WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling analyses revealed

  1. Comparative analyses reveal potential uses of Brachypodium distachyon as a model for cold stress responses in temperate grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the potential of Brachypodium distachyon as a model for low temperature stress responses in Pooideae. The ice recrystallization inhibition protein (IRIP genes, fructosyltransferase (FST genes, and many C-repeat binding factor (CBF genes are Pooideae specific and important in low temperature responses. Here we used comparative analyses to study conservation and evolution of these gene families in B. distachyon to better understand its potential as a model species for agriculturally important temperate grasses. Results Brachypodium distachyon contains cold responsive IRIP genes which have evolved through Brachypodium specific gene family expansions. A large cold responsive CBF3 subfamily was identified in B. distachyon, while CBF4 homologs are absent from the genome. No B. distachyon FST gene homologs encode typical core Pooideae FST-motifs and low temperature induced fructan accumulation was dramatically different in B. distachyon compared to core Pooideae species. Conclusions We conclude that B. distachyon can serve as an interesting model for specific molecular mechanisms involved in low temperature responses in core Pooideae species. However, the evolutionary history of key genes involved in low temperature responses has been different in Brachypodium and core Pooideae species. These differences limit the use of B. distachyon as a model for holistic studies relevant for agricultural core Pooideae species.

  2. Genomic expression analyses reveal lysosomal, innate immunity proteins, as disease correlates in murine models of a lysosomal storage disorder.

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    Md Suhail Alam

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1(-/- mice relative to Npc1(+/- at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher's disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1(-/- as well as Balb/c Npc1(nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1(-/- mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1(-/- spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue. Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs

  3. Parsimony and Model-Based Analyses of Indels in Avian Nuclear Genes Reveal Congruent and Incongruent Phylogenetic Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick H. Sheldon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Insertion/deletion (indel mutations, which are represented by gaps in multiple sequence alignments, have been used to examine phylogenetic hypotheses for some time. However, most analyses combine gap data with the nucleotide sequences in which they are embedded, probably because most phylogenetic datasets include few gap characters. Here, we report analyses of 12,030 gap characters from an alignment of avian nuclear genes using maximum parsimony (MP and a simple maximum likelihood (ML framework. Both trees were similar, and they exhibited almost all of the strongly supported relationships in the nucleotide tree, although neither gap tree supported many relationships that have proven difficult to recover in previous studies. Moreover, independent lines of evidence typically corroborated the nucleotide topology instead of the gap topology when they disagreed, although the number of conflicting nodes with high bootstrap support was limited. Filtering to remove short indels did not substantially reduce homoplasy or reduce conflict. Combined analyses of nucleotides and gaps resulted in the nucleotide topology, but with increased support, suggesting that gap data may prove most useful when analyzed in combination with nucleotide substitutions.

  4. Whole genome and global gene expression analyses of the model mushroom Flammulina velutipes reveal a high capacity for lignocellulose degradation.

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    Young-Jin Park

    Full Text Available Flammulina velutipes is a fungus with health and medicinal benefits that has been used for consumption and cultivation in East Asia. F. velutipes is also known to degrade lignocellulose and produce ethanol. The overlapping interests of mushroom production and wood bioconversion make F. velutipes an attractive new model for fungal wood related studies. Here, we present the complete sequence of the F. velutipes genome. This is the first sequenced genome for a commercially produced edible mushroom that also degrades wood. The 35.6-Mb genome contained 12,218 predicted protein-encoding genes and 287 tRNA genes assembled into 11 scaffolds corresponding with the 11 chromosomes of strain KACC42780. The 88.4-kb mitochondrial genome contained 35 genes. Well-developed wood degrading machinery with strong potential for lignin degradation (69 auxiliary activities, formerly FOLymes and carbohydrate degradation (392 CAZymes, along with 58 alcohol dehydrogenase genes were highly expressed in the mycelium, demonstrating the potential application of this organism to bioethanol production. Thus, the newly uncovered wood degrading capacity and sequential nature of this process in F. velutipes, offer interesting possibilities for more detailed studies on either lignin or (hemi- cellulose degradation in complex wood substrates. The mutual interest in wood degradation by the mushroom industry and (ligno-cellulose biomass related industries further increase the significance of F. velutipes as a new model.

