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Sample records for modeling arterial partial

  1. Partial Portal Vein Arterialization Attenuates Acute Bile Duct Injury Induced by Hepatic Dearterialization in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Wei, Jishu; Wu, Junli; Gao, Wentao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic infarcts or abscesses occur after hepatic artery interruption. We explored the mechanisms of hepatic deprivation-induced acute liver injury and determine whether partial portal vein arterialization attenuated this injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either complete hepatic arterial deprivation or partial portal vein arterialization, or both. Hepatic ischemia was evaluated using biochemical analysis, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic ATP levels, the expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and the expression of bile transporter genes were assessed. Complete dearterialization of the liver induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by the histological changes, significantly increased serum biochemical markers, decreased ATP content, increased expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and decreased expression of bile transporter genes. These detrimental changes were extenuated but not fully reversed by partial portal vein arterialization, which also attenuated ductular reaction and fibrosis in completely dearterialized rat livers. Collectively, complete hepatic deprivation causes severe liver injury, including bile infarcts and biloma formation. Partial portal vein arterialization seems to protect against acute ischemia-hypoxia-induced liver injury.

  2. Partial Portal Vein Arterialization Attenuates Acute Bile Duct Injury Induced by Hepatic Dearterialization in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic infarcts or abscesses occur after hepatic artery interruption. We explored the mechanisms of hepatic deprivation-induced acute liver injury and determine whether partial portal vein arterialization attenuated this injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either complete hepatic arterial deprivation or partial portal vein arterialization, or both. Hepatic ischemia was evaluated using biochemical analysis, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic ATP levels, the expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and the expression of bile transporter genes were assessed. Complete dearterialization of the liver induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by the histological changes, significantly increased serum biochemical markers, decreased ATP content, increased expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and decreased expression of bile transporter genes. These detrimental changes were extenuated but not fully reversed by partial portal vein arterialization, which also attenuated ductular reaction and fibrosis in completely dearterialized rat livers. Collectively, complete hepatic deprivation causes severe liver injury, including bile infarcts and biloma formation. Partial portal vein arterialization seems to protect against acute ischemia-hypoxia-induced liver injury.

  3. Arterial-alveolar oxygen partial pressure ratio: a theoretical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, J P; Percival, C J; Annat, G; Rousselet, B; Motin, J

    1986-02-01

    The relationship between the arterial-alveolar oxygen partial pressure ratio (PaO2/PAO2) and different fractions of inspired oxygen (FIO2) was studied using a bicompartmental computer model. PaO2/PAO2 was found to be less stable than in previous clinical works probably because the venous admixture varied with changes in the FIO2.

  4. Partial portal arterialization for hepatic arterial thrombosis after living-donor liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hironori; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Tani, Takashi; Makino, Isamu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Onishi, Ichiro; Shimizu, Koichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-06-01

    The most serious, life-threatening complication after living-donor liver transplant is a hepatic arterial thrombosis. Although possible therapies for acute hepatic arterial thrombosis include revascularization to salvage the graft, or retransplant, these may be difficult to perform owing to technical aspects and donor shortages. Previously, we reported the usefulness of partial portal arterialization in such cases. Four cases of partial portal arterialization for hepatic arterial occlusion after living-donor liver transplant were reviewed. The surgical procedure of partial portal arterializations involves making an arteriovenous shunt via a side-to-side anastomosis, using mesenteric vessels approximately 2 mm in diameter. After partial portal arterialization, hepatic arterial flow was not detected, but graft injury owing to hypoxia gradually improved in all cases. In 1 case, occlusion of the arteriovenous shunt itself and the collateral artery to the graft were identified by angiography 45 days after partial portal arterialization. In another case, massive ascites, pleural effusion, and variceal changes of the mesenteric veins owing to portal hypertension were identified, and surgical closure of the shunt was performed 152 days after partial portal arterialization. In the other 2 cases, there were no definite problems related to partial portal arterialization, but the patients died owing to other complications. When hepatic arterial thrombosis occurs after living-donor liver transplant, revascularization should be performed first. However, this sometimes may be difficult, as when the arterial dissection reaches into the graft. Partial portal arterialization is an easy and effective surgical procedure. Therefore, partial portal arterialization appears to be a useful option to gain time until collateral arterial vessels develop or retransplant, even if revascularization cannot be performed.

  5. Partially Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Rissanen, Jorma

    1996-01-01

    Partially Hidden Markov Models (PHMM) are introduced. They differ from the ordinary HMM's in that both the transition probabilities of the hidden states and the output probabilities are conditioned on past observations. As an illustration they are applied to black and white image compression where...

  6. Partially ordered models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, R.; Deveaux, V.

    2010-01-01

    We provide a formal definition and study the basic properties of partially ordered chains (POC). These systems were proposed to model textures in image processing and to represent independence relations between random variables in statistics (in the later case they are known as Bayesian networks).

  7. Partially composite Higgs models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanne, Tommi; Buarque Franzosi, Diogo; Frandsen, Mads T.

    2018-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of partially composite-Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking is dynamically induced, and the Higgs is a mixture of a composite and an elementary state. The models considered have explicit realizations in terms of gauge-Yukawa theories with new strongly...... interacting fermions coupled to elementary scalars and allow for a very SM-like Higgs state. We study constraints on their parameter spaces from vacuum stability and perturbativity as well as from LHC results and find that requiring vacuum stability up to the compositeness scale already imposes relevant...... constraints. A small part of parameter space around the classically conformal limit is stable up to the Planck scale. This is however already strongly disfavored by LHC results. in different limits, the models realize both (partially) composite-Higgs and (bosonic) technicolor models and a dynamical extension...

  8. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    This minimum pressure may fall below the critical level of oxygen partial pressure and affect the retinal function. In order to restore normal retinal function, extreme hyperoxia may assist to make the choroid capable of supplying oxygen to the whole retina during total retinal artery occlusion. Keywords: Mathematical modeling ...

  9. Analysis of Partial Volume Effects on Arterial Input Functions Using Gradient Echo: A Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Birgitte Fuglsang; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Pedersen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    of an AIF voxel including the relaxation properties of blood and tissue. Artery orientations parallel and perpendicular to the main magnetic field were investigated and AIF voxels were modeled to either include or be situated close to a large artery. The impact of partial volume effects on quantitative...... perfusion metrics was investigated for the gradient echo pulse sequence at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. It is shown that the tissue contribution broadens and introduces fluctuations in the AIF. Furthermore, partial volume effects bias perfusion metrics in a nonlinear fashion, compromising quantitative perfusion...

  10. Contrast analysis of the partial splenic artery embolization with splenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wusheng; He Qing; Zheng Zhiyong; Wu Shaoping; Xu Dawei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the effects and the complications of partial splenic artery embolization (PSE) and splenectomy offering a feasible way to choose different therapeutic methods for hypersplenism. Methods: Forty-six patients treated with PSE and thirty-three undergone splenectomy were compared for their effectivenesses and complications in treating hypersplenism. Results: Thrombocyte and leucocyte counts increased markedly after the two kinds of treatment (P 0.05). The complication rate of the PSE was far more than that of the splenectomy (P<0.001). Conclusions Splenectomy is prior to PSE on patients with large mount of ascites, serious portal hypertension and splenomegaly. PSE is suitable for patients with poor liver function, blood coagulation disturbance, liver cancer complicated with hypersplenism and aging. (authors)

  11. Adaptive Partially Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Rasmussen, Tage

    1996-01-01

    Partially Hidden Markov Models (PHMM) have recently been introduced. The transition and emission probabilities are conditioned on the past. In this report, the PHMM is extended with a multiple token version. The different versions of the PHMM are applied to bi-level image coding....

  12. Partially molten magma ocean model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model

  13. Solvency ii. partial internal model

    OpenAIRE

    Baltrėnas, Rokas

    2016-01-01

    Solvency II. Partial Internal Model Solvency is one of the most important characteristics of the insurance company. Sufficient solvency ratio ensures long–term performance of the company and the necessary protection of policyholders. The new solvency assessment framework (Solvency II) came into force across the EU on 1 January 2016. It is based on a variety of risk evaluation modules, so it better reflects the real state of the company’s solvency. Under the Solvency II insurance company’s sol...

  14. Ruptured partially thrombosed anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: two case reports and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Fumiaki; Kawabata, Teppei; Muraoka, Shinsuke; Kojima, Takao; Watanabe, Tadashi; Hatano, Norikazu; Seki, Yukio

    2016-12-01

    Aneurysms arising from the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are very rare. When the parent artery is an AICA-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) variant, occlusion of the artery, even distal to the meatal loop, leads to a significant area of cerebellar infarction. We report two cases of ruptured partially thrombosed distal AICA aneurysms. In both cases, the parent artery was an AICA-PICA variant. The aneurysms were clipped in one case and trapped following occipital artery (OA)-AICA anastomosis in another case. It is important to keep the OA as a donor artery for revascularization in the treatment of the AICA-PICA variant aneurysms, especially when the absence of intra-aneurysmal thrombus is not comfirmed preoperatively.

  15. Hand-assisted partial nephrectomy with early arterial clamp removal: Impact of the learning curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azawi, Nessn H; Norus, Thomas P; Wittendorff, Hans-Erik

    2014-01-01

    (40%), nine (45%) and 14 (70%) patients in cohorts 1, 2 and 3, respectively (p = 0.0185). CONCLUSIONS: Hand-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy with early removal of arterial clamps is safe and easy to learn. An expert laparoscopic surgeon can perform hand-assisted laparoscopic partial...

  16. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of our present work is to develop a simple steady state model for intraretinal oxygen partial pressure distribution and to investigate the effect of various model parameters on the partial pressure distribution under adapted conditions of light and darkness.. Method: A simple eight-layered mathematical model ...

  17. Multiple Renal Artery Pseudoaneurysms in Patients Undergoing Renal Artery Embolization Following Partial Nephrectomy: Correlation with RENAL Nephrometry Scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nakul [Houston Methodist Hospital (United States); Patel, Anish [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (United States); Ensor, Joe [Houston Methodist Research Institute, The Houston Methodist Cancer Center (United States); Ahrar, Kamran; Ahrar, Judy; Tam, Alda; Odisio, Bruno; Huang, Stephen; Murthy, Ravi; Mahvash, Armeen; Avritscher, Rony; McRae, Stephen; Sabir, Sharjeel; Wallace, Michael [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Matin, Surena [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Urology (United States); Gupta, Sanjay, E-mail: sgupta@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2017-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the incidence of multiple renal artery pseudoaneurysms (PSA) in patients referred for renal artery embolization following partial nephrectomy and to study its relationship to RENAL nephrometry scores.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 25 patients referred for renal artery embolization after partial nephrectomy were retrospectively reviewed for the following parameters: size and number of tumors, RENAL nephrometry scores, angiographic abnormalities, technical and clinical outcomes, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) after embolization.ResultsTwenty-four patients had primary renal tumors, while 1 patient had a pancreatic tumor invading the kidney. Multiple tumors were resected in 4 patients. Most patients (92 %) were symptomatic, presenting with gross hematuria, flank pain, or both. Angiography revealed PSA with (n = 5) or without (n = 20) AV fistulae. Sixteen patients (64 %) had multiple PSA involving multiple renal vessels. Higher RENAL nephrometry scores were associated with an increasing likelihood of multiple PSA. Multiple vessels were embolized in 14 patients (56 %). Clinical success was achieved after one (n = 22) or two (n = 3) embolization sessions in all patients. Post-embolization eGFR values at different time points after embolization were not significantly different from the post-operative eGFR.ConclusionA majority of patients requiring renal artery embolization following partial nephrectomy have multiple pseudoaneurysms, often requiring selective embolization of multiple vessels. Higher RENAL nephrometry score is associated with an increasing likelihood of multiple pseudoaneurysms. We found transarterial embolization to be a safe and effective treatment option with no long-term adverse effect on renal function in all but one patient with a solitary kidney.

  18. Animal models of cerebral arterial gas embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Robert P.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Hulst, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism is a dreaded complication of diving and invasive medical procedures. Many different animal models have been used in research on cerebral arterial gas embolism. This review provides an overview of the most important characteristics of these animal models. The properties

  19. Relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and mortality in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lee P; Durward, Andrew; Tibby, Shane M

    2012-07-17

    Observational studies in adults have shown a worse outcome associated with hyperoxia after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Extrapolating from adult data, current pediatric resuscitation guidelines recommend avoiding hyperoxia. We investigated the relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure and survival in patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) after cardiac arrest. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Pediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet) database between 2003 and 2010 (n=122,521). Patients aged oxygen status and outcome was modeled with logistic regression, with nonlinearities explored via multivariable fractional polynomials. Covariates included age, sex, ethnicity, congenital heart disease, out-of-hospital arrest, year, Pediatric Index of Mortality-2 (PIM2) mortality risk, and organ supportive therapies. Of 1875 patients, 735 (39%) died in PICU. Based on the first arterial gas, 207 patients (11%) had hyperoxia (Pa(O)(2) ≥300 mm Hg) and 448 (24%) had hypoxia (Pa(O)(2) <60 mm Hg). We found a significant nonlinear relationship between Pa(O)(2) and PICU mortality. After covariate adjustment, risk of death increased sharply with increasing hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.21 at Pa(O)(2) of 23 mm Hg). There was also an association with increasing hyperoxia, although not as dramatic as that for hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.37 at 600 mm Hg). We observed an increasing mortality risk with advancing age, which was more pronounced in the presence of congenital heart disease. Both severe hypoxia and, to a lesser extent, hyperoxia are associated with an increased risk of death after PICU admission after cardiac arrest.

  20. Partial Differential Equations Modeling and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Glowinski, Roland

    2008-01-01

    This book is dedicated to Olivier Pironneau. For more than 250 years partial differential equations have been clearly the most important tool available to mankind in order to understand a large variety of phenomena, natural at first and then those originating from human activity and technological development. Mechanics, physics and their engineering applications were the first to benefit from the impact of partial differential equations on modeling and design, but a little less than a century ago the Schrödinger equation was the key opening the door to the application of partial differential equations to quantum chemistry, for small atomic and molecular systems at first, but then for systems of fast growing complexity. Mathematical modeling methods based on partial differential equations form an important part of contemporary science and are widely used in engineering and scientific applications. In this book several experts in this field present their latest results and discuss trends in the numerical analy...

  1. Three-dimensional renal CT angiography for guiding segmental renal artery clamping during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yi; Shao, Pengfei; Zhu, Xiaomei; Lv, Qiang; Liu, Wangyan; Xu, Hai; Zhu, Yinsu; Yang, Guangyu; Tang, Lijun; Yin, Changjun

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of three-dimensional (3D) renal computed tomography angiography (CTA) in guiding segmental renal artery clamping during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN). Materials and methods: Forty-three patients with renal tumours undergoing renal CTA before LPN were retrospectively enrolled in this study. 3D arteriogram reconstructed images were created to identify the renal tumour-supplying arteries. The number and location of these targeted vessels were annotated on 3D images preoperatively and compared with the clamped vessels during LPN. The consistency between target vessels annotated at CTA and clamped arteries at LPN was compared both using a patient-based analysis and vessel-based analysis. The χ 2 test was applied to analyse the influence of tumour size, location, and growth pattern on the number of clamped segmental renal branches. Results: On patient-based analysis, the number of targeted vessels was consistent with the clamped vessels during LPN in 33 of 43 patients. On vessel-based analysis, 56 of 65 target vessels annotated at CTA were clamped during LPN. More segmental renal branches (p = 0.04) were clamped in patients with tumours of larger size. Tumour location and growth pattern had no association with the number of clamped segmental branches during LPN. Conclusion: High-quality CTA images and 3D reconstruction images can detect detailed information of tumour-supplying arteries to renal tumours. 3D renal CTA is an effective way to guide segmental renal artery clamping during LPN

  2. Generalized linear model for partially ordered data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Ip, Edward Haksing

    2012-01-13

    Within the rich literature on generalized linear models, substantial efforts have been devoted to models for categorical responses that are either completely ordered or completely unordered. Few studies have focused on the analysis of partially ordered outcomes, which arise in practically every area of study, including medicine, the social sciences, and education. To fill this gap, we propose a new class of generalized linear models--the partitioned conditional model--that includes models for both ordinal and unordered categorical data as special cases. We discuss the specification of the partitioned conditional model and its estimation. We use an application of the method to a sample of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to illustrate how the new method is able to extract from partially ordered data useful information about smoking youths that is not possible using traditional methods. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Mathematical Modelling of Intraretinal Oxygen Partial Pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    pressure distribution under adapted conditions of light and darkness.. Method: A simple eight-layered mathematical model for intraretinal oxygen partial pressure distribution was developed using Fick's law of diffusion, Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and oxygen delivery in the inner retina. The system of non-linear differential ...

  4. Dual flow diversion stents for aneurysm treatment in a partial unfused basilar artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontu, Vamsi; Bhogal, Pervinder; Brouwer, Patricius A

    2015-12-01

    Unfused basilar arteries, frequently but erroneously referred to as 'fenestrations', are not uncommonly associated with aneurysms. The difficulty in treating these aneurysms lie in the fact that they are often wide necked and frequently incorporate both channels of the unfused segment, with varying calibres of the channels, necessitating technically challenging treatment strategies. It is important to preserve both channels because of the potential presence of perforating arteries originating from these segments. There are numerous case reports of such aneurysms being treated by coils alone, coiling with balloon assistance and stent-assisted coiling in configurations such as 'X', 'double barrel' or waffle cone. We present an exemplary case, in which an aneurysm on a partial unfused basilar segment was treated with parallel flow diverters with an excellent result on follow-up imaging. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. An in vivo rat model of artery buckling for studying wall remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical modeling and in vitro experiments have demonstrated that arterial buckling is a possible mechanism for the development of artery tortuosity. However, there has been no report of whether artery buckling develops into tortuosity, partially due to the lack of in vivo models for long-term studies. The objective of this study was to establish an in vivo buckling model in rat carotid arteries for studying arterial wall remodeling after buckling. Rat left carotid arteries were transplanted to the right carotid arteries to generate buckling under in vivo pressure and were maintained for 1 week to examine wall remodeling and adaptation. Our results showed that a significant buckling was achieved in the carotid arterial grafts with altered wall stress. Cell proliferation and matrix metalloprotinease-2 (MMP-2) expression in the buckled arteries increased significantly compared with the controls. The tortuosity level of the grafts also slightly increased 1 week post-surgery, while there was no change in vessel dimensions, blood pressure, and blood flow velocity. The artery buckling model provides a useful tool for further study of the adaptation of arteries into tortuous shapes.

  6. Giant partially thrombosed 4 th ventricular posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm; microsurgical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forhad Hossain Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of progressive occipital headache, vomiting, walking difficulty, and repeated fall. She had no history of sudden and severe headache. She had positive cerebellar signs, predominantly on the right side. Computerized tomography (CT scan, CT angiogram, and magnetic resonance image (MRI of the brain showed suspected partially thrombosed giant 4 th ventricular posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Patient developed severe hypersensitivity reaction during both CT scan and MRI after contrast injection. Though needed, digital subtraction angiogram (DSA of cerebral vessels was not done. The aneurysm was managed by microsurgical clipping of the aneurysm neck and partial excision of thrombosed aneurysm. Here, we report the details of management of these difficult giant aneurysm without DSA.

  7. Coding with partially hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Rissanen, J.

    1995-01-01

    Partially hidden Markov models (PHMM) are introduced. They are a variation of the hidden Markov models (HMM) combining the power of explicit conditioning on past observations and the power of using hidden states. (P)HMM may be combined with arithmetic coding for lossless data compression. A general....... The PHMM structure and the conditions of the convergence proof allows for application of the PHMM to image coding. Relations between the PHMM and hidden Markov models (HMM) are treated. Results of coding bi-level images with the PHMM coding scheme is given. The results indicate that the PHMM can adapt...

  8. Establishing experimental model of human internal carotid artery siphon segment in canine common carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xuee; Li Minghua; Wang Yongli; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Wenbin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of establishing experimental model of human internal carotid artery siphon segment in canine common carotid artery (CCA) by end-to-end anastomoses of one side common carotid artery segment with the other side common carotid artery. Methods: Surgical techniques were used to make siphon model in 8 canines. One side CCA was taken as the parent artery and anastomosing with the cut off contra-lateral CCA segment which has passed through within the S-shaped glass tube. Two weeks after the creation of models angiography showed the model siphons were patent. Results: Experimental models of human internal carotid artery siphon segment were successfully made in all 8 dogs. Conclusions: It is practically feasible to establish experimental canine common carotid artery models of siphon segment simulating human internal carotid artery. (authors)

  9. Comparison of partial volume effects in arterial and venous contrast curves in CT brain perfusion imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J Riordan

    Full Text Available In brain CT perfusion (CTP, the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE. This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA, usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE.The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV measurements.In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017. Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction.Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves.

  10. Partial sum approaches to mathematical parameters of some growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Growth model is fitted by evaluating the mathematical parameters, a, b and c. In this study, the method of partial sums were used. For finding the mathematical parameters, firstly three partial sums were used, secondly four partial sums were used, thirdly five partial sums were used and finally N partial sums were used. The purpose of increasing the partial decomposition is to produce a better phase model which gives a better expected value by minimizing error sum of squares in the interval used.

  11. Artery Buckling: New Phenotypes, Models, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hai-Chao; Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Garcia, Justin R.; Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Arteries are under significant mechanical loads from blood pressure, flow, tissue tethering, and body movement. It is critical that arteries remain patent and stable under these loads. This review summarizes the common forms of buckling that occur in blood vessels including cross-sectional collapse, longitudinal twist buckling, and bent buckling. The phenomena, model analyses, experimental measurements, effects on blood flow, and clinical relevance are discussed. It is concluded that mechanical buckling is an important issue for vasculature, in addition to wall stiffness and strength, and requires further studies to address the challenges. Studies of vessel buckling not only enrich vascular biomechanics but also have important clinical applications. PMID:23192265

  12. Partial differential equation models in macroeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achdou, Yves; Buera, Francisco J; Lasry, Jean-Michel; Lions, Pierre-Louis; Moll, Benjamin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this article is to get mathematicians interested in studying a number of partial differential equations (PDEs) that naturally arise in macroeconomics. These PDEs come from models designed to study some of the most important questions in economics. At the same time, they are highly interesting for mathematicians because their structure is often quite difficult. We present a number of examples of such PDEs, discuss what is known about their properties, and list some open questions for future research. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Parameter Estimation of Partial Differential Equation Models

    KAUST Repository

    Xun, Xiaolei

    2013-09-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) models are commonly used to model complex dynamic systems in applied sciences such as biology and finance. The forms of these PDE models are usually proposed by experts based on their prior knowledge and understanding of the dynamic system. Parameters in PDE models often have interesting scientific interpretations, but their values are often unknown and need to be estimated from the measurements of the dynamic system in the presence of measurement errors. Most PDEs used in practice have no analytic solutions, and can only be solved with numerical methods. Currently, methods for estimating PDE parameters require repeatedly solving PDEs numerically under thousands of candidate parameter values, and thus the computational load is high. In this article, we propose two methods to estimate parameters in PDE models: a parameter cascading method and a Bayesian approach. In both methods, the underlying dynamic process modeled with the PDE model is represented via basis function expansion. For the parameter cascading method, we develop two nested levels of optimization to estimate the PDE parameters. For the Bayesian method, we develop a joint model for data and the PDE and develop a novel hierarchical model allowing us to employ Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to make posterior inference. Simulation studies show that the Bayesian method and parameter cascading method are comparable, and both outperform other available methods in terms of estimation accuracy. The two methods are demonstrated by estimating parameters in a PDE model from long-range infrared light detection and ranging data. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  14. Cranial pole nephrectomy in the pig model: anatomic analysis of arterial injuries in tridimensional endocasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Henry, Robert W; Favorito, Luciano A; Sampaio, Francisco J B

    2012-06-01

    To assess the intrarenal arteries injuries after cranial pole nephrectomy in a pig model to compare these findings with those in humans. Polyester resin was injected through the ureter and the renal artery to make three-dimensional casts of 61 pig kidneys. The cranial pole of the kidneys was sectioned at four different sites before the solidification of the resin, and the casts were examined for arterial damage. Section performed through the hilus (15 kidneys): The cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in two (13.33%) cases, the ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 13 (86.7%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 11 (73.34%) cases. Section at 0.5 cm cranial to the hilus (16 kidneys): The cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 1 (6.25%) case, the ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 14 (87.5%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in 13 (81.25%) cases. Section at 1.0 cm cranial to the hilus (15 kidneys): The ventral branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was sectioned in five (33.33%) cases, and the dorsal branch of the cranial division of the renal artery was injured in five (33.33%) cases. Section at 1.5 cm cranial to the hilus (15 kidneys): No lesions were found in the main arteries, only in the interlobular branches. As previously demonstrated in humans, sections at 1.0 cm or more cranially to the hilus in pigs also showed a significant decrease in damage to the major intrarenal arteries. Therefore, as regards arterial damage, the pig kidney is a useful model for partial nephrectomy in the cranial (upper) pole.

  15. Epistaxis after partial middle turbinectomy: the role of sphenopalatine artery ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Michele; Cassano, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    Extensive nasal polyposis could involve the middle turbinate inducing the surgeon to partially remove it. We initiated this retrospective study to evaluate the effect of a partial middle turbinectomy (PMT) on postoperative epistaxis and if sphenopalatine artery ligation (SPAL) could reduce the risk of bleeding in patients without nasal packing. Twenty-seven patients with extended bilateral nasal polyposis and submitted to primary functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) with PMT on 40 sides were retrospectively selected. Postoperative bleeding and other complications were evaluated and compared with those of a control group of 27 patients who underwent FESS with middle turbinate preservation on 40 sides. The study group was furthermore divided into 2 groups according to the execution of SPAL. The incidence of postoperative bleeding of both groups and of the 2 parts of the study group was compared using the Fisher exact test. A SPAL was necessary to stop intraoperative bleeding in 21 (52.5%) sides of the study group patients and in 7 (17.5%) of the control group patients. After surgery, epistaxis occurred in 8 cases (20%) in the PMT group (1 submitted to SPAL) and in 2 (5%) of the control group. The comparison with the Fisher exact test confirmed the major tendency of postoperative bleeding in the study group and in those not submitted to SPAL (P < .05). Partial middle turbinectomy causes a higher incidence of postoperative bleeding in patients who are not packed during the FESS operation. The execution of SPAL greatly reduces this risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparing the Effect of Continuous and Intermittent Irrigation Techniques on Complications of Arterial Catheter and Partial Thromboplastin Time in Patients Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Arta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different approaches are available to irrigate the arterial catheter, such as continuous and intermittent techniques. However, there is a disagreement regarding the most appropriate method. Aim: this study aimed to compare the effect of two continuous and intermittent irrigation methods on complications of arterial catheter and partial thromboplastin time (PTT in patients with coronary artery bypass (CABG surgery. Method: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 participants undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in open-heart surgery ICU at Imam Reza hospital in Mashhad, Iran, in 2016. In continuous group, the arterial catheter was continuously irrigated with heparin solution at the rate of 2cc/h, and in the intermittent group with a syringe containing 5cc heparin solution every 3 hours. In both groups, catheter was monitored and recorded every 3 hours (until 48 hours and 3 times from enrollment in terms of complications of partial thromboplastin time. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: The findingsof independent t-test showed that the two groups are homogeneous in age (P =0.48. The result of Fisher's exact test revealed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of average incidence of complications during the first 24 hours (P=0.55 and second 24 hours (P=0.55 after catheterization. Also during the 48 hours after surgery, independent t-test results showed no statistically significant difference in partial thromboplastin time (P=0.53 between the two groups. Implications for Practice: According to the results of the research based on the lack of difference between continuous and intermittent irrigation methods up to 48 hours after catheter replacement in terms of arterial catheter complications, further long-term follow-up researches are recommended.

  17. Hypoxic vasoconstriction of partial muscular intra-acinar pulmonary arteries in murine precision cut lung slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldenberg Anna

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute alveolar hypoxia causes pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV which serves to match lung perfusion to ventilation. The underlying mechanisms are not fully resolved yet. The major vascular segment contributing to HPV, the intra-acinar artery, is mostly located in that part of the lung that cannot be selectively reached by the presently available techniques, e.g. hemodynamic studies of isolated perfused lungs, recordings from dissected proximal arterial segments or analysis of subpleural vessels. The aim of the present study was to establish a model which allows the investigation of HPV and its underlying mechanisms in small intra-acinar arteries. Methods Intra-acinar arteries of the mouse lung were studied in 200 μm thick precision-cut lung slices (PCLS. The organisation of the muscle coat of these vessels was characterized by α-smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry. Basic features of intra-acinar HPV were characterized, and then the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers, inhibitors of the respiratory chain and Krebs cycle metabolites was analysed. Results Intra-acinar arteries are equipped with a discontinuous spiral of α-smooth muscle actin-immunoreactive cells. They exhibit a monophasic HPV (medium gassed with 1% O2 that started to fade after 40 min and was lost after 80 min. This HPV, but not vasoconstriction induced by the thromboxane analogue U46619, was effectively blocked by nitro blue tetrazolium and diphenyleniodonium, indicating the involvement of ROS and flavoproteins. Inhibition of mitochondrial complexes II (3-nitropropionic acid, thenoyltrifluoroacetone and III (antimycin A specifically interfered with HPV, whereas blockade of complex IV (sodium azide unspecifically inhibited both HPV and U46619-induced constriction. Succinate blocked HPV whereas fumarate had minor effects on vasoconstriction. Conclusion This study establishes the first model for investigation of basic characteristics of HPV

  18. Traumatic partial avulsion of a single right subclavian artery from the aortic arch and definitive repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Sears-Rogan, Pamela; Young, Richard S; Kanda, Louis T; Ellis, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Blunt injury to the right subclavian artery is a rare complication of severe deceleration trauma often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe an atypical presentation in a patient who sustained a traumatic avulsion of his right subclavian artery arising off the aortic arch. An interposition graft was used to restore the continuity of the artery to the ascending thoracic aorta.

  19. Estimation of an image derived input function with MR-defined carotid arteries in FDG-PET human studies using a novel partial volume correction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sari, Hasan; Erlandsson, Kjell; Law, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data requires an accurate knowledge the arterial input function. The gold standard method to measure the arterial input function requires collection of arterial blood samples and is an invasive method. Measuring an image derived...... input function is a non-invasive alternative but is challenging due to partial volume effects caused by the limited spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography scanners. In this work, a practical image derived input function extraction method is presented, which only requires segmentation...... of the carotid arteries from MR images. The simulation study results showed that at least 92% of the true intensity could be recovered after the partial volume correction. Results from 19 subjects showed that the mean cerebral metabolic rate of glucose calculated using arterial samples and partial volume...

  20. Randomized comparison of intra-arterial and intravenous thrombolysis in a canine model of acute basilar artery thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.I.; Yahia, A.M.; Boulos, A.S.; Hanel, R.A.; Suri, M.F.K.; Hopkins, L.N.; Alberico, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the rates of recanalization cerebral infarct and hemorrhage between intra-arterial (IA) reteplase and intravenous (IV) alteplase thrombolysis in a canine model of basilar artery thrombosis. Thrombosis was induced by injecting a clot in the basilar artery of 13 anesthetized dogs via superselective catheterization. The animals were randomized in a blinded fashion, 2 h after clot injection and verification of arterial occlusion, to receive IV alteplase 0.9 mg/kg over 60 min and IA placebo, or IA reteplase 0.09 units/kg over 20 min, equivalent to one-half the alteplase dose, and IV placebo. Recanalization was studied for 6 h after treatment with serial angiography; the images were later graded in a blinded fashion. Blinded interpretation of postmortem MRI was performed to assess the presence of brain infarcts and/or hemorrhage. At 3 h after initiation of treatment, partial or complete recanalization was observed in one of six dogs in the IV alteplase group and in five of seven in the IA reteplase group (P = 0.08). At 6 h, no significant difference in partial or complete recanalization was observed between the groups (two of six vs. five of seven; P = 0.20). Postmortem MRI revealed infarcts in four of six animals treated with IV alteplase and three of seven treated with IA reteplase (P = 0.4). Intracerebral hemorrhage was more common in the IV alteplase group (four of six vs. none of seven; P = 0.02). This study thus suggests that IA thrombolysis affords a recanalization rate similar to that of IV thrombolysis, but with a lower rate of intracerebral hemorrhage. (orig.)

  1. Bayesian mixture models for partially verified data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostoulas, Polychronis; Browne, William J.; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian mixture models can be used to discriminate between the distributions of continuous test responses for different infection stages. These models are particularly useful in case of chronic infections with a long latent period, like Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection...

  2. Optimal Retail Price Model for Partial Consignment to Multiple Retailers

    OpenAIRE

    Po-Yu Chen

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the product pricing decision-making problem under a consignment stock policy in a two-level supply chain composed of one supplier and multiple retailers. The effects of the supplier’s wholesale prices and its partial inventory cost absorption of the retail prices of retailers with different market shares are investigated. In the partial product consignment model this paper proposes, the seller and the retailers each absorb part of the inventory costs. This model also p...

  3. Partially natural Two Higgs Doublet Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, Patrick [Department of Physics, University of California,Broida Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Haber, Howard E. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California,1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California,Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Ruderman, Joshua T. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University,4 Washington Pl. New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    It is possible that the electroweak scale is low due to the fine-tuning of microscopic parameters, which can result from selection effects. The experimental discovery of new light fundamental scalars other than the Standard Model Higgs boson would seem to disfavor this possibility, since generically such states imply parametrically worse fine-tuning with no compelling connection to selection effects. We discuss counterexamples where the Higgs boson is light because of fine-tuning, and a second scalar doublet is light because a discrete symmetry relates its mass to the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson. Our examples require new vectorlike fermions at the electroweak scale, and the models possess a rich electroweak vacuum structure. The mechanism that we discuss does not protect a small CP-odd Higgs mass in split or high-scale supersymmetry-breaking scenarios of the MSSM due to an incompatibility between the discrete symmetries and holomorphy.

  4. Artery buckling analysis using a four-fiber wall model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi; Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2014-08-22

    Artery bent buckling has been suggested as a possible mechanism that leads to artery tortuosity, which is associated with aging, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and other pathological conditions. It is necessary to understand the relationship between microscopic wall structural changes and macroscopic artery buckling behavior. To this end, the objectives of this study were to develop arterial buckling equations using a microstructure-based 4-fiber reinforced wall model, and to simulate the effects of vessel wall microstructural changes on artery buckling. Our results showed that the critical pressure increased nonlinearly with the axial stretch ratio, and the 4-fiber model predicted higher critical buckling pressures than what the Fung model predicted. The buckling equation using the 4-fiber model captured the experimentally observed reduction of critical pressure induced by elastin degradation and collagen fiber orientation changes in the arterial wall. These results improve our understanding of arterial stability and its relationship to microscopic wall remodeling, and the model provides a useful tool for further studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Variance Function Partially Linear Single-Index Models1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Heng; Liang, Hua; Carroll, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    We consider heteroscedastic regression models where the mean function is a partially linear single index model and the variance function depends upon a generalized partially linear single index model. We do not insist that the variance function depend only upon the mean function, as happens in the classical generalized partially linear single index model. We develop efficient and practical estimation methods for the variance function and for the mean function. Asymptotic theory for the parametric and nonparametric parts of the model is developed. Simulations illustrate the results. An empirical example involving ozone levels is used to further illustrate the results, and is shown to be a case where the variance function does not depend upon the mean function.

  6. Latent Partially Ordered Classification Models and Normal Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuoka, Curtis; Varadi, Ferenc; Jaeger, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Latent partially ordered sets (posets) can be employed in modeling cognitive functioning, such as in the analysis of neuropsychological (NP) and educational test data. Posets are cognitively diagnostic in the sense that classification states in these models are associated with detailed profiles of cognitive functioning. These profiles allow for…

  7. Partial-Order Reduction for GPU Model Checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, T.; Wijs, A.; Bosnacki, D.; van de Pol, Jan Cornelis; Artho, C; Legay, A.; Peled, D.

    2016-01-01

    Model checking using GPUs has seen increased popularity over the last years. Because GPUs have a limited amount of memory, only small to medium-sized systems can be verified. For on-the-fly explicit-state model checking, we improve memory efficiency by applying partial-order reduction. We propose

  8. Assessing The Suitability Of Partial Equilibrium Modelling In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of applying partial equilibrium modeling for forest sector analysis in Tanzania. The aim of the evaluation is to determine the usefulness of this model framework in analyzing the impact of various policies on the development of the forest sector. The structure and ...

  9. Partially Compensatory Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models: Two Alternate Model Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Partially compensatory models may capture the cognitive skills needed to answer test items more realistically than compensatory models, but estimating the model parameters may be a challenge. Data were simulated to follow two different partially compensatory models, a model with an interaction term and a product model. The model parameters were…

  10. Constitutive modelling of an arterial wall supported by microscopic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vychytil J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An idealized model of an arterial wall is proposed as a two-layer system. Distinct mechanical response of each layer is taken into account considering two types of strain energy functions in the hyperelasticity framework. The outer layer, considered as a fibre-reinforced composite, is modelled using the structural model of Holzapfel. The inner layer, on the other hand, is represented by a two-scale model mimicing smooth muscle tissue. For this model, material parameters such as shape, volume fraction and orientation of smooth muscle cells are determined using the microscopic measurements. The resulting model of an arterial ring is stretched axially and loaded with inner pressure to simulate the mechanical response of a porcine arterial segment during inflation and axial stretching. Good agreement of the model prediction with experimental data is promising for further progress.

  11. Superior mesenteric arterial branch occlusion causing partial jejunal ischemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van De Winkel Nele

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ischemic bowel disease comprises both mesenteric ischemia and colonic ischemia. Mesenteric ischemia can be divided into acute and chronic ischemia. These are two separate entities, each with their specific clinical presentation and diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. However, diagnosis may be difficult due to the vague symptomatology and subtle signs. Case presentation We report the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with abdominal discomfort, anorexia, melena and fever. A physical examination revealed left lower quadrant tenderness and an irregular pulse. Computed tomography of her abdomen as well as computed tomography enterography, enteroscopy, angiography and small bowel enteroclysis demonstrated an ischemic jejunal segment caused by occlusion of a branch of the superior mesenteric artery. The ischemic segment was resected and an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The diagnosis of segmental small bowel ischemia was confirmed by histopathological study. Conclusion Mesenteric ischemia is a pathology well-known by surgeons, gastroenterologists and radiologists. Acute and chronic mesenteric ischemia are two separate entities with their own specific clinical presentation, radiological signs and therapeutic modalities. We present the case of a patient with symptoms and signs of chronic mesenteric ischemia despite an acute etiology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report presenting a case of acute mesenteric ischemia with segmental superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  12. Flow Modelling for partially Cavitating Two-dimensional Hydrofoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnaswamy, Paddy

    2001-01-01

    The present work addresses te computational analysis of partial sheet hydrofoil cavitation in two dimensions. Particular attention is given to the method of simulating the flow at the end of the cavity. A fixed-length partially cavitating panel method is used to predict the height of the re...... of the model and comparing the present calculations with numerical results. The flow around the partially cavitating hydrofoil with a re-entrant jet has also been treated with a viscous/inviscid interactive method. The viscous flow model is based on boundary layer theory applied on the compound foil......, consisting of the union of the cavity and the hydrofoil surface. The change in the flow direction in the cavity closure region is seen to have a slightly adverse effect on the viscous pressure distribution. Otherwise, it is seen that the viscous re-entrant jet solution compares favourably with experimental...

  13. Partial dynamical symmetry in the symplectic shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Leviatan, A. [Hebrew Univ., Racah Inst. of Physics, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2000-08-01

    We present an example of a partial dynamical symmetry (PDS) in an interacting fermion system and demonstrate the close relationship of the associated Hamiltonians with a realistic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction, thus shedding light on this important interaction. Specifically, in the framework of the symplectic shell model of nuclei, we prove the existence of a family of fermionic Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry. We outline the construction process for the PDS eigenstates with good symmetry and give analytic expressions for the energies of these states and E2 transition strengths between them. Characteristics of both pure and mixed-symmetry PDS eigenstates are discussed and the resulting spectra and transition strengths are compared to those of real nuclei. The PDS concept is shown to be relevant to the description of prolate, oblate, as well as triaxially deformed nuclei. Similarities and differences between the fermion case and the previously established partial SU(3) symmetry in the interacting boson model are considered. (author)

  14. Partial dynamical symmetry in the symplectic shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escher, Jutta; Leviatan, Amiram

    2002-01-01

    We present an example of a partial dynamical symmetry (PDS) in an interacting fermion system and demonstrate the close relationship of the associated Hamiltonians with a realistic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction, thus shedding light on this important interaction. Specifically, in the framework of the symplectic shell model of nuclei, we prove the existence of a family of fermionic Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry. We outline the construction process for the PDS eigenstates with good symmetry and give analytic expressions for the energies of these states and E2 transition strengths between them. Characteristics of both pure and mixed-symmetry PDS eigenstates are discussed and the resulting spectra and transition strengths are compared to those of real nuclei. The PDS concept is shown to be relevant to the description of prolate, oblate, as well as triaxially deformed nuclei. Similarities and differences between the fermion case and the previously established partial SU(3) symmetry in the interacting boson model are considered

  15. Changes in oxygen partial pressure of brain tissue in an animal model of obstructive apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Marta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is one of the main consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and is usually attributed in part to the oxidative stress caused by intermittent hypoxia in cerebral tissues. The presence of oxygen-reactive species in the brain tissue should be produced by the deoxygenation-reoxygenation cycles which occur at tissue level during recurrent apneic events. However, how changes in arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2 during repetitive apneas translate into oxygen partial pressure (PtO2 in brain tissue has not been studied. The objective of this study was to assess whether brain tissue is partially protected from intermittently occurring interruption of O2 supply during recurrent swings in arterial SpO2 in an animal model of OSA. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g were used. Sixteen rats were anesthetized and non-invasively subjected to recurrent obstructive apneas: 60 apneas/h, 15 s each, for 1 h. A control group of 8 rats was instrumented but not subjected to obstructive apneas. PtO2 in the cerebral cortex was measured using a fast-response oxygen microelectrode. SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. The time dependence of arterial SpO2 and brain tissue PtO2 was carried out by Friedman repeated measures ANOVA. Results Arterial SpO2 showed a stable periodic pattern (no significant changes in maximum [95.5 ± 0.5%; m ± SE] and minimum values [83.9 ± 1.3%]. By contrast, brain tissue PtO2 exhibited a different pattern from that of arterial SpO2. The minimum cerebral cortex PtO2 computed during the first apnea (29.6 ± 2.4 mmHg was significantly lower than baseline PtO2 (39.7 ± 2.9 mmHg; p = 0.011. In contrast to SpO2, the minimum and maximum values of PtO2 gradually increased (p 2 were significantly greater relative to baseline and the first apnea dip, respectively. Conclusions These data suggest that the cerebral cortex is partially protected from intermittently occurring interruption of

  16. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  17. Can simple population genetic models reconcile partial match ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A recent study of partial matches in the Arizona offender database of DNA profiles has revealed a large number of nine and ten locus matches. I use simple models that incorporate the product rule, population substructure, and relatedness to predict the expected number of matches in large databases. I find that there is a ...

  18. Partial differential equations modeling, analysis and numerical approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Le Dret, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to the study of partial differential equation problems both from the theoretical and numerical points of view. After presenting modeling aspects, it develops the theoretical analysis of partial differential equation problems for the three main classes of partial differential equations: elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic. Several numerical approximation methods adapted to each of these examples are analyzed: finite difference, finite element and finite volumes methods, and they are illustrated using numerical simulation results. Although parts of the book are accessible to Bachelor students in mathematics or engineering, it is primarily aimed at Masters students in applied mathematics or computational engineering. The emphasis is on mathematical detail and rigor for the analysis of both continuous and discrete problems. .

  19. A Parallel Lattice Boltzmann Model of a Carotid Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, J.; Ryan, S. J.; Buick, J. M.

    2008-11-01

    A parallel implementation of the lattice Boltzmann model is considered for a three dimensional model of the carotid artery. The computational method and its parallel implementation are described. The performance of the parallel implementation on a Beowulf cluster is presented, as are preliminary hemodynamic results.

  20. Partial volume effect (PVE) on the arterial input function (AIF) in T1-weighted perfusion imaging and limitations of the multiplicative rescaling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Adam Espe; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill

    2009-01-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) on the arterial input function (AIF) remains a major obstacle to absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using MRI. This study evaluates the validity and performance of a commonly used multiplicative rescaling of the AIF to correct for the PVE. In a gr...

  1. Seismoelectric wave propagation numerical modelling in partially saturated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, S.; Garambois, S.; Jouniaux, L.; Brito, D.; Sailhac, P.; Bordes, C.

    2013-09-01

    To better understand and interpret seismoelectric measurements acquired over vadose environments, both the existing theory and the wave propagation modelling programmes, available for saturated materials, should be extended to partial saturation conditions. We propose here an extension of Pride's equations aiming to take into account partially saturated materials, in the case of a water-air mixture. This new set of equations was incorporated into an existing seismoelectric wave propagation modelling code, originally designed for stratified saturated media. This extension concerns both the mechanical part, using a generalization of the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the electromagnetic part, for which dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity were expressed against water saturation. The dynamic seismoelectric coupling was written as a function of the streaming potential coefficient, which depends on saturation, using four different relations derived from recent laboratory or theoretical studies. In a second part, this extended programme was used to synthesize the seismoelectric response for a layered medium consisting of a partially saturated sand overburden on top of a saturated sandstone half-space. Subsequent analysis of the modelled amplitudes suggests that the typically very weak interface response (IR) may be best recovered when the shallow layer exhibits low saturation. We also use our programme to compute the seismoelectric response of a capillary fringe between a vadose sand overburden and a saturated sand half-space. Our first modelling results suggest that the study of the seismoelectric IR may help to detect a sharp saturation contrast better than a smooth saturation transition. In our example, a saturation contrast of 50 per cent between a fully saturated sand half-space and a partially saturated shallow sand layer yields a stronger IR than a stepwise decrease in saturation.

  2. Arterial oxygen partial pressures reduce the insulin-dependent induction of the perivenously located glucokinase in rat hepatocyte cultures: mimicry of arterial oxygen pressures by H2O2.

    OpenAIRE

    Kietzmann, T; Roth, U; Freimann, S; Jungermann, K

    1997-01-01

    Liver glucokinase (GK) is localized predominantly in the perivenous zone. GK mRNA was induced by insulin maximally under venous O2 partial pressure (pO2) and only half-maximally under arterial pO2. CoCl2 and desferrioxamine mimicked venous pO2 and enhanced the insulin-dependent induction of GK mRNA under arterial pO2. H2O2 mimicked arterial pO2 and reduced insulin-induced GK mRNA under venous pO2 to the lower arterial levels. Thus the zonal O2 gradient in liver seems to have a key role in the...

  3. semPLS: Structural Equation Modeling Using Partial Least Squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Monecke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural equation models (SEM are very popular in many disciplines. The partial least squares (PLS approach to SEM offers an alternative to covariance-based SEM, which is especially suited for situations when data is not normally distributed. PLS path modelling is referred to as soft-modeling-technique with minimum demands regarding mea- surement scales, sample sizes and residual distributions. The semPLS package provides the capability to estimate PLS path models within the R programming environment. Different setups for the estimation of factor scores can be used. Furthermore it contains modular methods for computation of bootstrap confidence intervals, model parameters and several quality indices. Various plot functions help to evaluate the model. The well known mobile phone dataset from marketing research is used to demonstrate the features of the package.

  4. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdollah Ravand

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Structural equation modeling (SEM has become widespread in educational and psychological research. Its flexibility in addressing complex theoretical models and the proper treatment of measurement error has made it the model of choice for many researchers in the social sciences. Nevertheless, the model imposes some daunting assumptions and restrictions (e.g. normality and relatively large sample sizes that could discourage practitioners from applying the model. Partial least squares SEM (PLS-SEM is a nonparametric technique which makes no distributional assumptions and can be estimated with small sample sizes. In this paper a general introduction to PLS-SEM is given and is compared with conventional SEM. Next, step by step procedures, along with R functions, are presented to estimate the model. A data set is analyzed and the outputs are interpreted

  5. Artery Soft-Tissue Modelling for Stent Implant Training System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aloisio

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality technology can be utilised to provide new systematic training methods for surgical procedures. Our aim is to build a simulator that allows medical students to practice the coronary stent implant procedure and avoids exposing patients to risks. The designed simulation system consists of a virtual environment and a haptic interface, in order to provide both the visualization of the coronary arteries and the tactile and force feedback generated during the interactions of the surgical instruments in the virtual environment. Since the arteries are soft tissues, their shape may change during an operation; for this reason physical modelling of the organs is necessary to render their behaviour under the influence of surgeon's instruments. The idea is to define a model that computes the displacement of the tissue versus time; from the displacement it is possible to calculate the response of the tissue to the surgical tool external stimuli. Information about tools displacements and tissue responses are also used to graphically model the artery wall and virtual surgical instrument deformations generated as a consequence of their coming into contact. In order to obtain a realistic simulation, the Finite Element Method has been used to model the soft tissues of the artery, using linear elasticity to reduce computational time and speed up interaction rates.

  6. Development and Validity of a Silicone Renal Tumor Model for Robotic Partial Nephrectomy Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monda, Steven M; Weese, Jonathan R; Anderson, Barrett G; Vetter, Joel M; Venkatesh, Ramakrishna; Du, Kefu; Andriole, Gerald L; Figenshau, Robert S

    2018-02-05

    Objectives To provide a training tool to address the technical challenges of robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, we created silicone renal tumor models using 3D printed molds of a patient's kidney with a mass. In this study, we assessed the face, content, and construct validity of these models. Materials and Methods Surgeons of different training levels completed four simulations on silicone renal tumor models. Participants were surveyed on the usefulness and realism of the model as a training tool. Performance was measured using operation specific metrics, self-reported operative demands (NASA TLX), and blinded expert assessment (GEARS). Results 24 participants included attending urologists, endourology fellows, urology residents, and medical students. Post-training surveys of expert participants yielded mean results of 79.2 on the realism of the model's overall feel and 90.2 on the model's overall usefulness for training. Renal artery clamp times and GEARS scores were significantly better in surgeons further in training (p≤0.005, p≤0.025). Renal artery clamp times, preserved renal parenchyma, positive margins, NASA TLX, and GEARS scores were all found to improve across trials (psilicone renal tumor model in a cohort of surgeons of different training levels. Expert participants deemed the model useful and realistic. Surgeons of higher training levels performed better than less experienced surgeons in various study metrics, and improvements within individuals were observed over sequential trials. Future studies should aim to assess model predictive validity, namely the association between model performance improvements and improvements in live surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Agreement between values for arterial and end-tidal partial pressures of carbon dioxide in spontaneously breathing, critically ill dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmer, Efrat; Scanson, Lindsey C; Reed, Ann; Love, Lydia C

    2009-12-01

    To determine agreement between arterial partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) and end-tidal partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PETCO(2)) measured with a nasal catheter in spontaneously breathing, critically ill dogs. Validation study. 26 client-owned dogs admitted to an intensive care unit for various conditions. PaCO(2) was measured with a commercial blood gas analyzer, and PETCO(2) was measured with a sidestream capnograph attached to a nasal catheter. Measurements were obtained twice (ie, with and without supplemental oxygen). Paired values were compared by means of the Pearson correlation method. Level of agreement was assessed by means of the Bland-Altman method. Mean difference between PaCO(2) and PETCO(2) when dogs did not receive supplemental oxygen (mean +/- SD, 3.95 +/- 4.92 mm Hg) was significantly lower than mean difference when dogs did receive supplemental oxygen (6.87 +/- 6.42 mm Hg). Mean difference in dogs with a condition affecting the respiratory system (8.55 +/- 5.43 mm Hg) was significantly higher than mean difference in dogs without respiratory tract disease (3.28 +/- 3.23 mm Hg). There was a significant linear correlation and good agreement between measured values of PaCO(2) and PETCO(2). Catheter size, ventilatory status, and outcome were not significantly associated with mean difference between PaCO(2) and PETCO(2). Results suggested that nasal capnography is a clinically relevant method of estimating PaCO(2) in spontaneously breathing, critically ill dogs, but that values should be interpreted with caution in dogs receiving supplemental oxygen and in dogs with conditions affecting the respiratory system.

  8. Hidden physics models: Machine learning of nonlinear partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Maziar; Karniadakis, George Em

    2018-03-01

    While there is currently a lot of enthusiasm about "big data", useful data is usually "small" and expensive to acquire. In this paper, we present a new paradigm of learning partial differential equations from small data. In particular, we introduce hidden physics models, which are essentially data-efficient learning machines capable of leveraging the underlying laws of physics, expressed by time dependent and nonlinear partial differential equations, to extract patterns from high-dimensional data generated from experiments. The proposed methodology may be applied to the problem of learning, system identification, or data-driven discovery of partial differential equations. Our framework relies on Gaussian processes, a powerful tool for probabilistic inference over functions, that enables us to strike a balance between model complexity and data fitting. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated through a variety of canonical problems, spanning a number of scientific domains, including the Navier-Stokes, Schrödinger, Kuramoto-Sivashinsky, and time dependent linear fractional equations. The methodology provides a promising new direction for harnessing the long-standing developments of classical methods in applied mathematics and mathematical physics to design learning machines with the ability to operate in complex domains without requiring large quantities of data.

  9. Optimal Retail Price Model for Partial Consignment to Multiple Retailers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the product pricing decision-making problem under a consignment stock policy in a two-level supply chain composed of one supplier and multiple retailers. The effects of the supplier’s wholesale prices and its partial inventory cost absorption of the retail prices of retailers with different market shares are investigated. In the partial product consignment model this paper proposes, the seller and the retailers each absorb part of the inventory costs. This model also provides general solutions for the complete product consignment and the traditional policy that adopts no product consignment. In other words, both the complete consignment and nonconsignment models are extensions of the proposed model (i.e., special cases. Research results indicated that the optimal retail price must be between 1/2 (50% and 2/3 (66.67% times the upper limit of the gross profit. This study also explored the results and influence of parameter variations on optimal retail price in the model.

  10. Optimization of arterial age prediction models based in pulse wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandurra, A G; Meschino, G J; Passoni, L I; Dai Pra, A L; Introzzi, A R; Clara, F M

    2007-01-01

    We propose the detection of early arterial ageing through a prediction model of arterial age based in the coherence assumption between the pulse wave morphology and the patient's chronological age. Whereas we evaluate several methods, a Sugeno fuzzy inference system is selected. Models optimization is approached using hybrid methods: parameter adaptation with Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms. Features selection was performed according with their projection on main factors of the Principal Components Analysis. The model performance was tested using the bootstrap error type .632E. The model presented an error smaller than 8.5%. This result encourages including this process as a diagnosis module into the device for pulse analysis that has been developed by the Bioengineering Laboratory staff

  11. Optimization of arterial age prediction models based in pulse wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scandurra, A G [Bioengineering Laboratory, Electronic Department, Mar del Plata University (Argentina); Meschino, G J [Bioengineering Laboratory, Electronic Department, Mar del Plata University (Argentina); Passoni, L I [Bioengineering Laboratory, Electronic Department, Mar del Plata University (Argentina); Dai Pra, A L [Engineering Aplied Artificial Intelligence Group, Mathematics Department, Mar del Plata University (Argentina); Introzzi, A R [Bioengineering Laboratory, Electronic Department, Mar del Plata University (Argentina); Clara, F M [Bioengineering Laboratory, Electronic Department, Mar del Plata University (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    We propose the detection of early arterial ageing through a prediction model of arterial age based in the coherence assumption between the pulse wave morphology and the patient's chronological age. Whereas we evaluate several methods, a Sugeno fuzzy inference system is selected. Models optimization is approached using hybrid methods: parameter adaptation with Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms. Features selection was performed according with their projection on main factors of the Principal Components Analysis. The model performance was tested using the bootstrap error type .632E. The model presented an error smaller than 8.5%. This result encourages including this process as a diagnosis module into the device for pulse analysis that has been developed by the Bioengineering Laboratory staff.

  12. Model-based detection of partially obstructed endotracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visaria, Rachana K; Westenskow, Dwayne R

    2005-01-01

    A five-element lumped pulmonary model was developed to estimate respiratory mechanics automatically and noninvasively. The model was applied to diagnose obstructed endotracheal tube. Events like bronchospasm and stiff chest wall were also tested to determine the specificity of the diagnosis. Cases with positive end-expiratory pressure were also included in the analysis to see the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on the model. Randomized controlled animal study. University department of anesthesiology. Ten anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated mongrel dogs (19-45 kg) of either gender. Two levels of upper airway obstruction were induced in ten dogs by partially constricting the endotracheal tube. Acute bronchial constriction was produced in five dogs by injecting methacholine through a central venous catheter. In the same five dogs, the chest wall was stiffened by wrapping a pressure cuff around the chest. Positive end-expiratory pressure was also applied as a separate event in these five animals. Airway pressure and flow were continuously recorded at the mouth. Model parameters were iteratively identified until the root mean square error between respiratory impedance (obtained from airway pressure and flow) and model-predicted impedance (calculated using Ohm's law) was minimum. The peak inspiratory pressure increased and the peak expiratory flow rate decreased with increasing levels of partial obstruction. The value of the model parameters R(1) and C(2) increased and C(1) decreased with partial obstructed endotracheal tube, whereas R(1) increased and L and C(2) decreased with bronchospasm. With stiff chest wall, R(2) increased and C(2) decreased. With positive end-expiratory pressure, the L parameter decreased and no significant change in other model parameters was observed. Obstructed endotracheal tube is indicated if R(1) increased > or =30%, C(1) decreased > or =10%, and C(2) increased > or =10% from baseline. The test results using 45

  13. Bayesian Plackett-Luce Mixture Models for Partially Ranked Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Cristina; Tardella, Luca

    2017-06-01

    The elicitation of an ordinal judgment on multiple alternatives is often required in many psychological and behavioral experiments to investigate preference/choice orientation of a specific population. The Plackett-Luce model is one of the most popular and frequently applied parametric distributions to analyze rankings of a finite set of items. The present work introduces a Bayesian finite mixture of Plackett-Luce models to account for unobserved sample heterogeneity of partially ranked data. We describe an efficient way to incorporate the latent group structure in the data augmentation approach and the derivation of existing maximum likelihood procedures as special instances of the proposed Bayesian method. Inference can be conducted with the combination of the Expectation-Maximization algorithm for maximum a posteriori estimation and the Gibbs sampling iterative procedure. We additionally investigate several Bayesian criteria for selecting the optimal mixture configuration and describe diagnostic tools for assessing the fitness of ranking distributions conditionally and unconditionally on the number of ranked items. The utility of the novel Bayesian parametric Plackett-Luce mixture for characterizing sample heterogeneity is illustrated with several applications to simulated and real preference ranked data. We compare our method with the frequentist approach and a Bayesian nonparametric mixture model both assuming the Plackett-Luce model as a mixture component. Our analysis on real datasets reveals the importance of an accurate diagnostic check for an appropriate in-depth understanding of the heterogenous nature of the partial ranking data.

