions are described. The very good agreement between the calculated and measured characteristics is obtained.

  11. Revising explanatory models to accommodate anomalous genetic phenomena: Problem solving in the context of discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Robert; Stewart, Jim

    Past problem-solving research has provided a basis for helping students structure their knowledge and apply appropriate problem-solving strategies to solve problems for which their knowledge (or mental models) of scientific phenomena is adequate (model-using problem solving). This research examines how problem solving in the domain of Mendelian genetics proceeds in situations where solvers' mental models are insufficient to solve problems at hand (model-revising problem solving). Such situations require solvers to use existing models to recognize anomalous data and to revise those models to accommodate the data. The study was conducted in the context of 9-week high school genetics course and addressed: the heuristics charactenstic of successful model-revising problem solving: the nature of the model revisions, made by students as well as the nature of model development across problem types; and the basis upon which solvers decide that a revised model is sufficient (that t has both predictive and explanatory power).

  12. Numerical modelling of thermal and fluid flow phenomena in the mould channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sowa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a mathematical and a numerical model of the solidification of a cylindrical slender shaped casting, which take into account the process of filling the mould cavity with molten metal, has been proposed. Pressure and velocity fields were obtained by solving the momentum equations and the continuity equation, while the thermal fields were obtained by solving the heat conduction equation containing the convection term. Next, the numerical analysis of the solidification process of metals alloy in a cylindrical mould channel has been made. In the model one takes into account interdependence the heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena. Coupling of the thermal and fluid flow phenomena has been taken into consideration by the changes of the fluidity function and thermophysical parameters of alloy with respect to the temperature. The influence of the pressure and the temperature of metal pouring on the solid phase growth kinetics were estimated. The problem has been solved by the finite element method.

  13. Asymmetric simple exclusion processes with complex lattice geometries: A review of models and phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ming-Zhe; Li Shao-Da; Wang Rui-Li

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the findings of a large number of studies concerning the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with complex lattice geometries.The TASEP has been recognized as a paradigm in modeling and analyzing non-equilibrium traffic systems.The paper surveys both the observed physical phenomena and several popular meanfield approaches used to analyze the extended TASEP models.Several interesting physical phenomena,such as phase separation,spontaneous symmetry breaking,and the finite-size effect,have been identified and explained.The future investigations of the extended TASEP with complex lattice geometries are also introduced.This paper may help to obtain a better understanding of non-equilibrium systems.

  14. Self-assembly models for lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divya; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2006-03-01

    Solutions of mixed long and short (detergent-like) phospholipids referred to as ``bicelle'' mixtures in the literature, are known to form a variety of different morphologies based on their total lipid composition and temperature in a complex phase diagram. Some of these morphologies have been found to orient in a magnetic field, and consequently bicelle mixtures are widely used to study the structure of soluble as well as membrane embedded proteins using NMR. In this work, we report on the low temperature phase of the DMPC and DHPC bicelle mixture, where there is agreement on the discoid structures but where molecular packing models are still being contested. The most widely accepted packing arrangement, first proposed by Vold and Prosser had the lipids completely segregated in the disk: DHPC in the rim and DMPC in the disk. Using data from small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments, we show how radius of the planar domain of the disks is governed by the effective molar ratio qeff of lipids in aggregate and not the molar ratio q (q = [DMPC]/[DHPC] ) as has been understood previously. We propose a new quantitative (packing) model and show that in this self assembly scheme, qeff is the real determinant of disk sizes. Based on qeff , a master equation can then scale the radii of disks from mixtures with varying q and total lipid concentration.

  15. Modeling the Collision Phenomena of Ø11X19 Size Rolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Manescu jr.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical comparison using dynamic modeling techniques, of physical phenomena occurring at collisions between two rollers in a lot of distinct situations: impact on the edge at angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, 60°, 70°, 80° and impact on generator. These situations occur frequently in the manufacturing process of small cylindrical rollers.

  16. INVESTIGATION ON ELASTO-PLASTIC CONSTITUTIVE MODEL COUPLED WITH DAMAGE FOR LOCALIZATION PHENOMENA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈新普; 沈国晓; 陈立新

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of existing plasticity-based damage model for plasticity coupled with damage for localization analysis, constitutive parameter identification was carried out through a series of numerical tests at local level. And then improvements were made on the expressions of the evolution laws of damage. Strain localization phenomena were simulated with a typical double-notched specimen under tensions. Numerical results indicate the validity of the proposed theory.

  17. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    are subsequently evaluated based on their applicability in the four case studies. The evaluations especially focus on the impact of the choice of turbulence model and other modelling decisions made by the user. The conclusion is that CFD is a highly valuable tool for modelling several important parameters...... are presented as well as the theory behind the SST and the k-ε turbulence models. Modelling of additional variables, porous materials and twophase flows are also introduced. The two-phase flows are modelled using the Euler-Euler method, and both dispersed and free-surface flows are simulated. The importance...... of mass transfer with a focus on mixing, gas-liquid transfer of oxygen, and heterogeneous reactor systems is reviewed and mathematical models for these applications are presented. A review of how these mass transfer phenomena have been modelled in the scientific literature is also included. The models...

  18. Mathematical model for hit phenomena as stochastic process of interactions of human interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Akira; Matsuda, Naoya; Umemura, Sanae; Urushidani, Tamiko; Yamagata, Naoya; Yoshda, Narihiko

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical model for hit phenomena in entertainments in the society is presented as stochastic process of interactions of human dynamics. The model use only the time distribution of advertisement budget as input and the words of mouth (WOM) as posting in the social network system is used as the data to compare with the calculated results. The unit of time is daily. The WOM distribution in time is found to be very close to the residue distribution in time. The calculations for Japanese motion picture market due to the mathematical model agree very well with the actual residue distribution in time.

  19. Spatial modelling of periglacial phenomena in Deception Island (Maritime Antarctic): logistic regression and informative value method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Raquel; Vieira, Gonçalo; Caselli, Alberto; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Field surveying during the austral summer of 2007/08 and the analysis of a QuickBird satellite image, resulted on the production of a detailed geomorphological map of the Irizar and Crater Lake area in Deception Island (South Shetlands, Maritime Antarctic - 1:10 000) and allowed its analysis and spatial modelling of the geomorphological phenomena. The present study focus on the analysis of the spatial distribution and characteristics of hummocky terrains, lag surfaces and nivation hollows, complemented by GIS spatial modelling intending to identify relevant controlling geographical factors. Models of the susceptibility of occurrence of these phenomena were created using two statistical methods: logistical regression, as a multivariate method; and the informative value as a bivariate method. Success and prediction rate curves were used for model validation. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) was used to quantify the level of performance and prediction of the models and to allow the comparison between the two methods. Regarding the logistic regression method, the AUC showed a success rate of 71% for the lag surfaces, 81% for the hummocky terrains and 78% for the nivation hollows. The prediction rate was 72%, 68% and 71%, respectively. Concerning the informative value method, the success rate was 69% for the lag surfaces, 84% for the hummocky terrains and 78% for the nivation hollows, and with a correspondingly prediction of 71%, 66% and 69%. The results were of very good quality and demonstrate the potential of the models to predict the influence of independent variables in the occurrence of the geomorphological phenomena and also the reliability of the data. Key-words: present-day geomorphological dynamics, detailed geomorphological mapping, GIS, spatial modelling, Deception Island, Antarctic.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of transport phenomena in fuel cells and flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ao; Shyy, Wei; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-06-01

    Fuel cells and flow batteries are promising technologies to address climate change and air pollution problems. An understanding of the complex multiscale and multiphysics transport phenomena occurring in these electrochemical systems requires powerful numerical tools. Over the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has attracted broad interest in the computational fluid dynamics and the numerical heat transfer communities, primarily due to its kinetic nature making it appropriate for modeling complex multiphase transport phenomena. More importantly, the LB method fits well with parallel computing due to its locality feature, which is required for large-scale engineering applications. In this article, we review the LB method for gas-liquid two-phase flows, coupled fluid flow and mass transport in porous media, and particulate flows. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and flow batteries. Further developments of the LB method are also outlined.

  1. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  2. Global properties of symmetric competition models with riddling and blowout phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giant-italo Bischi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of chaos synchronization, and the related phenomena of riddling, blowout and on–off intermittency, are considered for discrete time competition models with identical competitors. The global properties which determine the different effects of riddling and blowout bifurcations are studied by the method of critical curves, a tool for the study of the global dynamical properties of two-dimensional noninvertible maps. These techniques are applied to the study of a dynamic market-share competition model.

  3. Numerical simulation of shock wave phenomena in hydrodynamic model of semiconductor devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ning; YANG Geng

    2007-01-01

    We propose a finite element method to investigate the phenomena of shock wave and to simulate the hydrodynamic model in semiconductor devices. An introduction of this model is discussed first. Then some scaling factors and a relationship between the changing variables are discussed. And then, we use a finite element method (P1-iso-P2 element) to discrete the equations. Some boundary conditions are also discussed. Finally,a sub-micron n+-n-n+ silicon diode and Si MESFET device are simulated and the results are analyzed. Numerical results show that electronic fluids are transonic under some conditions.

  4. Assembly interruptability robustness model with applications to Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, James William

    1991-02-01

    Interruptability robustness of a construction project together with its assembly sequence may be measured by calculating the probability of its survival and successful completion in the face of unplanned interruptions of the assembly process. Such an interruption may jeopardize the survival of the structure being assembled, the survival of the support equipment, and/or the safety of the members of the construction crew, depending upon the stage in the assembly sequence when the interruption occurs. The interruption may be due to a number of actors such as: machinery break-downs, environmental damage, worker emergency illness or injury, etc. Each source of interruption has a probability of occurring, and adds an associated probability of loss, schedule delay, and cost to the project. Several options may exist for reducing the consequences of an interruption at a given point in the assembly sequence, including altering the assembly sequence, adding extra components or equipment as interruptability 'insurance', increasing the capability of support facilities, etc. Each option may provide a different overall performance of the project as it relates to success, assembly time, and project cost. The Interruptability Robustness Model was devised and provides a method which allows the overall interruptability robustness of construction of a project design and its assembly sequence to be quantified. In addition, it identifies the susceptibility to interruptions for the assembly sequence at all points within the assembly sequence. The model is applied to the present problem of quantifying and improving interruptability robustness during the construction of Space Station Freedom. This application was used as a touchstone for devising the Interruptability Robustness Model. However, the model may be utilized to assist in the analysis of interruptability robustness for other space-related construction projects such as the lunar base and orbital assembly of the manned Mars

  5. Synthetic self-assembled models with biomimetic functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiammengo, Roberto; Crego-Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2001-01-01

    Self-assembly can be considered a powerful tool in the hand of chemists for the understanding, modeling and mimicking of biological systems. The possibility of reproducing biological functions in synthetic systems obtained by self-assembly is envisioned as a modest but very important step towards th

  6. Geophysical phenomena in the polar cap during northward interplanetary magnetic field; IUGG General Assembly, 20th, Vienna, Austria, August 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshichev, O. A.; Burke, W. J.

    1994-02-01

    The interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind and northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) continues to raise scientific interest and controversy. A selected group of papers from a conference on this topic discuss the following subjects: electric field generation, theoretical models of polar-cap convection, polar-cap distributions, dependencies of the polar-cap auroral distribution, and boundary populations in the polar-caps. Also discussed are satellite observations of polar arcs and mapping of the ionospheric convection response. For individual titles, see A95-64935 through A95-64945.

  7. Numerical modelling of the thermal and fluid flow phenomena of the fluidity test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bokota

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, two mathematical models of the solidification of a cylindrical shaped casting, which take into account the process of filling the mould cavity with molten metal during the vertical fluidity test, has been proposed. In the general model, velocity and pressure fields were obtained by solving the momentum equations and the continuity equation, whereas the thermal fields were obtained by solving the heat conduction equation containing the convection term. In the simplified model, making assumptions relating to both the material and the geometry of the region, the general equations for continuity and momentum have been reduced to single equation for pressure. This approach leads as to accelerate significantly of the fluid flow calculations. In this model, coupling of the thermal and fluid flow phenomena has been taken into consideration by the changes of the fluidity function and thermophysical parameters of alloy with respect to the temperature. The problem has been solved by the finite element method.

  8. Two-dimensional modeling of electrochemical and transport phenomena in the porous structures of a PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahraoui, Melik [Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingenieurs de Tunis (IPEIT) (Tunisia); Kharrat, Chafik; Halouani, Kamel [UR: Micro-Electro-Thermal Systems (METS-ENIS), Industrial Energy Systems Group, Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingenieurs de Sfax (IPEIS), University of Sfax, B.P: 1172, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2009-04-15

    A two-dimensional CFD model of PEM fuel cell is developed by taking into account the electrochemical, mass and heat transfer phenomena occurring in all of its regions simultaneously. The catalyst layers and membrane are each considered as distinct regions with finite thickness and calculated properties such as permeability, local protonic conductivity, and local dissolved water diffusion. This finite thickness model enables to model accurately the protonic current in these regions with higher accuracy than using an infinitesimal interface. In addition, this model takes into account the effect of osmotic drag in the membrane and catalyst layers. General boundary conditions are implemented in a way taking into consideration any given species concentration at the fuel cell inlet, such as water vapor which is a very important parameter in determining the efficiency of fuel cells. Other operating parameters such as temperature, pressure and porosity of the porous structure are also investigated to characterize their effect on the fuel cell efficiency. (author)

  9. Computational modeling of blood flow steal phenomena caused by subclavian stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, P J; Müller, L O; Watanabe, S M; Feijóo, R A

    2016-06-14

    The study of steal mechanisms caused by vessel obstructions is of the utmost importance to gain understanding about their pathophysiology, as well as to improve diagnosis and management procedures. The goal of this work is to perform a computational study to gain insight into the hemodynamic forces that drive blood flow steal mechanisms caused by subclavian artery stenosis. Such condition triggers a flow disorder known as subclavian steal. When this occurs in patients with internal thoracic artery anastomosed to the coronary vessels, the phenomenon includes a coronary-subclavian steal. True steal can exist in cases of increased arm blood flow, potentially resulting in neurological complications and, in the case of coronary-subclavian steal, graft function failure. In this context, the anatomically detailed arterial network (ADAN) model is employed to simulate subclavian steal and coronary-subclavian steal phenomena. Model results are verified by comparison with published data. It is concluded that this kind of model allows us to effectively address complex hemomdynamic phenomena occurring in clinical practice. More specifically, in the studied conditions it is observed that a regional brain steal occurs, primarily affecting the posterior circulation, not fully compensated by the anterior circulation. In the case of patients with coronary revascularization, it is concluded that there is a large variability in graft hemodynamic environments, which physically explain both the success of the procedure in cases of severe occlusive disease, and the reason for graft dysfunction in mildly stenosed left anterior descending coronary artery, due to alternating graft flow waveform signatures.

  10. Chemisorption phenomena: Analytic modeling based on perturbation theory and bond-order conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustorovich, Evgeny

    1986-07-01

    Tremendous advances in experimental studies of chemisorption revealed that many phenomena could not be understood and projected by the current theoretical constructs. We discuss some of the experimental puzzles that prompted a development of new analytic approaches to chemisorption based on general principles such as perturbation theory (PT) and bond-order conservation (BOC). The PT results concern the periodic regularities of the heat of chemisorption, the role of the antibonding adsorbate orbitals, and universal patterns of adsorbate-induced surface polarization Some of the PT findings are further corroborated within a much broader BOC approach. The BOC model and its postulates (including the use of a Morse potential) and diverse projections are thoroughly discussed. For atomic A and diatomic AB adsorbates, it is shown how the BOC model explicitly and rigorously interrelates a variety of seemingly disparate phenomena such as preferred adsorbate sites, the activation barriers for surface migration and dissociation, relations between atomic QA ( QB) and molecular QAB heats of chemisorption, coverage and coadsorption effects on QA, overlayer phase transitions and island formation, the nature of promotion and poisoning. The model also projects possible intermediates and elementary steps of surface reactions. Although some of the findings are counter to commonly held perceptions, the whole picture of chemisorption is coherent and fits experiment well. The new conceptual understanding is stressed and some comments on the theory of chemisorption are made.

  11. The role of fractional calculus in modeling biological phenomena: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, C.; Lopes, A.; Copot, D.; Machado, J. A. T.; Bates, J. H. T.

    2017-10-01

    This review provides the latest developments and trends in the application of fractional calculus (FC) in biomedicine and biology. Nature has often showed to follow rather simple rules that lead to the emergence of complex phenomena as a result. Of these, the paper addresses the properties in respiratory lung tissue, whose natural solutions arise from the midst of FC in the form of non-integer differ-integral solutions and non-integer parametric models. Diffusion of substances in human body, e.g. drug diffusion, is also a phenomena well known to be captured with such mathematical models. FC has been employed in neuroscience to characterize the generation of action potentials and spiking patters but also in characterizing bio-systems (e.g. vegetable tissues). Despite the natural complexity, biological systems belong as well to this class of systems, where FC has offered parsimonious yet accurate models. This review paper is a collection of results and literature reports who are essential to any versed engineer with multidisciplinary applications and bio-medical in particular.

  12. Modeling community succession and assembly: A novel method for network evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of modeling community succession and assembly is in some sense a method for network evolution, as done by Barabasi and Albert (1999. It is also one of the methods to create a sample networkfrom the statistic network I proposed earlier. I think that the mechanism of network evolution supposed by Barabasi and Albert is most likely applicable to the natural phenomena with emergency property. For natural phenomena without emergency property, the present study indicated that a scale-free network may be produced through a new mechanism, i.e., whether the connection of a taxon x occurs, dependent on the type and property of taxon y (in particular, the degree of its direct correlation with x to be connected but not necessarily the existing number of connections of taxon y, as proposed in present study.

  13. Modeling of Macroscopic/Microscopic Transport and Growth Phenomena in Zeolite Crystal Solutions Under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsonis, Nikos A.; Alexandrou, Andreas; Shi, Hui; Ongewe, Bernard; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    . At the same time, however, there is increased urgency to develop such an understanding in order to more accurately quantify the process. In order to better understand the results obtained from our prior space experiments, and design future experiments, a detailed fluid dynamic model simulating the crystal growth mechanism is required. This will not only add to the fundamental knowledge on the crystallization of zeolites, but also be useful in predicting the limits of size and growth of these important industrial materials. Our objective is to develop macro/microscopic theoretical and computational models to study the effect of transport phenomena in the growth of crystals grown in solutions. Our effort has concentrated so far in the development of separate macroscopic and microscopic models. The major highlights of our accomplishments are described.

  14. Groundwater flow pattern and related environmental phenomena in complex geologic setting based on integrated model construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Ádám; Havril, Tímea; Simon, Szilvia; Galsa, Attila; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Müller, Imre; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2016-08-01

    Groundwater flow, driven, controlled and determined by topography, geology and climate, is responsible for several natural surface manifestations and affected by anthropogenic processes. Therefore, flowing groundwater can be regarded as an environmental agent. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow could reveal the flow pattern and explain the observed features. In complex geologic framework, where the geologic-hydrogeologic knowledge is limited, the groundwater flow model could not be constructed based solely on borehole data, but geophysical information could aid the model building. The integrated model construction was presented via the case study of the Tihany Peninsula, Hungary, with the aims of understanding the background and occurrence of groundwater-related environmental phenomena, such as wetlands, surface water-groundwater interaction, slope instability, and revealing the potential effect of anthropogenic activity and climate change. The hydrogeologic model was prepared on the basis of the compiled archive geophysical database and the results of recently performed geophysical measurements complemented with geologic-hydrogeologic data. Derivation of different electrostratigraphic units, revealing fracturing and detecting tectonic elements was achieved by systematically combined electromagnetic geophysical methods. The deduced information can be used as model input for groundwater flow simulation concerning hydrostratigraphy, geometry and boundary conditions. The results of numerical modelling were interpreted on the basis of gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept and validated by field mapping of groundwater-related phenomena. The 3D model clarified the hydraulic behaviour of the formations, revealed the subsurface hydraulic connection between groundwater and wetlands and displayed the groundwater discharge pattern, as well. The position of wetlands, their vegetation type, discharge features and induced landslides were explained as

  15. Social network modeling: a powerful tool for the study of group scale phenomena in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Armand; Petit, Odile

    2011-08-01

    Social Network Analysis is now a valuable tool to study social complexity in many animal species, including primates. However, this framework has rarely been used to implement quantitative data on the social structure of a group within computer models. Such approaches allow the investigation of how social organization constrains other traits and also how these traits can impact the social organization in return. In this commentary, we discuss the powerful potential of social network modeling as a way to study group scale phenomena in primates. We describe the advantages of using such a method and we focus on the specificity of this approach in primates, given the particularities of their social networks compared with those of other taxa. We also give practical considerations and a list of examples as for the choice of parameters that can be used to implement the social layer within the models.

  16. An Expression of Periodic Phenomena of Fashion on Sexual Selection Model with Conformity Genes and Memes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Atsuko; Tokuhara, Shinya; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Oboshi, Tamon; Kato, Shohei; Itoh, Hidenori

    It is generally thought that living things have trends in their preferences. The mechanism of occurrence of another trends in successive periods is concerned in their conformity. According to social impact theory, the minority is always exists in the group. There is a possibility that the minority make the transition to the majority by conforming agents. Because of agent's promotion of their conform actions, the majority can make the transition. We proposed an evolutionary model with both genes and memes, and elucidated the interaction between genes and memes on sexual selection. In this paper, we propose an agent model for sexual selection imported the concept of conformity. Using this model we try an environment where male agents and female agents are existed, we find that periodic phenomena of fashion are expressed. And we report the influence of conformity and differentiation on the transition of their preferences.

  17. Modeling of gap cooling phenomena in LAVA-4 test using MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.H.; Park, S.Y.; Kim, S.D.; Song, Y.M.; Kim, D.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea)

    2000-07-01

    During the severe accident, the coolability of hot debris in the hemispherical lower vessel head has been an important issue concerning the plant safety. KAERI has launched the 'SONATA' experimental program and series of LAVA test have been performed to examine the existence of initial gap and its effect on the cooling of hot debris. A gap-cooling phenomenon was modeled and implemented into the lower plenum model in MELCOR. The calculation with considering the gap cooling phenomena shows a good prediction of the rapid cool clown of the vessel wall and the debris. But this model needs more refinement and evaluation against the experimental results before application to the plant. (author)

  18. A mesoscopic model for microscale hydrodynamics and interfacial phenomena: Slip, films, and contact angle hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2012-01-01

    We present a model based on the lattice Boltzmann equation that is suitable for the simulation of dynamic wetting. The model is capable of exhibiting fundamental interfacial phenomena such as weak adsorption of fluid on the solid substrate and the presence of a thin surface film within which a disjoining pressure acts. Dynamics in this surface film, tightly coupled with hydrodynamics in the fluid bulk, determine macroscopic properties of primary interest: the hydrodynamic slip; the equilibrium contact angle; and the static and dynamic hysteresis of the contact angles. The pseudo- potentials employed for fluid-solid interactions are composed of a repulsive core and an attractive tail that can be independently adjusted. This enables effective modification of the functional form of the disjoining pressure so that one can vary the static and dynamic hysteresis on surfaces that exhibit the same equilibrium contact angle. The modeled solid-fluid interface is diffuse, represented by a wall probability function which...

  19. Modelling and modal properties of nuclear fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the modelling and modal analysis of the hexagonal type nuclear fuel assembly. This very complicated mechanical system is created from the many beam type components shaped into spacer grids. The cyclic and central symmetry of the fuel rod package and load-bearing skeleton is advantageous for the fuel assembly decomposition into six identical revolved fuel rod segments, centre tube and skeleton linked by several spacer grids in horizontal planes. The derived mathematical model is used for the modal analysis of the Russian TVSA-T fuel assembly and validated in terms of experimentally determined natural frequencies, modes and static deformations caused by lateral force and torsional couple of forces. The presented model is the first necessary step for modelling of the nuclear fuel assembly vibration caused by different sources of excitation during the nuclear reactor VVER type operation.

  20. Paranormal phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alex

    1996-08-01

    Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

  1. Modeling of evaporation and oxidation phenomena in plasma spraying of metal powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanwei

    Plasma spraying of metals in air is usually accompanied by evaporation and oxidation of the sprayed material. Optimization of the spraying process must ensure that the particles are fully molten during their short residence time in the plasma jet and prior to hitting the substrate, but not overheated to minimize evaporation losses. In atmospheric plasma spraying (ASP), it is also clearly desirable to be able to control the extent of oxide formation. The objective of this work to develop an overall mathematical model of the oxidization and volatilization phenomena involved in the plasma-spraying of metallic particles in air atmosphere. Four models were developed to simulate the following aspects of the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process: (a) the particle trajectories and the velocity and temperature profiles in an Ar-H 2 plasma jet, (b) the heat and mass transfer between particles and plasma jet, (c) the interaction between the evaporation and oxidation phenomena, and (d) the oxidation of liquid metal droplets. The resulting overall model was generated by adapting the computational fluid dynamics code FIDAP and was validated by experimental measurements carried out at the collaborating plasma laboratory of the University of Limoges. The thesis also examined the environmental implications of the oxidization and volatilization phenomena in the plasma spraying of metals. The modeling results showed that the combination of the standard k-s model of turbulence and the Boussinesq eddy-viscosity model provided a more accurate prediction of plasma gas behavior. The estimated NOx generation levels from APS were lower than the U.S.E.P.A. emission standard. Either enhanced evaporation or oxidation can occur on the surface of the metal particles and the relative extent is determined by the process parameters. Comparatively, the particle size has the greatest impact on both evaporation and oxidation. The extent of particle oxidation depends principally on gas

  2. Geospatial Predictive Modelling for Climate Mapping of Selected Severe Weather Phenomena Over Poland: A Methodological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walawender, Ewelina; Walawender, Jakub P.; Ustrnul, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    The main purpose of the study is to introduce methods for mapping the spatial distribution of the occurrence of selected atmospheric phenomena (thunderstorms, fog, glaze and rime) over Poland from 1966 to 2010 (45 years). Limited in situ observations as well the discontinuous and location-dependent nature of these phenomena make traditional interpolation inappropriate. Spatially continuous maps were created with the use of geospatial predictive modelling techniques. For each given phenomenon, an algorithm identifying its favourable meteorological and environmental conditions was created on the basis of observations recorded at 61 weather stations in Poland. Annual frequency maps presenting the probability of a day with a thunderstorm, fog, glaze or rime were created with the use of a modelled, gridded dataset by implementing predefined algorithms. Relevant explanatory variables were derived from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and downscaled with the use of a Regional Climate Model. The resulting maps of favourable meteorological conditions were found to be valuable and representative on the country scale but at different correlation ( r) strength against in situ data (from r = 0.84 for thunderstorms to r = 0.15 for fog). A weak correlation between gridded estimates of fog occurrence and observations data indicated the very local nature of this phenomenon. For this reason, additional environmental predictors of fog occurrence were also examined. Topographic parameters derived from the SRTM elevation model and reclassified CORINE Land Cover data were used as the external, explanatory variables for the multiple linear regression kriging used to obtain the final map. The regression model explained 89 % of annual frequency of fog variability in the study area. Regression residuals were interpolated via simple kriging.

  3. Anisotropic Constitutive Model of Strain-induced Phenomena in Stainless Steels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2004-01-01

    A majority of the thin-walled components subjected to intensive plastic straining at cryogenic temperatures are made of stainless steels. The examples of such components can be found in the interconnections of particle accelerators, containing the superconducting magnets, where the thermal contraction is absorbed by thin-walled, axisymetric shells called bellows expansion joints. The stainless steels show three main phenomena induced by plastic strains at cryogenic temperatures: serrated (discontinuous) yielding, gamma->alpha' phase transformation and anisotropic ductile damage. In the present paper, a coupled constitutive model of gamma->alpha' phase transformation and orthotropic ductile damage is presented. A kinetic law of phase transformation, and a kinetic law of evolution of orthotropic damage are presented. The model is extended to anisotropic plasticity comprising a constant anisotropy (texture effect), which can be classically taken into account by the Hill yield surface, and plastic strain induced ...

  4. Mathematical model for hit phenomena and its application to analyze popularity of weekly tv drama

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Akira; Usui, Tsukasa; Uchiyama, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical model for hit phenomena presented by A Ishii et al in 2012 has been extended to analyze and predict a lot of hit subject using social network system. The equation for each individual consumers is assumed and the equation of social response to each hit subject is derived as stochastic process of statistical physics. The advertisement effect is included as external force and the communication effects are included as two-body and three-body interaction. The applications of this model are demonstrated for analyzing population of weekly TV drama. Including both the realtime view data and the playback view data, we found that the indirect communication correlate strongly to the TV viewing rate data for recent Japanese 20 TV drama.

  5. Critical phenomena of strange hadronic matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm strange hadronic matter (SHM) in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model. We implement the Nijmegen soft-core potential model NSC97f of hyperon-hyperon interactions in terms of the (hidden) strange mesons. The saturation properties of pure Lambda and Xi matter by the potential essentially determine the dependence of the critical temperature on the strangeness fraction of SHM. We treat the liquid-gas phase transition of SHM as the first-order one and employ Maxwell construction so as to calculate the phase coexistence curves. The derived critical exponents beta \\simeq 1/3 and gamma=1.22 are almost independent of the strangeness fraction of SHM and almost agree with the empirical values derived from the recent multifragmentation reactions. Consequently, we have confirmed the universality of the critical phenomena in the liquid-gas phase transition of hadronic system.

  6. Objects, Entities, Behaviors, and Interactions: A Typology of Student-Constructed Computer-Based Models of Physical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Loucas T.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Michael, Michalis; Constantinou, Constantinos P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for analyzing and evaluating student-constructed models of physical phenomena and monitoring the progress of these models. Moreover, we aimed to examine whether this framework could capture differences between models created using different computer-based modeling tools; namely, computer-based…

  7. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Spangler, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. Topical Review article submitted to the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, May 9, 2016

  8. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  9. Modeling conversion and transport phenomena in solid-state fermentation: a review and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahardjo, Yovita S P; Tramper, Johannes; Rinzema, Arjen

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation (SSF) is accompanied inevitably by development of concentration and temperature gradients within the substrate particles and microbial biofilms. These gradients are needed for driving the transport of substrates and products. In addition, concentration gradients have been suggested to be crucial for obtaining the characteristics that define the products of SSF; nevertheless, gradients are also known to result in reduced productivity and unwanted side reactions. Solid-state fermentations are generally batch processes and this further complicates their understanding as conditions change with time. Mathematical models are therefore needed for improving the understanding of SSF processes and allowing their manipulation to achieve the desired outcomes. Existing models of SSF processes describe coupled substrate conversion and diffusion and the consequent microbial growth. Existing models disregard many of the significant phenomena that are known to influence SSF. As a result, available models cannot explain the generation of the numerous products that form during any SSF process and the outcome of the process in terms of the characteristics of the final product. This review critically evaluates the proposed models and their experimental validation. In addition, important issues that need to be resolved for improved modeling of SSF are discussed.

  10. Crises and Collective Socio-Economic Phenomena: Simple Models and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Financial and economic history is strewn with bubbles and crashes, booms and busts, crises and upheavals of all sorts. Understanding the origin of these events is arguably one of the most important problems in economic theory. In this paper, we review recent efforts to include heterogeneities and interactions in models of decision. We argue that the so-called Random Field Ising model ( rfim) provides a unifying framework to account for many collective socio-economic phenomena that lead to sudden ruptures and crises. We discuss different models that can capture potentially destabilizing self-referential feedback loops, induced either by herding, i.e. reference to peers, or trending, i.e. reference to the past, and that account for some of the phenomenology missing in the standard models. We discuss some empirically testable predictions of these models, for example robust signatures of rfim-like herding effects, or the logarithmic decay of spatial correlations of voting patterns. One of the most striking result, inspired by statistical physics methods, is that Adam Smith's invisible hand can fail badly at solving simple coordination problems. We also insist on the issue of time-scales, that can be extremely long in some cases, and prevent socially optimal equilibria from being reached. As a theoretical challenge, the study of so-called "detailed-balance" violating decision rules is needed to decide whether conclusions based on current models (that all assume detailed-balance) are indeed robust and generic.

  11. Basic Model of a Control Assembly Drop in Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek BULÍN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the modelling and dynamic analysis of a nonlinear system representing a control assembly of the VVER 440/V213 nuclear reactor. A simple rigid body model intended for basic dynamic analyses is introduced. It contains the influences of the pressurized water and mainly the eects of possible control assembly contacts with guiding tubes inside the reactor. Another approach based on a complex multibody model is further described and the suitability of both modelling approaches is discussed.

  12. High-order Boussinesq-type modelling of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we start with a review of the development of Boussinesq theory for water waves covering the period from 1872 to date. Previous reviews have been given by Dingemans,1 Kirby,2,3 and Madsen & Schäffer.4 Next, we present our most recent high-order Boussinesq-type formulation valid...... for fully nonlinear and highly dispersive waves traveling over a rapidly varying bathymetry. Finally, we cover applications of this Boussinesq model, and we study a number of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water. These include (1) Kinematics in highly nonlinear progressive deep-water waves; (2......) Kinematics in progressive solitary waves; (3) Reflection of solitary waves from a vertical wall; (4) Reflection and diffraction around a vertical plate; (5) Quartet and quintet interactions and class I and II instabilities; (6) Extreme events from focused directionally spread waveelds; (7) Bragg scattering...

  13. Context-induced paranormal experiences: support for Houran and Lange's model of haunting phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, R; Houran, J

    1997-06-01

    Houran and Lange's psychological model of haunting phenomena predicts that contextual variables alone are sufficient to induce poltergeist-like perceptions. 22 subjects individually visited five areas of a performance theater and were asked to notice the environment. 11 subjects in an informed condition were instructed that the location was haunted, while 11 in the control condition were told that the building was simply under renovation. Subjects' perceptions in both conditions were recorded via Green, et al.'s 1992 experiential questionnaire which contains 10 subscales related to psychological and physiological perceptions. Analysis yielded significantly more intense perceptual experiences on nine of the ten subscales in the informed condition, indicating that demand characteristics alone can stimulate paranormal-type experiences.

  14. Explicitly Solvable Model of the Charge Carriers' Phenomena in Isotropic Conducting Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzak, Yaroslav S.; Wacławski, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the kinetic properties of the isotropic conducting crystals is presented. The general formulas for these kinetic properties are expressed in terms of the Fermi integrals. These integrals were obtained using methods of statistical ensembles with varying number of particles and the Gibbs's grand canonical distribution. The determination of the scattering function and the exploration of its relation with the mobility of the current carriers inside these crystals have been made. Together with the results of theoretical analysis of the scattering function and its relation with the current carriers' mobility, these formulas constitute the mathematical model of the charge carriers' transport phenomena in conducting crystals (where a non-parabolic energy spectrum is described by Kane's formula) and provide algorithms for the calculation of these properties.

  15. Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model. The three sets of the isovector-meson coupling constants are used. It is found that the critical temperature depends only on the difference of the symmetry energy but not on the differences of each isovector coupling constant. We treat the asymmetric nuclear matter as one-component system and employ the Maxwell construction so as to calculate the liquid-gas phase coexistence curve. The derived critical exponents depend on neither the symmetry energy nor the asymmetry of the system. Their values beta=0.33 and gamma=1.21 agree with the empirical values derived from the recent multifragmentation reactions. Consequently, we have confirmed the universality of the critical phenomena in the liquid-gas phase transition of nuclear matter.

  16. High-order Boussinesq-type modelling of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we start with a review of the development of Boussinesq theory for water waves covering the period from 1872 to date. Previous reviews have been given by Dingemans,1 Kirby,2,3 and Madsen & Schäffer.4 Next, we present our most recent high-order Boussinesq-type formulation valid...... for fully nonlinear and highly dispersive waves traveling over a rapidly varying bathymetry. Finally, we cover applications of this Boussinesq model, and we study a number of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water. These include (1) Kinematics in highly nonlinear progressive deep-water waves; (2......) Kinematics in progressive solitary waves; (3) Reflection of solitary waves from a vertical wall; (4) Reflection and diffraction around a vertical plate; (5) Quartet and quintet interactions and class I and II instabilities; (6) Extreme events from focused directionally spread waveelds; (7) Bragg scattering...

  17. Model tests on anomalous low friction and pendulum-type wave phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wu; Qin Fang; Yusheng Lu; Yadong Zhang; Jinchun Liu

    2009-01-01

    The anomalous low friction (ALF) and pendulum-type wave (μwave) phenomena were two typical,nonlinear,geo-mechanical,and dynamic responses in deep-block rock mass discovered from in situ observations,which occurred from the movement of the geo-blocks under the impact of external pulses,such as deep confined explosion,earthquake,and rock bursts.With the aim to confirm the existence of the above two phenomena and study the variation laws of them experimentally,laboratory tests on the granite and cement mortar continuum and blocks models were conducted on the self-independently developed multipurpose testing system,respectively.The ALF phenomenon was realized under two loading schemes,the blocks model and working block were acted upon by the joint action of vertical impact and horizontal static force as well as the joint action of both vertical and horizontal impacts with different time intervals.It revealed that the discrete time delays corresponding to the local maximums and minimums of the horizontal displacement amplitudes and residual horizontal displacements of the working block satisfied the canonical sequences with the multiple of √2,most of which satisfied the quantitative expression (√2)~i △/V_p.Besides,the one-dimensional impact experiments were carried out on the blocks granite model,continuum,and blocks cement mortar models,respectively.Based on the comparison and analysis of the propagation properties (amplitudes and the Fourier spectrums of acceleration time histories of blocks) of the 1D stress wave in the above models,it is indicated that the fractures in rock mass have tremendous effect on the attenuation of acceleration amplitudes and high-frequency waves.By comparison of the model test data with the in situ measurement conclusions,the existence of the μ wave was confirmed experimentally in the cement mortar blocks model with larger dimensions,and the frequencies corresponding to the local maximums of spectral density curves of three

  18. A network model for plant-pollinator community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colin; Yang, Suann; Albert, Réka; Shea, Katriona

    2011-01-04

    Community assembly models, usually constructed for food webs, are an important component of our understanding of how ecological communities are formed. However, models for mutualistic community assembly are still needed, especially because these communities are experiencing significant anthropogenic disturbances that affect their biodiversity. Here, we present a unique network model that simulates the colonization and extinction process of mutualistic community assembly. We generate regional source pools of species interaction networks on the basis of statistical properties reported in the literature. We develop a dynamic synchronous Boolean framework to simulate, with few free parameters, the dynamics of new mutualistic community formation from the regional source pool. This approach allows us to deterministically map out every possible trajectory of community formation. This level of detail is rarely observed in other analytic approaches and allows for thorough analysis of the dynamical properties of community formation. As for food web assembly, we find that the number of stable communities is quite low, and the composition of the source pool influences the abundance and nature of community outcomes. However, in contrast to food web assembly, stable mutualistic communities form rapidly. Small communities with minor fluctuations in species presence/absence (self-similar limit cycles) are the most common community outcome. The unique application of this Boolean network approach to the study of mutualistic community assembly offers a great opportunity to improve our understanding of these critical communities.

  19. Mathematical modeling of HIV-like particle assembly in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuewu; Zou, Xiufen

    2017-02-22

    In vitro, the recombinant HIV-1 Gag protein can generate spherical particles with a diameter of 25-30 nm in a fully defined system. It has approximately 80 building blocks, and its intermediates for assembly are abundant in geometry. Accordingly, there are a large number of nonlinear equations in the classical model. Therefore, it is difficult to compute values of geometry parameters for intermediates and make the mathematical analysis using the model. In this work, we develop a new model of HIV-like particle assembly in vitro by using six-fold symmetry of HIV-like particle assembly to decrease the number of geometry parameters. This method will greatly reduce computational costs and facilitate the application of the model. Then, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the positive equilibrium solution for this model with 79 nonlinear equations. Based on this model, we derive the interesting result that concentrations of all intermediates at equilibrium are independent of three important parameters, including two microscopic on-rate constants and the size of nucleating structure. Before equilibrium, these three parameters influence the concentration variation rates of all intermediates. We also analyze the relationship between the initial concentration of building blocks and concentrations of all intermediates. Furthermore, the bounds of concentrations of free building blocks and HIV-like particles are estimated. These results will be helpful to guide HIV-like particle assembly experiments and improve our understanding of the assembly dynamics of HIV-like particles in vitro.

  20. Borel and Stokes Nonperturbative Phenomena in Topological String Theory and c=1 Matrix Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquetti, Sara

    2010-01-01

    We address the nonperturbative structure of topological strings and c=1 matrix models, focusing on understanding the nature of instanton effects alongside with exploring their relation to the large-order behavior of the 1/N expansion. We consider the Gaussian, Penner and Chern-Simons matrix models, together with their holographic duals, the c=1 minimal string at self-dual radius and topological string theory on the resolved conifold. We employ Borel analysis to obtain the exact all-loop multi-instanton corrections to the free energies of the aforementioned models, and show that the leading poles in the Borel plane control the large-order behavior of perturbation theory. We understand the nonperturbative effects in terms of the Schwinger effect and provide a semiclassical picture in terms of eigenvalue tunneling between critical points of the multi-sheeted matrix model effective potentials. In particular, we relate instantons to Stokes phenomena via a hyperasymptotic analysis, providing a smoothing of the nonp...

  1. Finite element modeling of heating phenomena of cracks excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhao-Jiang; Zheng Jiang; Zhang Shu-Yi; Mi Xiao-Bing; Zheng Kai

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermo-mechanical coupled finite element model is built up to simulate the phenomena of dynamical contact and frictional heating of crack faces when the plate containing the crack is excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses. In the finite element model, the high-power ultrasonic transducer is modeled by using a piezoelectric thermal-analogy method, and the dynamical interaction between both crack faces is modeled using a contact-impact theory. In the simulations, the frictional heating taking place at the crack faces is quantitatively calculated by using finite element thermal-structural coupling analysis, especially, the influences of acoustic chaos to plate vibration and crack heating are calculated and analysed in detail Meanwhile, the related ultrasonic infrared images are also obtained experimentally, and the theoretical simulation results are in agreement with that of the experiments. The results show that, by using the theoretical method, a good simulation of dynamic interaction and friction heating process of the crack faces under non-chaotic or chaotic sound excitation can be obtained.

  2. On Modelling of Nonlinear Systems and Phenomena with the Use of Volterra and Wiener Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Borys

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a short tutorial on Volterra and Wiener series applications to modelling of nonlinear systems and phenomena, and also a survey of the recent achievements in this area. In particular, we show here how the philosophies standing behind each of the above theories differ from each other. On the other hand, we discuss also mathematical relationships between Volterra and Wiener kernels and operators. Also, the problem of a best approximation of large-scale nonlinear systems using Volterra operators in weighted Fock spaces is described. Examples of applications considered are the following: Volterra series use in description of nonlinear distortions in satellite systems and their equalization or compensation, exploiting Wiener kernels to modelling of biological systems, the use of both Volterra and Wiener theories in description of ocean waves and in magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Moreover, connections between Volterra series and neural network models, and also input-output descriptions of quantum systems by Volterra series are discussed. Finally, we consider application of Volterra series to solving some nonlinear problems occurring in hydrology, navigation, and transportation.