  5. Whole genome and global gene expression analyses of the model mushroom Flammulina velutipes reveal a high capacity for lignocellulose degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Jin; Baek, Jeong Hun; Lee, Seonwook; Kim, Changhoon; Rhee, Hwanseok; Kim, Hyungtae; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Park, Hae-Ran; Yoon, Dae-Eun; Nam, Jae-Young; Kim, Hong-Il; Kim, Jong-Guk; Yoon, Hyeokjun; Kang, Hee-Wan; Cho, Jae-Yong; Song, Eun-Sung; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yoo, Young-Bok; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Kong, Won-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Flammulina velutipes is a fungus with health and medicinal benefits that has been used for consumption and cultivation in East Asia. F. velutipes is also known to degrade lignocellulose and produce ethanol. The overlapping interests of mushroom production and wood bioconversion make F. velutipes an attractive new model for fungal wood related studies. Here, we present the complete sequence of the F. velutipes genome. This is the first sequenced genome for a commercially produced edible mushroom that also degrades wood. The 35.6-Mb genome contained 12,218 predicted protein-encoding genes and 287 tRNA genes assembled into 11 scaffolds corresponding with the 11 chromosomes of strain KACC42780. The 88.4-kb mitochondrial genome contained 35 genes. Well-developed wood degrading machinery with strong potential for lignin degradation (69 auxiliary activities, formerly FOLymes) and carbohydrate degradation (392 CAZymes), along with 58 alcohol dehydrogenase genes were highly expressed in the mycelium, demonstrating the potential application of this organism to bioethanol production. Thus, the newly uncovered wood degrading capacity and sequential nature of this process in F. velutipes, offer interesting possibilities for more detailed studies on either lignin or (hemi-) cellulose degradation in complex wood substrates. The mutual interest in wood degradation by the mushroom industry and (ligno-)cellulose biomass related industries further increase the significance of F. velutipes as a new model.

  6. Modeling and experimental analyses reveals signaling plasticity in a bi-modular assembly of CD40 receptor activated kinases.

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    Uddipan Sarma

    Full Text Available Depending on the strength of signal dose, CD40 receptor (CD40 controls ERK-1/2 and p38MAPK activation. At low signal dose, ERK-1/2 is maximally phosphorylated but p38MAPK is minimally phosphorylated; as the signal dose increases, ERK-1/2 phosphorylation is reduced whereas p38MAPK phosphorylation is reciprocally enhanced. The mechanism of reciprocal activation of these two MAPKs remains un-elucidated. Here, our computational model, coupled to experimental perturbations, shows that the observed reciprocity is a system-level behavior of an assembly of kinases arranged in two modules. Experimental perturbations with kinase inhibitors suggest that a minimum of two trans-modular negative feedback loops are required to reproduce the experimentally observed reciprocity. The bi-modular architecture of the signaling pathways endows the system with an inherent plasticity which is further expressed in the skewing of the CD40-induced productions of IL-10 and IL-12, the respective anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Targeting the plasticity of CD40 signaling significantly reduces Leishmania major infection in a susceptible mouse strain. Thus, for the first time, using CD40 signaling as a model, we show how a bi-modular assembly of kinases imposes reciprocity to a receptor signaling. The findings unravel that the signalling plasticity is inherent to a reciprocal system and that the principle can be used for designing a therapy.

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis revealed by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of the striata in two mouse models of Parkinson’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Mark H.; Qian, Weijun; Wang, Haixing; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Sforza, Daniel M.; Lacan, Goran; Liu, Dahai; Khan, Arshad H.; Cantor, Rita M.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2008-02-10

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the changes in the nigrostriatal pathway in Parkinson disease (PD) are not completely understood. Here we use mass spectrometry and microarrays to study the proteomic and transcriptomic changes in the striatum of two mouse models of PD, induced by the distinct neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and methamphetamine (METH). Proteomic analyses resulted in the identification and relative quantification of 912 proteins with two or more unique peptides and 85 proteins with significant abundance changes following neurotoxin treatment. Similarly, microarray analyses revealed 181 genes with significant changes in mRNA following neurotoxin treatment. The combined protein and gene list provides a clearer picture of the potential mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration observed in PD. Functional analysis of this combined list revealed a number of significant categories, including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress response and apoptosis. Additionally, codon usage and miRNAs may play an important role in translational control in the striatum. These results constitute one of the largest datasets integrating protein and transcript changes for these neurotoxin models with many similar endpoint phenotypes but distinct mechanisms.

  8. An extensible analysable system model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2008-01-01

    , this does not hold for real physical systems. Approaches such as threat modelling try to target the formalisation of the real-world domain, but still are far from the rigid techniques available in security research. Many currently available approaches to assurance of critical infrastructure security...... allows for easy development of analyses for the abstracted systems. We briefly present one application of our approach, namely the analysis of systems for potential insider threats....