  14. Partial differential equation models in the socio-economic sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Caffarelli, Luis; Markowich, Peter A

    2014-11-13

    Mathematical models based on partial differential equations (PDEs) have become an integral part of quantitative analysis in most branches of science and engineering, recently expanding also towards biomedicine and socio-economic sciences. The application of PDEs in the latter is a promising field, but widely quite open and leading to a variety of novel mathematical challenges. In this introductory article of the Theme Issue, we will provide an overview of the field and its recent boosting topics. Moreover, we will put the contributions to the Theme Issue in an appropriate perspective. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation and variable selection for generalized additive partial linear models

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Li

    2011-08-01

    We study generalized additive partial linear models, proposing the use of polynomial spline smoothing for estimation of nonparametric functions, and deriving quasi-likelihood based estimators for the linear parameters. We establish asymptotic normality for the estimators of the parametric components. The procedure avoids solving large systems of equations as in kernel-based procedures and thus results in gains in computational simplicity. We further develop a class of variable selection procedures for the linear parameters by employing a nonconcave penalized quasi-likelihood, which is shown to have an asymptotic oracle property. Monte Carlo simulations and an empirical example are presented for illustration. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2011.

  16. Partial differential equation models in the socio-economic sciences

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2014-10-06

    Mathematical models based on partial differential equations (PDEs) have become an integral part of quantitative analysis in most branches of science and engineering, recently expanding also towards biomedicine and socio-economic sciences. The application of PDEs in the latter is a promising field, but widely quite open and leading to a variety of novel mathematical challenges. In this introductory article of the Theme Issue, we will provide an overview of the field and its recent boosting topics. Moreover, we will put the contributions to the Theme Issue in an appropriate perspective.

  17. Genetic Associations for Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time and Prothrombin Time, their Gene Expression Profiles, and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weihong; Schwienbacher, Christine; Lopez, Lorna M.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Johnson, Andrew D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Basu, Saonli; Gögele, Martin; Davies, Gail; Lowe, Gordon D.O.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tan, Adrian; Pankow, James S.; Tenesa, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Volpato, Claudia B.; Rumley, Ann; Gow, Alan J.; Minelli, Cosetta; Yarnell, John W.G.; Porteous, David J.; Starr, John M.; Gallacher, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Visscher, Peter M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Cushman, Mary; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Matijevic, Nena; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Folsom, Aaron R.

    2012-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) are clinical tests commonly used to screen for coagulation-factor deficiencies. One genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been reported previously for aPTT, but no GWAS has been reported for PT. We conducted a GWAS and meta-analysis to identify genetic loci for aPTT and PT. The GWAS for aPTT was conducted in 9,240 individuals of European ancestry from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, and the GWAS for PT was conducted in 2,583 participants from the Genetic Study of Three Population Microisolates in South Tyrol (MICROS) and the Lothian Birth Cohorts (LBC) of 1921 and 1936. Replication was assessed in 1,041 to 3,467 individuals. For aPTT, previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG, F11, F12, and ABO were confirmed. A second independent association in ABO was identified and replicated (rs8176704, p = 4.26 × 10−24). Pooling the ARIC and replication data yielded two additional loci in F5 (rs6028, p = 3.22 × 10−9) and AGBL1 (rs2469184, p = 3.61 × 10−8). For PT, significant associations were identified and confirmed in F7 (rs561241, p = 3.71 × 10−56) and PROCR/EDEM2 (rs2295888, p = 5.25 × 10−13). Assessment of existing gene expression and coronary artery disease (CAD) databases identified associations of five of the GWAS loci with altered gene expression and two with CAD. In summary, eight genetic loci that account for ∼29% of the variance in aPTT and two loci that account for ∼14% of the variance in PT were detected and supported by functional data. PMID:22703881

  18. Tumor size and invasiveness matters for partial nephrectomy: External validation and modification of the arterial based complexity score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegmair, Maximilian C; Hetjens, Svetlana; Mandel, Philipp; Wadle, Jula; Budjan, Johannes; Michel, Maurice S; Pfalzgraf, Daniel; Wagener, Nina

    2017-05-01

    Outcome of partial nephrectomy (PN) depends on anatomic features of the renal tumor, which can be assessed by nephrometry scores. The aim was to externally validate and refine the Arterial Based Complexity (ABC) score and to compare it to established systems. Tumors of 300 patients undergoing PN were categorized according to the ABC, RENAL, and PADUA score. Size and tumor invasiveness were combined to form the ABCD score. Correlation analysis and multivariate logistic regression was performed to validate and compare the respective scores as predictors of surgical outcome. The ABC score shows significant correlation with ischemia time (IT) (P < 0.01), opening of the collecting system (CS) (P < 0.01), and conversion to nephrectomy (P = 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, the ABC score was predictive for on-clamp excision (P < 0.01) and opening of the CS (P < 0.01) only. The RENAL and ABCD scores were independent predictors for complications (P = 0.02, P = 0.05), IT (P < 0.01, P = 0.03), on clamp excision (P < 0.01, P < 0.01), and opening of the CS (P < 0.01, P < 0.01). The ABC score correlates well with surgical parameters. Expanding the score by tumor diameter gives the ABCD system. It has similar predictive effectiveness to the well-established RENAL score, but features simplicity by only assessing invasiveness and tumor size. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Constitutive modeling of coronary artery bypass graft with incorporated torsion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horný, L.; Chlup, Hynek; Žitný, R.; Adámek, T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2009), s. 273-277 ISSN 0543-5846 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : coronary artery bypass graft * constitutive model * digital image correlation Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2009 http://web.tuke.sk/sjf-kamam/mmams2009/contents.pdf

  20. Modeling tree crown dynamics with 3D partial differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Robert; Letort, Véronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth toward light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications.

  1. Modeling Tree Crown Dynamics with 3D Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eBeyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth towards light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications.

  2. Optimization Method of Fusing Model Tree into Partial Least Squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial Least Square (PLS can’t adapt to the characteristics of the data of many fields due to its own features multiple independent variables, multi-dependent variables and non-linear. However, Model Tree (MT has a good adaptability to nonlinear function, which is made up of many multiple linear segments. Based on this, a new method combining PLS and MT to analysis and predict the data is proposed, which build MT through the main ingredient and the explanatory variables(the dependent variable extracted from PLS, and extract residual information constantly to build Model Tree until well-pleased accuracy condition is satisfied. Using the data of the maxingshigan decoction of the monarch drug to treat the asthma or cough and two sample sets in the UCI Machine Learning Repository, the experimental results show that, the ability of explanation and predicting get improved in the new method.

  3. An XFEM Model for Hydraulic Fracturing in Partially Saturated Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimzadeh Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a complex multi-physics phenomenon. Numerous analytical and numerical models of hydraulic fracturing processes have been proposed. Analytical solutions commonly are able to model the growth of a single hydraulic fracture into an initially intact, homogeneous rock mass. Numerical models are able to analyse complex problems such as multiple hydraulic fractures and fracturing in heterogeneous media. However, majority of available models are restricted to single-phase flow through fracture and permeable porous rock. This is not compatible with actual field conditions where the injected fluid does not have similar properties as the host fluid. In this study we present a fully coupled hydro-poroelastic model which incorporates two fluids i.e. fracturing fluid and host fluid. Flow through fracture is defined based on lubrication assumption, while flow through matrix is defined as Darcy flow. The fracture discontinuity in the mechanical model is captured using eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM while the fracture propagation criterion is defined through cohesive fracture model. The discontinuous matrix fluid velocity across fracture is modelled using leak-off loading which couples fracture flow and matrix flow. The proposed model has been discretised using standard Galerkin method, implemented in Matlab and verified against several published solutions. Multiple hydraulic fracturing simulations are performed to show the model robustness and to illustrate how problem parameters such as injection rate and rock permeability affect the hydraulic fracturing variables i.e. injection pressure, fracture aperture and fracture length. The results show the impact of partial saturation on leak-off and the fact that single-phase models may underestimate the leak-off.

  4. Partial equilibrium model – Case study of the poultry market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Šobrová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with identifying the main determinants in the poultry agri-food chain in the Czech Republic and examines their relationships. The partial equilibrium model, defined as a seven-equation model in power form, is employed for this purpose. The analysis is based on both time-series and panel data of the main factors in the poultry market. The time-series as well as panel data contain annual data of selected variables for the period from 1995 to 2009. The analysis is focused on supply and demand of poultry meat, specifically on production, consumption and foreign trade in poultry meat in the Czech Republic. Firstly, the main factors influencing the poultry market are determined, then, an appropriate model is employed. The parameters of the model are estimated using the ordinary least squares method in statistical and econometric software. Estimated parameters confirm assumed relationships among the selected variables. Moreover, the long-term tendencies of the selected indicators are proven. Among other, the analysis proves an inertial consumption, the price level as the main factor influencing the consumption and one-way or mutual relationship among the selected variables. The statistical features of the model are satisfied as well – the estimated parameters are statistically significant, the model does not contain, neither the problem of autocorrelation of residuals nor the problem of heteroskedasticity.

  5. Implementation of variable segments to model the arterial system using electromechanical analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borik, Stefan; Cap, Ivo; Babusiak, Branko; Capova, Klara

    2017-05-01

    The article deals with the design of an electrical model of variable segments of a non-symmetrical tree of small arteries This model can be used to simulate the blood pressure and flow. Peripheral arterial resistance changes are modelled by an exponentially dependent resistor. By modulating the capacitor value, we can model the arterial wall properties which depend on the arterial pressure. Simulations are performed in which vasoconstriction and vasodilation were modelled by varying the transmural pressure. As a result, we can observe the changes in the blood pressure for each arterial generation.

  6. Modeling of an implantable device for remote arterial pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, J. A.; Lechuga, Y.; Mozuelos, R.; Martinez, M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of illness and death in Europe, having a major impact on healthcare costs. An intelligent stent (e-stent), capable of obtaining and transmitting measurements of physiological parameters, can be a useful tool for real-time monitorization of arterial blockage without patient hospitalization. In this paper, a behavioral model of a pressure sensing-based e-stent is proposed and simulated under several restenosis conditions. Special attention has been given to the need of an accurate fault model, obtained from realistic finite-element simulations, to ensure long-term reliability; particularly for those faults whose behavior cannot be described by usual analytical models.

  7. Safety modeling of urban arterials in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuesong; Fan, Tianxiang; Chen, Ming; Deng, Bing; Wu, Bing; Tremont, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Traffic safety on urban arterials is influenced by several key variables including geometric design features, land use, traffic volume, and travel speeds. This paper is an exploratory study of the relationship of these variables to safety. It uses a comparatively new method of measuring speeds by extracting GPS data from taxis operating on Shanghai's urban network. This GPS derived speed data, hereafter called Floating Car Data (FCD) was used to calculate average speeds during peak and off-peak hours, and was acquired from samples of 15,000+ taxis traveling on 176 segments over 18 major arterials in central Shanghai. Geometric design features of these arterials and surrounding land use characteristics were obtained by field investigation, and crash data was obtained from police reports. Bayesian inference using four different models, Poisson-lognormal (PLN), PLN with Maximum Likelihood priors (PLN-ML), hierarchical PLN (HPLN), and HPLN with Maximum Likelihood priors (HPLN-ML), was used to estimate crash frequencies. Results showed the HPLN-ML models had the best goodness-of-fit and efficiency, and models with ML priors yielded estimates with the lowest standard errors. Crash frequencies increased with increases in traffic volume. Higher average speeds were associated with higher crash frequencies during peak periods, but not during off-peak periods. Several geometric design features including average segment length of arterial, number of lanes, presence of non-motorized lanes, number of access points, and commercial land use, were positively related to crash frequencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The chemical energy unit partial oxidation reactor operation simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakin, A. N.; Selivanov, A. A.; Batrakov, P. A.; Sotnikov, D. G.

    2018-01-01

    The chemical energy unit scheme for synthesis gas, electric and heat energy production which is possible to be used both for the chemical industry on-site facilities and under field conditions is represented in the paper. The partial oxidation reactor gasification process mathematical model is described and reaction products composition and temperature determining algorithm flow diagram is shown. The developed software product verification showed good convergence of the experimental values and calculations according to the other programmes: the temperature determining relative discrepancy amounted from 4 to 5 %, while the absolute composition discrepancy ranged from 1 to 3%. The synthesis gas composition was found out practically not to depend on the supplied into the partial oxidation reactor (POR) water vapour enthalpy and compressor air pressure increase ratio. Moreover, air consumption coefficient α increase from 0.7 to 0.9 was found out to decrease synthesis gas target components (carbon and hydrogen oxides) specific yield by nearly 2 times and synthesis gas target components required ratio was revealed to be seen in the water vapour specific consumption area (from 5 to 6 kg/kg of fuel).

  9. MODELLING AND CONTROL OF PARTIALLY SHADED PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Seet Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The photovoltaic (PV array controlled by Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT method for optimum PV power generation, particularly when the PV array is under partially shaded condition is presented in this paper. The system modelling is carried out in MATLAB-SIMULINK where the PV array is formed by five series connected identical PV modules. Under uniform solar irradiance conditions, the PV module and the PV array present nonlinear P-V characteristic but the maximum power point (MPP can be easily identified. However, when the PV array is under shaded conditions, the P-V characteristic becomes more complex with the present of multiple MPP. While the PV array operated at local MPP, the generated power is limited. Thus, the investigation on MPPT approach is carried out to maximize the PV generated power even when the PV array is under partially shaded conditions (PSC. Fuzzy logic is adopted into the conventional MPPT to form fuzzy logic based MPPT (FMPPT for better performance. The developed MPPT and FMPPT are compared, particularly the performances on the transient response and the steady state response when the array is under various shaded conditions. FMPPT shows better performance where the simulation results demonstrate FMPPT is able to facilitate the PV array to reach the MPP faster while it helps the PV array to produce a more stable output power.

  10. Constitutive modeling of human femoropopliteal artery biaxial stiffening due to aging and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desyatova, Anastasia; MacTaggart, Jason; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2017-12-01

    Atherosclerotic obstructive disease of the femoropopliteal artery (Peripheral Arterial Disease, PAD) is notorious for high treatment failure rates. Older age and diabetes mellitus (DM) are among the major risk factors for PAD, and both are associated with increased arterial stiffness. Our goal was to develop a constitutive model describing multiaxial arterial stiffening, and use it to portray aging of normal and diabetic human femoropopliteal arteries (FPA). Fresh human FPAs (n=744) were obtained from 13-82-year-old donors. Arteries were tested using planar biaxial extension, and their behavior was modeled with a constitutive relation that included stiffening functions of age. FPA diameter, wall thickness, circumferential, and longitudinal opening angles increased with age, while longitudinal pre-stretch decreased. Diameter and circumferential opening angle did not change with age in subjects with DM. Younger FPAs were more compliant longitudinally but became more isotropic with age. Arteries with DM stiffened significantly faster in the circumferential direction than arteries without DM. Constitutive model accurately portrayed orthotropic stiffening with age of both normal and diabetic arteries. Constitutive description of FPA aging contributes to understanding of arterial pathophysiology and can help improve fidelity of computational models investigating device-artery interaction in PAD repair by providing more personalized arterial properties. We have analyzed n=744 human femoropopliteal artery (FPA) specimens using biaxial tensile testing to derive constitutive description of FPA aging in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. The proposed model allows determination of FPA mechanical properties for subjects of any given age in the range of 13-82years. These results contribute to understanding of FPA pathophysiology and can help improve fidelity of computational models investigating device-artery interaction in peripheral arterial disease repair by providing more

  11. Predictive capabilities of various constitutive models for arterial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Florian; Polzer, Stanislav; Slažanský, Martin; Man, Vojtěch; Skácel, Pavel

    2018-02-01

    Aim of this study is to validate some constitutive models by assessing their capabilities in describing and predicting uniaxial and biaxial behavior of porcine aortic tissue. 14 samples from porcine aortas were used to perform 2 uniaxial and 5 biaxial tensile tests. Transversal strains were furthermore stored for uniaxial data. The experimental data were fitted by four constitutive models: Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden model (HGO), model based on generalized structure tensor (GST), Four-Fiber-Family model (FFF) and Microfiber model. Fitting was performed to uniaxial and biaxial data sets separately and descriptive capabilities of the models were compared. Their predictive capabilities were assessed in two ways. Firstly each model was fitted to biaxial data and its accuracy (in term of R 2 and NRMSE) in prediction of both uniaxial responses was evaluated. Then this procedure was performed conversely: each model was fitted to both uniaxial tests and its accuracy in prediction of 5 biaxial responses was observed. Descriptive capabilities of all models were excellent. In predicting uniaxial response from biaxial data, microfiber model was the most accurate while the other models showed also reasonable accuracy. Microfiber and FFF models were capable to reasonably predict biaxial responses from uniaxial data while HGO and GST models failed completely in this task. HGO and GST models are not capable to predict biaxial arterial wall behavior while FFF model is the most robust of the investigated constitutive models. Knowledge of transversal strains in uniaxial tests improves robustness of constitutive models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Partial differential equations in action from modelling to theory

    CERN Document Server

    Salsa, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    The book is intended as an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course for students from various disciplines, including applied mathematics, physics and engineering. It has evolved from courses offered on partial differential equations (PDEs) over the last several years at the Politecnico di Milano. These courses had a twofold purpose: on the one hand, to teach students to appreciate the interplay between theory and modeling in problems arising in the applied sciences, and on the other to provide them with a solid theoretical background in numerical methods, such as finite elements. Accordingly, this textbook is divided into two parts. The first part, chapters 2 to 5, is more elementary in nature and focuses on developing and studying basic problems from the macro-areas of diffusion, propagation and transport, waves and vibrations. In turn the second part, chapters 6 to 11, concentrates on the development of Hilbert spaces methods for the variational formulation and the analysis of (mainly) linear bo...

  13. Optimal difference-based estimation for partially linear models

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Yuejin

    2017-12-16

    Difference-based methods have attracted increasing attention for analyzing partially linear models in the recent literature. In this paper, we first propose to solve the optimal sequence selection problem in difference-based estimation for the linear component. To achieve the goal, a family of new sequences and a cross-validation method for selecting the adaptive sequence are proposed. We demonstrate that the existing sequences are only extreme cases in the proposed family. Secondly, we propose a new estimator for the residual variance by fitting a linear regression method to some difference-based estimators. Our proposed estimator achieves the asymptotic optimal rate of mean squared error. Simulation studies also demonstrate that our proposed estimator performs better than the existing estimator, especially when the sample size is small and the nonparametric function is rough.

  14. Partial differential equations in action from modelling to theory

    CERN Document Server

    Salsa, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    The book is intended as an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course for students from various disciplines, including applied mathematics, physics and engineering. It has evolved from courses offered on partial differential equations (PDEs) over the last several years at the Politecnico di Milano. These courses had a twofold purpose: on the one hand, to teach students to appreciate the interplay between theory and modeling in problems arising in the applied sciences, and on the other to provide them with a solid theoretical background in numerical methods, such as finite elements. Accordingly, this textbook is divided into two parts. The first part, chapters 2 to 5, is more elementary in nature and focuses on developing and studying basic problems from the macro-areas of diffusion, propagation and transport, waves and vibrations. In turn the second part, chapters 6 to 11, concentrates on the development of Hilbert spaces methods for the variational formulation and the analysis of (mainly) linear bo...

  15. Risk and Management Control: A Partial Least Square Modelling Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen; Pontoppidan, Iens Christian

    and interrelations between risk and areas within management accounting. The idea is that management accounting should be able to conduct a valid feed forward but also predictions for decision making including risk. This study reports the test of a theoretical model using partial least squares (PLS) on survey data...... collected from 72 different types of organizations within different Danish sectors. The results show direct relationships between risk practices and two dimensions; an identify/control dimension and an internal attitude dimension. Also indirect relationships exist between a future expectation dimension...... and a external attitude dimension. The results have important implications for both management control research and for the management control systems design for the way accountants consider the element of risk in their different tasks, both operational and strategic. Specifically, it seems that different risk...

  16. The meat market in Brazil: a partial equilibrium model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo da Silva e Souza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A partial equilibrium model for the meat market is fit to Brazilian data by three stages least squares. The model is consistent with the data and may be used for simulation purposes. In this context we compare model simulations for the near future with the OECD/ Aglink outlook. To illustrate using the model for simulations in policy assessments, we investigate the effect of a relative increase in corn price on the poultry and pork markets, coeteris paribus.Um modelo de equilíbrio parcial para o mercado brasileiro de carnes é ajustado por meio de mínimos quadrados em três estágios. O modelo mostra-se consistente com as observações e pode ser usado para simulações. Neste contexto, comparam-se simulações para o futuro próximo com as projeções da OECD/Aglink. Para ilustrar o emprego do modelo em simulações de políticas investiga-se o efeito de um aumento relativo no preço do milho nos mercados de carne suína e de frango, coeteris paribus.

  17. An Integrative Model of the Cardiovascular System Coupling Heart Cellular Mechanics with Arterial Network Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2013-01-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements. PMID:23960442

  18. Scaffolding learning by modelling: The effects of partially worked-out models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Y.G.; Bollen, Lars; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Lazonder, Adrianus W.

    2016-01-01

    Creating executable computer models is a potentially powerful approach to science learning. Learning by modelling is also challenging because students can easily get overwhelmed by the inherent complexities of the task. This study investigated whether offering partially worked-out models can

  19. Salvianolic acid A attenuates vascular remodeling in a pulmonary arterial hypertension rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Cai; Yuan, Tian-Yi; Zhang, Hui-Fang; Wang, Dan-Shu; Yan, Yu; Niu, Zi-Ran; Lin, Yi-Huang; Fang, Lian-Hua; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-06-01

    The current therapeutic approaches have a limited effect on the dysregulated pulmonary vascular remodeling, which is characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In this study we examined whether salvianolic acid A (SAA) extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine 'Dan Shen' attenuated vascular remodeling in a PAH rat model, and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. PAH was induced in rats by injecting a single dose of monocrotaline (MCT 60 mg/kg, sc). The rats were orally treated with either SAA (0.3, 1, 3 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) or a positive control bosentan (30 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 4 weeks. Echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements were performed on d 28. Then the hearts and lungs were harvested, the organ indices and pulmonary artery wall thickness were calculated, and biochemical and histochemical analysis were conducted. The levels of apoptotic and signaling proteins in the lungs were measured using immunoblotting. Treatment with SAA or bosentan effectively ameliorated MCT-induced pulmonary artery remodeling, pulmonary hemodynamic abnormalities and the subsequent increases of right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP). Furthermore, the treatments significantly attenuated MCT-induced hypertrophic damage of myocardium, parenchymal injury and collagen deposition in the lungs. Moreover, the treatments attenuated MCT-induced apoptosis and fibrosis in the lungs. The treatments partially restored MCT-induced reductions of bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPRII) and phosphorylated Smad1/5 in the lungs. SAA ameliorates the pulmonary arterial remodeling in MCT-induced PAH rats most likely via activating the BMPRII-Smad pathway and inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, SAA may have therapeutic potential for the patients at high risk of PAH.

  20. Groundwater flow modelling of an abandoned partially open repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockgaard, Niclas

    2010-12-01

    As a part of the license application, according to the nuclear activities act, for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken a series of groundwater flow modelling studies. These represent time periods with different hydraulic conditions and the simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. The modelling study presented here serves as an input for analyses of so-called future human actions that may affect the repository. The objective of the work was to investigate the hydraulic influence of an abandoned partially open repository. The intention was to illustrate a pessimistic scenario of the effect of open tunnels in comparison to the reference closure of the repository. The effects of open tunnels were studied for two situations with different boundary conditions: A 'temperate' case with present-day boundary conditions and a generic future 'glacial' case with an ice sheet covering the repository. The results were summarized in the form of analyses of flow in and out from open tunnels, the effect on hydraulic head and flow in the surrounding rock volume, and transport performance measures of flow paths from the repository to surface

  1. Application of Stochastic Partial Differential Equations to Reservoir Property Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Potsepaev, R.

    2010-09-06

    Existing algorithms of geostatistics for stochastic modelling of reservoir parameters require a mapping (the \\'uvt-transform\\') into the parametric space and reconstruction of a stratigraphic co-ordinate system. The parametric space can be considered to represent a pre-deformed and pre-faulted depositional environment. Existing approximations of this mapping in many cases cause significant distortions to the correlation distances. In this work we propose a coordinate free approach for modelling stochastic textures through the application of stochastic partial differential equations. By avoiding the construction of a uvt-transform and stratigraphic coordinates, one can generate realizations directly in the physical space in the presence of deformations and faults. In particular the solution of the modified Helmholtz equation driven by Gaussian white noise is a zero mean Gaussian stationary random field with exponential correlation function (in 3-D). This equation can be used to generate realizations in parametric space. In order to sample in physical space we introduce a stochastic elliptic PDE with tensor coefficients, where the tensor is related to correlation anisotropy and its variation is physical space.

  2. Investigation of Brain Arterial Circle Malformations Using Electrical Modelling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Capova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the cerebral arterial system investigation by means of electrical modelling and simulations. The main attention is paid to the brain arterial circle malformations (stenoses and aneurysms and their determination and evaluation by computer-aided methods as tools of a non-invasive diagnostics. The compensation possibilities of brain arterial circle in case of presence of concrete arterial malformations are modelled and simulated. The simulation results of brain arteries blood pressures and volume flow velocities time dependences are presented and discussed under various health conditions.

  3. Idiopathic renal hematuria in a dog; the usefulness of a method of partial occlusion of the renal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, M; Watanabe, T; Yugeta, N; Maeda, H; Fujii, K; Wakao, Y; Takahashi, M; Yamamura, H

    1997-04-01

    Exploratory laparotomy was performed on a dog suspected of having idiopathic renal hematuria. Two catheters were inserted into the bilateral ureters, and hematuria from the left kidney was confirmed. The blood flow was occluded in the ventral and dorsal rami of the left renal artery in order to localize the site of hemorrhage. As hematuria disappeared when the dorsal ramus was occluded, the site of renal hematuria was localized to the area dominated by the dorsal ramus of the renal artery. As a result of ligating the dorsal ramus of the left renal artery in this dog, renal hematuria subsided, and the dog has shown a favorable course, to date, one year after surgery.

  4. Reactor modeling and process analysis for partial oxidation of natural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis analyses a novel process of partial oxidation of natural gas and develops a numerical tool for the partial oxidation reactor modeling. The proposed process generates syngas in an integrated plant of a partial oxidation reactor, a syngas turbine and an air separation unit. This is called

  5. Tissue expander stimulated lengthening of arteries (TESLA) induces early endothelial cell proliferation in a novel rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potanos, Kristina; Fullington, Nora; Cauley, Ryan; Purcell, Patricia; Zurakowski, David; Fishman, Steven; Vakili, Khashayar; Kim, Heung Bae

    2016-04-01

    We examine the mechanism of aortic lengthening in a novel rodent model of tissue expander stimulated lengthening of arteries (TESLA). A rat model of TESLA was examined with a single stretch stimulus applied at the time of tissue expander insertion with evaluation of the aorta at 2, 4 and 7day time points. Measurements as well as histology and proliferation assays were performed and compared to sham controls. The aortic length was increased at all time points without histologic signs of tissue injury. Nuclear density remained unchanged despite the increase in length suggesting cellular hyperplasia. Cellular proliferation was confirmed in endothelial cell layer by Ki-67 stain. Aortic lengthening may be achieved using TESLA. The increase in aortic length can be achieved without tissue injury and results at least partially from cellular hyperplasia. Further studies are required to define the mechanisms involved in the growth of arteries under increased longitudinal stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bayesian inference for partially identified models exploring the limits of limited data

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Identification What Is against Us? What Is for Us? Some Simple Examples of Partially Identified ModelsThe Road Ahead The Structure of Inference in Partially Identified Models Bayesian Inference The Structure of Posterior Distributions in PIMs Computational Strategies Strength of Bayesian Updating, Revisited Posterior MomentsCredible Intervals Evaluating the Worth of Inference Partial Identification versus Model Misspecification The Siren Call of Identification Comp

  7. Modeling Effects of Axial Extension on Arterial Growth and Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín, A.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse mechanical perturbations elicit arterial growth and remodeling responses that appear to optimize structure and function so as to achieve mechanical homeostasis. For example, it is well known that functional adaptations to sustained changes in transmural pressure and blood flow primarily affect wall thickness and caliber to restore circumferential and wall shear stresses toward normal. More recently, however, it has been shown that changes in axial extension similarly prompt dramatic cell and matrix reorganization and turnover, resulting in marked changes in unloaded geometry and mechanical behavior that presumably restore axial stress toward normal. Because of the inability to infer axial stress from in vivo measurements, simulations are needed to examine this hypothesis and to guide the design of future experiments. In this paper, we show that a constrained mixture model predicts salient features of observed responses to step increases in axial extension, including marked increases in fibrous constituent production, leading to a compensatory lengthening that restores original mechanical behavior. Because axial extension can be modified via diverse surgical procedures, including bypass operations and exploited in tissue regeneration research, there is a need for increased attention to this important aspect of arterial biomechanics and mechanobiology. PMID:19649667

  8. An implicit solver for 1D arterial network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jason; Van Loon, Raoul

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the 1D blood flow equations are solved using a newly proposed enhanced trapezoidal rule method (ETM), which is an extension to the simplified trapezoidal rule method. At vessel junctions, the conservation of mass and conservation of total pressure are held as system constraints using Lagrange multipliers that can be physically interpreted as external flow rates. The ETM scheme is compared with published arterial network benchmark problems and a dam break problem. Strengths of the ETM scheme include being simple to implement, intuitive connection to lumped parameter models, and no restrictive stability criteria such as the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number. The ETM scheme does not require the use of characteristics at vessel junctions, or for inlet and outlet boundary conditions. The ETM forms an implicit system of equations, which requires only one global solve per time step for pressure, followed by flow rate update on the elemental system of equations; thus, no iterations are required per time step. Consistent results are found for all benchmark cases, and for a 56-vessel arterial network problem, it gives very satisfactory solutions at a spatial and time discretization that results in a maximum CFL of 3, taking 4.44 seconds per cardiac cycle. By increasing the time step and element size to produce a maximum CFL number of 15, the method takes only 0.39 second per cardiac cycle with only a small compromise on accuracy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Circulação extracorpórea com desvio veno-arterial e baixa pressão parcial de oxigênio Extracorporeal circulation with venous-arterial shunt and low oxygen partial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Coli Junqueira de MORAES

    2001-09-01

    da perfusão. No estudo clínico verificou-se baixo pO2 arterial e fluxo de perfusão normal. Comparando-se os resultados clínicos constatou-se que não houve diferença de mortalidade nos 2 grupos, porém no grupo com baixo pO2 e desvio veno-arterial o sangramento pós-operatório foi significativamente menor, utilizando-se três vezes menos hemoderivados. Além disso, não foi necessário o uso de misturador de gases.PURPOSE: This study is divided into 2 parts, an experimental study to establish a technique of extracorporeal circulation with low oxygen partial pressure and a clinical study to show the feasibility in humans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Experimental surgery with extracorporeal circulation was performed in 20 dogs divided into 2 groups of ten. In group I, cannulation was done first in the superior vena cava, then in the inferior vena cava, keeping normal heartbeat and breathing, controlled by a respirator and pure oxygen. After passing through a heat exchanger, the blood of each vena cava was injected in the femoral artery. Blood samples from the aorta were taken above the diaphragm in every 30 minutes to check gasometric values. In group II, the right atrium was drained and half of the blood injected in the pulmonary artery with another pump and picked up through the left ventricle to the reservoir that also works as a heat exchanger. The mixed blood (50% arterial and 50% venous was re-injected by another pump in the arterial circulation. The heart was maintained fibrillating and the breathing controlled by the respirator. In the clinical study, 40 patients were divided into 2 groups of 20 each. In group A the patients were bypassed in the conventional manner, that is, compressed air and oxygen in the oxigenator with high arterial pO2. In group B, pure oxygen was used in the membrane oxigenator and venous-arterial shunt, performed between 40% to 50%. RESULTS: In both groups, from a physiologic point of view there was shunting of 50% of venous blood to the

  10. A surgical model of permanent and transient middle cerebral artery stroke in the sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Wells

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal models are essential to study the pathophysiological changes associated with focal occlusive stroke and to investigate novel therapies. Currently used rodent models have yielded little clinical success, however large animal models may provide a more suitable alternative to improve clinical translation. We sought to develop a model of acute proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA ischemic stroke in sheep, including both permanent occlusion and transient occlusion with reperfusion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 18 adult male and female Merino sheep were randomly allocated to one of three groups (n = 6/gp: 1 sham surgery; 2 permanent proximal MCA occlusion (MCAO; or 3 temporary MCAO with aneurysm clip. All animals had invasive arterial blood pressure, intracranial pressure and brain tissue oxygen monitoring. At 4 h following vessel occlusion or sham surgery animals were killed by perfusion fixation. Brains were processed for histopathological examination and infarct area determination. 6 further animals were randomized to either permanent (n = 3 or temporary MCAO (n = 3 and then had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 4 h after MCAO. RESULTS: Evidence of ischemic injury in an MCA distribution was seen in all stroke animals. The ischemic lesion area was significantly larger after permanent (28.8% compared with temporary MCAO (14.6%. Sham animals demonstrated no evidence of ischemic injury. There was a significant reduction in brain tissue oxygen partial pressure after permanent vessel occlusion between 30 and 210 mins after MCAO. MRI at 4 h demonstrated complete proximal MCA occlusion in the permanent MCAO animals with a diffusion deficit involving the whole right MCA territory, whereas temporary MCAO animals demonstrated MRA evidence of flow within the right MCA and smaller predominantly cortical diffusion deficits. CONCLUSIONS: Proximal MCAO can be achieved in an ovine model of stroke via a surgical approach. Permanent

  11. Study and optimization of the partial discharges in capacitor model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by a digital sinusoidal generator. The acquisitions of Partial Discharges are made every 5 mn. The sensibility of measure is adjusted to limit the number of discharges emerging from chosen measuring range. An electric detection system with an assembly of current pulses visualization composed from a measuring resistor as ...

  12. On models for continuous facility location with partial coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik; Körner, Mark-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept of partial coverage distance, where demand points within a given threshold distance of a new facility are covered in the traditional sense, while non-covered demand points are penalized an amount proportional to their distance to the covered region. Two single...

  13. Study and optimization of the partial discharges in capacitor model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that the main cause of failure of these devices is the appearance of partial discharges initiated on edges of armatures. These devices can quickly slam if discharges occur continuously during the liquid impregnation. One of the criteria for selecting impregnating liquids is the behavior of gas bubbles when discharges occur.

  14. Study and optimization of the partial discharges in capacitor model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decay on the thin film of Polyethylene Terephthalate,. Journal of Electrostatics; Elsevier, Vol. 67, Issue 2+3,. 198-202. [10] Dervos C., Bourkas P.d., kayafos E.A & Stathopules. I.A., 1990. Enhanced Partial Discharges due to temperature increase in the combined system of a solid liquid dielectric, IEEE Trans on Elect Insula, ...

  15. The effects of RSR13 on microvascular Po2 kinetics and muscle contractile performance in the rat arterial ligation model of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Aiko; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2017-10-01

    Exercise intolerance and claudication are symptomatic of peripheral arterial disease. There is a close relationship between muscle O 2 delivery, microvascular oxygen partial pressure (P mv O 2 ), and contractile performance. We therefore hypothesized that a reduction of hemoglobin-oxygen affinity via RSR13 would maintain a higher P mv O 2 and enhance blood-muscle O 2 transport and contractile function. In male Wistar rats (12 wk of age), we created hindlimb ischemia via right-side iliac artery ligation (AL). The contralateral (left) muscle served as control (CONT). Seven days after AL, phosphorescence-quenching techniques were used to measure P mv O 2 at rest and during contractions (electrical stimulation; 1 Hz, 300 s) in tibialis anterior muscle (TA) under saline ( n = 10) or RSR13 ( n = 10) conditions. RSR13 at rest increased TA P mv O 2 in CONT (13.9 ± 1.6 to 19.3 ± 1.9 Torr, P < 0.05) and AL (9.0 ± 0.5 to 9.9 ± 0.7 Torr, P < 0.05). Furthermore, RSR13 extended maintenance of the initial TA force (i.e., improved contractile performance) such that force was not decreased significantly until contraction 240 vs. 150 in CONT and 80 vs. 20 in AL. This improved muscle endurance with RSR13 was accompanied by a greater ΔP mv O 2 (P mv O 2 decrease from baseline) (CONT, 7.4 ± 1.0 to 11.2 ± 1.3; AL, 6.9 ± 0.5 to 8.6 ± 0.6 Torr, both P < 0.05). Whereas RSR13 did not alter the kinetics profile of P mv O 2 (i.e., mean response time) substantially during contractions, muscle force was elevated, and the ratio of muscle force to P mv O 2 increased. In conclusion, reduction of hemoglobin-oxygen affinity via RSR13 in AL increased P mv O 2 and improved muscle contractile performance most likely via enhanced blood-muscle O 2 diffusion. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first investigation to examine the effect of RSR13 (erythrocyte allosteric effector) on skeletal muscle microvascular oxygen partial pressure kinetics and contractile function using an arterial ligation model of

  16. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  17. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo, who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression.

  18. Automatic segmentation of vertebral arteries in CT angiography using combined circular and cylindrical model fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Jin; Hong, Helen; Chung, Jin Wook

    2014-03-01

    We propose an automatic vessel segmentation method of vertebral arteries in CT angiography using combined circular and cylindrical model fitting. First, to generate multi-segmented volumes, whole volume is automatically divided into four segments by anatomical properties of bone structures along z-axis of head and neck. To define an optimal volume circumscribing vertebral arteries, anterior-posterior bounding and side boundaries are defined as initial extracted vessel region. Second, the initial vessel candidates are tracked using circular model fitting. Since boundaries of the vertebral arteries are ambiguous in case the arteries pass through the transverse foramen in the cervical vertebra, the circle model is extended along z-axis to cylinder model for considering additional vessel information of neighboring slices. Finally, the boundaries of the vertebral arteries are detected using graph-cut optimization. From the experiments, the proposed method provides accurate results without bone artifacts and eroded vessels in the cervical vertebra.

  19. Partial anomalous left pulmonary artery with associated bronchial anomalies in a patient with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Helen C; Manghat, Nathan E

    2012-01-01

    We present a 28 year old man with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot who underwent CT imaging prior to pulmonary valve replacement. CT demonstrated a partial anomalous LPA with associated bronchial anomalies and normal variant pulmonary venous drainage. The case demonstrates the utility of multislice CT in delineating 3-dimensional vascular and bronchial anatomy in these complex anomalies. Copyright © 2012 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  1. Modulation of collateral artery growth in a porcine hindlimb ligation model using MCP-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, Michiel; van Royen, Niels; Hoefer, Imo E.; Seidler, Randolph; Guth, Brian D.; Bode, Christoph; Schaper, Wolfgang; Piek, Jan J.; Buschmann, Ivo R.

    2003-01-01

    For an appropriate extrapolation to patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease, we tested the efficacy of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) treatment in a porcine hindlimb ligation model. In 40 minipigs, a femoral artery ligation was performed. Control animals were examined

  2. Modeling, implementation, and validation of arterial travel time reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Previous research funded by Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) developed a method for estimating : travel time reliability for arterials. This method was not initially implemented or validated using field data. This : project evaluated and r...

  3. Building a Flexible Software Factory Using Partial Domain Specific Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warmer, J.B.; Kleppe, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes some experiences in building a software factory by defining multiple small domain specific languages (DSLs) and having multiple small models per DSL. This is in high contrast with traditional approaches using monolithic models, e.g. written in UML. In our approach, models behave

  4. CVS-1123, a direct thrombin inhibitor, prevents occlusive arterial and venous thrombosis in a canine model of vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, S S; Miller, B V; Basler, G C; Lucchesi, B R

    1997-02-01

    CVS-1123, low-molecular-weight, direct thrombin inhibitor was studied in an anesthetized canine model of arterial and venous thrombosis to determine whether thrombin inhibition could reduce the incidence of occlusive thrombosis in response to vessel-wall injury. The left carotid artery (LCA) and right jugular vein (RJV) were instrumented with a flow probe, intraluminal electrode, and critical stenosis. Either saline (n = 9), or CVS-1123 (n = 12) was administered in a loading dose of 2 mg/kg i.v., followed by an infusion (2.46 mg/kg/h for 180 min). Vessel-wall injury was initiated by applying a 300-microA anodal current to the intimal surface of the LCA and RJV. Platelet aggregation in response to gamma-thrombin remained inhibited by CVS-1123 for 8 h. The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was increased and remained elevated for the duration of the protocol. The prothrombin time (PT) showed an initial increase and then a rapid decrease after the infusion was discontinued. There was a twofold increase in the bleeding time (BT) at 2 h. The time to occlusion of the LCA was prolonged (380 +/- 22 min in the CVS-1123 group vs. 152 +/- 18 min in the saline group) with seven of 12 patent arteries at 8 h. Similarly, the time to occlusion for RJV was prolonged (415 +/- 16 min in the CVS-1123 group vs. 99 +/- 8 min in the saline group) with eight of 12 veins remaining patent at 8 h. CVS-1123 administration was associated with a decrease in the thrombus weights in both the LCA and RJV as compared with the saline-treated animals. In summary, CVS-1123 modifies the thrombogenic response to deep vessel-wall injury in both the arterial and venous circulations. The results suggest that CVS-1123 is an effective antithrombin and may offer a therapeutic alternative to current antithrombins in the management of arterial and venous thrombosis.

  5. Effect of body position on the arterial partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in spontaneously breathing, conscious dogs in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Matthew W; Whitaker, Katie E; Hughes, Dez; Brodbelt, David C; Boag, Amanda K

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of body position on the arterial partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (PaO(2), PaCO(2)), and the efficiency of pulmonary oxygen uptake as estimated by alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (A-a difference). Prospective, randomized, crossover study. University teaching hospital, intensive care unit. Twenty-one spontaneously breathing, conscious, canine patients with arterial catheters placed as part of their management strategy. Patients were placed randomly into lateral or sternal recumbency. PaO(2) and PaCO(2) were measured after 15 minutes in this position. Patients were then repositioned into the opposite position and after 15 minutes the parameters were remeasured. Results presented as median (interquartile range). PaO(2) was significantly higher (P=0.001) when patients were positioned in sternal, 91.2 mm Hg (86.0-96.1 mm Hg), compared with lateral recumbency, 86.4 mm Hg (73.9-90.9 mm Hg). The median change was 5.4 mm Hg (1.1-17.9 mm Hg). All 7 dogs with a PaO(2)<80 mm Hg in lateral recumbency had improved arterial oxygenation in sternal recumbency, median increase 17.4 mm Hg with a range of 3.8-29.7 mm Hg. PaCO(2) levels when patients were in sternal recumbency, 30.5 mm Hg (27.3-32.7 mm Hg) were not significantly different from those in lateral recumbency, 32.2 mm Hg (28.3-36.0 mm Hg) (P=0.07). The median change was -1.9 mm Hg (-3.6-0.77 mm Hg). A-a differences were significantly lower (P=0.005) when patients were positioned in sternal recumbency, 21.7 mm Hg (17.3-27.7 mm Hg), compared with lateral recumbency, 24.6 mm Hg (20.4-36.3 mm Hg). The median change was -3.1 mm Hg (-14.6-0.9 mm Hg). PaO(2) was significantly higher when animals were positioned in sternal recumbency compared with lateral recumbency, predominantly due to improved pulmonary oxygen uptake (decreased A-a difference) rather than increased alveolar ventilation (decreased PaCO(2)). Patients with hypoxemia (defined as PaO(2)<80 mm Hg) in lateral recumbency may

  6. Globally COnstrained Local Function Approximation via Hierarchical Modelling, a Framework for System Modelling under Partial Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Sadegh, Payman

    2000-01-01

    be obtained. This paper presents a new approach for system modelling under partial (global) information (or the so called Gray-box modelling) that seeks to perserve the benefits of the global as well as local methodologies sithin a unified framework. While the proposed technique relies on local approximations......Local function approximations concern fitting low order models to weighted data in neighbourhoods of the points where the approximations are desired. Despite their generality and convenience of use, local models typically suffer, among others, from difficulties arising in physical interpretation...... simultaneously with the (local estimates of) function values. The approach is applied to modelling of a linear time variant dynamic system under prior linear time invariant structure where local regression fails as a result of high dimensionality....

  7. Stochastic partial differential equations a modeling, white noise functional approach

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Helge; Ubøe, Jan; Zhang, Tusheng

    1996-01-01

    This book is based on research that, to a large extent, started around 1990, when a research project on fluid flow in stochastic reservoirs was initiated by a group including some of us with the support of VISTA, a research coopera­ tion between the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters and Den norske stats oljeselskap A.S. (Statoil). The purpose of the project was to use stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) to describe the flow of fluid in a medium where some of the parameters, e.g., the permeability, were stochastic or "noisy". We soon realized that the theory of SPDEs at the time was insufficient to handle such equations. Therefore it became our aim to develop a new mathematically rigorous theory that satisfied the following conditions. 1) The theory should be physically meaningful and realistic, and the corre­ sponding solutions should make sense physically and should be useful in applications. 2) The theory should be general enough to handle many of the interesting SPDEs that occur in r...

  8. Artery buckling analysis using a two-layered wall model with collagen dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-07-01

    Artery buckling has been proposed as a possible cause for artery tortuosity associated with various vascular diseases. Since microstructure of arterial wall changes with aging and diseases, it is essential to establish the relationship between microscopic wall structure and artery buckling behavior. The objective of this study was to developed arterial buckling equations to incorporate the two-layered wall structure with dispersed collagen fiber distribution. Seven porcine carotid arteries were tested for buckling to determine their critical buckling pressures at different axial stretch ratios. The mechanical properties of these intact arteries and their intima-media layer were determined via pressurized inflation test. Collagen alignment was measured from histological sections and modeled by a modified von-Mises distribution. Buckling equations were developed accordingly using microstructure-motivated strain energy function. Our results demonstrated that collagen fibers disperse around two mean orientations symmetrically to the circumferential direction (39.02°±3.04°) in the adventitia layer; while aligning closely in the circumferential direction (2.06°±3.88°) in the media layer. The microstructure based two-layered model with collagen fiber dispersion described the buckling behavior of arteries well with the model predicted critical pressures match well with the experimental measurement. Parametric studies showed that with increasing fiber dispersion parameter, the predicted critical buckling pressure increases. These results validate the microstructure-based model equations for artery buckling and set a base for further studies to predict the stability of arteries due to microstructural changes associated with vascular diseases and aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Partially linear varying coefficient models stratified by a functional covariate

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Arnab

    2012-10-01

    We consider the problem of estimation in semiparametric varying coefficient models where the covariate modifying the varying coefficients is functional and is modeled nonparametrically. We develop a kernel-based estimator of the nonparametric component and a profiling estimator of the parametric component of the model and derive their asymptotic properties. Specifically, we show the consistency of the nonparametric functional estimates and derive the asymptotic expansion of the estimates of the parametric component. We illustrate the performance of our methodology using a simulation study and a real data application.

  10. Mathematical analysis of partial differential equations modeling electrostatic MEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, Pierpaolo; Guo, Yujin

    2010-01-01

    Micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), which combine electronics with miniature-size mechanical devices, are essential components of modern technology. It is the mathematical model describing "electrostatically actuated" MEMS that is addressed in this monograph. Even the simplified models that the authors deal with still lead to very interesting second- and fourth-order nonlinear elliptic equations (in the stationary case) and to nonlinear parabolic equations (in the dynamic case). While nonlinear eigenvalue problems-where the stationary MEMS models fit-are a well-developed

  11. Models of a partially hydrated Titan interior with clathrate crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Castillo-Rogez, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present an updated model of the interior evolution of Titan over time, assuming the silicate core was hydrated early in Titan's history and is dehydrating over time. The original model presented in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010) was motivated by a Cassini-derived moment of inertia (Iess et al., 2010) for Titan too large to be accommodated by classical fully differentiated models in which an anhydrous silicate core was overlain by a water ice (with possible perched ocean) mantle. Our model consisted of a silicate core still in the process of dehydrating today, a situation made possible by the leaching of radiogenic potassium from the silicates into the liquid water ocean. The crust of Titan was assumed to be pure water ice I. The model was consistent with the moment of inertia of Titan, but neglected the presence of large amounts of methane in the upper crust invoked to explain methane's persistence at present and through geologic time (Tobie et al. 2006). We have updated our model with such a feature. We have also improved our modeling with a better physical model for the dehydration of antigorite and other hydrated minerals. In particular our modeling now simulates heat advection resulting from water circulation (e.g., Seipold and Schilling 2003), rather than the purely conductive heat transfer regime assumed in the first version of our model. The modeling proceeds as in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010), with the thermal conductivity of the methane clathrate crust rather than that of ice I. The former is several times lower than that of the latter, and the two have rather different temperature dependences (English and Tse, 2009). The crust turns out to have essentially no bearing on the temperature of the silicate core and hence the timing of dehydration, but it profoundly affects the thickness of the high-pressure ice layer beneath the ocean. Indeed, with the insulating methane clathrate crust, there must be a liquid water ocean beneath the methane clathrate

  12. Peripheral arterial disease: application of the chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Marge; Myers, Kathryn; Forbes, Thomas L; Dresser, George; Weiss, Ed

    2011-12-01

    Management of chronic diseases is one of the greatest challenges facing health care professionals globally. With the aging population increasing worldwide, the number of patients afflicted with chronic diseases will increase. Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is a common, chronic atherosclerotic vascular disease that is associated with a high risk of stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. The objective of this study was to determine if a multidisciplinary Vascular Risk Management Clinic (VRMC) would improve risk factor management and health outcomes for patients with PAD with poorly-controlled risk factors. A multidisciplinary VRMC was established utilizing a novel application of the Chronic Care Model to meet the needs of PAD patients. Interventions included optimization of medical therapy, investigations for undiagnosed atherosclerosis in other vascular distributions, smoking cessation therapy, dietary assessment and counseling, and active involvement of patients in evaluating progress towards their risk factor target goals. Assessment of risk factor control was done at each clinic visit and included measures of symptom severity, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar (FBS), lipid profile, body mass index (BMI), and smoking status. Analysis of risk factors was performed for the first 103 patients followed in the clinic. Average follow-up time was 528 days, and statistically significant improvements were seen in blood pressure, LDL, HDL, total cholesterol (TC), and TC/HDL ratio, while BMI, FBS, and triglycerides remained stable. Participation in a specialized vascular risk management clinic resulted in significant improvement in risk factors for disease progression compared to baseline status. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev A.R.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  14. the Modeling of Hydraulic Jump Generated Partially on Sloping Apron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Abdulatif Jalil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling aims to characterize system behavior and achieve simulation close as possible of the reality. The rapid energy exchange in supercritical flow to generate quiet or subcritical flow in hydraulic jump phenomenon is important in design of hydraulic structures. Experimental and numerical modeling is done on type B hydraulic jump which starts first on sloping bed and its end on horizontal bed.  Four different apron slopes are used, for each one of these slopes the jump is generated on different locations by controlling the tail water depth.  Modelling validation is based on 120 experimental runs which they show that there is reliability. The air volume fraction which creates in through hydraulic jump varied between 0.18 and 0.28. While the energy exchanges process take place within 6.6, 6.1, 5.8, 5.5 of the average relative jump height for apron slopes of 0.18, 0.14, 0.10, 0.07 respectively. Within the limitations of this study, mathematical prediction model for relative hydraulic jump height is suggested.The model having an acceptable coefficient of determination.

  15. Using Partial Credit and Response History to Model User Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Inwegen, Eric G.; Adjei, Seth A.; Wang, Yan; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2015-01-01

    User modelling algorithms such as Performance Factors Analysis and Knowledge Tracing seek to determine a student's knowledge state by analyzing (among other features) right and wrong answers. Anyone who has ever graded an assignment by hand knows that some answers are "more wrong" than others; i.e. they display less of an understanding…

  16. Selective arterialization of a cardiac vein in a model of cardiac microangiopathy and macroangiopathy in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resetar, Michaela Elisabeth; Ullmann, Cris; Broeske, Petra; Ludwig-Schindler, Kristin; Doll, Nicolas K; Salameh, Aida; Dhein, Stefan; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2007-05-01

    Some patients with significant arteriosclerosis of the heart are not amenable to revascularization of a coronary artery because they have a combination of microangiopathy and significant macroangiopathy. We investigated the benefit of arterialization of a cardiac vein under these circumstances in an acute animal model. In the hearts of 8 sheep, microspheres were injected into the left coronary artery; 60 minutes later, a stenosis of the left anterior descending artery was performed. After 45 minutes, retrograde venous revascularization was performed by sewing the left internal thoracic artery to the concomitant vein of the left anterior descending artery in a beating-heart technique. For flow reversal, the vein was ligated proximally to the anastomosis. The efficiency of the bypass graft was evaluated by coronary angiography and flow measurement. Cardiac output, electrocardiography, and mean arterial blood pressure were assessed in each phase of the experiment. The ischemic state of the myocardium was confirmed by a significant decrease of cardiac output, stroke volume, and mean arterial blood pressure, and a significant elevation of the ST segment in the electrocardiography. After retrograde venous revascularization was established, cardiac output and stroke volume increased and ST elevations decreased. The grafts showed adequate flow (26.15 +/- 2.08 mL/min), and reversed blood flow in the grafted vein was proved by coronary angiography. Retrograde venous revascularization is possible and improves cardiac function in a state of acute ischemia caused by a combination of microangiopathy and macroangiopathy.

  17. Models & Searches of CPT Violation: a personal, very partial, list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2018-01-01

    In this talk, first I motivate theoretically, and then I review the phenomenology of, some models entailing CPT Violation (CPTV). The latter is argued to be responsible for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Cosmos, and may owe its origin to either Lorentz-violating background geometries, whose effects are strong in early epochs of the Universe but very weak today, being temperature dependent in general, or to an ill-defined CPT generator in some quantum gravity models entailing decoherence of quantum matter as a result of quantum degrees of freedom in the gravity sector that are inaccessible to the low-energy observers. In particular, for the latter category of CPTV, I argue that entangled states of neutral mesons (Kaons or B-systems), of central relevance to KLOE-2 experiment, can provide smoking-gun sensitive tests or even falsify some of these models. If CPT is ill-defined one may also encounter violations of the spin-statistics theorem, with possible consequences for the Pauli Exclusion Principle, which I only briefly touch upon.

  18. Models & Searches of CPT Violation: a personal, very partial, list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavromatos Nick E.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this talk, first I motivate theoretically, and then I review the phenomenology of, some models entailing CPT Violation (CPTV. The latter is argued to be responsible for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Cosmos, and may owe its origin to either Lorentz-violating background geometries, whose effects are strong in early epochs of the Universe but very weak today, being temperature dependent in general, or to an ill-defined CPT generator in some quantum gravity models entailing decoherence of quantum matter as a result of quantum degrees of freedom in the gravity sector that are inaccessible to the low-energy observers. In particular, for the latter category of CPTV, I argue that entangled states of neutral mesons (Kaons or B-systems, of central relevance to KLOE-2 experiment, can provide smoking-gun sensitive tests or even falsify some of these models. If CPT is ill-defined one may also encounter violations of the spin-statistics theorem, with possible consequences for the Pauli Exclusion Principle, which I only briefly touch upon.

  19. Soft sensor modelling by time difference, recursive partial least squares and adaptive model updating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Y; Xu, O; Yang, W; Zhou, L; Wang, J

    2017-01-01

    To investigate time-variant and nonlinear characteristics in industrial processes, a soft sensor modelling method based on time difference, moving-window recursive partial least square (PLS) and adaptive model updating is proposed. In this method, time difference values of input and output variables are used as training samples to construct the model, which can reduce the effects of the nonlinear characteristic on modelling accuracy and retain the advantages of recursive PLS algorithm. To solve the high updating frequency of the model, a confidence value is introduced, which can be updated adaptively according to the results of the model performance assessment. Once the confidence value is updated, the model can be updated. The proposed method has been used to predict the 4-carboxy-benz-aldehyde (CBA) content in the purified terephthalic acid (PTA) oxidation reaction process. The results show that the proposed soft sensor modelling method can reduce computation effectively, improve prediction accuracy by making use of process information and reflect the process characteristics accurately. (paper)

  20. Investigating Importance Weighting of Satisfaction Scores from a Formative Model with Partial Least Squares Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Chen, Lung Hung; Tsai, Ying-Mei

    2009-01-01

    This study introduced a formative model to investigate the utility of importance weighting on satisfaction scores with partial least squares analysis. Based on the bottom-up theory of satisfaction evaluations, the measurement structure for weighted/unweighted domain satisfaction scores was modeled as a formative model, whereas the measurement…

  1. A simple procedure to model water level fluctuations in partially inundated wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spieksma, JFM; Schouwenaars, JM

    When modelling groundwater behaviour in wetlands, there are specific problems related to the presence of open water in small-sized mosaic patterns. A simple quasi two-dimensional model to predict water level fluctuations in partially inundated wetlands is presented. In this model, the ratio between

  2. Calculus for cognitive scientists partial differential equation models

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, James K

    2016-01-01

    This book shows cognitive scientists in training how mathematics, computer science and science can be usefully and seamlessly intertwined. It is a follow-up to the first two volumes on mathematics for cognitive scientists, and includes the mathematics and computational tools needed to understand how to compute the terms in the Fourier series expansions that solve the cable equation. The latter is derived from first principles by going back to cellular biology and the relevant biophysics.  A detailed discussion of ion movement through cellular membranes, and an explanation of how the equations that govern such ion movement leading to the standard transient cable equation are included. There are also solutions for the cable model using separation of variables, as well an explanation of why Fourier series converge and a description of the implementation of MatLab tools to compute the solutions. Finally, the standard Hodgkin - Huxley model is developed for an excitable neuron and is solved using MatLab.

  3. Error propagation of partial least squares for parameters optimization in NIR modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chenzhao; Dai, Shengyun; Qiao, Yanjiang; Wu, Zhisheng

    2018-03-01

    A novel methodology is proposed to determine the error propagation of partial least-square (PLS) for parameters optimization in near-infrared (NIR) modeling. The parameters include spectral pretreatment, latent variables and variable selection. In this paper, an open source dataset (corn) and a complicated dataset (Gardenia) were used to establish PLS models under different modeling parameters. And error propagation of modeling parameters for water quantity in corn and geniposide quantity in Gardenia were presented by both type І and type II error. For example, when variable importance in the projection (VIP), interval partial least square (iPLS) and backward interval partial least square (BiPLS) variable selection algorithms were used for geniposide in Gardenia, compared with synergy interval partial least squares (SiPLS), the error weight varied from 5% to 65%, 55% and 15%. The results demonstrated how and what extent the different modeling parameters affect error propagation of PLS for parameters optimization in NIR modeling. The larger the error weight, the worse the model. Finally, our trials finished a powerful process in developing robust PLS models for corn and Gardenia under the optimal modeling parameters. Furthermore, it could provide a significant guidance for the selection of modeling parameters of other multivariate calibration models.

  4. New interpretation of arterial stiffening due to cigarette smoking using a structurally motivated constitutive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Majken; Henneberg, K-A; Jensen, J A

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading self-inflicted risk factor for cardiovascular diseases; it causes arterial stiffening with serious sequelea including atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms. This work presents a new interpretation of arterial stiffening caused by smoking based on data...... by smoking was reflected by consistent increase in an elastin-associated parameter and moreover by marked increase in the collagen-associated parameters. That is, we suggest that arterial stiffening due to cigarette smoking appears to be isotropic, which may allow simpler phenomenological models to capture...