  3. Mesoscopic model for microscale hydrodynamics and interfacial phenomena: slip, films, and contact-angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Kavousanakis, Michail E; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2013-01-01

    We present a model based on the lattice Boltzmann equation that is suitable for the simulation of dynamic wetting. The model is capable of exhibiting fundamental interfacial phenomena such as weak adsorption of fluid on the solid substrate and the presence of a thin surface film within which a disjoining pressure acts. Dynamics in this surface film, tightly coupled with hydrodynamics in the fluid bulk, determine macroscopic properties of primary interest: the hydrodynamic slip; the equilibrium contact angle; and the static and dynamic hysteresis of the contact angles. The pseudo-potentials employed for fluid-solid interactions are composed of a repulsive core and an attractive tail that can be independently adjusted. This enables effective modification of the functional form of the disjoining pressure so that one can vary the static and dynamic hysteresis on surfaces that exhibit the same equilibrium contact angle. The modeled fluid-solid interface is diffuse, represented by a wall probability function that ultimately controls the momentum exchange between solid and fluid phases. This approach allows us to effectively vary the slip length for a given wettability (i.e., a given static contact angle) of the solid substrate.

  4. Solving Vertex Cover Problem Using DNA Tile Assembly Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA tile assembly models are a class of mathematically distributed and parallel biocomputing models in DNA tiles. In previous works, tile assembly models have been proved be Turing-universal; that is, the system can do what Turing machine can do. In this paper, we use tile systems to solve computational hard problem. Mathematically, we construct three tile subsystems, which can be combined together to solve vertex cover problem. As a result, each of the proposed tile subsystems consists of Θ(1 types of tiles, and the assembly process is executed in a parallel way (like DNA’s biological function in cells; thus the systems can generate the solution of the problem in linear time with respect to the size of the graph.

  5. Using Markov State Models to Study Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Perkett, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been demonstrated to be a powerful method for computationally studying intramolecular processes such as protein folding and macromolecular conformational changes. In this article, we present a new approach to construct MSMs that is applicable to modeling a broad class of multi-molecular assembly reactions. Distinct structures formed during assembly are distinguished by their undirected graphs, which are defined by strong subunit interactions. Spatial inhomogeneities of free subunits are accounted for using a recently developed Gaussian-based signature. Simplifications to this state identification are also investigated. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated on two different coarse-grained models for virus self-assembly. We find good agreement between the dynamics predicted by the MSMs and long, unbiased simulations, and that the MSMs can reduce overall simulation time by orders of magnitude.

  6. Marriage of Electromagnetism and Gravity in an Extended Space Model and Astrophysical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, V. A.; Tsipenyuk, D. Yu.

    2013-09-01

    The generalization of Einstein's special theory of relativity (SRT) is proposed. In this model the possibility of unification of scalar gravity and electromagnetism into a single unified field is considered. Formally, the generalization of the SRT is that instead of (1+3)-dimensional Minkowski space the (1+4)-dimensional extension G is considered. As a fifth additional coordinate the interval S is used. This value is saved under the usual Lorentz transformations in Minkowski space M, but it changes when the transformations in the extended space G are used. We call this model the extended space model (ESM). From a physical point of view our expansion means that processes in which the rest mass of the particles changes are acceptable now. If the rest mass of a particle does not change and the physical quantities do not depend on an additional variable S, then the electromagnetic and gravitational fields exist independently of each other. But if the rest mass is variable and there is a dependence on S, then these two fields are combined into a single unified field. In the extended space model a photon can have a nonzero mass and this mass can be either positive or negative. The gravitational effects such as the speed of escape, gravitational red shift and detection of light can be analyzed in the frame of the extended space model. In this model all these gravitational effects can be found algebraically by the rotations in the (1+4) dimensional space. Now it becomes possible to predict some future results of visible size of supermassive objects in our Universe due to new stage of experimental astronomy development in the RadioAstron Project and analyze phenomena is an explosion of the star V838 Mon.

  7. Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Rasmussen, Peder Lund

    2009-01-01

    Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems were investigated experimentally and by modeling. It was found that the two main degradation mechanisms in HTPEM fuel cells are carbon corrosion and Pt agglomeration. On basis of this conclusion a mechanistic model, describing...

  8. Experimental study and modelling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2009-01-01

    Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems were investigated experimentally and by modelling. It was found that the two main degradation mechanisms in HTPEM fuel cells are carbon corrosion and Pt agglomeration. On basis of this conclusion a mechanistic model, describing...

  9. Combinatorial Models for Assembly and Decomposition of Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Bojko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the most popular combinatorial models that are used for the synthesis of design solutions at the stage of the assembly process flow preparation. It shows that while assembling the product the relations of parts can be represented as a structure of preferences, which is formed on the basis of objective design restrictions put in at the stage of the product design. This structure is a binary preference relation pre-order. Its symmetrical part is equivalence and describes the entry of parts into the assembly unit. The asymmetric part is a partial order. It specifies part- ordering time in in the course of the assembly process. The structure of preferences is a minimal description of the restrictions and constraints in the assembly process. It can serve as a source for generating multiple assembly sequences of a product and its components, which are allowed by design. This multiplicity increases the likelihood of rational choice under uncertainty, unpredictable changes in the properties of technological or industrial systems.Incomplete dominance relation gives grounds for further examination and better understanding of the project situation. Operation field of the study is limited to a set of disparate elements of the partial order. Different strategies for processing the disparate elements may be offered, e.g. selection of the most informative pairs, comparison of which foremost linearizes the original partial order.

  10. NASA 3D Models: Cassini Assembly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Includes orbiter from CAD models. Accurate (to a fault) except no thermal blanketing is shown (this would cover most of the central structure of the spacecraft)....

  11. Meso-scale Modeling of Block Copolymers Self-Assembly in Casting Solutions for Membrane Manufacture

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Isoporous membranes manufactured from diblock copolymer are successfully produced at laboratory scale under controlled conditions. Because of the complex phenomena involved, membrane preparation requires trial and error methodologies to find the optimal conditions, leading to a considerable demand of resources. Experimental insights demonstrate that the self-assembly of the block copolymers in solution has an effect on the final membrane structure. Nevertheless, the complete understanding of these multi-scale phenomena is elusive. Herein we use the coarse-grained method Dissipative Particle Dynamics to study the self-assembly of block copolymers that are used for the preparation of the membranes. To simulate representative time and length scales, we introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain representations for dissipative particle dynamics, which preserves the properties governing the phase equilibria. We reduce the number of degrees of freedom by accounting for the correlation between beads in fine-grained models via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. The coarse-graining models are consistent with the experimental evidence, showing a morphological transition of the aggregates as the polymer concentration and solvent affinity change. We show that hexagonal packing of the micelles can occur in solution within different windows of polymer concentration depending on the solvent affinity. However, the shape and size dispersion of the micelles determine the characteristic arrangement. We describe the order of crew-cut micelles using a rigid-sphere approximation and propose different phase parameters that characterize the emergence of monodisperse-spherical micelles in solution. Additionally, we investigate the effect of blending asymmetric diblock copolymers (AB/AC) over the properties of the membranes. We observe that the co-assembly mechanism localizes the AC molecules at the interface of A and B domains, and induces

  12. 3-D Numerical Modeling of Heat Transport Phenomena in Soil under Climatic Conditions of Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jompob WAEWSAK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a 3-D numerical modeling of heat transport phenomena in soil due to a change of sensible and latent heat, under the ambient conditions of southern Thailand. The vertical soil temperature profile within 3 m was predicted based on energy balance and 3 modes of heat transfer mechanisms, i.e., conduction, convection, and radiation. Mathematical models for estimation of solar radiation intensity, ambient and sky temperatures, relative humidity, and surface wind velocity were used as model inputs. 3-D numerical implicit finite difference schemes, i.e., forward time, and forward, center, and backward spaces were used for discretizing the set of governing, initial, and boundary condition equations. The set of pseudo-linear equations were then solved using the single step Gauss-Seidel iteration method. Computer code was developed by using MATLAB computer software. The soil physical effects; density, thermal conductivity, emissivity, absorptivity, and latent heat on amplitude of soil temperature variation were investigated. Numerical results were validated in comparison to the experimental results. It was found that 3-D numerical modeling could predict the soil temperature to almost the same degree as results that were obtained by experimentation, especially at a depth of 1 m. The root mean square error at ground surface and at depths of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 m were 0.169, 0.153, 0.097, 0.116, 0.120, 0.115, and 0.098, respectively. Furthermore, it was found that variation of soil temperature occurred within 0.75 m only.

  13. Hierarchical Multiscale Modeling of Macromolecules and their Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortoleva, P; Singharoy, A; Pankavich, S

    2013-04-28

    Soft materials (e.g., enveloped viruses, liposomes, membranes and supercooled liquids) simultaneously deform or display collective behaviors, while undergoing atomic scale vibrations and collisions. While the multiple space-time character of such systems often makes traditional molecular dynamics simulation impractical, a multiscale approach has been presented that allows for long-time simulation with atomic detail based on the co-evolution of slowly-varying order parameters (OPs) with the quasi-equilibrium probability density of atomic configurations. However, this approach breaks down when the structural change is extreme, or when nearest-neighbor connectivity of atoms is not maintained. In the current study, a self-consistent approach is presented wherein OPs and a reference structure co-evolve slowly to yield long-time simulation for dynamical soft-matter phenomena such as structural transitions and self-assembly. The development begins with the Liouville equation for N classical atoms and an ansatz on the form of the associated N-atom probability density. Multiscale techniques are used to derive Langevin equations for the coupled OP-configurational dynamics. The net result is a set of equations for the coupled stochastic dynamics of the OPs and centers of mass of the subsystems that constitute a soft material body. The theory is based on an all-atom methodology and an interatomic force field, and therefore enables calibration-free simulations of soft matter, such as macromolecular assemblies.

  14. Towards an Advanced Modelling of Complex Economic Phenomena Pretopological and Topological Uncertainty Research Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Aluja, Jaime Gil

    2012-01-01

    Little by little we are being provided with an arsenal of operative instruments of a non-numerical nature, in the shape of models and algorithms, capable of providing answers to the “aggressions” which our economics and management systems must withstand, coming from an environment full of turmoil.   In the work which we are presenting, we dare to propose a set of elements from which we hope arise focuses capable of renewing those structures of economic thought which are upheld by the geometrical idea.   The concepts of pretopology and topology, habitually marginalized in economics and management studies, have centred our interest in recent times.  We consider that it is not possible to conceive formal structures capable of representing the Darwinism concept of economic behaviour today without recurring to this fundamental generalisation of metric spaces.   In our attempts to find a solid base to the structures proposed for the treatment of economic phenomena, we have frequently resorted to the theory ...

  15. Microscopic approach to critical phenomena at interfaces: An application to complete wetting in the Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, A.; Parola, A.; Reatto, L.

    2004-11-01

    We study how the formalism of the hierarchical reference theory (HRT) can be extended to inhomogeneous systems. HRT is a liquid-state theory which implements the basic ideas of the Wilson momentum-shell renormalization group (RG) to microscopic Hamiltonians. In the case of homogeneous systems, HRT provides accurate results even in the critical region, where it reproduces scaling and nonclassical critical exponents. We applied the HRT to study wetting critical phenomena in a planar geometry. Our formalism avoids the explicit definition of effective surface Hamiltonians but leads, close to the wetting transition, to the same renormalization group equation already studied by RG techiques. However, HRT also provides information on the nonuniversal quantities because it does not require any preliminary coarse graining procedure. A simple approximation to the infinite HRT set of equations is discussed. The HRT evolution equation for the surface free energy is numerically integrated in a semi-infinite three-dimensional Ising model and the complete wetting phase transition is analyzed. A renormalization of the adsorption critical amplitude and of the wetting parameter is observed. Our results are compared to available Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. A Model for Transport Phenomena in a Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration Module with Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Yoshikawa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross-flow ultrafiltration of macromolecular solutions in a module with microchannels is expected to have the advantages of fast diffusion from the membrane surface and a high ratio of membrane surface area to feed liquid volume. Cross-flow ultrafiltration modules with microchannels are expected to be used for separation and refining and as membrane reactors in microchemical processes. Though these modules can be applied as a separator connected with a micro-channel reactor or a membrane reactor, there have been few papers on their performance. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between operational conditions and performance of cross-flow ultrafiltration devices with microchannels. In this study, Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone (PVP aqueous solution was used as a model solute of macromolecules such as enzymes. Cross-flow ultrafiltration experiments were carried out under constant pressure conditions, varying other operational conditions. The permeate flux decreased in the beginning of each experiment. After enough time passed, the permeate flux reached a constant value. The performance of the module was discussed based on the constant values of the flux. It was observed that the permeate flux increased with increasing transmembrane pressure (TMP and feed flow rate, and decreased with an increase of feed liquid concentration. A model of the transport phenomena in the feed liquid side channel and the permeation through the membrane was developed based on the concentration and velocity distributions in the feed side channel. The experimental results were compared with those based on the model and the performance of the ultrafiltration module is discussed.

  17. Transport Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  18. Plantagora: modeling whole genome sequencing and assembly of plant genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Barthelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly

  19. Cooperativity-based modeling of heterotypic DNA nanostructure assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Anastasia; Hozeh, Avital; Girshevitz, Olga; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2015-07-27

    DNA origami is a robust method for the fabrication of nanoscale 2D and 3D objects with complex features and geometries. The process of DNA origami folding has been recently studied, however quantitative understanding of it is still elusive. Here, we describe a systematic quantification of the assembly process of DNA nanostructures, focusing on the heterotypic DNA junction-in which arms are unequal-as their basic building block. Using bulk fluorescence studies we tracked this process and identified multiple levels of cooperativity from the arms in a single junction to neighboring junctions in a large DNA origami object, demonstrating that cooperativity is a central underlying mechanism in the process of DNA nanostructure assembly. We show that the assembly of junctions in which the arms are consecutively ordered is more efficient than junctions with randomly-ordered components, with the latter showing assembly through several alternative trajectories as a potential mechanism explaining the lower efficiency. This highlights consecutiveness as a new design consideration that could be implemented in DNA nanotechnology CAD tools to produce more efficient and high-yield designs. Altogether, our experimental findings allowed us to devise a quantitative, cooperativity-based heuristic model for the assembly of DNA nanostructures, which is highly consistent with experimental observations.

  20. Using synchronous Boolean networks to model several phenomena of collective behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepan Kochemazov

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an approach for modeling and analysis of a number of phenomena of collective behavior. By collectives we mean multi-agent systems that transition from one state to another at discrete moments of time. The behavior of a member of a collective (agent is called conforming if the opinion of this agent at current time moment conforms to the opinion of some other agents at the previous time moment. We presume that at each moment of time every agent makes a decision by choosing from the set {0,1} (where 1-decision corresponds to action and 0-decision corresponds to inaction. In our approach we model collective behavior with synchronous Boolean networks. We presume that in a network there can be agents that act at every moment of time. Such agents are called instigators. Also there can be agents that never act. Such agents are called loyalists. Agents that are neither instigators nor loyalists are called simple agents. We study two combinatorial problems. The first problem is to find a disposition of instigators that in several time moments transforms a network from a state where the majority of simple agents are inactive to a state with the majority of active agents. The second problem is to find a disposition of loyalists that returns the network to a state with the majority of inactive agents. Similar problems are studied for networks in which simple agents demonstrate the contrary to conforming behavior that we call anticonforming. We obtained several theoretical results regarding the behavior of collectives of agents with conforming or anticonforming behavior. In computational experiments we solved the described problems for randomly generated networks with several hundred vertices. We reduced corresponding combinatorial problems to the Boolean satisfiability problem (SAT and used modern SAT solvers to solve the instances obtained.

  1. Using Synchronous Boolean Networks to Model Several Phenomena of Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemazov, Stepan; Semenov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for modeling and analysis of a number of phenomena of collective behavior. By collectives we mean multi-agent systems that transition from one state to another at discrete moments of time. The behavior of a member of a collective (agent) is called conforming if the opinion of this agent at current time moment conforms to the opinion of some other agents at the previous time moment. We presume that at each moment of time every agent makes a decision by choosing from the set (where 1-decision corresponds to action and 0-decision corresponds to inaction). In our approach we model collective behavior with synchronous Boolean networks. We presume that in a network there can be agents that act at every moment of time. Such agents are called instigators. Also there can be agents that never act. Such agents are called loyalists. Agents that are neither instigators nor loyalists are called simple agents. We study two combinatorial problems. The first problem is to find a disposition of instigators that in several time moments transforms a network from a state where the majority of simple agents are inactive to a state with the majority of active agents. The second problem is to find a disposition of loyalists that returns the network to a state with the majority of inactive agents. Similar problems are studied for networks in which simple agents demonstrate the contrary to conforming behavior that we call anticonforming. We obtained several theoretical results regarding the behavior of collectives of agents with conforming or anticonforming behavior. In computational experiments we solved the described problems for randomly generated networks with several hundred vertices. We reduced corresponding combinatorial problems to the Boolean satisfiability problem (SAT) and used modern SAT solvers to solve the instances obtained. PMID:25526612

  2. cDPD: A new dissipative particle dynamics method for modeling electrokinetic phenomena at the mesoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Zhen; Borodin, Oleg; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-10-01

    We develop a "charged" dissipative particle dynamics (cDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena governed by the stochastic Poisson-Nernst-Planck and the Navier-Stokes equations. Specifically, the transport equations of ionic species are incorporated into the DPD framework by introducing extra degrees of freedom and corresponding evolution equations associated with each DPD particle. Diffusion of ionic species driven by the ionic concentration gradient, electrostatic potential gradient, and thermal fluctuations is captured accurately via pairwise fluxes between DPD particles. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on the moving DPD particles iteratively at each time step. For charged surfaces in bounded systems, an effective boundary treatment methodology is developed for imposing both the correct hydrodynamic and electrokinetics boundary conditions in cDPD simulations. To validate the proposed cDPD model and the corresponding boundary conditions, we first study the electrostatic structure in the vicinity of a charged solid surface, i.e., we perform cDPD simulations of the electrostatic double layer and show that our results are in good agreement with the well-known mean-field theoretical solutions. We also simulate the electrostatic structure and capacity densities between charged parallel plates in salt solutions with different salt concentrations. Moreover, we employ the proposed methodology to study the electro-osmotic and electro-osmotic/pressure-driven flows in a micro-channel. In the latter case, we simulate the dilute poly-electrolyte solution drifting by electro-osmotic flow in a micro-channel, hence demonstrating the flexibility and capability of this method in studying complex fluids with electrostatic interactions at the micro- and nano-scales.

  3. Empirical Validation of Integrated Learning Performances for Hydrologic Phenomena: 3rd-Grade Students' Model-Driven Explanation-Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cory T.; Zangori, Laura; Schwarz, Christina V.

    2015-01-01

    Water is a crucial topic that spans the K-12 science curriculum, including the elementary grades. Students should engage in the articulation, negotiation, and revision of model-based explanations about hydrologic phenomena. However, past research has shown that students, particularly early learners, often struggle to understand hydrologic…

  4. Searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS and CMS detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Henri Bachacou; on behalf of the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations

    2012-10-01

    The LHC has delivered several fb-1 of data in spring and summer 2011, opening new windows of opportunity for discovering phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A summary of the searches conducted by the ATLAS and CMS experiments based on about 1 fb-1 of data is presented.

  5. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Modelling-Oriented Workshops for Engineering Undergraduates in the Field of Thermally Activated Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Onofrio Rosario; Di Paola, Benedetto; Persano Adorno, Dominique; Pizzolato, Nicola; Fazio, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    Two 20-h modelling-based workshops focused on the explanation of thermally activated phenomena were held at the University of Palermo, Italy, during the Academic Year 2014-2015. One of them was conducted by applying an inquiry-based approach, while the other, still based on laboratory and modelling activities, was not focused on inquiry. Seventy-two students belonging to the Undergraduate Program for Chemical Engineering attended the two workshops. The related content was focused on an à la Feynman unifying approach to thermally activated phenomena. Questionnaires were administered to the students of both groups, before and post instruction. Responses were analysed using k-means cluster analysis and students' inferred lines of reasoning about the description and explanation of phenomena were studied in both groups. We find that both workshops can be considered effective in improving student's reasoning skills. However, the inquiry-based approach revealed to be more effective than the traditional one in helping students to build mechanisms of functioning and explicative models and to identify common aspects in apparently different phenomena.

  6. Self-Assembled Magnetic Surface Swimmers: Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranson, Igor; Belkin, Maxim; Snezhko, Alexey

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms of self-propulsion of living microorganisms are a fascinating phenomenon attracting enormous attention in the physics community. A new type of self-assembled micro-swimmers, magnetic snakes, is an excellent tool to model locomotion in a simple table-top experiment. The snakes self-assemble from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles suspended on the liquid-air interface and subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Formation and dynamics of these swimmers are captured in the framework of theoretical model coupling paradigm equation for the amplitude of surface waves, conservation law for the density of particles, and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. The results of continuum modeling are supported by hybrid molecular dynamics simulations of magnetic particles floating on the surface of fluid.

  7. The elasto-damage theory of the components assembling model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG ShouChun; LIANG NaiGang; LU HaiXing

    2009-01-01

    The potential energy in materials is well approximated by pair functional which is composed of pair potentials and embedding energy. During calculating material potential energy, the orientational com-ponent and the volumetric component are derived respectively from pair potentials and embedding energy. The sum of energy of all these two kinds of components is the material potential. No matter how microstructures change, damage or fracture, at the most level, they are all the changing and breaking atomic bonds. As an abstract of atomic bonds, these components change their stiffness during dam-aging. Material constitutive equations have been formulated by means of assembling all components' response functions. This material model is called the component assembling model. Theoretical analysis and numerical computing indicate that the proposed model has the capacity of reproducing some results satisfactorily, with the advantages of great conceptual simplicity, physical explicitness, and intrinsic induced anisotropy, etc.

  8. The elasto-damage theory of the components assembling model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The potential energy in materials is well approximated by pair functional which is composed of pair potentials and embedding energy. During calculating material potential energy, the orientational component and the volumetric component are derived respectively from pair potentials and embedding energy. The sum of energy of all these two kinds of components is the material potential. No matter how microstructures change, damage or fracture, at the most level, they are all the changing and breaking atomic bonds. As an abstract of atomic bonds, these components change their stiffness during damaging. Material constitutive equations have been formulated by means of assembling all components’ response functions. This material model is called the component assembling model. Theoretical analysis and numerical computing indicate that the proposed model has the capacity of reproducing some results satisfactorily, with the advantages of great conceptual simplicity, physical explicitness, and intrinsic induced anisotropy, etc.

  9. An assembly model of Rift Valley fever virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirabela eRusu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a bunyavirus endemic to Africa and the Arabian Peninsula that infects humans and livestock. The virus encodes two glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, which represent the major structural antigens and are responsible for host cell receptor binding and fusion. Both glycoproteins are organized on the virus surface as cylindrical hollow spikes that cluster into distinct capsomers with the overall assembly exhibiting an icosahedral symmetry. Currently, no experimental three-dimensional structure for any entire bunyavirus glycoprotein is available. Using fold recognition, we generated molecular models for both RVFV glycoproteins and found significant structural matches between the RVFV Gn protein and the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein and a separate match between RVFV Gc protein and Sindbis virus envelope protein E1. Using these models, the potential interaction and arrangement of both glycoproteins in the RVFV particle was analyzed, by modeling their placement within the cryo-electron microscopy density map of RVFV. We identified four possible arrangements of the glycoproteins in the virion envelope. Each assembly model proposes that the ectodomain of Gn forms the majority of the protruding capsomer and that Gc is involved in formation of the capsomer base. Furthermore, Gc is suggested to facilitate intercapsomer connections. The proposed arrangement of the two glycoproteins on the RVFV surface is similar to that described for the alphavirus E1-E2 proteins. Our models will provide guidance to better understand the assembly process of phleboviruses and such structural studies can also contribute to the design of targeted antivirals.

  10. Mathematical Model of the Habituation Process as a Learning Basic Phenomena in PC-12 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Adolfo Obaya

    Learning processes have been investigated for regularities of the changes in the strength of a reflex that result from manipulations of several parameters of a stimulus. Most of this work has been carried out in the tradition of associative theory. One consequence of this emphasis was that for a long time several phenomena that can be…

  11. Using LabVIEW for Applying Mathematical Models in Representing Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, G.; Gabriele, L.

    2007-01-01

    Simulations make it possible to explore physical and biological phenomena, where conducting the real experiment is impracticable or difficult. The implementation of a software program describing and simulating a given physical situation encourages the understanding of a phenomenon itself. Fifty-nine students, enrolled at the Mathematical Methods…

  12. Using LabVIEW for Applying Mathematical Models in Representing Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, G.; Gabriele, L.

    2007-01-01

    Simulations make it possible to explore physical and biological phenomena, where conducting the real experiment is impracticable or difficult. The implementation of a software program describing and simulating a given physical situation encourages the understanding of a phenomenon itself. Fifty-nine students, enrolled at the Mathematical Methods…

  13. Transport Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  14. A structural model for multimodular NRPS assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    This viewpoint article focuses on the structures of the dissected catalytic domains of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) associated with substrate selection and activation (A domain), substrate shuttling among the active sites (PCP domain), peptide bond formation (C domain) and product release (TE domain). Structural details of these essential components of the NRPS machinery, integrated in a didomain (PCP-C) and an elongation module (C-A-PCP), were used to generate a model for a multimodular NRPS assembly line.

  15. CAD ACTIVE MODELS: AN INNOVATIVE METHOD IN ASSEMBLY ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADDEO Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to show the use and the versatility of the active models in different applications. It has been realized an active model of a cylindrical spring and it has been applied in two mechanisms, different for typology and for backlash loads. The first example is a dynamometer in which nthe cylindrical spring is loaded by traction forces, while the second example is made up from a pressure valve in which the cylindrical-conic spring works under compression. The imposition of the loads in both cases, has allowed us to evaluate the model of the mechanism in different working conditions, also in assembly environment.

  16. Prediction and Uncertainty in Computational Modeling of Complex Phenomena: A Whitepaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trucano, T.G.

    1999-01-20

    This report summarizes some challenges associated with the use of computational science to predict the behavior of complex phenomena. As such, the document is a compendium of ideas that have been generated by various staff at Sandia. The report emphasizes key components of the use of computational to predict complex phenomena, including computational complexity and correctness of implementations, the nature of the comparison with data, the importance of uncertainty quantification in comprehending what the prediction is telling us, and the role of risk in making and using computational predictions. Both broad and more narrowly focused technical recommendations for research are given. Several computational problems are summarized that help to illustrate the issues we have emphasized. The tone of the report is informal, with virtually no mathematics. However, we have attempted to provide a useful bibliography that would assist the interested reader in pursuing the content of this report in greater depth.

  17. Critical phenomena in a disc-percolation model and their application to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Hong-Wei; XU Ming-Mei; LIU Lian-Shou

    2009-01-01

    By studying the critical phenomena in continuum-percolation of discs, we find a new approach to locate the critical point, i.e.using the inflection point of P_∞ as an evaluation of the percolation threshold.The susceptibility, defined as the derivative of P_∞, possesses a finite-size scaling property, where the scaling exponent is the reciprocal of ν, the critical exponent of the correlation length.A possible application of this approach to the study of the critical phenomena in relativistic heavy ion collisions is discussed.The critical point for deconfinement can be extracted by the inflection point of P_(QGP)-the probability for the event with QGP formation.The finite-size scaling of its derivative can give the critical exponent ν, which is a rare case that can provide an experimental measure of a critical exponent in heavy ion collisions.

  18. Power Electronic Packaging Design, Assembly Process, Reliability and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Power Electronic Packaging presents an in-depth overview of power electronic packaging design, assembly,reliability and modeling. Since there is a drastic difference between IC fabrication and power electronic packaging, the book systematically introduces typical power electronic packaging design, assembly, reliability and failure analysis and material selection so readers can clearly understand each task's unique characteristics. Power electronic packaging is one of the fastest growing segments in the power electronic industry, due to the rapid growth of power integrated circuit (IC) fabrication, especially for applications like portable, consumer, home, computing and automotive electronics. This book also covers how advances in both semiconductor content and power advanced package design have helped cause advances in power device capability in recent years. The author extrapolates the most recent trends in the book's areas of focus to highlight where further improvement in materials and techniques can d...

  19. Modeling Complex Dynamic Interactions of Nonlinear, Aeroelastic, Multistage, and Localization Phenomena in Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Characteristics of Mistuned Blade Assemblies: Mode Localization and Loss of Eigenstructure,” AIAA Jounal , Vol. 30, No. 10, 1992, pp. 2483– 2496. [21] Pierre...C., Smith, T. E., and Murthy, D., “Localization of Aeroelastic Modes in Mistuned High-Energy Turbines,” Jounal of Propulsion and Power , Vol. 10, No

  20. Complex fission phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena can be studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle-point) nuclear shapes, may be obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in cold fission phenomena can be explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined. Predictions of two alpha accompanied fission are experimentally confirmed.

  1. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M A G Piette

    Full Text Available Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  2. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Bernard M A G; Liu, Junli; Peeters, Kasper; Smertenko, Andrei; Hawkins, Timothy; Deeks, Michael; Quinlan, Roy; Zakrzewski, Wojciech J; Hussey, Patrick J

    2009-08-11

    Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  3. A Computer Model for Analyzing Volatile Removal Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Boyun

    2010-01-01

    A computer model simulates reactional gas/liquid two-phase flow processes in porous media. A typical process is the oxygen/wastewater flow in the Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA) in the Closed Environment Life Support System (CELSS) installed in the International Space Station (ISS). The volatile organics in the wastewater are combusted by oxygen gas to form clean water and carbon dioxide, which is solved in the water phase. The model predicts the oxygen gas concentration profile in the reactor, which is an indicator of reactor performance. In this innovation, a mathematical model is included in the computer model for calculating the mass transfer from the gas phase to the liquid phase. The amount of mass transfer depends on several factors, including gas-phase concentration, distribution, and reaction rate. For a given reactor dimension, these factors depend on pressure and temperature in the reactor and composition and flow rate of the influent.

  4. Modelling of degradation/recovery phenomena in CdS/CdTe ultrathin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorji, Nima E. [University of Bologna, Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    The degradation/recovery phenomena in ultrathin film solar cells based on CdS/CdTe are theoretically analysed using Sah-Noyce-Shockley theory for generation and recombination in the depletion region. This theory can explain the overlap of the depletion regions at both front and back contacts where the carrier generation and collection are as important as recombination mechanism. The value of physical parameters such as uncompensated defect density, carrier recombination lifetime and band bending at interface are critically important when reducing the thickness of CdTe layer down to sub-micron. The rollover, materials inter-/out-diffusion, complex defect formation and the role of mobile ions are taken into consideration to obtain an insight into the physics of degradation/recovery phenomena in ultrathin CdTe film solar cells. Both mechanisms are precisely analysed drawing the schematics of the energy band diagrams and mobile ions transport paths which in this case is the grain interior. This means that we neglect the metal diffusion through the grain boundaries which are assumed to be completely passivated. This assumption enabled us to study the role of the defects on the carrier transport in the interiors rather than through the boundaries. (orig.)

  5. Theoretic analysis on phase delay phenomena of well water level tide in the double medium aquifer model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of double medium aquifer is briefly introduced in this paper, a partial differential equation about seepage motion derived by the tidal stress in the model layer is deduced. Compared this equation with Boulton equation used in the unconfined aquifer, a new lagging supply water term is obtained, which establish the physical basis for interpreting the phase delay phenomena of well water level caused by the solid tide. By analyzing the partial dif-ferential equation, it is found that this lagging supply term is related with the fluctuation of tide occurred in the deep aquifer.

  6. Models for general phase change phenomena in heat exchangers and in industrial processes affected by applying an electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Y.Y. [Nottingham Trent University Burton Street, Dept. of Mechinal and Manufacturing Engineering (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the theoretical models for general phase change phenomena in heat exchangers and in industrial processes affected by applying an electric field. The models are on the basis of nucleation and surface fluctuation theories to study the generality of phase change processes under the action of an electric field. Theoretical analysis is carried out and highlights the effect of an electric field on phase change processes from an existing phase to a new phase. The analysis has shown that a critical value of the filed strength could be found theoretically for a certain phase change process. This could be a mechanism of control the processes. (authors)

  7. Balancing mixed-model assembly lines: A computational evaluation of objectives to smoothen workload

    OpenAIRE

    Emde, Simon; Boysen, Nils; Scholl, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mixed-model assembly lines are widely used in a range of production settings, such as the final assembly of the automotive and electronics industries, where they are applied to mass-produce standardized commodities. One of the greatest challenges when installing and reconfiguring these lines is the vast product variety modern mixed-model assembly lines have to cope with. Traditionally, product variety is bypassed during mid-term assembly line balancing by applying a joint ...

  8. Self-assembled hemicapsules with inherent functionalities: modeling of a supramolecular electrostatic self-assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oshovsky, G.; Reinhoudt, David; Verboom, Willem

    2006-01-01

    An approach to functional self-assembled hemicapsules is described consisting of the use of multivalent (valency ≥ 4) and divalent components, the functional groups of which have a relatively weak binding affinity. Electrostatic self-assembly of tetrakis(pyridiniummethyl)cavitand hemispheres (H) and

  9. Assembly and mechanosensory function of focal adhesions: experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadsky, Alexander D; Ballestrem, Christoph; Carramusa, Letizia; Zilberman, Yuliya; Gilquin, Benoit; Khochbin, Saadi; Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Shemesh, Tom; Kozlov, Michael M

    2006-04-01

    Initial integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions (focal complexes) appear underneath the lamellipodia, in the regions of the "fast" centripetal flow driven by actin polymerization. Once formed, these adhesions convert the flow behind them into a "slow", myosin II-driven mode. Some focal complexes then turn into elongated focal adhesions (FAs) associated with contractile actomyosin bundles (stress fibers). Myosin II inhibition does not suppress formation of focal complexes but blocks their conversion into mature FAs and further FA growth. Application of external pulling force promotes FA growth even under conditions when myosin II activity is blocked. Thus, individual FAs behave as mechanosensors responding to the application of force by directional assembly. We proposed a thermodynamic model for the mechanosensitivity of FAs, taking into account that an elastic molecular aggregate subject to pulling forces tends to grow in the direction of force application by incorporating additional subunits. This simple model can explain a variety of processes typical of FA behavior. Assembly of FAs is triggered by the small G-protein Rho via activation of two major targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and the formin homology protein, Dia1. ROCK controls creation of myosin II-driven forces, while Dia1 is involved in the response of FAs to these forces. Expression of the active form of Dia1, allows the external force-induced assembly of mature FAs, even in conditions when Rho is inhibited. Conversely, downregulation of Dia1 by siRNA prevents FA maturation even if Rho is activated. Dia1 and other formins cap barbed (fast growing) ends of actin filaments, allowing insertion of the new actin monomers. We suggested a novel mechanism of such "leaky" capping based on an assumption of elasticity of the formin/barbed end complex. Our model predicts that formin-mediated actin polymerization should be greatly enhanced by application of external pulling force. Thus, the formin-actin complex

  10. Reliability models applicable to space telescope solar array assembly system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A complex system may consist of a number of subsystems with several components in series, parallel, or combination of both series and parallel. In order to predict how well the system will perform, it is necessary to know the reliabilities of the subsystems and the reliability of the whole system. The objective of the present study is to develop mathematical models of the reliability which are applicable to complex systems. The models are determined by assuming k failures out of n components in a subsystem. By taking k = 1 and k = n, these models reduce to parallel and series models; hence, the models can be specialized to parallel, series combination systems. The models are developed by assuming the failure rates of the components as functions of time and as such, can be applied to processes with or without aging effects. The reliability models are further specialized to Space Telescope Solar Arrray (STSA) System. The STSA consists of 20 identical solar panel assemblies (SPA's). The reliabilities of the SPA's are determined by the reliabilities of solar cell strings, interconnects, and diodes. The estimates of the reliability of the system for one to five years are calculated by using the reliability estimates of solar cells and interconnects given n ESA documents. Aging effects in relation to breaks in interconnects are discussed.

  11. Distributed Generation and Islanding – Study on Converter Modeling of PV Grid-Connected Systems under Islanding Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The technique to derive a dc-ac full bridge switching converter for a PV grid-connected system are proposed in this paper. An analysis of islanding phenomena due to load variations of R and RLC connections can be easily derived by using the state-space averaging technique and the piecewise technique with feedback current control by setting up the duty cycle with sinusoidal terms around constant value of 0.5. The solution of the two proposed models can be handled via MATLAB/SIMULINK in fast sp...

  12. Transfer function-based modelling for voltage oscillation phenomena in PWM motor drives with long feeding cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Choel; Park, Ju H.

    2010-04-01

    In this article, a transfer function-based modelling is proposed to investigate voltage oscillation phenomena, i.e. over-voltage at the motor terminal, associated with pulse-width modulation (PWM) inverter-fed motor drives with long feeding cables. As such, the long feeding cable is assumed to be a distortionless transmission line; then, a bounce diagram and time-harmonic method are utilised to derive a simple model with a minimum computational burden that is easy to realise using the Matlab/Simulink software package. Furthermore, the model takes account of the inverter output and the motor terminal filters, which are commonly used to suppress the motor terminal over-voltage. The model accuracy is verified by a comparison with the circuit-oriented software, OrCAD/PSpice, simulation results.

  13. PIV Experiments to Measure Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a VHTR Lower Plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Richard R. Schultz; Daniel Christensen; Robert J. Pink; Ryan C. Johnson

    2006-09-01

    A report of experimental data collected at the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Laboratory in support of contract DE-AC07-05ID14517 and the INL Standard Problem on measurements of flow phenomena occurring in a lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR concept reactor to assess CFD code is presented. Background on the experimental setup and procedures is provided along with several samples of data obtained from the 3-D PIV system and an assessment of experimental uncertainty is provided. Data collected in this study include 3-dimensional velocity-field descriptions of the flow in all four inlet jets and the entire lower plenum with inlet jet Reynolds numbers (ReJet) of approximately 4300 and 12,400. These investigations have generated over 2 terabytes of data that has been processed to describe the various velocity components in formats suitable for external release and archived on removable hard disks. The processed data from both experimental studies are available in multi-column text format.

  14. One-Dimensional, Two-Phase Flow Modeling Toward Interpreting Motor Slag Expulsion Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum oxide slag accumulation and expulsion was previously shown to be a player in various solid rocket motor phenomena, including the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) pressure perturbation, or "blip," and phantom moment. In the latter case, such un ]commanded side accelerations near the end of burn have also been identified in several other motor systems. However, efforts to estimate the mass expelled during a given event have come up short. Either bulk calculations are performed without enough physics present, or multiphase, multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic analyses are performed that give a snapshot in time and space but do not always aid in grasping the general principle. One ]dimensional, two ]phase compressible flow calculations yield an analytical result for nozzle flow under certain assumptions. This can be carried further to relate the bulk motor parameters of pressure, thrust, and mass flow rate under the different exhaust conditions driven by the addition of condensed phase mass flow. An unknown parameter is correlated to airflow testing with water injection where mass flow rates and pressure are known. Comparison is also made to full ]scale static test motor data where thrust and pressure changes are known and similar behavior is shown. The end goal is to be able to include the accumulation and flow of slag in internal ballistics predictions. This will allow better prediction of the tailoff when much slag is ejected and of mass retained versus time, believed to be a contributor to the widely-observed "flight knockdown" parameter.

  15. Inclusion Phenomena between the β-Cyclodextrin Chiral Selector and Trp-D,L, and Its Use on the Assembly of Solid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD and the chiral ionic liquids formed from β-cyclodextrin mono-6-deoxy-6-(3-methylimidazolium-β-cyclodextrin tosylate (β-CD-IL as chiral selectors is described. The inclusion phenomena between the β-cyclodextrin chiral selectors and D,L-tryptophan (D,L-Trp was studied. The inclusion compounds were prepared by grinding, and their properties analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. The separation factor between β-CD and β-CD-IL with D,L-Trp was studied by the saturated solution method. This indicated a different binding capacity of β-CD and β-CD-IL to the two enantiomers. This result shows that the chiral ionic liquids have a higher separation factor because of their high solubility. The β-cyclodextrin chiral ionic liquids and CS were cross-linked and immobilized on an N6 membrane to form composite membranes. Adsorption experiments and permeation experiments were carried out. 105.43 mg D,L-Trp/g membrane was obtained.

  16. Numerical Modelling Of Thermal And Structural Phenomena In Yb:YAG Laser Butt-Welded Steel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiak M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The numerical model of thermal and structural phenomena is developed for the analysis of Yb:YAG laser welding process with the motion of the liquid material in the welding pool taken into account. Temperature field and melted material velocity field in the fusion zone are obtained from the numerical solution of continuum mechanics equations using Chorin projection method and finite volume method. Phase transformations in solid state are analyzed during heating and cooling using classical models of the kinetics of phase transformations as well as CTA and CCT diagrams for welded steel. The interpolated heat source model is developed in order to reliably reflect the real distribution of Yb:YAG laser power obtained by experimental research on the laser beam profile.

  17. Preon model, CKM matrices and new phenomena in high energy collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senju, Hirofumi (Nagoya Municipal Women' s Coll. (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    Preon model predicts many new particles. On the basis of the ortho-para mixing model for family mixing, CKM matrices for various processes are discussed in detail. Using the results, experimental signatures of new particles predicted by the preon model with preonic charge are examined. (author).

  18. Preon Model, CKM Matrices and New Phenomena in High Energy Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, H.

    1994-07-01

    Preon model predicts many new particles. On the basis of the ortho-para mixing model for family mixing, CKM matrices for various processes are discussed in detail. Using the results, experimental signatures of new particles predicted by the preon model with preonic charge are examined.

  19. THE RELATIONS BETWEEN MODEL PARAMETERS AND CERTAIN PHENOMENA IN TRAFFIC FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Zhong-hui; TAO Ming-de; WU Zheng

    2004-01-01

    Based on the dimensionless dynamic model of traffic flow, the model parameters were compared with numerically simulating solutions, and the effects of the former on the latter was investigated. Some relations between the parameters were obtained. Investigation several idealized results from dimensionless dynamic model of traffic flow were concluded.

  20. Using the Neumann series expansion for assembling Reduced Order Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasisi S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method to remove the limitation in selecting the master degrees of freedom in a finite element model by means of a model order reduction is presented. A major difficulty of the Guyan reduction and IRS method (Improved Reduced System is represented by the need of appropriately select the master and slave degrees of freedom for the rate of convergence to be high. This study approaches the above limitation by using a particular arrangement of the rows and columns of the assembled matrices K and M and employing a combination between the IRS method and a variant of the analytical selection of masters presented in (Shah, V. N., Raymund, M., Analytical selection of masters for the reduced eigenvalue problem, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 18 (1 1982 in case first lowest frequencies had to be sought. One of the most significant characteristics of the approach is the use of the Neumann series expansion that motivates this particular arrangement of the matrices’ entries. The method shows a higher rate of convergence when compared to the standard IRS and very accurate results for the lowest reduced frequencies. To show the effectiveness of the proposed method two testing structures and the human vocal tract model employed in (Vampola, T., Horacek, J., Svec, J. G., FE modeling of human vocal tract acoustics. Part I: Prodution of Czech vowels, Acta Acustica United with Acustica 94 (3 2008 are presented.

  1. Vesicle aggregates as a model for primitive cellular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tereza Pereira; Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Stano, Pasquale; Steiniger, Frank; May, Sylvio; Luisi, Pier Luigi; Fahr, Alfred

    2017-08-02

    Primitive cell models help to understand the role that compartmentalization plays in origin of life scenarios. Here we present a combined experimental and modeling approach towards the construction of simple model systems for primitive cellular assemblies. Charged lipid vesicles aggregate in the presence of oppositely charged biopolymers, such as nucleic acids or polypeptides. Based on zeta potential measurements, dynamic light scattering and cryo-transmission electron-microscopy, we have characterized the behavior of empty and ferritin-filled large unilamellar POPC vesicles, doped with different amounts of cationic (DDAB, CTAB) and anionic (sodium oleate) surfactants, and their aggregation upon the addition of anionic (tRNA, poly-l-glutamic acid) and cationic (poly-l-arginine) biopolymers, respectively. The experimental results are rationalized by a phenomenological modeling approach that predicts the average size of the vesicle aggregates as function of the amount of added biopolymers. In addition, we discuss the mechanism of vesicle aggregation induced by oppositely charged biopolymers. Our study complements previous reports about the formation of giant vesicle clusters and thus provides a general vista on primitive cell systems, based on the association of vesicles into compartmentalized aggregates.

  2. Modelling DNA origami self-assembly at the domain level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannenberg, Frits; Kwiatkowska, Marta [Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QD (United Kingdom); Dunn, Katherine E. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Electronics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Ouldridge, Thomas E. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, 180 Queen’s Gate, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-28

    We present a modelling framework, and basic model parameterization, for the study of DNA origami folding at the level of DNA domains. Our approach is explicitly kinetic and does not assume a specific folding pathway. The binding of each staple is associated with a free-energy change that depends on staple sequence, the possibility of coaxial stacking with neighbouring domains, and the entropic cost of constraining the scaffold by inserting staple crossovers. A rigorous thermodynamic model is difficult to implement as a result of the complex, multiply connected geometry of the scaffold: we present a solution to this problem for planar origami. Coaxial stacking of helices and entropic terms, particularly when loop closure exponents are taken to be larger than those for ideal chains, introduce interactions between staples. These cooperative interactions lead to the prediction of sharp assembly transitions with notable hysteresis that are consistent with experimental observations. We show that the model reproduces the experimentally observed consequences of reducing staple concentration, accelerated cooling, and absent staples. We also present a simpler methodology that gives consistent results and can be used to study a wider range of systems including non-planar origami.

  3. AN APPROACH THAT AUTOMATICALLY DETERMINES PART CONTACT RELATIONS IN COMPUTER AIDED ASSEMBLY MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem SİNANOĞLU

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an approach for modeling of an assembly system which is, one of the main problems encountered during assembly. In this approach the wire-frame modeling of the assembly system is used. In addition, each part is drawn in a different color. Assembly drawing and its various approaches are scanned along three different (-x, -y, -z axis. Scanning is done automatically the software developed. The color codes obtained by scanning and representing different assembly parts are assessed by the software along the six axes of Cartesian coordinate. Then contact matrices are formed to represent the relations among the assembly parts. These matrices are complete enough to represent an assembly modeling. This approach was applied for various assembly systems. These assembly systems are as follows; pincer, hinge and clutch systems. One of the basic advantages of this approach is that the wire-frame modeling of the assembly system can be formed through various CAD programs; and it can be applied to assembly systems contain many parts.

  4. Modelling characteristics of photovoltaic panels with thermal phenomena taken into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krac, Ewa; Górecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    In the paper a new form of the electrothermal model of photovoltaic panels is proposed. This model takes into account the optical, electrical and thermal properties of the considered panels, as well as electrical and thermal properties of the protecting circuit and thermal inertia of the considered panels. The form of this model is described and some results of measurements and calculations of mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline panels are presented.

  5. Investigation of interaction phenomena between crural fascia and muscles by using a three-dimensional numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Piero G; Pachera, Paola; Forestiero, Antonella; Natali, Arturo N

    2017-02-10

    The focus of this work is the numerical modeling of the anterior compartment of the human leg with particular attention to crural fascia. Interaction phenomena between fascia and muscles are of clinical interest to explain some pathologies, as the compartment syndrome. A first step to enhance knowledge on this topic consists in the investigation of fascia biomechanical role and its interaction with muscles in physiological conditions. A three-dimensional finite element model of the anterior compartment is developed based on anatomical data, detailing the structural conformation of crural fascia, composed of three layers, and modeling the muscles as a unique structure. Different constitutive models are implemented to describe the mechanical response of tissues. Crural fascia is modeled as a hyperelastic fiber-reinforced material, while muscle tissue via a three-element Hill's model. The numerical analysis of isotonic contraction of muscles is performed, allowing the evaluation of pressure induced within muscles and consequent stress and strain fields arising on the crural fascia. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements of the compartment radial deformation and intracompartmental pressure during concentric contraction, to validate the model. The numerical model provides a suitable description of muscles contraction of the anterior compartment and the consequent mechanical interaction with the crural fascia.

  6. Multiscale method for modeling binding phenomena involving large objects: application to kinesin motor domains motion along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Alper, Joshua; Alexov, Emil

    2016-03-18

    Many biological phenomena involve the binding of proteins to a large object. Because the electrostatic forces that guide binding act over large distances, truncating the size of the system to facilitate computational modeling frequently yields inaccurate results. Our multiscale approach implements a computational focusing method that permits computation of large systems without truncating the electrostatic potential and achieves the high resolution required for modeling macromolecular interactions, all while keeping the computational time reasonable. We tested our approach on the motility of various kinesin motor domains. We found that electrostatics help guide kinesins as they walk: N-kinesins towards the plus-end, and C-kinesins towards the minus-end of microtubules. Our methodology enables computation in similar, large systems including protein binding to DNA, viruses, and membranes.

  7. Monte-Carlo Simulations of Spin-Crossover Phenomena Based on a Vibronic Ising-like Model with Realistic Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Hong-zhou; Jiang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Materials with spin-crossover (SCO) properties hold great potentials in information storage and therefore have received a lot of concerns in the recent decades. The hysteresis phenomena accompanying SCO is attributed to the intermolecular cooperativity whose underlying mechanism may have a vibronic origin. In this work, a new vibronic Ising-like model in which the elastic coupling between SCO centers is included by considering harmonic stretching and bending (SAB) interactions is proposed and solved by Monte Carlo simulations. The key parameters in the new model, $k_1$ and $k_2$, corresponding to the elastic constant of the stretching and bending mode, respectively, can be directly related to the macroscopic bulk and shear modulus of the material in study, which can be readily estimated either based on experimental measurements or first-principles calculations. The convergence issue in the MC simulations of the thermal hysteresis has been carefully checked, and it was found that the stable hysteresis loop can...

  8. Ion exchange phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  9. Mechanisms for improving mass transfer in food with ultrasound technology: Describing the phenomena in two model cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Alberto Claudio; Ibarz, Albert; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate how ultrasound mechanisms (direct and indirect effects) improve the mass transfer phenomena in food processing, and which part of the process they are more effective in. Two model cases were evaluated: the hydration of sorghum grain (with two water activities) and the influx of a pigment into melon cylinders. Different treatments enabled us to evaluate and discriminate both direct (inertial flow and "sponge effect") and indirect effects (micro channel formation), alternating pre-treatments and treatments using an ultrasonic bath (20 kHz of frequency and 28 W/L of volumetric power) and a traditional water-bath. It was demonstrated that both the effects of ultrasound technology are more effective in food with higher water activity, the micro channels only forming in moist food. Moreover, micro channel formation could also be observed using agar gel cylinders, verifying the random formation of these due to cavitation. The direct effects were shown to be important in mass transfer enhancement not only in moist food, but also in dry food, this being improved by the micro channels formed and the porosity of the food. In conclusion, the improvement in mass transfer due to direct and indirect effects was firstly discriminated and described. It was proven that both phenomena are important for mass transfer in moist foods, while only the direct effects are important for dry foods. Based on these results, better processing using ultrasound technology can be obtained.

  10. Modeling of the anode of a liquid-feed DMFC: Inhomogeneous compression effects and two-phase transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salaberri, Pablo A.; Vera, Marcos; Iglesias, Immaculada

    2014-01-01

    An isothermal two-phase 2D/1D across-the-channel model for the anode of a liquid-feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) is presented. The model takes into account the effects of the inhomogeneous assembly compression of the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL), including the spatial variations of porosity, diffusivity, permeability, capillary pressure, and electrical conductivity. The effective anisotropic properties of the GDL are evaluated from empirical data reported in the literature corresponding to Toray carbon paper TGP-H series. Multiphase transport is modeled according to the classical theory of porous media (two-fluid model), considering the effect of non-equilibrium evaporation and condensation of methanol and water. The numerical results evidence that the hydrophobic Leverett J-function approach is physically inconsistent to describe capillary transport in the anode of a DMFC when assembly compression effects are considered. In contrast, more realistic results are obtained when GDL-specific capillary pressure curves reflecting the mixed-wettability characteristics of GDLs are taken into account. The gas coverage factor at the GDL/channel interface also exhibits a strong influence on the gas-void fraction distribution in the GDL, which in turn depends on the relative importance between the capillary resistance induced by the inhomogeneous compression, Rc(∝ ∂pc / ∂ ε) , and the capillary diffusivity, Dbarc(∝ ∂pc / ∂ s) .

  11. RESEARCH OF GUIDANCE TECHNOLOGY FOR ASSEMBLY MODELING IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Technology of movement and knowledge guidance in virtual assembly is presented. The designer can move the mechanical part precisely under the movement guidance. The movement guidance is implemented based on constraint recognition and assembly degree of freedom analysis. A multi-hierarchy knowledge base is built to represent the assembly knowledge and information. The virtual assembly system judges the requirement of the designer based on the context of design task and searches for the useful knowledge and information, which can be provided to the designer in a natural way.

  12. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distr...

  13. A Comparison of Numerical Strategies for Modeling the Transport Phenomena in High-Energy Laser Surface Alloying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Chatterjee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative assessment is done on the effectiveness of some developed and reported macroscopic and mesoscopic models deployed for addressing the three-dimensional thermo-fluidic transport during high-power laser surface alloying process. The macroscopic models include the most celebrated k–ε turbulence model and the large eddy simulation (LES model, whereas a kinetic theory-based lattice Boltzmann (LB approach is invoked under the mesoscopic paradigm. The time-dependent Navier–Stokes equations are transformed into the k–ε turbulence model by performing the Reynolds averaging technique, whereas a spatial filtering operation is used to produce the LES model. The models are suitably modified to address the turbulent melt-pool convection by using a modified eddy viscosity expression including a damping factor in the form of square root of the liquid fraction. The LB scheme utilizes three separate distribution functions to monitor the underlying hydrodynamic, thermal and compositional fields. Accordingly, the kinematic viscosity, thermal and mass diffusivities are adjusted independently. A single domain fixed-grid enthalpy-porosity approach is utilized to model the phase change phenomena in conjunction with an appropriate enthalpy updating closure scheme. The performance of these models is recorded by capturing the characteristic nature of the thermo-fluidic transport during the laser material processing. The maximum values of the pertinent parameters in the computational domain obtained from several modeling efforts are compared to assess their capabilities. The comparison shows that the prediction from the k–ε turbulence model is higher than the LES and LB models. In addition, the results from all three models are compared with the available experimental results in the form of dimensionless composition of the alloyed layer along the dimensionless depth of the pool. The comparison reveals that the LB and the LES approaches are better

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Polymer Electrolyte and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Erik

    2004-02-01

    This thesis deals with modeling of two types of fuel cells: the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) and the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), for which we address four major issues: a) mass transport limitations; b) water management (PEFC); c) gas management (DMFC); d) thermal management. Four models have been derived and studied for the PEFC, focusing on the cathode. The first exploits the slenderness of the cathode for a two-dimensional geometry, leading to a reduced model, where several non dimensional parameters capture the behavior of the cathode. The model was extended to three dimensions, where four different flow distributors were studied for the cathode. A quantitative comparison shows that the interdigitated channels can sustain the highest current densities. These two models, comprising isothermal gas phase flow, limit the studies to (a). Returning to a two-dimensional geometry of the PEFC, the liquid phase was introduced via a separate flow model approach for the cathode. In addition to conservation of mass, momentum and species, the model was extended to consider simultaneous charge and heat transfer for the whole cell. Different thermal, flow fields, and hydrodynamic conditions were studied, addressing (a), (b) and (d). A scale analysis allowed for predictions of the cell performance prior to any computations. Good agreement between experiments with a segmented cell and the model was obtained. A liquid-phase model, comprising conservation of mass, momentum and species, was derived and analyzed for the anode of the DMFC. The impact of hydrodynamic, electrochemical and geometrical features on the fuel cell performance were studied, mainly focusing on (a). The slenderness of the anode allows the use of a narrow-gap approximation, leading to a reduced model, with benefits such as reduced computational cost and understanding of the physical trends prior to any numerical computations. Adding the gas-phase via a multiphase mixture approach, the gas

  15. Modeling spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and deracemization phenomena: discrete versus continuum approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Celia; Ribó, Josep M; Hochberg, David

    2015-02-01

    We derive the class of population balance equations (PBE), recently applied to model the Viedma deracemization experiment, from an underlying microreversible kinetic reaction scheme. The continuum limit establishing the relationship between the micro- and macroscopic processes and the associated particle fluxes erases the microreversible nature of the molecular interactions in the population growth rate functions and limits the scope of such PBE models to strict kinetic control. The irreversible binary agglomeration processes modeled in those PBEs contribute an additional source of kinetic control. These limitations are crucial regarding the question of the origin of biological homochirality, where the interest in any model lies precisely in its ability for absolute asymmetric synthesis and the amplification of the tiny inherent statistical chiral fluctuations about the ideal racemic composition up to observable enantiometric excess levels.

  16. Critical phenomena in the majority voter model on two-dimensional regular lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Lara, Ana L; Sastre, Francisco; Vargas-Arriola, José Raúl

    2014-05-01

    In this work we studied the critical behavior of the critical point as a function of the number of nearest neighbors on two-dimensional regular lattices. We performed numerical simulations on triangular, hexagonal, and bilayer square lattices. Using standard finite-size scaling theory we found that all cases fall in the two-dimensional Ising model universality class, but that the critical point value for the bilayer lattice does not follow the regular tendency that the Ising model shows.

  17. A quantitative evaluation of the high resolution HARMONIE model for critical weather phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, E. V.; Wichers Schreur, B.; Kok, K.

    2012-07-01

    The high resolution non-hydrostatic Harmonie model (Seity et al., 2012) seems capable of delivering high quality precipitation forecasts. The quality with respect to the European radar composite is assessed using the Model Evaluation Tool, as distributed by the NCAR DTC (Developmental Testbed Center, 2012), and compared to that of the reference run of Hirlam (Unden et al., 2002), the current operational NWP model at KNMI. Both neighbourhood and object-based verification methods are compared for a week with several high intensity precipitation events in July 2010. It is found that Hirlam scores very well in most metrics, and that in spite of the higher resolution the added value of the Harmonie model is sometimes hard to quantify. However, higher precipitation intensities are better represented in the Harmonie model with its higher resolution. Object-based methods do not yet yield a sharp distinction between the different models, as it proves difficult to construct a meaningful and distinguishing metric with a solid physical basis for the many settings that can be varied.

  18. The Transfer Function Model as a Tool to Study and Describe Space Weather Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Hayden S.; Mayr, Hans G.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Transfer Function Model (TFM) is a semi-analytical, linear model that is designed especially to describe thermospheric perturbations associated with magnetic storms and substorm. activity. It is a multi-constituent model (N2, O, He H, Ar) that accounts for wind induced diffusion, which significantly affects not only the composition and mass density but also the temperature and wind fields. Because the TFM adopts a semianalytic approach in which the geometry and temporal dependencies of the driving sources are removed through the use of height-integrated Green's functions, it provides physical insight into the essential properties of processes being considered, which are uncluttered by the accidental complexities that arise from particular source geometrie and time dependences. Extending from the ground to 700 km, the TFM eliminates spurious effects due to arbitrarily chosen boundary conditions. A database of transfer functions, computed only once, can be used to synthesize a wide range of spatial and temporal sources dependencies. The response synthesis can be performed quickly in real-time using only limited computing capabilities. These features make the TFM unique among global dynamical models. Given these desirable properties, a version of the TFM has been developed for personal computers (PC) using advanced platform-independent 3D visualization capabilities. We demonstrate the model capabilities with simulations for different auroral sources, including the response of ducted gravity waves modes that propagate around the globe. The thermospheric response is found to depend strongly on the spatial and temporal frequency spectra of the storm. Such varied behavior is difficult to describe in statistical empirical models. To improve the capability of space weather prediction, the TFM thus could be grafted naturally onto existing statistical models using data assimilation.

  19. Modeling the phenomena of dehydration and flooding of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerteisen, Dietmar; Heilmann, Timothy; Ziegler, Christoph

    A one-dimensional, two-phase, transient PEM fuel cell model including gas diffusion layer, cathode catalyst layer and membrane is developed. The electrode is assumed to consist of a network of dispersed Pt/C forming spherically shaped agglomerated zones that are filled with electrolyte. Water is modeled in all three phases: vapor, liquid and dissolved in the ionomer to capture the effect of dehydration of the ionomer as well as flooding of the porous media. The anode is modeled as a sophisticated spatially reduced interface. Motivated by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) images of contact angles for microscopic water droplets on fibers of the gas diffusion layer, we introduce the feature of immobile saturation. A step change of the saturation between the catalyst layer and the gas diffusion layer is modeled based on the assumption of a continuous capillary pressure at the interface. The model is validated against voltammetry experiments under various humidification conditions which all show hysteresis effects in the mass transport limited region. The transient saturation profiles clearly show that insufficient liquid water removal causes pore flooding, which is responsible for the oxygen mass transport limitation at high current density values. The simulated and measured current responses from chronoamperometry experiments are compared and analyzed.

  20. Forty years of 90Sr in situ migration: importance of soil characterization in modeling transport phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J M; Piault, E; Macouillard, D; Juncos, C

    2006-01-01

    In 1960 experiments were carried out on the transfer of (90)Sr between soil, grapes and wine. The experiments were conducted in situ on a piece of land limited by two control strips. The (90)Sr migration over the last 40 years was studied by performing radiological and physico-chemical characterizations of the soil on eight 70 cm deep cores. The vertical migration modeling of (90)Sr required the definition of a triple layer conceptual model integrating the rainwater infiltration at constant flux as the only external factor of influence. Afterwards the importance of a detailed soil characterization for modeling was discussed and satisfactory simulation of the (90)Sr vertical transport was obtained and showed a calculated migration rate of about 1.0 cm year(-1) in full agreement with the in situ measured values. The discussion was regarding some of the key parameters such as granulometry, organic matter content (in the Van Genuchten parameter determination), Kd and the efficient rainwater infiltration. Besides the experimental data, simplifying assumptions in modeling such as water-soil redistribution calculation and factual discontinuities in conceptual model were examined.

  1. A Weighted Multiobjective Optimization Method for Mixed-Model Assembly Line Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Şükran Şeker; Mesut Özgürler; Mehmet Tanyaş

    2013-01-01

    Mixed-model assembly line (MMAL) is a type of assembly line where several distinct models of a product are assembled. MMAL is applied in many industrial environments today because of its greater variety in demand. This paper considers the objective of minimizing the work overload (i.e., the line balancing problem) and station-to-station product flows. Generally, transportation time between stations are ignored in the literature. In this paper, Multiobjective Mixed-Integer Programming (MOMIP)...

  2. Models of natural computation : gene assembly and membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with two research areas in natural computing: the computational nature of gene assembly and membrane computing. Gene assembly is a process occurring in unicellular organisms called ciliates. During this process genes are transformed through cut-and-paste operations. We

  3. Models of natural computation : gene assembly and membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with two research areas in natural computing: the computational nature of gene assembly and membrane computing. Gene assembly is a process occurring in unicellular organisms called ciliates. During this process genes are transformed through cut-and-paste operations. We stud

  4. Modelling of phenomena in solid state for the steel casting cooled by liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a mathematical model of cooling process for steel castings is presented. Effect of convective motion of the coolant onmaterial structure after cooling process is investigated. Mathematical and numerical model based on Generalized Difference Method for axysimmertric elements is used. To solve the Navier-Stokes equation the characteristic based split scheme (CBS has been applied. The solution of the heat transport equation with the convective term has been obtained by a stabilized meshless method. To determine of the phase transformation the macroscopic model built on the basis of Time Temperature Transformation diagrams for continuous cooling of medium-carbon steel has been used. The temporary temperature fields, the phase transformation, thermal and structural strains for the cooled element and the fields of temperature and velocity for the coolant have been determined.

  5. Agent-Based Model Approach to Complex Phenomena in Real Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyetomi, H.; Aoyama, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Souma, W.

    An agent-based model for firms' dynamics is developed. The model consists of firm agents with identical characteristic parameters and a bank agent. Dynamics of those agents are described by their balance sheets. Each firm tries to maximize its expected profit with possible risks in market. Infinite growth of a firm directed by the ``profit maximization" principle is suppressed by a concept of ``going concern". Possibility of bankruptcy of firms is also introduced by incorporating a retardation effect of information on firms' decision. The firms, mutually interacting through the monopolistic bank, become heterogeneous in the course of temporal evolution. Statistical properties of firms' dynamics obtained by simulations based on the model are discussed in light of observations in the real economy.

  6. A learning-enabled neuron array IC based upon transistor channel models of biological phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, S; Nease, S; Hasler, P; Ramakrishnan, S; Wunderlich, R; Basu, A; Degnan, B

    2013-02-01

    We present a single-chip array of 100 biologically-based electronic neuron models interconnected to each other and the outside environment through 30,000 synapses. The chip was fabricated in a standard 350 nm CMOS IC process. Our approach used dense circuit models of synaptic behavior, including biological computation and learning, as well as transistor channel models. We use Address-Event Representation (AER) spike communication for inputs and outputs to this IC. We present the IC architecture and infrastructure, including IC chip, configuration tools, and testing platform. We present measurement of small network of neurons, measurement of STDP neuron dynamics, and measurement from a compiled spiking neuron WTA topology, all compiled into this IC.

  7. A Reduced-Order Model of Transport Phenomena for Power Plant Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Cizmas; Brian Richardson; Thomas Brenner; Raymond Fontenot

    2009-09-30

    A reduced-order model based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been developed to simulate transient two- and three-dimensional isothermal and non-isothermal flows in a fluidized bed. Reduced-order models of void fraction, gas and solids temperatures, granular energy, and z-direction gas and solids velocity have been added to the previous version of the code. These algorithms are presented and their implementation is discussed. Verification studies are presented for each algorithm. A number of methods to accelerate the computations performed by the reduced-order model are presented. The errors associated with each acceleration method are computed and discussed. Using a combination of acceleration methods, a two-dimensional isothermal simulation using the reduced-order model is shown to be 114 times faster than using the full-order model. In the pursue of achieving the objectives of the project and completing the tasks planned for this program, several unplanned and unforeseen results, methods and studies have been generated. These additional accomplishments are also presented and they include: (1) a study of the effect of snapshot sampling time on the computation of the POD basis functions, (2) an investigation of different strategies for generating the autocorrelation matrix used to find the POD basis functions, (3) the development and implementation of a bubble detection and tracking algorithm based on mathematical morphology, (4) a method for augmenting the proper orthogonal decomposition to better capture flows with discontinuities, such as bubbles, and (5) a mixed reduced-order/full-order model, called point-mode proper orthogonal decomposition, designed to avoid unphysical due to approximation errors. The limitations of the proper orthogonal decomposition method in simulating transient flows with moving discontinuities, such as bubbling flows, are discussed and several methods are proposed to adapt the method for future use.

  8. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule–motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate–consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation. PMID:26764729

  9. A cultural evolutionary programming approach to automatic analytical modeling of electrochemical phenomena through impedance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    An approach to automatic analytical modeling of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data by evolutionary programming based on cultural algorithms is proposed. A solution-search strategy based on a cultural mechanism is exploited for defining the equivalent-circuit model automatically: information on search advance is transmitted to all potential solutions, rather than only to a small inheriting subset, such as in a traditional genetic approach. Moreover, with respect to the state of the art, also specific information related to constraints on the application physics knowledge is transferred. Experimental results of the proposed approach implementation in impedance spectroscopy for general-purpose electrochemical circuit analysis and for corrosion monitoring and diagnosing are presented.

  10. Monte Carlo tests of renormalization-group predictions for critical phenomena in Ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Kurt; Luijten, Erik

    2001-04-01

    A critical review is given of status and perspectives of Monte Carlo simulations that address bulk and interfacial phase transitions of ferromagnetic Ising models. First, some basic methodological aspects of these simulations are briefly summarized (single-spin flip vs. cluster algorithms, finite-size scaling concepts), and then the application of these techniques to the nearest-neighbor Ising model in d=3 and 5 dimensions is described, and a detailed comparison to theoretical predictions is made. In addition, the case of Ising models with a large but finite range of interaction and the crossover scaling from mean-field behavior to the Ising universality class are treated. If one considers instead a long-range interaction described by a power-law decay, new classes of critical behavior depending on the exponent of this power law become accessible, and a stringent test of the ε-expansion becomes possible. As a final type of crossover from mean-field type behavior to two-dimensional Ising behavior, the interface localization-delocalization transition of Ising films confined between “competing” walls is considered. This problem is still hampered by questions regarding the appropriate coarse-grained model for the fluctuating interface near a wall, which is the starting point for both this problem and the theory of critical wetting.

  11. Modelling flow phenomena in time dependent store release from transonic aircraft

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    MacLucas, David A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics is routinely used in clearance of stores for carriage and release from aircraft in the transonic range of flight. A well-known validation case is modelled in this study, for which aerodynamic loads have been compared...

  12. Bifurcation Phenomena in a Lotka-Volterra Model with Cross-Diffusion and Delay Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuling; Guo, Shangjiang

    2017-06-01

    This paper focuses on a Lotka-Volterra model with delay and cross-diffusion. By using Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction, we investigate the existence, multiplicity, stability and Hopf bifurcation of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solutions. Furthermore, we obtain some criteria to determine the bifurcation direction and stability of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits by using Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction.

  13. Precursory phenomena associated with large avalanches in the long-range connective sandpile (LRCS) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Ting; Chen, Chien-chih; Chang, Young-Fo; Chiao, Ling-Yun

    2008-09-01

    Reduction in b-values before a large earthquake is a very popular topic for discussion. This study proposes an alternative sandpile model being able to demonstrate reduction in scaling exponents before large events through adaptable long-range connections. The distant connection between two separated cells was introduced in the sandpile model. We found that our modified long-range connective sandpile (LRCS) system repeatedly approaches and retreats from a critical state. When a large avalanche occurs in the LRCS model, accumulated energy dramatically dissipates and the system simultaneously retreats from criticality. The system quickly approaches the critical state accompanied by the increase in the slopes of the power-law frequency-size distributions of events. Afterwards, and most interestingly, the power-law slope declines before the next large event. The precursory b-value reduction before large earthquakes observed from earthquake catalogues closely mimics the evolution in power-law slopes for the frequency-size distributions of events derived in the LRCS models. Our paper, thus, provides a new explanation for declined b-values before large earthquakes.

  14. Modeling of condensation, stratification, and mixing phenomena in a pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.; Villanueva, W. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This work pertains to the research program on Containment Thermal-Hydraulics at KTH. The objective is to evaluate and improve performance of methods, which are used to analyze thermal-hydraulics of steam suppression pools in a BWR plant under different abnormal transient and accident conditions. As a passive safety system, the function of steam pressure suppression pools is paramount to the containment performance. In the present work, the focus is on apparently-benign but intricate and potentially risk-significant scenarios in which thermal stratification could significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. For the case of small flow rates of steam influx, the steam condenses rapidly in the pool and the hot condensate rises in a narrow plume above the steam injection plane and spreads into a thin layer at the pool's free surface. When the steam flow rate increases significantly, momentum introduced by the steam injection and/or periodic expansion and shrink of large steam bubbles due to direct contact condensation can cause breakdown of the stratified layers and lead to mixing of the pool water. Accurate prediction of the pool thermal-hydraulics in such scenarios presents a computational challenge. Lumped-parameter models have no capability to predict temperature distribution of water pool during thermal stratification development. While high-order-accurate CFD (RANS, LES) methods are not practical due to excessive computing power needed to calculate 3D high-Rayleighnumber natural circulation flow in long transients. In the present work, a middleground approach is used, namely CFD-like model of the general purpose thermalhydraulic code GOTHIC. Each cell of 3D GOTHIC grid uses lumped parameter volume type closures for modeling of various heat and mass transfer processes at subgrid scale. We use GOTHIC to simulate POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiment, in order to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, and (b

  15. Multiphysical Modeling of Transport Phenomena During Laser Welding of Dissimilar Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métais, A.; Matteï, S.; Tomashchuk, I.; Gaied, S.

    The success of new high-strength steels allows attaining equivalent performances with lower thicknesses and significant weight reduction. The welding of new couples of steel grades requires development and control of joining processes. Thanks to high precision and good flexibility, laser welding became one of the most used processes for joining of dissimilar welded blanks. The prediction of the local chemical composition in the weld formed between dissimilar steels in function of the welding parameters is essential because the dilution rate and the distribution of alloying elements in the melted zone determines the final tensile strength of the weld. The goal of the present study is to create and to validate a multiphysical numerical model studying the mixing of dissimilar steels in laser weld pool. A 3D modelling of heat transfer, turbulent flow and transport of species provides a better understanding of diffusion and convective mixing in laser weld pool. The present model allows predicting the weld geometry and element distribution. The model has been developed based on steady keyhole approximation and solved in quasi-stationary form in order to reduce the computation time. Turbulent flow formulation was applied to calculate velocity field. Fick law for diluted species was used to simulate the transport of alloying elements in the weld pool. To validate the model, a number of experiments have been performed: tests using pure 100 μm thick Ni foils like tracer and weld between a rich and poor manganese steels. SEM-EDX analysis of chemical composition has been carried out to obtain quantitative mapping of Ni and Mn distributions in the melted zone. The results of simulations have been found in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Non-linear dual-phase-lag model for analyzing heat transfer phenomena in living tissues during thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Kumar, Dinesh; Rai, K N

    2016-08-01

    In this article, a non-linear dual-phase-lag (DPL) bio-heat transfer model based on temperature dependent metabolic heat generation rate is derived to analyze the heat transfer phenomena in living tissues during thermal ablation treatment. The numerical solution of the present non-linear problem has been done by finite element Runge-Kutta (4,5) method which combines the essence of Runge-Kutta (4,5) method together with finite difference scheme. Our study demonstrates that at the thermal ablation position temperature predicted by non-linear and linear DPL models show significant differences. A comparison has been made among non-linear DPL, thermal wave and Pennes model and it has been found that non-linear DPL and thermal wave bio-heat model show almost same nature whereas non-linear Pennes model shows significantly different temperature profile at the initial stage of thermal ablation treatment. The effect of Fourier number and Vernotte number (relaxation Fourier number) on temperature profile in presence and absence of externally applied heat source has been studied in detail and it has been observed that the presence of externally applied heat source term highly affects the efficiency of thermal treatment method.

  17. 3D Visualization of Hydrological Model Outputs For a Better Understanding of Multi-Scale Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, J.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, many hydrological models has been created to simulate extreme events or scenarios on catchments. The classical outputs of these models are 2D maps, time series or graphs, which are easily understood by scientists, but not so much by many stakeholders, e.g. mayors or local authorities, and the general public. One goal of the Blue Green Dream project is to create outputs that are adequate for them. To reach this goal, we decided to convert most of the model outputs into a unique 3D visualization interface that combines all of them. This conversion has to be performed with an hydrological thinking to keep the information consistent with the context and the raw outputs.We focus our work on the conversion of the outputs of the Multi-Hydro (MH) model, which is physically based, fully distributed and with a GIS data interface. MH splits the urban water cycle into 4 components: the rainfall, the surface runoff, the infiltration and the drainage. To each of them, corresponds a modeling module with specific inputs and outputs. The superimposition of all this information will highlight the model outputs and help to verify the quality of the raw input data. For example, the spatial and the time variability of the rain generated by the rainfall module will be directly visible in 4D (3D + time) before running a full simulation. It is the same with the runoff module: because the result quality depends of the resolution of the rasterized land use, it will confirm or not the choice of the cell size.As most of the inputs and outputs are GIS files, two main conversions will be applied to display the results into 3D. First, a conversion from vector files to 3D objects. For example, buildings are defined in 2D inside a GIS vector file. Each polygon can be extruded with an height to create volumes. The principle is the same for the roads but an intrusion, instead of an extrusion, is done inside the topography file. The second main conversion is the raster

  18. Design issues of time-based phenomena and the notion of a persistent model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reflects on how sound can become part the architectural design process. Sound is a complex phenomenon that traditional architectural drawing tools do not capture well. Parametric tools allow for the encoding of relationships between material, geometry, and acoustic performance...... in a digital model. Computational simulation tools can give visual and aural feedback on how designs perform. These tools give architects the ability to contemplate the sound of architectural propositions. Different sounds, sound positions, and listener positions can be tested, as can different geometric...... and material configurations. Using these tools architects can design for sound. Sound should be a part of the architectural design process and in order for it to be a useful design parameter; it must be able to be considered in the digital modeling environment. We form a spatial impression of our surroundings...

  19. Modeling of asymmetric pulsed phenomena in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha Yan [College of Mathematics and Computer Science, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Wang Huijuan [School of Mathematics and Physics, North China Electric Power University, Baoding 071003 (China); Wang Xiaofei [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Asymmetric current pulses in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges are investigated by a self-consistent, one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the glow mode and Townsend mode can coexist in the asymmetric discharge even though the gas gap is rather large. The reason for this phenomenon is that the residual space charge plays the role of anode and reduces the gap width, resulting in the formation of a Townsend discharge.

  20. Marriage of Electromagnetism and Gravity in Extended Space Model and Astrophysical Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A

    2013-01-01

    The generalization of Einstein's special theory of relativity (SRT) is proposed. In this model the possibility of unification of scalar gravity and electromagnetism into a single united field is considered. Formally, the generalization of the SRT is that instead of (1+3)-dimensional Minkowski space the (1+4)-dimensional extension G is considered. As a fifth additional coordinate the interval S is used. This value is saved under the usual Lorentz transformations in Minkowski space M, but it changes when the transformations in the extended space G are used. We call this model the extended space model (ESM). From a physical point of view our expansion means that processes in which the rest mass of the particles changes are acceptable now. If the rest mass of a particle does not change and the physical quantities do not depend on an additional variable S, then the electromagnetic and gravitational fields exist independently of each other. But if the rest mass is variable and there is a dependence on S, then these...

  1. Extreme physical phenomena associated with close-in solid exoplanets: Models and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Prabal

    Solid exoplanets orbiting at very close distances away from their host star are astrophysical laboratories for unique and exotic processes that define everything from their orbit and shape to their atmospheres and interiors. We create models to examine the unique physical environments that these planets inhabit and explore the effects on planetary shape and on atmosphere and resurfacing processes. In particular we examine three related topics. The first topic involves the creation of a model of the atmospheres of synchronously orbiting close in solid planets which examines the potential of mass advection by the atmosphere to deform the planets shape and produce observable surface signatures. This model reproduces and builds upon earlier low dimension atmospheric models produced for Io and Heated Super-Earths by incorporating stellar disk insolation and latent heat considerations and then examines bulk atmospheric mass transport processes on a variety of different close in solid exoplanets. Spatial deposition profiles are then compared to putative sub-stellar magma oceans in order to examine deformation to a planets' shape and potential production of observable surface features. The second is the potential for tidally and rotationally distorted planets in synchronous orbit to produce observational effects and transit signatures which can both confound system characterization and also act as a probe to constrain system and planet properties. In this model we examine a number of different planet-star systems and quantify their potential biases and asphericity signatures in hypothetical transit data. The results indicate that such signatures and biases exceed observational thresholds of a number of current and future surveys and instruments and consequently may be an invaluable probe for exoplanet characterization - in particular they may help to discriminate between rocky super-earths and mini neptunes - a fundamental unresolved question regarding exoplanets. Finally

  2. Study on quality evaluation model in multi-station assembly processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Zejun; Liu Deshun; Yang Shuyi

    2008-01-01

    Based on features of dimension variation propagation in multi-station assembly processes,a new quality evalu-ation model of assembly processes is established.Firstly,the error source of multi-station assembly system is analyzed,the relationship of dimension variation propagation in multi-station assembly processes is studied and the state equation for variation propagation is constructed too.Then,the feature parameters which influence variation propagation and ac-cumulation in multi-station assembly processes are found to evaluate quality characteristic of the assembly system.Through the derivation of equation on dimension variation propagation,station coefficient matrices which axe combined and conversed to determine the max eigenvalue are educed.The max eigenvalue is multiplied by the weight coefficient to establish the quality evaluation model in multi-station assembly processes.Furthermore,assembly variation indexes are proposed to judge of the assembly technology process.Finally,through the practical example,the application of the model and assembly variation indexes are presented.

  3. Using set covering with item sampling to analyze the infeasibility of linear programming test assembly models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitzing, HA

    2004-01-01

    This article shows how set covering with item sampling (SCIS) methods can be used in the analysis and preanalysis of linear programming models for test assembly (LPTA). LPTA models can construct tests, fulfilling a set of constraints set by the test assembler. Sometimes, no solution to the LPTA mode

  4. Mathematical models of non-linear phenomena, processes and systems: from molecular scale to planetary atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book consists of twenty seven chapters, which can be divided into three large categories: articles with the focus on the mathematical treatment of non-linear problems, including the methodologies, algorithms and properties of analytical and numerical solutions to particular non-linear problems; theoretical and computational studies dedicated to the physics and chemistry of non-linear micro-and nano-scale systems, including molecular clusters, nano-particles and nano-composites; and, papers focused on non-linear processes in medico-biological systems, including mathematical models of ferments, amino acids, blood fluids and polynucleic chains.

  5. Vibrations of liquid drops in film boiling phenomena: the mathematical model

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Flattened liquid drops poured on a very hot surface evaporate quite slowly and float on a film of their own vapour. In the cavities of a surface, an unusual type of vibrational motions occurs. Large vibrations take place and different forms of dynamic drops are possible. They form elliptic patterns with two lobes or hypotrochoid patterns with three lobes or more. The lobes are turning relatively to the hot surface. We present a model of vibrating motions of the drops. Frequencies of the vibrations are calculated regarding the number of lobes. The computations agree with experiments.

  6. Monte Carlos studies of critical and dynamic phenomena in mixed bond Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Filho, J. B.; Moreno, N. O.; de Albuquerque, Douglas F.

    2010-11-01

    The phase transition of a random mixed-bond Ising ferromagnet on a cubic lattice model is studied both numerically and analytically. In this work, we use the Metropolis and Wolff algorithm with histogram technique and finite size scaling theory to simulate the dynamics of the system. We obtained the thermodynamic quantities such as magnetization, susceptibility, and specific heat. Our results were compared with those obtained using a new technique in effective field theory that employs similar probability distribution within the framework of two-site clusters.

  7. Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the thermodynamics of warm nuclear matter below the saturation density in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model. The EOS behaves like van der Waals one and shows the liquid-gas phase transition as the other microscopic EOSs. It predicts the critical temperature T_{C}=16.36MeV that agrees well with its empirical value. We have further calculated the phase coexistence curve and obtained the critical exponents beta=0.34 and gamma=1.22, which also agree with their universal values and empirical values derived in the recent experimental efforts.

  8. Efficient Simulation and Abuse Modeling of Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Phenomena in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graf, Peter A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pesaran, Ahmad A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Chao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Laboratories; Abraham, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory; Dees, Dennis [Argonne National Laboratory; Yao, Pierre [Argonne National Laboratory

    2017-08-08

    NREL's Energy Storage team is exploring the effect of mechanical crush of lithium ion cells on their thermal and electrical safety. PHEV cells, fresh as well as ones aged over 8 months under different temperatures, voltage windows, and charging rates, were subjected to destructive physical analysis. Constitutive relationship and failure criteria were developed for the electrodes, separator as well as packaging material. The mechanical models capture well, the various modes of failure across different cell components. Cell level validation is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. Experimental Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a VHTR Lower Plenum Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Keith G. Condie; Glenn E. McCreery; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2006-06-01

    The Very-High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of six reactor technologies chosen for further development by the Generation IV International Forum. In addition this system is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. In preparation for the thermal-hydraulics and safety analyses that will be required to confirm the performance of the NGNP, work has begun on readying the computational tools that will be needed to predict the thermal-hydraulics conditions and safety margins of the reactor design. Meaningful feasibility studies for VHTR designs will require accurate, reliable predictions of material temperatures which depend upon the thermal convection in the coolant channels of the core and other components. Unfortunately, one-dimensional system codes for gas-cooled reactors typically underpredict these temperatures, particularly for reduced power operations and hypothesized accident scenarios. Likewise, most turbulence models in general-purpose CFD codes also underpredict these temperatures. Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) fluid dynamics experiments have been designed and built to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of CFD solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing and turbulence models for typical VHTR plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties.

  10. Experimental Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a VHTR Lower Plenum Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Keith G. Condie; Glenn E. McCreery; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2006-06-01

    The Very-High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of six reactor technologies chosen for further development by the Generation IV International Forum. In addition this system is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. In preparation for the thermal-hydraulics and safety analyses that will be required to confirm the performance of the NGNP, work has begun on readying the computational tools that will be needed to predict the thermal-hydraulics conditions and safety margins of the reactor design. Meaningful feasibility studies for VHTR designs will require accurate, reliable predictions of material temperatures which depend upon the thermal convection in the coolant channels of the core and other components. Unfortunately, one-dimensional system codes for gas-cooled reactors typically underpredict these temperatures, particularly for reduced power operations and hypothesized accident scenarios. Likewise, most turbulence models in general-purpose CFD codes also underpredict these temperatures. Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) fluid dynamics experiments have been designed and built to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of CFD solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing and turbulence models for typical VHTR plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties.

  11. Modeling multiphase, multicomponent flows at the pore scale: Wetting phenomena and non-equilibrium phase behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Fu, X.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    The description of multicomponent flows with complex phase behavior remains an open challenge in pore-scale modeling. Darcy-scale general purpose simulators assume local thermodynamic equilibrium, and perform equation-of-state-based calculations to make phase equilibrium predictions; that is, to determine the phase volume fractions and their compositions from overall component mole fractions. What remains unclear is whether the thermodynamic equilibrium assumption is valid given the flow conditions, complex structure of the pore space and characteristic time scales for flow. Diffuse-interface theories of multiphase flow have recently emerged as promising tools to understand and simulate complex processes involving the simultaneous flow of two or more immiscible fluid phases. The common goal in these approaches is to formulate thermodynamically consistent stress tensors and mesoscale balance laws, including the impact of surface tension on the momentum balance, as well as properly tracking interfacial dynamics and mass transfer. We propose a phase-field model of multiphase, multicomponent flow, which we use to address the following research questions: What is the impact of the wetting conditions at the pore scale on upscaled descriptions of multiphase flow? What is the impact of the displacement dynamics, pore space structure and wetting conditions on the phase behavior of multicomponent mixtures? We finally investigate upscaling procedures to incorporate non-equilibrium phase behavior at the continuum scale.

  12. Efficient material flow in mixed model assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahhal, Mohammed; Noche, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In this study, material flow from decentralized supermarkets to stations in mixed model assembly lines using tow (tugger) trains is investigated. Train routing, scheduling, and loading problems are investigated in parallel to minimize the number of trains, variability in loading and in routes lengths, and line-side inventory holding costs. The general framework for solving these problems in parallel contains analytical equations, Dynamic Programming (DP), and Mixed Integer Programming (MIP). Matlab in conjunction with LP-solve software was used to formulate the problem. An example was presented to explain the idea. Results which were obtained in very short CPU time showed the effect of using time buffer among routes on the feasible space and on the optimal solution. Results also showed the effect of the objective, concerning reducing the variability in loading, on the results of routing, scheduling, and loading. Moreover, results showed the importance of considering the maximum line-side inventory beside the capacity of the train in the same time in finding the optimal solution.