  5. A new Bayesian model applied to cytogenetic partial body irradiation estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higueras, Manuel; Puig, Pedro; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Vinnikov, Volodymyr A.; Rothkamm, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A new zero-inflated Poisson model is introduced for the estimation of partial body irradiation dose and fraction of body irradiated. The Bayes factors are introduced as tools to help determine whether a data set of chromosomal aberrations obtained from a blood sample reflects partial or whole body irradiation. Two examples of simulated cytogenetic radiation exposure data are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this methodology in cytogenetic biological dosimetry. (authors)

  6. A new Bayesian model applied to cytogenetic partial body irradiation estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higueras, Manuel; Puig, Pedro; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Rothkamm, Kai

    2016-03-01

    A new zero-inflated Poisson model is introduced for the estimation of partial body irradiation dose and fraction of body irradiated. The Bayes factors are introduced as tools to help determine whether a data set of chromosomal aberrations obtained from a blood sample reflects partial or whole body irradiation. Two examples of simulated cytogenetic radiation exposure data are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this methodology in cytogenetic biological dosimetry. © Crown copyright 2015.

  7. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH 4 H 2 O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H 2 O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH) 4 are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components

  8. Stochastic pulse models of a partially-coherent elementary field representation of pulse coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2013-04-22

    A representation of the mutual coherence function (MCF) of a light pulse as an incoherent sum of partially-coherent elementary pulses is introduced. It is shown that this MCF can be decomposed into fully and partially-coherent constituents and three different pulse models of partially-coherent constituents are constructed: single elementary-pulse fluctuations, emission of elementary fields driven by white noise, and elementary pulses triggered by Poisson impulses. The fourth-order correlation function of this last model includes as limit cases those of the fluctuating-pulse and noise-driven-emission models. These results provide a means of extending elementary-field models to higher-order coherence theory.

  9. A chiral quark model for meson electroproduction in the S11 partial wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golli, B.; Sirca, S.

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the meson scattering and electroproduction amplitudes in the S11 partial wave in a coupled-channel approach that incorporates quasi-bound quark-model states. Using the quark wave functions and the quark-meson interaction from the Cloudy Bag Model, we obtain a good overall agreement with the available experimental results for the partial widths of the N(1535) and the N(1650) resonances as well as for the pion, eta and kaon electroproduction amplitudes. Our model is consistent with the N(1535) resonance being dominantly a genuine three-quark state rather than a quasi-bound state of mesons and baryons. (orig.)

  10. [Construction of a human cervical spine with bilateral vertebral artery fluid-solid coupling model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-hao; Shen, Zhi-bi; Deng, Zhen; Wang, Kuan; Zhan, Hong-sheng

    2015-03-01

    To construct a human cervical spine with bilateral vertebral artery fluid-solid coupling model. Helical CT images under the principle of reverse engineering and meshed in finite element model(FEM) related software were used to establish a human cervical spine with bilateral vertebral artery fluid-solid coupling model. In the process of modeling of vertebral body, vertebral artery, ligament, intervertebral disc, cartilage and endplate large anatomic data and cadaver experiments results were referenced. From the morphology and function the simulation of model with real physiological status was tested. The study showed that the stress concentration on the surface of vertebral body and the blood wall of the bilateral vertebral artery, and the result of the volume flow rate-time curve of bilateral vertebral artery of the model were consistent with the published literatures. This model was well consistent with the clinical phenomenon. The three-dimensional FEM of the human cervical spine established by the introduced method has been effectively verified. The modeling method would provide a new tool for research on the cervical spine biomechanics.

  11. Parametric uncertainty analysis of pulse wave propagation in a model of a human arterial network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Dongbin; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2007-10-01

    Reduced models of human arterial networks are an efficient approach to analyze quantitative macroscopic features of human arterial flows. The justification for such models typically arise due to the significantly long wavelength associated with the system in comparison to the lengths of arteries in the networks. Although these types of models have been employed extensively and many issues associated with their implementations have been widely researched, the issue of data uncertainty has received comparatively little attention. Similar to many biological systems, a large amount of uncertainty exists in the value of the parameters associated with the models. Clearly reliable assessment of the system behaviour cannot be made unless the effect of such data uncertainty is quantified. In this paper we present a study of parametric data uncertainty in reduced modelling of human arterial networks which is governed by a hyperbolic system. The uncertain parameters are modelled as random variables and the governing equations for the arterial network therefore become stochastic. This type stochastic hyperbolic systems have not been previously systematically studied due to the difficulties introduced by the uncertainty such as a potential change in the mathematical character of the system and imposing boundary conditions. We demonstrate how the application of a high-order stochastic collocation method based on the generalized polynomial chaos expansion, combined with a discontinuous Galerkin spectral/hp element discretization in physical space, can successfully simulate this type of hyperbolic system subject to uncertain inputs with bounds. Building upon a numerical study of propagation of uncertainty and sensitivity in a simplified model with a single bifurcation, a systematical parameter sensitivity analysis is conducted on the wave dynamics in a multiple bifurcating human arterial network. Using the physical understanding of the dynamics of pulse waves in these types of

  12. Global sensitivity analysis of a wave propagation model for arm arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leguy, C.A.D.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Belloum, A.S.Z.; Hoeks, A.P.G.; van de Vosse, F.N.

    2011-01-01

    Wave propagation models of blood flow and blood pressure in arteries play an important role in cardiovascular research. For application of these models in patient-specific simulations a number of model parameters, that are inherently subject to uncertainties, are required. The goal of this study is

  13. An isotonic partial credit model for ordering subjects on the basis of their sum scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtvoet, R.

    2012-01-01

    In practice, the sum of the item scores is often used as a basis for comparing subjects. For items that have more than two ordered score categories, only the partial credit model (PCM) and special cases of this model imply that the subjects are stochastically ordered on the common latent variable.

  14. The partial duration series method in regional index-flood modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1997-01-01

    A regional index-flood method based on the partial duration series model is introduced. The model comprises the assumptions of a Poisson-distributed number of threshold exceedances and generalized Pareto (GP) distributed peak magnitudes. The regional T-year event estimator is based on a regional...

  15. Logical Specification and Analysis of Fault Tolerant Systems through Partial Model Checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnesi, S.; Etalle, Sandro; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lenzini, G.; Martinelli, F.; Roychoudhury, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for a logical characterisation of fault tolerance and its formal analysis based on partial model checking techniques. The framework requires a fault tolerant system to be modelled using a formal calculus, here the CCS process algebra. To this aim we propose a uniform

  16. Development of a model of the coronary arterial tree for the 4D XCAT phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, George S. K.; Segars, W. Paul; Gullberg, Grant T.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2011-09-01

    A detailed three-dimensional (3D) model of the coronary artery tree with cardiac motion has great potential for applications in a wide variety of medical imaging research areas. In this work, we first developed a computer-generated 3D model of the coronary arterial tree for the heart in the extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom, thereby creating a realistic computer model of the human anatomy. The coronary arterial tree model was based on two datasets: (1) a gated cardiac dual-source computed tomography (CT) angiographic dataset obtained from a normal human subject and (2) statistical morphometric data of porcine hearts. The initial proximal segments of the vasculature and the anatomical details of the boundaries of the ventricles were defined by segmenting the CT data. An iterative rule-based generation method was developed and applied to extend the coronary arterial tree beyond the initial proximal segments. The algorithm was governed by three factors: (1) statistical morphometric measurements of the connectivity, lengths and diameters of the arterial segments; (2) avoidance forces from other vessel segments and the boundaries of the myocardium, and (3) optimality principles which minimize the drag force at the bifurcations of the generated tree. Using this algorithm, the 3D computational model of the largest six orders of the coronary arterial tree was generated, which spread across the myocardium of the left and right ventricles. The 3D coronary arterial tree model was then extended to 4D to simulate different cardiac phases by deforming the original 3D model according to the motion vector map of the 4D cardiac model of the XCAT phantom at the corresponding phases. As a result, a detailed and realistic 4D model of the coronary arterial tree was developed for the XCAT phantom by imposing constraints of anatomical and physiological characteristics of the coronary vasculature. This new 4D coronary artery tree model provides a unique simulation tool that can be

  17. The effect of ACE inhibition on the pulmonary vasculature in combined model of chronic hypoxia and pulmonary arterial banding in Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Shanelle; Baumgardt, Shelley; Molthen, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Microfocal CT was used to image the pulmonary arterial (PA) tree in rodent models of pulmonary hypertension (PH). CT images were used to measure the arterial tree diameter along the main arterial trunk at several hydrostatic intravascular pressures and calculate distensibility. High-resolution planar angiographic imaging was also used to examine distal PA microstructure. Data on pulmonary artery tree morphology improves our understanding of vascular remodeling and response to treatments. Angiotensin II (ATII) has been identified as a mediator of vasoconstriction and proliferative mitotic function. ATII has been shown to promote vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia as well as stimulate synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. Available ATII is targeted through angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), a method that has been used in animal models of PH to attenuate vascular remodeling and decrease pulmonary vascular resistance. In this study, we used rat models of chronic hypoxia to induce PH combined with partial left pulmonary artery occlusion (arterial banding, PLPAO) to evaluate effects of the ACEI, captopril, on pulmonary vascular hemodynamic and morphology. Male Sprague Dawley rats were placed in hypoxia (FiO2 0.1), with one group having underwent PLPAO three days prior to the chronic hypoxia. After the twenty-first day of hypoxia exposure, treatment was started with captopril (20 mg/kg/day) for an additional twenty-one days. At the endpoint, lungs were excised and isolated to examine: pulmonary vascular resistance, ACE activity, pulmonary vessel morphology and biomechanics. Hematocrit and RV/LV+septum ratio was also measured. CT planar images showed less vessel dropout in rats treated with captopril versus the non-treatment lungs. Distensibility data shows no change in rats treated with captopril in both chronic hypoxia (CH) and CH with PLPAO (CH+PLPAO) models. Hemodynamic measurements also show no change in the pulmonary vascular

  18. Computational fluid dynamics study of common stent models inside idealised curved coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Winson X; Poon, Eric K W; Hutchins, Nicholas; Thondapu, Vikas; Barlis, Peter; Ooi, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    The haemodynamic behaviour of blood inside a coronary artery after stenting is greatly affected by individual stent features as well as complex geometrical properties of the artery including tortuosity and curvature. Regions at higher risk of restenosis, as measured by low wall shear stress (WSS computational modelling and computational fluid dynamics methodologies were used to analyse the haemodynamic characteristics in curved stented arteries using several common stent models. Results in this study showed that stent strut thickness was one major factor influencing the distribution of WSS in curved arteries. Regions of low WSS were found behind struts, particularly those oriented at a large angle relative to the streamwise flow direction. These findings were similar to those obtained in studies of straight arteries. An uneven distribution of WSS at the inner and outer bends of curved arteries was observed where the WSS was lower at the inner bend. In this study, it was also shown that stents with a helical configuration generated an extra swirling component of the flow based on the helical direction; however, this extra swirl in the flow field did not cause significant changes on the distribution of WSS under the current setup.

  19. Patient-specific 3D hemodynamics modelling of left coronary artery under hyperemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Govindaraju, Kalimuthu; Nik-Ghazali, N; Badarudin, A; Viswanathan, Girish N; Ahmed, N J Salman; Khan, T M Yunus

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of various degrees of percentage stenosis on hemodynamic parameters during the hyperemic flow condition. 3D patient-specific coronary artery models were generated based on the CT scan data using MIMICS-18. Numerical simulation was performed for normal and stenosed coronary artery models of 70, 80 and 90% AS (area stenosis). Pressure, velocity, wall shear stress and fractional flow reserve (FFR) were measured and compared with the normal coronary artery model during the cardiac cycle. The results show that, as the percentage AS increase, the pressure drop increases as compared with the normal coronary artery model. Considerable elevation of velocity was observed as the percentage AS increases. The results also demonstrate a recirculation zone immediate after the stenosis which could lead to further progression of stenosis in the flow-disturbed area. Highest wall shear stress was observed for 90% AS as compared to other models that could result in the rupture of coronary artery. The FFR of 90% AS is found to be considerably low.

  20. 3D Printing of Preoperative Simulation Models of a Splenic Artery Aneurysm: Precision and Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Hidemasa; Amemiya, Shiori; Shibata, Eisuke; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is attracting increasing attention in the medical field. This study aimed to apply 3D printing to the production of hollow splenic artery aneurysm models for use in the simulation of endovascular treatment, and to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the simulation model. From 3D computed tomography (CT) angiography data of a splenic artery aneurysm, 10 hollow models reproducing the vascular lumen were created using a fused deposition modeling-type desktop 3D printer. After filling with water, each model was scanned using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of the lumen. All images were coregistered, binarized, and then combined to create an overlap map. The cross-sectional area of the splenic artery aneurysm and its standard deviation (SD) were calculated perpendicular to the x- and y-axes. Most voxels overlapped among the models. The cross-sectional areas were similar among the models, with SDs simulation modeling of a visceral artery aneurysm using a fused deposition modeling-type desktop 3D printer and computed tomography angiography data is highly precise and accurate. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Three-dimensional modelling of the human carotid artery using the lattice Boltzmann method: I. Model and velocity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, J [Cardiovascular Research Group Physics, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351 (Australia); Buick, J M [Department of Mechanical and Design Engineering, University of Portsmouth, Anglesea Building, Anglesea Road, Portsmouth PO1 3DJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-21

    Numerical modelling is a powerful tool in the investigation of human blood flow and arterial diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is known that near wall velocity and shear are important in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper results for a simulation of blood flow in a three-dimensional carotid artery geometry using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented. The velocity fields in the body of the fluid are analysed at six times of interest during a physiologically accurate velocity waveform. It is found that the three-dimensional model agrees well with previous literature results for carotid artery flow. Regions of low near wall velocity and circulatory flow are observed near the outer wall of the bifurcation and in the lower regions of the external carotid artery, which are regions that are typically prone to atherosclerosis.

  2. Three-dimensional modelling of the human carotid artery using the lattice Boltzmann method: I. Model and velocity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J; Buick, J M

    2008-01-01

    Numerical modelling is a powerful tool in the investigation of human blood flow and arterial diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is known that near wall velocity and shear are important in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper results for a simulation of blood flow in a three-dimensional carotid artery geometry using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented. The velocity fields in the body of the fluid are analysed at six times of interest during a physiologically accurate velocity waveform. It is found that the three-dimensional model agrees well with previous literature results for carotid artery flow. Regions of low near wall velocity and circulatory flow are observed near the outer wall of the bifurcation and in the lower regions of the external carotid artery, which are regions that are typically prone to atherosclerosis.

  3. Highly accelerated cardiac cine parallel MRI using low-rank matrix completion and partial separability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jingyuan; Nakarmi, Ukash; Zhang, Chaoyi; Ying, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach to highly accelerated dynamic parallel MRI using low rank matrix completion, partial separability (PS) model. In data acquisition, k-space data is moderately randomly undersampled at the center kspace navigator locations, but highly undersampled at the outer k-space for each temporal frame. In reconstruction, the navigator data is reconstructed from undersampled data using structured low-rank matrix completion. After all the unacquired navigator data is estimated, the partial separable model is used to obtain partial k-t data. Then the parallel imaging method is used to acquire the entire dynamic image series from highly undersampled data. The proposed method has shown to achieve high quality reconstructions with reduction factors up to 31, and temporal resolution of 29ms, when the conventional PS method fails.

  4. Simplified Method for Modeling the Impact of Arbitrary Partial Shading Conditions on PV Array Performance: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris

    2015-09-15

    It is often difficult to model the effects of partial shading conditions on PV array performance, as shade losses are nonlinear and depend heavily on a system's particular configuration. This work describes and implements a simple method for modeling shade loss: a database of shade impact results (loss percentages), generated using a validated, detailed simulation tool and encompassing a wide variety of shading scenarios. The database is intended to predict shading losses in crystalline silicon PV arrays and is accessed using basic inputs generally available in any PV simulation tool. Performance predictions using the database are within 1-2% of measured data for several partially shaded PV systems, and within 1% of those predicted by the full, detailed simulation tool on an annual basis. The shade loss database shows potential to considerably improve performance prediction for partially shaded PV systems.

  5. Experimental study on intra-arterial infusion of basic fibroblast growth factor in the ischemic limbs of rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Yang Wenduo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intra-arterial infusion of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on improving neovascularization, vascular perfusion and the function of partially ischemic limbs of rabbits. Methods: Twenty-seven New Zealand male rabbits were selected. Partial ischemia model was induced by surgical ligation of the primary branches of right femoral artery in each animal, and the left hind limb of each animal was served as a nonischemic control. Then, 27 rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: intra-arterial (IA) infusion of bFGF (n=9), intravenous (IV) infusion of bFGF and IA infusion of saline (n=9). Infusion was separately performed immediately after vascular ligation, 8th and 15th days post-surgery with 10 μg (4 ml) of bFGF per-time (or the same volume of saline). The differences between three groups and between ischemic and nonischemic limbs of the same group were compared and evaluated by the following indexes: (1) vessel section count (VSC), vessel section surface area (VSS) and vessel section perimeter (VSP) in the field of ischemic muscle tissues taken at 22nd day postoperatively; (2) capillary refilling time of ischemic limbs; and (3) functional and trophic changes of ischemic limbs. Statistical differences were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and T test. Results: VSC, VSS and VSP of the IA-bFGF group were significantly increased than those of the IV-bFGF and IA-saline groups (P<0.01). At 22nd day postoperatively, the capillary refilling time, new hair growth, the appearance and function of all ischemic limbs in IA-bFGF group were approximately normal. However, in IA-saline group, the ischemic changes, capillary refilling time and the function of ischemic limbs were not improved significantly. All the indexes of IV-bFGF group showed no difference statistically from those of IA-saline group. Conclusions: This experimental study identifies that intra-arterial infusion of bFGF may significantly promote neovascularization and vascular

  6. A new beating-heart off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting training model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Kuijpers, Michiel; Bijleveld, Aanke; De Maat, Gijs E.; Koene, Bart M.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; Natour, Ehsan; Mariani, Massimo A.

    OBJECTIVES: Training models are essential in mastering the skills required for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). We describe a new, high-fidelity, effective and reproducible beating-heart OPCAB training model in human cadavers. METHODS: Human cadavers were embalmed according to the

  7. Modeling of Kidney Hemodynamics: Probability-Based Topology of an Arterial Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry D; Marsh, Donald J; Postnov, Dmitry E

    2016-01-01

    CT) data we develop an algorithm for generating the renal arterial network. We then introduce a mathematical model describing blood flow dynamics and nephron to nephron interaction in the network. The model includes an implementation of electrical signal propagation along a vascular wall. Simulation...

  8. Multi-scale parameterisation of a myocardial perfusion model using whole-organ arterial networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyde, Eoin R.; Cookson, Andrew N.; Lee, Jack; Michler, Christian; Goyal, Ayush; Sochi, Taha; Chabiniok, Radomir; Sinclair, Matthew; Nordsletten, David A.; Spaan, Jos; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Siebes, Maria; Smith, Nicolas P.

    2014-01-01

    A method to extract myocardial coronary permeabilities appropriate to parameterise a continuum porous perfusion model using the underlying anatomical vascular network is developed. Canine and porcine whole-heart discrete arterial models were extracted from high-resolution cryomicrotome vessel image

  9. Implementing The Automated Phases Of The Partially-Automated Digital Triage Process Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary D Cantrell

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital triage is a pre-digital-forensic phase that sometimes takes place as a way of gathering quick intelligence. Although effort has been undertaken to model the digital forensics process, little has been done to date to model digital triage. This work discuses the further development of a model that does attempt to address digital triage the Partially-automated Crime Specific Digital Triage Process model. The model itself will be presented along with a description of how its automated functionality was implemented to facilitate model testing.

  10. Towards the virtual artery: a multiscale model for vascular physiology at the physics-chemistry-biology interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Alfons G; Alowayyed, Saad; Lorenz, Eric; Melnikova, Natalia; Mountrakis, Lampros; van Rooij, Britt; Svitenkov, Andrew; Závodszky, Gábor; Zun, Pavel

    2016-11-13

    This discussion paper introduces the concept of the Virtual Artery as a multiscale model for arterial physiology and pathologies at the physics-chemistry-biology (PCB) interface. The cellular level is identified as the mesoscopic level, and we argue that by coupling cell-based models with other relevant models on the macro- and microscale, a versatile model of arterial health and disease can be composed. We review the necessary ingredients, both models of arteries at many different scales, as well as generic methods to compose multiscale models. Next, we discuss how this can be combined into the virtual artery. Finally, we argue that the concept of models at the PCB interface could or perhaps should become a powerful paradigm, not only as in our case for studying physiology, but also for many other systems that have such PCB interfaces.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. Towards the virtual artery: a multiscale model for vascular physiology at the physics–chemistry–biology interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowayyed, Saad; Lorenz, Eric; Melnikova, Natalia; Mountrakis, Lampros; van Rooij, Britt; Svitenkov, Andrew; Závodszky, Gábor; Zun, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    This discussion paper introduces the concept of the Virtual Artery as a multiscale model for arterial physiology and pathologies at the physics–chemistry–biology (PCB) interface. The cellular level is identified as the mesoscopic level, and we argue that by coupling cell-based models with other relevant models on the macro- and microscale, a versatile model of arterial health and disease can be composed. We review the necessary ingredients, both models of arteries at many different scales, as well as generic methods to compose multiscale models. Next, we discuss how this can be combined into the virtual artery. Finally, we argue that the concept of models at the PCB interface could or perhaps should become a powerful paradigm, not only as in our case for studying physiology, but also for many other systems that have such PCB interfaces. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling at the physics–chemistry–biology interface’. PMID:27698036

  12. Parent Ratings of ADHD Symptoms: Generalized Partial Credit Model Analysis of Differential Item Functioning across Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Generalized partial credit model, which is based on item response theory (IRT), was used to test differential item functioning (DIF) for the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.), inattention (IA), and hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI) symptoms across boys and girls. Method: To accomplish this, parents completed…

  13. Application of partial differential equation modeling of the control/structural dynamics of flexible spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Rajiyah, H.

    1991-01-01

    Partial differential equations for modeling the structural dynamics and control systems of flexible spacecraft are applied here in order to facilitate systems analysis and optimization of these spacecraft. Example applications are given, including the structural dynamics of SCOLE, the Solar Array Flight Experiment, the Mini-MAST truss, and the LACE satellite. The development of related software is briefly addressed.

  14. New model reduction technique for a class of parabolic partial differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vajta, Miklos

    1991-01-01

    A model reduction (or lumping) technique for a class of parabolic-type partial differential equations is given, and its application is discussed. The frequency response of the temperature distribution in any multilayer solid is developed and given by a matrix expression. The distributed transfer

  15. An Efficient Implementation of Partial Condensing for Nonlinear Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frison, Gianluca; Kouzoupis, Dimitris; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    Partial (or block) condensing is a recently proposed technique to reformulate a Model Predictive Control (MPC) problem into a form more suitable for structure-exploiting Quadratic Programming (QP) solvers. It trades off horizon length for input vector size, and this degree of freedom can...

  16. Linear Mixture Models and Partial Unmixing in Multi- and Hyperspectral Image Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    1998-01-01

    As a supplement or an alternative to classification of hyperspectral image data the linear mixture model is considered in order to obtain estimates of abundance of each class or end-member in pixels with mixed membership. Full unmixing and the partial unmixing methods orthogonal subspace projection...... partial unmixing when we know the desired end-member spectra only and not the full set of end-member spectra. This is an advantage over full unmixing and OSP. An example with a simple simulated 2-band image shows the ability of the CEM method to isolate the desired signal. A case study with a 30 bands...

  17. Constraints on the rheology of the partially molten mantle from numerical models of laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, J. F.; Alisic Jewell, L.; Rhebergen, S.; Katz, R. F.; Wells, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    One of the fundamental components in any dynamical model of melt transport is the rheology of partially molten rock. This rheology is poorly understood, and one way in which a better understanding can be obtained is by comparing the results of laboratory deformation experiments to numerical models. Here we present a comparison between numerical models and the laboratory setup of Qi et al. 2013 (EPSL), where a cylinder of partially molten rock containing rigid spherical inclusions was placed under torsion. We have replicated this setup in a finite element model which solves the partial differential equations describing the mechanical process of compaction. These computationally-demanding 3D simulations are only possible due to the recent development of a new preconditioning method for the equations of magma dynamics. The experiments show a distinct pattern of melt-rich and melt-depleted regions around the inclusions. In our numerical models, the pattern of melt varies with key rheological parameters, such as the ratio of bulk to shear viscosity, and the porosity- and strain-rate-dependence of the shear viscosity. These observed melt patterns therefore have the potential to constrain rheological properties. While there are many similarities between the experiments and the numerical models, there are also important differences, which highlight the need for better models of the physics of two-phase mantle/magma dynamics. In particular, the laboratory experiments display more pervasive melt-rich bands than is seen in our numerics.

  18. Validation of a fluid-structure interaction numerical model for predicting flow transients in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyanta, V; Ivankovic, A; Karac, A

    2009-08-07

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) numerical models are now widely used in predicting blood flow transients. This is because of the importance of the interaction between the flowing blood and the deforming arterial wall to blood flow behaviour. Unfortunately, most of these FSI models lack rigorous validation and, thus, cannot guarantee the accuracy of their predictions. This paper presents the comprehensive validation of a two-way coupled FSI numerical model, developed to predict flow transients in compliant conduits such as arteries. The model is validated using analytical solutions and experiments conducted on polyurethane mock artery. Flow parameters such as pressure and axial stress (and precursor) wave speeds, wall deformations and oscillating frequency, fluid velocity and Poisson coupling effects, were used as the basis of this validation. Results show very good comparison between numerical predictions, analytical solutions and experimental data. The agreement between the three approaches is generally over 95%. The model also shows accurate prediction of Poisson coupling effects in unsteady flows through flexible pipes, which up to this stage have only being predicted analytically. Therefore, this numerical model can accurately predict flow transients in compliant vessels such as arteries.

  19. Doubly robust estimation of generalized partial linear models for longitudinal data with dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiming; Fu, Bo; Qin, Guoyou; Zhu, Zhongyi

    2017-12-01

    We develop a doubly robust estimation of generalized partial linear models for longitudinal data with dropouts. Our method extends the highly efficient aggregate unbiased estimating function approach proposed in Qu et al. (2010) to a doubly robust one in the sense that under missing at random (MAR), our estimator is consistent when either the linear conditional mean condition is satisfied or a model for the dropout process is correctly specified. We begin with a generalized linear model for the marginal mean, and then move forward to a generalized partial linear model, allowing for nonparametric covariate effect by using the regression spline smoothing approximation. We establish the asymptotic theory for the proposed method and use simulation studies to compare its finite sample performance with that of Qu's method, the complete-case generalized estimating equation (GEE) and the inverse-probability weighted GEE. The proposed method is finally illustrated using data from a longitudinal cohort study. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  20. The partial duration series method in regional index-flood modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1997-01-01

    A regional index-flood method based on the partial duration series model is introduced. The model comprises the assumptions of a Poisson-distributed number of threshold exceedances and generalized Pareto (GP) distributed peak magnitudes. The regional T-year event estimator is based on a regional ...... preferable to at-site estimation in moderately heterogeneous and homogeneous regions for large sample sizes. Modest intersite dependence has only a small effect on the performance of the regional index-flood estimator.......A regional index-flood method based on the partial duration series model is introduced. The model comprises the assumptions of a Poisson-distributed number of threshold exceedances and generalized Pareto (GP) distributed peak magnitudes. The regional T-year event estimator is based on a regional...

  1. Diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting He

    Full Text Available A comprehensive search of PubMed and Embase was performed in January 2015 to examine the available literature on validated diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease and to describe the characteristics of the models. Studies that were designed to develop and validate diagnostic models of pre-test probability for stable coronary artery disease were included. Data regarding baseline patient characteristics, procedural characteristics, modeling methods, metrics of model performance, risk of bias, and clinical usefulness were extracted. Ten studies involving the development of 12 models and two studies focusing on external validation were identified. Seven models were validated internally, and seven models were validated externally. Discrimination varied between studies that were validated internally (C statistic 0.66-0.81 and externally (0.49-0.87. Only one study presented reclassification indices. The majority of better performing models included sex, age, symptoms, diabetes, smoking, and hyperlipidemia as variables. Only two diagnostic models evaluated the effects on clinical decision making processes or patient outcomes. Most diagnostic models of the pre-test probability of stable coronary artery disease have had modest success, and very few present data regarding the effects of these models on clinical decision making processes or patient outcomes.

  2. Multidimensional model of apathy in older adults using partial least squares--path modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffard, Stéphane; Bortolon, Catherine; Burca, Marianna; Gely-Nargeot, Marie-Christine; Capdevielle, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Apathy defined as a mental state characterized by a lack of goal-directed behavior is prevalent and associated with poor functioning in older adults. The main objective of this study was to identify factors contributing to the distinct dimensions of apathy (cognitive, emotional, and behavioral) in older adults without dementia. One hundred and fifty participants (mean age, 80.42) completed self-rated questionnaires assessing apathy, emotional distress, anticipatory pleasure, motivational systems, physical functioning, quality of life, and cognitive functioning. Data were analyzed using partial least squares variance-based structural equation modeling in order to examine factors contributing to the three different dimensions of apathy in our sample. Overall, the different facets of apathy were associated with cognitive functioning, anticipatory pleasure, sensitivity to reward, and physical functioning, but the contribution of these different factors to the three dimensions of apathy differed significantly. More specifically, the impact of anticipatory pleasure and physical functioning was stronger for the cognitive than for emotional apathy. Conversely, the impact of sensibility to reward, although small, was slightly stronger on emotional apathy. Regarding behavioral apathy, again we found similar latent variables except for the cognitive functioning whose impact was not statistically significant. Our results highlight the need to take into account various mechanisms involved in the different facets of apathy in older adults without dementia, including not only cognitive factors but also motivational variables and aspects related to physical disability. Clinical implications are discussed.

  3. A partially ionized plasma modeling; Un modele de plasma partiellement ionise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Thanh, K.C.; Raviart, P.A

    2003-07-01

    We propose a model for the partially ionized plasma sheaths near the anode of an anodic spot electric arc where the cathode is considered as an electron emitter. A fluid description takes into account the heating and the ionization of the plasma induced by the electron beam. As physical hypothesis we assume that the condition of charge neutrality is valid. According that the electron mass can be neglected compared to the ion mass, we can assume that ions and atoms have the same velocity and the same temperature. Electrons and heavy particles are then regarded as two separate fluids coexisting in the plasma. Governing equations are then multi-fluid equations with relaxation correction to the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and heating by Joule effect. Equations are solved by an operator splitting procedure. That is we first discretize the homogeneous conservation laws (i.e. without source terms) by a finite volume method. The second step is to solve the ordinary differential system (i.e, governing equation without transport terms) with an implicit scheme. (authors)

  4. Mechanical characterization of atherosclerotic arteries using finite-element modeling: feasibility study on mock arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Valérie; Mongrain, Rosaire; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    Clinical studies on lipid-lowering therapy have shown that changing the composition of lipid pools reduced significantly the risk of cardiac events associated with plaque rupture. It has been shown also that changing the composition of the lipid pool affects its mechanical properties. However, knowledge about the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic lesions remains limited due to the difficulty of the experiments. This paper aims to assess the feasibility of characterizing a lipid pool embedded in the wall of a pressurized vessel using finite-element simulations and an optimization algorithm. Finite-element simulations of inflation experiments were used together with nonlinear least squares algorithm to estimate the material model parameters of the wall and of the inclusion. An optimal fit of the simulated experiment and the real experiment was sought with the parameter estimation algorithm. The method was first tested on a single-layer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel stenotic vessel, and then, applied on a double-layered PVA cryogel stenotic vessel with a lipid inclusion.

  5. The Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses on Hemodynamic Characteristics in Stenosed Arterial Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stenosis plays an important role in the progressions of thrombosis and stroke. In the present study, a standard axisymmetric tube model of the stenotic artery is introduced and the degree of stenosis η is evaluated by the area ratio of the blockage to the normal vessel. A normal case (η=0 and four stenotic cases of η=0.25, 0.5, 0.625, and 0.75 with a constant Reynolds number of 300 are simulated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD, respectively, with the Newtonian and Carreau models for comparison. Results show that for both models, the poststenotic separation vortex length increases exponentially with the growth of stenosis degree. However, the vortex length of the Carreau model is shorter than that of the Newtonian model. The artery narrowing accelerates blood flow, which causes high blood pressure and wall shear stress (WSS. The pressure drop of the η=0.75 case is nearly 8 times that of the normal value, while the WSS peak at the stenosis region of η=0.75 case even reaches up to 15 times that of the normal value. The present conclusions are of generality and contribute to the understanding of the dynamic mechanisms of artery stenosis diseases.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann model for high-order nonlinear partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zhenhua; He, Nanzhong; Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a general lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for the high-order nonlinear partial differential equation with the form ∂tϕ +∑k=1mαk∂xkΠk(ϕ ) =0 (1 ≤k ≤m ≤6 ), αk are constant coefficients, Πk(ϕ ) are some known differential functions of ϕ . As some special cases of the high-order nonlinear partial differential equation, the classical (m)KdV equation, KdV-Burgers equation, K (n ,n ) -Burgers equation, Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, and Kawahara equation can be solved by the present LB model. Compared to the available LB models, the most distinct characteristic of the present model is to introduce some suitable auxiliary moments such that the correct moments of equilibrium distribution function can be achieved. In addition, we also conducted a detailed Chapman-Enskog analysis, and found that the high-order nonlinear partial differential equation can be correctly recovered from the proposed LB model. Finally, a large number of simulations are performed, and it is found that the numerical results agree with the analytical solutions, and usually the present model is also more accurate than the existing LB models [H. Lai and C. Ma, Sci. China Ser. G 52, 1053 (2009), 10.1007/s11433-009-0149-3; H. Lai and C. Ma, Phys. A (Amsterdam) 388, 1405 (2009), 10.1016/j.physa.2009.01.005] for high-order nonlinear partial differential equations.

  7. Utilizing generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) to achieve high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography of hepatic artery: Initial experience in orthotopic liver transplantation candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Pengju [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai (China)]. E-mail: xpjbfc@163.com; Yan Fuhua [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai (China)]. E-mail: yanfuhua@yahoo.com; Wang Jianhua [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai (China); Lin Jiang [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai (China); Fan Jia [Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai (China)

    2007-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate feasibility of using GRAPPA to acquire high-resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) of hepatic artery and value of GRAPPA for displaying vessels anatomy. Materials and methods: High-resolution CE-MRA using GRAPPA was performed in 67 orthotopic liver transplantation recipient candidates. Signal intensity (SI) and relative SI, i.e., Cv-ro (vessel-to-liver contrast) of the aorta and the hepatic common artery (HCA), were measured. The SI and the relative SI were compared and analyzed using T-test. For purpose of qualitative evaluation, the vessel visualization quality and the order of depicted hepatic artery branches were evaluated by two radiologists independently and assessed by weighted kappa analysis. The depiction of hepatic arterial anatomy and variations was evaluated, and results were correlated with the findings in surgery. Results: The mean SI values were 283.29 {+-} 65.07 (mean {+-} S.D.) for aorta and 283.16 {+-} 64.07 for HCA, respectively. The mean relative SI values were 0.698 {+-} 0.09 for aorta and 0.696 {+-} 0.09 for HCA, respectively. Homogeneous enhancement between aorta and HCA was confirmed by statistically insignificant differences (p-values were 0.89 for mean SI values and 0.12 for mean relative SI values, respectively). The average score for vessel visualization ranged from good to excellent for different artery segments. Overall interobserver agreement in the visualization of different artery segments was excellent (kappa value > 0.80). The distal intrahepatic segmental arteries were well delineated for majority of patients with excellent interobserver agreement. Normal hepatic arterial anatomy was correctly demonstrated in 53 patients, and arterial anomalies were accurately detected on high-resolution MRA image of all 14 patients. Conclusion: High-resolution hepatic artery MRA acquired using GRAPPA in a reproducible manner excellently depicts and delineates small vessels and can be routinely used for

  8. A regional and nonstationary model for partial duration series of extreme rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Ida Bülow; Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2017-01-01

    of extreme rainfall. The framework is built on a partial duration series approach with a nonstationary, regional threshold value. The model is based on generalized linear regression solved by generalized estimation equations. It allows a spatial correlation between the stations in the network and accounts...... furthermore for variable observation periods at each station and in each year. Marginal regional and temporal regression models solved by generalized least squares are used to validate and discuss the results of the full spatiotemporal model. The model is applied on data from a large Danish rain gauge network...

  9. Inventory Model with Partial Backordering When Backordered Customers Delay Purchase after Stockout-Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Qian Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many inventory models with partial backordering assume that the backordered demand must be filled instantly after stockout restoration. In practice, however, the backordered customers may successively revisit the store because of the purchase delay behavior, producing a limited backorder demand rate and resulting in an extra inventory holding cost. Hence, in this paper we formulate the inventory model with partial backordering considering the purchase delay of the backordered customers and assuming that the backorder demand rate is proportional to the remaining backordered demand. Particularly, we model the problem by introducing a new inventory cost component of holding the backordered items, which has not been considered in the existing models. We propose an algorithm with a two-layer structure based on Lipschitz Optimization (LO to minimize the total inventory cost. Numerical experiments show that the proposed algorithm outperforms two benchmarks in both optimality and efficiency. We also observe that the earlier the backordered customer revisits the store, the smaller the inventory cost and the fill rate are, but the longer the order cycle is. In addition, if the backordered customers revisit the store without too much delay, the basic EOQ with partial backordering approximates our model very well.

  10. Benefits and limitations of animal models in partial bladder outlet obstruction for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitta, Takeya; Kanno, Yukiko; Chiba, Hiroki; Higuchi, Madoka; Ouchi, Mifuka; Togo, Mio; Moriya, Kimihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2018-01-01

    The functions of the lower urinary tract have been investigated for more than a century. Lower urinary tract symptoms, such as incomplete bladder emptying, weak urine stream, daytime urinary frequency, urgency, urge incontinence and nocturia after partial bladder outlet obstruction, is a frequent cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia in aging men. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The use of animal models is absolutely imperative for understanding the pathophysiological processes involved in bladder dysfunction. Surgical induction has been used to study lower urinary tract functions of numerous animal species, such as pig, dog, rabbit, guinea pig, rat and mouse, of both sexes. Several morphological and functional modifications under partial bladder outlet obstruction have not only been observed in the bladder, but also in the central nervous system. Understanding the changes of the lower urinary tract functions induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction would also contribute to appropriate drug development for treating these pathophysiological conditions. In the present review, we discuss techniques for creating partial bladder outlet obstruction, the characteristics of several species, as well as issues of each model, and their translational value. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. A physiological model for interpretation of arterial spin labeling reactive hyperemia of calf muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hou-Jen; Wright, Graham A

    2017-01-01

    To characterize and interpret arterial spin labeling (ASL) reactive hyperemia of calf muscles for a better understanding of the microcirculation in peripheral arterial disease (PAD), we present a physiological model incorporating oxygen transport, tissue metabolism, and vascular regulation mechanisms. The model demonstrated distinct effects between arterial stenoses and microvascular dysfunction on reactive hyperemia, and indicated a higher sensitivity of 2-minute thigh cuffing to microvascular dysfunction than 5-minute cuffing. The recorded perfusion responses in PAD patients (n = 9) were better differentiated from the normal subjects (n = 7) using the model-based analysis rather than characterization using the apparent peak and time-to-peak of the responses. The analysis results suggested different amounts of microvascular disease within the patient group. Overall, this work demonstrates a novel analysis method and facilitates understanding of the physiology involved in ASL reactive hyperemia. ASL reactive hyperemia with model-based analysis may be used as a noninvasive microvascular assessment in the presence of arterial stenoses, allowing us to look beyond the macrovascular disease in PAD. A subgroup who will have a poor prognosis after revascularization in the patients with critical limb ischemia may be associated with more severe microvascular diseases, which may potentially be identified using ASL reactive hyperemia.

  12. Hemodynamic analysis of a novel bioresorbable scaffold in porcine coronary artery model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Torii, Ryo; Bourantas, Christos V.; Cavalcante, Rafael; Sotomi, Yohei; Zeng, Yaping; Collet, Carlos; Crake, Tom; Abizaid, Alexandre; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Su, Solomon; Santoso, Teguh; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2017-01-01

    The shear stress distribution assessment can provide useful insights for the hemodynamic performance of the implanted stent/scaffold. Our aim was to investigate the effect of a novel bioresorbable scaffold, Mirage on local hemodynamics in animal models. The main epicardial coronary arteries of 7

  13. Assessment of collateral artery function and growth in a pig model of stepwise coronary occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Daphne; Grundmann, Sebastian; Timmers, Leo; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E.

    de Groot D, Grundmann S, Timmers L, Pasterkamp G, Hoefer IE. Assessment of collateral artery function and growth in a pig model of stepwise coronary occlusion. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 300: H408-H414, 2011. First published October 15, 2010; doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00070.2010.-Therapeutic

  14. A logistic regression model of Coronary Artery Disease among Male Patients in Punjab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Chand

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a cross-sectional retrospective study of 308 male patients, who were presented first time for coronary angiography at the Punjab Institute of Cardiology. The mean age was 50.97 + 9.9 among male patients. As the response variable coronary artery disease (CAD was a binary variable, logistic regression model was fitted to predict the Coronary Artery Disease with the help of significant risk factors. Age, Chest pain, Diabetes Mellitus, Smoking and Lipids are resulted as significant risk factors associated with CAD among male population.

  15. A multiscale active structural model of the arterial wall accounting for smooth muscle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccarelli, Alberto; Edwards, David Hughes; Aggarwal, Ankush; Nithiarasu, Perumal; Parthimos, Dimitris

    2018-02-01

    Arterial wall dynamics arise from the synergy of passive mechano-elastic properties of the vascular tissue and the active contractile behaviour of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that form the media layer of vessels. We have developed a computational framework that incorporates both these components to account for vascular responses to mechanical and pharmacological stimuli. To validate the proposed framework and demonstrate its potential for testing hypotheses on the pathogenesis of vascular disease, we have employed a number of pharmacological probes that modulate the arterial wall contractile machinery by selectively inhibiting a range of intracellular signalling pathways. Experimental probes used on ring segments from the rabbit central ear artery are: phenylephrine, a selective α 1-adrenergic receptor agonist that induces vasoconstriction; cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a specific inhibitor of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase; and ryanodine, a diterpenoid that modulates Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These interventions were able to delineate the role of membrane versus intracellular signalling, previously identified as main factors in smooth muscle contraction and the generation of vessel tone. Each SMC was modelled by a system of nonlinear differential equations that account for intracellular ionic signalling, and in particular Ca 2+ dynamics. Cytosolic Ca 2+ concentrations formed the catalytic input to a cross-bridge kinetics model. Contractile output from these cellular components forms the input to the finite-element model of the arterial rings under isometric conditions that reproduces the experimental conditions. The model does not account for the role of the endothelium, as the nitric oxide production was suppressed by the action of L-NAME, and also due to the absence of shear stress on the arterial ring, as the experimental set-up did not involve flow. Simulations generated by the integrated model closely matched experimental

  16. Exercise Does Not Attenuate Early Coronary Artery Disease Progression in a Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Kreutzer, Kurt V.; Rush, James W. E.; Turk, James R.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to examine the effects of high fat (HF) diet and subsequent exercise training (Ex) on coronary arteries of an animal model of early stage coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that HF diet would induce early stage disease and promote a pro-atherogenic coronary phenotype, while Ex would blunt disease progression and induce a healthier anti-inflammatory environment reflected by increased expression of antioxidant capacity and decreased expression of inflammatory markers in both the macro and microvasculature of the coronary circulation. Methods Immunohistochemistry in left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary arteries (RCA), and immunoblots in LAD and left ventricular (LV) arterioles were used to characterize effects of HF diet and Ex on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Results Our results revealed that HF diet promoted a pro-atherogenic coronary endothelial cell phenotype as evidenced by the endothelial expression of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers. Ex did not significantly alter any of these immunohistochemical markers in conduit arteries; however, Ex did increase antioxidant protein content in LV arterioles. Conclusions We conclude that, at this early stage of CAD, Ex did not seem to modify vascular cell phenotypes of conduit coronary arteries from pro- to a more favorable anti-atherogenic status; however, Ex increased antioxidant protein content in coronary arterioles. These findings also support the idea that endothelial phenotype expression follows different patterns in the macro and microvasculature of the coronary circulation. PMID:21685817

  17. Vascular histopathologic reaction to pulmonary artery banding in an in vivo growing porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedorost, Lukáš; Uemura, Hideki; Furck, Anke; Saeed, Imran; Slavik, Zdenek; Kobr, Jiří; Tonar, Zbyněk

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary artery banding (PAB) is used as a surgical palliation to reduce excessive pulmonary blood flow caused by congenital heart defects. Due to the lack of microscopic studies dealing with the tissue remodeling caused by contemporary PAB materials, this study aimed to assess histologic changes associated with PAB surgery by analyzing local tissue reaction to the presence of Gore-Tex strips fixed around the pulmonary artery. Gore-Tex strips were used for PAB in a growing porcine model. After 5 weeks, histologic samples with PAB (n = 5) were compared with healthy pulmonary arterial segments distal to the PAB or from a sham-treated animal (n = 1). Stereology was used to quantify the density of the vasa vasorum and the area fraction of elastin, smooth muscle actin, macrophages, and nervi vasorum within the pulmonary arterial wall. The null hypothesis stated that samples did not differ histopathologically from adjacent vascular segments or sham-treated samples. The PAB samples had a greater area fraction of macrophages, a lower amount of nervi vasorum, and a tendency toward decreased smooth muscle content compared with samples that had no PAB strips. There was no destruction of elastic membranes, no medionecrosis, no pronounced inflammatory infiltration or foreign body reaction, and no vasa vasorum deficiency after the PAB. All the histopathologic changes were limited to the banded vascular segment and did not affect distal parts of the pulmonary artery. The study results show the tissue reaction of palliative PAB and suggest that Gore-Tex strips used contemporarily for PAB do not cause severe local histologic damage to the banded segment of the pulmonary arterial wall after 5 weeks in a porcine PAB model.

  18. A cell culture model using rat coronary artery adventitial fibroblasts to measure collagen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meszaros Gary

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a rat cell model for studying collagen type I production in coronary artery adventitial fibroblasts. Increased deposition of adventitial collagen type I leads to stiffening of the blood vessel, increased blood pressure, arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Although the source and mechanism of collagen deposition is yet unknown, the adventitia appears to play a significant role. To demonstrate the application of our cell model, cultured adventitial fibroblasts were treated with sex hormones and the effect on collagen production measured. Methods Hearts (10–12 weeks were harvested and the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD was isolated and removed. Tissue explants were cultured and cells (passages 2–4 were confirmed as fibroblasts using immunohistochemistry. Optimal conditions were determined for cell tissue harvest, timing, proliferation and culture conditions. Fibroblasts were exposed to 10-7 M testosterone or 10-7 M estrogen for 24 hours and either immunostained for collagen type I or subjected to ELISA. Results Results showed increased collagen staining in fibroblasts treated with testosterone compared to control and decreased staining with estrogen. ELISA results showed that testosterone increased collagen I by 20% whereas estrogen decreased collagen I by 15%. Conclusion Data demonstrates the usefulness of our cell model in studying the specific role of the adventitia apart from other blood vessel tissue in rat coronary arteries. Results suggest opposite effects of testosterone and estrogen on collagen synthesis in the rat coronary artery adventitial fibroblasts.

  19. Spiral blood flows in an idealized 180-degree curved artery model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Kulkarni, Varun; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Understanding of cardiovascular flows has been greatly advanced by the Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) technique and its potential for three-dimensional velocity encoding in regions of anatomic interest. The MRV experiments were performed on a 180-degree curved artery model using a Newtonian blood analog fluid at the Richard M. Lucas Center at Stanford University employing a 3 Tesla General Electric (Discovery 750 MRI system) whole body scanner with an eight-channel cardiac coil. Analysis in two regions of the model-artery was performed for flow with Womersley number=4.2. In the entrance region (or straight-inlet pipe) the unsteady pressure drop per unit length, in-plane vorticity and wall shear stress for the pulsatile, carotid artery-based flow rate waveform were calculated. Along the 180-degree curved pipe (curvature ratio =1/7) the near-wall vorticity and the stretching of the particle paths in the vorticity field are visualized. The resultant flow behavior in the idealized curved artery model is associated with parameters such as Dean number and Womersley number. Additionally, using length scales corresponding to the axial and secondary flow we attempt to understand the mechanisms leading to the formation of various structures observed during the pulsatile flow cycle. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE), MRV measurements in collaboration with Prof. John K. Eaton and, Dr. Chris Elkins at Stanford University.

  20. Computational modelling suggests good, bad and ugly roles of glycosaminoglycans in arterial wall mechanics and mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccabianca, S.; Bellini, C.; Humphrey, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The medial layer of large arteries contains aggregates of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan and the proteoglycan versican. It is increasingly thought that these aggregates play important mechanical and mechanobiological roles despite constituting only a small fraction of the normal arterial wall. In this paper, we offer a new hypothesis that normal aggregates of hyaluronan and versican pressurize the intralamellar spaces, and thereby put into tension the radial elastic fibres that connect the smooth muscle cells to the elastic laminae, which would facilitate mechanosensing. This hypothesis is supported by novel computational simulations using two complementary models, a mechanistically based finite-element mixture model and a phenomenologically motivated continuum hyperelastic model. That is, the simulations suggest that normal aggregates of glycosaminoglycans/proteoglycans within the arterial media may play equally important roles in supporting (i.e. a structural role) and sensing (i.e. an instructional role) mechanical loads. Additional simulations suggest further, however, that abnormal increases in these aggregates, either distributed or localized, may over-pressurize the intralamellar units. We submit that these situations could lead to compromised mechanosensing, anoikis and/or reduced structural integrity, each of which represent fundamental aspects of arterial pathologies seen, for example, in hypertension, ageing and thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. PMID:24920112

  1. Systematic model development for partial nitrification of landfill leachate in a SBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganigue, R.; Volcke, E.I.P.; Puig, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with partial nitrification in a sequencing batch reactor (PN-SBR) treating raw urban landfill leachate. In order to enhance process insight (e.g. quantify interactions between aeration, CO2 stripping, alkalinity, pH, nitrification kinetics), a mathematical model has been set up....... Following a systematic procedure, the model was successfully constructed, calibrated and validated using data from short-term (one cycle) operation of the PN-SBR. The evaluation of the model revealed a good fit to the main physical-chemical measurements (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate and inorganic carbon...

  2. Comparison of annual maximum series and partial duration series methods for modeling extreme hydrologic events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Peter F.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Two different models for analyzing extreme hydrologic events, based on, respectively, partial duration series (PDS) and annual maximum series (AMS), are compared. The PDS model assumes a generalized Pareto distribution for modeling threshold exceedances corresponding to a generalized extreme value...... distribution for annual maxima. The performance of the two models in terms of the uncertainty of the T-year event estimator is evaluated in the cases of estimation with, respectively, the maximum likelihood (ML) method, the method of moments (MOM), and the method of probability weighted moments (PWM...... of the considered methods reveals that in general, one should use the PDS model with MOM estimation for negative shape parameters, the PDS model with exponentially distributed exceedances if the shape parameter is close to zero, the AMS model with MOM estimation for moderately positive shape parameters, and the PDS...

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Partial-Porous Circular Cylinders with Water Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Su Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of water waves with partially porous-surfaced circular cylinders was investigated. A three-dimensional numerical modeling was developed based on the complete mathematical formulation of the eigenfunction expansion method in the potential flow. Darcy’s law was applied to describe the porous boundary. The partial-porous cylinder is composed of a porous-surfaced body near the free surface, and an impermeable-surfaced body with an end-capped rigid bottom below the porous region. The optimal ratio of the porous portion to the impermeable portion can be adopted to design an effective ocean structure with minimal hydrodynamic impact. To scrutinize the hydrodynamic interactions in N partial-porous circular cylinders, the computational fluid domain is divided into three regions: an exterior region, N inner porous body regions, and N regions beneath the body. Wave excitation forces and wave run-up on multibodied partial-porous cylinders are calculated and compared for various porous-portion ratios and wave conditions, all of which significantly influence the hydrodynamic property.

  4. A partial hearing animal model for chronic electro-acoustic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, S.; Wise, A. K.; Millard, R. E.; Shepherd, R. K.; Fallon, J. B.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have provided some auditory function to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Although traditionally carried out only in profoundly deaf patients, the eligibility criteria for implantation have recently been relaxed to include many partially-deaf patients with useful levels of hearing. These patients receive both electrical stimulation from their implant and acoustic stimulation via their residual hearing (electro-acoustic stimulation; EAS) and perform very well. It is unclear how EAS improves speech perception over electrical stimulation alone, and little evidence exists about the nature of the interactions between electric and acoustic stimuli. Furthermore, clinical results suggest that some patients that undergo cochlear implantation lose some, if not all, of their residual hearing, reducing the advantages of EAS over electrical stimulation alone. A reliable animal model with clinically-relevant partial deafness combined with clinical CIs is important to enable these issues to be studied. This paper outlines such a model that has been successfully used in our laboratory. Approach. This paper outlines a battery of techniques used in our laboratory to generate, validate and examine an animal model of partial deafness and chronic CI use. Main results. Ototoxic deafening produced bilaterally symmetrical hearing thresholds in neonatal and adult animals. Electrical activation of the auditory system was confirmed, and all animals were chronically stimulated via adapted clinical CIs. Acoustic compound action potentials (CAPs) were obtained from partially-hearing cochleae, using the CI amplifier. Immunohistochemical analysis allows the effects of deafness and electrical stimulation on cell survival to be studied. Significance. This animal model has applications in EAS research, including investigating the functional interactions between electric and acoustic stimulation, and the development of techniques to maintain residual

  5. The efficacy of hemostatic techniques in the sheep model of carotid artery injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Rowan; Boase, Sam; Jervis-Bardy, Josh; Dones Cabral, Jay-Dee; Robinson, Simon; Wormald, Peter-John

    2011-01-01

    The most dramatic complication in endonasal surgery is inadvertent injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) with massive bleeding. Nasal packing is the favored technique for control; however, this often causes complete carotid occlusion or carotid stenosis, contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the patient. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of endoscopically applied hemostatic techniques that maintain vascular flow in an animal model of carotid artery injury. A total of 20 sheep underwent ICA dissection/isolation followed by the placement of the artery within a modified "sinus model otorhino neuro trainer" (SIMONT) model. A standardized 4-mm carotid artery injury was created endoscopically. Randomization of sheep to receive 1 of 5 hemostatic techniques was performed (Floseal, oxidized regenerated cellulose, Chitosan gel, muscle patch, or the U-Clip anastomotic device). Specific outcome measures were time to hemostasis, duration of time mean arterial pressure (MAP) was >55 mmHg, blood loss, and survival time. Muscle patch hemostasis and the U-Clip anastomotic device were significantly more effective at achieving primary hemostasis rapidly, reducing total blood loss, and increasing survival time and time MAP was >55 mmHg more than Floseal, oxidized regenerated cellulose, and Chitosan gel (p sheep achieved primary hemostasis and reached the endpoint of observation, while maintaining vascular patency. Floseal and oxidized regenerated cellulose failed to achieve hemostasis in any animal, with all animals exsanguinating prematurely. In the sheep model of endoscopic ICA injury, the muscle patch and U-Clip anastomotic device significantly improved survival, reduced blood loss, and achieved primary hemostasis while maintaining vascular patency. Copyright © 2011 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  6. Saphenous artery-based flap models in rats: new flap designs for experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksam, Ersin; Aksam, Berrak; Demirseren, Mustafa Erol; Yavuz, Huban Sibel Orhun

    2016-12-01

    Experimental research using laboratory animals provides substantial data about reconstructive surgery. However, the literature does not include any experimental studies that have used flap models on the hind limbs of rats. To gain an understanding of the physiology of lower-extremity flaps and of flap failures, this study assessed the cutaneous perforators of the saphenous artery, and new flap models were designed for the hind limbs of rats. The experiment was designed to include three stages and used 35 rats. The first stage involved mapping the perforators of the saphenous artery. In the second stage, the contents and structures of McFarlane, epigastric, and anterior hind limb flap tissues were compared histologically. The third stage of the study involved designing and comparing different flaps for the hind limbs of the rats and included random flaps, perforator-based peninsular flaps, perforator-based island flaps, and perforator-based flaps with rotated pedicles. Postoperative necrosis ratios were evaluated using computer-based software. Mapping of the saphenous artery perforators revealed an average of 2.2 septocutaneous arteries in each hind limb. Histologic studies showed thick dermis and panniculus carnosus in the McFarlane flaps, thick dermis, and thin panniculus carnosus layers in the epigastric flaps, and thin subcutaneous tissue with no panniculus carnosus tissue in the skin of the hind limbs. The results of the flap studies that used random flaps showed a 52.4% necrosis, while there was no necrosis when perforator-based peninsular flaps, island flaps, and flaps with rotated pedicles were used. New flap models used on the saphenous artery perforators of the hind limbs of rats can provide valuable information about the physiology of lower-extremity flaps. New studies can also be designed based on these flap models to acquire more knowledge about pathologic conditions such as ischemia and venous insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. High Voltage Breakdown, Partial Discharge and Aging in Lapped Tape Insulated Cold Dielectric Model Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Pace, M. O.; Ellis, A. R.; Muller, A. C.

    2004-06-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables generally follow either of two generic designs, cold dielectric and warm dielectric. In the cold dielectric design, lapped tape insulation and liquid nitrogen are used in combination to provide the electrical insulation between the conductor and the ground shield of an HTS cable. Lapped tape insulated model cables have been tested at high voltage, including AC breakdown, negative impulse breakdown, partial discharge, and long term aging under AC stress. Tapes tested include Cryoflex™ (a proprietary tape developed by Southwire) and PPLP® (a commercial semi synthetic tape). Two high voltage cryostats have been built for short and long term aging studies that permit testing of model cables under the combined conditions of high electric stress, cryogenic temperature and elevated pressures up to 15 bar. For the aging studies, a log-log plot of electric stress versus time-to-breakdown has yielded an estimate of cable lifetime. Since aging at cryogenic temperatures is not expected to have a thermal cause, dielectric wear in HTS cables reduces to partial discharge as the primary aging mechanism. Phase and amplitude resolved partial discharge data of model cables in liquid nitrogen will be presented.

  8. Implicit particle filtering for models with partial noise, and an application to geomagnetic data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morzfeld

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Implicit particle filtering is a sequential Monte Carlo method for data assimilation, designed to keep the number of particles manageable by focussing attention on regions of large probability. These regions are found by minimizing, for each particle, a scalar function F of the state variables. Some previous implementations of the implicit filter rely on finding the Hessians of these functions. The calculation of the Hessians can be cumbersome if the state dimension is large or if the underlying physics are such that derivatives of F are difficult to calculate, as happens in many geophysical applications, in particular in models with partial noise, i.e. with a singular state covariance matrix. Examples of models with partial noise include models where uncertain dynamic equations are supplemented by conservation laws with zero uncertainty, or with higher order (in time stochastic partial differential equations (PDE or with PDEs driven by spatially smooth noise processes. We make the implicit particle filter applicable to such situations by combining gradient descent minimization with random maps and show that the filter is efficient, accurate and reliable because it operates in a subspace of the state space. As an example, we consider a system of nonlinear stochastic PDEs that is of importance in geomagnetic data assimilation.