  13. Optimal control based on adaptive model reduction approach to control transfer phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulghelou, Mourad; Allery, Cyrille

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of optimal control is to act on a set of parameters characterizing a dynamical system to achieve a target dynamics. In order to reduce CPU time and memory storage needed to perform control on evolution systems, it is possible to use reduced order models (ROMs). The mostly used one is the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). However the bases constructed in this way are sensitive to the configuration of the dynamical system. Consequently, the need of full simulations to build a basis for each configuration is time consuming and makes that approach still relatively expensive. In this paper, to overcome this difficulty we suggest to use an adequate bases interpolation method. It consists in computing the associated bases to a distribution of control parameters. These bases are afterwards called in the control algorithm to build a reduced basis adapted to a given control parameter. This interpolation method involves results of the calculus of Geodesics on Grassmann manifold.

  14. Transport phenomena and fouling in vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation: Experimental and modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-08-27

    The application of vacuum to direct contact membrane distillation (vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation, V-DCMD) removed condensable gasses and reduced partial pressure in the membrane pores, achieving 37.6% higher flux than DCMD at the same feed temperature. Transfer mechanism and temperature distribution profile in V-DCMD were studied. The empirical flux decline (EFD) model represented fouling profiles of V-DCMD. In a continuous V-DCMD operation with moderate temperature (55 degrees C) and permeate pressure (300 mbar) for treating wastewater ROC, a flux of 16.0 +/- 0.3 L/m(2) h and high quality distillate were achieved with water flushing, showing the suitability of V-DCMD for ROC treatment. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. THE FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF LEAKAGE PHENOMENA UNDER THE SOIL DAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud GÜNGÖR

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Dams can store billions and billions m3 of water in their reservoirs. So leakage phenomenon which threats the stabilitiy of building sould be well examined. In this paper, flow that occurs in the dam's body and at the bottom of dam as a result of leaking water from the earth filled dam's reservoir is examined numericaly. For this purpose, the finite elements model of the phenomenon has been set up with the help of a computer program, the mathematical equation for whole area was calculated, velocity and potential distribution of the flow in the dam's body and at the bottom were obtained. The values of pore water and leak pressure which were previously calculated by graphical method and hand drown flow net can be obtained more precisely by the use of velocity and potential valves obtained by finite element method which is used in this study.

  16. Status of the phenomena representation, 3D modeling, and cloud-based software architecture development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Prescott, Steven [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kvarfordt, Kellie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sampath, Ram [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Larson, Katie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Early in 2013, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory outlined a technical framework to support the implementation of state-of-the-art probabilistic risk assessment to predict the safety performance of advanced small modular reactors. From that vision of the advanced framework for risk analysis, specific tasks have been underway in order to implement the framework. This report discusses the current development of a several tasks related to the framework implementation, including a discussion of a 3D physics engine that represents the motion of objects (including collision and debris modeling), cloud-based analysis tools such as a Bayesian-inference engine, and scenario simulations. These tasks were performed during 2015 as part of the technical work associated with the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  17. Investigation of high-p{sub T} phenomena within a partonic transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochler, Oliver

    2011-10-26

    In the work presented herein the microscopic transport model BAMPS (Boltzmann Approach to Multi-Parton Scatterings) is applied to simulate the time evolution of the hot partonic medium that is created in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and in Pb+Pb collisions at the recently started Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The study is especially focused on the investigation of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}, that quantifies the suppression of particle yields at large transverse momentum with respect to a scaled proton+proton reference, and the simultaneous description of the collective properties of the medium in terms of the elliptic flow v{sub 2} within a common framework. (orig.)

  18. A Weighted Multiobjective Optimization Method for Mixed-Model Assembly Line Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükran Şeker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-model assembly line (MMAL is a type of assembly line where several distinct models of a product are assembled. MMAL is applied in many industrial environments today because of its greater variety in demand. This paper considers the objective of minimizing the work overload (i.e., the line balancing problem and station-to-station product flows. Generally, transportation time between stations are ignored in the literature. In this paper, Multiobjective Mixed-Integer Programming (MOMIP model is presented to optimize these two criteria simultaneously. Also, this MOMIP model incorporates a practical constraint that allows to add parallel stations to assembly line to decrease higher station time. In the last section, MOMIP is applied to optimize the cycle time and transportation time simultaneously in mixed-model assembly line of a real consumer electronics firm in Turkey, and computational results are presented.

  19. Towards a phenomena-based model assessment: The Case of Blocking over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jury, Martin W.; Barriopedro, David

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Blocking (AB) is a main phenomenon influencing the future climate change in Europe. Results of Global Circulation Models (GCMs) state with medium confidence that the frequency of AB over the Northern Hemisphere will not increase, while AB-related regional changes in Europe are uncertain especially in connection to AB intensity and its persistence. Here, we present results of a study connecting GCMs' ability to reproduce AB patterns and its abilities to correctly reproduce Temperature near the surface (tas) and Precipitation (pr). The used method detects AB by localizing high pressure systems between 55°N and 65°N with the use of geopotential height gradients on the 500 hPa level (zg500). Daily fields of tas and pr are connected to the results of the AB detection over continental Europe. The AB detection method accounts for AB frequency, AB duration and AB intensity and henceforth allowing a detailed comparison of AB representations in GCMs. Furthermore, the number of AB episodes, average AB duration, longitudinal extension and longitudinal propagation are taken into account. The AB detection is applied on zg500 fields of 3 Reanalysis (ERA40, JRA55 and NCEP/NCAR) and 10 GCMs of the CMIP5 between 1961 and 1990 over the Atlantic and over Europe. Most of the evaluated models underrepresent the spatial distribution of annual blocking days over Europe. This is also the case on seasonal timescales, with the largest underestimations during winter and only some overestimations during summer. There are indications that biases in the representation of AB are connected to overall GCM biases concerning the representation of surface fields. Especially when taking into account the seasonal as well as localized characteristics of the AB representation and the surface biases.

  20. Cell survivor: Modeling radiobiological phenomena with a new kind of simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Melissa A.

    Despite widespread societal fear of radiation, whether justified or unjustified, and whether related to medicine (e.g., CT scans) or other forms of nuclear and atomic radiation (e.g., nuclear power) there is a fundamental lack of basic understanding of radiation effects on the human body. Different types of radiation are psychologically grouped into the same general fear category irrespective of their different potential to do harm, and this fear is not balanced by their potential beneficial effects. By modeling certain types of radiation biology experiments within a game engine, it is possible to enhance the player's intuitive understanding of radiobiology, both the effects of different types of radiation as well as different environmental factors that can enhance or suppress repair. For this dissertation, a game/simulation has been developed that intends to narrow the gap between public perception and the reality of these physical processes. The building blocks of this simulation are cells, which are damaged by incident radiation, accumulating either single or double strand breaks. They grow and reproduce, and are especially vulnerable during certain phases of the cell cycle (e.g. mitosis). Two dominant damage mechanisms are modeled, along with multiple repair mechanisms, for example, double strand breaks can be repaired by either non-homologous end joining or homologous repair. The output of the developed simulation was compared to data collected in experimental studies and the simulation appears to be a valid representation of the dominant mechanisms of radiobiology, as far as can be determined within the scope of this dissertation. Cell survival curves generated from playtest data display shoulders that depend on the LET of incident radiation, and rest time restores repair capability. In addition to public outreach, the presented code can be used to aid investigators by collecting data during play that can be used as a distributed Monte Carlo simulation

  1. Numerical Modelling of Fluid Flow and Thermal Phenomena in the Tundish of CSC Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowa L.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical and numerical simulation model of the liquid steel flow in a tundish is presented in this paper. The problem was treated as a complex and solved by the finite element method. The single-strand slab tundish is used to continuous casting slabs. The internal work space of the tundish was modified by the following flow control devices. The first device was a striker pad situated in the pouring tundish zone. The second device was a baffle with three holes and the third device was a baffle without hole. The main purpose of using these devices was to cause a quiet liquid mixing as well as give directional metal flow upwards which facilitated inclusion floatation. The interaction of flow control devices on hydrodynamic conditions was received from numerical simulation. As a result of the computations carried out, the liquid steel flow and steel temperature fields were obtained. The influence of the tundish modification on velocity fields in the liquid phase of steel was estimated, because these have an essential influence on high quality of a continuous steel cast slab.

  2. Mid-gap phenomena in chalcogenide glasses and barrier-cluster-heating model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banik, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.banik@stuba.sk; Kubliha, Marián; Lukovičová, Jozefa; Pavlendová, Gabriela [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology, 813 68 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2015-12-07

    The physical mechanism of photoluminescence spectrum formation of chalcogenide glasses (CHG) belongs to the important unsolved problems in physics of non-crystalline materials. Photoluminescence is an important means of the electron spectrum investigation. PL spectrum in CHG is produced mostly in the middle of the band gap, and its profile is normal - Gaussian. Several features of PL spectra in CHG is still a great mystery. The aim of the paper is to make reader acquainted with the new insight into the problem. In this article we also deal with the issue of clarifying the nature of mid-gap absorption. From the experiments it is known that after excitation of the glass As{sub 2}S{sub 3} (or As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}) with primary radiation from Urbach-tail region the glass will be able to absorb the photons of low energy (IR) radiation from mid-gap region of spectra. This low photon absorption without action of the primary excitation radiation of the higher photon energy is impossible. Mid-gap absorption yields boost in the photoluminescence. The paper gives the reader the new insights into some, until now, unexplained effects and contexts in chalcogenide glasses from the position of barrier-cluster-heating model.

  3. Cloud point phenomena for POE-type nonionic surfactants in a model room temperature ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tohru; Misono, Takeshi

    2008-10-15

    The cloud point phenomenon has been investigated for the solutions of polyoxyethylene (POE)-type nonionic surfactants (C(12)E(5), C(12)E(6), C(12)E(7), C(10)E(6), and C(14)E(6)) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)), a typical room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). The cloud point, T(c), increases with the elongation of the POE chain, while decreases with the increase in the hydrocarbon chain length. This demonstrates that the solvophilicity/solvophobicity of the surfactants in RTIL comes from POE chain/hydrocarbon chain. When compared with an aqueous system, the chain length dependence of T(c) is larger for the RTIL system regarding both POE and hydrocarbon chains; in particular, hydrocarbon chain length affects T(c) much more strongly in the RTIL system than in equivalent aqueous systems. In a similar fashion to the much-studied aqueous systems, the micellar growth is also observed in this RTIL solvent as the temperature approaches T(c). The cloud point curves have been analyzed using a Flory-Huggins-type model based on phase separation in polymer solutions.

  4. Lattice model of equilibrium polymerization. VII. Understanding the role of "cooperativity" in self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jack F; Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F

    2008-06-14

    Cooperativity is an emergent many-body phenomenon related to the degree to which elementary entities (particles, molecules, organisms) collectively interact to form larger scale structures. From the standpoint of a formal mean field description of chemical reactions, the cooperativity index m, describing the number of elements involved in this structural self-organization, is the order of the reaction. Thus, m for molecular self-assembly is the number of molecules in the final organized structure, e.g., spherical micelles. Although cooperativity is crucial for regulating the thermodynamics and dynamics of self-assembly, there is a limited understanding of this aspect of self-assembly. We analyze the cooperativity by calculating essential thermodynamic properties of the classical mth order reaction model of self-assembly (FAm model), including universal scaling functions describing the temperature and concentration dependence of the order parameter and average cluster size. The competition between self-assembly and phase separation is also described. We demonstrate that a sequential model of thermally activated equilibrium polymerization can quantitatively be related to the FAm model. Our analysis indicates that the essential requirement for "cooperative" self-assembly is the introduction of constraints (often nonlocal) acting on the individual assembly events to regulate the thermodynamic free energy landscape and, thus, the thermodynamic sharpness of the assembly transition. An effective value of m is defined for general self-assembly transitions, and we find a general tendency for self-assembly to become a true phase transition as m-->infinity. Finally, various quantitative measures of self-assembly cooperativity are discussed in order to identify experimental signatures of cooperativity in self-assembling systems and to provide a reliable metric for the degree of transition cooperativity.

  5. Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

    2010-09-01

    Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus® conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus® conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

  6. Development and validation of effective models for simulation of stratification and mixing phenomena in a pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.; Villanueva, W. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    This work pertains to the research program on Containment Thermal-Hydraulics at KTH. The objective is to evaluate and improve performance of methods, which are used to analyze thermal-hydraulics of steam suppression pools in a BWR plant under different abnormal transient and accident conditions. The pressure suppression pool was designed to have the capability as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel and/or main steam line during loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or opening of safety relief valve in normal operation of BWRs. For the case of small flow rates of steam influx, thermal stratification could develop on the part above the blowdown pipe exit and significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. Once steam flow rate increases significantly, momentum introduced by the steam injection and/or periodic expansion and collapse of large steam bubbles due to direct contact condensation can destroy stratified layers and lead to mixing of the pool water. We use CFD-like model of the general purpose thermal-hydraulic code GOTHIC for addressing the issues of stratification and mixing in the pool. In the previous works we have demonstrated that accurate and computationally efficient prediction of the pool thermal-hydraulics in the scenarios with transition between thermal stratification and mixing, presents a computational challenge. The reason is that direct contact condensation phenomena, which drive oscillatory motion of the water in the blowdown pipes, are difficult to simulate with original GOTHIC models because of appearance of artificial oscillations due to numerical disturbances. To resolve this problem we propose to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) model and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) model. We use POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiment (Lappeenranta University of Technology in Finland), in order to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC

  7. Complex fission phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.; Greiner, W.

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined.

  8. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  9. Effects of Model-Based Teaching on Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Conceptions of the Moon, Moon Phases, and Other Lunar Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogan-Bekiroglu, Feral

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, it was aimed to identify Turkish pre-service physics teachers' knowledge and understanding of the Moon, Moon phases, and other lunar phenomena. Second, the effects of model-based teaching on pre-service teachers' conceptions were examined. Conceptions were proposed as mental models in this study. Four…

  10. Analysis of flashing and swelling phenomena in tanks of nuclear power plants; the importance of bubble growth dynamics and bubble transport models with size tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezo A, E. [University of Caribe, Department of Basics Sciences and Engineering, Lote 1, Manzana 1, Region 78, esq. Fracc. Tabachines, 77500 Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico)]. E-mail: ecerezo@unicaribe.edu.mx; Munoz C, J.L. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a non-equilibrium model to describe flashing phenomena in tanks and cooling pools. The present model is based on Watanabe's work that we have extended by developing a realistic model for the growth of bubbles. We have made the corresponding venting model, continuity equation, gas and liquid phase energy conservation equations for the model. This model takes into account both drag and virtual mass force. The dynamics of bubble growth plays an important role in two-phase phenomena such as flashing. In our model the growth rate is assumed to be limited by the heat conduction in the liquid. The results of the analytic model were compared with the experimental data of Watanabe [1]. The results have shown that the present model evaluates fairly accurately the pressure evolution, the void fraction and the swelling level of a tank.

  11. CAPRG: sequence assembling pipeline for next generation sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Rawat

    Full Text Available Our goal is to introduce and describe the utility of a new pipeline "Contigs Assembly Pipeline using Reference Genome" (CAPRG, which has been developed to assemble "long sequence reads" for non-model organisms by leveraging a reference genome of a closely related phylogenetic relative. To facilitate this effort, we utilized two avian transcriptomic datasets generated using ROCHE/454 technology as test cases for CAPRG assembly. We compared the results of CAPRG assembly using a reference genome with the results of existing methods that utilize de novo strategies such as VELVET, PAVE, and MIRA by employing parameter space comparisons (intra-assembling comparison. CAPRG performed as well or better than the existing assembly methods based on various benchmarks for "gene-hunting." Further, CAPRG completed the assemblies in a fraction of the time required by the existing assembly algorithms. Additional advantages of CAPRG included reduced contig inflation resulting in lower computational resources for annotation, and functional identification for contigs that may be categorized as "unknowns" by de novo methods. In addition to providing evaluation of CAPRG performance, we observed that the different assembly (inter-assembly results could be integrated to enhance the putative gene coverage for any transcriptomics study.

  12. CAPRG: sequence assembling pipeline for next generation sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Arun; Elasri, Mohamed O; Gust, Kurt A; George, Glover; Pham, Don; Scanlan, Leona D; Vulpe, Chris; Perkins, Edward J

    2012-01-01

    Our goal is to introduce and describe the utility of a new pipeline "Contigs Assembly Pipeline using Reference Genome" (CAPRG), which has been developed to assemble "long sequence reads" for non-model organisms by leveraging a reference genome of a closely related phylogenetic relative. To facilitate this effort, we utilized two avian transcriptomic datasets generated using ROCHE/454 technology as test cases for CAPRG assembly. We compared the results of CAPRG assembly using a reference genome with the results of existing methods that utilize de novo strategies such as VELVET, PAVE, and MIRA by employing parameter space comparisons (intra-assembling comparison). CAPRG performed as well or better than the existing assembly methods based on various benchmarks for "gene-hunting." Further, CAPRG completed the assemblies in a fraction of the time required by the existing assembly algorithms. Additional advantages of CAPRG included reduced contig inflation resulting in lower computational resources for annotation, and functional identification for contigs that may be categorized as "unknowns" by de novo methods. In addition to providing evaluation of CAPRG performance, we observed that the different assembly (inter-assembly) results could be integrated to enhance the putative gene coverage for any transcriptomics study.

  13. Autoregressive description of biological phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Morariu, Vasile V; Pop, Alexadru; Soltuz, Stefan M; Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Zainea, Oana

    2008-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can be described by power-laws. A closer look at various experimental data reveals more or less significant deviations from a 1/f spectrum. We exemplify such cases with phenomena offered by molecular biology, cell biophysics, and cognitive psychology. Some of these cases can be described by first order autoregressive (AR) models or by higher order AR models which are short range correlation models. The calculations are checked against astrophysical data which were fitted to a an AR model by a different method. We found that our fitting method of the data give similar results for the astrhophysical data and therefore applied the method for examples mentioned above. Our results show that such phenomena can be described by first or higher order of AR models. Therefore such examples are described by short range correlation properties while they can be easily confounded with long range correlation phenomena.

  14. Quantitative computational models of molecular self-assembly in systems biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marcus; Schwartz, Russell

    2017-06-01

    Molecular self-assembly is the dominant form of chemical reaction in living systems, yet efforts at systems biology modeling are only beginning to appreciate the need for and challenges to accurate quantitative modeling of self-assembly. Self-assembly reactions are essential to nearly every important process in cell and molecular biology and handling them is thus a necessary step in building comprehensive models of complex cellular systems. They present exceptional challenges, however, to standard methods for simulating complex systems. While the general systems biology world is just beginning to deal with these challenges, there is an extensive literature dealing with them for more specialized self-assembly modeling. This review will examine the challenges of self-assembly modeling, nascent efforts to deal with these challenges in the systems modeling community, and some of the solutions offered in prior work on self-assembly specifically. The review concludes with some consideration of the likely role of self-assembly in the future of complex biological system models more generally.

  15. Estimation of water saturated permeability of soils, using 3D soil tomographic images and pore-level transport phenomena modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sławiński, Cezary; Barna, Gyöngyi

    2014-05-01

    There are some important macroscopic properties of the soil porous media such as: saturated permeability and water retention characteristics. These soil characteristics are very important as they determine soil transport processes and are commonly used as a parameters of general models of soil transport processes used extensively for scientific developments and engineering practise. These characteristics are usually measured or estimated using some statistical or phenomenological modelling, i.e. pedotransfer functions. On the physical basis, saturated soil permeability arises from physical transport processes occurring at the pore level. Current progress in modelling techniques, computational methods and X-ray micro-tomographic technology gives opportunity to use direct methods of physical modelling for pore level transport processes. Physically valid description of transport processes at micro-scale based on Navier-Stokes type modelling approach gives chance to recover macroscopic porous medium characteristics from micro-flow modelling. Water microflow transport processes occurring at the pore level are dependent on the microstructure of porous body and interactions between the fluid and the medium. In case of soils, i.e. the medium there exist relatively big pores in which water can move easily but also finer pores are present in which water transport processes are dominated by strong interactions between the medium and the fluid - full physical description of these phenomena is a challenge. Ten samples of different soils were scanned using X-ray computational microtomograph. The diameter of samples was 5 mm. The voxel resolution of CT scan was 2.5 µm. Resulting 3D soil samples images were used for reconstruction of the pore space for further modelling. 3D image threshholding was made to determine the soil grain surface. This surface was triangulated and used for computational mesh construction for the pore space. Numerical modelling of water flow through the

  16. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiere, James

    discipline. It covers thermo chemistry including mixtures and chemical reactions; Introduces combustion to the fire protection student; Discusses premixed flames and spontaneous ignition; Presents conservation laws for control volumes, including the effects of fire; Describes the theoretical bases...... analyses. Fire phenomena encompass everything about the scientific principles behind fire behaviour. Combining the principles of chemistry, physics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of fire phenomena, this book integrates the subject into a clear...... for empirical aspects of the subject of fire; Analyses ignition of liquids and the importance of evaporation including heat and mass transfer; Features the stages of fire in compartments, and the role of scale modelling in fire. The book is written by Prof. James G. Quintiere from University of Maryland...

  17. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distributed assembly processes. From a physical perspective, these phenomena provide insight into delay dynamics and inventory distributions in large-scale manufacturing systems.

  18. Black Hole Critical Phenomena Without Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Liebling, S L

    2000-01-01

    Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical phenomena, discuss some recent results, and describe a model which demonstrates similar phenomena without gravity.

  19. Thermo-Mechanical Modeling and Analysis for Turbopump Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Mike; Marsh, Matt

    2003-01-01

    Life, reliability, and cost are strongly impacted by steady and transient thermo-mechanical effect. Design cycle can suffer big setbacks when working a transient stress/deflection issue. Balance between objectives and constrains is always difficult. Requires assembly-level analysis early in the design cycle.

  20. Introducing Decorated HODs: modeling assembly bias in the galaxy-halo connection

    CERN Document Server

    Hearin, Andrew P; Bosch, Frank C van den; Campbell, Duncan; Tollerud, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The connection between galaxies and dark matter halos is often inferred from data using probabilistic models, such as the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD). Conventional HOD formulations assume that only halo mass governs the galaxy-halo connection. Violations of this assumption, known as galaxy assembly bias, threaten the HOD program. We introduce decorated HODs, a new, flexible class of models designed to account for assembly bias. Decorated HODs minimally expand the parameter space and maximize the independence between traditional and novel HOD parameters. We use decorated HODs to quantify the influence of assembly bias on clustering and lensing statistics. For SDSS-like samples, the impact of assembly bias on galaxy clustering can be as large as a factor of two on r ~ 200 kpc scales and ~15% in the linear regime. Assembly bias can either enhance or diminish clustering on large scales, but generally increases clustering on scales r <~ 1 Mpc. We performed our calculations with Halotools, an open-source,...

  1. Model of operating and balancing assembly line in a mass customization environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Dong; Jin Ye; Wang Rong; Wang Zheng

    2003-01-01

    The successful implementation of mass customization lies on reengineering technology and management methods to organize the production. Especially in assembly phase, various product con figurations, due-time penalties and order-driven strategy challenge the traditional operation and man agement of assembly lines. The business features and the operation pattern of assembly line based on mass customization are analyzed. And the research emphatically studies various technologic factors to improve customer satisfaction and their corresponding implement methods in operating assembly line.In addition, the models are proposed for operating assembly line under dynamic process environment in mass customization. A genetic approach is developed to provide the optimal solution to the models.The effectiveness of the proposed approach is evaluated with an industrial application.

  2. Challenging Students' Intuitions--The Influence of a Tangible Model of Virus Assembly on Students' Conceptual Reasoning about the Process of Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Caroline; Tibell, Lena A.

    2015-01-01

    A well-ordered biological complex can be formed by the random motion of its components, i.e. self-assemble. This is a concept that incorporates issues that may contradict students' everyday experiences and intuitions. In previous studies, we have shown that a tangible model of virus self-assembly, used in a group exercise, helps students to grasp…

  3. A computational technique to identify the optimal stiffness matrix for a discrete nuclear fuel assembly model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Nam-Gyu, E-mail: nkpark@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Joo, E-mail: kyoungjoo@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Hong, E-mail: kyounghong@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung-Min, E-mail: jmsuh@knfc.co.kr [R and D Center, KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., LTD., 493 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► An identification method of the optimal stiffness matrix for a fuel assembly structure is discussed. ► The least squares optimization method is introduced, and a closed form solution of the problem is derived. ► The method can be expanded to the system with the limited number of modes. ► Identification error due to the perturbed mode shape matrix is analyzed. ► Verification examples show that the proposed procedure leads to a reliable solution. -- Abstract: A reactor core structural model which is used to evaluate the structural integrity of the core contains nuclear fuel assembly models. Since the reactor core consists of many nuclear fuel assemblies, the use of a refined fuel assembly model leads to a considerable amount of computing time for performing nonlinear analyses such as the prediction of seismic induced vibration behaviors. The computational time could be reduced by replacing the detailed fuel assembly model with a simplified model that has fewer degrees of freedom, but the dynamic characteristics of the detailed model must be maintained in the simplified model. Such a model based on an optimal design method is proposed in this paper. That is, when a mass matrix and a mode shape matrix are given, the optimal stiffness matrix of a discrete fuel assembly model can be estimated by applying the least squares minimization method. The verification of the method is completed by comparing test results and simulation results. This paper shows that the simplified model's dynamic behaviors are quite similar to experimental results and that the suggested method is suitable for identifying reliable mathematical model for fuel assemblies.

  4. Modeling and optimization of shape memory-superelastic antagonistic beam assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, Majid; Elahinia, Mohammad H.

    2010-04-01

    Superelasticity (SE), shape memory effect (SM), high damping capacity, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility are the properties of NiTi that makes the alloy ideal for biomedical devices. In this work, the 1D model developed by Brinson was modified to capture the shape memory effect, superelasticity and hysteresis behavior, as well as partial transformation in both positive and negative directions. This model was combined with the Euler beam equation which, by approximation, considers 1D compression and tension stress-strain relationships in different layers of a 3D beam assembly cross-section. A shape memory-superelastic NiTi antagonistic beam assembly was simulated with this model. This wire-tube assembly is designed to enhance the performance of the pedicle screws in osteoporotic bones. For the purpose of this study, an objective design is pursued aiming at optimizing the dimensions and initial configurations of the SMA wire-tube assembly.

  5. Solid state phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrance, R

    1972-01-01

    Solid State Phenomena explores the fundamentals of the structure and their influence on the properties of solids. This book is composed of five chapters that focus on the electrical and thermal conductivities of crystalline solids. Chapter 1 describes the nature of solids, particularly metals and crystalline materials. This chapter also presents a model to evaluate crystal structure, the forces between atom pairs, and the mechanism of plastic and elastic deformation. Chapter 2 demonstrates random vibrations of atoms in a solid using a one-dimensional array, while Chapter 3 examines the resista

  6. Study of flashover phenomena on polluted insulation. Theoretical models and experimentation; Studio di scariche elettriche suy isolamenti contaminati. Modelli teorici e sperimentazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupo`, Giovanni [Naples, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica; Villacci, Domenico [Cassino, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Industriale

    1997-05-01

    The appreciable number of flashover of polluted insulators, energized with DC voltage, has motivated both theoretical and experimental studies for better understanding of the flashover processes. In order to study these phenomena different mathematical models for pollution flashover have been developed. These include models for sustaining DC arcs on contaminated surfaces, criteria for DC arc motion as well as arc reignition models for contaminated AC insulators. The results have permitted to improve the characteristics of the materials and the design techniques employed to realize insulation components. Nevertheless, a lot of problems due to environmental pollution phenomena are not clear sufficiently yet.,Typical examples are represented by ignition and propagation phenomena due to difficulties to identity all the parameters involved in pre-discharge and discharge phases. On the other hand, setting-up accurate models for the different discharge phases can not always utilize a dedicated experimental validation. In order to obtain more general models, in this paper a partial validation method of analytical discharge models was proposed. The method consider a low number of parameters controllable and reproducible in laboratory tests. In order to validate the method, experimental results are compared with analytical simulations obtained by use of dynamic arc modeling capable to take into account the configuration of an insulator profile at every instant, which plays an important role in the flashover process. =

  7. Hand Gesture Modeling and Recognition for Human and Robot Interactive Assembly Using Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture recognition is essential for human and robot collaboration. Within an industrial hybrid assembly cell, the performance of such a system significantly affects the safety of human workers. This work presents an approach to recognizing hand gestures accurately during an assembly task while in collaboration with a robot co-worker. We have designed and developed a sensor system for measuring natural human-robot interactions. The position and rotation information of a human worker's hands and fingertips are tracked in 3D space while completing a task. A modified chain-code method is proposed to describe the motion trajectory of the measured hands and fingertips. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM method is adopted to recognize patterns via data streams and identify workers' gesture patterns and assembly intentions. The effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by experimental results. The outcome demonstrates that the proposed system is able to automatically segment the data streams and recognize the gesture patterns thus represented with a reasonable accuracy ratio.

  8. Hand Gesture Modeling and Recognition for Human and Robot Interactive Assembly Using Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture recognition is essential for human and robot collaboration. Within an industrial hybrid assembly cell, the performance of such a system significantly affects the safety of human workers. This work presents an approach to recognizing hand gestures accurately during an assembly task while in collaboration with a robot co-worker. We have designed and developed a sensor system for measuring natural human-robot interactions. The position and rotation information of a human worker’s hands and fingertips are tracked in 3D space while completing a task. A modified chain-code method is proposed to describe the motion trajectory of the measured hands and fingertips. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM method is adopted to recognize patterns via data streams and identify workers’ gesture patterns and assembly intentions. The effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by experimental results. The outcome demonstrates that the proposed system is able to automatically segment the data streams and recognize the gesture patterns thus represented with a reasonable accuracy ratio.

  9. Monitoring and forecasting of hazardous hydrometeorological phenomena on the basis of conjuctive use of remote sensing data and the results of numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, Nikolai; Dikinis, Alexandr

    2015-04-01

    Modern technologies of remote sensing (RS) open wide opportunities for monitoring and increasing the accuracy and forecast-time interval of forecasts of hazardous hydrometeorological phenomena. The RS data do not supersede ground-based observations, but they allow to solve new problems in the area of hydrological and meteorological monitoring and forecasting. In particular, the data of satellite, aviation or radar observations may be used for increasing of special-temporal discreteness of hydrometeorological observations. Besides, what seems very promising is conjunctive use of the data of remote sensing, ground-based observations and the "output" of hydrodynamical weather models, which allows to increase significantly the accuracy and forecast-time interval of forecasts of hazardous hydrometeorological phenomena. Modern technologies of monitoring and forecasting of hazardous of hazardous hydrometeorological phenomena on the basis of conjunctive use of the data of satellite, aviation and ground-based observations, as well as the output data of hydrodynamical weather models are considered. It is noted that an important and promising method of monitoring is bioindication - surveillance over response of the biota to external influence and behavior of animals that are able to be presentient of convulsions of nature. Implement of the described approaches allows to reduce significantly both the damage caused by certain hazardous hydrological and meteorological phenomena and the general level of hydrometeorological vulnerability of certain different-purpose objects and the RF economy as a whole.

  10. Linking Phenomena with Competing Underlying Models: A Software Tool for Introducing Students to the Particulate Model of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, Joseph; Smith, Carol L.; Raz, Gila

    2003-01-01

    Helping students understand the general nature of scientific models is increasingly regarded as an important goal of the middle and high school science curriculum (e.g., J. K. Gilbert & C. Boutler, 1998. "International Handbook of Science Education"; Kluwer, London; A. G. Harrison & D. F. Treagust, 2000. "Science Education," 352-381). In addition,…

  11. FLEXIBLE ASSEMBLY FIXTURING LA-YOUT MODELING AND OPTIMIZATION BASED ON GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lai Xinmin; Luo Laijun; Lin Zhongqin

    2004-01-01

    There are many welding fixture layout design problems of flexible parts in body-in-white assembly process, which directly cause body assemble variation.The fixture layout design quality is mainly influenced by the position and quantity of fixture locators and clamps.A general analysis model of flexible assembles deformation caused by fixture is set up based on "N-2-1" locating principle, in which the locator and clamper are treated as the same fixture layout elements.An analysis model for the flexible part deformation in fixturing is set up in order to obtain the optimization object function and constraints accordingly.The final fixture element layout could be obtained through global optimal research by using improved genetic algorithm, which effectively decreases fixture elements layout influence on flexible assembles deformation.

  12. Development of numerical models for Monte Carlo simulations of Th-Pb fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oettingen Mikołaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thorium-uranium fuel cycle is a promising alternative against uranium-plutonium fuel cycle, but it demands many advanced research before starting its industrial application in commercial nuclear reactors. The paper presents the development of the thorium-lead (Th-Pb fuel assembly numerical models for the integral irradiation experiments. The Th-Pb assembly consists of a hexagonal array of ThO2 fuel rods and metallic Pb rods. The design of the assembly allows different combinations of rods for various types of irradiations and experimental measurements. The numerical model of the Th-Pb assembly was designed for the numerical simulations with the continuous energy Monte Carlo Burnup code (MCB implemented on the supercomputer Prometheus of the Academic Computer Centre Cyfronet AGH.

  13. Polypeptoids: A model system for exploring sequence and shape effects on block copolymer self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalman, Rachel

    2015-03-01

    While our ability to understand the detailed relationship between block copolymer chemistry and mesoscopic self-assembly has made remarkable progress over the last many years, yet we are still limited to a relatively small number of blocks in terms of structure-property understanding. Thus, there is a need to explore self-assembly phase space with sequence using a model system. Polypeptoids are non-natural, sequence specific polymers that offer the opportunity to probe the effect of sequence on self-assembly with much simpler molecular interactions and more scalable synthesis than traditional polypeptides. In this talk, I will discuss the use of this model system to understand the role of sequence on chain collapse and globule formation in solution, polymer crystallization, and block copolymer self-assembly. I will then discuss potential application as surface active agents for anti-fouling.

  14. A computational model for the optimization of transport phenomena in a rotating hollow-fiber bioreactor for artificial liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Filippo; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Truscello, Silvia; Caronna, Marco; Morbiducci, Umberto; Montevecchi, Franco M; Redaelli, Alberto

    2009-03-01

    A comprehensive computational study modelling the operation of a rotating hollow-fiber bioreactor for artificial liver (BAL) was performed to explore the interactions between the oxygenated culture medium and the cultured hepatocytes. Computational fluid dynamics investigations were carried out using two-dimensional (2D) and 3D time-dependent numerical simulations, integrating calculations of diffusion, convection, and multiphase fluid dynamics. The analysis was aimed at determining the rotational speed value of the chamber to ensure homogenous distribution of the floating microcarrier-attached aggregated cells (microCAACs) and avoid their sedimentation and excessive packing, analyzing oxygen (O(2)) delivery and cellular O(2) consumption as an index of cellular metabolic activity, and analyzing the fluid-induced mechanical stress experienced by cells. According to our results, homogeneous distribution of cells is reached at a rotational speed of 30 rpm; spreading of cellular concentration at around the initial value of 12% was limited (median = 11.97%, 5th percentile = 10.94%, 95th percentile = 13.2%), resulting in uniform suspension of microCAACs, which did not appear to be excessively packed. Mixing within the rotating fluid caused a maximum fluid-induced stress value of 0.05 Pa, which was neither endangering for liver-specific functions of cultured cells, nor causing disruption of the floating aggregates. Moreover, an inlet medium flow rate of 200 mL/m with a partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) value of 160 mmHg was found to guarantee an adequate O(2) supply for the hepatocytes (2.7 x 10(8) hepatocytes are simulated); under such conditions, the minimum pO(2) value (23 mmHg) is above the critical threshold value, causing the onset of cellular hypoxia (10 mmHg). We proved that numerical simulation of transport phenomena is a valuable tool for the computer-aided design of BALs, helping overcome the unsolved issues in optimizing the cell-environment conditioning

  15. Structural Model of the Tubular Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jaekyun; Qiao, Xin; Hung, Ivan; Mitra, Alok K; Desfosses, Ambroise; Huang, Daniel; Gor'kov, Peter L; Craven, Rebecca C; Kingston, Richard L; Gan, Zhehong; Zhu, Fangqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-08

    The orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA) assembles into polymorphic capsids, whose architecture, assembly, and stability are still being investigated. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CA (NTD and CTD, respectively) engage in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions to create the capsid. Hexameric turrets formed by the NTD decorate the majority of the capsid surface. We report nearly complete solid-state NMR (ssNMR) resonance assignments of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA, assembled into hexamer tubes that mimic the authentic capsid. The ssNMR assignments show that, upon assembly, large conformational changes occur in loops connecting helices, as well as the short 310 helix initiating the CTD. The interdomain linker becomes statically disordered. Combining constraints from ssNMR and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we establish an atomic resolution model of the RSV CA tubular assembly using molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) simulations. On the basis of comparison of this MDFF model with an earlier-derived crystallographic model for the planar assembly, the induction of curvature into the RSV CA hexamer lattice arises predominantly from reconfiguration of the NTD-CTD and CTD trimer interfaces. The CTD dimer and CTD trimer interfaces are also intrinsically variable. Hence, deformation of the CA hexamer lattice results from the variable displacement of the CTDs that surround each hexameric turret. Pervasive H-bonding is found at all interdomain interfaces, which may contribute to their malleability. Finally, we find helices at the interfaces of HIV and RSV CA assemblies have very different contact angles, which may reflect differences in the capsid assembly pathway for these viruses.

  16. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  17. Short read Illumina data for the de novo assembly of a non-model snail species transcriptome (Radix balthica, Basommatophora, Pulmonata, and a comparison of assembler performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotter Björn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, read lengths on the Solexa/Illumina system were too short to reliably assemble transcriptomes without a reference sequence, especially for non-model organisms. However, with read lengths up to 100 nucleotides available in the current version, an assembly without reference genome should be possible. For this study we created an EST data set for the common pond snail Radix balthica by Illumina sequencing of a normalized transcriptome. Performance of three different short read assemblers was compared with respect to: the number of contigs, their length, depth of coverage, their quality in various BLAST searches and the alignment to mitochondrial genes. Results A single sequencing run of a normalized RNA pool resulted in 16,923,850 paired end reads with median read length of 61 bases. The assemblies generated by VELVET, OASES, and SeqMan NGEN differed in the total number of contigs, contig length, the number and quality of gene hits obtained by BLAST searches against various databases, and contig performance in the mt genome comparison. While VELVET produced the highest overall number of contigs, a large fraction of these were of small size (BLAST searches and the mt genome alignment. The best overall contig performance resulted from the NGEN assembly. It produced the second largest number of contigs, which on average were comparable to the OASES contigs but gave the highest number of gene hits in two out of four BLAST searches against different reference databases. A subsequent meta-assembly of the four contig sets resulted in larger contigs, less redundancy and a higher number of BLAST hits. Conclusion Our results document the first de novo transcriptome assembly of a non-model species using Illumina sequencing data. We show that de novo transcriptome assembly using this approach yields results useful for downstream applications, in particular if a meta-assembly of contig sets is used to increase contig quality

  18. Modelling of Heat Transfer Phenomena for Vertical and Horizontal Configurations of In-Pool Condensers and Comparison with Experimental Findings

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Decay Heat Removal (DHR) is a fundamental safety function which is often accomplished in the advanced LWRs relying on natural phenomena. A typical passive DHR system is the two-phase flow, natural circulation, closed loop system, where heat is removed by means of a steam generator or heat exchanger, a condenser, and a pool. Different condenser tube arrangements have been developed for applications to the next generation NPPs. The two most used configurations, namely, horizontal and vertica...

  19. Connecting Galaxies with Halos Across Cosmic Time: Stellar mass assembly distribution modeling of galaxy statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I explore an empirically motivated model for investigating the relationship between galaxy stellar masses, star formation rates and their halo masses and mass accretion histories. The core statistical quantity in this model is the stellar mass assembly distribution, $P(dM_{*}/dt|\\mathbf{X},a)$, which specifies the probability density distribution of stellar mass assembly rates given a set of halo properties $\\mathbf{X}$ and epoch $a$. Predictions from this model are obtained by integrating the stellar mass assembly distribution (SMAD) over halo merger trees, easily obtained from modern, high-resolution $N$-body simulations. Further properties of the galaxies hosted by the halos can be obtained by post-processing the stellar mass assembly histories with stellar population synthesis models. In my particular example implementation of this model, I use the \\citet{behroozi13a} constraint on the median stellar mass assembly rates of halos as a function of their mass and redshift to construct an exampl...

  20. Inquiry Based Learning Model Natural Phenomena to Improve The Curiousity and Mastery of Teh Concept of Junior High School Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleh Hadiryanto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the increase curiousity and mastery of the concept of junior high school students after participating in inquiry learning based on the natural phenomenon of motion plant material. The method used is experiment using a randomized design Pretest-Posttest Control Group Design. In the conduct of research, classroom-based inquiry learning experiments using natural phenomena and grade control using conventional learning. The instrument used is the concept mastery tests and questionnaires curiousity students. The results of calculation of N-gain scores showed a rise curiousity and mastery of concepts students both in the experimental and control groups, but the increase in the experimental group was higher than the control group. Through two different test average showed a significant difference curiousity improvement and mastery of concepts students at level α of 0.05 between students who learn by inquiry-based learning and the study of natural phenomena with conventional learning. Increased curiousity and mastery of concepts students learn the natural phenomena based inquiry learning in the experimental group is higher than that of learning through conventional teaching in the control group.

  1. An atomic model of HIV-1 capsid-SP1 reveals structures regulating assembly and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K M; Obr, Martin; Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Jakobi, Arjen J; Kirkpatrick, Joanna M; Sachse, Carsten; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-07-29

    Immature HIV-1 assembles at and buds from the plasma membrane before proteolytic cleavage of the viral Gag polyprotein induces structural maturation. Maturation can be blocked by maturation inhibitors (MIs), thereby abolishing infectivity. The CA (capsid) and SP1 (spacer peptide 1) region of Gag is the key regulator of assembly and maturation and is the target of MIs. We applied optimized cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to resolve this region within assembled immature HIV-1 particles at 3.9 angstrom resolution and built an atomic model. The structure reveals a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions mediating immature HIV-1 assembly. The proteolytic cleavage site between CA and SP1 is inaccessible to protease. We suggest that MIs prevent CA-SP1 cleavage by stabilizing the structure, and MI resistance develops by destabilizing CA-SP1.

  2. Introducing decorated HODs: modelling assembly bias in the galaxy-halo connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Campbell, Duncan; Tollerud, Erik

    2016-08-01

    The connection between galaxies and dark matter haloes is often inferred from data using probabilistic models, such as the halo occupation distribution (HOD). Conventional HOD formulations assume that only halo mass governs the galaxy-halo connection. Violations of this assumption, known as galaxy assembly bias, threaten the HOD programme. We introduce decorated HODs, a new, flexible class of models designed to account for assembly bias. Decorated HODs minimally expand the parameter space and maximize the independence between traditional and novel HOD parameters. We use decorated HODs to quantify the influence of assembly bias on clustering and lensing statistics. For SDSS-like samples, the impact of assembly bias on galaxy clustering can be as large as a factor of 2 on r ˜ 200 kpc scales and ˜15 per cent in the linear regime. Assembly bias can either enhance or diminish clustering on large scales, but generally increases clustering on scales r ≲ 1 Mpc. We performed our calculations with HALOTOOLS, an open-source, community-driven PYTHON package for studying the galaxy-halo connection (http://halotools.readthedocs.org). We conclude by describing the use of decorated HODs to treat assembly bias in otherwise conventional likelihood analyses.

  3. Genome assembly and annotation of Arabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskine, Roman V; Paape, Timothy; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Akama, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2016-09-27

    The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability make A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies. We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp. gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of forced selfing, heterozygosity was reduced to 0.04%, which facilitated subsequent genome assembly. Our assembly now covers 196 Mb or 78% of the estimated genome size and achieved scaffold N50 length of 712 kb. To validate assembly and annotation, we used synteny of A. halleri Tada mine with a previously published high-quality reference assembly of a closely related species, Arabidopsis lyrata. Further validation of the assembly quality comes from synteny and phylogenetic analysis of the HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4) and METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN1 (MTP1) regions using published sequences from European A. halleri for comparison. Three tandemly duplicated copies of HMA4, key gene involved in cadmium and zinc hyperaccumulation, were assembled on a single scaffold. The assembly will enhance the genomewide studies of A. halleri as well as the allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica derived from A. lyrata and A. halleri. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. An assembly model of Rice dwarf virus particle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Boxiong; Don Allen Roth; ZHU Yafeng; Toshihiro Omura

    2004-01-01

    The Phytoreovirus rice dwarf virus (RDV) has a complex nucleocapsid architecture composed of multiple proteins and RNAs. However, specific RNA-protein and protein-protein interactions involved in virion packaging have not been entirely elucidated. In order to define mechanisms governing RDV particle assembly, interactions between individual components were analyzed both in vivo and in vitro. The P7 core protein binds specifically and with high affinity to all 12 genomic RDV dsRNAs. P1, a putative RNA polymerase, P5, a putative guanyltransferase and P7 are encapsidated within the virion and also bind viral transcripts based upon in vitro binding assays. P1, P5, P7 and genomic dsRNAs were lacking in empty particles purified from infected tissues that also yielded fractions containing intact, infectious particles. In addition, P7 forms complexes with P1 and P3, a core capsid protein, in viral particles. These results indicate the possibility that core proteins and dsRNAs interact as one unit suggesting a mechanism for assortment of viral RNAs and subsequent packaging into core particles.

  5. DNA Self-Assembly and Computation Studied with a Coarse-grained Dynamic Bonded Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Fellermann, Harold; Rasmussen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    We utilize a coarse-grained directional dynamic bonding DNA model [C. Svaneborg, Comp. Phys. Comm. (In Press DOI:10.1016/j.cpc.2012.03.005)] to study DNA self-assembly and DNA computation. In our DNA model, a single nucleotide is represented by a single interaction site, and complementary sites c...

  6. Simulation and Numerical Modeling of the Self-assembly of an Optoelectronic Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Rachael; Ferguson, Andrew

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the self-assembly of synthetic π-conjugated oligopeptides into optoelectronic nanostructures. The electronic properties provide the basis for an array of organic electronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and solar cells. Control of the structure, stability, and kinetics of self-assembled organic electronics by tuning monomer chemistry and environmental conditions presents a powerful route to the fabrication of biocompatible ``designer materials.'' We have performed coarse-grained simulations of the self-assembly of several hundred peptides over microsecond time scales to probe the morphology and kinetics of aggregation with molecular-level detail. We have subsequently used this simulation data to parameterize a kinetic aggregation model based on Smoluchowski coagulation theory to enable prediction of aggregation dynamics on millisecond time scales. These numerical models are now being integrated into a multi-physics model of peptide aggregation in a microfluidic flow cell developed by our experimental collaborators to model the self-assembly of diverse peptide architectures under tailored flow-fields for the fabrication of biocompatible assemblies with defined morphology and optoelectronic function.

  7. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  8. The Breadboard Model of the LISA Telescope Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Stefano; Scheulen, Dietmar; Kemper, Daniel; Sippel, Rudolf; Ende, David

    2012-07-01

    The primary goal of the LISA mission is the detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources in a frequency range of 10-4 to 1 Hz. This requires operational stabilities in the picometer range as well as highly predictable mechanical distortions upon cooling down, outgassing in space, and gravity release. In March 2011 ESA announced a new way forward for the L-class candidate missions, including LISA. ESA and the scientific community are now studying options for European-only missions that offer a significant reduction of the costs, while maintaining their core science objectives. In the context of this reformulation exercise LISA has become the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO) [1]. Despite this reformulation, the need for dimensional stability in the picometer range remains valid, and ESA have continued the corresponding LISA Technology Development Activities (TDA’s) also in view of NGO. In such frame Astrium GmbH and xperion (Immenstaad/Friedrichshafen, Germany) have designed and manufactured an ultra-stable CFRP breadboard of the LISA telescope in order to experimentally demonstrate that the structure and the M1 & M2 mirror mounts are fulfilling the LISA requirements in the mission operational thermal environment. Suitable techniques to mount the telescope mirrors and to support the M1 & M2 mirrors have been developed, with the aim of measuring a system CTE of less than 10-7 K-1 during cooling down to -80 °C. Additionally to the stringent mass and stiffness specifications, the required offset design makes the control of relative tilts and lateral displacements between the M1 and M2 mirrors particularly demanding. The thermo-elastic performance of the telescope assembly is going to be experimentally verified by TNO (Delft, The Netherlands) starting from the second half of 2012. This paper addresses challenges faced in the design phase, and shows the resulting hardware.

  9. Modelling Methods of Magnetohydrodynamic Phenomena Occurring in a Channel of the Device Used to Wash Out the Spent Automotive Catalyst by a Liquid Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornalczyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of precious metals is necessary for environmental and economic reasons. Spent catalysts from automotive industry containing precious metals are very attractive recyclable material as the devices have to be periodically renovated and eventually replaced. This paper presents the method of removing platinum from the spent catalytic converters applying lead as a collector metal in a device used to wash out by using mangetohydrodynamic stirrer. The article includes the description of the methods used for modeling of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena (coupled analysis of the electromagnetic, temperature and flow fields occurring in this particular device. The paper describes the general phenomena and ways of coupling the various physical fields for this type of calculation. The basic computational techniques with a discussion of their advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  10. Modeling and simulation of bus assem-bling process using DES/ABS approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel PAWLEWSKI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the project, which goal is to analyze the production process capability after reengineering the assembly process due to expansion of a bus production plant. The verification of the designed work organization for the new configuration of workstations on new production hall is necessary. To solve these  problems authors propose a method based on mixing DES (Discrete Event Simulation and ABS (Agent Based Simulation approach. DES is using to model the main process – material flow (buses, ABS is using to model assembling operations of teams of  workers.One of obtained goal is to build a simulation model, which presents the new assembly line in the factory, taking into ac-count the arrangement of workstations and work teams in the new production hall as well as the transport between workstations. Second goal is to present work organization of work teams and division of individual workers’ labor (who belongs to a particular work team and performs operations on buses in a particular workstation in order to determine the best allocation of tasks and the optimum size of individual work teams. Proposed solution enables to determine the effect of assembly interferences on the work of particular work teams and the efficiency of the whole production system, to define the efficiency of the designed assembly lines and proposing changes aimed at the quality improvement of the created conception. 

  11. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  12. Multiscale Phenomena in the Solid-Liquid Transition State of a Granular Material: Analysis, Modeling and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-21

    Methods in Geomechanics 33 pp 1737-1768. Tordesillas, A, Shi, J and Muhlhaus, H (2009) “Non-coaxiality and force chain evolution” International...Buckling force chains in dense granular assemblies: physical and numerical experiments” Geomechanics and Geoengineering 4(1) pp 3-16. Tordesillas, A...J, Tshaikiwsky, T (2010) “Stress-dilatancy and force chain evolution”, International Journal of Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics DOI

  13. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  14. Black hole critical phenomena without black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Steven L Liebling

    2000-10-01

    Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical phenomena, discuss some recent results, and describe a model which demonstrates similar phenomena without gravity.

  15. Mathematical Modelling of Surfactant Self-assembly at Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We present a mathematical model to describe the distribution of surfactant pairs in a multilayer structure beneath an adsorbed monolayer. A mesoscopic model comprising a set of ordinary differential equations that couple the rearrangement of surfactant within the multilayer to the surface adsorption kinetics is first derived. This model is then extended to the macroscopic scale by taking the continuum limit that exploits the typically large number of surfactant layers, which results in a novel third-order partial differential equation. The model is generalized to allow for the presence of two adsorbing boundaries, which results in an implicit free-boundary problem. The system predicts physically observed features in multilayer systems such as the initial formation of smaller lamellar structures and the typical number of layers that form in equilibrium.

  16. A distribution kinetics model of self-assembly: Effects of coalescence and solvent evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madras, Giridhar; McCoy, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly from a metastable state often occurs by nucleation accompanied by nanoparticle growth and eventually by Ostwald coarsening. By developing a population balance model for growth and coarsening, we here determine the dynamics of self-assembled cluster size distributions (CSDs) in two or three dimensions. The governing equations are solved numerically and the asymptotic coarsening stage reveals a power-law increase in average particle mass as the CSD evolves to a (minimum) polydispersity index of unity for both 2-D and 3-D phase transitions. By incorporating solvent evaporation to simulate drying-mediated self-assembly of nanoparticles, the model yields a temporal power law relationship with exponent 1/4 for the average 2-D domain radius, in agreement with experimentally observed behavior. The power law relationships can also be obtained by varying the coalescence rate and the power on mass in rate coefficient expressions.

  17. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing, into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  18. A model of DNA repeat-assembled mitotic chromosomal skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  19. State-space reduction and equivalence class sampling for a molecular self-assembly model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packwood, Daniel M; Han, Patrick; Hitosugi, Taro

    2016-07-01

    Direct simulation of a model with a large state space will generate enormous volumes of data, much of which is not relevant to the questions under study. In this paper, we consider a molecular self-assembly model as a typical example of a large state-space model, and present a method for selectively retrieving 'target information' from this model. This method partitions the state space into equivalence classes, as identified by an appropriate equivalence relation. The set of equivalence classes H, which serves as a reduced state space, contains none of the superfluous information of the original model. After construction and characterization of a Markov chain with state space H, the target information is efficiently retrieved via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. This approach represents a new breed of simulation techniques which are highly optimized for studying molecular self-assembly and, moreover, serves as a valuable guideline for analysis of other large state-space models.

  20. [FeFe]-hydrogenase models assembled into vesicular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Kristin; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Wolter, Nonio; Rüger, Ronny; Alpermann, Theodor; Steiniger, Frank; Gabel, Detlef; Förster, Stephan; Weigand, Wolfgang; Fahr, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    Compartmentalization is a major prerequisite for the origin of life on earth according to Wächtershäuser "Iron-Sulfur-World". The hypothesis is mainly based on an autocatalytic inorganic energy reproducing redox system consisting of iron and sulfur as requirement for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic structures. Here, we modified [FeFe]-hydrogenase models by means of covalent coupling to either oleic acid or the amphiphilic block copolymer polybutadiene-polyethyleneoxide (PB-PEO) and incorporated those into the membranes of vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or the unmodified amphiphilic polymer (polymersomes). We employed a [2Fe-2S] cluster as a hydrogenase model, since these structures are known to be suitable catalysts for the generation of H2 in the presence of weak acids. Successful incorporation was confirmed by spectrophotometric iron quantification and the vesicles formed were characterized by size determination (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)), and zeta potential as well as by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The modified models could be incorporated into liposomes or polymersomes up to molar proportions of 3.15% and 28%, respectively. Due to the immobilization in vesicular bilayers the [FeFe]-hydrogenase models can even exhibit catalytic action under the particular conditions of the intravesicular microenvironment. Our results suggest that the vesicular systems described may be applied as a nanoreactor for the reduction of encapsulated substances by generating hydrogen and thus as a minimal cell model.

  1. Model for Assembly Line Re-Balancing Considering Additional Capacity and Outsourcing to Face Demand Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadhi, TMAA; Sumihartati, Atin

    2016-02-01

    The most critical stage in a garment industry is sewing process, because generally, it consists of a number of operations and a large number of sewing machines for each operation. Therefore, it requires a balancing method that can assign task to work station with balance workloads. Many studies on assembly line balancing assume a new assembly line, but in reality, due to demand fluctuation and demand increased a re-balancing is needed. To cope with those fluctuating demand changes, additional capacity can be carried out by investing in spare sewing machine and paying for sewing service through outsourcing. This study develops an assembly line balancing (ALB) model on existing line to cope with fluctuating demand change. Capacity redesign is decided if the fluctuation demand exceeds the available capacity through a combination of making investment on new machines and outsourcing while considering for minimizing the cost of idle capacity in the future. The objective of the model is to minimize the total cost of the line assembly that consists of operating costs, machine cost, adding capacity cost, losses cost due to idle capacity and outsourcing costs. The model develop is based on an integer programming model. The model is tested for a set of data of one year demand with the existing number of sewing machines of 41 units. The result shows that additional maximum capacity up to 76 units of machine required when there is an increase of 60% of the average demand, at the equal cost parameters..

  2. Investigation and modelling of flow phenomena at ball poppet valves of mobile hydraulic systems; Untersuchung und Modellbildung zu Stroemungsphaenomenen an Kugelsitzventilen der Mobilhydraulik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, Andreas

    2008-07-01

    The author attempts the modelling of flow-physical phenomena at an electrohydraulic ball poppet valve. The focus is on reducing the complexity of nonlinear flow models. The flow, and especially the pressure curve which is relevant for the valve function, is modelled on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations. Complexity reduction is achieved by a quasi-one-dimensional approach and a separation approach of physical influencing factors (ISPE approach) and is applied exemplarily on flow in the valve seat. By introducing a friction and momentum coefficient, the relevant mathematical terms can be weighted selectively and physically founded, e.g. for adaption to reference results. A stream tube model is used for modelling the region ahead of the valve seat. Both modelling regions are modular and can be coupled as desired. Owing to the insufficient accessibility for measuring of the pressure field of interest and for avoiding interferences, the two approaches are validated by means of CFD simulations. (orig.)

  3. Modelling phagosomal lipid networks that regulate actin assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Roland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When purified phagosomes are incubated in the presence of actin under appropriate conditions, microfilaments start growing from the membrane in a process that is affected by ATP and the lipid composition of the membrane. Isolated phagosomes are metabolically active organelles that contain enzymes and metabolites necessary for lipid interconversion. Hence, addition of ATP, lipids, and actin to the system alter the steady-state composition of the phagosomal membrane at the same time that the actin nucleation is initiated. Our aim was to model all these processes in parallel. Results We compiled detailed experimental data on the effects of different lipids and ATP on actin nucleation and we investigated experimentally lipid interconversion and ATP metabolism in phagosomes by using suitable radioactive compounds. In a first step, a complex lipid network interconnected by chemical reactions catalyzed by known enzymes was modelled in COPASI (Complex Pathway Simulator. However, several lines of experimental evidence indicated that only the phosphatidylinositol branch of the network was active, an observation that dramatically reduced the number of parameters in the model. The results also indicated that a lipid network-independent ATP-consuming activity should be included in the model. When this activity was introduced, the set of differential equations satisfactorily reproduced the experimental data. On the other hand, a molecular mechanism connecting membrane lipids, ATP, and the actin nucleation process is still missing. We therefore adopted a phenomenological (black-box approach to represent the empirical observations. We proposed that lipids and ATP influence the dynamic interconversion between active and inactive actin nucleation sites. With this simple model, all the experimental data were satisfactorily fitted with a single positive parameter per lipid and ATP. Conclusion By establishing an active 'dialogue' between an

  4. Computational Modeling and Experimental Facts of Mixed Self- Assembly Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Paula V; Besada-Porto, Jose Miguel; Rial, Ramón; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The formation of liposomes, nanoparticle micelles, and related systems by mixtures of drugs and/or surfactants is of major relevance for the design of drug delivery systems. We can design new systems using different compounds. Traditionally these systems are created by trial and error using experimental data. However, in most cases measuring all the possible combinations represents a extensive work and almost always unaffordable. In this sense, we can use theoretical concepts and develop computational models to predict different physicochemical properties of self-aggregation processes of mixed molecular systems. In a previous work, we developed a new PT-LFER model (Linear Free Energy Relationships, LFER, combined with Perturbation Theory, PT, ideas) for binary systems. The best PT-LFER model found predicted the effects of 25000 perturbations over nine different properties of binary systems. The present work has two parts. Firstly, we carry out an analysis on the new results on the applications and experimental-theoretical studies of binary selfassembled systems. In the second part, we report for the first time, a new experimental-theoretic study of the NaDC-DTAB binary system. For this purpose, we have combined experimental procedures plus physicochemical thermodynamic framework with the PT-LFER model reported in our previous work.

  5. Bias in peak clad temperature predictions due to uncertainties in modeling of ECC bypass and dissolved non-condensable gas phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Neymotin, L.Y.; Jo, J.; Wulff, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a general method for estimating the effect on the Reflood Phase PCT from systematic errors (biases) associated with the modelling of the ECCS and dissolved nitrogen, and the application of this method in estimating biases in the Reflood Phase PCT (second PCT) predicted by the TRAC/PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. The bias in the second PCT due to the uncertainty in the existing code models for ECCS related phenomena is {minus}19{degree}K ({minus}34{degree}F). The negative bias implies that the code models for this phenomena are conservative. The bias in the second PCT due to the lack of modelling of dissolved N{sub 2} in the code is estimated to be 9.9{degree}K (17.8{degree}F). The positive bias implies that the absence of dissolved N{sub 2} model makes the code prediction of PCT non-conservative. The bias estimation in this report is a major exception among all other uncertainty and bias assessments performed in conjunction with the CSAU methodology demonstration, because this bias estimation benefitted from using full-scale test data from the full-scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Thus, the bias estimates presented here are unaffected by scale distortions in test facilities. Data from small size facilities were also available and an estimate of bias based on these data will be conservative. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Undergraduates' understanding of cardiovascular phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joel A; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Modell, Harold I; Cliff, William; Horwitz, Barbara; McHale, Philip; Richardson, Daniel; Silverthorn, Dee; Williams, Stephen; Whitescarver, Shirley

    2002-12-01

    Undergraduates students in 12 courses at 8 different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular function. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 20 to 81% and, for each misconception, was consistent across the different student populations. We also obtained explanations for the students' answers either as free responses or with follow-up multiple-choice questions. These results suggest that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardiovascular phenomena. One possible source of some misconceptions is the students' inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology are discussed.

  7. Molecular simulations of self-assembly processes in metal-organic frameworks: Model dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Debasmita; Kusalik, Peter G.

    2017-07-01

    Molecular simulation is a powerful tool for investigating microscopic behavior in various chemical systems, where the use of suitable models is critical to successfully reproduce the structural and dynamic properties of the real systems of interest. In this context, molecular dynamics simulation studies of self-assembly processes in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a well-known class of porous materials with interesting chemical and physical properties, are relatively challenging, where a reasonably accurate representation of metal-ligand interactions is anticipated to play an important role. In the current study, we both investigate the performance of some existing models and introduce and test new models to help explore the self-assembly in an archetypal Zn-carboxylate MOF system. To this end, the behavior of six different Zn-ion models, three solvent models, and two ligand models was examined and validated against key experimental structural parameters. To explore longer time scale ordering events during MOF self-assembly via explicit solvent simulations, it is necessary to identify a suitable combination of simplified model components representing metal ions, organic ligands, and solvent molecules. It was observed that an extended cationic dummy atom (ECDA) Zn-ion model combined with an all-atom carboxylate ligand model and a simple dipolar solvent model can reproduce characteristic experimental structures for the archetypal MOF system. The successful use of these models in extensive sets of molecular simulations, which provide key insights into the self-assembly mechanism of this archetypal MOF system occurring during the early stages of this process, has been very recently reported.

  8. Neural assembly models derived through nano-scale measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyou; Branda, Catherine; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments of a three-year project focused on developing technical capabilities for measuring and modeling neuronal processes at the nanoscale. It was successfully demonstrated that nanoprobes could be engineered that were biocompatible, and could be biofunctionalized, that responded within the range of voltages typically associated with a neuronal action potential. Furthermore, the Xyce parallel circuit simulator was employed and models incorporated for simulating the ion channel and cable properties of neuronal membranes. The ultimate objective of the project had been to employ nanoprobes in vivo, with the nematode C elegans, and derive a simulation based on the resulting data. Techniques were developed allowing the nanoprobes to be injected into the nematode and the neuronal response recorded. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first occasion in which nanoparticles have been successfully employed as probes for recording neuronal response in an in vivo animal experimental protocol.

  9. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  10. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Sarah; Xue, Wei-Feng; Robert, Philippe; Doumic, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  11. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  12. APPLICATION OF A FUZZY-SIMULATION MODEL OF SCHEDULING ROBOTIC FLEXIBLE ASSEMBLY CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Abd

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the application of the developed model to the scheduling of the Robotic Flexible Assembly Cells (RFACs. The present study is a continuation of the paper titled “Development of a Fuzzy-Simulation Model of Scheduling Robotic Flexible Assembly Cells”. This new model for multi-objective scheduling problems in RFACs was based on combining a fuzzy-based mathematical model with simulation software tools. In this study, a hypothetical case study of RFACs is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed model and then compare the results that are obtained by the new methodology with the common scheduling rules. The simulation results show that the performance of the proposed methodology outperforms the most popular scheduling rules from previous research.

  13. Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1980-05-01

    A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions.

  14. Physical modeling of geometrically confined disordered protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David

    2015-08-01

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature and uncertainty regarding the properties of individual nucleoporins. We first study the defining characteristics of the amino acid sequences of nucleoporins through bioinformatics techniques, although bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of FG motif containing nucleoporins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which the critical FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive, yet our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These sequence features are likely conserved due to a common functionality between species regarding how FG nups functionally regulate traffic, therefore these results constrain current models and eliminate proposed biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC which would not result in such a conserved amino acid sequence structure. Additionally, this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. To understand the physical implications of the sequence features on structure and dynamics of the nucleoporins, we performed coarse-grained simulations

  15. Recognition of Kinematic Joints of 3D Assembly Models Based on Reciprocal Screw Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal screw theory is used to recognize the kinematic joints of assemblies restricted by arbitrary combinations of geometry constraints. Kinematic analysis is common for reaching a satisfactory design. If a machine is large and the incidence of redesign frequent is high, then it becomes imperative to have fast analysis-redesign-reanalysis cycles. This work addresses this problem by providing recognition technology for converting a 3D assembly model into a kinematic joint model, which is represented by a graph of parts with kinematic joints among them. The three basic components of the geometric constraints are described in terms of wrench, and it is thus easy to model each common assembly constraint. At the same time, several different types of kinematic joints in practice are presented in terms of twist. For the reciprocal product of a twist and wrench, which is equal to zero, the geometry constraints can be converted into the corresponding kinematic joints as a result. To eliminate completely the redundant components of different geometry constraints that act upon the same part, the specific operation of a matrix space is applied. This ability is useful in supporting the kinematic design of properly constrained assemblies in CAD systems.

  16. Integrative Modeling of Macromolecular Assemblies from Low to Near-Atomic Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While conventional high-resolution techniques in structural biology are challenged by the size and flexibility of many biological assemblies, recent advances in low-resolution techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS have opened up new avenues to define the structures of such assemblies. By systematically combining various sources of structural, biochemical and biophysical information, integrative modeling approaches aim to provide a unified structural description of such assemblies, starting from high-resolution structures of the individual components and integrating all available information from low-resolution experimental methods. In this review, we describe integrative modeling approaches, which use complementary data from either cryo-EM or SAXS. Specifically, we focus on the popular molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF method, which has been widely used for flexible fitting into cryo-EM maps. Second, we describe hybrid molecular dynamics, Rosetta Monte-Carlo and minimum ensemble search (MES methods that can be used to incorporate SAXS into pseudoatomic structural models. We present concise descriptions of the two methods and their most popular alternatives, along with select illustrative applications to protein/nucleic acid assemblies involved in DNA replication and repair.

  17. A predictive model of community assembly that incorporates intraspecific trait variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Daniel C; Joshi, Chaitanya; van Bodegom, Peter M; Bastow, Zachary A; Fulé, Peter Z

    2012-11-01

    Community assembly involves two antagonistic processes that select functional traits in opposite directions. Environmental filtering tends to increase the functional similarity of species within communities leading to trait convergence, whereas competition tends to limit the functional similarity of species within communities leading to trait divergence. Here, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model that incorporates intraspecific trait variation into a predictive framework to unify classic coexistence theory and evolutionary biology with recent trait-based approaches. Model predictions exhibited a significant positive correlation (r = 0.66) with observed relative abundances along a 10 °C gradient in mean annual temperature. The model predicted the correct dominant species in half of the plots, and accurately reproduced species' temperature optimums. The framework is generalizable to any ecosystem as it can accommodate any species pool, any set of functional traits and multiple environmental gradients, and it eliminates some of the criticisms associated with recent trait-based community assembly models.

  18. Adsorption and self-assembly of bio-organic molecules at model surfaces: A route towards increased complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dominique; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Tielens, Frederik; Savio, Letizia

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the bio-physical-chemical interactions at nanostructured biointerfaces and the assembly mechanisms of so-called hybrid nano-composites is nowadays a key issue for nanoscience in view of the many possible applications foreseen. The contribution of surface science in this field is noteworthy since, using a bottom-up approach, it allows the investigation of the fundamental processes at the basis of complex interfacial phenomena and thus it helps to unravel the elementary mechanisms governing them. Nowadays it is well demonstrated that a wide variety of different molecular assemblies can form upon adsorption of small biomolecules at surfaces. The geometry of such self-organized structures can often be tuned by a careful control of the experimental conditions during the deposition process. Indeed an impressive number of studies exists (both experimental and - to a lesser extent - theoretical), which demonstrates the ability of molecular self-assembly to create different structural motifs in a more or less predictable manner, by tuning the molecular building blocks as well as the metallic substrate. In this frame, amino acids and small peptides at surfaces are key, basic, systems to be studied. The amino acids structure is simple enough to serve as a model for the chemisorption of biofunctional molecules, but their adsorption at surfaces has applications in surface functionalization, in enantiospecific catalysis, biosensing, shape control of nanoparticles or in emerging fields such as "green" corrosion inhibition. In this paper we review the most recent advances in this field. We shall start from the adsorption of amino acids at metal surfaces and we will evolve then in the direction of more complex systems, in the light of the latest improvements of surface science techniques and of computational methods. On one side, we will focus on amino acids adsorption at oxide surfaces, on the other on peptide adsorption both at metal and oxide substrates. Particular

  19. Self-assembly of model amphiphilic Janus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Gerald; Gubbins, Keith E; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2012-05-07

    We apply molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure formation of amphiphilic Janus particles in the bulk phase. The Janus particles are modeled as (soft) spheres composed of a hydrophilic and hydrophobic part. Their orientation is described by a vector representing an internal degree of freedom. Investigating energy fluctuations and cluster size distributions, we determine the aggregation line in a temperature-density-diagram, where the reduced temperature is an inverse measure for the anisotropic coupling. Below this aggregation line clusters of various sizes depending on density and reduced temperature are found. For low densities in the range ρ∗ ≤ 0.3, the cluster size distribution has a broad maximum, indicating simultaneous existence of various cluster sizes between 5 and 10. We find no hint of a condensation transition of these clustered systems. In the case of higher densities (ρ∗ = 0.5 and 0.6), the cluster size distribution shows an extremely narrow peak at clusters of size 13. In these icosahedrons, the particles are arranged in a closed-packed manner, thereby maximizing the number of bonds. Analyzing the translational mean-square displacement we also observe indications of hindered diffusion due to aggregation.

  20. Assembly of the first model of MQXFS quadrupole magnet for Hi-Lumi

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086825

    2016-01-01

    Building 927. Assembly of the first model of MQXFS quadrupole magnet for Hi-Lumi. The MQXF models are about 1.5 m long and are used to validate the design before start building the first long prototype. Two types of insertion quadrupoles will be built and installed in the LHC tunnel during LS3. LARP (US collaboration) will built MQXFA type (4.2 meters long) and MQXFB magnets (around 7 m long) will be built at CERN.

  1. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem r...

  2. Science and Paranormal Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H. Pierre

    1999-06-03

    In order to ground my approach to the study of paranormal phenomena, I first explain my operational approach to physics, and to the ''historical'' sciences of cosmic, biological, human, social and political evolution. I then indicate why I believe that ''paranormal phenomena'' might-but need not- fit into this framework. I endorse the need for a new theoretical framework for the investigation of this field presented by Etter and Shoup at this meeting. I close with a short discussion of Ted Bastin's contention that paranormal phenomena should be defined as contradicting physics.

  3. Nonlinear surface electromagnetic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ponath, H-E

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the physics of electromagnetic surface phenomena has developed rapidly, evolving into technologies for communications and industry, such as fiber and integrated optics. The variety of phenomena based on electromagnetism at surfaces is rich and this book was written with the aim of summarizing the available knowledge in selected areas of the field. The book contains reviews written by solid state and optical physicists on the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves at and with surfaces and films. Both the physical phenomena and some potential applications are

  4. Science and Paranormal Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Noyes, H P

    1999-01-01

    In order to ground my approach to the study of paranormal phenomena, I first explain my operational approach to physics, and to the ``historical'' sciences of cosmic, biological, human, social and political evolution. I then indicate why I believe that ``paranormal phenomena'' might --- but need not --- fit into this framework. I endorse the need for a new theoretical framework for the investigation of this field presented by Etter and Shoup at this meeting. I close with a short discussion of Ted Bastin's contention that paranormal phenomena should be {\\it defined} as contradicting physics.

  5. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena, 2e serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultra short laser pulses and describes how this technology can be used to examine problems in areas such as electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena combines theoretical backgrounds and experimental techniques and will serve as a manual on designing and constructing femtosecond (""faster than electronics"") systems or experiments from scratch. Beyond the simple optical system, the various sources of ultrashort pulses are presented, again with emphasis on the basic

  6. Modelling of isothermal remanence magnetisation curves for an assembly of macrospins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournus, F., E-mail: florent.tournus@univ-lyon1.fr

    2015-02-01

    We present a robust and efficient framework to compute isothermal remanent magnetisation (IRM) curves for magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. The assembly is modelled by independent, randomly oriented, uniaxial macrospins and we use a Néel model to take into account the thermal relaxation. A simple analytic expression is established for a single size, in a sudden switching approximation, and is compared to more evolved models. We show that for realistic samples (necessarily presenting a size dispersion) the simple model is very satisfactory. With this framework, it is then possible to reliably simulate IRM curves, which can be compared to experimental measurements and used in a best fit procedure. We also examine the influence of several parameters on the IRM curves and we discuss the link between the irreversible susceptibility and the switching field distribution. - Highlights: • A framework to compute IRM curves for nanoparticle assemblies is presented. • A simple analytic expression (for a single size) is compared to more evolved models. • The simple expression can reliably simulate IRM curves for realistic samples. • Irreversible susceptibility and the influence of several parameters is discussed.

  7. The determinism and boundedness of self-assembling structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tesoro, S

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly processes are widespread in nature, and lie at the heart of many biological and physical phenomena. The characteristics of self-assembly building blocks determine the structures that they form. Among the most important of these properties are whether the self-assembly is deterministic or nondeterministic, and whether it is bound or unbound. The former tells us whether the same set of building blocks always generates the same structure, and the latter whether it grows indefinitely. These properties are highly relevant in the context of protein structures, as the difference between deterministic protein self-assembly and nondeterministic protein aggregation is central to a number of diseases. Here we introduce a graph-based approach that can determine, with a few restrictions, whether a set of self-assembly building blocks is deterministic or nondeterministic, and whether it is bound or unbound. We apply this methodology to a previously studied lattice self-assembly model and discuss generalisatio...

  8. A tractable genotype-phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F; Johnston, Iain G; Louis, Ard A; Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2014-06-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype-phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps.

  9. A tractable genotype–phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype–phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps. PMID:24718456

  10. Modeling Textural Processes during Self-Assembly of Plant-Based Chiral-Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K. Murugesan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological liquid crystalline polymers are found in cellulosic, chitin, and DNA based natural materials. Chiral nematic liquid crystalline orientational order is observed frozen-in in the solid state in plant cell walls and is known as a liquid crystal analogue characterized by a helicoidal plywood architecture. The emergence of the plywood architecture by directed chiral nematic liquid crystalline self assembly has been postulated as the mechanism that leads to optimal cellulose fibril organization. In natural systems, tissue growth and development takes place in the presence of inclusions and secondary phases leaving behind characteristic defects and textures, which provide a unique testing ground for the validity of the liquid crystal self-assembly postulate. In this work, a mathematical model, based on the Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals, is used to simulate defect textures arising in the domain of self assembly, due to presence of secondary phases representing plant cells, lumens and pit canals. It is shown that the obtained defect patterns observed in some plant cell walls are those expected from a truly liquid crystalline phase. The analysis reveals the nature and magnitude of the viscoelastic material parameters that lead to observed patterns in plant-based helicoids through directed self-assembly. In addition, the results provide new guidance to develop biomimetic plywoods for structural and functional applications.

  11. A component modes projection and assembly model reduction methodology for articulated, multi-flexible body structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Tsuha, Walter S.

    1993-01-01

    A two-stage model reduction methodology, combining the classical Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) method and the newly developed Enhanced Projection and Assembly (EP&A) method, is proposed in this research. The first stage of this methodology, called the COmponent Modes Projection and Assembly model REduction (COMPARE) method, involves the generation of CMS mode sets, such as the MacNeal-Rubin mode sets. These mode sets are then used to reduce the order of each component model in the Rayleigh-Ritz sense. The resultant component models are then combined to generate reduced-order system models at various system configurations. A composite mode set which retains important system modes at all system configurations is then selected from these reduced-order system models. In the second stage, the EP&A model reduction method is employed to reduce further the order of the system model generated in the first stage. The effectiveness of the COMPARE methodology has been successfully demonstrated on a high-order, finite-element model of the cruise-configured Galileo spacecraft.

  12. ANALYSIS OF ASSEMBLY SUITABILITY OF THE HYBRID NODE BASED ON WELD DISTORTION PREDICTION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Urbański

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of assembly suitability of the innovative hybrid node. Weld distortions are a factor that affects significantly the quality of a structure during its pre-fabrication stage, thus increasing manufacturing costs . For the purposes of this analysis, such distortion forms were chosen that are the highest-ranking ones in the technological hierarchy. The analysis was performed taking advantage of significant parameters in order to demonstrate the possibilities of using mathematical models determined on the basis of a designed experiment to modify the construction technology as early as during the stage of the hybrid node’s manufacture. It was shown that using the above-mentioned theoretical models a technological assessment of the structural component can be performed by selecting such system of parameters that will produce distortions at a level acceptable from the point of view of further assembly suitability.

  13. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  14. Galaxy assembly, stellar feedback and metal enrichment: the view from the GAEA model

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschmann, Michaela; De Lucia, Gabriella; Fontanot, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    One major problem of current theoretical models of galaxy formation is given by their inability to reproduce the apparently `anti-hierarchical' evolution of galaxy assembly: massive galaxies appear to be in place since $z\\sim 3$, while a significant increase of the number densities of low mass galaxies is measured with decreasing redshift. In this work, we perform a systematic analysis of the influence of different stellar feedback schemes, carried out in the framework of GAEA, a new semi-ana...

  15. Modeling and simulation for microelectronic packaging assembly manufacturing, reliability and testing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Although there is increasing need for modeling and simulation in the IC package design phase, most assembly processes and various reliability tests are still based on the time consuming ""test and try out"" method to obtain the best solution. Modeling and simulation can easily ensure virtual Design of Experiments (DoE) to achieve the optimal solution. This has greatly reduced the cost and production time, especially for new product development. Using modeling and simulation will become increasingly necessary for future advances in 3D package development.  In this book, Liu and Liu allow people

  16. Simulation model of fatigue crack opening/closing phenomena for predicting RPG load under arbitrary stress distribution field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyosada, M.; Niwa, T. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, Newman`s calculation model is modified to solve his neglected effect of the change of stress distribution ahead of a crack, and to leave elastic plastic materials along the crack surface because of the compatibility of Dugdale model. In addition to above treatment, the authors introduce plastic shrinkage at an immediate generation of new crack surfaces due to emancipation of internal force with the magnitude of yield stress level during unloading process in the model. Moreover, the model is expanded to arbitrary stress distribution field. By using the model, RPG load is simulated for a center notched specimen under constant amplitude loading with various stress ratios and decreased maximum load while keeping minimum load.

  17. Fuzzy Mixed Assembly Line Sequencing and Scheduling Optimization Model Using Multiobjective Dynamic Fuzzy GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahriri, Farzad; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Taha, Zahari

    2014-01-01

    A new multiobjective dynamic fuzzy genetic algorithm is applied to solve a fuzzy mixed-model assembly line sequencing problem in which the primary goals are to minimize the total make-span and minimize the setup number simultaneously. Trapezoidal fuzzy numbers are implemented for variables such as operation and travelling time in order to generate results with higher accuracy and representative of real-case data. An improved genetic algorithm called fuzzy adaptive genetic algorithm (FAGA) is proposed in order to solve this optimization model. In establishing the FAGA, five dynamic fuzzy parameter controllers are devised in which fuzzy expert experience controller (FEEC) is integrated with automatic learning dynamic fuzzy controller (ALDFC) technique. The enhanced algorithm dynamically adjusts the population size, number of generations, tournament candidate, crossover rate, and mutation rate compared with using fixed control parameters. The main idea is to improve the performance and effectiveness of existing GAs by dynamic adjustment and control of the five parameters. Verification and validation of the dynamic fuzzy GA are carried out by developing test-beds and testing using a multiobjective fuzzy mixed production assembly line sequencing optimization problem. The simulation results highlight that the performance and efficacy of the proposed novel optimization algorithm are more efficient than the performance of the standard genetic algorithm in mixed assembly line sequencing model. PMID:24982962

  18. 3D Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Nanoparticle Self-Assembly in Evaporating Droplets and Rivulets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a three-dimensional free-energy-based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method-Lagrangian particle tracking hybrid model is presented to simulate nanoparticle-laden droplets and rivulets undergoing evaporation. The 3D model enables the development of the 3D flow structures in the evaporating droplets, as well as allows us to capture the axial flows in the evaporating rivulets. We first model non-evaporating droplets and rivulets loaded with nanoparticles and the effects of particle-fluid interaction parameters on particle dynamics are characterized. By implementing evaporation, we probe the self-assembly of nanoparticles inside the fluid mass or at the liquid-vapor interface. The 3D microstructure of nanoparticle assemblies is quantified through radial distribution functions and structure factors. In particular, the final deposit of evaporating rivulets with oscillatory axial flows is revealed, resembling the flow field in printed rivulets in experiments. Our findings offer a theoretical framework to explore the dynamics of nanoparticle self-assembly in evaporating fluid mass.

  19. Nonlinear friction modelling and compensation control of hysteresis phenomena for a pair of tendon-sheath actuated surgical robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, T. N.; Tjahjowidodo, T.; Lau, M. W. S.; Phee, S. J.

    2015-08-01

    Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) is a special method that allows surgical operations via natural orifices like mouth, anus, and vagina, without leaving visible scars. The use of flexible tendon-sheath mechanism (TSM) is common in these systems because of its light weight in structure, flexibility, and easy transmission of power. However, nonlinear friction and backlash hysteresis pose many challenges to control of such systems; in addition, they do not provide haptic feedback to assist the surgeon in the operation of the systems. In this paper, we propose a new dynamic friction model and backlash hysteresis nonlinearity for a pair of TSM to deal with these problems. The proposed friction model, unlike current approaches in the literature, is smooth and able to capture the force at near zero velocity when the system is stationary or operates at small motion. This model can be used to estimate the friction force for haptic feedback purpose. To improve the system tracking performances, a backlash hysteresis model will be introduced, which can be used in a feedforward controller scheme. The controller involves a simple computation of the inverse hysteresis model. The proposed models are configuration independent and able to capture the nonlinearities for arbitrary tendon-sheath shapes. A representative experimental setup is used to validate the proposed models and to demonstrate the improvement in position tracking accuracy and the possibility of providing desired force information at the distal end of a pair of TSM slave manipulator for haptic feedback to the surgeons.

  20. New phenomena searches at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

    2006-04-01

    The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

  1. The Physalis peruviana leaf transcriptome: assembly, annotation and gene model prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garzón-Martínez Gina A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physalis peruviana commonly known as Cape gooseberry is a member of the Solanaceae family that has an increasing popularity due to its nutritional and medicinal values. A broad range of genomic tools is available for other Solanaceae, including tomato and potato. However, limited genomic resources are currently available for Cape gooseberry. Results We report the generation of a total of 652,614 P. peruviana Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs, using 454 GS FLX Titanium technology. ESTs, with an average length of 371 bp, were obtained from a normalized leaf cDNA library prepared using a Colombian commercial variety. De novo assembling was performed to generate a collection of 24,014 isotigs and 110,921 singletons, with an average length of 1,638 bp and 354 bp, respectively. Functional annotation was performed using NCBI’s BLAST tools and Blast2GO, which identified putative functions for 21,191 assembled sequences, including gene families involved in all the major biological processes and molecular functions as well as defense response and amino acid metabolism pathways. Gene model predictions in P. peruviana were obtained by using the genomes of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato and Solanum tuberosum (potato. We predict 9,436 P. peruviana sequences with multiple-exon models and conserved intron positions with respect to the potato and tomato genomes. Additionally, to study species diversity we developed 5,971 SSR markers from assembled ESTs. Conclusions We present the first comprehensive analysis of the Physalis peruviana leaf transcriptome, which will provide valuable resources for development of genetic tools in the species. Assembled transcripts with gene models could serve as potential candidates for marker discovery with a variety of applications including: functional diversity, conservation and improvement to increase productivity and fruit quality. P. peruviana was estimated to be phylogenetically branched out before the

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Nano-scale Phenomena: Towards a Multiphysics Simulation Capability for Design and Optimization of Sensor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, R; McElfresh, M; Lee, C; Balhorn, R; White, D

    2003-12-01

    In this white paper, a road map is presented to establish a multiphysics simulation capability for the design and optimization of sensor systems that incorporate nanomaterials and technologies. The Engineering Directorate's solid/fluid mechanics and electromagnetic computer codes will play an important role in both multiscale modeling and integration of required physics issues to achieve a baseline simulation capability. Molecular dynamic simulations performed primarily in the BBRP, CMS and PAT directorates, will provide information for the construction of multiscale models. All of the theoretical developments will require closely coupled experimental work to develop material models and validate simulations. The plan is synergistic and complimentary with the Laboratory's emerging core competency of multiscale modeling. The first application of the multiphysics computer code is the simulation of a ''simple'' biological system (protein recognition utilizing synthesized ligands) that has a broad range of applications including detection of biological threats, presymptomatic detection of illnesses, and drug therapy. While the overall goal is to establish a simulation capability, the near-term work is mainly focused on (1) multiscale modeling, i.e., the development of ''continuum'' representations of nanostructures based on information from molecular dynamics simulations and (2) experiments for model development and validation. A list of LDRDER proposals and ongoing projects that could be coordinated to achieve these near-term objectives and demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a multiphysics simulation capability is given.