  9. Filtering a statistically exactly solvable test model for turbulent tracers from partial observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershgorin, B.; Majda, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    A statistically exactly solvable model for passive tracers is introduced as a test model for the authors' Nonlinear Extended Kalman Filter (NEKF) as well as other filtering algorithms. The model involves a Gaussian velocity field and a passive tracer governed by the advection-diffusion equation with an imposed mean gradient. The model has direct relevance to engineering problems such as the spread of pollutants in the air or contaminants in the water as well as climate change problems concerning the transport of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide with strongly intermittent probability distributions consistent with the actual observations of the atmosphere. One of the attractive properties of the model is the existence of the exact statistical solution. In particular, this unique feature of the model provides an opportunity to design and test fast and efficient algorithms for real-time data assimilation based on rigorous mathematical theory for a turbulence model problem with many active spatiotemporal scales. Here, we extensively study the performance of the NEKF which uses the exact first and second order nonlinear statistics without any approximations due to linearization. The role of partial and sparse observations, the frequency of observations and the observation noise strength in recovering the true signal, its spectrum, and fat tail probability distribution are the central issues discussed here. The results of our study provide useful guidelines for filtering realistic turbulent systems with passive tracers through partial observations.

  10. Console-integrated real-time three-dimensional image overlay navigation for robot-assisted partial nephrectomy with selective arterial clamping: early single-centre experience with 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Junya; Miyake, Hideaki; Tanaka, Kazushi; Sugimoto, Maki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe our early experience with robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) incorporating selective arterial clamping, using an image overlay navigation system. Three-dimensional images were reconstructed from computed tomography using open source processing software, OsiriX, and were directly visualized on the screen of a da Vinci surgeon's console with TilePro multi-input display functions. Using this imaging system, RAPN with selective arterial clamping was performed in 17 patients with renal tumours. The intraoperative image overlay navigation system made it possible to clearly show the tumour position and vascular supply within the console's field of view, and facilitate selective arterial clamping during RAPN, resulting in a mean decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rates at both 1 and 4 weeks after RAPN < 10 ml/min/1.73 m(2) . RAPN with selective arterial clamping using this innovative imaging system could be a useful alternative to conventional RAPN. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny B. Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery disease (PAD is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic.

  12. Simulations of Magnetohemodynamics in Stenosed Arteries in Diabetic or Anemic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Alshare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile flow simulations of non-Newtonian blood flow in an axisymmetric multistenosed artery, subjected to a static magnetic field, are performed using FLUENT. The influence of artery size and magnetic field intensity on transient wall shear stress, mean shear stress, and pressure drop is investigated. Three different types of blood, namely, healthy, diabetic, and anemic are considered. It is found that using Newtonian viscosity model of blood in contrast to Carreau model underestimates the pressure drop and wall shear stress by nearly 34% and 40%, respectively. In addition, it is found that using a magnetic field increases the pressure drop by 15%. Generally, doubling the artery diameter reduces the wall shear stress approximately by 1.6 times. Also increasing the stenosis level from moderate to severe results in reduction of the shear stress by 1.6 times. Furthermore, doubling the diameter of moderately stenosed artery results in nearly 3-fold decrease in pressure drop. It is also found that diabetic blood results in higher shear stress and greater pressure drop in comparison to healthy blood, whereas anemic blood has a decreasing effect on both wall shear stress and pressure drop in comparison to healthy blood.

  13. Modelling and subject-specific validation of the heart-arterial tree system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Andrea; Camporeale, Carlo; Tosello, Francesco; Canuto, Claudio; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    A modeling approach integrated with a novel subject-specific characterization is here proposed for the assessment of hemodynamic values of the arterial tree. A 1D model is adopted to characterize large-to-medium arteries, while the left ventricle, aortic valve and distal micro-circulation sectors are described by lumped submodels. A new velocity profile and a new formulation of the non-linear viscoelastic constitutive relation suitable for the {Q, A} modeling are also proposed. The model is firstly verified semi-quantitatively against literature data. A simple but effective procedure for obtaining subject-specific model characterization from non-invasive measurements is then designed. A detailed subject-specific validation against in vivo measurements from a population of six healthy young men is also performed. Several key quantities of heart dynamics-mean ejected flow, ejection fraction, and left-ventricular end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes-and the pressure waveforms (at the central, radial, brachial, femoral, and posterior tibial sites) are compared with measured data. Mean errors around 5 and 8%, obtained for the heart and arterial quantities, respectively, testify the effectiveness of the model and its subject-specific characterization.

  14. Model test on partial expansion in stratified subsidence during foundation pit dewatering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxiu; Deng, Yansheng; Ma, Ruiqiang; Liu, Xiaotian; Guo, Qingfeng; Liu, Shaoli; Shao, Yule; Wu, Linbo; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Tianliang; Wang, Hanmei; Huang, Xinlei

    2018-02-01

    Partial expansion was observed in stratified subsidence during foundation pit dewatering. However, the phenomenon was suspected to be an error because the compression of layers is known to occur when subsidence occurs. A slice of the subsidence cone induced by drawdown was selected as the prototype. Model tests were performed to investigate the phenomenon. The underlying confined aquifer was generated as a movable rigid plate with a hinge at one end. The overlying layers were simulated with remolded materials collected from a construction site. Model tests performed under the conceptual model indicated that partial expansion occurred in stratified settlements under coordination deformation and consolidation conditions. During foundation pit dewatering, rapid drawdown resulted in rapid subsidence in the dewatered confined aquifer. The rapidly subsiding confined aquifer top was the bottom deformation boundary of the overlying layers. Non-coordination deformation was observed at the top and bottom of the subsiding overlying layers. The subsidence of overlying layers was larger at the bottom than at the top. The layers expanded and became thicker. The phenomenon was verified using numerical simulation method based on finite difference method. Compared with numerical simulation results, the boundary effect of the physical tests was obvious in the observation point close to the movable endpoint. The tensile stress of the overlying soil layers induced by the underlying settlement of dewatered confined aquifer contributed to the expansion phenomenon. The partial expansion of overlying soil layers was defined as inversed rebound. The inversed rebound was induced by inversed coordination deformation. Compression was induced by the consolidation in the overlying soil layers because of drainage. Partial expansion occurred when the expansion exceeded the compression. Considering the inversed rebound, traditional layer-wise summation method for calculating subsidence should be

  15. Utilizing generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) to achieve high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography of hepatic artery: Initial experience in orthotopic liver transplantation candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pengju; Yan Fuhua; Wang Jianhua; Lin Jiang; Fan Jia

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate feasibility of using GRAPPA to acquire high-resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) of hepatic artery and value of GRAPPA for displaying vessels anatomy. Materials and methods: High-resolution CE-MRA using GRAPPA was performed in 67 orthotopic liver transplantation recipient candidates. Signal intensity (SI) and relative SI, i.e., Cv-ro (vessel-to-liver contrast) of the aorta and the hepatic common artery (HCA), were measured. The SI and the relative SI were compared and analyzed using T-test. For purpose of qualitative evaluation, the vessel visualization quality and the order of depicted hepatic artery branches were evaluated by two radiologists independently and assessed by weighted kappa analysis. The depiction of hepatic arterial anatomy and variations was evaluated, and results were correlated with the findings in surgery. Results: The mean SI values were 283.29 ± 65.07 (mean ± S.D.) for aorta and 283.16 ± 64.07 for HCA, respectively. The mean relative SI values were 0.698 ± 0.09 for aorta and 0.696 ± 0.09 for HCA, respectively. Homogeneous enhancement between aorta and HCA was confirmed by statistically insignificant differences (p-values were 0.89 for mean SI values and 0.12 for mean relative SI values, respectively). The average score for vessel visualization ranged from good to excellent for different artery segments. Overall interobserver agreement in the visualization of different artery segments was excellent (kappa value > 0.80). The distal intrahepatic segmental arteries were well delineated for majority of patients with excellent interobserver agreement. Normal hepatic arterial anatomy was correctly demonstrated in 53 patients, and arterial anomalies were accurately detected on high-resolution MRA image of all 14 patients. Conclusion: High-resolution hepatic artery MRA acquired using GRAPPA in a reproducible manner excellently depicts and delineates small vessels and can be routinely used for evaluating

  16. Modelling Air Pollution Near Arterial Roads and Highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenouda, Deloor Abdel Shaheed

    In this study emissions of carbon dioxide (CO _2), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NO_{rm x}) from vehicles are modelled by considering the instantaneous power generated by each vehicle and modifying the expressions developed by Post et al, (1981). The emissions from both spark ignition (SI) and diesel vehicles have been included. The model was used to estimate fuel consumption and emissions over a standard driving cycle. When used for spark ignition vehicles over a driving cycle, the influence of cold starts was quantified and allowance was made, in the case of equipped vehicles, for catalyst warm-up and for variations in catalyst efficiency. The model was validated against fuel consumption and emissions data obtained using ADR27 and ADR37 tests, and also against detailed, high time resolution analysis of ADR27 tests carried out by the Victorian EPA. The emissions model was used in conjunction with two pollution dispersion models viz: HIWAY and CALINE to compare predicted concentrations with an experimental data -set consisting of measurements of the pollutants of CO _2, CO, HC, and NO_ {rm x}, and were made under a variety of traffic and meteorological conditions. The measurements were made at locations up to 60 metres downwind from the roadside and to heights of 10m above the ground. A video camera was used to record the traffic flow, speed and type (classified simply as domestic, light or heavy commercial). The emission rates of CO, HC, and NO_ {rm x} (at slope 0^ circ) for spark ignition and diesel vehicles produced by the power-based emissions model were found to be similar to those produced by the California EPA, EMFAC7, emissions model.

  17. An Odor Interaction Model of Binary Odorant Mixtures by a Partial Differential Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchun Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel odor interaction model was proposed for binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes by a partial differential equation (PDE method. Based on the measurement method (tangent-intercept method of partial molar volume, original parameters of corresponding formulas were reasonably displaced by perceptual measures. By these substitutions, it was possible to relate a mixture’s odor intensity to the individual odorant’s relative odor activity value (OAV. Several binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes were respectively tested to establish the PDE models. The obtained results showed that the PDE model provided an easily interpretable method relating individual components to their joint odor intensity. Besides, both predictive performance and feasibility of the PDE model were proved well through a series of odor intensity matching tests. If combining the PDE model with portable gas detectors or on-line monitoring systems, olfactory evaluation of odor intensity will be achieved by instruments instead of odor assessors. Many disadvantages (e.g., expense on a fixed number of odor assessors also will be successfully avoided. Thus, the PDE model is predicted to be helpful to the monitoring and management of odor pollutions.

  18. An odor interaction model of binary odorant mixtures by a partial differential equation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Luchun; Liu, Jiemin; Wang, Guihua; Wu, Chuandong

    2014-07-09

    A novel odor interaction model was proposed for binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes by a partial differential equation (PDE) method. Based on the measurement method (tangent-intercept method) of partial molar volume, original parameters of corresponding formulas were reasonably displaced by perceptual measures. By these substitutions, it was possible to relate a mixture's odor intensity to the individual odorant's relative odor activity value (OAV). Several binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes were respectively tested to establish the PDE models. The obtained results showed that the PDE model provided an easily interpretable method relating individual components to their joint odor intensity. Besides, both predictive performance and feasibility of the PDE model were proved well through a series of odor intensity matching tests. If combining the PDE model with portable gas detectors or on-line monitoring systems, olfactory evaluation of odor intensity will be achieved by instruments instead of odor assessors. Many disadvantages (e.g., expense on a fixed number of odor assessors) also will be successfully avoided. Thus, the PDE model is predicted to be helpful to the monitoring and management of odor pollutions.

  19. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour of porcine carotid artery undergoing inflation-deflation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vychytil J.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Samples of porcine carotid artery are examined using Tissue bath MAYFLOWER, Perfusion of tubular organs Version, Type 813/6. Pressure-diameter diagrams are obtained for fixed axial extension and volumetric flow rate. Finite element analysis of the experiment, performed using COMSOL software, indicates a negligible effect of given flow rate on the mechanical response of the tested sample. Also the effect of clamped ends is shown to be local only. Hence, static analysis in MATLAB software is performed considering the arterial segment as an incompressible hyperelastic axisymmetric tube. Residual stress at the load-free configuration is taken into account resulting in the overall stiffening of the model. Comparison of theoretical and experimental pressure-diameter curves results in the identification of material parameters using the least square method. In addition to classical hyperelastic models, such as the neo-Hookean and the Fung’s exponential, two-scale model mimicking arrangement of soft tissue is considered.

  20. Comparison of annual maximum series and partial duration series methods for modeling extreme hydrologic events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Pearson, Charles P.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Two regional estimation schemes, based on, respectively, partial duration series (PDS) and annual maximum series (AMS), are compared. The PDS model assumes a generalized Pareto (GP) distribution for modeling threshold exceedances corresponding to a generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution......-way grouping based on annual average rainfall is sufficient to attain homogeneity for PDS, whereas a further partitioning is necessary for AMS. In determination of the regional parent distribution using L-moment ratio diagrams, PDS data, in contrast to AMS data, provide an unambiguous interpretation......, supporting a GP distribution....

  1. Exotic muon-to-positron conversion in nuclei: partial transition sum evaluation by using shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divari, P.C.; Vergados, J.D.; Kosmas, T.S.; Skouras, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the exotic (μ - ,e + ) conversion in 27 Al, 27 Al(μ - ,e + ) 27 Na is presented. The relevant operators are deduced assuming one-pion and two-pion modes in the framework of intermediate neutrino mixing models, paying special attention to the light neutrino case. The total rate is calculated by summing over partial transition strengths for all kinematically accessible final states derived with s-d shell model calculations employing the well-known Wildenthal realistic interaction

  2. Pseudo-partial likelihood estimators for the Cox regression model with missing covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaodong; Tsai, Wei Yann; Xu, Qiang

    2009-09-01

    By embedding the missing covariate data into a left-truncated and right-censored survival model, we propose a new class of weighted estimating functions for the Cox regression model with missing covariates. The resulting estimators, called the pseudo-partial likelihood estimators, are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal. A simulation study demonstrates that, compared with the popular inverse-probability weighted estimators, the new estimators perform better when the observation probability is small and improve efficiency of estimating the missing covariate effects. Application to a practical example is reported.

  3. Robust-BD Estimation and Inference for General Partially Linear Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunming Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The classical quadratic loss for the partially linear model (PLM and the likelihood function for the generalized PLM are not resistant to outliers. This inspires us to propose a class of “robust-Bregman divergence (BD” estimators of both the parametric and nonparametric components in the general partially linear model (GPLM, which allows the distribution of the response variable to be partially specified, without being fully known. Using the local-polynomial function estimation method, we propose a computationally-efficient procedure for obtaining “robust-BD” estimators and establish the consistency and asymptotic normality of the “robust-BD” estimator of the parametric component β o . For inference procedures of β o in the GPLM, we show that the Wald-type test statistic W n constructed from the “robust-BD” estimators is asymptotically distribution free under the null, whereas the likelihood ratio-type test statistic Λ n is not. This provides an insight into the distinction from the asymptotic equivalence (Fan and Huang 2005 between W n and Λ n in the PLM constructed from profile least-squares estimators using the non-robust quadratic loss. Numerical examples illustrate the computational effectiveness of the proposed “robust-BD” estimators and robust Wald-type test in the appearance of outlying observations.

  4. An Outflow Boundary Condition Model for Noninvasive Prediction of Fractional Flow Reserve in Diseased Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayssal, Iyad A; Moukalled, Fadl; Alam, Samir; Isma'eel, Hussain

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports on a new boundary condition formulation to model the total coronary myocardial flow and resistance characteristics of the myocardial vascular bed for any specific patient when considered for noninvasive diagnosis of ischemia. The developed boundary condition model gives an implicit representation of the downstream truncated coronary bed. Further, it is based on incorporating patient-specific physiological parameters that can be noninvasively extracted to account for blood flow demand to the myocardium at rest and hyperemic conditions. The model is coupled to a steady three-dimensional (3D) collocated pressure-based finite volume flow solver and used to characterize the "functional significance" of a patient diseased coronary artery segment without the need for predicting the hemodynamics of the entire arterial system. Predictions generated with this boundary condition provide a deep understanding of the inherent challenges behind noninvasive image-based diagnostic techniques when applied to human diseased coronary arteries. The overall numerical method and formulated boundary condition model are validated via two computational-based procedures and benchmarked with available measured data. The newly developed boundary condition is used via a designed computational methodology to (a) confirm the need for incorporating patient-specific physiological parameters when modeling the downstream coronary resistance, (b) explain the discrepancies presented in the literature between measured and computed fractional flow reserve (FFRCT), and (c) discuss the current limitations and future challenges in shifting to noninvasive assessment of ischemia.

  5. Simple canine model of arterial thrombosis with endothelial injury suitable for investigation of thrombolytic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badylak, S.F.; Poehlman, E.; Williams, C.; Klabunde, R.E.; Turek, J.; Schoenlein, W.

    1988-01-01

    Three separate studies were done to evaluate a new canine model of arterial thrombosis with endothelial injury. Endothelial injury was produced by exposing the luminal surface of a 2-cm segment of femoral artery to 100 degrees C saline for 5 min. There was no disruption of proximal or distal blood flow with this model, and thrombolysis was continuously monitored by measuring 125 I-labelled fibrin gamma emissions from the thrombus. Study No. 1 showed that complete endothelial denudation was achieved with this model. Study No. 2 demonstrated 1) adherence of the experimentally induced thrombus to subendothelial connective tissue, and 2) endogenous thrombolysis of approximately 9% during the initial 2 h after thrombus formation. Study No. 3 tested the usefulness of the model for evaluating the thrombolytic efficacy of urokinase. Urokinase (30,000 U/Kg, bolus IV injection) caused 38 +/- 5.4% thrombolysis within 90 min of drug administration versus 5.9 +/- 2.4% for a saline-treated control group. We conclude that this model provides a technically simple and reproducible method for the laboratory investigation of thrombosis and thrombolysis in arteries with endothelial injury

  6. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  7. Partial molar volume of proteins studied by the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-04-14

    The three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory is applied to the analysis of hydration effects on the partial molar volume of proteins. For the native structure of some proteins, the partial molar volume is decomposed into geometric and hydration contributions using the 3D-RISM theory combined with the geometric volume calculation. The hydration contributions are correlated with the surface properties of the protein. The thermal volume, which is the volume of voids around the protein induced by the thermal fluctuation of water molecules, is directly proportional to the accessible surface area of the protein. The interaction volume, which is the contribution of electrostatic interactions between the protein and water molecules, is apparently governed by the charged atomic groups on the protein surface. The polar atomic groups do not make any contribution to the interaction volume. The volume differences between low- and high-pressure structures of lysozyme are also analyzed by the present method.

  8. Influence of variable selection on partial least squares discriminant analysis models for explosive residue classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lucia, Frank C., E-mail: frank.delucia@us.army.mil; Gottfried, Jennifer L.

    2011-02-15

    Using a series of thirteen organic materials that includes novel high-nitrogen energetic materials, conventional organic military explosives, and benign organic materials, we have demonstrated the importance of variable selection for maximizing residue discrimination with partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). We built several PLS-DA models using different variable sets based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of the organic residues on an aluminum substrate under an argon atmosphere. The model classification results for each sample are presented and the influence of the variables on these results is discussed. We found that using the whole spectra as the data input for the PLS-DA model gave the best results. However, variables due to the surrounding atmosphere and the substrate contribute to discrimination when the whole spectra are used, indicating this may not be the most robust model. Further iterative testing with additional validation data sets is necessary to determine the most robust model.

  9. A Leasing Model to Deal with Partial Failures in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Boix, Elisa; van Cutsem, Tom; Vallejos, Jorge; de Meuter, Wolfgang; D'Hondt, Theo

    In mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) many partial failures are the result of temporary network partitions due to the intermittent connectivity of mobile devices. Some of these failures will be permanent and require application-level failure handling. However, it is impossible to distinguish a permanent from a transient failure. Leasing provides a solution to this problem based on the temporal restriction of resources. But to date no leasing model has been designed specifically for MANETs. In this paper, we identify three characteristics required for a leasing model to be usable in a MANET, discuss the issues with existing leasing models and then propose the leased object references model, which integrates leasing with remote object references. In addition, we describe an implementation of the model in the programming language AmbientTalk. Leased object references provide an extensible framework that allows programmers to express their own leasing patterns and enables both lease holders (clients) and lease grantors (services) to deal with permanent failures.

  10. Life time test of a partial model of HTGR helium-helium heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Masaki; Hattori, Hiroshi; Ohtomo, Akira; Teramae, Tetsuo; Hamanaka, Junichi; Itoh, Mitsuyoshi; Urabe, Shigemi

    1984-01-01

    Authors had proposed a design guide for the HTGR components and applied it to the design and construction of the 1.5 Mwt helium heat exchanger test loop for the nuclear steel making under the financial support of the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry. In order to assure that the design method covers all the conceivable failure mode and has enough safety margin, a series of life time tests of partial model may be needed. For this project, three types of model tests were performed. A life time test of a partial model of the center manifold pipe and eight heat exchanger tubes were described in this report. A damage criterion with a set of material constants and a simplified method for stress-strain analysis for stub tube under three dimensional load were newly developed and used to predict the lives of each tube. The predicted lives were compared with the experimental lives and good agreement was found between the two. The life time test model was evaluated according to the proposed design guide and it was found that the guide has a safety factor of approximately 200 in life for this particular model. (author)

  11. Partially ordered mixed hidden Markov model for the disablement process of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Edward H; Zhang, Qiang; Rejeski, W Jack; Harris, Tamara B; Kritchevsky, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    At both the individual and societal levels, the health and economic burden of disability in older adults is enormous in developed countries, including the U.S. Recent studies have revealed that the disablement process in older adults often comprises episodic periods of impaired functioning and periods that are relatively free of disability, amid a secular and natural trend of decline in functioning. Rather than an irreversible, progressive event that is analogous to a chronic disease, disability is better conceptualized and mathematically modeled as states that do not necessarily follow a strict linear order of good-to-bad. Statistical tools, including Markov models, which allow bidirectional transition between states, and random effects models, which allow individual-specific rate of secular decline, are pertinent. In this paper, we propose a mixed effects, multivariate, hidden Markov model to handle partially ordered disability states. The model generalizes the continuation ratio model for ordinal data in the generalized linear model literature and provides a formal framework for testing the effects of risk factors and/or an intervention on the transitions between different disability states. Under a generalization of the proportional odds ratio assumption, the proposed model circumvents the problem of a potentially large number of parameters when the number of states and the number of covariates are substantial. We describe a maximum likelihood method for estimating the partially ordered, mixed effects model and show how the model can be applied to a longitudinal data set that consists of N = 2,903 older adults followed for 10 years in the Health Aging and Body Composition Study. We further statistically test the effects of various risk factors upon the probabilities of transition into various severe disability states. The result can be used to inform geriatric and public health science researchers who study the disablement process.

  12. Vascular reactivity of mesenteric arteries and veins to endothelin-1 in a murine model of high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rivera, Alex A; Fink, Gregory D; Galligan, James J

    2005-06-01

    We characterized vascular reactivity to endothelin-1 (ET-1) in mesenteric vessels from DOCA-salt hypertensive and SHAM control mice and assessed the effect that endothelial-derived vasodilators have on ET-1-induced vasoconstriction. Changes in the diameter of unpressurized small mesenteric arteries and veins (100- to 300-microm outside diameter) were measured in vitro using computer-assisted video microscopy. Veins were more sensitive than arteries to the contractile effects of ET-1. There was a decrease in arterial maximal responses (E(max)) compared to veins, this effect was larger in DOCA-salt arteries. The selective ET(B) receptor agonist, sarafotoxin 6c (S6c), contracted DOCA-salt and SHAM veins but did not contract arteries. The ET(B) receptor antagonist, BQ-788 (100 nM), but not the ET(A) receptor antagonist, BQ-610 (100 nM), blocked S6c responses. BQ-610 partially inhibited responses to ET-1 in mesenteric veins from DOCA-salt and SHAM mice while BQ-788 did not affect responses to ET-1. Co-administration of both antagonists inhibited responses to ET-1 to a greater extent than BQ-610 alone suggesting a possible functional interaction between ET(A) and ET(B) receptors. Responses to ET-1 in mesenteric arteries were completely inhibited by BQ-610 while BQ-788 did not affect arterial responses. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition potentiated ET-1 responses in veins from SHAM but not DOCA-salt mice. There was a prominent role for ET-mediated nitric oxide release in DOCA-salt but not SHAM arteries. In summary, these studies showed a differential regulation of ET-1 contractile mechanisms between murine mesenteric arteries and veins.

  13. A new nonlinear turbulence model based on Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J T; Wu, Y L; Cai, C; Liu, S H; Wang, L Q

    2013-01-01

    Partially-averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) Model was recognized as a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) to direct numerical simulation (DNS) bridging method. PANS model was purported for any filter width-from RANS to DNS. PANS method also shared some similarities with the currently popular URANS (unsteady RANS) method. In this paper, a new PANS model was proposed, which was based on RNG k-ε turbulence model. The Standard and RNG k-ε turbulence model were both isotropic models, as well as PANS models. The sheer stress in those PANS models was solved by linear equation. The linear hypothesis was not accurate in the simulation of complex flow, such as stall phenomenon. The sheer stress here was solved by nonlinear method proposed by Ehrhard. Then, the nonlinear PANS model was set up. The pressure coefficient of the suction side of the NACA0015 hydrofoil was predicted. The result of pressure coefficient agrees well with experimental result, which proves that the nonlinear PANS model can capture the high pressure gradient flow. A low specific centrifugal pump was used to verify the capacity of the nonlinear PANS model. The comparison between the simulation results of the centrifugal pump and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) results proves that the nonlinear PANS model can be used in the prediction of complex flow field

  14. A Thermo-Poromechanics Finite Element Model for Predicting Arterial Tissue Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankell, Douglas P.

    This work provides modeling efforts and supplemental experimental work performed towards the ultimate goal of modeling heat transfer, mass transfer, and deformation occurring in biological tissue, in particular during arterial fusion and cutting. Developing accurate models of these processes accomplishes two goals. First, accurate models would enable engineers to design devices to be safer and less expensive. Second, the mechanisms behind tissue fusion and cutting are widely unknown; models with the ability to accurately predict physical phenomena occurring in the tissue will allow for insight into the underlying mechanisms of the processes. This work presents three aims and the efforts in achieving them, leading to an accurate model of tissue fusion and more broadly the thermo-poromechanics (TPM) occurring within biological tissue. Chapters 1 and 2 provide the motivation for developing accurate TPM models of biological tissue and an overview of previous modeling efforts. In Chapter 3, a coupled thermo-structural finite element (FE) model with the ability to predict arterial cutting is offered. From the work presented in Chapter 3, it became obvious a more detailed model was needed. Chapter 4 meets this need by presenting small strain TPM theory and its implementation in an FE code. The model is then used to simulate thermal tissue fusion. These simulations show the model's promise in predicting the water content and temperature of arterial wall tissue during the fusion process, but it is limited by its small deformation assumptions. Chapters 5-7 attempt to address this limitation by developing and implementing a large deformation TPM FE model. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 present a thermodynamically consistent, large deformation TPM FE model and its ability to simulate tissue fusion. Ultimately, this work provides several methods of simulating arterial tissue fusion and the thermo-poromechanics of biological tissue. It is the first work, to the author's knowledge, to

  15. Numerical modeling of spray combustion in DI diesel engine using partially stirred reactor (PaSR) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, H.; Hosseini, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years special attention has been paid to the topic of diesel engine combustion. Various combustion models are used in CFD codes. In this paper Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) model, one of the newest turbulent combustion models, is introduced. This model has been employed in conjunction with the non-iterative PISO algorithm to calculate spray combustion in an axi-symmetric, direct injection diesel engine. Qualitative consideration of the results shows very good agreement with physical expectations and other numerical and experimental results. (author)

  16. Determinant Factors for Arterial Hemodynamics in Hypertension: Theoretical Insights From a Computational Model-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fuyou; Guan, Debao; Alastruey, Jordi

    2018-03-01

    Hypertension is a well-documented predictive factor for cardiovascular events. Clinical studies have extensively demonstrated the differential hemodynamic consequences of various antihypertensive drugs, but failed to clearly elucidate the underlying mechanisms due to the difficulty in performing a quantitative deterministic analysis based on clinical data that carry confounding information stemming from interpatient differences and the nonlinearity of cardiovascular hemodynamics. In the present study, a multiscale model of the cardiovascular system was developed to quantitatively investigate the relationships between hemodynamic variables and cardiovascular properties under hypertensive conditions, aiming to establish a theoretical basis for assisting in the interpretation of clinical observations or optimization of therapy. Results demonstrated that heart period, central arterial stiffness, and arteriolar radius were the major determinant factors for blood pressures and flow pulsatility indices both in large arteries and in the microcirculation. These factors differed in the degree and the way in which they affect hemodynamic variables due to their differential effects on wave reflections in the vascular system. In particular, it was found that the hemodynamic effects of varying arteriolar radius were considerably influenced by the state of central arterial stiffness, and vice versa, which implied the potential of optimizing antihypertensive treatment by selecting proper drugs based on patient-specific cardiovascular conditions. When analyzed in relation to clinical observations, the simulated results provided mechanistic explanations for the beneficial pressure-lowering effects of vasodilators as compared to β-blockers, and highlighted the significance of monitoring and normalizing arterial stiffness in the treatment of hypertension.

  17. Application of the lattice Boltzmann model to simulated stenosis growth in a two-dimensional carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J; Buick, J; Cosgrove, J A; Stansell, P

    2005-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann model is used to observe changes in the velocity flow and shear stress in a carotid artery model during a simulated stenosis growth. Near wall shear stress in the unstenosed artery is found to agree with literature values. The model also shows regions of low velocity, rotational flow and low near wall shear stress along parts of the walls of the carotid artery that have been identified as being prone to atherosclerosis. These regions persist during the simulated stenosis growth, suggesting that atherosclerotic plaque build-up creates regions of flow with properties that favour atherosclerotic progression

  18. Chronic antihypertensive treatment improves pulse pressure but not large artery mechanics in a mouse model of congenital vascular stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Carmen M; Broekelmann, Thomas J; Knutsen, Russell H; Ye, Li; Mecham, Robert P; Kozel, Beth A

    2015-09-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is a common characteristic of humans with Williams-Beuren syndrome and mouse models of elastin insufficiency. Arterial stiffness is associated with multiple negative cardiovascular outcomes, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death. Therefore, identifying therapeutic interventions that improve arterial stiffness in response to changes in elastin levels is of vital importance. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of chronic pharmacologic therapy with different classes of antihypertensive medications on arterial stiffness in elastin insufficiency. Elastin-insufficient mice 4-6 wk of age and wild-type littermates were subcutaneously implanted with osmotic micropumps delivering a continuous dose of one of the following: vehicle, losartan, nicardipine, or propranolol for 8 wk. At the end of treatment period, arterial blood pressure and large artery compliance and remodeling were assessed. Our results show that losartan and nicardipine treatment lowered blood pressure and pulse pressure in elastin-insufficient mice. Elastin and collagen content of abdominal aortas as well as ascending aorta and carotid artery biomechanics were not affected by any of the drug treatments in either genotype. By reducing pulse pressure and shifting the working pressure range of an artery to a more compliant region of the pressure-diameter curve, antihypertensive medications may mitigate the consequences of arterial stiffness, an effect that is drug class independent. These data emphasize the importance of early recognition and long-term management of hypertension in Williams-Beuren syndrome and elastin insufficiency. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Anatomical relationship between the collecting system and the intrarenal arteries in the rabbit: contribution for an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalgum, A; Marques-Sampaio, B P S; Dafalla, A; Pereira-Sampaio, M A

    2012-04-01

    Intrarenal anatomy was studied in detail to evaluate how useful rabbits could be as a urologic model. Only one renal artery was observed, which was divided into dorsal and ventral branches in all cases. Three segmental arteries (cranial, mesorenal and caudal) was the most frequent branching pattern found in both the dorsal and ventral division. There was an important artery related to the ureteropelvic junction in both dorsal and ventral surfaces in all specimens. The cranial pole was supplied by both dorsal and ventral divisions of the renal artery in 23 of 41 casts (56%). Although the cranial pole of the rabbit kidney could be useful as a model because of the resemblances with human kidney, the different relationship between the intrarenal arteries and the kidney collecting system in other regions of the kidney must be taken into consideration by the urologists, when using rabbit kidney in urological research. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Imaging and modeling of acute pressure-induced changes of collagen and elastin microarchitectures in pig and human resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas M; Spronck, Bart

    2017-01-01

    The impact of disease related changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries largely remains to be established. Resistance arteries from both pig and human parietal pericardium (PRA) display a different ECM microarchitecture compared...... changes of elastin and collagen upon pressurization. In conclusion, we show for the first time in resistance arteries a quantitative relationship between pressure-induced changes in the extracellular matrix and the arterial wall mechanics. The strength of the integrated methods invites for future detailed...... to frequently used rodent mesenteric arteries. We hypothesized that the biaxial mechanics of PRA mirror pressure induced changes in the ECM microarchitecture. This was tested using isolated pig PRA as model system, integrating vital imaging, pressure myography and mathematical modeling. Collagenase and elastase...

  1. Geometric modeling of hepatic arteries in 3D ultrasound with unsupervised MRA fusion during liver interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Maxime; Michaud, François; Bigot, Alexandre; Tang, An; Soulez, Gilles; Kadoury, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Modulating the chemotherapy injection rate with regard to blood flow velocities in the tumor-feeding arteries during intra-arterial therapies may help improve liver tumor targeting while decreasing systemic exposure. These velocities can be obtained noninvasively using Doppler ultrasound (US). However, small vessels situated in the liver are difficult to identify and follow in US. We propose a multimodal fusion approach that non-rigidly registers a 3D geometric mesh model of the hepatic arteries obtained from preoperative MR angiography (MRA) acquisitions with intra-operative 3D US imaging. The proposed fusion tool integrates 3 imaging modalities: an arterial MRA, a portal phase MRA and an intra-operative 3D US. Preoperatively, the arterial phase MRA is used to generate a 3D model of the hepatic arteries, which is then non-rigidly co-registered with the portal phase MRA. Once the intra-operative 3D US is acquired, we register it with the portal MRA using a vessel-based rigid initialization followed by a non-rigid registration using an image-based metric based on linear correlation of linear combination. Using the combined non-rigid transformation matrices, the 3D mesh model is fused with the 3D US. 3D US and multi-phase MRA images acquired from 10 porcine models were used to test the performance of the proposed fusion tool. Unimodal registration of the MRA phases yielded a target registration error (TRE) of [Formula: see text] mm. Initial rigid alignment of the portal MRA and 3D US yielded a mean TRE of [Formula: see text] mm, which was significantly reduced to [Formula: see text] mm ([Formula: see text]) after affine image-based registration. The following deformable registration step allowed for further decrease of the mean TRE to [Formula: see text] mm. The proposed tool could facilitate visualization and localization of these vessels when using 3D US intra-operatively for either intravascular or percutaneous interventions to avoid vessel perforation.

  2. Comparison of using different bridge prosthetic designs for partial defect restoration through mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styranivska, Oksana; Kliuchkovska, Nataliia; Mykyyevych, Nataliya

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the stress-strain states of bone and abutment teeth during the use of different prosthetic designs of fixed partial dentures with the use of relevant mathematical modeling principles. The use of Comsol Multiphysics 3.5 (Comsol AB, Sweden) software during the mathematical modeling of stress-strain states provided numerical data for analytical interpretation in three different clinical scenarios with fixed dentures and different abutment teeth and demountable prosthetic denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part. Microsoft Excel Software (Microsoft Office 2017) helped to evaluate absolute mistakes of stress and strain parameters of each abutment tooth during three modeled scenarios and normal condition and to summarize data into the forms of tables. In comparison with the fixed prosthetic denture supported by the canine, first premolar, and third molar, stresses at the same abutment teeth with the use of demountable denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part decreased: at the mesial abutment tooth by 2.8 times, at distal crown by 6.1 times, and at the intermediate part by 11.1 times, respectively, the deformation level decreased by 3.1, 1.9, and 1.4 times at each area. The methods of mathematical modeling proved that complications during the use of fixed partial dentures based on the overload effect of the abutment teeth and caused by the deformation process inside the intermediate section of prosthetic construction.

  3. Partial least squares path modeling basic concepts, methodological issues and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Noonan, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This edited book presents the recent developments in partial least squares-path modeling (PLS-PM) and provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of the most advanced research related to PLS-PM. The first section of this book emphasizes the basic concepts and extensions of the PLS-PM method. The second section discusses the methodological issues that are the focus of the recent development of the PLS-PM method. The third part discusses the real world application of the PLS-PM method in various disciplines. The contributions from expert authors in the field of PLS focus on topics such as the factor-based PLS-PM, the perfect match between a model and a mode, quantile composite-based path modeling (QC-PM), ordinal consistent partial least squares (OrdPLSc), non-symmetrical composite-based path modeling (NSCPM), modern view for mediation analysis in PLS-PM, a multi-method approach for identifying and treating unobserved heterogeneity, multigroup analysis (PLS-MGA), the assessment of the common method b...

  4. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  5. Analysis of a Model for the Morphological Structure of Renal Arterial Tree: Fractal Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Espinoza-Valdez

    2013-01-01

    experimental data measurements of the rat kidneys. The fractal dimension depends on the probability of sprouting angiogenesis in the development of the arterial vascular tree of the kidney, that is, of the distribution of blood vessels in the morphology generated by the analytical model. The fractal dimension might determine whether a suitable renal vascular structure is capable of performing physiological functions under appropriate conditions. The analysis can describe the complex structures of the development vasculature in kidney.

  6. Effects of Venous Superdrainage and Arterial Supercharging on Dorsal Perforator Flap in a Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zheng

    Full Text Available To comparatively assess the effects of venous superdrainage and arterial supercharging on dorsal perforator flap survival.Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (450-550g were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20, including control group (Control and experimental groups A (venous superdrainage, Exp. A and B (arterial supercharging, Exp. B. At postoperative day 7, survival areas of the flaps were evaluated and all animals underwent angiography. Laser Doppler was used to evaluate flap perfusion from 0h to 7days after surgery. Histology with hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to count microvessels. Tissue of "Choke vessels"was excised for quantification of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF by western blot assay at 6h and 7days after surgery.In the Exp. A group, almost all flaps survived (98.2±1.6%; in the Exp. B and control group, survival areas accounted for 78.8±8.5% and 60.3±7.8%, respectively (P <0.001. In addition, Exp. A animals showed improved anastomosis of choke vessels 2 compared with the Exp. B and Control groups. Furthermore, flap blood flow and partial pressure of oxygen in the Exp. A group were significantly higher compared with values obtained for the Exp. B and Control groups, from 6 hours to 7 days after surgery. More microvessels were found in the Exp. A group (11.65±1.33 than in Exp. B (9.25±0.34 and control (7.25±0.91 animals on POD 7. The relative expression level of HIF-1α and VEGF were significant at 6h and 7days after surgery.Venous superdrainage in rat dorsal perforator flap is more effective than arterial supercharging in promoting flap survival, and could effectively alter hemodynamics in the microcirculation and stimulate blood vessel formation.

  7. Fractional modeling of viscoelasticity in 3D cerebral arteries and aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Perdikaris, Paris; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-10-15

    We develop efficient numerical methods for fractional order PDEs, and employ them to investigate viscoelastic constitutive laws for arterial wall mechanics. Recent simulations using one-dimensional models [1] have indicated that fractional order models may offer a more powerful alternative for modeling the arterial wall response, exhibiting reduced sensitivity to parametric uncertainties compared with the integer-calculus-based models. Here, we study three-dimensional (3D) fractional PDEs that naturally model the continuous relaxation properties of soft tissue, and for the first time employ them to simulate flow structure interactions for patient-specific brain aneurysms. To deal with the high memory requirements and in order to accelerate the numerical evaluation of hereditary integrals, we employ a fast convolution method [2] that reduces the memory cost to O (log( N )) and the computational complexity to O ( N log( N )). Furthermore, we combine the fast convolution with high-order backward differentiation to achieve third-order time integration accuracy. We confirm that in 3D viscoelastic simulations, the integer order models strongly depends on the relaxation parameters, while the fractional order models are less sensitive. As an application to long-time simulations in complex geometries, we also apply the method to modeling fluid-structure interaction of a 3D patient-specific compliant cerebral artery with an aneurysm. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that fractional calculus can be employed effectively in modeling complex behavior of materials in realistic 3D time-dependent problems if properly designed efficient algorithms are employed to overcome the extra memory requirements and computational complexity associated with the non-local character of fractional derivatives.

  8. Effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Lu, Yan; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Our objective is to explore the effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. 45 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade were selected and divided into treatment group, model control group and blank control group. The rats in the treatment group and model control group received high-fat diet for 12 weeks and intraperitoneal injection of VD3 to establish rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. After modeling, the rats in the treatment group received gavage of 100 mg/(kg·d) curcimin, and the rats in the model control group and blank control group received gavage of 5 ml/(kg·d) distilled water, the intervention time was 4 weeks. After intervention, the rats were killed, and the hearts were dissected to obtain the samples of coronary artery. After embedding and frozen section, immunofluorescence method was used to detect the change of endarterium permeability in 3 groups, Western blot was used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and CD40L in coronary artery tissue, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and C reaction protein (CRP). After modeling, compared with the blank control group, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterin (LDL-c) in the treatment group and model control group were significantly higher (Pcoronary artery in treatment group and model control group, indicating that the modeling was successful. Immunofluorescence showed that there was only a little fluorochrome permeability in artery in blank control group, there was some fluorochrome permeability in artery in the treatment group and there was a lot of fluorochrome permeability in artery in the model control group. MMP-9 and CD40L in coronary artery tissue in the model control group were significantly higher than the treatment group (Pcoronary artery tissue in the treatment group

  9. Coupled 0D-1D CFD Modeling of Right Heart and Pulmonary Artery Morphometry Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Melody; Yang, Weiguang; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.; Marsden, Alison

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary artery (PA) pressure and remodeling of the distal PAs resulting in right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure. It is hypothesized that patients with untreated ventricular septal defects (VSD) may develop PAH due to elevated flows and pressures in the PAs. Wall shear stress (WSS), due to elevated flows, and circumferential stress, due to elevated pressures, are known to play a role in vascular mechanobiology. Thus, simulating VSD hemodynamics and wall mechanics may facilitate our understanding of mechanical stimuli leading to PAH initiation and progression. Although 3D CFD models can capture detailed hemodynamics in the proximal PAs, they cannot easily model hemodynamics and wave propagation in the distal PAs, where remodeling occurs. To improve current PA models, we will present a new method that couples distal PA hemodynamics with RV function. Our model couples a 0D lumped parameter model of the RV to a 1D model of the PA tree, based on human PA morphometry data, to characterize RV performance and WSS changes in the PA tree. We will compare a VSD 0D-1D model and a 0D-3D model coupled to a mathematical morphometry tree model to quantify WSS in the entire PA vascular tree.

  10. Fixed point and anomaly mediation in partial {\\boldsymbol{N}}=2 supersymmetric standard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the simple toroidal compactification of extra-dimensional SUSY theories, we investigate a partial N = 2 supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the standard model which has an N = 2 SUSY sector and an N = 1 SUSY sector. We point out that below the scale of the partial breaking of N = 2 to N = 1, the ratio of Yukawa to gauge couplings embedded in the original N = 2 gauge interaction in the N = 2 sector becomes greater due to a fixed point. Since at the partial breaking scale the sfermion masses in the N = 2 sector are suppressed due to the N = 2 non-renormalization theorem, the anomaly mediation effect becomes important. If dominant, the anomaly-induced masses for the sfermions in the N = 2 sector are almost UV-insensitive due to the fixed point. Interestingly, these masses are always positive, i.e. there is no tachyonic slepton problem. From an example model, we show interesting phenomena differing from ordinary MSSM. In particular, the dark matter particle can be a sbino, i.e. the scalar component of the N = 2 vector multiplet of {{U}}{(1)}Y. To obtain the correct dark matter abundance, the mass of the sbino, as well as the MSSM sparticles in the N = 2 sector which have a typical mass pattern of anomaly mediation, is required to be small. Therefore, this scenario can be tested and confirmed in the LHC and may be further confirmed by the measurement of the N = 2 Yukawa couplings in future colliders. This model can explain dark matter, the muon g-2 anomaly, and gauge coupling unification, and relaxes some ordinary problems within the MSSM. It is also compatible with thermal leptogenesis.

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Pain during Electrocutaneous Stimulation using a Log-Linearized Peripheral Arterial Viscoelastic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Hirano, Hiroki; Hirano, Harutoyo; Soh, Zu; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yoshizumi, Masao; Yoshino, Atsuo; Sasaoka, Takafumi; Yamawaki, Shigeto; Tsuji, Toshio

    2018-02-15

    In clinical practice, subjective pain evaluations, e.g., the visual analogue scale and the numeric rating scale, are generally employed, but these are limited in terms of their ability to detect inaccurate reports, and are unsuitable for use in anesthetized patients or those with dementia. We focused on the peripheral sympathetic nerve activity that responds to pain, and propose a method for evaluating pain sensation, including intensity, sharpness, and dullness, using the arterial stiffness index. In the experiment, electrocardiogram, blood pressure, and photoplethysmograms were obtained, and an arterial viscoelastic model was applied to estimate arterial stiffness. The relationships among the stiffness index, self-reported pain sensation, and electrocutaneous stimuli were examined and modelled. The relationship between the stiffness index and pain sensation could be modelled using a sigmoid function with high determination coefficients, where R 2  ≥ 0.88, p < 0.01 for intensity, R 2  ≥ 0.89, p < 0.01 for sharpness, and R 2  ≥ 0.84, p < 0.01 for dullness when the stimuli could appropriately evoke dull pain.

  12. Assessment Of Coronary Artery Aneurysms Using Transluminal Attenuation Gradient And Computational Modeling In Kawasaki Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande Gutierrez, Noelia; Kahn, Andrew; Shirinsky, Olga; Gagarina, Nina; Lyskina, Galina; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Owaga, Shunichi; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) in up to 25% of patients, putting them at risk of thrombus formation, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend CAA diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for initiating systemic anticoagulation. KD patient specific modeling and flow simulations suggest that hemodynamic data can predict regions at increased risk of thrombosis. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient (TAG) is determined from the change in radiological attenuation per vessel length and has been proposed as a non-invasive method for characterizing coronary stenosis from CT Angiography. We hypothesized that CAA abnormal flow could be quantified using TAG. We computed hemodynamics for patient specific coronary models using a stabilized finite element method, coupled numerically to a lumped parameter network to model the heart and vascular boundary conditions. TAG was quantified in the major coronary arteries. We compared TAG for aneurysmal and normal arteries and we analyzed TAG correlation with hemodynamic and geometrical parameters. Our results suggest that TAG may provide hemodynamic data not available from anatomy alone. TAG represents a possible extension to standard CTA that could help to better evaluate the risk of thrombus formation in KD.

  13. Experimental investigations of the steady flow through an idealized model of a femoral artery bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giurgea Corina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the steps taken by the authors in the first stage of an experimental program within a larger national research project whose objective is to characterize the flow through a femoral artery bypass with a view to finding solutions for its optimization. The objective of the stage is to investigate by means of the PIV method the stationary flow through a bypass model with an idealized geometry. A bypass assembly which reunites the idealized geometry models of the proximal and distal anastomoses, and which respects the lengths of a femoral artery bypass was constructed on the basis of data for a real patient provided by medical investigations. With the aim of testing the model and the established experimental set-up with regard to their suitability for the assessment of the velocity field associated to the steady flow through the bypass, three zones that can restore the whole distal anastomosis were PIV investigated. The measurements were taken in the conditions of maintained inflow at the bypass entry of 0.9 l / min (Re = 600. The article presents comparatively the flow spectra and the velocity fields for each zone obtained in two situations: with the femoral artery completely occluded and completely open.

  14. [Superior mesenteric artery syndrome as a cause of chronic partial intolerance to oral feeding. Report of a case and review of the subject].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lozada, Raúl; Acosta-Rosero, Ana Vanessa; Balas-Salame, Carlos; Chapa-Azuela, Oscar; Hurtado-López, Luis Mauricio

    2002-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is the obstruction of the duodenum in the third portion due to this artery. We present a case of chronic oral feeding intolerance due to this problem. A 24 year-old woman, with a time of evolution of 1 year and a half of postprandial epigastric pain with nausea, vomiting, and loss of 30 kg managed as acid-peptic disease. The patient was studied with gastrointestinal contrast study and endoscopy without conclusive results. The patient was admitted for unstoppable vomiting, malnutrition, and severe dehydration. A laparotomy was performed and SMAS was identified. We performed Treitz's ligament section and gastrojejunoanastomosis. Her clinical outcome was satisfactory and the patient was discharged without complications. SMAS is also called Wilkie's syndrome. SMAS is more frequent in women between the 10 and 39 years. The disease due to the decrease of the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, to the anomalous origin of this artery, or to the shortening of Treitz's ligament. SMAS may appear as a sudden weight loss. Food intolerance is a predominant symptom. Diagnosis can be made with x-ray studies. Treatment is medical or surgical, with Treitz's ligament section, duodenojejunoanastomosis, and in some cases gastrojejunoanastomosis. SMAS should be considered as no the differential diagnosis of chronic oral feeding intolerance.

  15. Screening for a Chronic Disease: A Multiple Stage Duration Model with Partial Observability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Thomas A; Picone, Gabriel; Sloan, Frank; Yashkin, Arseniy P

    2016-08-01

    We estimate a dynamic multi-stage duration model to investigate how early detection of diabetes can delay the onset of lower extremity complications and death. We allow for partial observability of the disease stage, unmeasured heterogeneity, and endogenous timing of diabetes screening. Timely diagnosis appears important. We evaluate the effectiveness of two potential policies to reduce the monetary costs of frequent screening in terms of lost longevity. Compared to the status quo, the more restrictive policy yields an implicit value for an additional year of life of about $50,000, while the less restrictive policy implies a value of about $120,000.

  16. Autoregressive Model with Partial Forgetting within Rao-Blackwellized Particle Filter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dedecius, Kamil; Hofman, Radek

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 5 (2012), s. 582-589 ISSN 0361-0918 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102013018; GA ČR GA102/08/0567 Grant - others:ČVUT(CZ) SGS 10/099/OHK3/1T/16 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Bayesian methods * Particle filters * Recursive estimation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.295, year: 2012 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/AS/dedecius-autoregressive model with partial forgetting within rao-blackwellized particle filter.pdf

  17. A queueing model for error control of partial buffer sharing in ATM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Boo Yong

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We model the error control of the partial buffer sharing of ATM by a queueing system M 1 , M 2 / G / 1 / K + 1 with threshold and instantaneous Bernoulli feedback. We first derive the system equations and develop a recursive method to compute the loss probabilities at an arbitrary time epoch. We then build an approximation scheme to compute the mean waiting time of each class of cells. An algorithm is developed for finding the optimal threshold and queue capacity for a given quality of service.

  18. Analysis and Modeling of Parallel Photovoltaic Systems under Partial Shading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddala, Santhoshi Snigdha

    Since the industrial revolution, fossil fuels like petroleum, coal, oil, natural gas and other non-renewable energy sources have been used as the primary energy source. The consumption of fossil fuels releases various harmful gases into the atmosphere as byproducts which are hazardous in nature and they tend to deplete the protective layers and affect the overall environmental balance. Also the fossil fuels are bounded resources of energy and rapid depletion of these sources of energy, have prompted the need to investigate alternate sources of energy called renewable energy. One such promising source of renewable energy is the solar/photovoltaic energy. This work focuses on investigating a new solar array architecture with solar cells connected in parallel configuration. By retaining the structural simplicity of the parallel architecture, a theoretical small signal model of the solar cell is proposed and modeled to analyze the variations in the module parameters when subjected to partial shading conditions. Simulations were run in SPICE to validate the model implemented in Matlab. The voltage limitations of the proposed architecture are addressed by adopting a simple dc-dc boost converter and evaluating the performance of the architecture in terms of efficiencies by comparing it with the traditional architectures. SPICE simulations are used to compare the architectures and identify the best one in terms of power conversion efficiency under partial shading conditions.

  19. A simple one-step chemistry model for partially premixed hydrocarbon combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Tarrazo, Eduardo [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, Antonio L. [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes 28911 (Spain); Linan, Amable [ETSI Aeronauticos, Pl. Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Williams, Forman A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    This work explores the applicability of one-step irreversible Arrhenius kinetics with unity reaction order to the numerical description of partially premixed hydrocarbon combustion. Computations of planar premixed flames are used in the selection of the three model parameters: the heat of reaction q, the activation temperature T{sub a}, and the preexponential factor B. It is seen that changes in q with equivalence ratio f need to be introduced in fuel-rich combustion to describe the effect of partial fuel oxidation on the amount of heat released, leading to a universal linear variation q(f) for f>1 for all hydrocarbons. The model also employs a variable activation temperature T{sub a}(f) to mimic changes in the underlying chemistry in rich and very lean flames. The resulting chemistry description is able to reproduce propagation velocities of diluted and undiluted flames accurately over the whole flammability limit. Furthermore, computations of methane-air counterflow diffusion flames are used to test the proposed chemistry under nonpremixed conditions. The model not only predicts the critical strain rate at extinction accurately but also gives near-extinction flames with oxygen leakage, thereby overcoming known predictive limitations of one-step Arrhenius kinetics. (author)

  20. Generalized partially linear single-index model for zero-inflated count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Liang; Yin, Guosheng

    2015-02-28

    Count data often arise in biomedical studies, while there could be a special feature with excessive zeros in the observed counts. The zero-inflated Poisson model provides a natural approach to accounting for the excessive zero counts. In the semiparametric framework, we propose a generalized partially linear single-index model for the mean of the Poisson component, the probability of zero, or both. We develop the estimation and inference procedure via a profile maximum likelihood method. Under some mild conditions, we establish the asymptotic properties of the profile likelihood estimators. The finite sample performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation studies, and the new model is illustrated with a medical care dataset. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Partial corrosion casting to assess cochlear vasculature in mouse models of presbycusis and CMV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Mattia; Park, Albert H; Harrison, Robert V

    2016-02-01

    Some forms of sensorineural hearing loss involve damage or degenerative changes to the stria vascularis and/or other vascular structures in the cochlea. In animal models, many methods for anatomical assessment of cochlear vasculature exist, each with advantages and limitations. One methodology, corrosion casting, has proved useful in some species, however in the mouse model this technique is difficult to achieve because digestion of non vascular tissue results in collapse of the delicate cast specimen. We have developed a partial corrosion cast method that allows visualization of vasculature along much of the cochlear length but maintains some structural integrity of the specimen. We provide a detailed step-by-step description of this novel technique. We give some illustrative examples of the use of the method in mouse models of presbycusis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Computational Model of Drug-Coated Balloon Delivery in a Patient-Specific Arterial Vessel with Heterogeneous Tissue Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Prashanta K; Sarifuddin; Kolachalama, Vijaya B

    2016-12-01

    Balloon angioplasty followed by local delivery of antiproliferative drugs to target tissue is increasingly being considered for the treatment of obstructive arterial disease, and yet there is much to appreciate regarding pharmacokinetics in arteries of non-uniform disease. We developed a computational model capable of simulating drug-coated balloon delivery to arteries of heterogeneous tissue composition comprising healthy tissue, as well as regions of fibrous, fibro-fatty, calcified and necrotic core lesions. Image processing using an unsupervised clustering technique was used to reconstruct an arterial geometry from a single, patient-specific color image obtained from intravascular ultrasound-derived virtual histology. Transport of free drug was modeled using a time-dependent reaction-diffusion model and the bound, immobilized drug using the time-dependent reaction equation. The governing equations representing the transport of free as well as bound drug along with a set of initial settings and boundary conditions were solved numerically using an explicit finite difference scheme that satisfied the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion. Our results support previous findings related to the transport and binding of drug in arteries where tissue retention is strongly dependent on local pharmacologic properties. Additionally, modeling results indicate that non-uniform disease composition leads to heterogeneous arterial drug distribution patterns, although further validation using animal studies is required to fully appreciate pharmacokinetics in disease-laden arteries.

  3. Bayesian modeling of the covariance structure for irregular longitudinal data using the partial autocorrelation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Daniels, Michael J

    2015-05-30

    In long-term follow-up studies, irregular longitudinal data are observed when individuals are assessed repeatedly over time but at uncommon and irregularly spaced time points. Modeling the covariance structure for this type of data is challenging, as it requires specification of a covariance function that is positive definite. Moreover, in certain settings, careful modeling of the covariance structure for irregular longitudinal data can be crucial in order to ensure no bias arises in the mean structure. Two common settings where this occurs are studies with 'outcome-dependent follow-up' and studies with 'ignorable missing data'. 'Outcome-dependent follow-up' occurs when individuals with a history of poor health outcomes had more follow-up measurements, and the intervals between the repeated measurements were shorter. When the follow-up time process only depends on previous outcomes, likelihood-based methods can still provide consistent estimates of the regression parameters, given that both the mean and covariance structures of the irregular longitudinal data are correctly specified and no model for the follow-up time process is required. For 'ignorable missing data', the missing data mechanism does not need to be specified, but valid likelihood-based inference requires correct specification of the covariance structure. In both cases, flexible modeling approaches for the covariance structure are essential. In this paper, we develop a flexible approach to modeling the covariance structure for irregular continuous longitudinal data using the partial autocorrelation function and the variance function. In particular, we propose semiparametric non-stationary partial autocorrelation function models, which do not suffer from complex positive definiteness restrictions like the autocorrelation function. We describe a Bayesian approach, discuss computational issues, and apply the proposed methods to CD4 count data from a pediatric AIDS clinical trial. © 2015 The Authors

  4. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cluster analysis in kinetic modelling of the brain: A noninvasive alternative to arterial sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liptrot, Matthew George; Adams, K.H.; Martiny, L.

    2004-01-01

    extracted from the PET data set. Hierarchical K-means cluster analysis was performed on the PET time series to extract a cerebral vasculature ROI. The number of clusters was varied from K = 1 to 10 for the second of the two-stage method. Determination of the correct number of clusters was performed...... blood sampling, the Simplified Reference Tissue Model (SRTM) and Logan analysis with cerebellar TAC as an input. There was a good agreement (P K-means-clustered input function and those from the arterial blood samples. This work......) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by cluster analysis. Five healthy subjects were injected with the 5HT2A- receptor ligand [18F]-altanserin and blood samples were subsequently taken from the radial artery and cubital vein. Eight regions-of-interest (ROI) TACs were...

  6. The anterior cerebral artery: II. A computer model of its cortical branches estereotaxically obtained from anatomical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Marino Jr

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a corrollary of a previously published anatomical study of the anterior cerebral artery. The authors propose a method to obtain a computer model of the anterior cerebral artery, based on a combined system of stereotaxic coordinates and a specially developed computer program. The graphic analysis, thus obtained, is projected on a model atlas brain and an ideal diagram of this anatomical structure is obtained. Forty anatomical specimens were used for this study.