  3. Trait-Based Ecosystem Modeling: Integrating Community Assembly and Optimality Concepts into Dgvms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, S.; Langan, L.; Higgins, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are a central component of Earth system models, and our ability to understand and simulate past, present and future changes in the Earth system is linked to the quality of DGVMs. A major limitation of most DGVMs is that they represent vegetation by a fixed number of static functional types that do not allow plants and plant communities to dynamically adjust to the biotic and abiotic conditions. Here, we present the aDGVM2, a novel individual- and trait-based dynamic vegetation model. The aDGVM2 simulates growth, reproduction and mortality of single plants as a function of the plant-specific combination of trait values. Concepts from genetic optimization are used to simulate trait inheritance, crossover and mutation. These processes ensure that well-performing plants can pass their traits to the next generation and that vegetation can adjust to potentially changing environmental conditions. Thereby, the model iteratively assembles plant communities that are adapted to the environment. The aDGVM2 simulates responses of plant traits along climate, soil and disturbance gradients and associated responses in community structure, diversity and biome types. More specifically, we show that rooting strategies emerging in model simulations are related to soil characteristics and rainfall regimes and that community assembly processes can buffer impacts of disturbances on vegetation. The aDGVM2 model approach integrates aspects of community assembly theory, Earth system modeling and optimality theory and it has a high potential to improve our understanding of ecosystem responses to environmental changes.

  4. Transport phenomena in a model cheese: the influence of the charge and shape of solutes on diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J V C; Peixoto, P D S; Lortal, S; Floury, J

    2013-10-01

    During cheese ripening, microorganisms grow as immobilized colonies, metabolizing substrates present in the matrix and generating products from enzymatic reactions. Local factors that limit the rates of diffusion, either within the general cheese matrix or near the colonies, may influence the metabolic activity of the bacteria during ripening, affecting the final quality of the cheese. The objective of this study was to determine the diffusion coefficients of solutes as a function of their different physicochemical characteristics (size, charge, and shape) in an ultrafiltrate (UF) model cheese (based on ultrafiltered milk) to enable better understanding of the ripening mechanisms. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans (4 kDa to 2 MDa) and FITC-labeled dairy proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and BSA) were measured using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This study showed that macromolecules up to 2 MDa and proteins could diffuse through the UF model cheese. The larger FITC-dextrans were not more hindered by the structure of the UF model cheese compared with the smaller ones. Any decrease in the diffusion coefficients of solutes was related only to their hydrodynamic radii. The FITC-dextran diffusion data were fitted to an obstruction model, resulting in a constant obstruction factor (k ~0.42). Diffusion in the model cheese was sensitive to the physicochemical characteristics of the solute. The FITC-dairy proteins studied (rigid and negatively charged molecules) were hindered to a greater degree than the FITC-dextrans (flexible and charge-neutral molecules) in the UF model cheese. The existence of steric and electrostatic interactions between the protein matrix of the UF model cheese and the FITC-dairy proteins could explain the decrease in diffusion compared with FITC-dextrans.

  5. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation of the polarization switching phenomena in the ferroelectric polymers PVDF at the nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bystrov, V.S., E-mail: bystrov@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering and CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology RAS, 142290, Pushchino (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-01

    The molecular modeling and molecular dynamics of polarization switching for the ferroelectric films model of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are investigated at the nanoscale. We consider a molecular model of PVDF film, consisting of two and four a chains [–CH2–CF2–]{sub n} limited by n=6 elementary units. The first-principle approach is applied to the switching and kinetics of these models. Two types of behavior were established for PVDF chains: simultaneous and sequential rotation in high and low electric fields. Kinetics of sequential polarization switching shows a homogeneous critical behavior in the low electric field with a critical point at Landau–Ginzburg–Devonshire (LGD) coercive field E=E{sub C}. This type of kinetics demonstrates a kink-like behavior for polarization solitary wave propagation. The simultaneous type of kinetics demonstrates the total domain-like polarization switching, corresponding to exponential behavior of switching time in high electric field as for bulk samples. Corresponding LGD intrinsic coercive field for a two-chain and four-chains model is E{sub C}∼2.0 GV/m with revealing size effect. Obtained results show common quantum nature of PVDF chains switching phenomena—the quantum interaction of the PVDF molecular orbitals under applied electric field at the nanoscale level. The results obtained are compared with experimental data.

  6. Forty years of {sup 9}Sr in situ migration: importance of soil characterization in modeling transport phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.M. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/SMTM/LMTE, BP 1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)]. E-mail: jean-michel.fernandez@noumea.ird.nc; Piault, E. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/SMTM/LMTE, BP 1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Macouillard, D. [ENSIL, 16 rue d' Atlantis, Technopole BP 6804, 87068 Limoges (France); Juncos, C. [Universite de Savoie, BP 1104, 73011 Chambery (France)

    2006-07-01

    In 1960 experiments were carried out on the transfer of {sup 9}Sr between soil, grapes and wine. The experiments were conducted in situ on a piece of land limited by two control strips. The {sup 9}Sr migration over the last 40 years was studied by performing radiological and physico-chemical characterizations of the soil on eight 70 cm deep cores. The vertical migration modeling of {sup 9}Sr required the definition of a triple layer conceptual model integrating the rainwater infiltration at constant flux as the only external factor of influence. Afterwards the importance of a detailed soil characterization for modeling was discussed and satisfactory simulation of the {sup 9}Sr vertical transport was obtained and showed a calculated migration rate of about 1.0 cm year{sup -1} in full agreement with the in situ measured values. The discussion was regarding some of the key parameters such as granulometry, organic matter content (in the Van Genuchten parameter determination), Kd and the efficient rainwater infiltration. Besides the experimental data, simplifying assumptions in modeling such as water-soil redistribution calculation and factual discontinuities in conceptual model were examined.

  7. Test of the standard model in the B-meson sector by mixing phenomena and rare decays

    CERN Document Server

    Urbán, J

    1999-01-01

    Calculations for the rare decays b -> s gamma and b -> s g, as well as the BB sup - -mixing inclusive QCD-corrections in Next-to-Leading-Log-Approximation are presented throughout this work. The decays and the mixing are caused by Flavor Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) processes, which are absent on the tree-level within the framework of the Standard-Model. Hence these processes are qualified to test the validity of the Standard-Model, because possible extensions may provide similar contributions. Considered extensions are the 2-Higgs-Doublet-Model, Left-Right-Models and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard-Model. It is shown that the determination of the Wilson-coefficients is independent of the treatment of the light fields for the case of the BB sup - -mixing. For this proof the dimensional regularisation of the IR-divergences on one side and a regulator mass for the light fields on the other side is utilized. The well-known value for the mass splitting ''Delta m B'' available from the BB sup - -oscillation...

  8. Rheological phenomena in focus

    CERN Document Server

    Boger, DV

    1993-01-01

    More than possibly any other scientific discipline, rheology is easily visualized and the relevant literature contains many excellent photographs of unusual and often bizarre phenomena. The present book brings together these photographs for the first time. They are supported by a full explanatory text. Rheological Phenomena in Focus will be an indispensable support manual to all those who teach rheology or have to convince colleagues of the practical relevance of the subject within an industrial setting. For those who teach fluid mechanics, the book clearly illustrates the difference be

  9. Multi-objective Analysis for a Sequencing Planning of Mixed-model Assembly Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Waki, Toshiya; Yoo, Jae Kyu

    Diversified customer demands are raising importance of just-in-time and agile manufacturing much more than before. Accordingly, introduction of mixed-model assembly lines becomes popular to realize the small-lot-multi-kinds production. Since it produces various kinds on the same assembly line, a rational management is of special importance. With this point of view, this study focuses on a sequencing problem of mixed-model assembly line including a paint line as its preceding process. By taking into account the paint line together, reducing work-in-process (WIP) inventory between these heterogeneous lines becomes a major concern of the sequencing problem besides improving production efficiency. Finally, we have formulated the sequencing problem as a bi-objective optimization problem to prevent various line stoppages, and to reduce the volume of WIP inventory simultaneously. Then we have proposed a practical method for the multi-objective analysis. For this purpose, we applied the weighting method to derive the Pareto front. Actually, the resulting problem is solved by a meta-heuristic method like SA (Simulated Annealing). Through numerical experiments, we verified the validity of the proposed approach, and discussed the significance of trade-off analysis between the conflicting objectives.

  10. Preliminary Thermal Hydraulic Analyses of the Conceptual Core Models with Tubular Type Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Jong Hark; Park, Cheol

    2006-11-15

    A new research reactor (AHR, Advanced HANARO Reactor) based on the HANARO has being conceptually developed for the future needs of research reactors. A tubular type fuel was considered as one of the fuel options of the AHR. A tubular type fuel assembly has several curved fuel plates arranged with a constant small gap to build up cooling channels, which is very similar to an annulus pipe with many layers. This report presents the preliminary analysis of thermal hydraulic characteristics and safety margins for three conceptual core models using tubular fuel assemblies. Four design criteria, which are the fuel temperature, ONB (Onset of Nucleate Boiling) margin, minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) and OFIR (Onset of Flow Instability Ratio), were investigated along with various core flow velocities in the normal operating conditions. And the primary coolant flow rate based a conceptual core model was suggested as a design information for the process design of the primary cooling system. The computational fluid dynamics analysis was also carried out to evaluate the coolant velocity distributions between tubular channels and the pressure drop characteristics of the tubular fuel assembly.

  11. Multi-objective optimization algorithms for mixed model assembly line balancing problem with parallel workstations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rabbani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with mixed model assembly line (MMAL balancing problem of type-I. In MMALs several products are made on an assembly line while the similarity of these products is so high. As a result, it is possible to assemble several types of products simultaneously without any additional setup times. The problem has some particular features such as parallel workstations and precedence constraints in dynamic periods in which each period also effects on its next period. The research intends to reduce the number of workstations and maximize the workload smoothness between workstations. Dynamic periods are used to determine all variables in different periods to achieve efficient solutions. A non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II and multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO are used to solve the problem. The proposed model is validated with GAMS software for small size problem and the performance of the foregoing algorithms is compared with each other based on some comparison metrics. The NSGA-II outperforms MOPSO with respect to some comparison metrics used in this paper, but in other metrics MOPSO is better than NSGA-II. Finally, conclusion and future research is provided.

  12. Models for Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Systems with Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Paula V; Rial, Ramon; Ruso, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the physicochemical basis and the different models of nanosystems is nowadays fundamental in a great number of scientific areas and industrial processes. Here, we focus on nanosystems created by self-assembly, molecular or inorganic. The organization of single units at these scales is a challenging matter in light of the inherently small dimensions involved, the sensitivity of the system to small perturbations, and the problem of scaling up such a process for widespread use and implementation. This review examines the different self-assembly routes used to create nanostructures in both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium/dynamic systems and discusses their limits and applications. The connection to biomedicine and pharmaceutical design has been emphasized.

  13. A SEM Model in Assessing the Effect of Convergent, Divergent and Logical Thinking on Students' Understanding of Chemical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamovlasis, D.; Kypraios, N.; Papageorgiou, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to an instrument assessing students' understanding of chemical change. The instrument comprised items on understanding the structure of substances, chemical changes and their interpretation. The structural relationships among particular groups of items are investigated and analyzed using…

  14. Modeling the transport of drugs eluted from stents: physical phenomena driving drug distribution in the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozsak, Franz; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Barakat, Abdul I

    2014-04-01

    Despite recent data that suggest that the overall performance of drug-eluting stents (DES) is superior to that of bare-metal stents, the long-term safety and efficacy of DES remain controversial. The risk of late stent thrombosis associated with the use of DES has also motivated the development of a new and promising treatment option in recent years, namely drug-coated balloons (DCB). Contrary to DES where the drug of choice is typically sirolimus and its derivatives, DCB use paclitaxel since the use of sirolimus does not appear to lead to satisfactory results. Since both sirolimus and paclitaxel are highly lipophilic drugs with similar transport properties, the reason for the success of paclitaxel but not sirolimus in DCB remains unclear. Computational models of the transport of drugs eluted from DES or DCB within the arterial wall promise to enhance our understanding of the performance of these devices. The present study develops a computational model of the transport of the two drugs paclitaxel and sirolimus eluted from DES in the arterial wall. The model takes into account the multilayered structure of the arterial wall and incorporates a reversible binding model to describe drug interactions with the constituents of the arterial wall. The present results demonstrate that the transport of paclitaxel in the arterial wall is dominated by convection while the transport of sirolimus is dominated by the binding process. These marked differences suggest that drug release kinetics of DES should be tailored to the type of drug used.

  15. Modelling of OPNMR phenomena using photon energy-dependent in GaAs and InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Dustin D.; Willmering, Matthew M.; Sesti, Erika L.; Pan, Xingyuan; Saha, Dipta; Stanton, Christopher J.; Hayes, Sophia E.

    2016-12-01

    We have modified the model for optically-pumped NMR (OPNMR) to incorporate a revised expression for the expectation value of the z-projection of the electron spin, and apply this model to both bulk GaAs and a new material, InP. This expression includes the photon energy dependence of the electron polarization when optically pumping direct-gap semiconductors in excess of the bandgap energy, Eg . Rather than using a fixed value arising from coefficients (the matrix elements) for the optical transitions at the k = 0 bandedge, we define a new parameter, Sopt (Eph) . Incorporating this revised element into the expression for , we have simulated the photon energy dependence of the OPNMR signals from bulk semi-insulating GaAs and semi-insulating InP. In earlier work, we matched calculations of electron spin polarization (alone) to features in a plot of OPNMR signal intensity versus photon energy for optical pumping (Ramaswamy et al., 2010). By incorporating an electron spin polarization which varies with pump wavelength into the penetration depth model of OPNMR signal, we are able to model features in both III-V semiconductors. The agreement between the OPNMR data and the corresponding model demonstrates that fluctuations in the OPNMR intensity have particular sensitivity to light hole-to-conduction band transitions in bulk systems. We provide detailed plots of the theoretical predictions for optical pumping transition probabilities with circularly-polarized light for both helicities of light, broken down into illustrative plots of optical magnetoabsorption and spin polarization, shown separately for heavy-hole and light-hole transitions. These plots serve as an effective roadmap of transitions, which are helpful to other researchers investigating optical pumping effects.

  16. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  17. Transport phenomena in multiphase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mauri, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides a thorough presentation of the phenomena related to the transport of mass, momentum and energy.  It lays all the basic physical principles, then for the more advanced readers, it offers an in-depth treatment with advanced mathematical derivations and ends with some useful applications of the models and equations in specific settings. The important idea behind the book is to unify all types of transport phenomena, describing them within a common framework in terms of cause and effect, respectively represented by the driving force and the flux of the transported quantity. The approach and presentation are original in that the book starts with a general description of transport processes, providing the macroscopic balance relations of fluid dynamics and heat and mass transfer, before diving into the mathematical realm of continuum mechanics to derive the microscopic governing equations at the microscopic level. The book is a modular teaching tool and can be used either for an introductory...

  18. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  19. Steady-state observations and theoretical modeling of critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing hemispherical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB test facility to observe the two-phase boundary layer flow behavior on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel near the critical heat flux (CHF) limit and to measure the spatial variation of the local CHF along the vessel outer surface. Based upon the flow observations, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed. The model considers the existence of a micro-layer underneath an elongated vapor slug on the downward facing curved heating surface. The micro-layer is treated as a thin liquid film with numerous micro-vapor jets penetrating through it. The micro-jets have the characteristic size dictated by Helmholtz instability. Local dryout is considered to occur when the supply of fresh liquid from the two phase boundary layer to the micro-layer is not sufficient to prevent depletion of the liquid film by boiling. A boundary layer analysis, treating the two-phase motion as a separated flow, is performed to determine the liquid supply rate and thus the local critical heat flux. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel.

  20. Challenging Students' Intuitions—the Influence of a Tangible Model of Virus Assembly on Students' Conceptual Reasoning About the Process of Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Caroline; Tibell, Lena A. E.

    2015-10-01

    A well-ordered biological complex can be formed by the random motion of its components, i.e. self-assemble. This is a concept that incorporates issues that may contradict students' everyday experiences and intuitions. In previous studies, we have shown that a tangible model of virus self-assembly, used in a group exercise, helps students to grasp the process of self-assembly and in particular the facet "random molecular collision". The present study investigates how and why the model and the group exercise facilitate students' learning of this particular facet. The data analysed consist of audio recordings of six group exercises ( n = 35 university students) and individual semi-structured interviews ( n = 5 university students). The analysis is based on constructivist perspectives of learning, a combination of conceptual change theory and learning with external representations. Qualitative analysis indicates that perceived counterintuitive aspects of the process created a cognitive conflict within learners. The tangible model used in the group exercises facilitated a conceptual change in their understanding of the process. In particular, the tangible model appeared to provide cues and possible explanations and functioned as an "eye-opener" and a "thinking tool". Lastly, the results show signs of emotions also being important elements for successful accommodation.

  1. Bioelectrochemistry II membrane phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, M

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the lectures of the second course devoted to bioelectro­ chemistry, held within the framework of the International School of Biophysics. In this course another very large field of bioelectrochemistry, i. e. the field of Membrane Phenomena, was considered, which itself consists of several different, but yet related subfields. Here again, it can be easily stated that it is impossible to give a complete and detailed picture of all membrane phenomena of biological interest in a short course of about one and half week. Therefore the same philosophy, as the one of the first course, was followed, to select a series of lectures at postgraduate level, giving a synthesis of several membrane phenomena chosen among the most'important ones. These lectures should show the large variety of membrane-regulated events occurring in living bodies, and serve as sound interdisciplinary basis to start a special­ ized study of biological phenomena, for which the investigation using the dual approach, physico-che...

  2. CISM Course on Rolling Contact Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kalker, Joost

    2000-01-01

    Preface.- Rolling Contact Phenomena - Linear Elasticity.- Finite Element Methods for Rolling Contact.- Plastic Deformation in Rolling Contact.- Non-Steady State Rolling Contact and Corrugations.- Modelling of Tyre Force and Moment Generation.- Rolling Noise.- Lubrication

  3. Sorption phenomena of PCBs in environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the properties of PCBs and the behavior of soil and sediment is reviewed. The sorption phenomena of PCBs in the environment are described with different models. The research progress on the sorption mechanisms is also discussed.

  4. Patterns in the English language: phonological networks, percolation and assembly models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Massimo; Brede, Markus

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we provide a quantitative framework for the study of phonological networks (PNs) for the English language by carrying out principled comparisons to null models, either based on site percolation, randomization techniques, or network growth models. In contrast to previous work, we mainly focus on null models that reproduce lower order characteristics of the empirical data. We find that artificial networks matching connectivity properties of the English PN are exceedingly rare: this leads to the hypothesis that the word repertoire might have been assembled over time by preferentially introducing new words which are small modifications of old words. Our null models are able to explain the ‘power-law-like’ part of the degree distributions and generally retrieve qualitative features of the PN such as high clustering, high assortativity coefficient and small-world characteristics. However, the detailed comparison to expectations from null models also points out significant differences, suggesting the presence of additional constraints in word assembly. Key constraints we identify are the avoidance of large degrees, the avoidance of triadic closure and the avoidance of large non-percolating clusters.

  5. Modelling of Heat Transfer Phenomena for Vertical and Horizontal Configurations of In-Pool Condensers and Comparison with Experimental Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Papini

    2010-01-01

    Different condenser tube arrangements have been developed for applications to the next generation NPPs. The two most used configurations, namely, horizontal and vertical tube condensers, are thoroughly investigated in this paper. Several thermal-hydraulic features were explored, being the analysis mainly devoted to the description of the best-estimate correlations and models for heat transfer coefficient prediction. In spite of a more critical behaviour concerning thermal expansion issues, vertical tube condensers offer remarkably better thermal-hydraulic performances. An experimental validation of the vertical tube correlations is provided by PERSEO facility (SIET labs, Piacenza, showing a fairly good agreement.

  6. Mathematical modeling of phenomena of dynamic recrystallization during hot plastic deformation in high-carbon bainitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dembiczak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the research results, coefficients were determined in constitutive equations, describing the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization in high-carbon bainitic steel during hot deformation. The developed mathematical model takes into account the dependence of changing kinetics in the size evolution of the initial austenite grains, the value of strain, strain rate, temperature and time. Physical simulations were carried out on rectangular specimens measuring 10 × 15 × 20 mm. Compression tests with a plane state of deformation were carried out using a Gleeble 3800.

  7. Transport phenomena in articular cartilage cryopreservation as predicted by the modified triphasic model and the effect of natural inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Alireza; Thompson, Richard B; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2012-03-21

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is necessary for the cryopreservation of articular cartilage. Cartilage dehydration and shrinkage, as well as the change in extracellular osmolality, may have a significant impact on chondrocyte survival during and after CPA loading, freezing, and thawing, and during CPA unloading. In the literature, Fick's law of diffusion is commonly used to predict the spatial distribution and overall concentration of the CPA in the cartilage matrix, and the shrinkage and stress-strain in the cartilage matrix during CPA loading are neglected. In this study, we used a previously described biomechanical model to predict the spatial and temporal distributions of CPA during loading. We measured the intrinsic inhomogeneities in initial water and fixed charge densities in the cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging and introduced them into the model as initial conditions. We then compared the prediction results with the results obtained using uniform initial conditions. The simulation results in this study demonstrate the presence of a significant mechanical strain in the matrix of the cartilage, within all layers, during CPA loading. The osmotic response of the chondrocytes to the cartilage dehydration during CPA loading was also simulated. The results reveal that a transient shrinking occurs to different levels, and the chondrocytes experience a significant decrease in volume, particularly in the middle and deep zones of articular cartilage, during CPA loading.

  8. Three-Dimensional CFD Modeling of Transport Phenomena in a Cross-Flow Anode-Supported Planar SOFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonggang Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD model is developed for an anode-supported planar SOFC from the Chinese Academy of Science Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering (NIMTE. The simulation results of the developed model are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained under the same conditions. With the simulation results, the distribution of temperature, flow velocity and the gas concentrations through the cell components and gas channels is presented and discussed. Potential and current density distributions in the cell and overall fuel utilization are also presented. It is also found that the temperature gradients exist along the length of the cell, and the maximum value of the temperature for the cross-flow is at the outlet region of the cell. The distribution of the current density is uneven, and the maximum current density is located at the interfaces between the channels, ribs and the electrodes, the maximum current density result in a large over-potential and heat source in the electrodes, which is harmful to the overall performance and working lifespan of the fuel cells. A new type of flow structure should be developed to make the current flow be more evenly distributed and promote most of the TPB areas to take part in the electrochemical reactions.

  9. Modeling of Flow, Transport and Controlled Sedimentation Phenomena during Mixing of Salt Solutions in Complex Porous Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Eugene D.; Jaho, Sofia; Pavlakou, Efstathia I.; Sygouni, Varvara; Petsi, Anastasia; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of salts in porous media is a major engineering phenomenon encountered in a plethora of industrial and environmental applications where in some cases is desirable and in other not (oil production, geothermal systems, soil stabilization etc). Systematic approach of these problems requires knowledge of the key mechanisms of precipitating salts within the porous structures, in order to develop new methods to control the process. In this work, the development and the solution of spatiotemporally variable mass balances during salt solution mixing along specific pores were performed. Both analytical models and finite differences CFD models were applied for the study of flow and transport with simultaneous homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation (by crystal growth on the surface of the pores) in simple geometries, while unstructured finite elements and meshless methods were developed and implemented for spatial discretization, reconstruction, and solution of transport equations and homogeneous / heterogeneous reactions in more complex geometries. At initial stages of this work, critical problem parameters were identified, such as the characteristics of the porosity, the number of dissolved components, etc. The parameters were then used for solving problems which correspond to available experimental data. For each combination of ions and materials, specific data and process characteristics were included: (a) crystal kinetics (nucleation, growth rates or reaction surface rates of crystals, critical suspension concentrations), (b) physico-chemical properties (bulk density, dimensions of generated crystals, ion diffusion coefficients in the solution), (c) operating parameters (macroscopic velocity, flow, or pressure gradient of the solution, ion concentration) (d) microfluidic data (geometry, flow area), (e) porosity data in Darcy description (initial porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity). During the modeling of flow and transport in three

  10. CATIA-V 3D Modeling for Design Integration of the Ignitor Machine Load Assembly^*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A.; Parodi, B.; Gardella, F.; Coppi, B.

    2007-11-01

    In the framework of the ANSALDO industrial contribution to the Ignitor engineering design, the detailed design of all components of the machine core (Load Assembly) has been completed. The machine Central Post, Central Solenoid, and Poloidal Field Coil systems, the Plasma Chamber and First Wall system, the surrounding mechanical structures, the Vacuum Cryostat and the polyethylene boron sheets attached to it for neutron shielding, have all been analyzed to confirm that they can withstand both normal and off-normal operating loads, as well as the Plasma Chamber and First Wall baking operations, with proper safety margins, for the maximum plasma parameters scenario at 13 T/11 MA, for the reduced scenarios at 9 T/7 MA (limiter) and at 9 T/6 MA (double nul). Both 3D and 2D drawings of each individual component have been produced using the Dassault Systems CATIA-V software. After they have been all integrated into a single 3D CATIA model of the Load Assembly, the electro-fluidic and fluidic lines which supply electrical currents and helium cooling gas to the coils have been added and mechanically incorporated with the components listed above. A global seismic analysis of the Load Assembly with SSE/OBE response spectra has also been performed to verify that it is able to withstand such external events. ^*Work supported in part by ENEA of italy and by the US D.O.E.

  11. Field enhancement and resonance phenomena in complex three-dimensional nanoparticles: efficient computation using the source-model technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishay, Yakir; Leviatan, Yehuda; Bartal, Guy

    2014-05-15

    We present a semi-analytical method for computing the electromagnetic field in and around 3D nanoparticles (NP) of complex shape and demonstrate its power via concrete examples of plasmonic NPs that have nonsymmetrical shapes and surface areas with very small radii of curvature. In particular, we show the three axial resonances of a 3D cashew-nut and the broadband response of peanut-shell NPs. The method employs the source-model technique along with a newly developed intricate source distributing algorithm based on the surface curvature. The method is simple and can outperform finite-difference time domain and finite-element-based software tools in both its efficiency and accuracy.

  12. Economic Phenomena Via Mathematical Modelling in Maple System Ekonominių reiškinių matematinis modeliavimas Maple sistema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Chvatalova

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, economics utilizes more and more frequently quantitative methods. This is an important phenomenon in the process of education. The paper deals with application of the Maple system for on-line creation of mathematical models in economic sectors. Means of Maple represent an important challenge for application in practice or research – resolve specific problems, apply mathematical models in many science fields, create intelligent documents for the presentation of modelling and analyses with computations, visualizations, animations, simulations. The paper incorporates selected samples of models in Maple and indicates further fields of its practical using, e.g. for measurement of marketing activity effectiveness.

    Šiuolaikinė ekonomika vis dažniau ir plačiau taiko kiekybinius metodus. Tai yra svarbus veiksnys ug­dymo procese. Straipsnyje nagrinėjamas Maple sistemos taikymas, matematinių modelių sukūrimas ir taikymas skirtinguose ekonominiuose sektoriuose. Jame apžvelgiamos plačios Maple sistemos taikymo praktikoje ir moksliniuose tyrimuose galimybės, sprendžiant konkrečias ekonomines problemas; ma­tematinių modelių taikymo

  13. A simple model of the diffusion phenomena taking place during the debittering process of green table olives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, M.B.; Zuritz, C.A.; Wuilloud, R.G.; Bageta, C.R.; Terreni, J.; Sanchez, M.J.

    2011-07-01

    The change in the concentration of sodium and calcium ions in the olive flesh and in the lye during the debittering process was quantified. The average concentration of Na increased from 0.0045 to 0.395 meq Na/g of olive flesh and the concentration of Ca increased from 0.018 to 0.0252 meq Ca/g of olive flesh. The firmness of the olives decreased almost linearly from 375 gf to 235 gf during the alkali treatment. The olives also suffered a 25.9% loss in their initial content of reducing sugars. A hypothetical simplified description of the dynamic of ionic charge changes and unwinding of the pectinic structure during the debittering process of green olives has been proposed. In addition, the effective diffusion coefficients were calculated for sodium and calcium using a diffusion model for a composite flat plate and constant diffusion coefficients. (Author).

  14. Assembly Finite Element Models as a Basis to Save Time for Creating Spacecraft Detailed Thermal Mathematical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Kulikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates the role of mathematical modeling in thermal design at different stages of spacecraft development. It analyses the current state of the issue and the approach used to solve this problem in the aerospace industry. The paper suggests using the assembly finite elements models (AFEM for detailed thermal mathematical models (DTMM at the stages of conceptual design, production of technical documentation, and technology groundwork. It shows advantages of the proposed approach such as an increased productivity, a possibility of real-time correction of the thermal models and their reuse when designing the next generation of products or upgrading. There are the ways of creating finite element models of assemblies and their applicability in matters of a descending, ascending and combined thermal design styles. A honeycomb panel «+ Z», a part of the construction of small spacecraft "AIST-2D", is used, as an example, to consider the process of creating the assembly finite element model (AFEM in the software package Siemens NX.During the AFEM application tests when building the detailed thermal mathematical models of small spacecraft "AIST" and "AICT-2D" was revealed an essential feature inherent in the proposed technology that is a need to use thermal couplings because the meshes of various components do not involve a mate "node to node ".A test problem has been solved by analytical and numerical methods in order to verify the proper use of thermal couplings when building the detailed thermal mathematical models of small spacecraft. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been estimated in terms of saving time to create DTMM, with the benefit of hindsight of its use as applied to the functioning and newly developed small spacecraft.

  15. Fatty acid membrane assembly on coacervate microdroplets as a step towards a hybrid protocell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dora Tang, T.-Y.; Rohaida Che Hak, C.; Thompson, Alexander J.; Kuimova, Marina K.; Williams, D. S.; Perriman, Adam W.; Mann, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Mechanisms of prebiotic compartmentalization are central to providing insights into how protocellular systems emerged on the early Earth. Protocell models are based predominantly on the membrane self-assembly of fatty-acid vesicles, although membrane-free scenarios that involve liquid-liquid microphase separation (coacervation) have also been considered. Here we integrate these alternative models of prebiotic compartmentalization and develop a hybrid protocell model based on the spontaneous self-assembly of a continuous fatty-acid membrane at the surface of preformed coacervate microdroplets prepared from cationic peptides/polyelectrolytes and adenosine triphosphate or oligo/polyribonucleotides. We show that the coacervate-supported membrane is multilamellar, and mediates the selective uptake or exclusion of small and large molecules. The coacervate interior can be disassembled without loss of membrane integrity, and fusion and growth of the hybrid protocells can be induced under conditions of high ionic strength. Our results highlight how notions of membrane-mediated compartmentalization, chemical enrichment and internalized structuration can be integrated in protocell models via simple chemical and physical processes.

  16. An anisotropic numerical model for thermal hydraulic analyses: application to liquid metal flow in fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitillo, F.; Vitale Di Maio, D.; Galati, C.; Caruso, G.

    2015-11-01

    A CFD analysis has been carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of liquid metal coolant in a fuel assembly of triangular lattice. In order to obtain fast and accurate results, the isotropic two-equation RANS approach is often used in nuclear engineering applications. A different approach is provided by Non-Linear Eddy Viscosity Models (NLEVM), which try to take into account anisotropic effects by a nonlinear formulation of the Reynolds stress tensor. This approach is very promising, as it results in a very good numerical behavior and in a potentially better fluid flow description than classical isotropic models. An Anisotropic Shear Stress Transport (ASST) model, implemented into a commercial software, has been applied in previous studies, showing very trustful results for a large variety of flows and applications. In the paper, the ASST model has been used to perform an analysis of the fluid flow inside the fuel assembly of the ALFRED lead cooled fast reactor. Then, a comparison between the results of wall-resolved conjugated heat transfer computations and the results of a decoupled analysis using a suitable thermal wall-function previously implemented into the solver has been performed and presented.

  17. Modeling Energy Efficiency As A Green Logistics Component In Vehicle Assembly Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumer, Abduaziz; Mekbib Atnaw, Samson; Kie Cheng, Jack; Singh, Lakveer

    2016-11-01

    This paper uses System Dynamics (SD) simulation to investigate the concept green logistics in terms of energy efficiency in automotive industry. The car manufacturing industry is considered to be one of the highest energy consuming industries. An efficient decision making model is proposed that capture the impacts of strategic decisions on energy consumption and environmental sustainability. The sources of energy considered in this research are electricity and fuel; which are the two main types of energy sources used in a typical vehicle assembly plant. The model depicts the performance measurement for process- specific energy measures of painting, welding, and assembling processes. SD is the chosen simulation method and the main green logistics issues considered are Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emission and energy utilization. The model will assist decision makers acquire an in-depth understanding of relationship between high level planning and low level operation activities on production, environmental impacts and costs associated. The results of the SD model signify the existence of positive trade-offs between green practices of energy efficiency and the reduction of CO2 emission.

  18. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The Surtsey Test Facility is used to perform scaled experiments simulating High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The experiments investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load. The results from Zion and Surry experiments can be extrapolated to other Westinghouse plants, but predicted containment loads cannot be generalized to all Combustion Engineering (CE) plants. Five CE plants have melt dispersal flow paths which circumvent the main mitigation of containment compartmentalization in most Westinghouse PWRs. Calvert Cliff-like plant geometries and the impact of codispersed water were addressed as part of the DCH issue resolution. Integral effects tests were performed with a scale model of the Calvert Cliffs NPP inside the Surtsey test vessel. The experiments investigated the effects of codispersal of water, steam, and molten core stimulant materials on DCH loads under prototypic accident conditions and plant configurations. The results indicated that large amounts of coejected water reduced the DCH load by a small amount. Large amounts of debris were dispersed from the cavity to the upper dome (via the annular gap). 22 refs., 84 figs., 30 tabs.

  19. Low energy phenomena in a model with symmetry group SUSY SO (10) ×△(48)×U(1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周光召; 吴岳良

    1996-01-01

    Fermion masses and mixing angles including that of neutrinos are studied in a model with symmetry group SUSY S0(10) x4(48) xU(i). Universality of Yukawa coupling of superfields is assumed. The resulting texture of mass matrices in the low energy region depends only on a single coupling constant and VEVs caused by necessary symmetry breaking. 13 parameters involving masses and mixing angles in the quark and charged lepton sector are successfully described by only five parameters with two of them determined by the scales of U(1), SO (10) and SU(5) symmetry breaking compatible with the requirement of grand unification and proton decay. The neutrino masses and mixing angles in the leptonic sector are also determined with the addition of a Majorana coupling term. It is found that LSND, events, atmospheric neutrino deficit and the mass limit put by hot dark matter can be naturally explained. Solar neutrino puzzle can be solved only by introducing sterile neutrino with one additional parameter. More precise me

  20. Multi-Objective Analysis Applied to Mixed-Model Assembly Line Sequencing Problem through Elite Induced Evolutionary Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Sakaguchi, Tatsuhiko; Pralomkarn, Theerayoth

    To meet higher customer satisfaction and shorter production lead time, assembly lines are shifting to mixed-model assembly lines. Accordingly, sequencing is becoming an increasingly important operation scheduling that directly affects on efficiency of the entire process. In this study, such sequencing problem at the mixed-model assembly line has been formulated as a bi-objective integer programming problem so that decision making through trade-off analysis can bring about significant production improvements. Then we have developed a multi-objective analysis method by hybridizing conventional and recent meta-heuristic methods. After showing its generic idea, the car mixed-model assembly line sequencing problem is concerned as a case study. Certain measures are also introduced to quantitatively evaluate the performances of the method through comparison.

  1. Electrical transport properties and modelling of electrostrictive resonance phenomena in Ba2/3Sr1/3TiO3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalem, A.; Huitema, L.; Crunteanu, A.; Rammal, M.; Trupina, L.; Nedelcu, L.; Banciu, M. G.; Dutheil, P.; Constantinescu, C.; Marchet, P.; Dumas-Bouchiat, F.; Champeaux, C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the conduction mechanisms of Ba2/3Sr1/3TiO3 thin films integrated in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors and the modelling of the frequency-dependent electrostrictive resonances (in the 100 MHz-10 GHz domain) induced in the devices upon applying different voltage biases. Au/BST/Ir MIM structures on MgO substrates have been fabricated and, depending on their specific polarization, we highlighted different conduction mechanisms in the devices. Depending on the dc bias polarity, the conduction current across the material shows a space-charge-limited-current behavior under negative polarization, whereas under positive bias, the conduction obeys an electrode-limited Schottky-type law at the Au/BST interface. The application of an electric field on the device induces the onset of acoustic resonances related to electrostrictive phenomena in the ferroelectric material. We modeled these acoustic resonances over a wide frequency range, by using a modified Lakin model, which takes into account the dispersions of acoustic properties near the lower electrode/thin film interface.

  2. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

  3. Three Applications of Automated Test Assembly within a User-Friendly Modeling Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Cor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available While linear programming is a common tool in business and industry, there have not been many applications in educational assessment and only a handful of individuals have been actively involved in conducting psychometric research in this area. Perhaps this is due, at least in part, to the complexity of existing software packages. This article presents three applications of linear programming to automate test assembly using an add-in to Microsoft Excel 2007. These increasingly complex examples permit the reader to readily see and manipulate the programming objectives and constraints within a familiar modeling environment. A spreadsheet used in this demonstration is available for downloading.

  4. Efficient tunable generic model for self-assembling fluid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Markus

    2005-03-01

    We present a new model for the simulation of generic lipid bilayers in the mesoscopic regime (between a few nanometers and many tens of nanometers), which is very robust, versatile, and extremely efficient, since it avoids the need for an embedding solvent. Based entirely on simple pair potentials, it features a wide region of unassisted self assembly into fluid bilayers without the need for careful parameter tuning. The resulting membranes display the correct continuum elastic behavior with bending constants in the experimentally relevant range. It can be readily used to study events like bilayer fusion, bilayer melting, lipid mixtures, rafts, and protein-bilayer interactions.

  5. Shock wave reflection phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-dor, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive state-of-the-knowledge description of the shock wave reflection phenomena from a phenomenological point of view. The first part is a thorough introduction to oblique shock wave reflections, presenting the two major well-known reflection wave configurations, namely, regular (RR) and Mach (MR) reflections, the corresponding two- and three-shock theories, their analytical and graphical solution and the proposed transition boundaries between these two reflection-wave configurations. The second, third and fourth parts describe the reflection phenomena in steady, pseudo-steady and unsteady flows, respectively. Here, the possible specific types of reflection wave configurations are described, criteria for their formation and termination are presented and their governing equations are solved analytically and graphically and compared with experimental results. The resolution of the well-known von Neumann paradox and a detailed description of two new reflection-wave configurations - t...

  6. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiere, James

    Understanding fire dynamics and combustion is essential in fire safety engineering and in fire science curricula. Engineers and students involved in fire protection, safety and investigation need to know and predict how fire behaves to be able to implement adequate safety measures and hazard...... analyses. Fire phenomena encompass everything about the scientific principles behind fire behaviour. Combining the principles of chemistry, physics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of fire phenomena, this book integrates the subject into a clear...... discipline. It covers thermo chemistry including mixtures and chemical reactions; Introduces combustion to the fire protection student; Discusses premixed flames and spontaneous ignition; Presents conservation laws for control volumes, including the effects of fire; Describes the theoretical bases...

  7. A simple model of the diffusion phenomena taking place during the debittering process of green table olives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maldonado, Mariela B.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The change in the concentration of sodium and calcium ions in the olive flesh and in the lye during the debittering process was quantified. The average concentration of Na increased from 0.0045 to 0,395 meq Na/g of olive flesh and the concentration of Ca increased from 0.018 to 0.0252 meq Ca/g of olive flesh. The firmness of the olives decreased almost linearly from 375 gf to 235 gf during the alkali treatment. The olives also suffered a 25.9% loss in their initial content of reducing sugars. A hypothetical simplified description of the dynamic of ionic charge changes and unwinding of the pectinic structure during the debittering process of green olives has been proposed. In addition, the effective diffusion coefficients were calculated for sodium and calcium using a diffusion model for a composite flat plate and constant diffusion coefficients. The coefficients for both solutes were in the order of 10–12 m2/s for the skin and 10–10 m2/s for the flesh. In both cases, the diffusion coefficients of Na were larger than the diffusion coefficients of Ca.

    Se ha cuantificado el cambio en la concentración de sodio y calcio en la pulpa y en la lejía durante el tratamiento alcalino de aceitunas. La concentración promedio de sodio en la pulpa aumentó de 0,0045 a 0,395 meq Na/g mientras que la de calcio creció de 0,018 a 0,0252 meq Ca/g. La textura de las aceitunas disminuyó casi linealmente de 375 gf a 235 gf durante el tratamiento alcalino. Las aceitunas sufrieron una perdida de azúcares reductores del 25.9%. Se ha propuesto una hipotética y simplificada descripción de la dinámica de los cambios de carga iónica y el desenrrollamiento de las pectinas durante el desamarizado de las aceitunas. También se calculó el coeficiente efectivo de difusión para sodio y calcio usando un modelo de difusión para una placa compuesta. Los coeficientes resultaron en el orden de 10–12 m2

  8. Transport phenomena II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena II covers forced convention, temperature distribution, free convection, diffusitivity and the mechanism of mass transfer, convective mass transfer, concentration

  9. Paramutation phenomena in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilu, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Paramutation is a particular epigenetic phenomenon discovered in Zea mays by Alexander Brink in the 1950s, and then also found in other plants and animals. Brink coined the term paramutation (from the Greek syllable "para" meaning beside, near, beyond, aside) in 1958, with the aim to differentiate paramutation from mutation. The peculiarity of paramutation with respect to other gene silencing phenomena consists in the ability of the silenced allele (named paramutagenic) to silence the other allele (paramutable) present in trans. The newly silenced (paramutated) allele remains stable in the next generations even after segregation from the paramutagenic allele and acquires paramutagenic ability itself. The inheritance behaviour of these epialleles permits a fast diffusion of a particular gene expression level/phenotype in a population even in the absence of other evolutionary influences, thus breaking the Hardy-Weinberg law. As with other gene silencing phenomena such as quelling in the fungus Neurospora crassa, transvection in Drosophila, co-suppression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) described in transgenic plants and RNA interference (RNAi) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, paramutation occurs without changes in the DNA sequence. So far the molecular basis of paramutation remains not fully understood, although many studies point to the involvement of RNA causing changes in DNA methylation and chromatin structure of the silenced genes. In this review I summarize all paramutation phenomena described in plants, focusing on the similarities and differences between them.

  10. Modeling of RFID-Enabled Real-Time Manufacturing Execution System in Mixed-Model Assembly Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To quickly respond to the diverse product demands, mixed-model assembly lines are well adopted in discrete manufacturing industries. Besides the complexity in material distribution, mixed-model assembly involves a variety of components, different process plans and fast production changes, which greatly increase the difficulty for agile production management. Aiming at breaking through the bottlenecks in existing production management, a novel RFID-enabled manufacturing execution system (MES, which is featured with real-time and wireless information interaction capability, is proposed to identify various manufacturing objects including WIPs, tools, and operators, etc., and to trace their movements throughout the production processes. However, being subject to the constraints in terms of safety stock, machine assignment, setup, and scheduling requirements, the optimization of RFID-enabled MES model for production planning and scheduling issues is a NP-hard problem. A new heuristical generalized Lagrangian decomposition approach has been proposed for model optimization, which decomposes the model into three subproblems: computation of optimal configuration of RFID senor networks, optimization of production planning subjected to machine setup cost and safety stock constraints, and optimization of scheduling for minimized overtime. RFID signal processing methods that could solve unreliable, redundant, and missing tag events are also described in detail. The model validity is discussed through algorithm analysis and verified through numerical simulation. The proposed design scheme has important reference value for the applications of RFID in multiple manufacturing fields, and also lays a vital research foundation to leverage digital and networked manufacturing system towards intelligence.