  7. Modelling and investigation of partial wetting surfaces for drop dynamics using lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravinraj, T.; Patrikar, Rajendra

    2017-07-01

    Partial wetting surfaces and its influence on the droplet movement of micro and nano scale being contemplated for many useful applications. The dynamics of the droplet usually analyzed with a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). In this paper, the influence of partial wetting surface on the dynamics of droplet is systematically analyzed for various cases. Splitting of droplets due to chemical gradient of the surface is studied and analyses of splitting time for various widths of the strips for different Weber numbers are computed. With the proposed model one can tune the splitting volume and time by carefully choosing a strip width and droplet position. The droplet spreading on chemically heterogeneous surfaces shows that the spreading can be controlled not only by parameters of Weber number but also by tuning strip width ratio. The transportation of the droplet from hydrophobic surface to hydrophilic surface due to chemical gradient is simulated and analyzed using our hybrid thermodynamic-image processing technique. The results prove that with the progress of time the surface free energy decreases with increase in spreading area. Finally, the transportation of a droplet on microstructure gradient is demonstrated. The model explains the temporal behaviour of droplet during the spreading, recoiling and translation along with tracking of contact angle hysteresis phenomenon.

  8. Cannabidiol exerts anti-convulsant effects in animal models of temporal lobe and partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nicholas A; Glyn, Sarah E; Akiyama, Satoshi; Hill, Thomas D M; Hill, Andrew J; Weston, Samantha E; Burnett, Matthew D A; Yamasaki, Yuki; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J; Williams, Claire M

    2012-06-01

    Cannabis sativa has been associated with contradictory effects upon seizure states despite its medicinal use by numerous people with epilepsy. We have recently shown that the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) reduces seizure severity and lethality in the well-established in vivo model of pentylenetetrazole-induced generalised seizures, suggesting that earlier, small-scale clinical trials examining CBD effects in people with epilepsy warrant renewed attention. Here, we report the effects of pure CBD (1, 10 and 100mg/kg) in two other established rodent seizure models, the acute pilocarpine model of temporal lobe seizure and the penicillin model of partial seizure. Seizure activity was video recorded and scored offline using model-specific seizure severity scales. In the pilocarpine model CBD (all doses) significantly reduced the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe seizures. In the penicillin model, CBD (≥ 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the percentage mortality as a result of seizures; CBD (all doses) also decreased the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe tonic-clonic seizures. These results extend the anti-convulsant profile of CBD; when combined with a reported absence of psychoactive effects, this evidence strongly supports CBD as a therapeutic candidate for a diverse range of human epilepsies. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rosiglitazone Attenuated Endothelin-1-Induced Vasoconstriction of Pulmonary Arteries in the Rat Model of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension via Differential Regulation of ET-1 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a fatal disease characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right ventricular failure and death. Activation of the endothelin (ET-1 system has been demonstrated in plasma and lung tissue of PAH patients as well as in animal models of PAH. Recently, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ agonists have been shown to ameliorate PAH. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism for the antivasoconstrictive effects of rosiglitazone in response to ET-1 in PAH. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 3 weeks. Pulmonary arteries from PAH rats showed an enhanced vasoconstriction in response to ET-1. Treatment with PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (20 mg/kg per day with oral gavage for 3 days attenuated the vasocontractive effect of ET-1. The effect of rosiglitazone was lost in the presence of L-NAME, indicating a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. Western blotting revealed that rosiglitazone increased ETBR but decreased ETAR level in pulmonary arteries from PAH rats. ETBR antagonist A192621 diminished the effect of rosiglitazone on ET-1-induced contraction. These results demonstrated that rosiglitazone attenuated ET-1-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction in PAH through differential regulation of the subtypes of ET-1 receptors and, thus, provided a new mechanism for the therapeutic use of PPARγ agonists in PAH.

  10. High Spatial Resolution Multi-Organ Finite Element Modeling of Ventricular-Arterial Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mohammad Shavik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available While it has long been recognized that bi-directional interaction between the heart and the vasculature plays a critical role in the proper functioning of the cardiovascular system, a comprehensive study of this interaction has largely been hampered by a lack of modeling framework capable of simultaneously accommodating high-resolution models of the heart and vasculature. Here, we address this issue and present a computational modeling framework that couples finite element (FE models of the left ventricle (LV and aorta to elucidate ventricular—arterial coupling in the systemic circulation. We show in a baseline simulation that the framework predictions of (1 LV pressure—volume loop, (2 aorta pressure—diameter relationship, (3 pressure—waveforms of the aorta, LV, and left atrium (LA over the cardiac cycle are consistent with the physiological measurements found in healthy human. To develop insights of ventricular-arterial interactions, the framework was then used to simulate how alterations in the geometrical or, material parameter(s of the aorta affect the LV and vice versa. We show that changing the geometry and microstructure of the aorta model in the framework led to changes in the functional behaviors of both LV and aorta that are consistent with experimental observations. On the other hand, changing contractility and passive stiffness of the LV model in the framework also produced changes in both the LV and aorta functional behaviors that are consistent with physiology principles.

  11. Generalized least squares and empirical Bayes estimation in regional partial duration series index-flood modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1997-01-01

    A regional estimation procedure that combines the index-flood concept with an empirical Bayes method for inferring regional information is introduced. The model is based on the partial duration series approach with generalized Pareto (GP) distributed exceedances. The prior information of the model...... parameters is inferred from regional data using generalized least squares (GLS) regression. Two different Bayesian T-year event estimators are introduced: a linear estimator that requires only some moments of the prior distributions to be specified and a parametric estimator that is based on specified...... families of prior distributions. The regional method is applied to flood records from 48 New Zealand catchments. In the case of a strongly heterogeneous intersite correlation structure, the GLS procedure provides a more efficient estimate of the regional GP shape parameter as compared to the usually...

  12. An integro-partial differential equation for modeling biofluids flow in fractured biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh Zadeh, Kouroush

    2011-03-21

    A novel mathematical model in the framework of a nonlinear integro-partial differential equation governing biofluids flow in fractured biomaterials is proposed, solved, verified, and evaluated. A semi-analytical solution is derived for the equation, verified by a mass-lumped Galerkin finite element method (FEM), and calibrated with two in vitro experimental datasets. The solution process uses separation of variables and results in explicit expression involving complete and incomplete beta functions. The proposed semi-analytical model shows reasonable agreements with the finite element simulator as well as with two in vitro experimental time series and can be successfully used to simulate biofluids (e.g. water, blood, oil, etc.) flow in natural and synthetic porous biomaterials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A randomised control study of partial liquid ventilation after airway lavage with exogenous surfactant in a meconium aspiration syndrome animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Matsuzawa, S.; Sugiura, M.; Tamura, M.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To test the hypothesis that lavage with exogenous surfactant before partial liquid ventilation in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) would improve debris removal, and therefore the effectiveness of partial liquid ventilation.
METHODS—12 newborn piglets were randomised into 4 groups, partial liquid ventilation or gas ventilation, with and without surfactant lavage. Physiological and blood gas data were compared between groups by analysis of variance.
RESULTS—Arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) was improved in the group treated with surfactant lavage when compared with the group not receiving surfactant. PaO2 in the group receiving surfactant lavage followed by partial liquid ventilation was further improved when compared with the group treated with surfactant lavage followed by gas ventilation and the group receiving partial liquid ventilation alone.
CONCLUSION—The effectiveness of partial liquid ventilation in MAS might be enhanced by pretreatment with exogenous surfactant bronchial lavage.

 PMID:10685992

  14. Application of partial least-squares (PLS) modeling in quantifying drug crystallinity in amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumondor, Alfred C F; Taylor, Lynne S

    2010-10-15

    Among the different experimental methods that can be used to quantify the evolution of drug crystallinity in polymer-containing amorphous solid dispersions, powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) is commonly considered as a frontline method. In order to achieve accurate quantification of the percent drug crystallinity in the system, calibration curves have to be constructed using appropriate calibration samples and calculation methods. This can be non-trivial in the case of partially crystalline solid dispersions where the calibration samples must capture the multiphase nature of the systems and the mathematical model must be robust enough to accommodate subtle and not so subtle changes in the diffractograms. The purpose of this study was to compare two different calculation and model-building methods to quantify the proportion of crystalline drug in amorphous solid dispersions containing different ratios of drug and amorphous polymer. The first method involves predicting the % drug crystallinity from the ratio of the area underneath the Bragg peaks to total area of the diffractogram. The second method is multivariate analysis using a Partial Least-Squares (PLS) multivariate regression method. It was found that PLS analysis provided far better accuracy and prediction of % drug crystallinity in the sample. Through the application of PLS, root-mean-squared error of estimation (RMSEE) values of 2.2%, 1.9%, and 4.7% drug crystallinity was achieved for samples containing 25%, 50%, and 75% polymer, respectively, compared to values of 11.2%, 17.0%, and 23.6% for the area model. In addition, construction of a PLS model enables further analysis of the data, including identification of outliers and non-linearity in the data, as well as insight into which factors are most important to correlate PXRD diffractograms with % crystallinity of the drug through analysis of the loadings. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of Placental Barrier Permeability: A Model Based on Partial Least Squares Variable Selection Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hong Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the human placental barrier permeability of drugs is very important to guarantee drug safety during pregnancy. Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR method was used as an effective assessing tool for the placental transfer study of drugs, while in vitro human placental perfusion is the most widely used method. In this study, the partial least squares (PLS variable selection and modeling procedure was used to pick out optimal descriptors from a pool of 620 descriptors of 65 compounds and to simultaneously develop a QSAR model between the descriptors and the placental barrier permeability expressed by the clearance indices (CI. The model was subjected to internal validation by cross-validation and y-randomization and to external validation by predicting CI values of 19 compounds. It was shown that the model developed is robust and has a good predictive potential (r2 = 0.9064, RMSE = 0.09, q2 = 0.7323, rp2 = 0.7656, RMSP = 0.14. The mechanistic interpretation of the final model was given by the high variable importance in projection values of descriptors. Using PLS procedure, we can rapidly and effectively select optimal descriptors and thus construct a model with good stability and predictability. This analysis can provide an effective tool for the high-throughput screening of the placental barrier permeability of drugs.

  16. Efficient semiparametric estimation in generalized partially linear additive models for longitudinal/clustered data

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Guang

    2014-02-01

    We consider efficient estimation of the Euclidean parameters in a generalized partially linear additive models for longitudinal/clustered data when multiple covariates need to be modeled nonparametrically, and propose an estimation procedure based on a spline approximation of the nonparametric part of the model and the generalized estimating equations (GEE). Although the model in consideration is natural and useful in many practical applications, the literature on this model is very limited because of challenges in dealing with dependent data for nonparametric additive models. We show that the proposed estimators are consistent and asymptotically normal even if the covariance structure is misspecified. An explicit consistent estimate of the asymptotic variance is also provided. Moreover, we derive the semiparametric efficiency score and information bound under general moment conditions. By showing that our estimators achieve the semiparametric information bound, we effectively establish their efficiency in a stronger sense than what is typically considered for GEE. The derivation of our asymptotic results relies heavily on the empirical processes tools that we develop for the longitudinal/clustered data. Numerical results are used to illustrate the finite sample performance of the proposed estimators. © 2014 ISI/BS.

  17. Partial least squares for efficient models of fecal indicator bacteria on Great Lakes beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wesley R.; Fienen, Michael N.; Corsi, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    At public beaches, it is now common to mitigate the impact of water-borne pathogens by posting a swimmer's advisory when the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) exceeds an action threshold. Since culturing the bacteria delays public notification when dangerous conditions exist, regression models are sometimes used to predict the FIB concentration based on readily-available environmental measurements. It is hard to know which environmental parameters are relevant to predicting FIB concentration, and the parameters are usually correlated, which can hurt the predictive power of a regression model. Here the method of partial least squares (PLS) is introduced to automate the regression modeling process. Model selection is reduced to the process of setting a tuning parameter to control the decision threshold that separates predicted exceedances of the standard from predicted non-exceedances. The method is validated by application to four Great Lakes beaches during the summer of 2010. Performance of the PLS models compares favorably to that of the existing state-of-the-art regression models at these four sites.

  18. Rule-Driven Object Tracking in Clutter and Partial Occlusion with Model-Based Snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapantzikos Konstantinos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years it has been made clear to the research community that further improvements in classic approaches for solving low-level computer vision and image/video understanding tasks are difficult to obtain. New approaches started evolving, employing knowledge-based processing, though transforming a priori knowledge to low-level models and rules are far from being straightforward. In this paper, we examine one of the most popular active contour models, snakes, and propose a snake model, modifying terms and introducing a model-based one that eliminates basic problems through the usage of prior shape knowledge in the model. A probabilistic rule-driven utilization of the proposed model follows, being able to handle (or cope with objects of different shapes, contour complexities and motions; different environments, indoor and outdoor; cluttered sequences; and cases where background is complex (not smooth and when moving objects get partially occluded. The proposed method has been tested in a variety of sequences and the experimental results verify its efficiency.

  19. Novel assessment of haemodynamic kinetics with acute exercise in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary Beth; Chingombe, Tsungai J; Zinn, Abigail B; Reddy, Jagadeshwar G; Novack, Rachel A; Cooney, Sean A; Fisher, Amanda J; Presson, Robert G; Lahm, Tim; Petrache, Irina

    2015-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? The acute effect of exercise at moderately high intensity on already-elevated pulmonary arterial pressures and right ventricular wall stress in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? We show, for the first time, that in a rat model of PAH, exercise induces an acute reduction in pulmonary artery pressure associated with lung endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation, without evidence of acute right ventricular inflammation or myocyte apoptosis. Haemodynamic measures obtained with traditional invasive methodology as well as novel implantable telemetry reveal an exercise-induced 'window' of pulmonary hypertension alleviation, supporting future investigations of individualized exercise as therapy in PAH. Exercise improves outcomes of multiple chronic conditions, but controversial results, including increased pulmonary artery (PA) pressure, have prevented its routine implementation in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), an incurable disease that drastically reduces exercise tolerance. Individualized, optimized exercise prescription for PAH requires a better understanding of disease-specific exercise responses. We investigated the acute impact of exercise on already-elevated PA pressure and right ventricular (RV) wall stress and inflammation in a rat model of PAH (PAH group, n = 12) induced once by monocrotaline (50 mg kg(-1) , i.p.; 2 weeks), compared with healthy control animals (n = 8). Single bouts of exercise consisted of a 45 min treadmill run at 75% of individually determined aerobic capacity (V̇O2max). Immediately after exercise, measurements of RV systolic pressure and systemic pressure were made via jugular and carotid cannulation, and were followed by tissue collection. Monocrotaline induced moderate PAH, evidenced by RV hypertrophy, decreased V̇O2max, PA muscularization, and RV and skeletal muscle cytoplasmic glycolysis detected by

  20. Partial Atomic Charges and Screened Charge Models of the Electrostatic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-06-12

    We propose a new screened charge method for calculating partial atomic charges in molecules by electrostatic potential (ESP) fitting. The model, called full density screening (FDS), is used to approximate the screening effect of full charge densities of atoms in molecules. The results are compared to the conventional ESP fitting method based on point charges and to our previously proposed outer density screening (ODS) method, in which the parameters are reoptimized for the present purpose. In ODS, the charge density of an atom is represented by the sum of a point charge and a smeared negative charge distributed in a Slater-type orbital (STO). In FDS, the charge density of an atom is taken to be the sum of the charge density of the neutral atom and a partial atomic charge (of either sign) distributed in an STO. The ζ values of the STOs used in these two models are optimized in the present study to best reproduce the electrostatic potentials. The quality of the fit to the electrostatics is improved in the screened charge methods, especially for the regions that are within one van der Waals radius of the centers of atoms. It is also found that the charges derived by fitting electrostatic potentials with screened charges are less sensitive to the positions of the fitting points than are those derived with conventional electrostatic fitting. Moreover, we found that the electrostatic-potential-fitted (ESP) charges from the screened charge methods are similar to those from the point-charge method except for molecules containing the methyl group, where we have explored the use of restraints on nonpolar H atoms. We recommend the FDS model if the only goal is ESP fitting to obtain partial atomic charges or a fit to the ESP field. However, the ODS model is more accurate for electronic embedding in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) modeling and is more accurate than point-charge models for ESP fitting, and it is recommended for applications

  1. Secondary flow structure in a model curved artery: 3D morphology and circulation budget analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rate of change of circulation within control regions encompassing the large-scale vortical structures associated with secondary flows, i.e. deformed Dean-, Lyne- and Wall-type (D-L-W) vortices at planar cross-sections in a 180° curved artery model (curvature ratio, 1/7). Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments were performed independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number, 4.2) and using Newtonian blood-analog fluids. The MRV-technique performed at Stanford University produced phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields. Secondary flow field comparisons of MRV-data to PIV-data at various cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were made. A wavelet-decomposition-based approach was implemented to characterize various secondary flow morphologies. We hypothesize that the persistence and decay of arterial secondary flow vortices is intrinsically related to the influence of the out-of-plane flow, tilting, in-plane convection and diffusion-related factors within the control regions. Evaluation of these factors will elucidate secondary flow structures in arterial hemodynamics. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE). The MRV data were acquired at Stanford University in collaboration with Christopher Elkins and John Eaton.

  2. An analysis of three dimensional diffusion in a representative arterial wall mass transport model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, William J; O'Connell, Barry M; Milroy, John; Walsh, Michael T

    2013-05-01

    The development and use of drug eluting stents has brought about significant improvements in reducing in-stent restenosis, however, their long term presence in the artery is still under examination due to restenosis reoccurring. Current studies focus mainly on stent design, coatings and deployment techniques but few studies address the issue of the physics of three dimensional mass transport in the artery wall. There is a dearth of adequate validated numerical mass transport models that simulate the physics of diffusion dominated drug transport in the artery wall whilst under compression. A novel experimental setup used in a previous study was adapted and an expansion of that research was carried out to validate the physics of three dimensional diffusive mass transport into a compressed porous media. This study developed a more sensitive method for measuring the concentration of the species of interest. It revalidated mass transport in the radial direction and presented results which highlight the need for an evaluation of the governing equation for transient diffusive mass transport in a porous media, in its current form, to be carried out.

  3. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-06-29

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe.

  4. Development of an Experimental and Digital Cardiovascular Arterial Model for Transient Hemodynamic and Postural Change Studies: "A Preliminary Framework Analysis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlin, Rodward L; Kizito, John P

    2018-03-01

    The ultimate goal of the present work is to aid in the development of tools to assist in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Gaining an understanding of hemodynamic parameters for medical implants allow clinicians to have some patient-specific proposals for intervention planning. In the present work an experimental and digital computational fluid dynamics (CFD) arterial model consisting of a number of major arteries (aorta, carotid bifurcation, cranial, femoral, jejunal, and subclavian arteries) were fabricated to study: (1) the effects of local hemodynamics (flow parameters) on global hemodynamics (2) the effects of transition from bedrest to upright position (postural change) on hemodynamics, and (3) diffusion of dye (medical drug diffusion simulation) in the arterial system via experimental and numerical techniques. The experimental and digital arterial models used in the present study are the first 3-D systems reported in literature to incorporate the major arterial vessels that deliver blood from the heart to the cranial and femoral arteries. These models are also the first reported in literature to be used for flow parameter assessment via medical drug delivery and orthostatic postural change studies. The present work addresses the design of the experimental and digital arterial model in addition to the design of measuring tools used to measure hemodynamic parameters. The experimental and digital arterial model analyzed in the present study was developed from patient specific computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans and simplified geometric data. Segments such as the aorta (ascending and descending) and carotid bifurcation arteries of the experimental and digital arterial model was created from online available patient-specific CTA scan data provided by Charite' Clinical and Research Hospital. The cranial and coronary arteries were simplified arterial geometries developed from dimensional specification data used in previous work. For the patient

  5. Endothelial Dysfunction in Experimental Models of Arterial Hypertension: Cause or Consequence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Bernatova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a risk factor for other cardiovascular diseases and endothelial dysfunction was found in humans as well as in various commonly employed animal experimental models of arterial hypertension. Data from the literature indicate that, in general, endothelial dysfunction would not be the cause of experimental hypertension and may rather be secondary, that is, resulting from high blood pressure (BP. The initial mechanism of endothelial dysfunction itself may be associated with a lack of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (mainly nitric oxide and/or accentuation of various endothelium-derived constricting factors. The involvement and role of endothelium-derived factors in the development of endothelial dysfunction in individual experimental models of hypertension may vary, depending on the triggering stimulus, strain, age, and vascular bed investigated. This brief review was focused on the participation of endothelial dysfunction, individual endothelium-derived factors, and their mechanisms of action in the development of high BP in the most frequently used rodent experimental models of arterial hypertension, including nitric oxide deficient models, spontaneous (prehypertension, stress-induced hypertension, and selected pharmacological and diet-induced models.

  6. Prediction of CO concentrations based on a hybrid Partial Least Square and Support Vector Machine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganeh, B.; Motlagh, M. Shafie Pour; Rashidi, Y.; Kamalan, H.

    2012-08-01

    Due to the health impacts caused by exposures to air pollutants in urban areas, monitoring and forecasting of air quality parameters have become popular as an important topic in atmospheric and environmental research today. The knowledge on the dynamics and complexity of air pollutants behavior has made artificial intelligence models as a useful tool for a more accurate pollutant concentration prediction. This paper focuses on an innovative method of daily air pollution prediction using combination of Support Vector Machine (SVM) as predictor and Partial Least Square (PLS) as a data selection tool based on the measured values of CO concentrations. The CO concentrations of Rey monitoring station in the south of Tehran, from Jan. 2007 to Feb. 2011, have been used to test the effectiveness of this method. The hourly CO concentrations have been predicted using the SVM and the hybrid PLS-SVM models. Similarly, daily CO concentrations have been predicted based on the aforementioned four years measured data. Results demonstrated that both models have good prediction ability; however the hybrid PLS-SVM has better accuracy. In the analysis presented in this paper, statistic estimators including relative mean errors, root mean squared errors and the mean absolute relative error have been employed to compare performances of the models. It has been concluded that the errors decrease after size reduction and coefficients of determination increase from 56 to 81% for SVM model to 65-85% for hybrid PLS-SVM model respectively. Also it was found that the hybrid PLS-SVM model required lower computational time than SVM model as expected, hence supporting the more accurate and faster prediction ability of hybrid PLS-SVM model.

  7. Real-time characterization of partially observed epidemics using surrogate models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Crary, David (Applied Research Associates, Arlington, VA); Sargsyan, Khachik; Cheng, Karen (Applied Research Associates, Arlington, VA)

    2011-09-01

    We present a statistical method, predicated on the use of surrogate models, for the 'real-time' characterization of partially observed epidemics. Observations consist of counts of symptomatic patients, diagnosed with the disease, that may be available in the early epoch of an ongoing outbreak. Characterization, in this context, refers to estimation of epidemiological parameters that can be used to provide short-term forecasts of the ongoing epidemic, as well as to provide gross information on the dynamics of the etiologic agent in the affected population e.g., the time-dependent infection rate. The characterization problem is formulated as a Bayesian inverse problem, and epidemiological parameters are estimated as distributions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, thus quantifying the uncertainty in the estimates. In some cases, the inverse problem can be computationally expensive, primarily due to the epidemic simulator used inside the inversion algorithm. We present a method, based on replacing the epidemiological model with computationally inexpensive surrogates, that can reduce the computational time to minutes, without a significant loss of accuracy. The surrogates are created by projecting the output of an epidemiological model on a set of polynomial chaos bases; thereafter, computations involving the surrogate model reduce to evaluations of a polynomial. We find that the epidemic characterizations obtained with the surrogate models is very close to that obtained with the original model. We also find that the number of projections required to construct a surrogate model is O(10)-O(10{sup 2}) less than the number of samples required by the MCMC to construct a stationary posterior distribution; thus, depending upon the epidemiological models in question, it may be possible to omit the offline creation and caching of surrogate models, prior to their use in an inverse problem. The technique is demonstrated on synthetic data as well as

  8. SU-F-T-145: Modeling of a Proton Pencil Beam Partially Blocked by a Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slopsema, R; Matysiak, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model of the fluence distribution of a proton pencil beam that is partially blocked by a collimator. Methods: In one dimension, an exact analytical solution of the proton distribution behind a collimator edge was derived, taking the beam’s phase space, the edge position, and the scattering downstream of the collimator as input. Extension to two dimensions was achieved using a Clarkson-like Method: determine the radial distances from each calculation point to the collimator outline, calculate the beam’s phase space in the direction of each radial line, apply the one-dimensional model along each radial line, and sum the contributions. A Matlab implementation of the full model produced high-resolution distributions with relatively short calculation times (of about 2 ms per calculation point). The model was validated by comparison to Monte Carlo simulations for select pencil beam phase space distributions and collimator shapes. Results: Agreement between model and simulation confirm the exact mathematical solution of the one-dimensional model. In two dimensions the agreement is reasonable, but not exact, due to the approximations introduced in the Clarkson-like method. Conclusion: A model has been developed and validated that gives the lateral fluence distribution of a pencil beam beyond a collimator. Notably, this model does not include free parameters and the final fluence is completely determined by the phase space parameters of the beam, already existing in the treatment planning system, as well as both axial and lateral position of the aperture edge. As such, it can be incorporated in a full pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm allowing for the modeling of field-specific collimators in proton pencil beam scanning and, potentially, the optimization of collimator shape and/or pencil phase space in addition to the customary spot weight optimization.

  9. The Occupancy Rate Modeling of Kendari Hotel Room using Mexican Hat Transformation and Partial Least Squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaretha Ohyver

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Partial Least Squares (PLS method was developed in 1960 by Herman Wold. The method particularly suits with construct a regression model when the number of independent variables is many and highly collinear. The PLS can be combined with other methods, one of which is a Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT. By considering that the presence of outliers can lead to a less reliable model, and this kind of transformation may be required at a stage of pre-processing, the data is free of noise or outliers. Based on the previous study, Kendari hotel room occupancy rate was affected by the outlier, and it had a low value of R2. Therefore, this research aimed to obtain a good model by combining the PLS method and CWT transformation using the Mexican Hats them other wavelet of CWT. The research concludes that merging the PLS and the Mexican Hat transformation has resulted in a better model compared to the model that combined the PLS and the Haar wavelet transformation as shown in the previous study. The research shows that by changing the mother of the wavelet, the value of R2 can be improved significantly. The result provides information on how to increase the value of R2. The other advantage is the information for hotel managements to notice the age of the hotel, the maximum rates, the facilities, and the number of rooms to increase the number of visitors.

  10. Ionic screening of charged impurities in electrolytically gated graphene: A partially linearized Poisson-Boltzmann model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Mišković, Z L

    2015-10-07

    We present a model describing the electrostatic interactions across a structure that consists of a single layer of graphene with large area, lying above an oxide substrate of finite thickness, with its surface exposed to a thick layer of liquid electrolyte containing salt ions. Our goal is to analyze the co-operative screening of the potential fluctuation in a doped graphene due to randomness in the positions of fixed charged impurities in the oxide by the charge carriers in graphene and by the mobile ions in the diffuse layer of the electrolyte. In order to account for a possibly large potential drop in the diffuse later that may arise in an electrolytically gated graphene, we use a partially linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) model of the electrolyte, in which we solve a fully nonlinear PB equation for the surface average of the potential in one dimension, whereas the lateral fluctuations of the potential in graphene are tackled by linearizing the PB equation about the average potential. In this way, we are able to describe the regime of equilibrium doping of graphene to large densities for arbitrary values of the ion concentration without restrictions to the potential drop in the electrolyte. We evaluate the electrostatic Green's function for the partially linearized PB model, which is used to express the screening contributions of the graphene layer and the nearby electrolyte by means of an effective dielectric function. We find that, while the screened potential of a single charged impurity at large in-graphene distances exhibits a strong dependence on the ion concentration in the electrolyte and on the doping density in graphene, in the case of a spatially correlated two-dimensional ensemble of impurities, this dependence is largely suppressed in the autocovariance of the fluctuating potential.

  11. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2009-03-15

    This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

  12. New Inference Procedures for Semiparametric Varying-Coefficient Partially Linear Cox Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbei Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In biomedical research, one major objective is to identify risk factors and study their risk impacts, as this identification can help clinicians to both properly make a decision and increase efficiency of treatments and resource allocation. A two-step penalized-based procedure is proposed to select linear regression coefficients for linear components and to identify significant nonparametric varying-coefficient functions for semiparametric varying-coefficient partially linear Cox models. It is shown that the penalized-based resulting estimators of the linear regression coefficients are asymptotically normal and have oracle properties, and the resulting estimators of the varying-coefficient functions have optimal convergence rates. A simulation study and an empirical example are presented for illustration.

  13. Bayesian Inference for Step-Stress Partially Accelerated Competing Failure Model under Type II Progressive Censoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Bayesian inference on step-stress partially accelerated life tests using Type II progressive censored data in the presence of competing failure causes. Suppose that the occurrence time of the failure cause follows Pareto distribution under use stress levels. Based on the tampered failure rate model, the objective Bayesian estimates, Bayesian estimates, and E-Bayesian estimates of the unknown parameters and acceleration factor are obtained under the squared loss function. To evaluate the performance of the obtained estimates, the average relative errors (AREs and mean squared errors (MSEs are calculated. In addition, the comparisons of the three estimates of unknown parameters and acceleration factor for different sample sizes and different progressive censoring schemes are conducted through Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. CMS Partial Releases Model, Tools, and Applications. Online and Framework-Light Releases

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Christopher D; Meschi, Emilio; Shahzad Muzaffar; Andreas Pfeiffer; Ratnikova, Natalia; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The CMS Software project CMSSW embraces more than a thousand packages organized in subsystems for analysis, event display, reconstruction, simulation, detector description, data formats, framework, utilities and tools. The release integration process is highly automated by using tools developed or adopted by CMS. Packaging in rpm format is a built-in step in the software build process. For several well-defined applications it is highly desirable to have only a subset of the CMSSW full package bundle. For example, High Level Trigger algorithms that run on the Online farm, and need to be rebuilt in a special way, require no simulation, event display, or analysis packages. Physics analysis applications in Root environment require only a few core libraries and the description of CMS specific data formats. We present a model of CMS Partial Releases, used for preparation of the customized CMS software builds, including description of the tools used, the implementation, and how we deal with technical challenges, suc...

  15. Renal function is the same 6 months after robot-assisted partial nephrectomy regardless of clamp technique: analysis of outcomes for off-clamp, selective arterial clamp and main artery clamp techniques, with a minimum follow-up of 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninos, Christos; Shin, Tae Young; Tuliao, Patrick; Han, Woong Kyu; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2015-06-01

    To compare the renal functional outcomes, with >1 year of follow-up, of patients who underwent robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) performed with different clamping techniques. The peri-operative data of patients undergoing RAPN performed with different clamping techniques were retrospectively analysed (group 1: off-clamp, n = 23; group 2: selective clamp, n = 25; group 3: main artery clamp, n = 114). The main outcome measures were postoperative serum creatinine level, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and percentage change in eGFR, the data for which were collected at periodic intervals during the first 12 months and annually thereafter, in addition to late eGFR value. Only patients with >1 year of follow-up were included in the analysis. The baseline characteristics of groups 2 and 3 were similar, while patients in group 1 had smaller sized tumours and lower tumour complexity. The median follow-up periods were 45 (group 1), 20 (group 2) and 47 (group 3) months. The median clamping times were 24.8 min in the main artery clamp and 18 min in the selective artery clamp groups. Group 2 had greater median blood loss volume (100 vs 500 vs 200 mL for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively; P clamp procedure and tumour complexity score were predictive of normal renal function 7 days after surgery, while only baseline eGFR and age could predict it 1 year postoperatively. Off-clamp and selective artery clamp techniques result in superior short-term renal functional outcomes compared with the main artery clamp approach; however, after the 6th postoperative month, there were no significant differences regarding the functional outcome among the above surgical techniques, as long as the warm ischaemia time was 20-30 min. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  16. Internalisation of external costs in the Polish power generation sector: A partial equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudelko, Mariusz

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a methodical framework, which is the basis for the economic analysis of the mid-term planning of development of the Polish energy system. The description of the partial equilibrium model and its results are demonstrated for different scenarios applied. The model predicts the generation, investment and pricing of mid-term decisions that refer to the Polish electricity and heat markets. The current structure of the Polish energy sector is characterised by interactions between the supply and demand sides of the energy sector. The supply side regards possibilities to deliver fuels from domestic and import sources and their conversion through transformation processes. Public power plants, public CHP plants, industry CHP plants and municipal heat plants represent the main producers of energy in Poland. Demand is characterised by the major energy consumers, i.e. industry and construction, transport, agriculture, trade and services, individual consumers and export. The relationships between the domestic electricity and heat markets are modelled taking into account external costs estimates. The volume and structure of energy production, electricity and heat prices, emissions, external costs and social welfare of different scenarios are presented. Results of the model demonstrate that the internalisation of external costs through the increase in energy prices implies significant improvement in social welfare

  17. Processes, mechanisms, parameters, and modeling approaches for partially saturated flow in soil and rock media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses conceptual models and mathematical equations, analyzes distributions and correlations among hydrological parameters of soils and tuff, introduces new path integration approaches, and outlines scaling procedures to model potential-driven fluid flow in heterogeneous media. To properly model the transition from fracture-dominated flow under saturated conditions to matrix-dominated flow under partially saturated conditions, characteristic curves and permeability functions for fractures and matrix need to be improved and validated. Couplings from two-phase flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and rock deformation to liquid flow are also important. For stochastic modeling of alternating units of welded and nonwelded tuff or formations bounded by fault zones, correlations and constraints on average values of saturated permeability and air entry scaling factor between different units need to be imposed to avoid unlikely combinations of parameters and predictions. Large-scale simulations require efficient and verifiable numerical algorithms. New path integration approaches based on postulates of minimum work and mass conservation to solve flow geometry and potential distribution simultaneously are introduced. This verifiable integral approach, together with fractal scaling procedures to generate statistical realizations with parameter distribution, correlation, and scaling taken into account, can be used to quantify uncertainties and generate the cumulative distribution function for groundwater travel times

  18. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for their flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. They model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, they develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account the fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  19. Langevin dynamics modeling of the water diffusion tensor in partially aligned collagen networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sean K.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2012-09-01

    In this work, a Langevin dynamics model of the diffusion of water in articular cartilage was developed. Numerical simulations of the translational dynamics of water molecules and their interaction with collagen fibers were used to study the quantitative relationship between the organization of the collagen fiber network and the diffusion tensor of water in model cartilage. Langevin dynamics was used to simulate water diffusion in both ordered and partially disordered cartilage models. In addition, an analytical approach was developed to estimate the diffusion tensor for a network comprising a given distribution of fiber orientations. The key findings are that (1) an approximately linear relationship was observed between collagen volume fraction and the fractional anisotropy of the diffusion tensor in fiber networks of a given degree of alignment, (2) for any given fiber volume fraction, fractional anisotropy follows a fiber alignment dependency similar to the square of the second Legendre polynomial of cos(θ), with the minimum anisotropy occurring at approximately the magic angle (θMA), and (3) a decrease in the principal eigenvalue and an increase in the transverse eigenvalues is observed as the fiber orientation angle θ progresses from 0∘ to 90∘. The corresponding diffusion ellipsoids are prolate for θθMA. Expansion of the model to include discrimination between the combined effects of alignment disorder and collagen fiber volume fraction on the diffusion tensor is discussed.

  20. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1984-10-01

    We have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for our flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. We model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, we develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account for fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  1. Partial ionization in dense plasmas: comparisons among average-atom density functional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Michael S; Weisheit, Jon; Hansen, Stephanie B; Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2013-06-01

    Nuclei interacting with electrons in dense plasmas acquire electronic bound states, modify continuum states, generate resonances and hopping electron states, and generate short-range ionic order. The mean ionization state (MIS), i.e, the mean charge Z of an average ion in such plasmas, is a valuable concept: Pseudopotentials, pair-distribution functions, equations of state, transport properties, energy-relaxation rates, opacity, radiative processes, etc., can all be formulated using the MIS of the plasma more concisely than with an all-electron description. However, the MIS does not have a unique definition and is used and defined differently in different statistical models of plasmas. Here, using the MIS formulations of several average-atom models based on density functional theory, we compare numerical results for Be, Al, and Cu plasmas for conditions inclusive of incomplete atomic ionization and partial electron degeneracy. By contrasting modern orbital-based models with orbital-free Thomas-Fermi models, we quantify the effects of shell structure, continuum resonances, the role of exchange and correlation, and the effects of different choices of the fundamental cell and boundary conditions. Finally, the role of the MIS in plasma applications is illustrated in the context of x-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter.

  2. Pulse wave analysis in a 180-degree curved artery model: Implications under physiological and non-physiological inflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, pulse pressures, and left ventricular hypertrophy contribute to cardiovascular risks. Increase of arterial stiffness due to aging and hypertension is an important factor in cardiovascular, chronic kidney and end-stage-renal-diseases. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) based on arterial pressure wave characteristics, is well established in clinical practice for evaluation of arterial distensibility and hypertension. The objective of our exploratory study in a rigid 180-degree curved artery model was to evaluate arterial pressure waveforms. Bend upstream conditions were measured using a two-component, two-dimensional, particle image velocimeter (2C-2D PIV). An ultrasonic transit-time flow meter and a catheter with a MEMS-based solid state pressure sensor, capable of measuring up to 20 harmonics of the observed pressure waveform, monitored flow conditions downstream of the bend. Our novel continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2), in addition to detecting coherent secondary flow structures is used to evaluate arterial pulse wave characteristics subjected to physiological and non-physiological inflows. Results of this study will elucidate the utility of wavelet transforms in arterial function evaluation and pulse wave speed. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  3. Partial redistribution in 3D non-LTE radiative transfer in solar-atmosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhorukov, Andrii V.; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2017-01-01

    Context. Resonance spectral lines such as H I Ly α, Mg II H&K, and Ca II H&K that form in the solar chromosphere, are influenced by the effects of 3D radiative transfer as well as partial redistribution (PRD). So far no one has modeled these lines including both effects simultaneously owing to the high computing demands of existing algorithms. Such modeling is, however, indispensable for accurate diagnostics of the chromosphere. Aims: We present a computationally tractable method to treat PRD scattering in 3D model atmospheres using a 3D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer code. Methods: To make the method memory-friendly, we use the hybrid approximation for the redistribution integral. To make the method fast, we use linear interpolation on equidistant frequency grids. We verify our algorithm against computations with the RH code and analyze it for stability, convergence, and usefulness of acceleration using model atoms of Mg II with the H&K lines and H I with the Ly α line treated in PRD. Results: A typical 3D PRD solution can be obtained in a model atmosphere with 252 × 252 × 496 coordinate points in 50 000-200 000 CPU hours, which is a factor ten slower than computations assuming complete redistribution. We illustrate the importance of the joint action of PRD and 3D effects for the Mg II H&K lines for disk-center intensities, as well as the center-to-limb variation. Conclusions: The proposed method allows for the simulation of PRD lines in a time series of radiation-magnetohydrodynamic models, in order to interpret observations of chromospheric lines at high spatial resolution.

  4. Anode partial flooding modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Lei; Du, Shangfeng; Chen, Rui; Mamlouk, Mohamed; Scott, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional along-the-channel CFD (computational fluid dynamic) model, coupled with a two-phase flow model of liquid water and gas transport for a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell is described. The model considers non-isothermal operation and thus the non-uniform temperature distribution in the cell structure. Water phase-transfer between the vapour, liquid water and dissolved phase is modelled with the combinational transport mechanism through the membrane. Liquid water saturation is simulated inside the electrodes and channels at both the anode and cathode sides. Three types of models are compared for the HOR (hydrogen oxidation reaction) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) in catalyst layers, including Butler–Volmer (B–V), liquid water saturation corrected B–V and agglomerate mechanisms. Temperature changes in MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and channels due to electrochemical reaction, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer are analysed as a function of current density. Nonlinear relations of liquid water saturations with respect to current densities at both the anode and cathode are regressed. At low and high current densities, liquid water saturation at the anode linearly increases as a consequence of the linear increase of liquid water saturation at the cathode. In contrast, exponential relation is found to be more accurate at medium current densities. - Highlights: • A fully coupled 2D, along-the-channel, two-phase flow, non-isothermal, CFD model is developed. • Temperature rise due to electrochemical reactions, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer is analysed. • Mathematical expressions of liquid water saturation against current density at anode and cathode are regressed. • Relationship between the liquid water saturation at anode and cathode is built.

  5. Comparison of models for predicting outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease focusing on microsimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Amiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physicians have difficulty to subjectively estimate the cardiovascular risk of their patients. Using an estimate of global cardiovascular risk could be more relevant to guide decisions than using binary representation (presence or absence of risk factors data. The main aim of the paper is to compare different models of predicting the progress of a coronary artery diseases (CAD to help the decision making of physician. Methods: There are different standard models for predicting risk factors such as models based on logistic regression model, Cox regression model, dynamic logistic regression model, and simulation models such as Markov model and microsimulation model. Each model has its own application which can or cannot use by physicians to make a decision on treatment of each patient. Results: There are five main common models for predicting of outcomes, including models based on logistic regression model (for short-term outcomes, Cox regression model (for intermediate-term outcomes, dynamic logistic regression model, and simulation models such as Markov and microsimulation models (for long-term outcomes. The advantages and disadvantages of these models have been discussed and summarized. Conclusion: Given the complex medical decisions that physicians face in everyday practice, the multiple interrelated factors that play a role in choosing the optimal treatment, and the continuously accumulating new evidence on determinants of outcome and treatment options for CAD, physicians may potentially benefit from a clinical decision support system that accounts for all these considerations. The microsimulation model could provide cardiologists, researchers, and medical students a user-friendly software, which can be used as an intelligent interventional simulator.

  6. Mortality risk prediction models for coronary artery bypass graft surgery: current scenario and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Mohammed N; Reid, Christopher M; Cochrane, Andrew; Tran, Lavinia; Alramadan, Mohammed; Hossain, Mohammed N; Billah, Baki

    2017-12-01

    Many risk prediction models are currently in use for predicting short-term mortality following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. This review critically appraised the methods that were used for developing these models to assess their applicability in current practice setting as well as for the necessity of up-gradation. Medline via Ovid was searched for articles published between 1946 and 2016 and EMBASE via Ovid between 1974 and 2016 to identify risk prediction models for CABG. Article selection and data extraction was conducted using the CHARMS checklist for review of prediction model studies. Association between model development methods and model's discrimination was assessed using Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Mann-Whitney U-test. A total of 53 risk prediction models for short-term mortality following CABG were identified. The review found a wide variation in development methodology of risk prediction models in the field. Ambiguous predictor and outcome definition, sub-optimum sample size, inappropriate handling of missing data and inefficient predictor selection technique are major issues identified in the review. Quantitative synthesis in the review showed "missing value imputation" and "adopting machine learning algorithms" may result in better discrimination power of the models. There are aspects in current risk modeling, where there is room for improvement to reflect current clinical practice. Future risk modelling needs to adopt a standardized approach to defining both outcome and predictor variables, rational treatment of missing data and robust statistical techniques to enhance performance of the mortality risk prediction.

  7. Development of a computer-generated model for the coronary arterial tree based on multislice CT and morphometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, George S. K.; Segars, W. Paul; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Fishman, Elliot K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2006-03-01

    A detailed four-dimensional model of the coronary artery tree has great potential in a wide variety of applications especially in biomedical imaging. We developed a computer generated three-dimensional model for the coronary arterial tree based on two datasets: (1) gated multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) angiographic data obtained from a normal human subject and (2) statistical morphometric data obtained from porcine hearts. The main coronary arteries and heart structures were segmented from the MSCT data to define the initial segments of the vasculature and geometrical details of the boundaries. An iterative rule-based computer generation algorithm was then developed to extend the coronary artery tree beyond the initial segmented branches. The algorithm was governed by the following factors: (1) the statistical morphometric measurements of the connectivities, lengths, and diameters of the arterial segments, (2) repelling forces from other segments and boundaries, and (3) optimality principles to minimize the drag force at each bifurcation in the generated tree. Using this algorithm, the segmented coronary artery tree from the MSCT data was optimally extended to create a 3D computational model of the largest six orders of the coronary arterial tree. The new method for generating the 3D model is effective in imposing the constraints of anatomical and physiological characteristics of coronary vasculature. When combined with the 4D NCAT phantom, a computer model for the human anatomy and cardiac and respiratory motions, the new model will provide a unique tool to study cardiovascular characteristics and diseases through direct and medical imaging simulation studies.

  8. Improving temporal resolution of pulmonary perfusion imaging in rats using the partially separable functions model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinegar, Cornelius; Schmitter, Sarah S; Mistry, Nilesh N; Johnson, G Allan; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2010-10-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (or DCE-MRI) is a useful tool for measuring blood flow and perfusion, and it has found use in the study of pulmonary perfusion in animal models. However, DCE-MRI experiments are difficult in small animals such as rats. A recently developed method known as Interleaved Radial Imaging and Sliding window-keyhole (IRIS) addresses this problem by using a data acquisition scheme that covers (k,t)-space with data acquired from multiple bolus injections of a contrast agent. However, the temporal resolution of IRIS is limited by the effects of temporal averaging inherent in the sliding window and keyhole operations. This article describes a new method to cover (k,t)-space based on the theory of partially separable functions (PSF). Specifically, a sparse sampling of (k,t)-space is performed to acquire two data sets, one with high-temporal resolution and the other with extended k-space coverage. The high-temporal resolution training data are used to determine the temporal basis functions of the PSF model, whereas the other data set is used to determine the spatial variations of the model. The proposed method was validated by simulations and demonstrated by an experimental study. In this particular study, the proposed method achieved a temporal resolution of 32 msec.

  9. Deletion of the App-Runx1 region in mice models human partial monosomy 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Arbogast

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Partial monosomy 21 (PM21 is a rare chromosomal abnormality that is characterized by the loss of a variable segment along human chromosome 21 (Hsa21. The clinical phenotypes of this loss are heterogeneous and range from mild alterations to lethal consequences, depending on the affected region of Hsa21. The most common features include intellectual disabilities, craniofacial dysmorphology, short stature, and muscular and cardiac defects. As a complement to human genetic approaches, our team has developed new monosomic mouse models that carry deletions on Hsa21 syntenic regions in order to identify the dosage-sensitive genes that are responsible for the symptoms. We focus here on the Ms5Yah mouse model, in which a 7.7-Mb region has been deleted from the App to Runx1 genes. Ms5Yah mice display high postnatal lethality, with a few surviving individuals showing growth retardation, motor coordination deficits, and spatial learning and memory impairments. Further studies confirmed a gene dosage effect in the Ms5Yah hippocampus, and pinpointed disruptions of pathways related to cell adhesion (involving App, Cntnap5b, Lgals3bp, Mag, Mcam, Npnt, Pcdhb2, Pcdhb3, Pcdhb4, Pcdhb6, Pcdhb7, Pcdhb8, Pcdhb16 and Vwf. Our PM21 mouse model is the first to display morphological abnormalities and behavioural phenotypes similar to those found in affected humans, and it therefore demonstrates the major contribution that the App-Runx1 region has in the pathophysiology of PM21.

  10. Modelling the mechanics of partially mineralized collagen fibrils, fibres and tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanxin; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Chen, Changqing; Birman, Victor; Buehler, Markus J.; Genin, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive stiffening of collagen tissue by bioapatite mineral is important physiologically, but the details of this stiffening are uncertain. Unresolved questions about the details of the accommodation of bioapatite within and upon collagen's hierarchical structure have posed a central hurdle, but recent microscopy data resolve several major questions. These data suggest how collagen accommodates bioapatite at the lowest relevant hierarchical level (collagen fibrils), and suggest several possibilities for the progressive accommodation of bioapatite at higher hierarchical length scales (fibres and tissue). We developed approximations for the stiffening of collagen across spatial hierarchies based upon these data, and connected models across hierarchies levels to estimate mineralization-dependent tissue-level mechanics. In the five possible sequences of mineralization studied, percolation of the bioapatite phase proved to be an important determinant of the degree of stiffening by bioapatite. The models were applied to study one important instance of partially mineralized tissue, which occurs at the attachment of tendon to bone. All sequences of mineralization considered reproduced experimental observations of a region of tissue between tendon and bone that is more compliant than either tendon or bone, but the size and nature of this region depended strongly upon the sequence of mineralization. These models and observations have implications for engineered tissue scaffolds at the attachment of tendon to bone, bone development and graded biomimetic attachment of dissimilar hierarchical materials in general. PMID:24352669

  11. Lab-on-a-brane: A novel physiologically relevant planar arterial model to study transendothelial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Karim Ismail

    The tremendous quality of life impact notwithstanding, cardiovascular diseases and Cancer add up to over US$ 700bn each year in financial costs alone. Aging and population growth are expected to further expand the problem space while drug research and development remain expensive. However, preclinical costs can be substantially mitigated by substituting animal models with in vitro devices that accurately model human cardiovascular transport. Here we present a novel physiologically relevant lab-on-a-brane that simulates in vivo pressure, flow, strain, and shear waveforms associated with normal and pathological conditions in large and small blood vessels for studying molecular transport across the endothelial monolayer. The device builds upon previously demonstrated integrated microfluidic loop design by: (a) introducing nanoscale pores in the substrate membrane to enable transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transforming the substrate membrane into a nanofibrous matrix for 3D smooth muscle cell (SMC) tissue culture, (c) integrating electrospinning fabrication methods, (d) engineering an invertible sandwich cell culture device architecture, and (e) devising a healthy co-culture mechanism for human arterial endothelial cell (HAEC) monolayer and multiple layers of human smooth muscle cells (HSMC) to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural and mechanical characterization was conducted using confocal microscopy, SEM, stress/strain analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Transport was characterized using FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability protocol. Structure and transport characterization successfully demonstrate device viability as a physiologically relevant arterial mimic for testing transendothelial transport. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides a highly effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in pre-clinical testing, clinical trials cost from false

  12. Partially anaortic clampless off-pump coronary artery bypass prevents neurologic injury compared to on-pump coronary surgery: a propensity score-matched study on 286 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassano, Carlo; Bovio, Emanuele; Uva, Floriano; Iacobelli, Simona; Iasevoli, Nicola; Farinaccio, Andrea; Ruvolo, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Anaortic coronary artery bypass proved to prevent early neurologic injury compared to on-pump CABG. The Cardica PAS-Port(®) is a fully automated device that might be able to perform proximal aorto-venous anastomoses without an increased embolic risk. We evaluated early post-operative neurologic outcome in a matched population following clampless OPCAB (CCAB: either "all-arterial" or with automatically anastomosed venous grafts) or on-pump CABG. 366 consecutive patients were submitted to isolated coronary bypass by a single surgeon experienced in both off and on-pump procedures between January 2009 and December 2013. Of these patients, 223 underwent a clampless off-pump revascularization. After propensity score matching, 143 pairs were selected, who received either off-pump or on-pump surgery. In the off-pump group, CCAB was performed with an all-arterial approach (n = 33) or with automated proximal anastomosis of the venous graft(s) by means of the Cardica PAS-Port(®) connector (n = 110). Neurologic injury was defined as non-reversible (NRNI: lethal coma or stroke) or reversible (RNI: TIA or delirium). Operative mortality was 2.4 % (CCAB 1.4 %; CABG 3.5 %; p = 0.14). The global rate of early neurologic injury was 5.6 % (CCAB 2.1 vs. CABG 9.1 %; p = 0.006). Incidence was 1.4 % for NRNI (CCAB 0 vs. CABG 2.8 %; p = 0.04) and 4.2 % for RNI (CCAB 2.1 vs. CABG 6.3 %; p = 0.06). No differences were found among other major perioperative outcomes. CCAB prevents both early post-operative RNI and NRNI. This result can be achieved with a totally anaortic strategy and also with the aid of a fully automated device for proximal aorto-venous anastomoses.

  13. A model of flow and surfactant transport in an oscillatory alveolus partially filled with liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2005-03-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. We model the system in which an alveolus is partially filled with liquid in the presence of surfactants. By assuming a circular interface due to sufficiently strong surface tension and small surfactant activity, we combine semianalytical and numerical techniques to solve the Stokes flow and the surfactant transport equations. In the absence of surfactants, there is no steady streaming because of reversibility of Stokes flow. The presence of surfactants, however, induces a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns (e.g., number of vortices) particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration periods (I :E ratio) and the sorption parameter K. For an insoluble surfactant, a single vortex is formed when the I :E ratio is either smaller or larger than 1:1, but the recirculations have opposite directions in the two cases. A soluble surfactant can lead to more complex flow patterns such as three vortices or saddle-point flow structures. The estimated unsteady velocity is 10-3cm/s, and the corresponding Péclet number for transporting respiratory gas is O(1). For a cell-cell signaling molecule such as surfactant-associated protein-A for regulating surfactant secretion, the Péclet number could be O(10) or higher. Convection is either comparable to or more dominant than diffusion in these processes. The estimated steady velocity ranges from 10-6to10-4cm /s, depending on I :E and K, and the corresponding steady Péclet number is between 10-8/Dm and 10-6/Dm (Dm is the molecular diffusivity with units of cm2/s). Therefore, for Dm⩽10-8cm2/s, the convective transport dominates.

  14. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    KAUST Repository

    Hossain, Shaolie S.

    2011-08-20

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A threedimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  15. Thermodynamically consistent modeling and simulation of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-12-09

    A general diffuse interface model with a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state) is proposed to describe the multi-component two-phase fluid flow based on the principles of the NVT-based framework which is an attractive alternative recently over the NPT-based framework to model the realistic fluids. The proposed model uses the Helmholtz free energy rather than Gibbs free energy in the NPT-based framework. Different from the classical routines, we combine the first law of thermodynamics and related thermodynamical relations to derive the entropy balance equation, and then we derive a transport equation of the Helmholtz free energy density. Furthermore, by using the second law of thermodynamics, we derive a set of unified equations for both interfaces and bulk phases that can describe the partial miscibility of multiple fluids. A relation between the pressure gradient and chemical potential gradients is established, and this relation leads to a new formulation of the momentum balance equation, which demonstrates that chemical potential gradients become the primary driving force of fluid motion. Moreover, we prove that the proposed model satisfies the total (free) energy dissipation with time. For numerical simulation of the proposed model, the key difficulties result from the strong nonlinearity of Helmholtz free energy density and tight coupling relations between molar densities and velocity. To resolve these problems, we propose a novel convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density and deal well with the coupling relations between molar densities and velocity through very careful physical observations with a mathematical rigor. We prove that the proposed numerical scheme can preserve the discrete (free) energy dissipation. Numerical tests are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Hemodynamic analysis in an idealized artery tree: differences in wall shear stress between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared C Weddell

    Full Text Available Development of many conditions and disorders, such as atherosclerosis and stroke, are dependent upon hemodynamic forces. To accurately predict and prevent these conditions and disorders hemodynamic forces must be properly mapped. Here we compare a shear-rate dependent fluid (SDF constitutive model, based on the works by Yasuda et al in 1981, against a Newtonian model of blood. We verify our stabilized finite element numerical method with the benchmark lid-driven cavity flow problem. Numerical simulations show that the Newtonian model gives similar velocity profiles in the 2-dimensional cavity given different height and width dimensions, given the same Reynolds number. Conversely, the SDF model gave dissimilar velocity profiles, differing from the Newtonian velocity profiles by up to 25% in velocity magnitudes. This difference can affect estimation in platelet distribution within blood vessels or magnetic nanoparticle delivery. Wall shear stress (WSS is an important quantity involved in vascular remodeling through integrin and adhesion molecule mechanotransduction. The SDF model gave a 7.3-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at the top of the 3-dimensional cavity. The SDF model gave a 37.7-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at artery walls located immediately after bifurcations in the idealized femoral artery tree. The pressure drop across arteries reveals arterial sections highly resistive to flow which correlates with stenosis formation. Numerical simulations give the pressure drop across the idealized femoral artery tree with the SDF model which is approximately 2.3-fold higher than with the Newtonian model. In atherosclerotic lesion models, the SDF model gives over 1 Pa higher WSS than the Newtonian model, a difference correlated with over twice as many adherent monocytes to endothelial cells from the Newtonian model compared to the SDF model.

  17. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 4. Fracture surface analyses of an experimental model, all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M C; Sornsuwan, T; Swain, M V

    2013-06-01

    In the previous three papers, the authors sought to conduct a thorough analysis of the feasibility for the use of zirconia in inlay supported, fixed partial dentures via finite element analysis (FEA). Correlating the response of the numerical model against the experimental model has never been satisfactorily performed for an anatomically accurate ceramic bridge; such validation is crucial if the results from the FEA are to be confidently relied upon. Part 4 of this series is a detailed fractographic analysis of the zirconia bridge that was the model for the experimental validation, performed in order to confirm the fracture origin/s and fracture trajectory as predicted from the FEA. Established fractographic techniques involving optical examination followed by examination with scanning electron microscopy were conducted. The porous, granular surface of zirconia (both partially and fully sintered) does not lend itself to easy surface analysis but the classic fractographic signs (hackle lines, wake hackle lines and compression curl) are present. Use of linear fracture elastic mechanics allowed the calculation of theoretical critical flaw size and a comparison to two defects or inclusions found at the primary origin of fracture. Excellent agreement between the fracture sites and paths of travel as predicted in the numerical analysis exist with fractographic analysis. Furthermore, the calculated critical flaw size of 30 μm to 40 μm equates very well with defects seen at the general vicinity of the primary fracture origin and the general observed size of critical flaws in machined ceramics which range between 20 μm to 50 μm, thus providing further confirmation. The fractographic analysis detailed in this study provides validation of the 'zones of failure' as predicted in our FEA. Additionally, the excellent correlation between the calculated critical flaw size and the defects observed at the primary fracture site demonstrates that field of experimental mechanics is

  18. Modelling the cooling and partial dismantling of the Febex in-situ test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.; Gens, A.; Guimaraes, L.

    2010-01-01

    predictions from analysis. The operation related to the partial dismantling included the demolition of the concrete plug and the removal of the sections of the barrier corresponding to 'Heater 1'. The objective was to carry out the partial dismantling causing minimum disturbance to the sections of test corresponding to the second heater, which remained in operation at all times. A new concrete plug was constructed immediately after excavation. A detailed description of the work performed during the partial dismantling of the in-situ test can be found in Huertas et al. (2006). This contribution focuses on the modelling of the cooling and partly dismantling of the FEBEX in-situ experiment. The finite element computer program CODE-BRIGHT has been used for the numerical analysis. CODE-BRIGHT is a program developed to handle coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical and Geochemical problems in geological media. It has been observed a very good performance of the model to reproduce the evolution of the main THM variables of the tests, during the cooling of the Heater No.1, concrete demolition and excavation of the clay barrier. It is worth mentioning that these are a kind of 'blind model predictions', as the constitutive laws and model parameters adopted at the beginning of the heating were used in this analysis. (authors)

  19. Development and update of guidelines to perform and report partial least squares path modeling in Information Systems research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benitez Amado, Jose; Henseler, Jörg; Castillo, Ana

    Partial least squares (PLS) path modeling has been widely and dominantly used in the field of Information Systems (IS) during decades. The usage and prescriptions for performing PLS path modeling has been recently examined, debated, and improved, which have generated substantial changes,

  20. Behavior and Three-Dimensional Finite Element Modeling of Circular Concrete Columns Partially Wrapped with FRP Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zeng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP jacketing/wrapping has become an attractive strengthening technique for concrete columns. Wrapping an existing concrete column with continuous FRP jackets with the fiber in the jacket being oriented in the hoop direction is referred to as FRP full wrapping strengthening technique. In practice, however, strengthening concrete columns with vertically discontinuous FRP strips is also favored and this technique is referred to as FRP partial wrapping strengthening technique. Existing research has demonstrated that FRP partial wrapping strengthening technique is a promising and economical alternative to the FRP full wrapping strengthening technique. Although extensive experimental investigations have hitherto been conducted on partially FRP-confined concrete columns, the confinement mechanics of confined concrete in partially FRP-confined circular columns remains unclear. In this paper, an experimental program consisting of fifteen column specimens was conducted and the test results were presented. A reliable three-dimensional (3D finite element (FE approach for modeling of partially FRP-confined circular columns was established. In the proposed FE approach, an accurate plastic-damage model for concrete under multiaxial compression is employed. The accuracy of the proposed FE approach was verified by comparisons between the numerical results and the test results. Numerical results from the verified FE approach were then presented to gain an improved understanding of the behavior of confined concrete in partially FRP-confined concrete columns.

  1. Some general remarks on hyperplasticity modelling and its extension to partially saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaoqin; Wong, Henry; Fabbri, Antonin; Bui, Tuan Anh; Limam, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The essential ideas and equations of classic plasticity and hyperplasticity are successively recalled and compared, in order to highlight their differences and complementarities. The former is based on the mathematical framework proposed by Hill (The mathematical theory of plasticity. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1950), whereas the latter is founded on the orthogonality hypothesis of Ziegler (An introduction to thermomechanics. Elsevier, North-Holland, 1983). The main drawback of classic plasticity is the possibility of violating the second principle of thermodynamics, while the relative ease to conjecture the yield function in order to approach experimental results is its main advantage. By opposition, the a priori satisfaction of thermodynamic principles constitutes the chief advantage of hyperplasticity theory. Noteworthy is also the fact that this latter approach allows a finer energy partition; in particular, the existence of frozen energy emerges as a natural consequence from its theoretical formulation. On the other hand, the relative difficulty to conjecture an efficient dissipation function to produce accurate predictions is its main drawback. The two theories are thus better viewed as two complementary approaches. Following this comparative study, a methodology to extend the hyperplasticity approach initially developed for dry or saturated materials to the case of partially saturated materials, accounting for interface energies and suction effects, is developed. A particular example based on the yield function of modified Cam-Clay model is then presented. It is shown that the approach developed leads to a model consistent with other existing works.

  2. Statistical mechanical study of partial annealing of a neural network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uezu, T; Abe, K; Miyoshi, S; Okada, M

    2010-01-01

    We study a neural network model in which both neurons and synaptic interactions evolve in time simultaneously. The time evolution of synaptic interactions is described by a Langevin equation including a Hebbian learning term with the learning coefficient ε, and a bias term which is the interaction of the Hopfield model. We assume that synaptic interactions change is much slower than neurons and we study the stationary states of synaptic interactions by the replica method. We draw phase diagrams taking into account the stability of solutions, and find that the temperature region in which the Hopfield attractor is stable increases as the learning coefficient increases. Theoretical results are confirmed by the direct numerical integration of the Langevin equation. Further, we study the characteristics of the resultant synaptic interactions by partial annealing in the parameter region where the Hopfield and the mixed states exist. We find two kinds of interactions, one of which has the Hopfield attractor and the other has the mixed state attractor. Each interaction is characterized mainly by the eigenvector belonging to the largest eigenvalue of the interaction as a matrix.

  3. Exploring the chemical kinetics of partially oxidized intermediates by combining experiments, theory, and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Olzmann, Matthias; Welz, Oliver; Zeuch, Thomas

    2017-07-19

    Partially oxidized intermediates play a central role in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. In this perspective, we focus on the chemical kinetics of alkoxy radicals, peroxy radicals, and Criegee intermediates, which are key species in both combustion and atmospheric environments. These reactive intermediates feature a broad spectrum of chemical diversity. Their reactivity is central to our understanding of how volatile organic compounds are degraded in the atmosphere and converted into secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, they sensitively determine ignition timing in internal combustion engines. The intention of this perspective article is to provide the reader with information about the general mechanisms of reactions initiated by addition of atomic and molecular oxygen to alkyl radicals and ozone to alkenes. We will focus on critical branching points in the subsequent reaction mechanisms and discuss them from a consistent point of view. As a first example of our integrated approach, we will show how experiment, theory, and kinetic modeling have been successfully combined in the first infrared detection of Criegee intermediates during the gas phase ozonolysis. As a second example, we will examine the ignition timing of n-heptane/air mixtures at low and intermediate temperatures. Here, we present a reduced, fuel size independent kinetic model of the complex chemistry initiated by peroxy radicals that has been successfully applied to simulate standard n-heptane combustion experiments.

  4. New interpretation of arterial stiffening due to cigarette smoking using a structurally motivated constitutive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Majken; Henneberg, K-A; Jensen, J A

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading self-inflicted risk factor for cardiovascular diseases; it causes arterial stiffening with serious sequelea including atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms. This work presents a new interpretation of arterial stiffening caused by smoking based on data...... published for rat pulmonary arteries. A structurally motivated "four fiber family" constitutive relation was used to fit the available biaxial data and associated best-fit values of material parameters were estimated using multivariate nonlinear regression. Results suggested that arterial stiffening caused...

  5. An ontology-driven, case-based clinical decision support model for removable partial denture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingxiao; Wu, Ji; Li, Shusen; Lyu, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Li, Miao

    2016-06-01

    We present the initial work toward developing a clinical decision support model for specific design of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in dentistry. We developed an ontological paradigm to represent knowledge of a patient’s oral conditions and denture component parts. During the case-based reasoning process, a cosine similarity algorithm was applied to calculate similarity values between input patients and standard ontology cases. A group of designs from the most similar cases were output as the final results. To evaluate this model, the output designs of RPDs for 104 randomly selected patients were compared with those selected by professionals. An area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (AUC-ROC) was created by plotting true-positive rates against the false-positive rate at various threshold settings. The precision at position 5 of the retrieved cases was 0.67 and at the top of the curve it was 0.96, both of which are very high. The mean average of precision (MAP) was 0.61 and the normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) was 0.74 both of which confirmed the efficient performance of our model. All the metrics demonstrated the efficiency of our model. This methodology merits further research development to match clinical applications for designing RPDs. This paper is organized as follows. After the introduction and description of the basis for the paper, the evaluation and results are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides a discussion of the methodology and results. Section 4 describes the details of the ontology, similarity algorithm, and application.

  6. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.

  7. Multiphysics processes in partially saturated fractured rock: Experiments and models from Yucca Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2012-09-01

    The site investigations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have provided us with an outstanding data set, one that has significantly advanced our knowledge of multiphysics processes in partially saturated fractured geological media. Such advancement was made possible, foremost, by substantial investments in multiyear field experiments that enabled the study of thermally driven multiphysics and testing of numerical models at a large spatial scale. The development of coupled-process models within the project have resulted in a number of new, advanced multiphysics numerical models that are today applied over a wide range of geoscientific research and geoengineering applications. Using such models, the potential impact of thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) multiphysics processes over the long-term (e.g., 10,000 years) could be predicted and bounded with some degree of confidence. The fact that the rock mass at Yucca Mountain is intensively fractured enabled continuum models to be used, although discontinuum models were also applied and are better suited for analyzing some issues, especially those related to predictions of rockfall within open excavations. The work showed that in situ tests (rather than small-scale laboratory experiments alone) are essential for determining appropriate input parameters for multiphysics models of fractured rocks, especially related to parameters defining how permeability might evolve under changing stress and temperature. A significant laboratory test program at Yucca Mountain also made important contributions to the field of rock mechanics, showing a unique relation between porosity and mechanical properties, a time dependency of strength that is significant for long-term excavation stability, a decreasing rock strength with sample size using very large core experiments, and a strong temperature dependency of the thermal expansion coefficient for temperatures up to 200°C. The analysis of in situ heater experiments showed that fracture

  8. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, M-Y; Liu, H-L [Graduate Institute of Medical Physics and Imaging Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, T-H; Yang, S-T; Kuo, H-H [Stroke Section, Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chyi, T-K [Molecular Imaging Center Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hlaliu@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2009-05-15

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  9. Invasive and non-invasive evaluation of spontaneous arteriogenesis in a novel porcine model for peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Ivo R; Voskuil, Michiel; van Royen, Niels; Hoefer, Imo E; Scheffler, Klaus; Grundmann, Sebastian; Hennig, Jürgen; Schaper, Wolfgang; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J

    2003-03-01

    Our current knowledge regarding the efficacy of factors stimulating collateral artery growth in the peripheral circulation primarily stems from models in small animals. However, experimental models in large sized animals are a prerequisite for extrapolation of growth factor therapy to patients with peripheral atherosclerotic obstructive disease. Therefore, we have developed a novel porcine femoral artery ligation model using non-invasive and invasive evaluation techniques. In 12 young farm pigs and nine older minipigs, a ligation of the superficial femoral artery was performed. Using an intra-arterial catheter, phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered with a first-pass over the collateral vascular bed. Directly after ligation as well as after 2 weeks of continuous infusion of PBS, perfusion of the leg was measured using various flow and pressure parameters. Using a pump driven extracorporal system, collateral conductance was determined under maximal vasodilatation. Conductance decreased after acute ligation to similar levels in both young farm pigs as well as the older minipigs (both 9.3% of normal perfusion) and recovered after 2 weeks to a higher value in farm pigs compared with minipigs (22.4 vs. 12.7% of normal; Parteries. To the best of our knowledge this is the first in vivo pig model for hemodynamic assessment of growth of collateral arteries in the peripheral circulation, that is suitable for evaluation of arteriogenic effects of growth factors or genes.

  10. Invasive and non-invasive evaluation of spontaneous arteriogenesis in a novel porcine model for peripheral arterial obstructive disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschmann, Ivo R.; Voskuil, Michiel; van Royen, Niels; Hoefer, Imo E.; Scheffler, Klaus; Grundmann, Sebastian; Hennig, Jürgen; Schaper, Wolfgang; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J.

    2003-01-01

    Our current knowledge regarding the efficacy of factors stimulating collateral artery growth in the peripheral circulation primarily stems from models in small animals. However, experimental models in large sized animals are a prerequisite for extrapolation of growth factor therapy to patients with

  11. Deletion of the App-Runx1 region in mice models human partial monosomy 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Thomas; Raveau, Matthieu; Chevalier, Claire; Nalesso, Valérie; Dembele, Doulaye; Jacobs, Hugues; Wendling, Olivia; Roux, Michel; Duchon, Arnaud; Herault, Yann

    2015-06-01

    Partial monosomy 21 (PM21) is a rare chromosomal abnormality that is characterized by the loss of a variable segment along human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). The clinical phenotypes of this loss are heterogeneous and range from mild alterations to lethal consequences, depending on the affected region of Hsa21. The most common features include intellectual disabilities, craniofacial dysmorphology, short stature, and muscular and cardiac defects. As a complement to human genetic approaches, our team has developed new monosomic mouse models that carry deletions on Hsa21 syntenic regions in order to identify the dosage-sensitive genes that are responsible for the symptoms. We focus here on the Ms5Yah mouse model, in which a 7.7-Mb region has been deleted from the App to Runx1 genes. Ms5Yah mice display high postnatal lethality, with a few surviving individuals showing growth retardation, motor coordination deficits, and spatial learning and memory impairments. Further studies confirmed a gene dosage effect in the Ms5Yah hippocampus, and pinpointed disruptions of pathways related to cell adhesion (involving App, Cntnap5b, Lgals3bp, Mag, Mcam, Npnt, Pcdhb2, Pcdhb3, Pcdhb4, Pcdhb6, Pcdhb7, Pcdhb8, Pcdhb16 and Vwf). Our PM21 mouse model is the first to display morphological abnormalities and behavioural phenotypes similar to those found in affected humans, and it therefore demonstrates the major contribution that the App-Runx1 region has in the pathophysiology of PM21. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics of the right ventricular outflow tract and of the pulmonary artery: a bench model of flow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbahi, Selim; Mickaily-Huber, Elizabeth; Charbonnier, Dominique; Hullin, Roger; Burki, Marco; Ferrari, Enrico; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Berdajs, Denis A

    2014-10-01

    The reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with valved conduits remains a challenge. The reoperation rate at 5 years can be as high as 25% and depends on age, type of conduit, conduit diameter and principal heart malformation. The aim of this study is to provide a bench model with computer fluid dynamics to analyse the haemodynamics of the RVOT, pulmonary artery, its bifurcation, and left and right pulmonary arteries that in the future may serve as a tool for analysis and prediction of outcome following RVOT reconstruction. Pressure, flow and diameter at the RVOT, pulmonary artery, bifurcation of the pulmonary artery, and left and right pulmonary arteries were measured in five normal pigs with a mean weight of 24.6 ± 0.89 kg. Data obtained were used for a 3D computer fluid-dynamics simulation of flow conditions, focusing on the pressure, flow and shear stress profile of the pulmonary trunk to the level of the left and right pulmonary arteries. Three inlet steady flow profiles were obtained at 0.2, 0.29 and 0.36 m/s that correspond to the flow rates of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 l/min flow at the RVOT. The flow velocity profile was constant at the RVOT down to the bifurcation and decreased at the left and right pulmonary arteries. In all three inlet velocity profiles, low sheer stress and low-velocity areas were detected along the left wall of the pulmonary artery, at the pulmonary artery bifurcation and at the ostia of both pulmonary arteries. This computed fluid real-time model provides us with a realistic picture of fluid dynamics in the pulmonary tract area. Deep shear stress areas correspond to a turbulent flow profile that is a predictive factor for the development of vessel wall arteriosclerosis. We believe that this bench model may be a useful tool for further evaluation of RVOT pathology following surgical reconstructions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery

  13. The use of stereolithographic hand held models for evaluation of congenital anomalies of the great arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranicar, Mark; Gregory, William; Douglas, William I; Di Sessa, Peter; Di Sessa, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    Imaging anomalies of the great vessels has traditionally been accomplished using conventional biplane modalities as well as three-dimensional (3D) video displays. Our aim was to review the use of stereolithography to create 3D models to assess coarctation of the aorta and vascular rings. Twelve patients had high-resolution CT scans to evaluate anomalies of the great arteries (coarctation: 9, vascular ring: 3). Ages were 19 days to 29 years and weights were 3.3 to 139 kg. Digital dicom data from each scan were converted by a commercially available software package into a 3D digital image. The area of interest was selected and the image was exported to a 3D stereolithographic printer to create a 3D model. The models were then evaluated and the results compared to catheterization and surgical findings. All models accurately displayed the pathology investigated. All 3 of the vascular ring models correlated with surgical findings (double arch: 2, pulmonary sling: 1). Models of aortic coarctation allowed clear depictions of discrete narrowing as well as arch hypoplasia and tortuosity. Stereolithography can create realistic 3D models that accurately display aortic pathology and add important additional information, which may have implications regarding surgical and transcatheter interventions and may also be useful teaching tools for parents and students.

  14. Correlation between vortices and wall shear stress in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    One of the most physiologically relevant factors within the cardiovascular system is the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress affects endothelial cells via mechanotransduction and atherosclerotic regions are strongly correlated with curvature and branching in the human vasculature, where the shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. In this work, our goal is to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. To accomplish this, we use an in-house high-order flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid through a rigid 180° curved artery model. We use a physiologically relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter motivated by the fact that flow upstream to a curved artery may not be fully developed. Under these two inflow conditions, we characterize the evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on several wall shear stress metrics. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  15. Mutant Enpp1asj mice as a model for generalized arterial calcification of infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    2013-09-01

    Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI, an autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by early mineralization of blood vessels, often diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound and usually resulting in demise during the first year of life. It is caused in most cases by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, encoding an enzyme that hydrolyzes ATP to AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate, the latter being a powerful anti-mineralization factor. Recently, a novel mouse phenotype was recognized as a result of ENU mutagenesis – those mice developed stiffening of the joints, hence the mutant mouse was named ‘ages with stiffened joints’ (asj. These mice harbor a missense mutation, p.V246D, in the Enpp1 gene. Here we demonstrate that the mutant ENPP1 protein is largely absent in the liver of asj mice, and the lack of enzymatic activity results in reduced inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi levels in the plasma, accompanied by extensive mineralization of a number of tissues, including arterial blood vessels. The progress of mineralization is highly dependent on the mineral composition of the diet, with significant shortening of the lifespan on a diet enriched in phosphorus and low in magnesium. These results suggest that the asj mouse can serve as an animal model for GACI.

  16. Integrative modeling of small artery structure and function uncovers critical parameters for diameter regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed VanBavel

    Full Text Available Organ perfusion is regulated by vasoactivity and structural adaptation of small arteries and arterioles. These resistance vessels are sensitive to pressure, flow and a range of vasoactive stimuli. Several strongly interacting control loops exist. As an example, the myogenic response to a change of pressure influences the endothelial shear stress, thereby altering the contribution of shear-dependent dilation to the vascular tone. In addition, acute responses change the stimulus for structural adaptation and vice versa. Such control loops are able to maintain resistance vessels in a functional and stable state, characterized by regulated wall stress, shear stress, matched active and passive biomechanics and presence of vascular reserve. In this modeling study, four adaptation processes are identified that together with biomechanical properties effectuate such integrated regulation: control of tone, smooth muscle cell length adaptation, eutrophic matrix rearrangement and trophic responses. Their combined action maintains arteries in their optimal state, ready to cope with new challenges, allowing continuous long-term vasoregulation. The exclusion of any of these processes results in a poorly regulated state and in some cases instability of vascular structure.

  17. A model for investigating the control of muscle blood flow: the masseteric artery in conscious rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Mohammed, M; Turturici, M; Milano, L; Passatore, M

    2010-09-01

    The complex interplay of neural, metabolic, myogenic and mechanical mechanisms that regulate blood flow in skeletal muscle (MBF) is still incompletely understood. For the first time, a method is presented for high time-resolution recording of MBF from a purely muscular artery in physiological conditions. Ultrasound perivascular flow probes were implanted (n = 15) mono- or bilaterally around the masseteric branch of the facial artery in nine rabbits and tested up to 16 days after implant. Reliable and stable recordings were achieved in 50% of implants. Blood flow was observed to increase from a resting level of 0.2-0.3 ml min(-1) up to 4.0-6.0 ml min(-1) during spontaneous masticatory activity. In addition, within single masticatory cycles marked back flow transients could be observed (peak flow = -10 ml min(-1)) during powerful masticatory strokes but not during mild mastication. The possibility of (1) surgically removing the sympathetic supply to the relevant vascular bed and of (2) bilaterally monitoring the perfusion of masseter muscles thus allowing to use one side as control side for different types of interventions makes this model a useful tool for disentangling the different mechanisms involved in the control of MBF.

  18. A model analysis of arterial oxygen desaturation during apnea in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; Edwards, Bradley A; Kelly, Vanessa J; Davidson, Malcolm R; Wilkinson, Malcolm H; Berger, Philip J

    2009-12-01

    Rapid arterial O(2) desaturation during apnea in the preterm infant has obvious clinical implications but to date no adequate explanation for why it exists. Understanding the factors influencing the rate of arterial O(2) desaturation during apnea (Sa(O)₂) is complicated by the non-linear O(2) dissociation curve, falling pulmonary O(2) uptake, and by the fact that O(2) desaturation is biphasic, exhibiting a rapid phase (stage 1) followed by a slower phase when severe desaturation develops (stage 2). Using a mathematical model incorporating pulmonary uptake dynamics, we found that elevated metabolic O(2) consumption accelerates Sa(O)₂throughout the entire desaturation process. By contrast, the remaining factors have a restricted temporal influence: low pre-apneic alveolar P(O)₂causes an early onset of desaturation, but thereafter has little impact; reduced lung volume, hemoglobin content or cardiac output, accelerates Sa(O)₂during stage 1, and finally, total blood O(2) capacity (blood volume and hemoglobin content) alone determines Sa(O)₂during stage 2. Preterm infants with elevated metabolic rate, respiratory depression, low lung volume, impaired cardiac reserve, anemia, or hypovolemia, are at risk for rapid and profound apneic hypoxemia. Our insights provide a basic physiological framework that may guide clinical interpretation and design of interventions for preventing sudden apneic hypoxemia.

  19. A model analysis of arterial oxygen desaturation during apnea in preterm infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Sands

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid arterial O(2 desaturation during apnea in the preterm infant has obvious clinical implications but to date no adequate explanation for why it exists. Understanding the factors influencing the rate of arterial O(2 desaturation during apnea (Sa(O₂ is complicated by the non-linear O(2 dissociation curve, falling pulmonary O(2 uptake, and by the fact that O(2 desaturation is biphasic, exhibiting a rapid phase (stage 1 followed by a slower phase when severe desaturation develops (stage 2. Using a mathematical model incorporating pulmonary uptake dynamics, we found that elevated metabolic O(2 consumption accelerates Sa(O₂throughout the entire desaturation process. By contrast, the remaining factors have a restricted temporal influence: low pre-apneic alveolar P(O₂causes an early onset of desaturation, but thereafter has little impact; reduced lung volume, hemoglobin content or cardiac output, accelerates Sa(O₂during stage 1, and finally, total blood O(2 capacity (blood volume and hemoglobin content alone determines Sa(O₂during stage 2. Preterm infants with elevated metabolic rate, respiratory depression, low lung volume, impaired cardiac reserve, anemia, or hypovolemia, are at risk for rapid and profound apneic hypoxemia. Our insights provide a basic physiological framework that may guide clinical interpretation and design of interventions for preventing sudden apneic hypoxemia.

  20. In vivo genome editing partially restores alpha1-antitrypsin in a murine model of AAT deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chun-Qing; Wang, Dan; Jiang, Tingting; O'Connor, Kevin; Tang, Qiushi; Cai, Lingling; Li, Xiangrui; Weng, Zhiping; Yin, Hao; Gao, Guangping; Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R; Xue, Wen

    2018-03-29

    CRISPR genome editing holds promise in the treatment of genetic diseases that currently lack effective long-term therapies. Patients with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency develop progressive lung disease due to the loss of AAT's antiprotease function and liver disease due to a toxic gain of function of the common mutant allele. However, it remains unknown whether CRISPR-mediated AAT correction in the liver, where AAT is primarily expressed, can correct either or both defects. Here we show that AAV delivery of CRISPR can effectively correct Z-AAT mutation in the liver of a transgenic mouse model. Specifically, we co-injected two AAV: one expressing Cas9 and another encoding an AAT guide RNA and homology-dependent repair template. In both neonate and adult mice, this treatment partially restored M-AAT in the serum. Furthermore, deep sequencing confirmed both indel mutations and precise gene correction in the liver, permitting careful analysis of gene editing events in vivo. This study demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct AAT mutations in vivo and validates continued exploration of this approach for the treatment of patients with AAT deficiency.

  1. A consistent model for the equilibrium thermodynamic functions of partially ionized flibe plasma with Coulomb corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2003-01-01

    Flibe (2LiF-BeF2) is a molten salt that has been chosen as the coolant and breeding material in many design studies of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) chamber. Flibe plasmas are to be generated in the ICF chamber in a wide range of temperatures and densities. These plasmas are more complex than the plasma of any single chemical species. Nevertheless, the composition and thermodynamic properties of the resulting flibe plasmas are needed for the gas dynamics calculations and the determination of other design parameters in the ICF chamber. In this paper, a simple consistent model for determining the detailed plasma composition and thermodynamic functions of high-temperature, fully dissociated and partially ionized flibe gas is presented and used to calculate different thermodynamic properties of interest to fusion applications. The computed properties include the average ionization state; kinetic pressure; internal energy; specific heats; adiabatic exponent, as well as the sound speed. The presented results are computed under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and electro-neutrality. A criterion for the validity of the LTE assumption is presented and applied to the computed results. Other attempts in the literature are assessed with their implied inaccuracies pointed out and discussed

  2. The Dif Identification in Constructed Response Items Using Partial Credit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Retnawati

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was to identify the load, the type and the significance of differential item functioning (DIF in constructed response item using the partial credit model (PCM. The data in the study were the students’ instruments and the students’ responses toward the PISA-like test items that had been completed by 386 ninth grade students and 460 tenth grade students who had been about 15 years old in the Province of Yogyakarta Special Region in Indonesia. The analysis toward the item characteristics through the student categorization based on their class was conducted toward the PCM using CONQUEST software. Furthermore, by applying these items characteristics, the researcher draw the category response function (CRF graphic in order to identify whether the type of DIF content had been in uniform or non-uniform. The significance of DIF was identified by comparing the discrepancy between the difficulty level parameter and the error in the CONQUEST output results. The results of the analysis showed that from 18 items that had been analyzed there were 4 items which had not been identified load DIF, there were 5 items that had been identified containing DIF but not statistically significant and there were 9 items that had been identified containing DIF significantly. The causes of items containing DIF were discussed.

  3. Assessment of Deep Partial Thickness Burn Treatment with Keratin Biomaterial Hydrogels in a Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Poranki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial thickness burns can advance to full thickness after initial injury due to inadequate tissue perfusion and increased production of inflammatory cytokines, which has been referred to as burn wound progression. In previous work, we demonstrated that a keratin biomaterial hydrogel appeared to reduce burn wound progression. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a modified keratin hydrogel could reduce burn wound progression and speed healing. Standardized burn wounds were created in Yorkshire swine and treated within 30 minutes with keratin hydrogel (modified and unmodified, collagen hydrogel, or silver sulfadiazine (SSD. Digital images of each wound were taken for area measurements immediately prior to cleaning and dressing changes. Wound tissue was collected and assessed histologically at several time points. Wound area showed a significant difference between hydrogels and SSD groups, and rates of reepithelialization at early time points showed an increase when keratin treatment was used compared to both collagen and SSD. A linear regression model predicted a time to wound closure of approximately 25 days for keratin hydrogel while SSD treatment required 35 days. There appeared to be no measurable differences between the modified and unmodified formulations of keratin hydrogels.

  4. Generalized partial linear varying multi-index coefficient model for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Gao, Bin; Cui, Yuehua

    2017-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested the joint effect of simultaneous exposures to multiple environments on disease risk. However, how environmental mixtures as a whole jointly modify genetic effect on disease risk is still largely unknown. Given the importance of gene-environment (G×E) interactions on many complex diseases, rigorously assessing the interaction effect between genes and environmental mixtures as a whole could shed novel insights into the etiology of complex diseases. For this purpose, we propose a generalized partial linear varying multi-index coefficient model (GPLVMICM) to capture the genetic effect on disease risk modulated by multiple environments as a whole. GPLVMICM is semiparametric in nature which allows different index loading parameters in different index functions. We estimate the parametric parameters by a profile procedure, and the nonparametric index functions by a B-spline backfitted kernel method. Under some regularity conditions, the proposed parametric and nonparametric estimators are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal. We propose a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test to rigorously assess the linearity of the interaction effect between multiple environments and a gene, while apply a parametric likelihood test to detect linear G×E interaction effect. The finite sample performance of the proposed method is examined through simulation studies and is further illustrated through a real data analysis.

  5. Generalized Partially Linear Models for Incomplete Longitudinal Data In the Presence of Population-Level Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baojiang; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Summary In observational studies, interest often lies in estimation of the population-level relationship between the explanatory variables and dependent variables, and the estimation is often done using longitudinal data. Longitudinal data often feature sampling error and bias due to non-random drop-out. However, inclusion of population-level information can increase estimation efficiency. In this paper we consider a generalized partially linear model for incomplete longitudinal data in the presence of the population-level information. A pseudo-empirical likelihood-based method is introduced to incorporate population-level information, and non-random drop-out bias is corrected by using a weighted generalized estimating equations method. A three-step estimation procedure is proposed, which makes the computation easier. Several methods that are often used in practice are compared in simulation studies, which demonstrate that our proposed method can correct the non-random drop-out bias and increase the estimation efficiency, especially for small sample size or when the missing proportion is high. We apply this method to an Alzheimer's disease study. PMID:23413768

  6. Algebraic aspects of evolution partial differential equation arising in the study of constant elasticity of variance model from financial mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsepa, Tanki; Aziz, Taha; Fatima, Aeeman; Khalique, Chaudry Masood

    2018-03-01

    The optimal investment-consumption problem under the constant elasticity of variance (CEV) model is investigated from the perspective of Lie group analysis. The Lie symmetry group of the evolution partial differential equation describing the CEV model is derived. The Lie point symmetries are then used to obtain an exact solution of the governing model satisfying a standard terminal condition. Finally, we construct conservation laws of the underlying equation using the general theorem on conservation laws.

  7. Cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients after surgery: a multicomponent model using partial least squares-path modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolon, Catherine; Krikorian, Alicia; Carayol, Marion; Brouillet, Denis; Romieu, Gilles; Ninot, Gregory

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine factors contributing to cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in breast cancer patients who have undergone surgery. Sixty women (mean age: 50.0) completed self-rated questionnaires assessing components of CRF, muscular and cognitive functions. Also, physiological and subjective data were gathered. Data were analyzed using partial least squares variance-based structural equation modeling in order to examine factors contributing to CRF after breast surgery. The tested model was robust in terms of its measurement quality (reliability and validity). According to the structural model results, emotional distress (β = 0.59; p accounting for 61% of the explained variance. Also, emotional distress (β = 0.41; p accounted for 41% of the explained variance. However, the relationship between low physical function and CRF was weak and nonsignificant (β = 0.01; p > 0.05). Emotional distress, altered vigilance capacity, and pain are associated with CRF in postsurgical breast cancer. In addition, emotional distress and pain are related to diminished physical function, which, in turn, has no significant impact on CRF. The current model should be examined in subsequent phases of the treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) when side effects are more pronounced and may lead to increased intensity of CRF and low physical function. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Human activated protein C variants in a rat model of arterial thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlbäck Björn

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated protein C (APC inhibits coagulation by degrading activated factor V (FVa and factor VIII (FVIIIa, protein S (PS functioning as a cofactor to APC. Methods By mutagenesis of the vitamin K-dependent Gla domain of APC, we have recently created an APC variant having enhanced anticoagulant activity due to increased affinity for negatively charged phospholipid membranes. In the present study, the potential antithrombotic effects of this APC variant, and of a variant APC that is additionally mutated in the serine protease domain, have been evaluated in a blind randomized study in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. In this model, we have previously found the combination of bovine APC and PS to be highly antithrombotic. Four treatment groups each containing 10 rats were, in a blind random fashion, given intravenous bolus injections of wild-type or mutant variants of APC (0.8 mg/kg together with human PS (0.6 mg/kg or human PS (0.6 mg/kg alone. A control group with 20 animals where given vehicle only. Results A trend to increased patency rates was noted in a group receiving one of the APC variants, but it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion In conclusion, administration of human APC variants having enhanced anticoagulant efficacy together with human PS in a rat model of arterial thrombosis did not give an efficient antithrombotic effect. The lack of effect may be due to species-specific differences between the human protein C system and the rat hemostatic system.

  9. Microparticulate ICE slurry for renal hypothermia: laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in a porcine model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikanov, S; Wille, M; Large, M; Razmaria, A; Lifshitz, D; Chang, A; Wu, Y; Kasza, K; Shalhav, A (Nuclear Engineering Division); (University of Chicago Medical Center)

    2010-10-01

    Previously, we described the feasibility of renal hypothermia using microparticulate ice slurry during laparoscopy. In the present study, we compared surface cooling with the ice slurry versus near-frozen saline or warm ischemia (WI) during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) in a porcine model. We used a single-kidney porcine model. Animals in 5 equal groups (n = 6 each) underwent right laparoscopic complete nephrectomy. In Phase I, left LPN was performed under 90 minutes of ischemia and 90-minute renal cooling with either slurry (Slurry group 1) or saline (Saline group 1). No cooling was applied in the WI group. In Phase II, to simulate more extreme condition, ischemia time was extended to 120 minutes and cooling shortened to 10 minutes (Slurry group 2 and Saline group 2). The study endpoints were renal and core temperature during the surgery and serum creatinine at baseline and days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after the procedure. The ice slurry was easily produced and delivered. Nadir renal temperature (mean {+-} SD) was 8 {+-} 4 C in Slurry group 1 vs. 22.5 {+-} 3 C in Saline group 1 (P < .0001). Renal rewarming to 30 C occurred after 61 {+-} 7 minutes in Slurry group 2 vs. 24 {+-} 6 minutes in Saline group 2 (P < .0001). Core temperature decreased on average to 35 C in the Saline groups compared with 37 C in the Slurry groups (P < .0001). Serum creatinine did not differ between the Saline and Slurry groups in Phases I and II at any time point. Ice slurry provides superior renal cooling compared with near-frozen saline during LPN without associated core hypothermia.

  10. A theoretical computerized study for the electrical conductivity of arterial pulsatile blood flow by an elastic tube model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Zhu, Yong; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The electrical conductivity of pulsatile blood flow in arteries is an important factor for the application of the electrical impedance measurement system in clinical settings. The electrical conductivity of pulsatile blood flow depends not only on blood-flow-induced red blood cell (RBC) orientation and deformation but also on artery wall motion. Numerous studies have investigated the conductivity of pulsatile blood based on a rigid tube model, in which the effects of wall motion on blood conductivity are not considered. In this study, integrating Ling and Atabek's local flow theory and Maxwell-Fricke theory, we develop an elastic tube model to explore the effects of wall motion as well as blood flow velocity on blood conductivity. The simulation results suggest that wall motion, rather than blood flow velocity, is the primary factor that affects the conductivity of flowing blood in arteries. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peroral endoscopic full and partial-thickness myotomy. A viability study in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D. Quiroz-Guadarrama

    2013-10-01

    Conclusions: The endoscopic myotomy technique is feasible. Endoscopic partial-thickness myotomy was associated with shorter surgery duration and better results during the intraoperative period and the 7-day follow-up.

  12. Modeling Solution of Nonlinear Dispersive Partial Differential Equations using the Marker Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, Jerome L.V.

    2005-01-01

    A new method for the solution of nonlinear dispersive partial differential equations is described. The marker method relies on the definition of a convective field associated with the underlying partial differential equation; the information about the approximate solution is associated with the response of an ensemble of markers to this convective field. Some key aspects of the method, such as the selection of the shape function and the initial loading, are discussed in some details

  13. A finite element model to study the effect of tissue anisotropy on ex vivo arterial shear wave elastography measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, D A; Debusschere, N; Caenen, A; Iannaccone, F; Pernot, M; Swillens, A; Segers, P

    2017-07-07

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an ultrasound (US) diagnostic method for measuring the stiffness of soft tissues based on generated shear waves (SWs). SWE has been applied to bulk tissues, but in arteries it is still under investigation. Previously performed studies in arteries or arterial phantoms demonstrated the potential of SWE to measure arterial wall stiffness-a relevant marker in prediction of cardiovascular diseases. This study is focused on numerical modelling of SWs in ex vivo equine aortic tissue, yet based on experimental SWE measurements with the tissue dynamically loaded while rotating the US probe to investigate the sensitivity of SWE to the anisotropic structure. A good match with experimental shear wave group speed results was obtained. SWs were sensitive to the orthotropy and nonlinearity of the material. The model also allowed to study the nature of the SWs by performing 2D FFT-based and analytical phase analyses. A good match between numerical group velocities derived using the time-of-flight algorithm and derived from the dispersion curves was found in the cross-sectional and axial arterial views. The complexity of solving analytical equations for nonlinear orthotropic stressed plates was discussed.

  14. Tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow in a modeled human carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Atkinson, C.; Jeremy, M. C.; Soria, J.

    2011-04-01

    Hemodynamic forces within the human carotid artery are well known to play a key role in the initiation and progression of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The degree and extent of the disease largely depends on the prevailing three-dimensional flow structure and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution. This work presents tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) measurements of the flow structure and WSS in a physiologically accurate model of the human carotid artery bifurcation. The vascular geometry is reconstructed from patient-specific data and reproduced in a transparent flow phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of Tomo-PIV in a complex three-dimensional geometry. Tomographic reconstruction is performed with the multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation and simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction (SMART) technique. The implemented methodology is validated by comparing the results with Stereo-PIV measurements in the same facility. Using a steady flow assumption, the measurement error and RMS uncertainty are directly inferred from the measured velocity field. It is shown that the measurement uncertainty increases for increasing light sheet thickness and increasing velocity gradients, which are largest near the vessel walls. For a typical volume depth of 6 mm (or 256 pixel), the analysis indicates that the velocity derived from 3D cross-correlation can be measured within ±2% of the maximum velocity (or ±0.2 pixel) near the center of the vessel and within ±5% (±0.6 pixel) near the vessel wall. The technique is then applied to acquire 3D-3C velocity field data at multiple axial locations within the carotid artery model, which are combined to yield the flow field and WSS in a volume of approximately 26 mm × 27 mm × 60 mm. Shear stress is computed from the velocity gradient tensor and a method for inferring the WSS distribution on the vessel wall is presented. The results indicate the presence of a complex and three-dimensional flow structure, with

  15. Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging improves the stability of rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lu; Li, Yao; Li, Hangdao; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2015-09-01

    Rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model is commonly used in stroke research. Creating a stable infarct volume has always been challenging for technicians due to the variances of animal anatomy and surgical operations. The depth of filament suture advancement strongly influences the infarct volume as well. We investigated the cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the affected cortex using laser speckle contrast imaging when advancing suture during MCAO surgery. The relative CBF drop area (CBF50, i.e., the percentage area with CBF less than 50% of the baseline) showed an increase from 20.9% to 69.1% when the insertion depth increased from 1.6 to 1.8 cm. Using the real-time CBF50 marker to guide suture insertion during the surgery, our animal experiments showed that intraoperative CBF-guided surgery could significantly improve the stability of MCAO with a more consistent infarct volume and less mortality.

  16. 4D motion modeling of the coronary arteries from CT images for robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong Ping; Edwards, Eddie; Mei, Lin; Rueckert, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for coronary artery motion modeling from cardiac Computed Tomography( CT) images. The aim of this work is to develop a 4D motion model of the coronaries for image guidance in robotic-assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass (TECAB) surgery. To utilize the pre-operative cardiac images to guide the minimally invasive surgery, it is essential to have a 4D cardiac motion model to be registered with the stereo endoscopic images acquired intraoperatively using the da Vinci robotic system. In this paper, we are investigating the extraction of the coronary arteries and the modelling of their motion from a dynamic sequence of cardiac CT. We use a multi-scale vesselness filter to enhance vessels in the cardiac CT images. The centerlines of the arteries are extracted using a ridge traversal algorithm. Using this method the coronaries can be extracted in near real-time as only local information is used in vessel tracking. To compute the deformation of the coronaries due to cardiac motion, the motion is extracted from a dynamic sequence of cardiac CT. Each timeframe in this sequence is registered to the end-diastole timeframe of the sequence using a non-rigid registration algorithm based on free-form deformations. Once the images have been registered a dynamic motion model of the coronaries can be obtained by applying the computed free-form deformations to the extracted coronary arteries. To validate the accuracy of the motion model we compare the actual position of the coronaries in each time frame with the predicted position of the coronaries as estimated from the non-rigid registration. We expect that this motion model of coronaries can facilitate the planning of TECAB surgery, and through the registration with real-time endoscopic video images it can reduce the conversion rate from TECAB to conventional procedures.

  17. Effects of wall condition on flow distributions in arterial modeling: comparison of rigid, dynamic, and compliant walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fan [Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Beijing (China); Hua, Lu; Gao, Li jian [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    Blood flow distributions were evaluated using various computational strategies. Three commonly used wall conditions in arterial modeling were employed, namely rigid, dynamic and compliant walls. The results show that the velocity distributions are similar under rigid and dynamic walls, developing into the Poiseuille flow, but they are blunt under compliant walls. The peak pressure under rigid walls is highest, but the model of dynamic walls has a good approximation of pressure against the model of compliant walls. The results indicate that a model of compliant walls appears to be a computationally and reasonably accurate approximation of blood velocity distributions compared with the analysis under rigid or dynamic walls. Introducing fluid-structure interaction into arterial modeling is necessary to ensure reliable results and information. However, a model of dynamic walls seems to be a computationally inexpensive yet reasonably accurate approximation for pressure.

  18. Myostatin deficiency partially rescues the bone phenotype of osteogenesis imperfecta model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, A K; Carleton, S M; Yao, X; Gentry, B A; Raw, C E; Brown, M; Pfeiffer, F M; Wang, Y; Phillips, C L

    2016-01-01

    Mice with osteogenesis imperfecta (+/oim), a disorder of bone fragility, were bred to mice with muscle over growth to test whether increasing muscle mass genetically would improve bone quality and strength. The results demonstrate that femora from mice carrying both mutations have greater mechanical integrity than their +/oim littermates. Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable connective tissue disorder due primarily to mutations in the type I collagen genes resulting in skeletal deformity and fragility. Currently, there is no cure, and therapeutic strategies encompass the use of antiresorptive pharmaceuticals and surgical bracing, with limited success and significant potential for adverse effects. Bone, a mechanosensing organ, can respond to high mechanical loads by increasing new bone formation and altering bone geometry to withstand increased forces. Skeletal muscle is a major source of physiological loading on bone, and bone strength is proportional to muscle mass. To test the hypothesis that congenic increases in muscle mass in the osteogenesis imperfecta murine model mouse (oim) will improve their compromised bone quality and strength, heterozygous (+/oim) mice were bred to mice deficient in myostatin (+/mstn), a negative regulator of muscle growth. The resulting adult offspring were evaluated for hindlimb muscle mass, and bone microarchitecture, physiochemistry, and biomechanical integrity. +/oim mice deficient in myostatin (+/mstn +/oim) were generated and demonstrated that myostatin deficiency increased body weight, muscle mass, and biomechanical strength in +/mstn +/oim mice as compared to +/oim mice. Additionally, myostatin deficiency altered the physiochemical properties of the +/oim bone but did not alter bone remodeling. Myostatin deficiency partially improved the reduced femoral bone biomechanical strength of adult +/oim mice by increasing muscle mass with concomitant improvements in bone microarchitecture and physiochemical properties.

  19. Penskalaan Butir Format Respons Pilihan dan Respons Bebas Berdasarkan Model Rasch dan Partial Credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Hariadi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian melihat pengaruh jumlah parameter butir, kategori respons bebas (RB, pengaruh sampel terhadap akurasi estimasi parameter kemampuan untuk menghasilkan estimasi yang stabil dan pengaruh pembobotan butir RP dan butir RB terhadap kesalahan baku. Penelitian dalam dua tahap, simulasi menggunakan 30 kondisi dengan replikasi 50 dengan variabel panjang tes, jumlah kategori, dan jumlah parameter butir, dan analisis deskriptif, dilanjutkan penerapan penskalaan gabungan butir tipe respons pilihan (rp dan butir respons bebas (rb pada konstruksi tes elektronika yang terdiri 40 butir pilihan ganda dan 4 butir jawaban tersusun, 3 butir memiliki lima kategori jawaban dan 1 butir dengan 4 kategori jawaban, melibatkan 355 siswa. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan: ukuran sampel kurang berpengaruh pada root mean square error atau (RSME> dan korelasi antara 9 dengan 0, namun berpengaruh terhadap akurasi estimasi parameter butir pilihan ganda (/>/y,dan parameter butir respons tersusun (3^- Jumlah parameter butir berpengaruh terhadap parameter kemampuan, tetapi tidak berpengaruh terhadap akurasi dari b^, dan S„,. Estimasi dari parameter tingkat kesulitan butir jawaban tersusun tiga kategori lebih akurat daripada butir jawaban tersusun lima kategori. Estimasi tahan {robust untuk parameter kesulitan butir jawaban tersusun 5 kategori memerlukan sampel minimal 250 responden, sedangkan untuk butir respons tersusun 3 kategori memerlukan sampel minimal 100 responden. Estimasi parameter kemampuan dari skor total (0^^ tidak sama dengan rata-rata jumlah tbeta dari masing-masing subtes (0^ + 0CR. Theta dari tes yang dikalibrasi bersama-sama berbeda dengan theta dari total subtes yang dikalibrasi secara terpisah. Korelasi kemampuan yang mengunakan pembobotan dan kemampuan tanpa pembobotan mempunyai suatu rentang dari 0,988 sampai 0,948. Kata kunci: penyekaiaan, model rash dan partial credit.

  20. Enzymatic digestion of partially and fully regenerated cellulose model films from trimethylsilyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Kargl, Rupert; Doliška, Aleš; Ehmann, Heike M A; Ribitsch, Volker; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin

    2013-03-01

    Partially and fully regenerated cellulose model films from trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC) were prepared by a time dependent regeneration approach. These thin films were characterized with contact angle measurements and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In order to get further insights into the completeness of the regeneration we studied the interaction of cellulase enzymes from Trichoderma viride with the cellulose films using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). To support the results from the QCM-D experiments capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were applied. The changes in mass and energy dissipation due to the interaction of the enzymes with the substrates were correlated with the surface wettability and elemental composition of the regenerated films. The highest interaction activity between the films and the enzyme, as well as the highest cellulose degradation, was observed on fully regenerated cellulose films, but some degradation also occurred on pure TMSC films. The enzymatic degradation rate correlated well with the rate of regeneration. It was demonstrated that CZE can be used to support QCM-D data via the detection of enzyme hydrolysis products in the eluates of the QCM-D cells. Glucose release peaked at the same time as the maximum mass loss was detected via QCM-D. It was shown that a combination of QCM-D and CZE together with enzymatic digestion is a reliable method to determine the conversion rate of TMSC to cellulose. In addition QCM-D and AFM revealed that cellulase is irreversibly bound to hydrophobic TMSC surfaces, while pure cellulose is digested almost completely in the course of hydrolysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermodynamically consistent modeling and simulation of multi-component two-phase flow model with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-11-25

    A general diffuse interface model with a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state) is proposed to describe the multi-component two-phase fluid flow based on the principles of the NVT-based framework which is a latest alternative over the NPT-based framework to model the realistic fluids. The proposed model uses the Helmholtz free energy rather than Gibbs free energy in the NPT-based framework. Different from the classical routines, we combine the first law of thermodynamics and related thermodynamical relations to derive the entropy balance equation, and then we derive a transport equation of the Helmholtz free energy density. Furthermore, by using the second law of thermodynamics, we derive a set of unified equations for both interfaces and bulk phases that can describe the partial miscibility of two fluids. A relation between the pressure gradient and chemical potential gradients is established, and this relation leads to a new formulation of the momentum balance equation, which demonstrates that chemical potential gradients become the primary driving force of fluid motion. Moreover, we prove that the proposed model satisfies the total (free) energy dissipation with time. For numerical simulation of the proposed model, the key difficulties result from the strong nonlinearity of Helmholtz free energy density and tight coupling relations between molar densities and velocity. To resolve these problems, we propose a novel convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density and deal well with the coupling relations between molar densities and velocity through very careful physical observations with a mathematical rigor. We prove that the proposed numerical scheme can preserve the discrete (free) energy dissipation. Numerical tests are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. New interpretation of arterial stiffening due to cigarette smoking using a structurally motivated constitutive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading self-inflicted risk factor for cardiovascular diseases; it causes arterial stiffening with serious sequelea including atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms. This work presents a new interpretation of arterial stiffening caused by smoking based on data...... published for rat pulmonary arteries. A structurally motivated ‘‘four fiber family’’ constitutive relation was used to fit the available biaxial data and associated best-fit values of material parameters were estimated using multivariate nonlinear regression. Results suggested that arterial stiffening...

  3. Determining the Cardiovascular Effect of Partial versus Complete REBOA in a Porcine (Sus scrofa) Model of Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-09

    the Cardiovascular Effect of Partial versus Complete REBOA in a Porcine (Sus scrofa) Model of Hemorrhagic Shock. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (PI...or sentience been identified as potential study/training models in this protocol? No. REDUCTION: Since the last IACUC approval, have any methods...questions regarding applicability of REBOA in different positions for different therapeutic goals . This will, in turn, help to guide the practice of

  4. Benzodiazepine modulation of partial agonist efficacy and spontaneously active GABAA receptors supports an allosteric model of modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Downing, Scott S; Lee, Yan T; Farb, David H; Gibbs, Terrell T

    2005-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) have been used extensively for more than 40 years because of their high therapeutic index and low toxicity. Although BZDs are understood to act primarily as allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors, the mechanism of modulation is not well understood.The applicability of an allosteric model with two binding sites for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and one for a BZD-like modulator was investigated.This model predicts that BZDs should enhance the efficacy of partial agonists.C...

  5. Modeling of pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and hemodynamic effects of macitentan in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Zisowsky, Jochen; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2018-04-01

    Macitentan is the first endothelin receptor antagonist with demonstrated efficacy on morbidity and mortality in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the pivotal study SERAPHIN. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of macitentan and its active metabolite, ACT-132577, were characterized in a population model. Efficacy and hemodynamics (pharmacodynamics, PD) were related to PK based on PK/PD modeling. Sex, age, and body weight influenced the PK to a statistically significant extent. Model-based simulations showed that these variables are clinically not relevant. Concomitant use of PAH medication (PDE-5 inhibitors) did not influence macitentan trough concentration to a relevant extent. Efficacy and hemodynamics showed clear differences from placebo for macitentan concentrations on 3 and 10 mg with consistent superior effects for 10 mg. After 6 months, PAH patients showed model-predicted 6-min walk distance (6-MWD) improvements of 1.0 m on placebo compared to 29.8 and 34.1 m on 3 and 10 mg of macitentan, respectively. Higher macitentan concentrations were associated with reductions in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), mean right atrial and pulmonary arterial pressure, and total pulmonary resistance (TPR) and increases in cardiac index (CI) and mixed venous oxygen saturation. Statistical significance was determined for PVR, TPR, and CI but not for 6-MWD. In addition, PVR showed more pronounced differences between active treatment and placebo than 6-MWD. Modeling identified statistically significant inter-patient differences; simulations to assess the magnitude of the effects permitted clinical judgment. The same approach will allow for extrapolation to children. Hemodynamic markers might be better markers of treatment effects than 6-MWD. The SERAPHIN study and its open-label extension are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov with identifiers NCT00660179 (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00660179) and NCT00667823 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show

  6. Development of Occlusive Neointimal Lesions in Distal Pulmonary Arteries of Endothelin B Receptor–Deficient Rats: A New Model of Severe Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, D. Dunbar; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Colvin, Kelley; Imamura, Masatoshi; Oka, Masahiko; Lee, Dong-Seok; Gebb, Sarah; Jones, Peter Lloyd

    2007-01-01

    Background Human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and, in its more severe form, by the development of occlusive neointimal lesions. However, few animal models of pulmonary neointimal proliferation exist, thereby limiting a complete understanding of the pathobiology of PAH. Recent studies of the endothelin (ET) system demonstrate that deficiency of the ETB receptor predisposes adult rats to acute and chronic hypoxic PAH, yet these animals fail to develop neointimal lesions. Herein, we determined and thereafter showed that exposure of ETB receptor–deficient rats to the endothelial toxin monocrotaline (MCT) leads to the development of neointimal lesions that share hallmarks of human PAH. Methods and Results The pulmonary hemodynamic and morphometric effects of 60 mg/kg MCT in control (MCT+/+) and ETB receptor–deficient (MCTsl/sl) rats at 6 weeks of age were assessed. MCTsl/sl rats developed more severe PAH, characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure, diminished cardiac output, and right ventricular hypertrophy. In MCTsl/sl rats, morphometric evaluation revealed the presence of neointimal lesions within small distal pulmonary arteries, increased medial wall thickness, and decreased arterial-to-alveolar ratio. In keeping with this, barium angiography revealed diminished distal pulmonary vasculature of MCTsl/sl rat lungs. Cells within neointimal lesions expressed smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers. Moreover, cells within neointimal lesions exhibited increased levels of proliferation and were located in a tissue microenvironment enriched with vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and activated matrix metalloproteinase-9, factors already implicated in human PAH. Finally, assessment of steady state mRNA showed that whereas expression of ETB receptors was decreased in MCTsl/sl rat lungs, ETA receptor expression increased. Conclusions Deficiency of the ETB receptor markedly

  7. Stochastic Partial Differential Equation Solver for Hydroacoustic Modeling: Improvements to Paracousti Sound Propagation Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices offer a clean, renewable alternative energy source for the future. Responsible utilization of MHK devices, however, requires that the effects of acoustic noise produced by these devices on marine life and marine-related human activities be well understood. Paracousti is a 3-D full waveform acoustic modeling suite that can accurately propagate MHK noise signals in the complex bathymetry found in the near-shore to open ocean environment and considers real properties of the seabed, water column, and air-surface interface. However, this is a deterministic simulation that assumes the environment and source are exactly known. In reality, environmental and source characteristics are often only known in a statistical sense. Thus, to fully characterize the expected noise levels within the marine environment, this uncertainty in environmental and source factors should be incorporated into the acoustic simulations. One method is to use Monte Carlo (MC) techniques where simulation results from a large number of deterministic solutions are aggregated to provide statistical properties of the output signal. However, MC methods can be computationally prohibitive since they can require tens of thousands or more simulations to build up an accurate representation of those statistical properties. An alternative method, using the technique of stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE), allows computation of the statistical properties of output signals at a small fraction of the computational cost of MC. We are developing a SPDE solver for the 3-D acoustic wave propagation problem called Paracousti-UQ to help regulators and operators assess the statistical properties of environmental noise produced by MHK devices. In this presentation, we present the SPDE method and compare statistical distributions of simulated acoustic signals in simple models to MC simulations to show the accuracy and efficiency of the SPDE method. Sandia National Laboratories

  8. The assessment of the performance of covariance-based structural equation modeling and partial least square path modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimran, Ahmad Nazim; Ahmad, Sabri; Afthanorhan, Asyraf; Awang, Zainudin

    2017-05-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) is the second generation statistical analysis technique developed for analyzing the inter-relationships among multiple variables in a model. Previous studies have shown that there seemed to be at least an implicit agreement about the factors that should drive the choice between covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM) and partial least square path modeling (PLS-PM). PLS-PM appears to be the preferred method by previous scholars because of its less stringent assumption and the need to avoid the perceived difficulties in CB-SEM. Along with this issue has been the increasing debate among researchers on the use of CB-SEM and PLS-PM in studies. The present study intends to assess the performance of CB-SEM and PLS-PM as a confirmatory study in which the findings will contribute to the body of knowledge of SEM. Maximum likelihood (ML) was chosen as the estimator for CB-SEM and was expected to be more powerful than PLS-PM. Based on the balanced experimental design, the multivariate normal data with specified population parameter and sample sizes were generated using Pro-Active Monte Carlo simulation, and the data were analyzed using AMOS for CB-SEM and SmartPLS for PLS-PM. Comparative Bias Index (CBI), construct relationship, average variance extracted (AVE), composite reliability (CR), and Fornell-Larcker criterion were used to study the consequence of each estimator. The findings conclude that CB-SEM performed notably better than PLS-PM in estimation for large sample size (100 and above), particularly in terms of estimations accuracy and consistency.

  9. 3-D flow characterization and shear stress in a stenosed carotid artery bifurcation model using stereoscopic PIV technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Poepping, Tamie L

    2010-01-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation is a common site of atherosclerosis which is a major leading cause of ischemic stroke. The impact of stenosis in the atherosclerotic carotid artery is to disturb the flow pattern and produce regions with high shear rate, turbulence, and recirculation, which are key hemodynamic factors associated with plaque rupture, clot formation, and embolism. In order to characterize the disturbed flow in the stenosed carotid artery, stereoscopic PIV measurements were performed in a transparent model with 50% stenosis under pulsatile flow conditions. Simulated ECG gating of the flowrate waveform provides external triggering required for volumetric reconstruction of the complex flow patterns. Based on the three-component velocity data in the lumen region, volumetric shear-stress patterns were derived.

  10. Novel A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits carotid artery restenosis in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou ZH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhen-hua Zhou,1 Jing Peng,1 Zhao-you Meng,1 Lin Chen,1 Jia-Lu Huang,1 He-qing Huang,1 Li Li,2 Wen Zeng,2 Yong Wei,2 Chu-Hong Zhu,2 Kang-Ning Chen1 1Department of Neurology, Cerebrovascular Disease Research Institute, Southwest Hospital, 2Department of Anatomy, Key Laboratory for Biomechanics of Chongqing, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Background: Carotid artery stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although carotid angioplasty and stenting using an embolic protection device has been introduced as a less invasive carotid revascularization approach, in-stent restenosis limits its long-term efficacy and safety. The objective of this study was to test the anti-restenosis effects of local stent-mediated delivery of the A20 gene in a porcine carotid artery model.Materials and methods: The pCDNA3.1EHA20 was firmly attached onto stents that had been collagen coated and treated with N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiolpropionate solution and anti-DNA immunoglobulin fixation. Anti-restenosis effects of modified vs control (the bare-metal stent and pCDNA3.1 void vector stents were assessed by Western blot and scanning electron microscopy, as well as by morphological and inflammatory reaction analyses.Results: Stent-delivered A20 gene was locally expressed in porcine carotids in association with significantly greater extent of re-endothelialization at day 14 and of neointimal hyperplasia inhibition at 3 months than stenting without A20 gene expression.Conclusion: The A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits neointimal hyperplasia while promoting re-endothelialization and therefore constitutes a novel potential alternative to prevent restenosis while minimizing complications. Keywords: restenosis, A20, gene therapy, stent, endothelialization

  11. Efficient automatic OCR word validation using word partial format derivation and language model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyuan; Misra, Dharitri; Thoma, George R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an OCR validation module, implemented for the System for Preservation of Electronic Resources (SPER) developed at the U.S. National Library of Medicine.1 The module detects and corrects suspicious words in the OCR output of scanned textual documents through a procedure of deriving partial formats for each suspicious word, retrieving candidate words by partial-match search from lexicons, and comparing the joint probabilities of N-gram and OCR edit transformation corresponding to the candidates. The partial format derivation, based on OCR error analysis, efficiently and accurately generates candidate words from lexicons represented by ternary search trees. In our test case comprising a historic medico-legal document collection, this OCR validation module yielded the correct words with 87% accuracy and reduced the overall OCR word errors by around 60%.

  12. Methods for partial differential equations qualitative properties of solutions, phase space analysis, semilinear models

    CERN Document Server

    Ebert, Marcelo R

    2018-01-01

    This book provides an overview of different topics related to the theory of partial differential equations. Selected exercises are included at the end of each chapter to prepare readers for the “research project for beginners” proposed at the end of the book. It is a valuable resource for advanced graduates and undergraduate students who are interested in specializing in this area. The book is organized in five parts: In Part 1 the authors review the basics and the mathematical prerequisites, presenting two of the most fundamental results in the theory of partial differential equations: the Cauchy-Kovalevskaja theorem and Holmgren's uniqueness theorem in its classical and abstract form. It also introduces the method of characteristics in detail and applies this method to the study of Burger's equation. Part 2 focuses on qualitative properties of solutions to basic partial differential equations, explaining the usual properties of solutions to elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations for the archetypes...

  13. Partial coherence and imperfect optics at a synchrotron radiation source modeled by wavefront propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundy, David; Alcock, Simon G.; Alianelli, Lucia; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal J. S.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    A full wave propagation of X-rays from source to sample at a storage ring beamline requires simulation of the electron beam source and optical elements in the beamline. The finite emittance source causes the appearance of partial coherence in the wave field. Consequently, the wavefront cannot be treated exactly with fully coherent wave propagation or fully incoherent ray tracing. We have used the wavefront code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) to perform partially coherent wavefront propagation using a parallel computing cluster at the Diamond Light Source. Measured mirror profiles have been used to correct the wavefront for surface errors.