  11. Fuzzy reasoning model using fuzzy Petri Nets for the monitoring of robotic assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presented a fuzzy Petri net model to deal with the monitoring of robotic assembly. Based on the fuzzy Petri net model. All efficient composite reasoning mode was proposed to perform fuzzy reasoning automatically. It can determine whether there exists an antecedent-consequence relationship between two contact states. Furthermore, various types of sensor signals can be converted to the same form of real values between zero and one, and the contradiction among large number, high degree of truth and importance of input conditions can be resolved very well by introducing the weight factors and priorities for sensor signals. Finally, a pegin-the-hole example was given to illustrate the reasonability and feasibility of the proposed model.

  12. Input dependent cell assembly dynamics in a model of the striatal medium spiny neuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzi, Adam; Wickens, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) network is sparsely connected with fairly weak GABAergic collaterals receiving an excitatory glutamatergic cortical projection. Peri-stimulus time histograms (PSTH) of MSN population response investigated in various experimental studies display strong firing rate modulations distributed throughout behavioral task epochs. In previous work we have shown by numerical simulation that sparse random networks of inhibitory spiking neurons with characteristics appropriate for UP state MSNs form cell assemblies which fire together coherently in sequences on long behaviorally relevant timescales when the network receives a fixed pattern of constant input excitation. Here we first extend that model to the case where cortical excitation is composed of many independent noisy Poisson processes and demonstrate that cell assembly dynamics is still observed when the input is sufficiently weak. However if cortical excitation strength is increased more regularly firing and completely quiescent cells are found, which depend on the cortical stimulation. Subsequently we further extend previous work to consider what happens when the excitatory input varies as it would when the animal is engaged in behavior. We investigate how sudden switches in excitation interact with network generated patterned activity. We show that sequences of cell assembly activations can be locked to the excitatory input sequence and outline the range of parameters where this behavior is shown. Model cell population PSTH display both stimulus and temporal specificity, with large population firing rate modulations locked to elapsed time from task events. Thus the random network can generate a large diversity of temporally evolving stimulus dependent responses even though the input is fixed between switches. We suggest the MSN network is well suited to the generation of such slow coherent task dependent response which could be utilized by the animal in behavior.

  13. Input dependent cell assembly dynamics in a model of the striatal medium spiny neuron network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam ePonzi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The striatal medium spiny neuron (MSNs network is sparsely connected with fairly weak GABAergic collaterals receiving an excitatory glutamatergic cortical projection. Peri stimulus time histograms (PSTH of MSN population response investigated in various experimental studies display strong firing rate modulations distributed throughout behavioural task epochs. In previous work we have shown by numerical simulation that sparse random networks of inhibitory spiking neurons with characteristics appropriate for UP state MSNs form cell assemblies which fire together coherently in sequences on long behaviourally relevant timescales when the network receives a fixed pattern of constant input excitation. Here we first extend that model to the case where cortical excitation is composed of many independent noisy Poisson processes and demonstrate that cell assembly dynamics is still observed when the input is sufficiently weak. However if cortical excitation strength is increased more regularly firing and completely quiescent cells are found, which depend on the cortical stimulation. Subsequently we further extend previous work to consider what happens when the excitatory input varies as it would in when the animal is engaged in behavior. We investigate how sudden switches in excitation interact with network generated patterned activity. We show that sequences of cell assembly activations can be locked to the excitatory input sequence and delineate the range of parameters where this behaviour is shown. Model cell population PSTH display both stimulus and temporal specificity, with large population firing rate modulations locked to elapsed time from task events. Thus the random network can generate a large diversity of temporally evolving stimulus dependent responses even though the input is fixed between switches. We suggest the MSN network is well suited to the generation of such slow coherent task dependent response

  14. Assembly Variation Identification of High Pressure Spool by Response Surface Based Model Updating Using IV-optimal Designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ziyang; XIE Shousheng; HU Jinhai; MIAO Zhuoguang; WANG Lei

    2012-01-01

    This article,in order to improve the assembly of the high-pressure spool,presents an assembly variation identification method achieved by response surface method (RSM)-based model updating using IV-optimal designs.The method involves screening out non-relevant assembly parameters using IV-optimal designs and the preload of the joints is chosen as the input features and modal frequency is the only response feature.Emphasis is placed on the construction of response surface models including the interactions between the bolted joints by which the non-linear relationship between the assembly variation caused by the changes of preload and the output frequency variation is established.By achieving an optimal process of selected variables in the model,assembly variation can be identified.With a case study of the laboratory bolted disks as an example,the proposed method is verified and it gives enough accuracy in variation identification.It has been observed that the first-order response surface models considering the interactions between the bolted joints based on the IV-optimal criterion are adequate for assembly purposes.

  15. Molecular model of fission yeast centrosome assembly determined by superresolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestul, Andrew J; Yu, Zulin; Unruh, Jay R; Jaspersen, Sue L

    2017-08-07

    Microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs), known as centrosomes in animals and spindle pole bodies (SPBs) in fungi, are important for the faithful distribution of chromosomes between daughter cells during mitosis as well as for other cellular functions. The cytoplasmic duplication cycle and regulation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe SPB is analogous to centrosomes, making it an ideal model to study MTOC assembly. Here, we use superresolution structured illumination microscopy with single-particle averaging to localize 14 S. pombe SPB components and regulators, determining both the relationship of proteins to each other within the SPB and how each protein is assembled into a new structure during SPB duplication. These data enabled us to build the first comprehensive molecular model of the S. pombe SPB, resulting in structural and functional insights not ascertained through investigations of individual subunits, including functional similarities between Ppc89 and the budding yeast SPB scaffold Spc42, distribution of Sad1 to a ring-like structure and multiple modes of Mto1 recruitment. © 2017 Bestul et al.

  16. Revealing Assembly of a Pore-Forming Complex Using Single-Cell Kinetic Analysis and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, Mirko; Iacovache, Ioan; Boss, Daniel; Naef, Felix; van der Goot, F Gisou; Molina, Nacho

    2016-04-12

    Many biological processes depend on the sequential assembly of protein complexes. However, studying the kinetics of such processes by direct methods is often not feasible. As an important class of such protein complexes, pore-forming toxins start their journey as soluble monomeric proteins, and oligomerize into transmembrane complexes to eventually form pores in the target cell membrane. Here, we monitored pore formation kinetics for the well-characterized bacterial pore-forming toxin aerolysin in single cells in real time to determine the lag times leading to the formation of the first functional pores per cell. Probabilistic modeling of these lag times revealed that one slow and seven equally fast rate-limiting reactions best explain the overall pore formation kinetics. The model predicted that monomer activation is the rate-limiting step for the entire pore formation process. We hypothesized that this could be through release of a propeptide and indeed found that peptide removal abolished these steps. This study illustrates how stochasticity in the kinetics of a complex process can be exploited to identify rate-limiting mechanisms underlying multistep biomolecular assembly pathways.

  17. Traffic model for commercial payloads in the Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA). [market research in commercial space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietzel, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    One hundred individuals representing universities, technical institutes, government agencies, and industrial facilities were surveyed to determine potential commercial use of a self-contained, automated assembly for the space processing of materials during frequent shuttle flights for the 1981 to 1987 period. The approach used and the results of the study are summarized. A time time-phased projection (traffic model) of commercial usage of the materials experiment assembly is provided.

  18. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  19. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  20. Transport phenomena I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena I includes viscosity, flow of Newtonian fluids, velocity distribution in laminar flow, velocity distributions with more than one independent variable, thermal con

  1. Birefringence phenomena revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Dante D; Gonçalves, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves is investigated in the context of the isotropic and nonlinear dielectric media at rest in the eikonal limit of the geometrical optics. Taking into account the functional dependence $\\varepsilon=\\varepsilon(E,B)$ and $\\mu=\\mu(E,B)$ for the dielectric coefficients, a set of phenomena related to the birefringence of the electromagnetic waves induced by external fields are derived and discussed. Our results contemplate the known cases already reported in the literature: Kerr, Cotton-Mouton, Jones and magnetoelectric effects. Moreover, new effects are presented here as well as the perspectives of its experimental confirmations.

  2. A dielectric model of self-assembled monolayer interfaces by capacitive spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góes, Márcio S; Rahman, Habibur; Ryall, Joshua; Davis, Jason J; Bueno, Paulo R

    2012-06-26

    The presence of self-assembled monolayers at an electrode introduces capacitance and resistance contributions that can profoundly affect subsequently observed electronic characteristics. Despite the impact of this on any voltammetry, these contributions are not directly resolvable with any clarity by standard electrochemical means. A capacitive analysis of such interfaces (by capacitance spectroscopy), introduced here, enables a clean mapping of these features and additionally presents a means of studying layer polarizability and Cole-Cole relaxation effects. The resolved resistive term contributes directly to an intrinsic monolayer uncompensated resistance that has a linear dependence on the layer thickness. The dielectric model proposed is fully aligned with the classic Helmholtz plate capacitor model and additionally explains the inherently associated resistive features of molecular films.

  3. MELCOR Modeling of Air-Cooled PWR Spent Fuel Assemblies in Water empty Fuel Pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L. E.; Lopez, C.

    2013-07-01

    The OECD Spent Fuel Project (SFP) investigated fuel degradation in case of a complete Loss-Of- Coolant-Accident in a PWR spent fuel pool. Analyses of the SFP PWR ignition tests have been conducted with the 1.86.YT.3084.SFP MELCOR version developed by SNL. The main emphasis has been placed on assessing the MELCOR predictive capability to get reasonable estimates of time-to-ignition and fire front propagation under two configurations: hot neighbor (i.e., adiabatic scenario) and cold neighbor (i.e., heat transfer to adjacent fuel assemblies). A detailed description of hypotheses and approximations adopted in the MELCOR model are provided in the paper. MELCOR results accuracy was notably different between both scenarios. The reasons are highlighted in the paper and based on the results understanding a set of remarks concerning scenarios modeling is given.

  4. Composite transcriptome assembly of RNA-seq data in a sheep model for delayed bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Marten; Ott, Claus-Eric; Grünhagen, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Schell, Hanna; Mundlos, Stefan; Duda, Georg N; Robinson, Peter N; Lienau, Jasmin

    2011-03-24

    The sheep is an important model organism for many types of medically relevant research, but molecular genetic experiments in the sheep have been limited by the lack of knowledge about ovine gene sequences. Prior to our study, mRNA sequences for only 1,556 partial or complete ovine genes were publicly available. Therefore, we developed a composite de novo transcriptome assembly method for next-generation sequence data to combine known ovine mRNA and EST sequences, mRNA sequences from mouse and cow, and sequences assembled de novo from short read RNA-Seq data into a composite reference transcriptome, and identified transcripts from over 12 thousand previously undescribed ovine genes. Gene expression analysis based on these data revealed substantially different expression profiles in standard versus delayed bone healing in an ovine tibial osteotomy model. Hundreds of transcripts were differentially expressed between standard and delayed healing and between the time points of the standard and delayed healing groups. We used the sheep sequences to design quantitative RT-PCR assays with which we validated the differential expression of 26 genes that had been identified by RNA-seq analysis. A number of clusters of characteristic expression profiles could be identified, some of which showed striking differences between the standard and delayed healing groups. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were enriched in terms including extracellular matrix, cartilage development, contractile fiber, and chemokine activity. Our results provide a first atlas of gene expression profiles and differentially expressed genes in standard and delayed bone healing in a large-animal model and provide a number of clues as to the shifts in gene expression that underlie delayed bone healing. In the course of our study, we identified transcripts of 13,987 ovine genes, including 12,431 genes for which no sequence information was previously available. This

  5. Kinetic modeling of the assembly, dynamic steady state, and contraction of the FtsZ ring in prokaryotic cytokinesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V Surovtsev

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis in prokaryotes involves the assembly of a polymeric ring composed of FtsZ protein monomeric units. The Z ring forms at the division plane and is attached to the membrane. After assembly, it maintains a stable yet dynamic steady state. Once induced, the ring contracts and the membrane constricts. In this work, we present a computational deterministic biochemical model exhibiting this behavior. The model is based on biochemical features of FtsZ known from in vitro studies, and it quantitatively reproduces relevant in vitro data. An essential part of the model is a consideration of interfacial reactions involving the cytosol volume, where monomeric FtsZ is dispersed, and the membrane surface in the cell's mid-zone where the ring is assembled. This approach allows the same chemical model to simulate either in vitro or in vivo conditions by adjusting only two geometrical parameters. The model includes minimal reactions, components, and assumptions, yet is able to reproduce sought-after in vivo behavior, including the rapid assembly of the ring via FtsZ-polymerization, the formation of a dynamic steady state in which GTP hydrolysis leads to the exchange of monomeric subunits between cytoplasm and the ring, and finally the induced contraction of the ring. The model gives a quantitative estimate for coupling between the rate of GTP hydrolysis and of FtsZ subunit turnover between the assembled ring and the cytoplasmic pool as observed. Membrane constriction is chemically driven by the strong tendency of GTP-bound FtsZ to self-assembly. The model suggests a possible mechanism of membrane contraction without a motor protein. The portion of the free energy of GTP hydrolysis released in cyclization is indirectly used in this energetically unfavorable process. The model provides a limit to the mechanistic complexity required to mimic ring behavior, and it highlights the importance of parallel in vitro and in vivo modeling.

  6. Rail Shock and Vibration Pre-Test Modeling of a Used Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steven B.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Best, Ralph E.; Maheras, Steven J.; McConnell, Paul E.; Orchard, John

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and HLW generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The Storage and Transportation staff within the UFDC is responsible for addressing issues regarding the long-term or extended storage (ES) of UNF and its subsequent transportation. Available information is not sufficient to determine the ability of ES UNF, including high-burnup fuel, to withstand shock and vibration forces that could occur when the UNF is shipped by rail from nuclear power plant sites to a storage or disposal facility. There are three major gaps in the available information – 1) the forces that UNF assemblies would be subjected to when transported by rail, 2) the mechanical characteristics of fuel rod cladding, which is an essential structure for controlling the geometry of the UNF, a safety related feature, and 3) modeling methodologies to evaluate multiple possible degradation or damage mechanisms over the UNF lifetime. In order to address the first gap, options for tests to determine the physical response of surrogate UNF assemblies subjected to shock and vibration forces that are expected to be experienced during normal conditions of transportation (NCT) by rail must be identified and evaluated. The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to obtain data that will help researchers understand the mechanical loads that ES UNF assemblies would be subjected to under normal conditions of transportation and to fortify the computer modeling that will be necessary to evaluate the impact

  7. Viscoplastic behavior of zirconium alloys in the temperatures range 20 deg C - 400 deg C: characterization and modeling of strain ageing phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, St

    2006-10-15

    The anomalous strain rate sensitivity of zirconium alloys over the temperatures range 20-600 C has been widely reported in the literature. This unconventional behavior is related to the existence of strain ageing phenomenon which results from the combined action of thermally activated diffusion of foreign atoms to and along dislocation cores and the long range of dislocations interactions. The important role of interstitial and substitutional atoms in zirconium alloys, responsible for strain ageing and the lack of information about the domain where strain ageing is active have not been yet adequately characterized because of the multiplicity of alloying elements and chemical impurities. The aim of this work is to characterize experimentally the range of temperatures and strain rates where strain ageing is active on the macroscopic and mesoscopic scales. We propose also a predictive approach of the strain ageing effects, using the macroscopic strain ageing model suggested by McCormick (McCormick, 1988; Zhang et al., 2000). Specific zirconium alloys were elaborated starting from a crystal bar of zirconium with 2.2 wt% hafnium and very low oxygen content (80 wt ppm), called ZrHf. Another substitutional atom was added to the solid solution under the form of 1 wt% niobium. Some zirconium alloys were doped with oxygen, others were not. All of them were characterized by various mechanical tests (standard tensile tests, tensile tests with strain rate changes, relaxation tests with unloading). The experimental results were compared with those for the standard oxygen doped zirconium alloy (1300 wt ppm) studied by Pujol (Pujol, 1994) and called Zr702. The following experimental evidences of the age-hardening phenomena were collected and then modeled: 1) low and/or negative strain rate sensitivity around 200-300 C, 2) creep arrest at 200 C, 3) relaxation arrest at 200 C and 300 C, 4) plastic strain heterogeneities observed in laser extensometry on the millimeter scale

  8. An assembly model for simulation of large-scale ground water flow and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junqi; Christ, John A; Goltz, Mark N

    2008-01-01

    When managing large-scale ground water contamination problems, it is often necessary to model flow and transport using finely discretized domains--for instance (1) to simulate flow and transport near a contamination source area or in the area where a remediation technology is being implemented; (2) to account for small-scale heterogeneities; (3) to represent ground water-surface water interactions; or (4) some combination of these scenarios. A model with a large domain and fine-grid resolution will need extensive computing resources. In this work, a domain decomposition-based assembly model implemented in a parallel computing environment is developed, which will allow efficient simulation of large-scale ground water flow and transport problems using domain-wide grid refinement. The method employs common ground water flow (MODFLOW) and transport (RT3D) simulators, enabling the solution of almost all commonly encountered ground water flow and transport problems. The basic approach partitions a large model domain into any number of subdomains. Parallel processors are used to solve the model equations within each subdomain. Schwarz iteration is applied to match the flow solution at the subdomain boundaries. For the transport model, an extended numerical array is implemented to permit the exchange of dispersive and advective flux information across subdomain boundaries. The model is verified using a conventional single-domain model. Model simulations demonstrate that the proposed model operated in a parallel computing environment can result in considerable savings in computer run times (between 50% and 80%) compared with conventional modeling approaches and may be used to simulate grid discretizations that were formerly intractable.

  9. Computational modelling of genome-wide [corrected] transcription assembly networks using a fluidics analogy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousry Y Azmy

    Full Text Available Understanding how a myriad of transcription regulators work to modulate mRNA output at thousands of genes remains a fundamental challenge in molecular biology. Here we develop a computational tool to aid in assessing the plausibility of gene regulatory models derived from genome-wide expression profiling of cells mutant for transcription regulators. mRNA output is modelled as fluid flow in a pipe lattice, with assembly of the transcription machinery represented by the effect of valves. Transcriptional regulators are represented as external pressure heads that determine flow rate. Modelling mutations in regulatory proteins is achieved by adjusting valves' on/off settings. The topology of the lattice is designed by the experimentalist to resemble the expected interconnection between the modelled agents and their influence on mRNA expression. Users can compare multiple lattice configurations so as to find the one that minimizes the error with experimental data. This computational model provides a means to test the plausibility of transcription regulation models derived from large genomic data sets.

  10. Computational simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in the model LMFBR fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayaskhalanov, M. V.; Merinov, I. G.; Korsun, A. S.; Vlasov, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify a developed software module on the experimental fuel assembly with partial blockage of the flow section. The developed software module for simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in liquid metal coolant is based on theory of anisotropic porous media with specially developed integral turbulence model for coefficients determination. The finite element method is used for numerical solution. Experimental data for hexahedral assembly with electrically heated smooth cylindrical rods cooled by liquid sodium are considered. The results of calculation obtained with developed software module for a case of corner blockade are presented. The calculated distribution of coolant velocities showed the presence of the vortex flow behind the blockade. Features vortex region are in a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data. This demonstrates the efficiency of the hydrodynamic unit for developed software module. But obtained radial coolant temperature profiles differ significantly from the experimental in the vortex flow region. The possible reasons for this discrepancy were analyzed.

  11. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  12. Self-assembly model, hepatocytes attachment and inflammatory response for silk fibroin/chitosan scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She Zhending; Feng Qingling [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu Weiqiang, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Center for Advanced Materials and Biotechnology, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Silk fibroin is an attractive natural fibrous protein for biomedical application due to its good biocompatibility and high tensile strength. Silk fibroin is apt to form a sheet-like structure during the freeze-drying process, which is not suitable for the scaffold of tissue engineering. In our former study, the adding of chitosan promoted the self-assembly of silk fibroin/chitosan (SFCS) into a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous porous structure. In this study, a model of the self-assembly is proposed; furthermore, hepatocytes attachment and inflammatory response for the SFCS scaffold were examined. The rigid chain of chitosan may be used as a template for beta-sheet formation of silk fibroin, and this may break the sheet structure of the silk fibroin scaffold and promote the formation of a 3D porous structure of the SFCS scaffold. Compared with the polylactic glycolic acid scaffold, the SFCS scaffold further facilitates the attachment of hepatocytes. To investigate the inflammatory response, SFCS scaffolds were implanted into the greater omentum of rats. From the results of implantation, we could demonstrate in vivo that the implantation of SFCS scaffolds resulted in only slight inflammation. Keeping the good histocompatibility and combining the advantages of both fibroin and chitosan, the SFCS scaffold could be a prominent candidate for soft tissue engineering, for example, in the liver.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements

  14. A strong test of a maximum entropy model of trait-based community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Bill; Laughlin, Daniel C; Sonnier, Grégory; Otfinowski, Rafael

    2011-02-01

    We evaluate the predictive power and generality of Shipley's maximum entropy (maxent) model of community assembly in the context of 96 quadrats over a 120-km2 area having a large (79) species pool and strong gradients. Quadrats were sampled in the herbaceous understory of ponderosa pine forests in the Coconino National Forest, Arizona, U.S.A. The maxent model accurately predicted species relative abundances when observed community-weighted mean trait values were used as model constraints. Although only 53% of the variation in observed relative abundances was associated with a combination of 12 environmental variables, the maxent model based only on the environmental variables provided highly significant predictive ability, accounting for 72% of the variation that was possible given these environmental variables. This predictive ability largely surpassed that of nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) or detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) ordinations. Using cross-validation with 1000 independent runs, the median correlation between observed and predicted relative abundances was 0.560 (the 2.5% and 97.5% quantiles were 0.045 and 0.825). The qualitative predictions of the model were also noteworthy: dominant species were correctly identified in 53% of the quadrats, 83% of rare species were correctly predicted to have a relative abundance of < 0.05, and the median predicted relative abundance of species actually absent from a quadrat was 5 x 10(-5).

  15. Interpolating function and Stokes Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, Masazumi

    2015-01-01

    When we have two expansions of physical quantity around two different points in parameter space, we can usually construct a family of functions, which interpolates the both expansions. In this paper we study analytic structures of such interpolating functions and discuss their physical implications. We propose that the analytic structures of the interpolating functions provide information on analytic property and Stokes phenomena of the physical quantity, which we approximate by the interpolating functions. We explicitly check our proposal for partition functions of zero-dimensional $\\varphi^4$ theory and Sine-Gordon model. In the zero dimensional Sine-Gordon model, we compare our result with a recent result from resurgence analysis. We also comment on construction of interpolating function in Borel plane.

  16. A human CCT5 gene mutation causing distal neuropathy impairs hexadecamer assembly in an archaeal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wonki; Angileri, Francesca; Luo, Haibin; Lauria, Antonino; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Almerico, Anna Maria; Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Lednev, Igor K; Macario, Alberto J L; Robb, Frank T

    2014-10-27

    Chaperonins mediate protein folding in a cavity formed by multisubunit rings. The human CCT has eight non-identical subunits and the His147Arg mutation in one subunit, CCT5, causes neuropathy. Knowledge is scarce on the impact of this and other mutations upon the chaperone's structure and functions. To make progress, experimental models must be developed. We used an archaeal mutant homolog and demonstrated that the His147Arg mutant has impaired oligomeric assembly, ATPase activity, and defective protein homeostasis functions. These results establish for the first time that a human chaperonin gene defect can be reproduced and studied at the molecular level with an archaeal homolog. The major advantage of the system, consisting of rings with eight identical subunits, is that it amplifies the effects of a mutation as compared with the human counterpart, in which just one subunit per ring is defective. Therefore, the slight deficit of a non-lethal mutation can be detected and characterized.

  17. Micromechanics model of liquid crystal anisotropic triple lines with applications to self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D; Valencia, E E Herrera

    2010-08-17

    Directed self-assembly of mesophases at three phase contact lines has been reported for a variety of solutions, including micelles, tobacco mosaic virus, DNA, silk, and others, through the action of capillary forces, wetting processes, and/or evaporation. This communication presents a new micromechanical line-excess model of the anisotropic contact line tension for nematic liquid crystal phases, which incorporates well characterized liquid crystal interfacial tensions. The anisotropic line tension is then used to formulate the contact line torque that promotes the azimuthal orientation, widely reported experimentally. The dependence of the line torque strength on the contact angle reveals the conditions that promote azimuthal orientational ordering close to the contact line. This work is limited to anisotropic line-excess tension, and wetting and evaporation processes are outside its scope.

  18. Fusion of uniluminal vascular spheroids: a model for assembly of blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul A; Argraves, W Scott; Gentile, Carmine; Neagu, Adrian; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J

    2010-02-01

    We evaluated the self-assembly properties of uniluminal vascular spheroids having outer layers of vascular smooth muscle cells and a contiguous inner layer of endothelial cells lining a central lumen. We showed that while pairs of uniluminal vascular spheroids suspended in culture medium fused to form a larger diameter spheroidal structure, spheroids in collagen hydrogels formed elongated structures. These findings highlight the potential use of uniluminal vascular spheroids as modules to engineer blood vessels. We also demonstrate that uniluminal vascular spheroid fusion conforms to models describing the coalescence of liquid drops. Furthermore, the fusion of uniluminal vascular spheroids in vitro closely resembled the in vivo process by which the descending aorta forms from the fusion of the paired dorsal aortae during embryonic development. Together, the findings indicate that tissue liquidity underlies uniluminal vascular spheroid fusion and that in vivo anastomosis of blood vessels may involve a similar mechanism.

  19. Modeling Self-Assembly Across Scales: The Unifying Perspective of Smart Minimal Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcherio Martinoli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A wealth of current research in microengineering aims at fabricating devices of increasing complexity, notably by (self-assembling elementary components into heterogeneous functional systems. At the same time, a large body of robotic research called swarm robotics is concerned with the design and the control of large ensembles of robots of decreasing size and complexity. This paper describes the asymptotic convergence of micro/nano electromechanical systems (M/NEMS on one side, and swarm robotic systems on the other, toward a unifying class of systems, which we denote Smart Minimal Particles (SMPs. We define SMPs as mobile, purely reactive and physically embodied agents that compensate for their limited on-board capabilities using specifically engineered reactivity to external physical stimuli, including local energy and information scavenging. In trading off internal resources for simplicity and robustness, SMPs are still able to collectively perform non-trivial, spatio-temporally coordinated and highly scalable operations such as aggregation and self-assembly (SA. We outline the opposite converging tendencies, namely M/NEMS smarting and robotic minimalism, by reviewing each field’s literature with specific focus on self-assembling systems. Our main claim is that the SMPs can be used to develop a unifying technological and methodological framework that bridges the gap between passive M/NEMS and active, centimeter-sized robots. By proposing this unifying perspective, we hypothesize a continuum in both complexity and length scale between these two extremes. We illustrate the benefits of possible cross-fertilizations among these originally separate domains, with specific emphasis on the modeling of collective dynamics. Particularly, we argue that while most of the theoretical studies on M/NEMS SA dynamics belong so far to one of only two main frameworks—based on analytical master equations and on numerical agent-based simulations

  20. Two-Stage orders sequencing system for mixed-model assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemczak, M.; Skolud, B.; Krenczyk, D.

    2015-11-01

    In the paper, the authors focus on the NP-hard problem of orders sequencing, formulated similarly to Car Sequencing Problem (CSP). The object of the research is the assembly line in an automotive industry company, on which few different models of products, each in a certain number of versions, are assembled on the shared resources, set in a line. Such production type is usually determined as a mixed-model production, and arose from the necessity of manufacturing customized products on the basis of very specific orders from single clients. The producers are nowadays obliged to provide each client the possibility to determine a huge amount of the features of the product they are willing to buy, as the competition in the automotive market is large. Due to the previously mentioned nature of the problem (NP-hard), in the given time period only satisfactory solutions are sought, as the optimal solution method has not yet been found. Most of the researchers that implemented inaccurate methods (e.g. evolutionary algorithms) to solving sequencing problems dropped the research after testing phase, as they were not able to obtain reproducible results, and met problems while determining the quality of the received solutions. Therefore a new approach to solving the problem, presented in this paper as a sequencing system is being developed. The sequencing system consists of a set of determined rules, implemented into computer environment. The system itself works in two stages. First of them is connected with the determination of a place in the storage buffer to which certain production orders should be sent. In the second stage of functioning, precise sets of sequences are determined and evaluated for certain parts of the storage buffer under certain criteria.

  1. Secondary Structure Transition and Critical Stress for a Model of Spider Silk Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesa, Tristan; Perry, Carole C; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-08

    Spiders spin their silk from an aqueous solution to a solid fiber in ambient conditions. However, to date, the assembly mechanism in the spider silk gland has not been satisfactorily explained. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to model Nephila clavipes MaSp1 dragline silk formation under shear flow and determine the secondary structure transitions leading to the experimentally observed fiber structures. While no experiments are performed on the silk fiber itself, insights from this polypeptide model can be transferred to the fiber scale. The novelty of this study lies in the calculation of the shear stress (300-700 MPa) required for fiber formation and identification of the amino acid residues involved in the transition. This is the first time that the shear stress has been quantified in connection with a secondary structure transition. By study of molecules containing varying numbers of contiguous MaSp1 repeats, we determine that the smallest molecule size giving rise to a "silk-like" structure contains six polyalanine repeats. Through a probability analysis of the secondary structure, we identify specific amino acids that transition from α-helix to β-sheet. In addition to portions of the polyalanine section, these amino acids include glycine, leucine, and glutamine. The stability of β-sheet structures appears to arise from a close proximity in space of helices in the initial spidroin state. Our results are in agreement with the forces exerted by spiders in the silking process and the experimentally determined global secondary structure of spidroin and pulled MaSp1 silk. Our study emphasizes the role of shear in the assembly process of silk and can guide the design of microfluidic devices that attempt to mimic the natural spinning process and predict molecular requirements for the next generation of silk-based functional materials.

  2. TerraFERMA: The Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler for multiphysics problems in Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Cian R.; Spiegelman, Marc; van Keken, Peter E.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce and describe a new software infrastructure TerraFERMA, the Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler, for the rapid and reproducible description and solution of coupled multiphysics problems. The design of TerraFERMA is driven by two computational needs in Earth sciences. The first is the need for increased flexibility in both problem description and solution strategies for coupled problems where small changes in model assumptions can lead to dramatic changes in physical behavior. The second is the need for software and models that are more transparent so that results can be verified, reproduced, and modified in a manner such that the best ideas in computation and Earth science can be more easily shared and reused. TerraFERMA leverages three advanced open-source libraries for scientific computation that provide high-level problem description (FEniCS), composable solvers for coupled multiphysics problems (PETSc), and an options handling system (SPuD) that allows the hierarchical management of all model options. TerraFERMA integrates these libraries into an interface that organizes the scientific and computational choices required in a model into a single options file from which a custom compiled application is generated and run. Because all models share the same infrastructure, models become more reusable and reproducible, while still permitting the individual researcher considerable latitude in model construction. TerraFERMA solves partial differential equations using the finite element method. It is particularly well suited for nonlinear problems with complex coupling between components. TerraFERMA is open-source and available at http://terraferma.github.io, which includes links to documentation and example input files.

  3. Genome assembly quality: Assessment and improvement using the neutral indel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meader, Stephen; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Locke, Devin; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton

    2010-01-01

    We describe a statistical and comparative-genomic approach for quantifying error rates of genome sequence assemblies. The method exploits not substitutions but the pattern of insertions and deletions (indels) in genome-scale alignments for closely related species. Using two- or three-way alignments, the approach estimates the amount of aligned sequence containing clusters of nucleotides that were wrongly inserted or deleted during sequencing or assembly. Thus, the method is well-suited to assessing fine-scale sequence quality within single assemblies, between different assemblies of a single set of reads, and between genome assemblies for different species. When applying this approach to four primate genome assemblies, we found that average gap error rates per base varied considerably, by up to sixfold. As expected, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences contained lower, but still substantial, predicted numbers of errors, arguing for caution in regarding BACs as the epitome of genome fidelity. We then mapped short reads, at approximately 10-fold statistical coverage, from a Bornean orangutan onto the Sumatran orangutan genome assembly originally constructed from capillary reads. This resulted in a reduced gap error rate and a separation of error-prone from high-fidelity sequence. Over 5000 predicted indel errors in protein-coding sequence were corrected in a hybrid assembly. Our approach contributes a new fine-scale quality metric for assemblies that should facilitate development of improved genome sequencing and assembly strategies. PMID:20305016

  4. DATA MINING METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE OPTIMAL MODEL OF COST PREDICTION IN SHIP INTERIM PRODUCT ASSEMBLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Kolich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to accurately predict costs of the thousands of interim products that are assembled in shipyards, it is necessary to use skilled engineers to develop detailed Gantt charts for each interim product separately which takes many hours. It is helpful to develop a prediction tool to estimate the cost of interim products accurately and quickly without the need for skilled engineers. This will drive down shipyard costs and improve competitiveness. Data mining is used extensively for developing prediction models in other industries. Since ships consist of thousands of interim products, it is logical to develop a data mining methodology for a shipyard or any other manufacturing industry where interim products are produced. The methodology involves analysis of existing interim products and data collection. Pre-processing and principal component analysis is done to make the data “user-friendly” for later prediction processing and the development of both accurate and robust models. The support vector machine is demonstrated as the better model when there are a lower number of tuples. However as the number of tuples is increased to over 10000, then the artificial neural network model is recommended.

  5. Fluid-Mediated Stochastic Self-Assembly at Centimetric and Sub-Millimetric Scales: Design, Modeling, and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Haghighat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic self-assembly provides promising means for building micro-/nano-structures with a variety of properties and functionalities. Numerous studies have been conducted on the control and modeling of the process in engineered self-assembling systems constituted of modules with varied capabilities ranging from completely reactive nano-/micro-particles to intelligent miniaturized robots. Depending on the capabilities of the constituting modules, different approaches have been utilized for controlling and modeling these systems. In the quest of a unifying control and modeling framework and within the broader perspective of investigating how stochastic control strategies can be adapted from the centimeter-scale down to the (sub-millimeter-scale, as well as from mechatronic to MEMS-based technology, this work presents the outcomes of our research on self-assembly during the past few years. As the first step, we leverage an experimental platform to study self-assembly of water-floating passive modules at the centimeter scale. A dedicated computational framework is developed for real-time tracking, modeling and control of the formation of specific structures. Using a similar approach, we then demonstrate controlled self-assembly of microparticles into clusters of a preset dimension in a microfluidic chamber, where the control loop is closed again through real-time tracking customized for a much faster system dynamics. Finally, with the aim of distributing the intelligence and realizing programmable self-assembly, we present a novel experimental system for fluid-mediated programmable stochastic self-assembly of active modules at the centimeter scale. The system is built around the water-floating 3-cm-sized Lily robots specifically designed to be operative in large swarms and allows for exploring the whole range of fully-centralized to fully-distributed control strategies. The outcomes of our research efforts extend the state-of-the-art methodologies

  6. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  7. Model Development and Process Analysis for Lean Cellular Design Planning in Aerospace Assembly and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, Monty D.

    Successful lean manufacturing and cellular manufacturing execution relies upon a foundation of leadership commitment and strategic planning built upon solid data and robust analysis. The problem for this study was to create and employ a simple lean transformation planning model and review process that could be used to identify functional support staff resources required to plan and execute lean manufacturing cells within aerospace assembly and manufacturing sites. The lean planning model was developed using available literature for lean manufacturing kaizen best practices and validated through a Delphi panel of lean experts. The resulting model and a standardized review process were used to assess the state of lean transformation planning at five sites of an international aerospace manufacturing and assembly company. The results of the three day, on-site review were compared with baseline plans collected from each of the five sites to determine if there analyzed, with focus on three critical areas of lean planning: the number and type of manufacturing cells identified, the number, type, and duration of planned lean and continuous kaizen events, and the quantity and type of functional staffing resources planned to support the kaizen schedule. Summarized data of the baseline and on-site reviews was analyzed with descriptive statistics. ANOVAs and paired-t tests at 95% significance level were conducted on the means of data sets to determine if null hypotheses related to cell, kaizen event, and support resources could be rejected. The results of the research found significant differences between lean transformation plans developed by site leadership and plans developed utilizing the structured, on-site review process and lean transformation planning model. The null hypothesis that there was no difference between the means of pre-review and on-site cell counts was rejected, as was the null hypothesis that there was no significant difference in kaizen event plans. These

  8. Balancing assembly lines with variable parallel workplaces: Problem definition, model and exact solution procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Becker; Armin Scholl

    2008-01-01

    Assembly line balancing problems (ALBP) arise whenever an assembly line is con- figured, redesigned or adjusted. An ALBP consists of distributing the total workload for manu- facturing any unit of the products to be assembled among the work stations along the line sub- ject to a strict or average cycle time. Traditionally, stations are considered to be manned by one operator, respectively, or duplicated in form of identical parallel stations, each also manned by a single operator. In practice...

  9. Model assembly for estimating cell surviving fraction for both targeted and nontargeted effects based on microdosimetric probability densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko Sato

    Full Text Available We here propose a new model assembly for estimating the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with various types of ionizing radiation, considering both targeted and nontargeted effects in the same framework. The probability densities of specific energies in two scales, which are the cell nucleus and its substructure called a domain, were employed as the physical index for characterizing the radiation fields. In the model assembly, our previously established double stochastic microdosimetric kinetic (DSMK model was used to express the targeted effect, whereas a newly developed model was used to express the nontargeted effect. The radioresistance caused by overexpression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 known to frequently occur in human cancer was also considered by introducing the concept of the adaptive response in the DSMK model. The accuracy of the model assembly was examined by comparing the computationally and experimentally determined surviving fraction of Bcl-2 cells (Bcl-2 overexpressing HeLa cells and Neo cells (neomycin resistant gene-expressing HeLa cells irradiated with microbeam or broadbeam of energetic heavy ions, as well as the WI-38 normal human fibroblasts irradiated with X-ray microbeam. The model assembly reproduced very well the experimentally determined surviving fraction over a wide range of dose and linear energy transfer (LET values. Our newly established model assembly will be worth being incorporated into treatment planning systems for heavy-ion therapy, brachytherapy, and boron neutron capture therapy, given critical roles of the frequent Bcl-2 overexpression and the nontargeted effect in estimating therapeutic outcomes and harmful effects of such advanced therapeutic modalities.

  10. Model assembly for estimating cell surviving fraction for both targeted and nontargeted effects based on microdosimetric probability densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We here propose a new model assembly for estimating the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with various types of ionizing radiation, considering both targeted and nontargeted effects in the same framework. The probability densities of specific energies in two scales, which are the cell nucleus and its substructure called a domain, were employed as the physical index for characterizing the radiation fields. In the model assembly, our previously established double stochastic microdosimetric kinetic (DSMK) model was used to express the targeted effect, whereas a newly developed model was used to express the nontargeted effect. The radioresistance caused by overexpression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 known to frequently occur in human cancer was also considered by introducing the concept of the adaptive response in the DSMK model. The accuracy of the model assembly was examined by comparing the computationally and experimentally determined surviving fraction of Bcl-2 cells (Bcl-2 overexpressing HeLa cells) and Neo cells (neomycin resistant gene-expressing HeLa cells) irradiated with microbeam or broadbeam of energetic heavy ions, as well as the WI-38 normal human fibroblasts irradiated with X-ray microbeam. The model assembly reproduced very well the experimentally determined surviving fraction over a wide range of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) values. Our newly established model assembly will be worth being incorporated into treatment planning systems for heavy-ion therapy, brachytherapy, and boron neutron capture therapy, given critical roles of the frequent Bcl-2 overexpression and the nontargeted effect in estimating therapeutic outcomes and harmful effects of such advanced therapeutic modalities.

  11. Dissipative phenomena in condensed matter some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2004-01-01

    From the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics, this graduate- and research-level volume treats the modeling and characterization of dissipative phenomena. A variety of examples from diverse disciplines like condensed matter physics, materials science, metallurgy, chemical physics etc. are discussed. Dattagupta employs the broad framework of stochastic processes and master equation techniques to obtain models for a wide range of experimentally relevant phenomena such as classical and quantum Brownian motion, spin dynamics, kinetics of phase ordering, relaxation in glasses, dissipative tunneling. It provides a pedagogical exposition of current research material and will be useful to experimentalists, computational physicists and theorists.

  12. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanical models for cytoskeletal assembly: Towards understanding tensegrity in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tongye; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-10-01

    The cytoskeleton is not an equilibrium structure. To develop theoretical tools to investigate such nonequilibrium assemblies, we study a statistical physical model of motorized spherical particles. Though simple, it captures some of the key nonequilibrium features of the cytoskeletal networks. Variational solutions of the many-body master equation for a set of motorized particles accounts for their thermally induced Brownian motion as well as for the motorized kicking of the structural elements. These approximations yield stability limits for crystalline phases and for frozen amorphous structures. The methods allow one to compute the effects of nonequilibrium behavior and adhesion (effective cross-linking) on the mechanical stability of localized phases as a function of density, adhesion strength, and temperature. We find that nonequilibrium noise does not necessarily destabilize mechanically organized structures. The nonequilibrium forces strongly modulate the phase behavior and have comparable effect as the adhesion due to cross-linking. Modeling transitions such as these allows the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton to rapidly and adaptively change. The present model provides a statistical mechanical underpinning for a tensegrity picture of the cytoskeleton.

  13. Galaxy assembly, stellar feeback and metal enrichment: the view from the GAEA model

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschmann, Michaela; Fontanot, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    One major problem of current theoretical models of galaxy formation is given by their inability to reproduce the apparently "anti-hierarchical" evolution of galaxy assembly: massive galaxies appear to be in place since $z\\sim 3$, while a significant evolution is measured for lower mass galaxies, whose number densities increase significantly with decreasing redshift. In this work, we perform a systematic analysis of the influence of different stellar feedback schemes. Our analysis is carried out in the framework of GAEA, a new semi-analytic model that includes a self-consistent treatment for the timings of gas, metal and energy recycling, as well for the chemical yields. We show this to be crucial in order to use observational measurements of the metal content as independent and powerful constraints for the adopted feedback schemes. We find that the observed trends can be reproduced in the framework of either a strong ejective or preventive feedback model. In the former case, the gas ejection rate must decreas...

  14. A surface interaction model for self-assembly of block copolymers under soft confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun-Qing; Liu, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Hong-Dong

    2016-12-01

    The surface interaction between substrates and block copolymers is one of the most important factors that control the alignment of self-assembled domains under thin film confinement. Most previous studies simply modeled substrates modified by grafting polymers as a hard wall with a specified surface energy, leading to an incomplete understanding of the role of grafted polymers. In this study, we propose a general model of surface interactions where the role of grafted polymers is decomposed into two independent contributions: the surface preference and the surface softness. Based on this model, we perform a numerical analysis of the stability competition between perpendicular and parallel lamellae of symmetric diblock copolymers on substrates modified by homopolymers using self-consistent field theory. The effects of the surface preference and the surface softness on the alignment of lamellar domains are carefully examined. A phase diagram of the alignment in the plane of the surface preference parameter and the surface softness parameter is constructed, which reveals a considerable parameter window for preparing stable perpendicular lamellae even on highly preferential substrates.