  14. Effect of arterial deprivation on growing femoral epiphysis: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging using a piglet model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jung Eun; Yoo, Won Joon; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion MRI for the evaluation of femoral head ischemia. Unilateral femoral head ischemia was induced by selective embolization of the medial circumflex femoral artery in 10 piglets. All MRIs were performed immediately (1 hour) and after embolization (1, 2, and 4 weeks). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated for the femoral head. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters (Kep and Ve from two-compartment model) and semi-quantitative parameters including peak enhancement, time-to-peak (TTP), and contrast washout were evaluated. The epiphyseal ADC values of the ischemic hip decreased immediately (1 hour) after embolization. However, they increased rapidly at 1 week after embolization and remained elevated until 4 weeks after embolization. Perfusion MRI of ischemic hips showed decreased epiphyseal perfusion with decreased Kep immediately after embolization. Signal intensity-time curves showed delayed TTP with limited contrast washout immediately post-embolization. At 1-2 weeks after embolization, spontaneous reperfusion was observed in ischemic epiphyses. The change of ADC (p = 0.043) and Kep (p = 0.043) were significantly different between immediate (1 hour) after embolization and 1 week post-embolization. Diffusion MRI and pharmacokinetic model obtained from the DCE-MRI are useful in depicting early changes of perfusion and tissue damage using the model of femoral head ischemia in skeletally immature piglets.

  15. Population Modeling of Selexipag Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Response Parameters in Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacek, M; Lott, D; Hurst, N; Bruderer, S; Dingemanse, J

    2017-01-01

    Selexipag (Uptravi) is an oral selective IP prostacyclin receptor agonist approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The pivotal GRIPHON study was the largest clinical study ever conducted in PAH patients, providing long‐term data from 1,156 patients. PAH comedication did not affect exposure to selexipag, while exposure to its active metabolite ACT‐333679 was reduced by 30% when taken in combination, clinically not relevant in the context of individual dose up‐titration. Using log‐linear regression models linking model‐predicted steady‐state exposure to pharmacodynamics (PD), exposure to selexipag and ACT‐333679 showed some statistically significant, albeit not clinically relevant, effects on exercise capacity, laboratory values, and the occurrence of prostacyclin‐related adverse events, but not on vital signs or adverse events denoting hemorrhage. Using suitable modeling techniques, the GRIPHON study yielded clinically relevant data with limited burden of pharmacokinetics (PK) blood sampling, demonstrating that PK/PD modeling enables firm conclusions even with sparse PK and PD sampling. PMID:28556581

  16. Comprehensive Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease by Using First-Pass Analysis Dynamic CT Perfusion: Validation in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Ziemer, Benjamin; Malkasian, Shant; Sadeghi, Bahman; Javan, Hanna; Groves, Elliott M; Dertli, Brian; Molloi, Sabee

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively validate a first-pass analysis (FPA) technique that combines computed tomographic (CT) angiography and dynamic CT perfusion measurement into one low-dose examination. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the animal care committee. The FPA technique was retrospectively validated in six swine (mean weight, 37.3 kg ± 7.5 [standard deviation]) between April 2015 and October 2016. Four to five intermediate-severity stenoses were generated in the left anterior descending artery (LAD), and 20 contrast material-enhanced volume scans were acquired per stenosis. All volume scans were used for maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion measurement, but only two volume scans were used for FPA perfusion measurement. Perfusion measurements in the LAD, left circumflex artery (LCx), right coronary artery, and all three coronary arteries combined were compared with microsphere perfusion measurements by using regression, root-mean-square error, root-mean-square deviation, Lin concordance correlation, and diagnostic outcomes analysis. The CT dose index and size-specific dose estimate per two-volume FPA perfusion measurement were also determined. Results FPA and MSM perfusion measurements (P FPA and P MSM ) in all three coronary arteries combined were related to reference standard microsphere perfusion measurements (P MICRO ), as follows: P FPA_COMBINED = 1.02 P MICRO_COMBINED + 0.11 (r = 0.96) and P MSM_COMBINED = 0.28 P MICRO_COMBINED + 0.23 (r = 0.89). The CT dose index and size-specific dose estimate per two-volume FPA perfusion measurement were 10.8 and 17.8 mGy, respectively. Conclusion The FPA technique was retrospectively validated in a swine model and has the potential to be used for accurate, low-dose vessel-specific morphologic and physiologic assessment of coronary artery disease. © RSNA, 2017.

  17. Soliton wave model for simulating the slug formation in vertical-to-horizontal partially blocked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nihan Onder; Alberto Teyssedou; Danila Roubtsov

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In CANDU reactors the fuel channels are connected to inlet and outlet headers by feeder-pipes that consist of vertical and horizontal legs. In some feeders, orifices are installed for flow adjustment. During a postulated Loss of Coolant Accidents, the emergency cooling water injected into the inlet and outlet headers enters the fuel channels through the feeder pipes. Steam produced in the feeders and in the fuel channels may flow in the direction opposite to that of the water, thereby creating vertical to horizontal Counter-Current Flow (CCF). The rate at which the cooling water enters the fuel channel may be substantially limited by the flooding phenomena that entrains the water in the same direction as the steam flow. Steam flowing in the direction opposite to the cooling water can bring about the formation of slug flow. Long slugs of liquid moving at relatively high speed are transported back towards the headers by the steam. This phenomenon substantially reduces the amount of cooling water that can reach the reactor core. We conducted CCF experiments using a vertical-to-horizontal test section connected by 90 deg. elbows, with an orifice installed in the horizontal leg. Four different orifices were used to carry out the experiments. We have observed that soliton-type waves generated close to the elbow propagate in the horizontal leg towards the orifice, where a partial reflection takes place. Without an orifice, the soliton waves are reflected from the second elbow. The reflected waves move in the opposite direction to that of the incident wave. Since soliton-type waves are periodically generated, the incident and reflected waves interfere at some place in the horizontal leg. If the amplitude of the interference wave is high enough, the bridging of the tubes occur, which generates the slugs. During the experiments the water and air flow rates, pressures and void fraction distributions were measured. The slug propagation

  18. A comparison of ballon injury models of endovascular lesions in rat arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E.E. Gabeler; R. van Hillegersberg (Richard); R.G. Statius van Eps (Randolph); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); E.J. Gussenhoven (Elma); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); H. van Urk (Hero)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Balloon injury (BI) of the rat carotid artery (CCA) is widely used to study intimal hyperplasia (IH) and decrease in lumen diameter (LD), but CCA's small diameter impedes the evaluation of endovascular therapies. Therefore, we validated BI in the aorta (AA) and iliac artery

  19. L-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2015-03-15

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite α-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. LES and acoustic analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez, I.; Staffelbach, G.; Poinsot, T.; Roman Casado, J.C.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and acoustic analysis tools to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in a methane/air academic burner installed at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). It operates under fuel-lean partially premixed conditions at atmospheric

  1. Modelling of a reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor for the partial oxidation of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) processes have great potential as alternative to conventional oil and coal processing for the production of liquid fuels. In GTL-processes the partial oxidation of methane (POM) is combined with the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. An important part of the investment costs of a

  2. Building 3D anatomical model of coiling of the internal carotid artery derived from CT angiographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govsa, Figen; Yagdi, Tahir; Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Eraslan, Cenk; Alagoz, Ahmet Kemal

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to recreate live patient arterial anomalies using new recent application of three-dimensional (3D) printed anatomical models. Another purpose of building such models is to evaluate the effectiveness of angiographic data. With the help of the DICOM files from computed tomographic angiography (CT-A), we were able to build a printed model of variant course of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Images of coiling of the ICA taken by CT-A, were then converted into 3D images using Google SketchUp free software, and the images were saved in stereolithography format. Imaging helped us conduct the examination in details with reference to geometrical features of ICA, degree of curve, its extension, location and presence of loop. Challenging vascular anatomy was exposed with models of adverse curve of carotid anatomy, including highly angulated necks, conical necks, short necks, tortuous carotid arteries, and narrowed carotid lumens. It assisted us to comprehend spatial anatomy configuration of life-like models. 3D model can be very effective in cases when anatomical difficulties are detected through the CT-A, and therefore, a tactile approach is demanded preoperatively. 3D life-like models serve as an essential office-based tool in vascular surgery as they assist surgeons in preoperative planning, develop intraoperative guidance, teach both the patients and the surgical trainees, and simulate to show patient-specific procedures in medical field.

  3. A model to predict multivessel coronary artery disease from the exercise thallium-201 stress test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, S.G.; Abbott, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Watson, D.D.; Kaul, S.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to (1) determine whether nonimaging variables add to the diagnostic information available from exercise thallium-201 images for the detection of multivessel coronary artery disease; and (2) to develop a model based on the exercise thallium-201 stress test to predict the presence of multivessel disease. The study populations included 383 patients referred to the University of Virginia and 325 patients referred to the Massachusetts General Hospital for evaluation of chest pain. All patients underwent both cardiac catheterization and exercise thallium-201 stress testing between 1978 and 1981. In the University of Virginia cohort, at each level of thallium-201 abnormality (no defects, one defect, more than one defect), ST depression and patient age added significantly in the detection of multivessel disease. Logistic regression analysis using data from these patients identified three independent predictors of multivessel disease: initial thallium-201 defects, ST depression, and age. A model was developed to predict multivessel disease based on these variables. As might be expected, the risk of multivessel disease predicted by the model was similar to that actually observed in the University of Virginia population. More importantly, however, the model was accurate in predicting the occurrence of multivessel disease in the unrelated population studied at the Massachusetts General Hospital. It is, therefore, concluded that (1) nonimaging variables (age and exercise-induced ST depression) add independent information to thallium-201 imaging data in the detection of multivessel disease; and (2) a model has been developed based on the exercise thallium-201 stress test that can accurately predict the probability of multivessel disease in other populations

  4. A Preoperative Risk Model for Postoperative Pneumonia After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Raymond J; Liang, Qixing; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoting; Rogers, Mary A M; Theurer, Patricia F; Fishstrom, Astrid B; Harrington, Steven D; DeLucia, Alphonse; Paone, Gaetano; Patel, Himanshu J; Prager, Richard L; Likosky, Donald S

    2016-10-01

    Postoperative pneumonia is the most prevalent of all hospital-acquired infections after isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Accurate prediction of a patient's risk of this morbid complication is hindered by its low relative incidence. In an effort to support clinical decision making and quality improvement, we developed a preoperative prediction model for postoperative pneumonia after CABG. We undertook an observational study of 16,084 patients undergoing CABG between the third quarter of 2011 and the second quarter of 2014 across 33 institutions participating in the Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Quality Collaborative. Variables related to patient demographics, medical history, admission status, comorbid disease, cardiac anatomy, and the institution performing the procedure were investigated. Logistic regression through forward stepwise selection (p risk prediction model for estimating the occurrence of pneumonia. Traditional methods were used to assess the model's performance. Postoperative pneumonia occurred in 3.30% of patients. Multivariable analysis identified 17 preoperative factors, including demographics, laboratory values, comorbid disease, pulmonary and cardiac function, and operative status. The final model significantly predicted the occurrence of pneumonia, and performed well (C-statistic: 0.74). These findings were confirmed through sensitivity analyses by center and clinically important subgroups. We identified 17 readily obtainable preoperative variables associated with postoperative pneumonia. This model may be used to provide individualized risk estimation and to identify opportunities to reduce a patient's preoperative risk of pneumonia through prehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Establishment of rat model with diabetes mellitus and concomitant periodontitis and the carotid artery lesions in the model rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X Y; Wang, C; Liu, X; Li, H; Gao, J H; Ge, X J

    2017-12-09

    Objectives: To establish SD rat model with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and concomitant chronic periodontitis (CP) and to evaluate the influence of periodontitis on the vascular lesions of type 2 diabetes rats. Methods: Totally 241 clean level SD rats were randomly divided into four groups, group A (normal control, NC, n= 27), group B (DM, n= 34), group C (CP, n= 90) and group D (DM+CP, n= 90). The rats of DM group were fed with high-fat and high-sugar diet for 8 to 10 weeks, and then were multiply injected with small dose streptozotocin under the condition of ice bath. Blood sugar levels after the injection were dynamically monitored at 72 h, 1 week, 2 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. The CP model was established by means of ligation. Bilateral maxillary first and second molars were selected and ligated using 0.2 mm orthodontic wires binding with 4-0 surgical suture soaked with Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) suspension. After a period of 14 weeks, all the rats were put to death. Maxillary samples were subjected to methylene blue staining to observe alveolar bone loss. Bilateral carotid artery specimens were collected. The left carotid artery specimens were used to detect the prevalence of Pg using quantitative real-time PCR. The right carotid artery specimens were used to observe pathological changes. Results: Blood sugar levels of rats in group B and D increased and changed sharply after Streptozotocin injection with in 1 week. Symptoms of 'more drink, more food and body weight loss' appeared. The fasting blood glucose (FBG) was more than 7.8 mmol/L and (or) the random blood glucose (RBG) was more than 17.8 mmol/L. Both FBG and RBG became stable after 2 to 3 weeks. Levels of HbA1C in group B and D ([7.32±0.45]%, [9.41±0.45]%) were significantly higher than that of group A ([4.02±0.45]%) ( Pdiabetes vascular lesions.

  6. Fractional Partial Differential Equation: Fractional Total Variation and Fractional Steepest Descent Approach-Based Multiscale Denoising Model for Texture Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fei Pu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional integer-order partial differential equation-based image denoising approaches often blur the edge and complex texture detail; thus, their denoising effects for texture image are not very good. To solve the problem, a fractional partial differential equation-based denoising model for texture image is proposed, which applies a novel mathematical method—fractional calculus to image processing from the view of system evolution. We know from previous studies that fractional-order calculus has some unique properties comparing to integer-order differential calculus that it can nonlinearly enhance complex texture detail during the digital image processing. The goal of the proposed model is to overcome the problems mentioned above by using the properties of fractional differential calculus. It extended traditional integer-order equation to a fractional order and proposed the fractional Green’s formula and the fractional Euler-Lagrange formula for two-dimensional image processing, and then a fractional partial differential equation based denoising model was proposed. The experimental results prove that the abilities of the proposed denoising model to preserve the high-frequency edge and complex texture information are obviously superior to those of traditional integral based algorithms, especially for texture detail rich images.

  7. A Novel and Freely Available Interactive 3d Model of the Internal Carotid Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera-Melé, Marc; Puigdellívol-Sánchez, Anna; Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Juanes-Méndez, Juan A; San-Román, Luis; de Notaris, Matteo; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2018-03-05

    We describe a new and freely available 3D interactive model of the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) and the skull base that also allows to display and compare its main segment classifications. High-resolution 3D human angiography (isometric voxel's size 0.36 mm) and Computed Tomography angiography images were exported to Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) format for processing in a 3D software platform and embedding in a 3D Portable Document Format (PDF) document that can be freely downloaded at http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/handle/2445/112442 and runs under Acrobat Reader on Mac and Windows computers and Windows 10 tablets. The 3D-PDF allows for visualisation and interaction through JavaScript-based functions (including zoom, rotation, selective visualization and transparentation of structures or a predefined sequence view of the main segment classifications if desired). The ICA and its main branches and loops, the Gasserian ganglion, the petrolingual ligament and the proximal and distal dural rings within the skull base environment (anterior and posterior clinoid processes, silla turcica, ethmoid and sphenoid bones, orbital fossae) may be visualized from different perspectives. This interactive 3D-PDF provides virtual views of the ICA and becomes an innovative tool to improve the understanding of the neuroanatomy of the ICA and surrounding structures.

  8. Use of 3D printer model to study vertebral artery anatomy and variations in developmental craniovertebral junction anomalies and as a preoperative tool-an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Sachin; Chopra, Sanjeev; Kataria, Rashim; Sinha, Virendra Deo

    2017-12-01

    Spinal instrumentation using rods and screws have become procedure of choice for posterior fixation. Vertebral artery anatomy is highly variable in this region posing challenges during surgery. Our study used 3D printer model to understand the anatomy and variations in vertebral artery in live patients thereby providing an accurate idea about vertebral artery injury risk in these patients preoperatively and to rehearse the whole procedure. Ten patients of developmental craniovertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies who were planned for operative intervention in the Department of Neurosurgery at SMS Hospital from February 2016 to December 2016 were analysed using a 3D printer model. Out of twenty vertebral arteries studied in ten patients, two were hypoplastic and out of these one could not be appreciated on 3D printer model. Out of remaining nineteen, thirteen arteries were found to lie outside the joint, three were in lateral third, one traversed the middle third of joint and one lied in medial third. In one patient, the vertebral artery was stretched and it traversed horizontally over the joint. Out of ten patients studied, nine were having occipitalised atlas and so entry of these vertebral arteries into cranium were classified as given by Wang et al. into four types. By our study, 3D printer model was extremely helpful in analyzing joints and vertebral artery preoperatively and making the surgeon acquainted about the placement and trajectory of the screws accordingly. In our opinion, these models should be included as a basic investigation tool in these patients.

  9. Effect of hepatic artery embolization on liver hypertrophy response in a rabbit liver VX2 tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lienden, Krijn P; Hoekstra, Lisette T; van Trigt, Jessica D; Roelofs, Joris J; van Delden, Otto M; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-12-01

    Portal vein embolization not only induces hypertrophy of the non-embolized liver, but also enhances tumor growth. The latter could be prevented by embolizing the hepatic arteries supplying the tumor-bearing liver segments. This study aimed to determine the effects of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on tumor volume and liver regeneration in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Twenty-three rabbits underwent subcapsular tumor implantation with a VX2 tumor. Two weeks after implantation, 18 rabbits were used for TAE experiments, 5 were for sham controls. Tumor response and liver regeneration response of the embolized cranial and non-embolized caudal liver lobes were assessed by CT volumetry, liver to body weight index, and the amount of proliferating hepatocytes. All super-selective arterial tumor embolization procedures were performed successfully. Despite embolization, the tumor volume increased after an initial steady state. The tumor volume after embolization was smaller than that of the sham group, but this difference was not significant. Massive necrosis of the tumor, however, was seen after embolization, without damage of the surrounding liver parenchyma. There was a significant atrophy response of the tumor bearing cranial lobe after super-selective arterial embolization of the tumor with a concomitant hypertrophy response of the non-embolized, caudal lobe. This regeneration response was confirmed histologically by a significantly higher number of proliferating hepatocytes on the Ki-67 stained slides. Super-selective, bland arterial coil embolization causes massive necrosis of the tumor, despite increase of volume on CT scan. Atrophy of the tumor bearing liver lobe is seen after arterial embolization of the tumor with a concomitant hypertrophy response of the non-embolized lobe, despite absence of histological damage of the tumor-surrounding liver parenchyma.

  10. Arterial morphology responds differently to Captopril then N-acetylcysteine in a monocrotaline rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthen, Robert; Wu, Qingping; Baumgardt, Shelley; Kohlhepp, Laura; Shingrani, Rahul; Krenz, Gary

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an incurable condition inevitably resulting in death because of increased right heart workload and eventual failure. PH causes pulmonary vascular remodeling, including muscularization of the arteries, and a reduction in the typically large vascular compliance of the pulmonary circulation. We used a rat model of monocrotaline (MCT) induced PH to evaluated and compared Captopril (an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor with antioxidant capacity) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a mucolytic with a large antioxidant capacity) as possible treatments. Twenty-eight days after MCT injection, the rats were sacrificed and heart, blood, and lungs were studied to measure indices such as right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), hematocrit, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), vessel morphology and biomechanics. We implemented microfocal X-ray computed tomography to image the pulmonary arterial tree at intravascular pressures of 30, 21, 12, and 6 mmHg and then used automated vessel detection and measurement algorithms to perform morphological analysis and estimate the distensibility of the arterial tree. The vessel detection and measurement algorithms quickly and effectively mapped and measured the vascular trees at each intravascular pressure. Monocrotaline treatment, and the ensuing PH, resulted in a significantly decreased arterial distensibility, increased PVR, and tended to decrease the length of the main pulmonary trunk. In rats with PH induced by monocrotaline, Captopril treatment significantly increased arterial distensibility and decrease PVR. NAC treatment did not result in an improvement, it did not significantly increase distensibility and resulted in further increase in PVR. Interestingly, NAC tended to increase peripheral vascular density. The results suggest that arterial distensibility may be more important than distal collateral pathways in maintaining PVR at normally low values.

  11. Diminished neurogenic femoral artery vasoconstrictor response in a Zucker obese rat model: differential regulation of NOS and COX derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Martínez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Peripheral arterial disease is one of the macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study addresses femoral artery regulation in a prediabetic model of obese Zucker rats (OZR by examining cross-talk between endothelial and neural factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial preparations from lean (LZR and OZR were subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS on basal tone. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX isoform expression patterns were determined by immunohistochemical labelling and Western blotting. Results indicate significantly reduced noradrenergic contractions in preparations from OZR compared with those of LZR. Functional inhibition of endothelial NOS (eNOS indicated a predominant role of this isoform in LZR and its modified activity in OZR. Neural (nNOS and inducible NOS (iNOS were activated and their expression was higher in femoral arteries from OZR. Neurotransmission modulated by large-conductance Ca2+-activated (BKCa or voltage-dependent (KV K+ channels did not seem compromised in the obese animals. Endothelial COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed in LZR and an additional adventitial location of COX-2 was also observed in OZR, explaining the higher COX-2 protein levels detected in this group. Prostanoids derived from both isoforms helped maintain vasoconstriction in LZR while in OZR only COX-2 was active. Superoxide anion inhibition reduced contractions in endothelium-intact arteries from OZR. CONCLUSIONS: Endothelial dysfunction led to reduced neurogenic vasoconstriction in femoral arteries from OZR. In a setting of obesity, NO-dependent nNOS and iNOS dilation activity could be an alternative mechanism to offset COX-2- and reactive oxygen species-mediated vasoconstriction, along with impaired endothelial NO relaxation.

  12. Imaging and modeling of acute pressure-induced changes of collagen and elastin microarchitectures in pig and human resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas M; Spronck, Bart; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Thorsted, Bjarne; Rosenstand, Kristoffer; Nissen, Inger; Hansen, Ulla M; Brewer, Jonathan R; Bagatolli, Luis A; Rasmussen, Lars M; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon; Reesink, Koen D; De Mey, Jo G R

    2017-07-01

    The impact of disease-related changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries largely remains to be established. Resistance arteries from both pig and human parietal pericardium (PRA) display a different ECM microarchitecture compared with frequently used rodent mesenteric arteries. We hypothesized that the biaxial mechanics of PRA mirror pressure-induced changes in the ECM microarchitecture. This was tested using isolated pig PRA as a model system, integrating vital imaging, pressure myography, and mathematical modeling. Collagenase and elastase digestions were applied to evaluate the load-bearing roles of collagen and elastin, respectively. The incremental elastic modulus linearly related to the straightness of adventitial collagen fibers circumferentially and longitudinally (both R 2 ≥ 0.99), whereas there was a nonlinear relationship to the internal elastic lamina elastin fiber branching angles. Mathematical modeling suggested a collagen recruitment strain (means ± SE) of 1.1 ± 0.2 circumferentially and 0.20 ± 0.01 longitudinally, corresponding to a pressure of ~40 mmHg, a finding supported by the vital imaging. The integrated method was tested on human PRA to confirm its validity. These showed limited circumferential distensibility and elongation and a collagen recruitment strain of 0.8 ± 0.1 circumferentially and 0.06 ± 0.02 longitudinally, reached at a distending pressure below 20 mmHg. This was confirmed by vital imaging showing negligible microarchitectural changes of elastin and collagen upon pressurization. In conclusion, we show here, for the first time in resistance arteries, a quantitative relationship between pressure-induced changes in the extracellular matrix and the arterial wall mechanics. The strength of the integrated methods invites for future detailed studies of microvascular pathologies. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to quantitatively relate pressure

  13. A Computational Model to Assess Poststenting Wall Stresses Dependence on Plaque Structure and Stenosis Severity in Coronary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuned Hajiali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study presents computational models to investigate the poststenting hemodynamic stresses and internal stresses over/within the diseased walls of coronary arteries which are in different states of atherosclerotic plaque. The finite element method is applied to build the axisymmetric models which include the plaque, arterial wall, and stent struts. The study takes into account the mechanical effects of the opening pressure and its association with the plaque severity and the morphology. The wall shear stresses and the von Mises stresses within the stented coronary arteries show their strong dependence on the plaque structure, particularly the fibrous cap thickness. Higher stresses occur in severely stenosed coronaries with a thinner fibrous cap. Large stress concentrations around the stent struts cause injury or damage to the vessel wall which is linked to the mechanism of restenosis. The in-stent restenosis rate is also highly dependent on the opening pressure, to the extent that stenosed artery is expanded, and geometry of the stent struts. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that the restenosis is to be viewed as a consequence of biomechanical design of a stent repeating unit, the opening pressure, and the severity and morphology of the plaque.

  14. Micro-CT image-derived metrics quantify arterial wall distensibility reduction in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2000-04-01

    We developed methods to quantify arterial structural and mechanical properties in excised rat lungs and applied them to investigate the distensibility decrease accompanying chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Lungs of control and hypertensive (three weeks 11% O2) animals were excised and a contrast agent introduced before micro-CT imaging with a special purpose scanner. For each lung, four 3D image data sets were obtained, each at a different intra-arterial contrast agent pressure. Vessel segment diameters and lengths were measured at all levels in the arterial tree hierarchy, and these data used to generate features sensitive to distensibility changes. Results indicate that measurements obtained from 3D micro-CT images can be used to quantify vessel biomechanical properties in this rat model of pulmonary hypertension and that distensibility is reduced by exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mechanical properties can be assessed in a localized fashion and quantified in a spatially-resolved way or as a single parameter describing the tree as a whole. Micro-CT is a nondestructive way to rapidly assess structural and mechanical properties of arteries in small animal organs maintained in a physiological state. Quantitative features measured by this method may provide valuable insights into the mechanisms causing the elevated pressures in pulmonary hypertension of differing etiologies and should become increasingly valuable tools in the study of complex phenotypes in small-animal models of important diseases such as hypertension.

  15. Hemodynamic effects of left pulmonary artery stenosis after superior cavopulmonary connection: a patient-specific multiscale modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavazzi, Daniele E; Kung, Ethan O; Marsden, Alison L; Baker, Catriona; Pennati, Giancarlo; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Hlavacek, Anthony; Dorfman, Adam L

    2015-03-01

    Currently, no quantitative guidelines have been established for treatment of left pulmonary artery (LPA) stenosis. This study aims to quantify the effects of LPA stenosis on postoperative hemodynamics for single-ventricle patients undergoing stage II superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) surgery, using a multiscale computational approach. Image data from 6 patients were segmented to produce 3-dimensional models of the pulmonary arteries before stage II surgery. Pressure and flow measurements were used to tune a 0-dimensional model of the entire circulation. Postoperative geometries were generated through stage II virtual surgery; varying degrees of LPA stenosis were applied using mesh morphing and hemodynamics assessed through coupled 0-3-dimensional simulations. To relate metrics of stenosis to clinical classifications, pediatric cardiologists and surgeons ranked the degrees of stenosis in the models. The effects of LPA stenosis were assessed based on left-to-right pulmonary artery flow split ratios, mean pressure drop across the stenosis, cardiac pressure-volume loops, and other clinically relevant parameters. Stenosis of >65% of the vessel diameter was required to produce a right pulmonary artery:LPA flow split 3.0 mm Hg, defined as clinically significant changes. The effects of SCPC hemodynamics and physiology were minor and may not justify the increased complexity of adding LPA arterioplasty to the SCPC operation. However, in the longer term, pulmonary augmentation may affect outcomes of the Fontan completion surgery, as pulmonary artery distortion is a risk factor that may influence stage III physiology. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bayesian quantile regression-based partially linear mixed-effects joint models for longitudinal data with multiple features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanze; Huang, Yangxin; Wang, Wei; Chen, Henian; Langland-Orban, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    In longitudinal AIDS studies, it is of interest to investigate the relationship between HIV viral load and CD4 cell counts, as well as the complicated time effect. Most of common models to analyze such complex longitudinal data are based on mean-regression, which fails to provide efficient estimates due to outliers and/or heavy tails. Quantile regression-based partially linear mixed-effects models, a special case of semiparametric models enjoying benefits of both parametric and nonparametric models, have the flexibility to monitor the viral dynamics nonparametrically and detect the varying CD4 effects parametrically at different quantiles of viral load. Meanwhile, it is critical to consider various data features of repeated measurements, including left-censoring due to a limit of detection, covariate measurement error, and asymmetric distribution. In this research, we first establish a Bayesian joint models that accounts for all these data features simultaneously in the framework of quantile regression-based partially linear mixed-effects models. The proposed models are applied to analyze the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) data. Simulation studies are also conducted to assess the performance of the proposed methods under different scenarios.

  17. Predictive Model for Blood Product Use in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, H.; Ansari, H.Z.; Ashfaq, A.; Rawasia, W.F.; Bano, G.; Hashmi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To build a clinical predictive model to determine the need for transfusing blood and its products in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures in South East Asian population. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2006 to October 2014. Methodology: Information on pre-, intra- and postoperative variables were collected for all adult patients who underwent on-pump CABG. The patients grouped into those who received blood and its components, and those who did not. A univariate as well as multivariate logistic model was built to determine the predictors of transfusion. Result: A total of 3,550 patients underwent CABG and males were dominant in both groups (75 vs. 93 percent). The transfusion rate was 56.4 percent (n=2001). Age (adjusted OR 1.03, p < 0.001), obesity (1.50, p=0.001), tobacco use (1.29, p=0.001), and male gender (4.51, p < 0.001) found to be a stronger predictor. Among preoperative comorbidities, diabetes (1.20, p=0.016), myocardial infarction (1.22, p=0.009), preoperative creatinine (1.12, p=0.033), and left main vessel disease of > 50 percent (1.49, p < 0.001) were independently associated with the outcome. Compared to elective cases, transfusion rates were high in urgent and emergent cases (OR: 1.93 and 3.36 respectively, p < 0.001 for both). Conclusion: Age, male gender, obesity, tobacco use, diabetes, myocardial infarction, high creatinine, urgent and emergent cases were independent predictors of transfusion in CABG procedure. This model can be utilized for preoperative risk stratification of patients and their management to improve the outcomes. (author)

  18. Hyperglycemia decreases preoxiredoxin-2 expression in a middle cerebral artery occlusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and is also associated with worsened outcomes following a stroke. Peroxiredoxin-2 exerts potent neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress. In the present study, we identified altered peroxiredoxin-2 expression in an ischemic stroke model under hyperglycemic conditions. Adult male rats were administrated streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection to induce diabetes. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was induced surgically 4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 hours after MCAO. Peroxiredoxin-2 expression was evaluated in the cerebral cortex of MCAO-operated animals using a proteomics approach, and was found to be decreased. In addition, the reduction in peroxiredoxin-2 levels was more severe in cerebral ischemia with diabetes compared to animals without diabetes. Reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed the significantly reduced peroxiredoxin-2 expression in MCAO-operated animals under hyperglycemic conditions. It is an accepted fact that peroxiredoxin-2 has antioxidative activity against ischemic injury. Thus, the findings of this study suggest that a more severe reduction in peroxiredoxin-2 under hyperglycemic conditions leads to worsened brain damage during cerebral ischemia with diabetes.

  19. Effect of cigarette smoking on arterial stiffness re-interpreted using a structurally-based model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Humphrey, Jay D.; Lönn, Lars

    Cigarette smoking constitutes a major risk factor for diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Many physiological and pathophysiological parameters affect arterial stiffness. While underlying mechanisms remain unclear, smoking increases arterial stiffness, which contributes to many disease processes....... The goal of this work was to use a structurally motivated nonlinear constitutive relation to quantify increased arterial stiffness based on available data. Specifically, we used a “four-fiber family model” that includes dominant effects of axial, circumferential, and symmetric-diagonal families of collagen...... fibers embedded within an isotropic, elastin-dominated matrix. Published data, i.e. biaxial responses during pressure-diameter and axial force-length tests on pulmonary arteries from rats subjected to 2 or 3 months of smoking, were used to determine the associated best-fit values of the material...

  20. Unipolar Depression and the Progression of Coronary Artery Disease : Toward an Integrative Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Johan; de Jonge, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite extensive research on the relationship between depression and coronary artery disease (CAD) after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), causal interpretations are still difficult. This uncertainty has led to much confusion regarding screening and treatment for depression in CAD

  1. Aspirin, but not clopidogrel, reduces collateral conductance in a rabbit model of femoral artery occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, Imo E.; Grundmann, Sebastian; Schirmer, Stephan; van Royen, Niels; Meder, Benjamin; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J.; Buschmann, Ivo R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to test the potential of aspirin and clopidogrel to influence collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis). BACKGROUND Aspirin and clopidogrel are antiplatelet agents commonly used in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular disease. Both inhibit platelet

  2. Development of a modified model of spinal cord ischemia injury by selective ligation of lumbar arteries in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W; Wen, J; Huang, Y-C; Yu, B-S

    2017-11-01

    Experimental study. The aim of this study is to develop a modified model of spinal cord ischemia in rabbits. Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Spine Surgery, Shenzhen, China. In total, 20 New Zealand rabbits were divided into the following four groups according to the level of ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries: (1) group A, sham group, no ligation, n=5; (2) group B, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at three levels (L2-L4, n=5); (3) group C, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at four levels (L2-L5, n=5); and (4) group D, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at five levels (L1-L5, n=5). The latency of motor-evoked potentials was measured intraoperatively and the modified Tarlov grades were scored, followed by a histological observation of spinal cord, on the seventh day after surgery. All 10 rabbits in Group A and Group B were electrophysiologically, neurologically and histologically normal. In Group C, moderate spinal cord ischemia injury was found in three of five rabbits: they had prolonged latency of motor-evoked potentials and neuronal karyopyknosis in the anterior horn of spinal cord, and the average Tarlov score was 4.2±0.8. In Group D, severe spinal cord ischemia injury was recorded in all the five rabbits: the latency of motor-evoked potential prolonged in one rabbit, whereas the waveform disappeared in four rabbits; loss of neurons and vacuolation of gray matter were seen in spinal cord sections, and the average Tarlov score was 0.6±0.9. Selective ligation of lumbar arteries was a modified method to induce feasible and reproducible model of spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

  3. Modeling the absorbed dose to the common carotid arteries following radioiodine treatment of benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Jensen, Lars Thorbjorn; Hedemann-Jensen, Per; Sogaard-Hansen, Jens; Nygaard, Birte

    2013-01-01

    External fractionated radiotherapy of cancer increases the risk of cardio- and cerebrovascular events, but less attention has been paid to the potential side effects on the arteries following internal radiotherapy with radioactive iodine (RAI), i.e. 131-iodine. About 279 per million citizens in the western countries are treated each year with RAI for benign thyroid disorders (about 140,000 a year in the EU), stressing that it is of clinical importance to be aware of even rare radiation-induced side effects. In order to induce or accelerate atherosclerosis, the dose to the carotid arteries has to exceed 2 Gy which is the known lower limit of ionizing radiation to affect the endothelial cells and thereby to induce atherosclerosis. To estimate the radiation dose to the carotid arteries following RAI therapy of benign thyroid disorders. Assuming that the lobes of the thyroid gland are ellipsoid, that the carotid artery runs through a part of the lobes, that there is a homogeneous distribution of RAI in the lobes, and that the 24 h RAI uptake in the thyroid is 35% of the 131 I orally administrated, we used integrated modules for bioassay analysis and Monte Carlo simulations to calculate the dose in Gy/GBq of administrated RAI. The average radiation dose along the arteries is 4-55 Gy/GBq of the 131 I orally administrated with a maximum dose of approximately 25-85 Gy/GBq. The maximum absorbed dose rate to the artery is 4.2 Gy/day per GBq 131 I orally administrated. The calculated radiation dose to the carotid arteries after RAI therapy of benign thyroid disorder clearly exceeds the 2 Gy known to affect the endothelial cells and properly induce atherosclerosis. This simulation indicates a relation between the deposited dose in the arteries following RAI treatment and an increased risk of atherosclerosis and subsequent cerebrovascular events such as stroke. (author)

  4. Efficient Semiparametric Marginal Estimation for the Partially Linear Additive Model for Longitudinal/Clustered Data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, Raymond

    2009-04-23

    We consider the efficient estimation of a regression parameter in a partially linear additive nonparametric regression model from repeated measures data when the covariates are multivariate. To date, while there is some literature in the scalar covariate case, the problem has not been addressed in the multivariate additive model case. Ours represents a first contribution in this direction. As part of this work, we first describe the behavior of nonparametric estimators for additive models with repeated measures when the underlying model is not additive. These results are critical when one considers variants of the basic additive model. We apply them to the partially linear additive repeated-measures model, deriving an explicit consistent estimator of the parametric component; if the errors are in addition Gaussian, the estimator is semiparametric efficient. We also apply our basic methods to a unique testing problem that arises in genetic epidemiology; in combination with a projection argument we develop an efficient and easily computed testing scheme. Simulations and an empirical example from nutritional epidemiology illustrate our methods.

  5. Membrane potential and Ca2+ concentration dependence on pressure and vasoactive agents in arterial smooth muscle: A model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Arthur

    2015-07-01

    Arterial smooth muscle (SM) cells respond autonomously to changes in intravascular pressure, adjusting tension to maintain vessel diameter. The values of membrane potential (Vm) and sarcoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration (Ca(in)) within minutes of a change in pressure are the results of two opposing pathways, both of which use Ca(2+) as a signal. This works because the two Ca(2+)-signaling pathways are confined to distinct microdomains in which the Ca(2+) concentrations needed to activate key channels are transiently higher than Ca(in). A mathematical model of an isolated arterial SM cell is presented that incorporates the two types of microdomains. The first type consists of junctions between cisternae of the peripheral sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), containing ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and the sarcolemma, containing voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These junctional microdomains promote hyperpolarization, reduced Ca(in), and relaxation. The second type is postulated to form around stretch-activated nonspecific cation channels and neighboring Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, and promotes the opposite (depolarization, increased Ca(in), and contraction). The model includes three additional compartments: the sarcoplasm, the central SR lumen, and the peripheral SR lumen. It incorporates 37 protein components. In addition to pressure, the model accommodates inputs of α- and β-adrenergic agonists, ATP, 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid, and nitric oxide (NO). The parameters of the equations were adjusted to obtain a close fit to reported Vm and Ca(in) as functions of pressure, which have been determined in cerebral arteries. The simulations were insensitive to ± 10% changes in most of the parameters. The model also simulated the effects of inhibiting RyR, BK, or voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels on Vm and Ca(in). Deletion of BK β1 subunits is known to increase arterial-SM tension. In the model, deletion of β1 raised Ca(in) at all pressures, and these

  6. Fracture behavior of inlay and onlay fixed partial dentures - An in-vitro experimental and XFEM modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Thompson, Mark; Field, Clarice; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael V

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the "sensitivity" of the fracture load and initiation site to loading position on the central occlusal surface of a pontic tooth for both all-ceramic inlay retained and onlay supported partial denture systems. Three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) inlay retained and onlay supported partial denture models were established for simulating crack initiation and propagation by using the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM). The models were subjected to a mastication force up to 500N on the central fossa of the pontic. The loading position was varied to investigate its influence on fracture load and crack path. Small perturbation of the loading position caused the fracture load and crack pattern to vary considerably. For the inlay fixed partial dentures (FPDs), the fracture origins changed from the bucco-gingival aspect of the molar embrasure to the premolar embrasure when the indenter force location is slightly shifted from the mesial to distal side. In contrast, for onlay FPDs, cracking initiated from bucco-gingival aspect of the premolar embrasure when the indenter is slightly shifted to the buccal side and from molar embrasure when the indenter is shifted to the lingual side. The fracture load and cracking path were found to be very sensitive to loading position in the all-ceramic inlay and onlay FPDs. The study provides a basis for improved understanding on the role of localized contact loading of the cusp surface in all-ceramic FPDs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Partial Discharge Detection Using Low Cost RTL-SDR Model for Wideband Spectrum Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, H.; Lazaridis, Pavlos; Upton, D.

    2016-01-01

    Partial discharge (PD) is one of the predominant factors to be controlled to ensure reliability and undisrupted functions of power generators, motors, Gas Insulated Switchgear (GIS) and grid connected power distribution equipment, especially in the future smart grid. The emergence of wireless...... technology has provided numerous opportunities to optimise remote monitoring and control facilities that can play a significant role in ensuring swift control and restoration of HV plant equipment. In order to monitor PD, several approaches have been employed, however, the existing schemes do not provide...... detection that was later replaced by an RTL-SDR device. The proposed schemes exhibit promising results for spectral detection within the VHF and UHF band....

  8. Nonlinear Parasitic Capacitance Modelling of High Voltage Power MOSFETs in Partial SOI Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Lin; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2016-01-01

    : off-state, sub-threshold region, and on-state in the linear region. A high voltage power MOSFET is designed in a partial Silicon on Insulator (SOI) process, with the bulk as a separate terminal. 3D plots and contour plots of the capacitances versus bias voltages for the transistor summarize......State-of-the-art power converter topologies such as resonant converters are either designed with or affected by the parasitic capacitances of the power switches. However, the power switches are conventionally characterized in terms of switching time and/or gate charge with little insight...

  9. A partial backlogging inventory model for deteriorating items with time-varying demand and holding cost: An interval number approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Dutta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a differential equation inventory model that incorporates partial backlogging and deterioration. Holding cost and demand rate are time dependent. Shortages are allowed and assumed to be partially backlogged. Two versions are presented, the first one with deterministic values of the parameters and the second one taking into the account the interval uncertainty of the parameters. In the crisp case, Taylor’s series expansion is used, and graphically shown that the cost function is convex. While, in the case of intervals, the interval arithmetic is used and then the problem is transformed into a multi-objective non-linear optimization problem and an interval objective function. To solve this problem, the weighted-sum method is used. The proposed procedure is validated with the help of a numerical example. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters has also been carried out.

  10. Three-dimensional modelling of the human carotid artery using the lattice Boltzmann method: II. Shear analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, J [Cardiovascular Research Group, Physics, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351 (Australia); Buick, J M [Mechanical and Design Engineering, Anglesea Building, Anglesea Road, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3DJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-21

    Near-wall shear is known to be important in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper, the shear field in a three-dimensional model of the human carotid artery is presented. The simulations are performed using the lattice Boltzmann model and are presented at six times of interest during a physiologically accurate velocity waveform. The near-wall shear rate and von Mises effective shear are also examined. Regions of low near-wall shear rates are observed near the outer wall of the bifurcation and in the lower regions of the external carotid artery. These are regions where low near-wall velocity and circulatory flows have been observed and are regions that are typically prone to atherosclerosis.

  11. Three-dimensional modelling of the human carotid artery using the lattice Boltzmann method: II. Shear analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J; Buick, J M

    2008-01-01

    Near-wall shear is known to be important in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper, the shear field in a three-dimensional model of the human carotid artery is presented. The simulations are performed using the lattice Boltzmann model and are presented at six times of interest during a physiologically accurate velocity waveform. The near-wall shear rate and von Mises effective shear are also examined. Regions of low near-wall shear rates are observed near the outer wall of the bifurcation and in the lower regions of the external carotid artery. These are regions where low near-wall velocity and circulatory flows have been observed and are regions that are typically prone to atherosclerosis.

  12. Five Factor Model personality traits and all-cause mortality in the Edinburgh Artery Study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michelle D; Whiteman, Martha C; Fowkes, Gerald R; Lee, Amanda J; Allerhand, Michael; Deary, Ian J

    2009-07-01

    To examine whether personality traits are related to all-cause mortality in a general adult population in Scotland. The Edinburgh Artery Study began in 1987 to 1988 by recruiting 1592 men and women aged 55 to 74 years to be followed-up for atherosclerotic diseases. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) was completed by 1035 surviving participants in 1995 to 1996. Deaths from all causes were examined in relation to personality traits and social and physical risk factors for mortality. During follow-up, 242 (37.1%) men and 165 (24.6%) women died. For the whole sample, there was a 28% lower rate of all-cause mortality for each 1 SD increase in NEO-FFI openness (95% CI, 0.61-0.84) and a 18% lower rate of all-cause mortality for each 1 SD increase in NEO-FFI conscientiousness (95% CI, 0.70-0.97). In men, the risk of all-cause mortality was 0.63 (95% CI, 0.5-10.78) for a 1 SD increase in openness and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.61-0.91) for a 1 SD increase in conscientiousness. In women, none of the personality domains were significantly associated with all-cause mortality. Well fitting structural equation models in men (n = 652) showed that the relationships between conscientiousness and openness and all-cause mortality were not substantially explained by smoking, or other variables in the models. High conscientiousness and openness may be protective against all-cause mortality in men. Further investigations are needed on the mechanisms of these associations, and the influence of personality traits on specific causes of death.

  13. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  14. Online Semiparametric Identification of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using the Wavelet-Based Partially Linear Battery Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiping Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Battery model identification is very important for reliable battery management as well as for battery system design process. The common problem in identifying battery models is how to determine the most appropriate mathematical model structure and parameterized coefficients based on the measured terminal voltage and current. This paper proposes a novel semiparametric approach using the wavelet-based partially linear battery model (PLBM and a recursive penalized wavelet estimator for online battery model identification. Three main contributions are presented. First, the semiparametric PLBM is proposed to simulate the battery dynamics. Compared with conventional electrical models of a battery, the proposed PLBM is equipped with a semiparametric partially linear structure, which includes a parametric part (involving the linear equivalent circuit parameters and a nonparametric part [involving the open-circuit voltage (OCV]. Thus, even with little prior knowledge about the OCV, the PLBM can be identified using a semiparametric identification framework. Second, we model the nonparametric part of the PLBM using the truncated wavelet multiresolution analysis (MRA expansion, which leads to a parsimonious model structure that is highly desirable for model identification; using this model, the PLBM could be represented in a linear-in-parameter manner. Finally, to exploit the sparsity of the wavelet MRA representation and allow for online implementation, a penalized wavelet estimator that uses a modified online cyclic coordinate descent algorithm is proposed to identify the PLBM in a recursive fashion. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed PLBM with the corresponding identification algorithm can accurately simulate the dynamic behavior of a lithium-ion battery in the Federal Urban Driving Schedule tests.

  15. Partial Gene Cloning and Enzyme Structure Modeling of Exolevanase Fragment from Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, M.; Natalia, D.; Syukur, S.; Andriani, N.; Jamsari, J.

    2018-04-01

    Inulin hydrolysis thermophilic and thermotolerant bacteria are potential sources of inulin hydrolysis enzymes. Partial gene that encodes inulin hydrolysis enzymes had been isolated from Bacillus subtilis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method with the DPE.slFandDPE.eR degenerative primers. The partial gene was cloned into pGEM-T Easy vector with E. coli as host cells and analyzed using BLASTx, CrustalW2, and Phyre2 programs. Size of thepartial gene had been found539 bp that encoded 179aminoacid residues of protein fragment. The sequences of protein fragment was more similar to exolevanase than exoinulinase. The protein fragment had conserved motif FSGS, and specific hits GH32 β-fructosidase. It had three residues of active site and five residues of substrate binding. The active site on the protein fragment were D (1-WLNDP-5), D (125-FRDPK-129) and E (177-WEC-179). Substrate binding on the protein fragment were ND (1-WLNDP-5), Q (18-FYQY-21), FS (60-FSGS-63) RD (125-FRDPK-129) and E (177-WEC-179).

  16. Partial priapism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyerup, Peter; Dahl, Claus; Azawi, Nessn Htum

    2014-01-01

    Partial priapism, also called partial segmental thrombosis of the corpus cavernosum, is a rare urological condition. Factors such as bicycle riding, drug usage, penile trauma and haematological diseases have been associated with the condition. Medical treatment with low molecular weight heparin (...... (LMWH) or acetylsalicylic acid is first choice treatment, and surgery is preserved for patients unresponsive to analgesics. In this report we describe the case of a 70-year-old man with partial priapism after blood transfusions treated successfully with LMWH....

  17. Diagnosis Of The Risk For Carotid Artery Stenos Based On Thermal Model In Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Valipoori Goodarzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and a common cause of hospitalization in the United States of America and is also an important factor for Inability of patients and carotid stenos is one of the most important factors in creating it. Now, Imaging studies include: Angiography, MRI, CT scan and Doppler ultrasonography , are used to detect carotid artery stenos that is one of the most important causes of ischemic stroke. However, each method has unique advantages and disadvantages, that many of them will have a compromise between performance and accuracy versus easy usage and cost considerations. In contrast, in this paper, thermography is used as a non-invasive and cost effective to detect carotid artery Stenos and thus the risk of stroke. Materials and methods: This study is done on a series of thermal images obtained from the Clinical Center in California. In this imaging, the automatic detection of carotid artery stenos and thus Risk for stroke was done, based on: (1 the difference of average temperature between the right and left carotid arteries in the neck (2 The presence or absence of internal and external carotid arteries. Results: In this study, with the survey conducted by a specialist brain of patients had been previously, the accuracy of this work is confirmed. the techniques and points that are Experimental and  scientifically based  and obtained in this study, can help to doctors for Early detection of Artery disease, based on analysis of thermal images . Conclusion: The method presented in this paper is considered as a non-invasive and cost-effective method that automatically operates to detect the carotid arteries and prevent the Risk for stroke.

  18. Evolution of the continental upper mantle : numerical modelling of thermo-chemical convection including partial melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smet, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis elaborates on the evolution of the continental upper mantle based on numerical modelling results. The descriptive and explanatory basis is formed by a numerical thermo-chemical convection model. The model evolution starts in the early Archaean about 4 billion years ago. The model follows

  19. Evolution of the continental upper mantle : numerical modelling of thermo-chemical convection including partial melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, J.H. de

    1999-01-01

    This thesis elaborates on the evolution of the continental upper mantle based on numerical modelling results. The descriptive and explanatory basis is formed by a numerical thermo-chemical convection model. The model evolution starts in the early Archaean about 4 billion years ago. The model

  20. A comparison of long-term functional outcome after 2 middle cerebral artery occlusion models in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roof, R L; Schielke, G P; Ren, X; Hall, E D

    2001-11-01

    Proven behavioral assessment strategies for testing potential therapeutic agents in rat stroke models are needed. Few studies include tasks that demand higher levels of sensorimotor and cognitive function. Because behavioral outcome and rate of recovery vary among ischemia models, there is a need to characterize and compare performance on specific tasks across models. To this end, sensorimotor and cognitive deficits were assessed during a 5-week period after either permanent proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) or permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion combined with a 90-minute occlusion of both common carotid arteries (dMCAO/tCCAO) in Sprague-Dawley rats. The EBST, hindlimb and forelimb placing, and cylinder tests were given at regular intervals postinjury to assess sensorimotor function. Cognitive function was assessed with a multitrial water navigation task. pMCAO, which caused both striatal and cortical damage, produced persistent sensorimotor and cognitive deficits. Limb placing responses and postural reflexes were impaired throughout the month of testing. A persistent bias for using the ipsilateral forelimb for wall movements in the cylinder test was observed as well as a bias for landing on the opposite forelimb. pMCAO rats were also impaired in the water navigation task. dMCAO/tCCAO, which caused only cortical damage, produced similar sensorimotor deficits, but these were greatly diminished by 2 weeks after injury. No impairment was found for water tank navigation. Correlations between forelimb placing (both models), water navigation performance (pMCAO model), and sensorimotor asymmetry (dMCAOtCCAO model) and infarct volume were observed. Based on the range of functions affected and stability of observed deficits, the pMCAO model appears to be preferable to the dMCAO/tCCAO model for use in assessing therapeutic agents for stroke.

  1. Modelling and validation of robust partial thawing of frozen convenience foods during distribution in the cold chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Jens; Zammit, Gine Ørnholt

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with two commercial distributors we have tested a new concept for distribution, where convenience products for the food service industry are prepared, frozen and packed in cardboard boxes, but distributed in the chill chain at +5°C instead of in the frost chain. This will lead...... with small blocks of a frozen model food (23 pct. Tylose® gel) and quipped with temperature loggers were distributed by trucks operating in the cold chain. In addition, controlled storage and temperature abuse experiments were conducted. To predict the product temperature–time relationship we developed a new...... thawing model for the slow thawing of food pieces packed in a box. The model is based on enthalpy balances under quasi-stationary conditions; a condition that is fulfilled in the practical distribution experiments. The experiments confirmed the model predictions that the products were still partially...

  2. Nonlinear Parasitic Capacitance Modelling of High Voltage Power MOSFETs in Partial SOI Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Lin; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art power converter topologies such as resonant converters are either designed with or affected by the parasitic capacitances of the power switches. However, the power switches are conventionally characterized in terms of switching time and/or gate charge with little insight into the......State-of-the-art power converter topologies such as resonant converters are either designed with or affected by the parasitic capacitances of the power switches. However, the power switches are conventionally characterized in terms of switching time and/or gate charge with little insight......: off-state, sub-threshold region, and on-state in the linear region. A high voltage power MOSFET is designed in a partial Silicon on Insulator (SOI) process, with the bulk as a separate terminal. 3D plots and contour plots of the capacitances versus bias voltages for the transistor summarize...

  3. ENTREPRENEURIAL ATTITUDE AND STUDENTS BUSINESS START-UP INTENTION: A PARTIAL LEAST SQUARE MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widayat Widayat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is designed to examine the role of the entrepreneurial spirit, education and in build­ing­ an attitude about working as an entrepreneur, and his influence on the intention to start a business, to the students. Data were collected using a questionnaire has been prepared and maintained the validity and relia­bility. Questionnaires given to the respondent students were selected as samples at several universi­ti­es in Malang, East Java, Indonesia. The collected data were analyzed by using Partial Least Square. The a­­na­­ly­sis showed entrepreneurial spirit and education contribute to the formation of entrepreneurial atti­tu­des. Attitudes are formed encourage entrepreneurship intentions to start a business significantly.

  4. Partial priapism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoyerup, Peter; Azawi, Nessn Htum

    2013-01-01

    With only 34 prior cases in world literature, partial priapism (PP), also called partial segmental thrombosis of the corpus cavernosum, is a rare urological condition. The aetiology and treatment of PP is still unclear, but bicycle riding, trauma, drug usage, sexual intercourse, haematological...

  5. Effects of silodosin, a selective alpha-1A adrenoceptor antagonist, on erectile function in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastaskın, Tugce; Kaya, Ecem; Ozakca, Isıl; Yilmaz, Didem; Bayatlı, Nur; Akdemir, Alp Ozgur; Gur, Serap

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effects of silodosin (selective α 1A -adrenoceptor antagonist) on erectile dysfunction (ED) in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 32) were divided into four groups: (i) sham-operated control; (ii) silodosin-treated (sham) control (0.1 mg/kg/day); (iii) partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO); and (iv) silodosin-treated with PBOO. PBOO was induced by ligation of the urethra for 6 weeks. In vivo, erectile responses were monitored by evaluating ratios of intracavernosal pressure (ICP)/mean arterial pressure (MAP). Organ-bath studies were performed on corpus cavernosum (CC) strips. Penises were assessed at baseline for protein expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK2) by Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and Masson trichrome staining were performed for analysis of nNOS protein levels and tissue alterations. The ratio of ICP/MAP was significantly decreased in obstructed rats (0.26 ± 0.043, P < 0.01) compared to sham-control rats (0.64 ± 0.10), which was restored by the treatment (0.59 ± 0.14, P < 0.01) compared with obstructed rats. Relaxation responses were significantly reduced in strips from the obstructed group. Silodosin restored nitrergic relaxant responses. nNOS expression in the obstructed group decreased, which was improved by treatment. The decreased smooth muscle/collagen ratio in the bladder obstructed group was reversed by the treatment. Silodosin improves erectile function in obstructed rats. Further clinical trials are needed to explore fully the potential benefits of silodosin in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)/lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in association with ED. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:597-603, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Within-breath arterial PO2 oscillations in an experimental model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E M; Viale, J P; Hamilton, R M; McPeak, H; Sutton, L; Hahn, C E

    2000-09-01

    Tidal ventilation causes within-breath oscillations in alveolar oxygen concentration, with an amplitude which depends on the prevailing ventilator settings. These alveolar oxygen oscillations are transmitted to arterial oxygen tension, PaO2, but with an amplitude which now depends upon the magnitude of venous admixture or true shunt, QS/QT. We investigated the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on the amplitude of the PaO2 oscillations, using an atelectasis model of shunt. Blood PaO2 was measured on-line with an intravascular PaO2 sensor, which had a 2-4 s response time (10-90%). The magnitude of the time-varying PaO2 oscillation was titrated against applied PEEP while tidal volume, respiratory rate and inspired oxygen concentration were kept constant. The amplitude of the PaO2 oscillation, delta PaO2, and the mean PaO2 value varied with the level of PEEP applied. At zero PEEP, both the amplitude and the mean were at their lowest values. As PEEP was increased to 1.5 kPa, both delta PaO2 and the mean PaO2 increased to a maximum. Thereafter, the mean PaO2 increased but delta PaO2 decreased. Clear oscillations of PaO2 were seen even at the lowest mean PaO2, 9.5 kPa. Conventional respiratory models of venous admixture predict that these PaO2 oscillations will be reduced by the steep part of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve if a constant pulmonary shunt exists throughout the whole respiratory cycle. The facts that the PaO2 oscillations occurred at all mean PaO2 values and that their amplitude increased with increasing PEEP suggest that QS/QT, in the atelectasis model, varies between end-expiration and end-inspiration, having a much lower value during inspiration than during expiration.

  7. General and Partial Equilibrium Modeling of Sectoral Policies to Address Climate Change in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizer, William; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Newell, Richard; Sanchirico, James; Toman, Michael

    2003-03-31

    This document provides technical documentation for work using detailed sectoral models to calibrate a general equilibrium analysis of market and non-market sectoral policies to address climate change. Results of this work can be found in the companion paper, "Modeling Costs of Economy-wide versus Sectoral Climate Policies Using Combined Aggregate-Sectoral Model".

  8. An analysis of the OI 1304 A dayglow using a Monte Carlo resonant scattering model with partial frequency redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R. R.; Lee, J.-S.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of resonance radiation under optically thick conditions is shown to be accurately described by a Monte Carlo model of the atomic oxygen 1304 A airglow triplet in which partial frequency redistribution, temperature gradients, pure absorption and multilevel scattering are accounted for. All features of the data can be explained by photoelectron impact excitation and the resonant scattering of sunlight, where the latter source dominates below 100 and above 500 km and is stronger at intermediate altitudes than previously thought. It is concluded that the OI 1304 A emission can be used in studies of excitation processes and atomic oxygen densities in planetary atmospheres.

  9. Anomalous Gonadal Arteries in Relation to the Renal Vein: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in ovarian arteries on the right side; 37 (64%) of testicular arteries and 3 (27%) of ovarian arteries on the left side. Partial occlusion or compression of the renal vein due to the arching gonadal arteries could result in varicocele and hypertension. The knowledge of such anomalous is useful in surgery and human anatomy

  10. Intermittent pneumatic leg compressions enhance muscle performance and blood flow in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseguini, Bruno T; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Newcomer, Sean C; Yang, Hsiao T; Terjung, Ronald; Laughlin, M H

    2012-05-01

    Despite the escalating prevalence in the aging population, few therapeutic options exist to treat patients with peripheral arterial disease. Application of intermittent pneumatic leg compressions (IPC) is regarded as a promising noninvasive approach to treat this condition, but the clinical efficacy, as well the mechanistic basis of action of this therapy, remain poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that 2 wk of daily application of IPC enhances exercise tolerance by improving blood flow and promoting angiogenesis in skeletal muscle in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to bilateral ligation of the femoral artery and randomly allocated to treatment or sham groups. Animals were anesthetized daily and exposed to 1-h sessions of bilateral IPC or sham treatment for 14-16 consecutive days. A third group of nonligated rats was also studied. Marked increases in treadmill exercise tolerance (∼33%, P < 0.05) and improved muscle performance in situ (∼10%, P < 0.05) were observed in IPC-treated animals. Compared with sham-treated controls, blood flow measured with isotope-labeled microspheres during in situ contractions tended to be higher in IPC-treated animals in muscles composed of predominantly fast-twitch white fibers, such as the plantaris (∼93%, P = 0.02). Capillary contacts per fiber and citrate synthase activity were not significantly altered by IPC treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that IPC improves exercise tolerance in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency in part by enhancing blood flow to collateral-dependent tissues.