  15. Galaxy assembly, stellar feedback and metal enrichment: the view from the GAEA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; De Lucia, Gabriella; Fontanot, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    One major problem of current theoretical models of galaxy formation is given by their inability to reproduce the apparently `anti-hierarchical' evolution of galaxy assembly: massive galaxies appear to be in place since z ˜ 3, while a significant increase of the number densities of low-mass galaxies is measured with decreasing redshift. In this work, we perform a systematic analysis of the influence of different stellar feedback schemes, carried out in the framework of GAEA, a new semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. It includes a self-consistent treatment for the timings of gas, metal and energy recycling, and for the chemical yields. We show this to be crucial to use observational measurements of the metallicity as independent and powerful constraints for the adopted feedback schemes. The observed trends can be reproduced in the framework of either a strong ejective or preventive feedback model. In the former case, the gas ejection rate must decrease significantly with cosmic time (as suggested by parametrizations of the cosmological `FIRE' simulations). Irrespective of the feedback scheme used, our successful models always imply that up to 60-70 per cent of the baryons reside in an `ejected' reservoir and are unavailable for cooling at high redshift. The same schemes predict physical properties of model galaxies (e.g. gas content, colour, age, and metallicity) that are in much better agreement with observational data than our fiducial model. The overall fraction of passive galaxies is found to be primarily determined by internal physical processes, with environment playing a secondary role.

  16. Composite transcriptome assembly of RNA-seq data in a sheep model for delayed bone healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundlos Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sheep is an important model organism for many types of medically relevant research, but molecular genetic experiments in the sheep have been limited by the lack of knowledge about ovine gene sequences. Results Prior to our study, mRNA sequences for only 1,556 partial or complete ovine genes were publicly available. Therefore, we developed a composite de novo transcriptome assembly method for next-generation sequence data to combine known ovine mRNA and EST sequences, mRNA sequences from mouse and cow, and sequences assembled de novo from short read RNA-Seq data into a composite reference transcriptome, and identified transcripts from over 12 thousand previously undescribed ovine genes. Gene expression analysis based on these data revealed substantially different expression profiles in standard versus delayed bone healing in an ovine tibial osteotomy model. Hundreds of transcripts were differentially expressed between standard and delayed healing and between the time points of the standard and delayed healing groups. We used the sheep sequences to design quantitative RT-PCR assays with which we validated the differential expression of 26 genes that had been identified by RNA-seq analysis. A number of clusters of characteristic expression profiles could be identified, some of which showed striking differences between the standard and delayed healing groups. Gene Ontology (GO analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were enriched in terms including extracellular matrix, cartilage development, contractile fiber, and chemokine activity. Conclusions Our results provide a first atlas of gene expression profiles and differentially expressed genes in standard and delayed bone healing in a large-animal model and provide a number of clues as to the shifts in gene expression that underlie delayed bone healing. In the course of our study, we identified transcripts of 13,987 ovine genes, including 12,431 genes for which

  17. Modeling the Hybrid Flow Shop Scheduling Problem Followed by an Assembly Stage Considering Aging Effects and Preventive Maintenance Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Hassan Hosseini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling problem for the hybrid flow shop scheduling problem (HFSP followed by an assembly stage considering aging effects additional preventive and maintenance activities is studied in this paper. In this production system, a number of products of different kinds are produced. Each product is assembled with a set of several parts. The first stage is a hybrid flow shop to produce parts. All machines can process all kinds of parts in this stage but each machine can process only one part at the same time. The second stage is a single assembly machine or a single assembly team of workers. The aim is to schedule the parts on the machines and assembly sequence and also determine when the preventive maintenance activities get done in order to minimize the completion time of all products (makespan. A mathematical modeling is presented and its validation is shown by solving an example in small scale. Since this problem has been proved strongly NP-hard, in order to solve the problem in medium and large scale, four heuristic algorithms is proposed based on the Johnson’s algorithm. The numerical experiments are used to run the mathematical model and evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithms.

  18. Phase behaviour of self-assembled monolayers controlled by tuning physisorbed and chemisorbed states: A lattice-model view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Sara; Cheung, David L; Johnston, Karen

    2016-04-07

    The self-assembly of molecules on surfaces into 2D structures is important for the bottom-up fabrication of functional nanomaterials, and the self-assembled structure depends on the interplay between molecule-molecule interactions and molecule-surface interactions. Halogenated benzene derivatives on platinum have been shown to have two distinct adsorption states: a physisorbed state and a chemisorbed state, and the interplay between the two can be expected to have a profound effect on the self-assembly and phase behaviour of these systems. We developed a lattice model that explicitly includes both adsorption states, with representative interactions parameterised using density functional theory calculations. This model was used in Monte Carlo simulations to investigate pattern formation of hexahalogenated benzene molecules on the platinum surface. Molecules that prefer the physisorbed state were found to self-assemble with ease, depending on the interactions between physisorbed molecules. In contrast, molecules that preferentially chemisorb tend to get arrested in disordered phases. However, changing the interactions between chemisorbed and physisorbed molecules affects the phase behaviour. We propose functionalising molecules in order to tune their adsorption states, as an innovative way to control monolayer structure, leading to a promising avenue for directed assembly of novel 2D structures.

  19. Superfluid analogies of cosmological phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Volovik, G E

    2001-01-01

    Superfluid 3He-A gives example of how chirality, Weyl fermions, gauge fields and gravity appear in low emergy corner together with corresponding symmetries, including Lorentz symmetry and local SU(N). This supports idea that quantum field theory (Standard Model or GUT) is effective theory describing low-energy phenomena. * Momentum space topology of fermionic vacuum provides topological stability of universality class of systems, where above properties appear. * BCS scheme for 3He-A incorporates both ``relativistic'' infrared regime and ultraviolet ``transplanckian'' range: subtle issues of cut-off in quantum field theory and anomalies can be resolved on physical grounds. This allows to separate ``renormalizable'' terms in action, treated by effective theory, from those obtained only in ``transPlanckian'' physics. * Energy density of superfluid vacuum within effective theory is ~ E_{Planck}^4. Stability analysis of ground state beyond effective theory leads to exact nullification of vacuum energy: equilibrium...

  20. Class of cooperative stochastic models: Exact and approximate solutions, simulations, and experiments using ionic self-assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazilu, I.; Mazilu, D. A.; Melkerson, R. E.; Hall-Mejia, E.; Beck, G. J.; Nshimyumukiza, S.; da Fonseca, Carlos M.

    2016-03-01

    We present exact and approximate results for a class of cooperative sequential adsorption models using matrix theory, mean-field theory, and computer simulations. We validate our models with two customized experiments using ionically self-assembled nanoparticles on glass slides. We also address the limitations of our models and their range of applicability. The exact results obtained using matrix theory can be applied to a variety of two-state systems with cooperative effects.

  1. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA-booster subcritical assembly part 1: analytical models and main neutronics parameters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-09-11

    This study was carried out to model and analyze the YALINA-Booster facility, of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus, with the long term objective of advancing the utilization of accelerator driven systems for the incineration of nuclear waste. The YALINA-Booster facility is a subcritical assembly, driven by an external neutron source, which has been constructed to study the neutron physics and to develop and refine methodologies to control the operation of accelerator driven systems. The external neutron source consists of Californium-252 spontaneous fission neutrons, 2.45 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium reactions, or 14.1 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Tritium reactions. In the latter two cases a deuteron beam is used to generate the neutrons. This study is a part of the collaborative activity between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus. In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a coordinated research project benchmarking and comparing the results of different numerical codes with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility and ANL has a leading role coordinating the IAEA activity. The YALINA-Booster facility has been modeled according to the benchmark specifications defined for the IAEA activity without any geometrical homogenization using the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCNP/MCNPX/MCB. The MONK model perfectly matches the MCNP one. The computational analyses have been extended through the MCB code, which is an extension of the MCNP code with burnup capability because of its additional feature for analyzing source driven multiplying assemblies. The main neutronics parameters of the YALINA-Booster facility were calculated using these computer codes with different nuclear data libraries based on ENDF/B-VI-0, -6, JEF-2.2, and JEF-3.1.

  2. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  3. The evidences of progressive pressurization of volcanic conduit as driving forces of unrest phenomena analyzed via modelling of multiplatform geodetic measurements: Fernandina (GALAPAGOS) and Maunaloa (HAWAII) case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; Casu, Francesco; D'Auria, Luca; De Luca, Claudio; De Novellis, Vincenzo; Solaro, Giuseppe; Tizzani, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the source of the ground deformation pattern affecting the Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Fernandina (Galapagos) volcanoes by jointly exploiting different dataset collected by both GPS and multiplatform and multiorbit SAR sensors. We exploited the advanced Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques to analyze unrest episode in two different geodynamics context. Our main goal is the understanding of the relationship among the spatio-temporal evolution of the ground deformation field and the temporal volumetric variation of the detected geodetic source during the uplift phenomena. We highlight the huge opportunity in understanding volcano unrest phenomena offered by the joint use of remote sensing data and inversion procedures: this prospect is particularly relevant for the analysis of uplift events, when other geophysical measurements are not available. For Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Fernandina (Galapagos) volcanoes, the performed statistic analysis support the source pipe-like as the more suitable geometry to explain the unrest phenomena in which magmatic masses intrude in volcanic conduits. In particular, the deformation time series achieved at MounaLoa volcano are achieved by 23 GPS permanent stations of the Hawaii surveillance network, processed by Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, 7 SAR dataset acquired from ascending and descending orbits, with different look angles and along different tracks, by the C-Band Envisat satellite along the 2003 - 2010 time period for a total of 189 SAR imagery. Moreover, we exploited 2 dataset collected from ascending and descending passes by the X-Band Cosmo Sky-Med constellation during the 2012 - 2015 time span . These SAR datasets have been processed through the advanced DInSAR technique referred to as P-SBAS (De Luca et al., 2016), which allows us to retrieve the Line of Sight (LOS) projection of the surface deformation and analyze its temporal evolution by generating displacement time series. Starting this data

  4. The Assembly and Merging History of Supermassive Black Holes in Hierarchical Models of Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, M; Madau, A F P; Volonteri, Marta; Haardt, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    We assess models for the assembly of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of galaxies that trace their hierarchical build-up far up in the dark halo `merger tree'. We assume that the first `seed' black holes (BHs) formed in (mini)halos collapsing at z=20 from high-sigma density fluctuations. As these pregalactic holes become incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, they sink to the center owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become supermassive, form a binary system, and eventually coalesce. The merger history of dark matter halos and associated BHs is followed by cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy. A simple model, where quasar activity is driven by major mergers and SMBHs accrete at the Eddington rate a mass that scales with the fifth power of the velocity dispersion, is shown to reproduce the optical LF of quasars in the redshift range 1

  5. Polymerization of immunoglobulin domains: A model system for the development of facilitated macromolecular assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.

    1991-12-31

    We have recently determined that monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (Bence Jones proteins) are capable of reversible polymerization at room temperature. This property, as exhibited by immunoglobulin light chains (normally a component of an intact antibody molecule), may have novel implications for the development of ``molecular nanotechnology.`` The polymerization capability of the immunoglobulin light chain is associated with the so-called variable domain of this molecule. The variable domain is a durable, compact beta-sheet structure of molecular weight approximately 12,000. Most of the primary sequence variation is limited to one portion of the molecule, that portion associated with the contribution of immunoglobulin light chains to the recognition and binding of thousand of different antigens by antibodies. As a consequence of these variations, different light chains polymerize with different degrees of avidity, from negligible to extensive. The polymerization process depends on solution parameters such as Ph. Thus, polymerization might be induced at one pH and suppressed or reversed at another. Combinations of molecules of appropriate specificities could assemble into structures of predetermined three-dimensional forms and properties. These features suggest that Bence Jones proteins represent a powerful model system within which to develop empirical rules relevant to a technology of protein-based ``construction``. Development of these rules will require the combined efforts of biophysical and crystallographic studies, protein engineering, and molecular modeling. 53 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Polymerization of immunoglobulin domains: A model system for the development of facilitated macromolecular assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    We have recently determined that monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (Bence Jones proteins) are capable of reversible polymerization at room temperature. This property, as exhibited by immunoglobulin light chains (normally a component of an intact antibody molecule), may have novel implications for the development of molecular nanotechnology.'' The polymerization capability of the immunoglobulin light chain is associated with the so-called variable domain of this molecule. The variable domain is a durable, compact beta-sheet structure of molecular weight approximately 12,000. Most of the primary sequence variation is limited to one portion of the molecule, that portion associated with the contribution of immunoglobulin light chains to the recognition and binding of thousand of different antigens by antibodies. As a consequence of these variations, different light chains polymerize with different degrees of avidity, from negligible to extensive. The polymerization process depends on solution parameters such as Ph. Thus, polymerization might be induced at one pH and suppressed or reversed at another. Combinations of molecules of appropriate specificities could assemble into structures of predetermined three-dimensional forms and properties. These features suggest that Bence Jones proteins represent a powerful model system within which to develop empirical rules relevant to a technology of protein-based construction''. Development of these rules will require the combined efforts of biophysical and crystallographic studies, protein engineering, and molecular modeling. 53 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Error modeling, sensitivity analysis and assembly process of a class of 3-DOF parallel kinematic machines with parallelogram struts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an error modeling methodology that enables the tolerance design, assembly and kinematic calibration of a class of 3-DOF parallel kinematic machines with parallelogram struts to be integrated into a unified framework. The error mapping function is formulated to identify the source errors affecting the uncompensable pose error. The sensitivity analysis in the sense of statistics is also carried out to investigate the influences of source errors on the pose accuracy. An assembly process that can effectively minimize the uncompensable pose error is proposed as one of the results of this investigation.

  8. Performance evaluation of ant colony optimization-based solution strategies on the mixed-model assembly line balancing problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Sener; Mirac Bayhan, G.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to compare the performances of iterative ant colony optimization (ACO)-based solution strategies on a mixed-model assembly line balancing problem of type II (MMALBP-II) by addressing some particular features of real-world assembly line balancing problems such as parallel workstations and zoning constraints. To solve the problem, where the objective is to minimize the cycle time (i.e. maximize the production rate) for a predefined number of workstations in an existing assembly line, two ACO-based approaches which differ in the mission assigned to artificial ants are used. Furthermore, each ACO-based approach is conducted with two different pheromone release strategies: global and local pheromone updating rules. The four ACO-based approaches are used for solving 20 representative MMALBP-II to compare their performance in terms of computational time and solution quality. Detailed comparison results are presented.

  9. Modeling and Finite Element Analysis of Load-Carrying Performance of a Wind Turbine Considering the Influence of Assembly Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a wind turbine shrink disk is used as the research object to investigate load-carrying performance of a multi-layer interference fit, and the theoretical model and finite element model are constructed. According to those models, a MW-level turbine shrink disk is designed, and a test device is developed to apply torque to this turbine shrink disk by hydraulic jack. Then, the circumferential slip between the contact surfaces is monitored and the slip of all contact surfaces is zero. This conclusion verifies the reasonability of the proposed models. The effect of the key influencing factors, such as machining deviation, assembly clearance and propel stroke, were analyzed. The contact pressure and load torque of the mating surfaces were obtained by building typical models with different parameters using finite element analysis (FEA. The results show that the minimum assembly clearance and the machining deviation within the machining range have little influence on load-carrying performance of multi-layer interference fit, while having a greater influence on the maximum assembly clearance and the propel stroke. The results also show that the load-carrying performance of a multiple-layer interference fit can be ensured only if the key factors are set within a reasonable design range. To avoid the abnormal operation of equipment caused by insufficient load torque, the propel stroke during practical assembly should be at least 0.95 times the designed propel stroke, which is significant in guiding the design and assembly of the multi-layer interference fit.

  10. A software tool to model genetic regulatory networks. Applications to the modeling of threshold phenomena and of spatial patterning in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Dilão

    Full Text Available We present a general methodology in order to build mathematical models of genetic regulatory networks. This approach is based on the mass action law and on the Jacob and Monod operon model. The mathematical models are built symbolically by the Mathematica software package GeneticNetworks. This package accepts as input the interaction graphs of the transcriptional activators and repressors of a biological process and, as output, gives the mathematical model in the form of a system of ordinary differential equations. All the relevant biological parameters are chosen automatically by the software. Within this framework, we show that concentration dependent threshold effects in biology emerge from the catalytic properties of genes and its associated conservation laws. We apply this methodology to the segment patterning in Drosophila early development and we calibrate the genetic transcriptional network responsible for the patterning of the gap gene proteins Hunchback and Knirps, along the antero-posterior axis of the Drosophila embryo. In this approach, the zygotically produced proteins Hunchback and Knirps do not diffuse along the antero-posterior axis of the embryo of Drosophila, developing a spatial pattern due to concentration dependent thresholds. This shows that patterning at the gap genes stage can be explained by the concentration gradients along the embryo of the transcriptional regulators.

  11. Coastal Meteorological Phenomena in CalNex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, W. M.; Brioude, J.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal meteorology plays an important role in air quality and climate in California. During the 2010 CalNex experiment, several phenomena affected the campaign observations. Among these were coastal eddies and outflow in Santa Monica Bay and the Los Angeles Bight; marine stratus and stratocumulus; and the land-sea breeze cycle on a variety of spatial scales, including transport from the San Francisco Bay Area into the Central Valley. In this presentation, we will describe these phenomena as they were seen in model forecasts and hindcast simulations, and compare those simulations to the relevant meteorological observations.

  12. Anomalous Light Phenomena vs. Bioelectric Brain Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    We present a research proposal concerning the instrumented investigation of anomalous light phenomena that are apparently correlated with particular mind states, such as prayer, meditation or psi. Previous research by these authors demonstrate that such light phenomena can be monitored and measured quite efficiently in areas of the world where they are reported in a recurrent way. Instruments such as optical equipment for photography and spectroscopy, VLF spectrometers, magnetometers, radar and IR viewers were deployed and used massively in several areas of the world. Results allowed us to develop physical models concerning the structural and time-variable behaviour of light phenomena, and their kinematics. Recent insights and witnesses have suggested to us that a sort of "synchronous connection" seems to exist between plasma-like phenomena and particular mind states of experiencers who seem to trigger a light manifestation which is very similar to the one previously investigated. The main goal of these authors is now aimed at the search for a concrete "entanglement-like effect" between the experiencer's mind and the light phenomena, in such a way that both aspects are intended to be monitored and measured simultaneously using appropriate instrumentation. The goal of this research project is twofold: a) to verify quantitatively the existence of one very particular kind of mind-matter interaction and to study in real time its physical and biophysical manifestations; b) to repeat the same kind of experiment using the same test-subject in different locations and under various conditions of geomagnetic activity.

  13. Impaired activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and refinement in autism spectrum disorder genetic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Andrew Doll

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-use activity during circuit-specific critical periods refines brain circuitry by the coupled processes of eliminating inappropriate synapses and strengthening maintained synapses. We theorize these activity-dependent developmental processes are specifically impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. ASD genetic models in both mouse and Drosophila have pioneered our insights into normal activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and consolidation, and how these developmental mechanisms go awry in specific genetic conditions. The monogenic Fragile X syndrome (FXS, a common cause of heritable ASD and intellectual disability, has been particularly well linked to defects in activity-dependent critical period processes. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP is positively activity-regulated in expression and function, in turn regulates excitability and activity in a negative feedback loop, and appears to be required for the activity-dependent remodeling of synaptic connectivity during early-use critical periods. The Drosophila FXS model has been shown to functionally conserve the roles of human FMRP in synaptogenesis, and has been centrally important in generating our current mechanistic understanding of the FXS disease state. Recent advances in Drosophila optogenetics, transgenic calcium reporters, highly-targeted transgenic drivers for individually-identified neurons, and a vastly improved connectome of the brain are now being combined to provide unparalleled opportunities to both manipulate and monitor activity-dependent processes during critical period brain development in defined neural circuits. The field is now poised to exploit this new Drosophila transgenic toolbox for the systematic dissection of activity-dependent mechanisms in normal versus ASD brain development, particularly utilizing the well-established Drosophila FXS disease model.

  14. Stability and Restoration phenomena in Competitive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Uechi, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A conservation law and stability, recovering phenomena and characteristic patterns of a nonlinear dynamical system have been studied and applied to biological and ecological systems. In our previous study, we proposed a system of symmetric 2n-dimensional conserved nonlinear differential equations with external perturbations. In this paper, competitive systems described by 2-dimensional nonlinear dynamical (ND) model with external perturbations are applied to population cycles and recovering phenomena of systems from microbes to mammals. The famous 10-year cycle of population density of Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare is numerically analyzed. We find that a nonlinear dynamical system with a conservation law is stable and generates a characteristic rhythm (cycle) of population density, which we call the {\\it standard rhythm} of a nonlinear dynamical system. The stability and restoration phenomena are strongly related to a conservation law and balance of a system. The {\\it standard rhythm} of population density ...

  15. Performance Evaluation of O-Ring Seals in Model 9975 Packaging Assemblies (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, Eric

    1998-12-28

    The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed a review of existing literature and data regarding the useable service life of Viton{reg_sign} GLT fluoroelastomer O-rings currently used in the Model 9975 packaging assemblies. Although the shipping and transportation period is normally limited to 2 years, it is anticipated that these packages will be used for longer-term storage of Pu-bearing materials in KAMS (K-Area Materials Storage) prior to processing or disposition in the APSF (Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility). Based on the service conditions and review of available literature, Materials Consultation concludes that there is sufficient existing data to establish the technical basis for storage of Pu-bearing materials using Parker Seals O-ring compound V835-75 (or equivalent) for up to 10 years following the 2-year shipping period. Although significant physical deterioration of the O-rings and release of product is not expected, definite changes in physical properties will occur. However, due to the complex relationship between elastomer formulation, seal properties, and competing degradation mechanisms, the actual degree of property variation and impact upon seal performance is difficult to predict. Therefore, accelerated aging and/or surveillance programs are recommended to validate the assumptions outlined in this report and to assess the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions. Such programs could provide a unique opportunity to develop nonexistent long-term performance data, as well as address storage extension issues if necessary.

  16. Design of amphiphilic oligopeptides as models for fine tuning peptide assembly with plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha N; Gupta, Pardeep K

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the design of novel amphiphilic oligopeptides with hydrophobic and cationic amino acids to serve as models to understand peptide-DNA assembly. Biophysical and thermodynamic characterization of interaction of these amphiphilic peptides with plasmid DNA is presented. Peptides with at least +4 charges favor stable complex formation. Surface potential is dependent on the type of hydrophobic amino acid for a certain charge. Thermodynamically it is a spontaneous interaction between most of the peptides and plasmid DNA. Lys(7) and Tyr peptides with +4/+5 charges indicate cooperative binding with pDNA without saturation of interaction while Val(2)-Gly-Lys(4), Val-Gly-Lys(5), and Phe-Gly-Lys(5) lead to saturation of interaction indicating condensed pDNA within the range of N/Ps studied. We show that the biophysical properties of DNA-peptide complexes could be modulated by design and the peptides presented here could be used as building blocks for creating DNA-peptide complexes for various biomedical applications, mainly nucleic acid delivery.

  17. Remote sensing of natural phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag D. Regodić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There has always been a need to directly perceive and study the events whose extent is beyond people's possibilities. In order to get new data and to make observations and studying much more objective in comparison with past syntheses - a new method of examination called remote sensing has been adopted. The paper deals with the principles and elements of remote sensing, as well as with the basic aspects of using remote research in examining meteorological (weather parameters and the conditions of the atmosphere. The usage of satellite images is possible in all phases of the global and systematic research of different natural phenomena when airplane and satellite images of different characteristics are used and their analysis and interpretation is carried out by viewing and computer added procedures. Introduction Remote sensing of the Earth enables observing and studying global and local events that occur on it. Satellite images are nowadays used in geology, agriculture, forestry, geodesy, meteorology, spatial and urbanism planning, designing of infrastructure and other objects, protection from natural and technological catastrophes, etc. It it possible to use satellite images in all phases of global and systematic research of different natural phenomena. Basics of remote sensing Remote sensing is a method of the acquisition and interpretation of information about remote objects without making a physical contact with them. The term Daljinska detekcija is a literal translation of the English term Remote Sensing. In French it isTeledetection, in German - Fernerkundung, in Russian - дистанционие иследования. We also use terms such as: remote survailance, remote research, teledetection, remote methods, and distance research. The basic elements included in Remote Sensing are: object, electromagnetic energy, sensor, platform, image, analysis, interpretation and the information (data, fact. Usage of satellite remote research in

  18. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  19. Clay Generic Disposal System Model - Sensitivity Analysis for 32 PWR Assembly Canisters (+2 associated model files).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Edgar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), as part of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy’s (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology program (FCT) is investigating the disposal of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuela (SNF) in a variety of geologic media. The feasibility of disposing SNF and HLW in clay media has been investigated and has been shown to be promising [Ref. 1]. In addition the disposal of these wastes in clay media is being investigated in Belgium, France, and Switzerland. Thus, Argillaceous media is one of the environments being considered by UFDC. As identified by researchers at Sandia National Laboratory, potentially suitable formations that may exist in the U.S. include mudstone, clay, shale, and argillite formations [Ref. 1]. These formations encompass a broad range of material properties. In this report, reference to clay media is intended to cover the full range of material properties. This report presents the status of the development of a simulation model for evaluating the performance of generic clay media. The clay Generic Disposal System Model (GDSM) repository performance simulation tool has been developed with the flexibility to evaluate not only different properties, but different waste streams/forms and different repository designs and engineered barrier configurations/ materials that could be used to dispose of these wastes.

  20. Structural and Magnetic model of self-assembled FePt nanoparticle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, T

    2004-05-13

    Chemically ordered, self-assembled FePt nanoparticle arrays with high magnetic anisotropy are considered a candidate medium for data storage beyond 1 Tbit/in{sup 2}. We report comprehensive structural and magnetic studies on thin (3 layer) assemblies of polyethylenimine (PEI) and 4 nm Fe{sub 58}Pt{sub 42} nanoparticles using X-ray diffraction, small angle neutron scattering and magnetometry. We show that prior to annealing FePt nanoparticles in the PEI-FePt assembly consist of a metallic, magnetic core surrounded by a weakly magnetic or non-magnetic shell. High temperature annealing creates the desired L1{sub 0} chemical ordering and results in high coercivity FePt nanoparticles. However, we find that the high temperatures necessary to establish full chemical ordering leads to particle sintering and agglomeration. Understanding the magnetic and physical properties of these assemblies allows future research directions to be clarified for nanoparticle arrays as data storage media.

  1. 3-D FDTD Maxwell's-Equations Modeling of Sub-30 kHz Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in the Earth-Ionosphere Waveguide including Ionospheric Plasma Phenomena as Influenced by the Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. J.; Taflove, A.

    2006-12-01

    We report a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computational solution of Maxwell's equations for sub-30 kHz electromagnetic (EM) propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The FDTD technique used in this study enables a direct, full-vector, three-dimensional (3-D) time-domain calculation of EM propagation accounting for arbitrary horizontal as well as vertical geometrical and electrical inhomogeneities and anisotropies of the excitation, ionosphere, lithosphere, and oceans. This is unlike previous FDTD models which assumed azimuthal symmetry about a vertical current source excitation representing a lightning channel. Our model is therefore unique in that it includes fully 3-D anisotropic plasma phenomena in the ionosphere as influenced by the full-vector geomagnetic field. In this study, we show results for EM propagation from lightning strikes using a spherical-coordinate (latitude- longitude) grid having a 1 x 1 x 1 km resolution. Our new model provides additional capabilities to simulate EM wave phenomena arising from whistlers and other lightning-related events, as well as for better understanding anomalous ionospheric phenomena reported to have occurred prior to and during major earthquakes.

  2. Oral insulin delivery by self-assembled chitosan nanoparticles: In vitro and in vivo studies in diabetic animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Sarkar, Kishor [Department of Polymer Science and Technology, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata-700009, University of Calcutta (India); Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Mishra, Roshnara [Department of Physiology, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata-700009, University of Calcutta (India); Kundu, P.P., E-mail: ppk923@yahoo.com [Department of Polymer Science and Technology, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata-700009, University of Calcutta (India)

    2013-01-01

    We have developed self-assembled chitosan/insulin nanoparticles for successful oral insulin delivery. The main purpose of our study is to prepare chitosan/insulin nanoparticles by self-assembly method, to characterize them and to evaluate their efficiency in vivo diabetic model. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average particle size ranged from 200 to 550 nm, with almost spherical or sub spherical shape. An average insulin encapsulation within the nanoparticles was {approx} 85%. In vitro release study showed that the nanoparticles were also efficient in retaining good amount of insulin in simulated gastric condition, while significant amount of insulin release was noticed in simulated intestinal condition. The oral administrations of chitosan/insulin nanoparticles were effective in lowering the blood glucose level of alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Thus, self-assembled chitosan/insulin nanoparticles show promising effects as potential insulin carrier system in animal models. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Self-assembled chitosan/insulin nanoparticle preparation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost spherical or sub-spherical nanoparticles observed under microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good insulin encapsulation of the nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles reduced blood glucose level significantly in diabetic mice.

  3. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  4. The Multiproduct Parallel Assembly Lines Balancing Problem: Model and Optimization Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Armin Scholl; Nils Boysen

    2008-01-01

    A production system which consists of a number of parallel assembly lines is considered. On each line a certain product is manufactured observing a common cycle time. By arranging the lines in a favourable manner, it is possible to increase efficiency of the production system by combining stations of neighbouring lines when balancing them. The objective is to minimize the number of operators required. This problem is called Multiproduct Parallel Assembly Lines Balancing Problem (MPALBP) and h...

  5. Assembly of a three-dimensional multitype bronchiole coculture model using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Raphael, Robert M; Moore, Robert H; Killian, Thomas C; Grande-Allen, K Jane; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-09-01

    A longstanding goal in biomedical research has been to create organotypic cocultures that faithfully represent native tissue environments. There is presently great interest in representative culture models of the lung, which is a particularly challenging tissue to recreate in vitro. This study used magnetic levitation in conjunction with magnetic nanoparticles as a means of creating an organized three-dimensional (3D) coculture of the bronchiole that sequentially layers cells in a manner similar to native tissue architecture. The 3D coculture model was assembled from four human cell types in the bronchiole: endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), fibroblasts, and epithelial cells (EpiCs). This study represents the first effort to combine these particular cell types into an organized bronchiole coculture. These cell layers were first cultured in 3D by magnetic levitation, and then manipulated into contact with a custom-made magnetic pen, and again cultured for 48 h. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of the resulting coculture showed four distinct layers within the 3D coculture. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the phenotype of each of the four cell types and showed organized extracellular matrix formation, particularly, with collagen type I. Positive stains for CD31, von Willebrand factor, smooth muscle α-actin, vimentin, and fibronectin demonstrate the maintenance of the phenotype for endothelial cells, SMCs, and fibroblasts. Positive stains for mucin-5AC, cytokeratin, and E-cadherin after 7 days with and without 1% fetal bovine serum showed that EpiCs maintained the phenotype and function. This study validates magnetic levitation as a method for the rapid creation of organized 3D cocultures that maintain the phenotype and induce extracellular matrix formation.

  6. On the Use of Self-Assembling Block Copolymers to Toughen A Model Epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yilin

    Block copolymers have been receiving considerable attention in toughening epoxy due to their ability to form a wide variety of nanostructures. This study focuses on using both triblock and diblock copolymers to improve the fracture toughness of an aromatic-amine cured epoxy system. The curing system consisted of 1,3- phenylenediamine (mPDA) as curing agent and aniline as a chain extender. Three triblock copolymers and three diblock copolymers were incorporated in the same lightly crosslinked model epoxy system, which was chosen to mimic an underfill material in flip-chip packaging for the microelectronics industry. In this research, rubber particles were formed in situ using self-assembling block copolymers. Mechanical, thermal and microscopic studies were conducted with the main goal to study the relationship between the block parameters and the final morphologies and their effects on static and dynamic mechanical properties of the toughened resin, especially fracture toughness. In these block-copolymer-modified epoxies, spherical micelles and wormlike micelles were obtained by varying block lengths, molecular weight, polarities and compositions. It was found that miscibility of the epoxy-miscible block played a crucial role in the formation of different types of morphologies. At a low loading level, diblock copolymers were able to toughen the model epoxy as effectively as triblock copolymers. The fracture toughness was improved to almost three times with respect to that of the neat resin with addition of 10 phr AM*-27. At the same time, other mechanical properties, such as yield strength and modulus, were well retained. Incorporation of block copolymers did not have a significant effect on glass transition temperature but caused an increase in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the modified epoxy. Particle cavitation and matrix void growth were proved to be the toughening mechanisms for SBM-Modified epoxies. However, these typical toughening mechanisms for

  7. Probabilistic Dynamic Logic of Phenomena and Cognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vityaev, Evgenii; Perlovsky, Leonid; Smerdov, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop further the main concepts of Phenomena Dynamic Logic (P-DL) and Cognitive Dynamic Logic (C-DL), presented in the previous paper. The specific character of these logics is in matching vagueness or fuzziness of similarity measures to the uncertainty of models. These logics are based on the following fundamental notions: generality relation, uncertainty relation, simplicity relation, similarity maximization problem with empirical content and enhancement (learning) operator. We develop these notions in terms of logic and probability and developed a Probabilistic Dynamic Logic of Phenomena and Cognition (P-DL-PC) that relates to the scope of probabilistic models of brain. In our research the effectiveness of suggested formalization is demonstrated by approximation of the expert model of breast cancer diagnostic decisions. The P-DL-PC logic was previously successfully applied to solving many practical tasks and also for modelling of some cognitive processes.

  8. Weir instability experiments in 1/4 reactor assembly model of PFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirumalai, M.; Gupta, P.K.; Anandaraj, M.; Prakash, V.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603102 (India)

    2005-07-01

    The construction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), a 500 MWe liquid sodium cooled reactor, has commenced at Kalpakkam in India. The main vessel of this pool type reactor acts as the primary containment in the reactor assembly. In order to keep the main vessel temperature below creep range and to reduce high temperature embrittlement, a small fraction of core flow (0.5 m3/s) is sent through an annular space formed between the main vessel and a cylindrical baffle (primary thermal baffle) to cool the vessel. The sodium after cooling the main vessel overflows the primary baffle (weir shell) and falls into another concentric pool of sodium separated from the cold pool by the secondary thermal baffle and then returns to the cold pool. These baffles, which are thin concentric shells, are prone to flow induced vibrations due to instability caused by sloshing and fluid-structure interaction. A similar vibration phenomenon was first observed during the commissioning of Super-Phenix reactor, which had got a similar main vessel cooling arrangement. In order to understand the phenomenon and also to provide necessary experimental back up to validate the analytical codes, weir instability experiments were conducted on a 1/4 scale stainless steel model installed in a water test loop. The experiments were conducted with flow rate and fall height as the varying parameters. The primary and secondary baffles in the model were instrumented with accelerometers and strain gages in circumferential and longitudinal directions at different locations to measure the vibration. At each fall height, the strain gage and accelerometer output signals were acquired and analyzed using an multichannel FFT analyzer. The baffle system became unstable under certain combinations of flow rate and fall height. From the analysis of shell vibration time plots, probability density functions, and spectra, the results showed that the instability of the weir shell was caused due to fluid structure

  9. Advanced diffusion processes and phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; Belova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    This topical volume on Advanced Diffusion Processes and Phenomena addresses diffusion in a wider sense of not only mass diffusion but also heat diffusion in fluids and solids. Both diffusion phenomena play an important role in the characterization of engineering materials and corresponding structures. Understanding these different transport phenomena at many levels, from atomistic to macro, has therefore long attracted the attention of many researchers in materials science and engineering and related disciplines. The present topical volume captures a representative cross-section of some of the

  10. Modifying self-assembly and species separation in three-dimensional systems of shape-anisotropic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windows-Yule, Kit; Scheper, B.J.; den Otter, Wouter K.; Parker, D.J.; Thornton, Anthony Richard

    2016-01-01

    The behaviors of large, dynamic assemblies of macroscopic particles are of direct relevance to geophysical and industrial processes and may also be used as easily studied analogs to micro- or nano-scale systems, or model systems for microbiological, zoological, and even anthropological phenomena. We

  11. NMR derived model of GTPase effector domain (GED self association: relevance to dynamin assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Self-association of dynamin to form spiral structures around lipidic vesicles during endocytosis is largely mediated by its 'coiled coil' GTPase Effector Domain (GED, which, in vitro, self-associates into huge helical assemblies. Residue-level structural characterizations of these assemblies and understanding the process of association have remained a challenge. It is also impossible to get folded monomers in the solution phase. In this context, we have developed here a strategy to probe the self-association of GED by first dissociating the assembly using Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO and then systematically monitoring the refolding into helix and concomitant re-association using NMR spectroscopy, as DMSO concentration is progressively reduced. The short segment, Arg109 - Met116, acts as the nucleation site for helix formation and self-association. Hydrophobic and complementary charge interactions on the surfaces drive self-association, as the helices elongate in both the directions resulting in an antiparallel stack. A small N-terminal segment remains floppy in the assembly. Following these and other published results on inter-domain interactions, we have proposed a plausible mode of dynamin self assembly.

  12. Nonlinear phenomena in wave-body interaction: description and theoretical modeling; Les effets non-lineaires en interaction houle-structure et leur modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molin, B. [Ecole Generaliste d' Ingenieurs de Marseille, 13 (France)

    2006-03-15

    At first approximation, the study of wave interaction with fixed or floating bodies is carried out within a linear frame. However nonlinear effects are numerous and they have diverse origins: mechanical nonlinearities, variation in time of the wetted part of the hull, viscous phenomena (flow separation), nonlinear free surface equations. We focus here on the latter type of nonlinearities. Two different approaches are described, both being based on potential flow theory. Practical applications are given for two basic geometries: a vertical cylinder and a vertical plate, perpendicular to the wave direction. In the first approach, one proceeds through successive approximations, based on a perturbation series development. The first-order of approximation coincides with the linear theory. The main interest of the second-order of approximation, well mastered nowadays, is that it yields excitation loads in an enlarged frequency domain, encompassing most of the natural frequencies of the system considered. At third-order the complexity of the equations becomes dissuasive and few researchers have ventured there. We suggest that third-order (or tertiary) interactions, between incoming waves and reflected waves by the structure, can play a very important role, overlooked so far, in phenomena such as run-up or green water. In the second approach one integrates in time and space the nonlinear equations of the initial boundary value problem, with the free surface equations being exactly satisfied. In this way one obtains numerical equivalents of the physical wave-tanks. They are briefly described and some illustrative results are given. (authors)

  13. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  14. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components. Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbinden, M.; Durbec, V.

    1996-12-01

    A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which corresponds to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work. (author). 34 refs.

  15. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, R. S.; Lagasse, R. R.; Guess, T. R.; Plazek, D. J.; Bero, C.

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e.g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies.

  16. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, R.S.; Lagasse, R.R.; Guess, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Plazek, D.J.; Bero, C. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1992-12-31

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e. g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component`s protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  17. Assembly of PRR-containing receptors on scaffolds: a model for imidazoline I(1)-receptor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, I F; Dehle, F C; Piletz, J

    2003-12-01

    IRAS, a putative clone of the I(1)-imidazoline receptor, possesses a proline-rich region (PRR) motif, which might interact with SH3 regions on tyrosine kinases, and an integrin-binding motif. Receptors with a PRR motif can generally assemble onto multi-element signaling complexes (eg., the beta(3)-receptor on the EGF receptor) and thereby modulate signal transduction. Integrins serve as scaffolds for multi-element signaling complexes, similar to that assembled with the EGF receptor. It is therefore possible that IRAS signals through a complex with other receptors.

  18. Phototrophic biofilm assembly in microbial-mat-derived unicyanobacterial consortia: model systems for the study of autotroph-heterotroph interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Cole

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, but the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ manipulation make it challenging to elucidate the principles governing these interactions. The study of assembling phototrophic biofilm communities provides a robust means to identify such interactions and evaluate their contributions to the recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity over time. To examine primary succession in phototrophic communities, we isolated two unicyanobacterial consortia from the microbial mat in Hot Lake, Washington, characterizing the membership and metabolic function of each consortium. We then analyzed the spatial structures and quantified the community compositions of their assembling biofilms. The consortia retained the same suite of heterotrophic species, identified as abundant members of the mat and assigned to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Autotroph growth rates dominated early in assembly, yielding to increasing heterotroph growth rates late in succession. The two consortia exhibited similar assembly patterns, with increasing relative abundances of members from Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria concurrent with decreasing relative abundances of those from Gammaproteobacteria. Despite these similarities at higher taxonomic levels, the relative abundances of individual heterotrophic species were substantially different in the developing consortial biofilms. This suggests that, although similar niches are created by the cyanobacterial metabolisms, the resulting webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions are specific to each primary producer. The relative simplicity and tractability of the Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia make them useful model systems for deciphering interspecies interactions and assembly principles relevant to natural

  19. Sequence dependence of kinetics and morphology of collagen model peptide self-assembly into higher order structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The process of self-assembly of the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 into higher order structure resembles the nucleation-growth mechanism of collagen fibril formation in many features, but the irregular morphology of the self-assembled peptide contrasts with the ordered fibers and networks formed by collagen in vivo. The amino acid sequence in the central region of the (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 peptide was varied and found to affect the kinetics of self-assembly and nature of the higher order structure formed. Single amino acid changes in the central triplet produced irregular higher order structures similar to (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, but the rate of self-association was markedly delayed by a single change in one Pro to Ala or Leu. The introduction of a Hyp-rich hydrophobic sequence from type IV collagen resulted in a more regular suprastructure of extended fibers that sometimes showed supercoiling and branching features similar to those seen for type IV collagen in the basement membrane network. Several peptides, where central Pro-Hyp sequences were replaced by charged residues or a nine-residue hydrophobic region from type III collagen, lost the ability to self-associate under standard conditions. The inability to self-assemble likely results from loss of imino acids, and lack of an appropriate distribution of hydrophobic/electrostatic residues. The effect of replacement of a single Gly residue was also examined, as a model for collagen diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta and Alport syndrome. Unexpectedly, the Gly to Ala replacement interfered with self-assembly of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, while the peptide with a Gly to Ser substitution self-associated to form a fibrillar structure. PMID:18441232

  20. Calculations to compare different ways of modelling the plate geometry cells of the Zebra fast critical assembly, MZA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlands, John, E-mail: rowlandsjl@aol.com

    2009-03-15

    The core region cells of the Zebra fast critical assembly MZA comprise 14 plates in a square steel tube, with 12 cells being stacked axially to form the core section of the assembly. The cells can be modelled in different levels of detail, ranging from a three-dimensional representation in which the core (The word core is used to describe both the region of a plate containing the main material, such as plutonium, UO{sub 2} or sodium, and the region of the assembly containing fissile material cells.) and canning regions of the plates and the void gaps between the edges of the plates and the steel tube, and between tubes, are represented. Simplified models include a three-dimensional representation in which the void regions are combined with the tube material. A further simplified three-dimensional model, called the MURAL model, represents the core regions of the plates but homogenises the canning, tube material and void regions. Two types of one-dimensional slab geometry model are found in the literature, one in which the materials are homogenised within each of the three axial slab regions of a canned plate (plate core and upper and lower canning regions) and a further simplified version in which the plate is modelled as a single region, the compositions being averaged over the whole thickness of the plate, comprising the plate core material, the canning and the tube material. MONK Monte Carlo calculations have been made for each of these models, and also for the fully homogenised cells, and the k-effective values, core sodium void reactivities and reaction rate ratios are compared.