  11. FUSED KERNEL-SPLINE SMOOTHING FOR REPEATEDLY MEASURED OUTCOMES IN A GENERALIZED PARTIALLY LINEAR MODEL WITH FUNCTIONAL SINGLE INDEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Ma, Yanyuan; Wang, Yuanjia

    We propose a generalized partially linear functional single index risk score model for repeatedly measured outcomes where the index itself is a function of time. We fuse the nonparametric kernel method and regression spline method, and modify the generalized estimating equation to facilitate estimation and inference. We use local smoothing kernel to estimate the unspecified coefficient functions of time, and use B-splines to estimate the unspecified function of the single index component. The covariance structure is taken into account via a working model, which provides valid estimation and inference procedure whether or not it captures the true covariance. The estimation method is applicable to both continuous and discrete outcomes. We derive large sample properties of the estimation procedure and show different convergence rate of each component of the model. The asymptotic properties when the kernel and regression spline methods are combined in a nested fashion has not been studied prior to this work even in the independent data case.

  12. An EOQ model of time quadratic and inventory dependent demand for deteriorated items with partially backlogged shortages under trade credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pushpinder; Mishra, Nitin Kumar; Singh, Vikramjeet; Saxena, Seema

    2017-07-01

    In this paper a single buyer, single supplier inventory model with time quadratic and stock dependent demand for a finite planning horizon has been studied. Single deteriorating item which suffers shortage, with partial backlogging and some lost sales is considered. Model is divided into two scenarios, one with non permissible delay in payment and other with permissible delay in payment. Latter is called, centralized system, where supplier offers trade credit to retailer. In the centralized system cost saving is shared amongst the two. The objective is to study the difference in minimum costs borne by retailer and supplier, under two scenarios including the above mentioned parameters. To obtain optimal solution of the problem the model is solved analytically. Numerical example and a comparative study are then discussed supported by sensitivity analysis of each parameter.

  13. Hand-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in the porcine model using gelatin matrix hemostatic sealant without hilar occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Premal J; Maynes, Lincoln J; Zuppan, Craig; Berger, Kenneth A; Torrey, Robert; Baldwin, D Duane

    2005-06-01

    Gelatin matrix hemostatic sealant (GMHS) has been used for hemostasis during partial nephrectomy with hilar clamping. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of GMHS to achieve hemostasis without hilar clamping in the porcine model. In this feasibility study, eight farm pigs underwent a left-hand-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (HALPN). The lower fourth of the kidney was removed with cold scissors, and GMHS was applied laparoscopically. Samples were collected for measurement of serum hemoglobin (Hb) and creatinine (Cr) prior to surgery and at 4 and 30 days after HALPN. The kidneys were harvested at 30 days, and retrograde pyelograms and pathologic analysis were performed. Application of GMHS achieved complete hemostasis in all eight animals. The mean estimated blood loss was 40 mL, and the operating time was short (mean 92.5 minutes). In three kidneys, a significant collecting system opening was noted but not repaired. At harvest, there were no hematomas, infections, or urine leaks in any animals. In one animal, a 2-cm contained fluid collection was identified. There was no difference in the preoperative and harvest Hb (9.63 v 9.21 g/dL; P = 0.49), but there was a slight increase in Cr (1.21 v 1.46 mg/dL; P = 0.01) possibly because of the decreased renal mass after partial nephrectomy. Even without hilar occlusion, GMHS was 100% safe and effective in controlling bleeding after HALPN in the porcine model. Avoidance of hilar occlusion may reduce the risk associated with warm renal ischemia and the extra dissection required to isolate the hilum in preparation for clamping.

  14. A comparison of balloon injury models of endovascular lesions in rat arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E.E. Gabeler; R. van Hillegersberg (Richard); R.G. Statius van Eps (Randolph); W. Sluiter (Wim); E.J. Gussenhoven (Elma); H. van Urk (Hero); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Balloon injury (BI) of the rat carotid artery (CCA) is widely used to study intimal hyperplasia (IH) and decrease in lumen diameter (LD), but CCA's small diameter impedes the evaluation of endovascular therapies. Therefore, we validated BI in the aorta (AA)

  15. Total arterial inertance as the fourth element of the windkessel model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopulos, N.; Westerhof, B. E.; Westerhof, N.

    1999-01-01

    In earlier studies we found that the three-element windkessel, although an almost perfect load for isolated heart studies, does not lead to accurate estimates of total arterial compliance. To overcome this problem, we introduce an inertial term in parallel with the characteristic impedance. In seven

  16. Modeling the absorbed dose to the common carotid arteries following radioiodine treatment of benign thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Hedemann-Jensen, Per; Søgaard-Hansen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    in the western countries are treated each year with RAI for benign thyroid disorders (about 140,000 a year in the EU), stressing that it is of clinical importance to be aware of even rare radiation-induced side effects. In order to induce or accelerate atherosclerosis, the dose to the carotid arteries has...

  17. Modeling of the blood flow in the lower extremities for dynamic diffuse optical tomography of peripheral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, A.; Hoi, J. W.; Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Shrikhande, G.; Dayal, R.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by a reduction of the internal diameters of the arteries in the upper or lower extremities mainly due to atherosclerosis. If not treated, its worsening may led to a complete occlusion, causing the death of the cells lacking proper blood supply, followed by gangrene that may require chirurgical amputation. We have recently performed a clinical study in which good sensitivities and specificities were achieved with dynamic diffuse optical tomography. To gain a better understanding of the physiological foundations of many of the observed effects, we started to develop a mathematical model for PAD. The model presented in this work is based on a multi-compartment Windkessel model, where the vasculature in the leg and foot is represented by resistors and capacitors, the blood pressure with a voltage drop, and the blood flow with a current. Unlike existing models, the dynamics induced by a thigh-pressure-cuff inflation and deflation during the measurements are taken into consideration. This is achieved by dynamically varying the resistances of the large veins and arteries. By including the effects of the thigh-pressure cuff, we were able to explain many of the effects observed during our dynamic DOT measurements, including the hemodynamics of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes. The model was implemented in MATLAB and the simulations were normalized and compared with the blood perfusion obtained from healthy, PAD and diabetic patients. Our preliminary results show that in unhealthy patients the total system resistance is sensibly higher than in healthy patients.

  18. Sensitivity of Reliability Estimates in Partially Damaged RC Structures subject to Earthquakes, using Reduced Hysteretic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwankiewicz, R.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Skjærbæk, P. S.

    The subject of the paper is the investigation of the sensitivity of structural reliability estimation by a reduced hysteretic model for a reinforced concrete frame under an earthquake excitation.......The subject of the paper is the investigation of the sensitivity of structural reliability estimation by a reduced hysteretic model for a reinforced concrete frame under an earthquake excitation....

  19. Sound statistical model checking for MDP using partial order and confluence reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmanns, Arnd; Timmer, Mark

    Statistical model checking (SMC) is an analysis method that circumvents the state space explosion problem in model-based verification by combining probabilistic simulation with statistical methods that provide clear error bounds. As a simulation-based technique, it can in general only provide sound

  20. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginn, Helen Mary [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin [Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Fermi Avenue, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Grimes, Jonathan M. [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Fermi Avenue, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Sauter, Nicholas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sutton, Geoff [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David Ian, E-mail: dave@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Fermi Avenue, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-23

    An updated partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for XFEL snapshot diffraction data is presented and confirmed by observing anomalous density for S atoms at an X-ray wavelength of 1.3 Å. Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating the R{sub split} value) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will

  1. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-01-01

    An updated partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for XFEL snapshot diffraction data is presented and confirmed by observing anomalous density for S atoms at an X-ray wavelength of 1.3 Å. Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating the R split value) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will

  2. An improved optimization algorithm of the three-compartment model with spillover and partial volume corrections for dynamic FDG PET images of small animal hearts in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinlin; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2018-03-01

    The three-compartment model with spillover (SP) and partial volume (PV) corrections has been widely used for noninvasive kinetic parameter studies of dynamic 2-[18F] fluoro-2deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography images of small animal hearts in vivo. However, the approach still suffers from estimation uncertainty or slow convergence caused by the commonly used optimization algorithms. The aim of this study was to develop an improved optimization algorithm with better estimation performance. Femoral artery blood samples, image-derived input functions from heart ventricles and myocardial time-activity curves (TACs) were derived from data on 16 C57BL/6 mice obtained from the UCLA Mouse Quantitation Program. Parametric equations of the average myocardium and the blood pool TACs with SP and PV corrections in a three-compartment tracer kinetic model were formulated. A hybrid method integrating artificial immune-system and interior-reflective Newton methods were developed to solve the equations. Two penalty functions and one late time-point tail vein blood sample were used to constrain the objective function. The estimation accuracy of the method was validated by comparing results with experimental values using the errors in the areas under curves (AUCs) of the model corrected input function (MCIF) and the 18F-FDG influx constant K i . Moreover, the elapsed time was used to measure the convergence speed. The overall AUC error of MCIF for the 16 mice averaged  -1.4  ±  8.2%, with correlation coefficients of 0.9706. Similar results can be seen in the overall K i error percentage, which was 0.4  ±  5.8% with a correlation coefficient of 0.9912. The t-test P value for both showed no significant difference. The mean and standard deviation of the MCIF AUC and K i percentage errors have lower values compared to the previously published methods. The computation time of the hybrid method is also several times lower than using just a stochastic

  3. Arterial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    In many major metropolitan areas, the freeway system is : functioning at or beyond the capacity for which it was : designed. Many drivers are choosing to use arterial streets : instead. The resulting stress on the arterial systems creates : gridlock ...

  4. Determination of the Orthokinetic Coalescence Efficiency of Droplets in Simple Shear Flow Using Mobile, Partially Mobile and Immobile Drainage Models and Trajectory Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mousa, H.A.H.; Agterof, W.G.M.; Mellema, J.

    2002-01-01

    The orthokinetic coalescence efficiency, of two Newtonian droplets submerged in a Newtonian fluid in simple shear flow, was theoretically investigated. The investigation considered three drainage models: immobile, partially mobile and mobile interfaces. The coalescence efficiency was also determined

  5. Pemodelan Peningkatan Akurasi Estimasi Biaya Dengan Metode Structural Equation Modeling-Partial Least Square Pada Proyek Jalan Provinsi Kalimantan Tengah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanda Christian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acceleration of national development increases the number of construction projects in Indonesia, including road projects. The contractor as the service provider in the implementation of the construction work shall have a detailed implementation schedule and project cost budget plan so that the construction work shall not be subject to delays and cost overrun. The main thing that can cause cost overrun is the error in cost estimation. In this study discusses the modeling of increasing the accuracy of cost estimation as well as the development of factors that can improve the accuracy of cost estimation. Validation of research variables was done to experts using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method and modeling using Structural Equation ModelingPartial Least Square (SEM-PLS method to project contractor of Public Works Department of Central Kalimantan Province and National Road Implementation Center XI Unit Work of Central Kalimantan with contract value of project worth 20 Billion to 50 Billion Rupiah Year 2016. The result of variable validation shows the competence variable of estimator, survey, availability of information, calculation of cost estimation and internal company is variable which influence estimation The obtained modeling equation is AEB = 0,129 KE + 0.466 S + 0,191 KI + 0,153 PEB + 0,069 IP + 0,181 ζ. The development of cost estimation is done by improving each influential indicator in each variable and applying development strategies to increase the estimated cost estimation based on SWOT analysis. Keywords : Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP, cost estimation, road, Structural Equation Modeling-Partial Least Square (SEM-PLS, SWOT analysis.

  6. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Sauter, Nicholas K; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-06-01

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating the R(split) value) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.

  7. TRANEXAMIC ACID ACTION ON LIVER REGENERATION AFTER PARTIAL HEPATECTOMY: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Felipe Antonio; Daga, Henrique; Rasera, Henrique Nogueira; Pinheiro, Matheus da Rocha; Cella, Igor Furlan; Morais, Igor Henrique; Marques, Luciana de Oliveira; Collaço, Luiz Martins

    2016-01-01

    Different lesions may affect the liver resulting in harmful stimuli. Some therapeutic procedures to treat those injuries depend on liver regeneration to increase functional capacity of this organ. Evaluate the effects of tranexamic acid on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats. 40 rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Rodentia mammalia) of Wistar-UP lineage were randomly divided into two groups named control (CT) and tranexamic acid (ATX), with 20 rats in each. Both groups were subdivided, according to liver regeneration time of 32 h or seven days after the rats had been operated. The organ regeneration was evaluated through weight and histology, stained with HE and PCNA. The average animal weight of ATX and CT 7 days groups before surgery were 411.2 g and 432.7 g, and 371.3 g and 392.9 g after the regeneration time, respectively. The average number of mitotic cells stained with HE for the ATX and CT 7 days groups were 33.7 and 32.6 mitosis, and 14.5 and 14.9 for the ATX and CT 32 h groups, respectively. When stained with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, the numbers of mitotic cells counted were 849.7 for the ATX 7 days, 301.8 for the CT 7 days groups, 814.2 for the ATX 32 hand 848.1 for the CT 32 h groups. Tranexamic acid was effective in liver regeneration, but in longer period after partial hepatectomy. Muitas são as injúrias que acometem o fígado e levam a estímulo lesivo. Alguns procedimentos terapêuticos para tratamento dessas lesões dependem da regeneração hepática para aumentar a sua capacidade funcional. Avaliar o efeito do ácido tranexâmico na regeneração hepática após hepatectomia parcial em ratos. Foram utilizados 40 ratos (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Rodentia mammalia) convencionais da linhagem Wistar-UP. Foram divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos de 20: grupo controle (CT) e grupo ácido tranexâmico (ATX). Cada um deles foi divido em dois subgrupos para avaliar a regeneração hepática no tempo de 32 h e 7 dias do p

  8. A conceptual model of daily water balance following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple conceptual water balance model representing the streamflow generation processes on a daily time step following land use change is presented. The model consists of five stores: (i Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores for vertical and lateral water flow, (ii a transient Stream zone Store (iii a saturated Goundwater Store. The soil moisture balance in the top soil Dry and Wet Stores are the most important components of the model and characterize the dynamically varying saturated areas responsible for surface runoff, interflow and deep percolation. The Subsurface Store describes the unsaturated soil moisture balance, extraction of percolated water by vegetation and groundwater recharge. The Groundwater Store controls the baseflow to stream (if any and the groundwater contribution to the stream zone saturated areas. The daily model was developed following a downward approach by analysing data from Ernies (control and Lemon (53% cleared catchments in Western Australia and elaborating a monthly model. The daily model performed very well in simulating daily flow generation processes for both catchments. Most of the model parameters were incorporated a priori from catchment attributes such as surface slope, soil depth, porosity, stream length and initial groundwater depth, and some were calibrated by matching the observed and predicted hydrographs. The predicted groundwater depth, and streamflow volumes across all time steps from daily to monthly to annual were in close agreement with observations for both catchments.

  9. Large-scale subject-specific cerebral arterial tree modeling using automated parametric mesh generation for blood flow simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Mahsa; Tangen, Kevin; Alaraj, Ali; Du, Xinjian; Charbel, Fady T; Linninger, Andreas A

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel technique for automatic parametric mesh generation of subject-specific cerebral arterial trees. This technique generates high-quality and anatomically accurate computational meshes for fast blood flow simulations extending the scope of 3D vascular modeling to a large portion of cerebral arterial trees. For this purpose, a parametric meshing procedure was developed to automatically decompose the vascular skeleton, extract geometric features and generate hexahedral meshes using a body-fitted coordinate system that optimally follows the vascular network topology. To validate the anatomical accuracy of the reconstructed vasculature, we performed statistical analysis to quantify the alignment between parametric meshes and raw vascular images using receiver operating characteristic curve. Geometric accuracy evaluation showed an agreement with area under the curves value of 0.87 between the constructed mesh and raw MRA data sets. Parametric meshing yielded on-average, 36.6% and 21.7% orthogonal and equiangular skew quality improvement over the unstructured tetrahedral meshes. The parametric meshing and processing pipeline constitutes an automated technique to reconstruct and simulate blood flow throughout a large portion of the cerebral arterial tree down to the level of pial vessels. This study is the first step towards fast large-scale subject-specific hemodynamic analysis for clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Organ culture of C57BL/6 mouse arteries with LPS as an in vitro model of vascular inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Outzen, Emilie Middelbo; Mehryar, Rahila; Boonen, Harrie C.M.

    an in vitro model for studying vascular inflammation and function in cultured arteries from C57BL/6 mice. Methods: Segments of abdominal aorta and mesenteric arteries (MA) were incubated for 24 hours at 37̊C and 95% O2/5% CO2 in DMEM ± 100 ng/mL LPS. Aorta segments were frozen for molecular studies...... was achieved at a normalisation factor of 0.9 (0.91 ± 0.06, mean ± SEM, n = 9) as observed (0.85 ± 0.06, mean ± SEM, n = 3) and previously described in rat MA (Mulvany and Halpern, 1977). Furthermore, preliminary findings show that organ culture with 100 ng/mL LPS decreases endothelium-dependent dilation of C......57BL/6 MA along with increased expression of inflammatory markers in aorta. Conclusions: In C57BL/6 MA, maximum active wall tension was achieved with a normalisation factor of 0.9. Furthermore, organ culture with LPS induces vascular inflammation and functional changes in C57BL/6 arteries...

  11. Balloon-augmented carotid artery sacrifice with Onyx: a proof of concept study in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiotta, Alejandro M; Sivapatham, Thinesh; Teng, Qingshan; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Hui, Ferdinand K

    2011-12-01

    Carotid sacrifice remains a valuable tool in the treatment of select vascular lesions. Neurointerventionalists have relied on coil embolization as their primary means of carotid sacrifice, a procedure that can be lengthy and expensive with long fluoroscopy times. We investigated a novel technique for carotid sacrifice in a swine model using temporary balloon occlusion to achieve proximal flow arrest in the carotid artery while embolizing the vessel with a liquid embolic agent. A total of 10 common carotid artery sacrifices were performed in pigs under fluoroscopic guidance. Various balloons were employed to achieve near total proximal flow arrest to allow an Onyx cast to accumulate in the target vessel. The technique for sacrifice was modified during the experiment with the final procedures yielding successful sacrifice using Onyx through a dimethylsulfoxide-tolerant catheter (Echelon 14) with the assistance of two fibered coils and a 5 mm × 30 mm Hyperglide balloon resulting in a 2.5 cm long cast. Carotid artery sacrifice using commercially available non-adhesive liquid embolic agents is feasible with balloon assistance, allowing for reduced radiation and material costs. Coils may be beneficial in providing an anchor point for liquid embolic deposition, as well as reducing the volume of liquid embolysate required to achieve vessel occlusion.

  12. Right Heart End-Systolic Remodeling Index Strongly Predicts Outcomes in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Comparison With Validated Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsallem, Myriam; Sweatt, Andrew J; Aymami, Marie C; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Selej, Mona; Lu, HongQuan; Mercier, Olaf; Fadel, Elie; Schnittger, Ingela; McConnell, Michael V; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Zamanian, Roham T; Haddad, Francois

    2017-06-01

    Right ventricular (RV) end-systolic dimensions provide information on both size and function. We investigated whether an internally scaled index of end-systolic dimension is incremental to well-validated prognostic scores in pulmonary arterial hypertension. From 2005 to 2014, 228 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension were prospectively enrolled. RV end-systolic remodeling index (RVESRI) was defined by lateral length divided by septal height. The incremental values of RV free wall longitudinal strain and RVESRI to risk scores were determined. Mean age was 49±14 years, 78% were female, 33% had connective tissue disease, 52% were in New York Heart Association class ≥III, and mean pulmonary vascular resistance was 11.2±6.4 WU. RVESRI and right atrial area were strongly connected to the other right heart metrics. Three zones of adaptation (adapted, maladapted, and severely maladapted) were identified based on the RVESRI to RV systolic pressure relationship. During a mean follow-up of 3.9±2.4 years, the primary end point of death, transplant, or admission for heart failure was reached in 88 patients. RVESRI was incremental to risk prediction scores in pulmonary arterial hypertension, including the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term PAH Disease Management score, the Pulmonary Hypertension Connection equation, and the Mayo Clinic model. Using multivariable analysis, New York Heart Association class III/IV, RVESRI, and log NT-proBNP (N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide) were retained (χ 2 , 62.2; P right heart metrics, RVESRI demonstrated the best test-retest characteristics. RVESRI is a simple reproducible prognostic marker in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Porous Gelatin Particles for Uterine Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study of Intra-Arterial Distribution, Uterine Necrosis, and Inflammation in a Porcine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Miyuki; Osuga, Keigo; Shimazu, Kohki; Higashihara, Hiroki; Nakazawa, Tetsuro; Kato, Kenichi; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Nakamura, Hironobu; Morii, Eiichi; Aozasa, Katsuyuki

    2010-01-01

    PurposeWe evaluated the location of porous gelatin particles (GP; Gelpart; Nippon Kayaku/Astellas, Tokyo, Japan) within the arterial vasculature and their acute effects on uterine necrosis and inflammation after uterine artery embolization (UAE) in swine.Materials and MethodsAdult nonpregnant pigs (n = 6) were allocated to either 1- (n = 3) or 2-mm GP (n = 3). Superselective and bilateral embolization of the uterine arteries was performed. All animals were killed 1 week after UAE. Macroscopic and microscopic findings, including the level of arterial occlusion and their effect on uterine necrosis and inflammation, were analyzed.ResultsAll UAE procedures were completed without severe complications. The macroscopic necrosis was seen in two animals in the 2-mm group with an extent of <50%. The location of the occluded arteries did not differ significantly between groups. The median diameters of the occluded arteries were 449 μm (95% confidence interval [CI] 417-538 μm) in the 1-mm GP group and 484 μm (95% CI 370-560 μm) in the 2-mm GP group. As for microscopic necrosis, no statistically significant difference was observed. The qualitative inflammatory reaction was significantly greater in the 2-mm GP group than in the 1-mm group (p < 0.001).ConclusionsBoth 1- and 2-mm GP occluded the arteries relevant to the target diameter for UAE in porcine uterus, presumably due to the plastic deformity. Both sizes of GP were associated with limited areas of necrosis; however, evaluation of inflammatory reaction was preliminary. Further study with adequate evaluation of inflammatory reactions is suggested.

  14. Mature and emerging organic markets: Modelling consumer attitude and behaviour with Partial Least Square Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Höfer, Marie von; Jaik, Evelyn Olea; Bravo, Carlos Padilla; Spiller, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Although the organic food sector has been the subject of research for around 20 years, little is known about consumer behaviour when comparing developed and emerging organic food markets using causal research models. Thus, by developing a behavioural model based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), the aim of this research article is to investigate the main determinants of organic food consumption in a mature (Germany) and an emerging (Chile) organic market. Subjects aged 18 or above wer...

  15. Nested partially latent class models for dependent binary data; estimating disease etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenke; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Zeger, Scott L

    2017-04-01

    The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study seeks to use modern measurement technology to infer the causes of pneumonia for which gold-standard evidence is unavailable. Based on case-control data, the article describes a latent variable model designed to infer the etiology distribution for the population of cases, and for an individual case given her measurements. We assume each observation is drawn from a mixture model for which each component represents one disease class. The model conisidered here addresses a major limitation of the traditional latent class approach by taking account of residual dependence among multivariate binary outcomes given disease class, hence reducing estimation bias, retaining efficiency and offering more valid inference. Such "local dependence" on each subject is induced in the model by nesting latent subclasses within each disease class. Measurement precision and covariation can be estimated using the control sample for whom the class is known. In a Bayesian framework, we use stick-breaking priors on the subclass indicators for model-averaged inference across different numbers of subclasses. Assessment of model fit and individual diagnosis are done using posterior samples drawn by Gibbs sampling. We demonstrate the utility of the method on simulated and on the motivating PERCH data. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF COMBINED THERAPY OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION BY MARKOV’S MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Maksimchuk-Kolobova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the economic effectiveness of the combined two-drug antihypertensive therapy in patients with arterial hypertension (HT and high cardiovascular risk by Markov’s modeling.Material and methods. Patients (n= 65; 19 males and 46 females with essential HT accompanied by metabolic disorders, history of previous ineffective antihypertensive therapy were included into the study. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. Group V/A was treated with valsartan and amlodipine in fixed-dose combinations of 160/5 and 160/10 mg depending on blood pressure (BP level. Patients of group L/A were treated with losartan 100 mg and amlodipine 5 or 10 mg daily. Treatment duration was 24 weeks. Changes in BP level, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH regression were assessed. Economic evaluation was performed on the basis of modeling with specialized software Decision Tree 4.xla.Results. Effect of the two variants of combination therapy on LVH was used to estimate treatment effectiveness and to build the model. Patients were distributed according to the left ventricular mass (LVM at baseline and after 24 weeks of therapy. Significant decrease in LVM was observed in V/A group: from 225.1±71.7 to 186.3±44.5 g (p<0.05. There was no LVM dynamics in L/A group. The model took into account economic and frequency factors for 10 years forecast. V/A therapy is able to prevent 94 deaths, 22 strokes, and 64 myocardial infarction per 1000 patients. Absence of need in treatment of these prevented events can save about 5.5 million RUR for every 1000 patients. It would reduce the total costs per patient during 10 years. V/A therapy is able to save maximal number of quality adjusted life years (QALY due to LVM regression (5.016 years. L/A combination is the most economical variant of pharmacotherapy due to low cost of treatment (16.491.25 RUR per 1 QALY. It would take 286.698.7 RUR additionally for one additional QALY in the treatment with V/A, and it is

  17. The relationship between the Rating Scale and Partial Credit Models and the implication of disordered thresholds of the Rasch models for polytomous responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guanzhong

    2005-01-01

    There is a perception in the literature that the Rating Scale Model (RSM) and Partial Credit Model (PCM) are two different types of Rasch models. This paper clarifies the relationship between the RSM and PCM from the perspectives of literature history and mathematical logic. It is shown that not only are the RSM and the PCM identical, but the two approaches used to introduce them are statistically equivalent. Then the implication of disordered thresholds is discussed. In addition, the difference between the structural thresholds and the Thurstone thresholds are clarified.

  18. Modelling of the partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes on Mo-V-oxides based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnke, H.; Petzoldt, J.C.; Stein, B.; Weimer, C.; Gaube, J.W. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemische Technologie

    1998-12-31

    A kinetic model based on the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism that allows to describe the microkinetics of the heterogeneously catalysed partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes is presented. This conversion is represented by a network, composed of the oxidation of the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehyde towards the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acid and the consecutive oxidation of the acid as well as the parallel reaction of the aldehyde to products of deeper oxidation. The reaction steps of aldehyde respectively acid oxidation and catalyst reoxidation have been investigated separately in transient experiments. The combination of steady state and transient experiments has led to an improved understanding of the interaction of the catalyst with the aldehyde and the carboxylic acids as well as to a support of the kinetic model assumptions. (orig.)

  19. Use of 3D printer model to study vertebral artery anatomy and variations in developmental craniovertebral junction anomalies and as a preoperative tool—an institutional experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sanjeev; Kataria, Rashim; Sinha, Virendra Deo

    2017-01-01

    Background Spinal instrumentation using rods and screws have become procedure of choice for posterior fixation. Vertebral artery anatomy is highly variable in this region posing challenges during surgery. Our study used 3D printer model to understand the anatomy and variations in vertebral artery in live patients thereby providing an accurate idea about vertebral artery injury risk in these patients preoperatively and to rehearse the whole procedure. Methods Ten patients of developmental craniovertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies who were planned for operative intervention in the Department of Neurosurgery at SMS Hospital from February 2016 to December 2016 were analysed using a 3D printer model. Results Out of twenty vertebral arteries studied in ten patients, two were hypoplastic and out of these one could not be appreciated on 3D printer model. Out of remaining nineteen, thirteen arteries were found to lie outside the joint, three were in lateral third, one traversed the middle third of joint and one lied in medial third. In one patient, the vertebral artery was stretched and it traversed horizontally over the joint. Out of ten patients studied, nine were having occipitalised atlas and so entry of these vertebral arteries into cranium were classified as given by Wang et al. into four types. Conclusions By our study, 3D printer model was extremely helpful in analyzing joints and vertebral artery preoperatively and making the surgeon acquainted about the placement and trajectory of the screws accordingly. In our opinion, these models should be included as a basic investigation tool in these patients. PMID:29354734

  20. A partially coupled, fraction-by-fraction modelling approach to the subsurface migration of gasoline spills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, F.; Niemi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The subsurface spreading behaviour of gasoline, as well as several other common soil- and groundwater pollutants (e.g. diesel, creosote), is complicated by the fact that it is a mixture of hundreds of different constituents, behaving differently with respect to e.g. dissolution, volatilisation, adsorption and biodegradation. Especially for scenarios where the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) phase is highly mobile, such as for sudden spills in connection with accidents, it is necessary to simultaneously analyse the migration of the NAPL and its individual components in order to assess risks and environmental impacts. Although a few fully coupled, multi-phase, multi-constituent models exist, such models are highly complex and may be time consuming to use. A new, somewhat simplified methodology for modelling the subsurface migration of gasoline while taking its multi-constituent nature into account is therefore introduced here. Constituents with similar properties are grouped together into eight fractions. The migration of each fraction in the aqueous and gaseous phases as well as adsorption is modelled separately using a single-constituent multi-phase flow model, while the movement of the free-phase gasoline is essentially the same for all fractions. The modelling is done stepwise to allow updating of the free-phase gasoline composition at certain time intervals. The output is the concentration of the eight different fractions in the aqueous, gaseous, free gasoline and solid phases with time. The approach is evaluated by comparing it to a fully coupled multi-phase, multi-constituent numerical simulator in the modelling of a typical accident-type spill scenario, based on a tanker accident in northern Sweden. Here the PCFF method produces results similar to those of the more sophisticated, fully coupled model. The benefit of the method is that it is easy to use and can be applied to any single-constituent multi-phase numerical simulator, which in turn may have

  1. Determination of Cefoperazone Sodium in Presence of Related Impurities by Linear Support Vector Regression and Partial Least Squares Chemometric Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A. Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison between partial least squares regression and support vector regression chemometric models is introduced in this study. The two models are implemented to analyze cefoperazone sodium in presence of its reported impurities, 7-aminocephalosporanic acid and 5-mercapto-1-methyl-tetrazole, in pure powders and in pharmaceutical formulations through processing UV spectroscopic data. For best results, a 3-factor 4-level experimental design was used, resulting in a training set of 16 mixtures containing different ratios of interfering moieties. For method validation, an independent test set consisting of 9 mixtures was used to test predictive ability of established models. The introduced results show the capability of the two proposed models to analyze cefoperazone in presence of its impurities 7-aminocephalosporanic acid and 5-mercapto-1-methyl-tetrazole with high trueness and selectivity (101.87 ± 0.708 and 101.43 ± 0.536 for PLSR and linear SVR, resp.. Analysis results of drug products were statistically compared to a reported HPLC method showing no significant difference in trueness and precision, indicating the capability of the suggested multivariate calibration models to be reliable and adequate for routine quality control analysis of drug product. SVR offers more accurate results with lower prediction error compared to PLSR model; however, PLSR is easy to handle and fast to optimize.

  2. Comparison of artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least squares (PLS) regression models for predicting respiratory ventilation: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-I Brandon; Groves, William A; Freivalds, Andris; Lee, Eun Gyung; Harper, Martin

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the potential for using artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict inspired minute ventilation (V(I)) during exercise activities. Six physiological/kinematic measurements obtained from a portable ambulatory monitoring system, along with individual's anthropometric and demographic characteristics, were employed as input variables to develop and optimize the ANN configuration with respect to reference values simultaneously measured using a pneumotachograph (PT). The generalization ability of the resulting two-hidden-layer ANN model was compared with a linear predictive model developed through partial least squares (PLS) regression, as well as other V(I) predictive models proposed in the literature. Using an independent dataset recorded from nine 80-min step tests, the results showed that the ANN-estimated V(I) was highly correlated (R(2) = 0.88) with V(I) measured by the PT, with a mean difference of approximately 0.9%. In contrast, the PLS and other regression-based models resulted in larger average errors ranging from 7 to 34%. In addition, the ANN model yielded estimates of cumulative total volume that were on average within 1% of reference PT measurements. Compared with established statistical methods, the proposed ANN model demonstrates the potential to provide improved prediction of respiratory ventilation in workplace applications for which the use of traditional laboratory-based instruments is not feasible. Further research should be conducted to investigate the performance of ANNs for different types of physical activity in larger and more varied worker populations.

  3. Towards Additive Manufacture of Functional, Spline-Based Morphometric Models of Healthy and Diseased Coronary Arteries: In Vitro Proof-of-Concept Using a Porcine Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Jewkes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the additive manufacture of morphometric models of healthy and diseased coronary arteries. Using a dissected porcine coronary artery, a model was developed with the use of computer aided engineering, with splines used to design arteries in health and disease. The model was altered to demonstrate four cases of stenosis displaying varying severity, based on published morphometric data available. Both an Objet Eden 250 printer and a Solidscape 3Z Pro printer were used in this analysis. A wax printed model was set into a flexible thermoplastic and was valuable for experimental testing with helical flow patterns observed in healthy models, dominating the distal LAD (left anterior descending and left circumflex arteries. Recirculation zones were detected in all models, but were visibly larger in the stenosed cases. Resin models provide useful analytical tools for understanding the spatial relationships of blood vessels, and could be applied to preoperative planning techniques, but were not suitable for physical testing. In conclusion, it is feasible to develop blood vessel models enabling experimental work; further, through additive manufacture of bio-compatible materials, there is the possibility of manufacturing customized replacement arteries.

  4. A Partial Test and Development of Delone and Mclean's Model of IS Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Seddon

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available DeLone and McLean's (1992 comprehensive review of different information system success measures concludes with a model of interrelationships between six IS Success constructs. This paper critically examines the meaning of four of these constructs and the evidence of relationships between them. It then provides results from empirical tests of these relationships. Tests are conducted using both conventional ordinary least squares regression path analysis and structural equation modeling - with substantially similar results. The empirical results provide substantial support for the "up stream" two thirds of DeLone and McLean's model. Three factors. System Quality, Information Quality, and Usefulness, are found to explain 75% of the variance in the overall User Satisfaction measure. The empirical results also provide substantial support for the use of usefulness as an IS success measure, and of the hitherto-unreported importance of "Importance of the task" in user perceptions of IS usefulness.

  5. Genetic analyses of partial egg production in Japanese quail using multi-trait random regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, K; Zerehdaran, S; Barzanooni, B; Lotfi, E

    2017-12-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to estimate genetic parameters for average egg weight (EW) and egg number (EN) at different ages in Japanese quail using multi-trait random regression (MTRR) models. 2. A total of 8534 records from 900 quail, hatched between 2014 and 2015, were used in the study. Average weekly egg weights and egg numbers were measured from second until sixth week of egg production. 3. Nine random regression models were compared to identify the best order of the Legendre polynomials (LP). The most optimal model was identified by the Bayesian Information Criterion. A model with second order of LP for fixed effects, second order of LP for additive genetic effects and third order of LP for permanent environmental effects (MTRR23) was found to be the best. 4. According to the MTRR23 model, direct heritability for EW increased from 0.26 in the second week to 0.53 in the sixth week of egg production, whereas the ratio of permanent environment to phenotypic variance decreased from 0.48 to 0.1. Direct heritability for EN was low, whereas the ratio of permanent environment to phenotypic variance decreased from 0.57 to 0.15 during the production period. 5. For each trait, estimated genetic correlations among weeks of egg production were high (from 0.85 to 0.98). Genetic correlations between EW and EN were low and negative for the first two weeks, but they were low and positive for the rest of the egg production period. 6. In conclusion, random regression models can be used effectively for analysing egg production traits in Japanese quail. Response to selection for increased egg weight would be higher at older ages because of its higher heritability and such a breeding program would have no negative genetic impact on egg production.

  6. Predictors of Health-Promoting Behaviors in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Patients: An Application of Pender's Health Promotion Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenipoua, Hossein; Majlessi, Fereshteh; Shojaeizadeh, Davood; Rahimiforooshani, Abbas; Ghafari, Rahman; Habibi, Valiollah

    2016-09-01

    Advances in coronary artery surgery have reduced patient morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, patients still have to face physical, psychological, and social problems after discharge from hospital. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of Pender's health promotion model in predicting cardiac surgery patients' lifestyles in Iran. This cross-sectional study comprised 220 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Mazandaran province (Iran) in 2015. The subjects were selected using a simple random sampling method. The data were collected via (1) the health-promoting lifestyle profile II (HPLP II) and (2) a self-designed questionnaire that included two main sections: demographic characteristics and questions based on the health-promoting model constructs. Spiritual growth (28.77 ± 5.03) and physical activity (15.79 ± 5.08) had the highest and lowest scores in the HPLP II dimensions, respectively. All the health promotion model variables were significant predictors of health-promoting behaviors and explained 69% of the variance in health-promoting behaviors. Three significant predictors were estimated using regression coefficients: behavioral feelings (β = 0.390, P health-promoting model-based self-care behaviors can help identify and predict cardiac surgery patients' lifestyles in Iran. This pattern can be used as a framework for discharge planning and the implementation of educational interventions to improve the lifestyles of CABG patients.

  7. The use of partial least squares path modeling in international marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henseler, Jörg; Ringle, Christian M.; Sinkovics, Rudolf R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine the status quo of PLS path modeling in international marketing research, we conducted an exhaustive literature review. An evaluation of double-blind reviewed journals through important academic publishing databases (e.g., ABI/Inform, Elsevier ScienceDirect, Emerald Insight,

  8. Intimal hyperplasia and wall shear in arterial bypass graft distal anastomoses: an in vivo model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynton, R S; Evancho, M M; Sims, R L; Rodway, N V; Gobin, A; Rittgers, S E

    2001-10-01

    The observation of intimal hyperplasia at bypass graft anastomoses has suggested a potential interaction between local hemodynamics and vascular wall response. Wall shear has been particularly implicated because of its known effects upon the endothelium of normal vessels and, thus, was examined as to its possible role in the development of intimal hyperplasia in arterial bypass graft distal anastomoses. Tapered (4-7 mm I.D.) e-PTFE synthetic grafts 6 cm long were placed as bilateral carotid artery bypasses in six adult, mongrel dogs weighing between 25 and 30 kg with distal anastomotic graft-to-artery diameter ratios (DR) of either 1.0 or 1.5. Immediately following implantation, simultaneous axial velocity measurements were made in the toe and artery floor regions in the plane of the anastomosis at radial increments of 0.35 mm, 0.70 mm, and 1.05 mm using a specially designed 20 MHz triple crystal ultrasonic wall shear rate transducer Mean, peak, and pulse amplitude wall shear rates (WSRs), their absolute values, the spatial and temporal wall shear stress gradients (WSSG), and the oscillatory shear index (OSI) were computed from these velocity measurements. All grafts were harvested after 12 weeks implantation and measurements of the degree of intimal hyperplasia (IH) were made along the toe region and the artery floor of the host artery in 1 mm increments. While some IH occurred along the toe region (8.35+/-23.1 microm) and was significantly different between DR groups (p<0.003), the greatest amount occurred along the artery floor (81.6+/-106.5 microm, mean +/- S.D.) (p < 0.001) although no significant differences were found between DR groups. Linear regressions were performed on the paired IH and mean, peak, and pulse amplitude WSR data as well as the absolute mean, peak, and pulse amplitude WSR data from all grafts. The mean and absolute mean WSRs showed a modest correlation with IH (r = -0.406 and -0.370, respectively) with further improvements seen (r = -0

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Blood Flow through a Tapered Overlapping Stenosed Artery with Variable Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Shit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions is solved by using a well known Frobenius method. The analytical expressions for velocity component, volumetric flow rate, wall shear stress and pressure gradient are obtained. The numerical values are extracted from these analytical expressions and are presented graphically. It is observed that the influence of hematocrit, magnetic field and the shape of artery have important impact on the velocity profile, pressure gradient and wall shear stress. Moreover, the effect of primary stenosis on the secondary one has been significantly observed.

  10. Modelling of oedemous limbs and venous ulcers using partial differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Michael J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oedema, commonly known as tissue swelling, occurs mainly on the leg and the arm. The condition may be associated with a range of causes such as venous diseases, trauma, infection, joint disease and orthopaedic surgery. Oedema is caused by both lymphatic and chronic venous insufficiency, which leads to pooling of blood and fluid in the extremities. This results in swelling, mild redness and scaling of the skin, all of which can culminate in ulceration. Methods We present a method to model a wide variety of geometries of limbs affected by oedema and venous ulcers. The shape modelling is based on the PDE method where a set of boundary curves are extracted from 3D scan data and are utilised as boundary conditions to solve a PDE, which provides the geometry of an affected limb. For this work we utilise a mixture of fourth order and sixth order PDEs, the solutions of which enable us to obtain a good representative shape of the limb and associated ulcers in question. Results A series of examples are discussed demonstrating the capability of the method to produce good representative shapes of limbs by utilising a series of curves extracted from the scan data. In particular we show how the method could be used to model the shape of an arm and a leg with an associated ulcer. Conclusion We show how PDE based shape modelling techniques can be utilised to generate a variety of limb shapes and associated ulcers by means of a series of curves extracted from scan data. We also discuss how the method could be used to manipulate a generic shape of a limb and an associated wound so that the model could be fine-tuned for a particular patient.

  11. A novel method to establish a rat ED model using internal iliac artery ligation combined with hyperlipidemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate a novel method, namely using bilateral internal iliac artery ligation combined with a high-fat diet (BCH, for establishing a rat model of erectile dysfunction (ED that, compared to classical approaches, more closely mimics the chronic pathophysiology of human ED after acute ischemic insult. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty 4-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly placed into five groups (n = 8 per group: normal control (NC, bilateral internal iliac artery ligation (BIIAL, high-fat diet (HFD, BCH, and mock surgery (MS. All rats were induced for 12 weeks. Copulatory behavior, intracavernosal pressure (ICP, ICP/mean arterial pressure, hematoxylin-eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining, serum lipid levels, and endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunohistochemical staining of the cavernous smooth muscle and endothelium were assessed. Data were analyzed by SAS 8.0 for Windows. RESULTS: Serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in the HFD and BCH groups than the NC and MS groups. High density lipoprotein levels were significantly lower in the HFD and BCH groups than the NC and MS groups. The ICP values and mount and intromission numbers were significantly lower in the BIIAL, HFD, and BCH groups than in the NC and MS groups. ICP was significantly lower in the BCH group than in the BIIAL and HFD groups. Cavernous smooth muscle and endothelial damage increased in the HFD and BCH groups. Cavernous smooth muscle to collagen ratio, nNOS and eNOS staining decreased significantly in the BIIAL, HFD, and BCH groups compared to the NC and MS groups. CONCLUSIONS: The novel BCH model mimics the chronic pathophysiology of ED in humans and avoids the drawbacks of traditional ED models.

  12. Thrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion produced by topical FeCl3 application: a novel model suitable for intravital microscopy and thrombolysis studies

    OpenAIRE

    Karatas, Hulya; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin; Gurer, Gunfer; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Dunn, Andrew K; Dalkara, Turgay

    2011-01-01

    Intravital or multiphoton microscopy and laser-speckle imaging have become popular because they allow live monitoring of several processes during cerebral ischemia. Available rodent models have limitations for these experiments; e.g., filament occlusion of the proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) is difficult to perform under a microscope, whereas distal occlusion methods may damage the MCA and the peri-arterial cortex. We found that placement of a 10% FeCl3-soaked filter paper strip (0.3 × ...

  13. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. Th...

  14. A prediction model of compressor with variable-geometry diffuser based on elliptic equation and partial least squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Yang, Chuanlei; Wang, Yinyan; Wang, Hechun

    2018-01-01

    To achieve a much more extensive intake air flow range of the diesel engine, a variable-geometry compressor (VGC) is introduced into a turbocharged diesel engine. However, due to the variable diffuser vane angle (DVA), the prediction for the performance of the VGC becomes more difficult than for a normal compressor. In the present study, a prediction model comprising an elliptical equation and a PLS (partial least-squares) model was proposed to predict the performance of the VGC. The speed lines of the pressure ratio map and the efficiency map were fitted with the elliptical equation, and the coefficients of the elliptical equation were introduced into the PLS model to build the polynomial relationship between the coefficients and the relative speed, the DVA. Further, the maximal order of the polynomial was investigated in detail to reduce the number of sub-coefficients and achieve acceptable fit accuracy simultaneously. The prediction model was validated with sample data and in order to present the superiority of compressor performance prediction, the prediction results of this model were compared with those of the look-up table and back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs). The validation and comparison results show that the prediction accuracy of the new developed model is acceptable, and this model is much more suitable than the look-up table and the BPNN methods under the same condition in VGC performance prediction. Moreover, the new developed prediction model provides a novel and effective prediction solution for the VGC and can be used to improve the accuracy of the thermodynamic model for turbocharged diesel engines in the future.

  15. A prediction model of compressor with variable-geometry diffuser based on elliptic equation and partial least squares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanlei; Wang, Yinyan; Wang, Hechun

    2018-01-01

    To achieve a much more extensive intake air flow range of the diesel engine, a variable-geometry compressor (VGC) is introduced into a turbocharged diesel engine. However, due to the variable diffuser vane angle (DVA), the prediction for the performance of the VGC becomes more difficult than for a normal compressor. In the present study, a prediction model comprising an elliptical equation and a PLS (partial least-squares) model was proposed to predict the performance of the VGC. The speed lines of the pressure ratio map and the efficiency map were fitted with the elliptical equation, and the coefficients of the elliptical equation were introduced into the PLS model to build the polynomial relationship between the coefficients and the relative speed, the DVA. Further, the maximal order of the polynomial was investigated in detail to reduce the number of sub-coefficients and achieve acceptable fit accuracy simultaneously. The prediction model was validated with sample data and in order to present the superiority of compressor performance prediction, the prediction results of this model were compared with those of the look-up table and back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs). The validation and comparison results show that the prediction accuracy of the new developed model is acceptable, and this model is much more suitable than the look-up table and the BPNN methods under the same condition in VGC performance prediction. Moreover, the new developed prediction model provides a novel and effective prediction solution for the VGC and can be used to improve the accuracy of the thermodynamic model for turbocharged diesel engines in the future. PMID:29410849

  16. Transient cavitating vortical flows around a hydrofoil using k-ω partially averaged Navier-Stokes model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xianwu; Huang, Renfang; Ji, Bin

    2016-01-01

    For accurate simulations of wall-bounded turbulent cavitating flows, the present paper proposed a partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method derived from the k-ω turbulence model. Transient cavitating vortical flows around a NACA66 hydrofoil were simulated by using the k-ω PANS model with various filter parameters (fk = 0.2, 0.5 and 1, while fω = 1/fk) and a mass transfer cavitation model based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Compared with the available experimental data, the k-ω PANS model with fk = 0.2 can accurately reproduce the cavitation evolution with more complicated structures due to the reduction in the predicted eddy viscosity. Further analyses, using the vorticity transport equation, indicate that the transition of cavitation structure from two dimension to three dimension is associated with strong vortex-cavitation interaction, where vortex stretching and dilation may play a major role. Therefore, the k-ω PANS model with the filter parameter of fk = 0.2 is an effective method to numerically predict the transient cavitating vortical flows around hydrofoils. The results obtained in this paper are helpful to provide a physical insight into the mechanisms of cavitation shedding dynamics.

  17. Quasi-homogeneous partial coherent source modeling of multimode optical fiber output using the elementary source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Alaa; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa A.

    2017-10-01

    Multimode fibers (MMF) have many applications in illumination, spectroscopy, sensing and even in optical communication systems. In this work, we present a model for the MMF output field assuming the fiber end as a quasi-homogenous source. The fiber end is modeled by a group of partially coherent elementary sources, spatially shifted and uncorrelated with each other. The elementary source distribution is derived from the far field intensity measurement, while the weighting function of the sources is derived from the fiber end intensity measurement. The model is compared with practical measurements for fibers with different core/cladding diameters at different propagation distances and for different input excitations: laser, white light and LED. The obtained results show normalized root mean square error less than 8% in the intensity profile in most cases, even when the fiber end surface is not perfectly cleaved. Also, the comparison with the Gaussian-Schell model results shows a better agreement with the measurement. In addition, the complex degree of coherence, derived from the model results, is compared with the theoretical predictions of the modified Van Zernike equation showing very good agreement, which strongly supports the assumption that the large core MMF could be considered as a quasi-homogenous source.

  18. Comparing CT perfusion with oxygen partial pressure in a rabbit VX2 soft-tissue tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changjin; Li Chao; Lv Haibo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxygen partial pressure of the rabbit model of the VX2 tumor using a 64-slice perfusion CT and to compare the results with that obtained using the oxygen microelectrode method. Perfusion CT was performed for 45 successfully constructed rabbit models of a VX2 brain tumor. The perfusion values of the brain tumor region of interest, the blood volume (BV), the time to peak (TTP) and the peak enhancement intensity (PEI) were measured. The results were compared with the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) of that region of interest obtained using the oxygen microelectrode method. The perfusion values of the brain tumor region of interest in 45 successfully constructed rabbit models of a VX2 brain tumor ranged from 1.3–127.0 (average, 21.1 ± 26.7 ml/min/ml); BV ranged from 1.2–53.5 ml/100g (average, 22.2 ± 13.7 ml/100g); PEI ranged from 8.7–124.6 HU (average, 43.5 ± 28.7 HU); and TTP ranged from 8.2–62.3 s (average, 38.8 ± 14.8 s). The PO2 in the corresponding region ranged from 0.14–47 mmHg (average, 16 ± 14.8 mmHg). The perfusion CT positively correlated with the tumor PO2, which can be used for evaluating the tumor hypoxia in clinical practice. (author)

  19. Resident Arterial Cells and Circulating Bone Marrow-Derived Cells both Contribute to Intimal Hyperplasia in a Rat Allograft Carotid Transplantation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Neointimal formation following vascular injury remains a major mechanism of restenosis, whereas the precise sources of neointimal cells are still uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that both injured arterial cells and non-arterial cells contribute to intimal hyperplasia. Methods: Following allograft transplantation of the balloon-injured carotid common artery (n = 3-6, the cellular composition of the transplant grafts and the origins of neointimal cells were measured by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Results: Smooth muscle actin (SMA-positive and CD68-positive cells were clearly observed 14 days later in the neointima after allograft transplantation of the balloon-injured carotid common artery, where re-endothelialization was not yet complete. Green fluorescent protein (GFP and wild-type (WT allograft transplantation revealed that the majority of the neointima cells were apparently from the recipient (≈85% versus the donor (≈15%. Both monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCR2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling were involved in intimal hyperplasia, with bone marrow-derived cells also playing a role. Conclusion: These data support the hypothesis that intimal hyperplasia could develop in our novel rat allograft transplantation model of arterial injury, where neointima is attributable not only to local arterial cells but also non-arterial cells including the bone marrow.

  20. Pharmacological characterization of the 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model of partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, M E; Klein, B D; Wolf, H H; White, H S

    2001-12-01

    Originally described as a model of 'psychomotor seizures' (J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. (1953) 107-273), the 6 Hz corneal stimulation model was abandoned shortly after its description because of its lack of sensitivity to phenytoin. This observation is the basis for the present study designed to validate the 6 Hz seizure as a model of therapy-resistant epilepsy. The pharmacological profile of the 6 Hz seizure was determined at varying current intensities using seven established AEDs (phenytoin, carbamazepine, clonazepam, phenobarbital, ethosuximide, trimethadione, valproic acid) and five second-generation AEDs (lamotrigine, levetiracetam, felbamate, tiagabine, topiramate). The immediate early gene c-Fos was used as a marker of seizure-induced neuronal activation to help define those brain structures that were activated by 6 Hz corneal stimulation. At the current intensity required to produce a seizure in 97% of the population (CC97=22 mA), the 6 Hz seizure did not discriminate between clinical classes of AEDs tested. Increasing the current intensity by 50% (i.e. 32 mA) decreased the sensitivity of the 6 Hz seizure to phenytoin and lamotrigine. At a current intensity of 2 x CC97 (i.e. 44 mA), only two AEDs, levetiracetam and valproic acid, displayed complete protection against the 6 Hz seizure, though the efficacy of these drugs was reduced when compared to the lower stimulation intensities. Intense c-Fos staining from 6 Hz seizures induced by 22 and 32 mA stimulus intensities remained localized to the amygdala and piriform cortex. Increasing the stimulus intensity to 44 mA resulted in additional heavy staining of the dentate gyrus. This recruitment of the dentate gyrus may account for the decrease in potency of levetiracetam and valproic acid at 44 mA. The pharmacological results combined with the c-Fos immunohistochemistry suggest that the 6 Hz stimulation may provide a useful model of therapy-resistant limbic seizures.

  1. Towards Automated Bargaining in Electronic Markets: A Partially Two-Sided Competition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Nicola; Lazaric, Alessandro; Restelli, Marcello

    This paper focuses on the prominent issue of automating bargaining agents within electronic markets. Models of bargaining in literature deal with settings wherein there are only two agents and no model satisfactorily captures settings in which there is competition among buyers, being they more than one, and analogously among sellers. In this paper, we extend the principal bargaining protocol, i.e. the alternating-offers protocol, to capture bargaining in markets. The model we propose is such that, in presence of a unique buyer and a unique seller, agents' equilibrium strategies are those in the original protocol. Moreover, we game theoretically study the considered game providing the following results: in presence of one-sided competition (more buyers and one seller or vice versa) we provide agents' equilibrium strategies for all the values of the parameters, in presence of two-sided competition (more buyers and more sellers) we provide an algorithm that produce agents' equilibrium strategies for a large set of the parameters and we experimentally evaluate its effectiveness.

  2. Influence of model boundary conditions on blood flow patterns in a patient specific stenotic right coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biyue; Zheng, Jie; Bach, Richard; Tang, Dalin

    2015-01-01

    In literature, the effect of the inflow boundary condition was investigated by examining the impact of the waveform and the shape of the spatial profile of the inlet velocity on the cardiac hemodynamics. However, not much work has been reported on comparing the effect of the different combinations of the inlet/outlet boundary conditions on the quantification of the pressure field and flow distribution patterns in stenotic right coronary arteries. Non-Newtonian models were used to simulate blood flow in a patient-specific stenotic right coronary artery and investigate the influence of different boundary conditions on the phasic variation and the spatial distribution patterns of blood flow. The 3D geometry of a diseased artery segment was reconstructed from a series of IVUS slices. Five different combinations of the inlet and the outlet boundary conditions were tested and compared. The temporal distribution patterns and the magnitudes of the velocity, the wall shear stress (WSS), the pressure, the pressure drop (PD), and the spatial gradient of wall pressure (WPG) were different when boundary conditions were imposed using different pressure/velocity combinations at inlet/outlet. The maximum velocity magnitude in a cardiac cycle at the center of the inlet from models with imposed inlet pressure conditions was about 29% lower than that from models using fully developed inlet velocity data. Due to the fact that models with imposed pressure conditions led to blunt velocity profile, the maximum wall shear stress at inlet in a cardiac cycle from models with imposed inlet pressure conditions was about 29% higher than that from models with imposed inlet velocity boundary conditions. When the inlet boundary was imposed by a velocity waveform, the models with different outlet boundary conditions resulted in different temporal distribution patterns and magnitudes of the phasic variation of pressure. On the other hand, the type of different boundary conditions imposed at the

  3. [Effect of hemodilution with 10% hydroxyethyl starch solution (MW 200,000/9.5) on the flow properties of blood, arterial blood gases and conjunctival oxygen partial pressure in patients with cerebral infarct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staedt, U; Hütt, M; Herrmann, B; Seufzer, U; Leweling, H

    1989-06-01

    Hemorheological parameters, arterial blood gases and conjunctival oxygen tension were measured in 15 patients with acute ischemic stroke and compared with values obtained in an age matched reference group. Since the conjunctival capillary bed is perfused by the ophthalmic artery, it reflects the oxygen delivery to the areas supplied by the internal carotid artery. Measurements of conjunctival oxygen tension are simple and safe. Patients with acute ischemic stroke showed a lowered conjunctival oxygen tension; this holds true especially to the ipsilateral side, i.e. the side where the attack occurred, and to a lesser extent to the other side. By contrast, the ratio of arterial/conjunctival pO2 was disturbed only on the ipsilateral side. Furthermore, these patients had pathologically elevated values for red cell aggregation, whole blood and plasma viscosity. After infusing 500 ml 10% middle-molecular-weight hydroxyethyl starch (10% HAES-steril) and phlebotomy (250 ml) blood fluidity was normalized, although the hematokrit was only slightly reduced. Arterial pO2 improved slightly while pCO2 remained unchanged. Conjunctival oxygen tension improved by 30% on the ipsilateral and by 10% on the contralateral side, the ipsilateral values always remaining significantly lower. The ratio conjunctival/arterial pO2 raised only on the ipsilateral side where it was below the reference range before hemodilution. In addition to the well known improvement of blood fluidity and augmentation of cerebral blood flow following hemodilution in patients with acute ischemic stroke, there seems to be an increase in oxygen supply in the territories of both internal carotid arteries, especially on the ipsilateral side as indicated by the values of conjunctival oxygen tension and the ratio of conjunctival to arterial pO2.

  4. Models of a partially hydrated Titan interior with a clathrate crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Choukroun, M.; Sotin, C.

    2012-04-01

    We present a model of the interior evolution of Titan over time, assuming the silicate core was hydrated early in Titan’s history and is dehydrating over time. The original model presented in Castillo-Rogez and Lunine (2010) was motivated by a Cassini-derived moment of inertia (Iess et al., 2010) for Titan too large to be accommodated by classical fully differentiated models in which an anhydrous silicate core was overlain by a water ice (with possible perched ocean) mantle. Our model consists of a silicate core still in the process of dehydrating today, a situation made possible by the leaching of radiogenic potassium from the silicates into the perched liquid water ocean. The most recent version of our model accounts for the likely presence of large amounts of methane in the upper crust invoked to explain methane’s persistence at present and through geologic time (Tobie et al. 2006). The methane-rich crust turns out to have essentially no bearing on the temperature of the silicate core and hence the timing of dehydration, but it profoundly affects the thickness of the high-pressure ice layer beneath the ocean. Indeed, the insulating effect of the methane clathrate crust could have delayed the formation of the high-pressure layer, resulting in the interaction of liquid water with the silicate core for extended periods of time. Although a high-pressure ice layer is likely in place today, it is thin enough that plumes of hot water from the dehydrating core probably breach that layer. The implications of such a deep hydrothermal system for the later stages of the evolution of Titan’s interior and surface will be discussed. Part of this work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged. References: Castillo-Rogez, J., Lunine, J.: “Evolution of Titan’s rocky core constrained by Cassini observations”. GRL, Vol. 37, L20205, 2010. Iess, L., et al.:

  5. Estimates of Evapotranspiration with a One- and Two-Layer Model of Heat Transfer over Partial Canopy Cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, William P.

    1990-08