  9. Comparative Analyses of the β-Tubulin Gene and Molecular Modeling Reveal Molecular Insight into the Colchicine Resistance in Kinetoplastids Organisms

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    Luis Luis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential susceptibility to microtubule agents has been demonstrated between mammalian cells and kinetoplastid organisms such as Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma spp. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize the architecture of the putative colchicine binding site of Leishmania spp. and investigate the molecular basis of colchicine resistance. We cloned and sequenced the β-tubulin gene of Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis and established the theoretical 3D model of the protein, using the crystallographic structure of the bovine protein as template. We identified mutations on the Leishmania  β-tubulin gene sequences on regions related to the putative colchicine-binding pocket, which generate amino acid substitutions and changes in the topology of this region, blocking the access of colchicine. The same mutations were found in the β-tubulin sequence of kinetoplastid organisms such as Trypanosoma cruzi, T. brucei, and T. evansi. Using molecular modelling approaches, we demonstrated that conformational changes include an elongation and torsion of an α-helix structure and displacement to the inside of the pocket of one β-sheet that hinders access of colchicine. We propose that kinetoplastid organisms show resistance to colchicine due to amino acids substitutions that generate structural changes in the putative colchicine-binding domain, which prevent colchicine access.

  10. Model-based analyses reveal insular population diversification and cryptic frog species in the Ischnocnema parva complex in the Atlantic forest of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehara, Marcelo; Barth, Adriane; Oliveira, Eliana Faria de; Costa, Marco Antonio; Haddad, Célio Fernando Baptista; Vences, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    The Atlantic Forest (AF) of Brazil has long been recognized as a biodiversity conservation hotspot. Despite decades of studies the species inventory of this biome continues to increase with the discovery of cryptic diversity and the description of new species. Different diversification mechanisms have been proposed to explain the diversity in the region, including models of forest dynamics, barriers to gene flow and dispersal. Also, sea level change is thought to have influenced coastal diversification and isolated populations on continental islands. However, the timing and mode of diversification of insular populations in the AF region were rarely investigated. Here, we analyze the phylogeography and species diversity of the small-sized direct-developing frog Ischnocnema parva. These frogs are independent from water bodies but dependent on forest cover and high humidity, and provide good models to understand forest dynamics and insular diversification. Our analysis was based on DNA sequences for one mitochondrial and four nuclear genes of 71 samples from 18 localities including two islands, São Sebastião, municipality of Ilhabela, and Mar Virado, municipality of Ubatuba, both in the state of São Paulo. We use molecular taxonomic methods to show that I. parva is composed of six independently evolving lineages, with the nominal I. parva likely endemic to the type locality. The time-calibrated species tree shows that these lineages have diverged in the Pliocene and Pleistocene, suggesting the persistence of micro-refuges of forest in the AF. For the two insular populations we used approximate Bayesian computation to test different diversification hypotheses. Our findings support isolation with migration for São Sebastião population, with ∼1Mya divergence time, and isolation without migration for Mar Virado population, with ∼13Kya divergence time, suggesting a combination of different processes for diversification on AF islands. Copyright © 2017. Published

  11. Graphical models for genetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Sheehan, Nuala A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces graphical models as a natural environment in which to formulate and solve problems in genetics and related areas. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among various local computation algorithms which have been developed within the hitherto mostly separate areas...... of graphical models and genetics. The potential of graphical models is explored and illustrated through a number of example applications where the genetic element is substantial or dominating....

  12. Graphical models for genetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Sheehan, Nuala A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces graphical models as a natural environment in which to formulate and solve problems in genetics and related areas. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among various local computation algorithms which have been developed within the hitherto mostly separate areas...

  13. (Capsicum annuum L.) genotypes revealed by AFLP analyses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... (26%) polymorphic AFLP markers out of total 215 DNA fragments from 4 primer pairs were used to define the genetic ... assisted selection and genome mapping. (Paran et al., ... of the consequences of breeding and selection for the production of ..... Comparative analyses of genetic diversities within tomato.

  14. Intron analyses reveal multiple calmodulin copies in Littorina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R J; Wilding, C S; Grahame, J

    2005-04-01

    Intron 3 and the flanking exons of the calmodulin gene have been amplified, cloned, and sequenced from 18 members of the gastropod genus Littorina. From the 48 sequences, at least five different gene copies have been identified and their functionality characterized using a strategy based upon the potential protein product predicted from flanking exon data. The functionality analyses suggest that four of the genes code for functional copies of calmodulin. All five copies have been identified across a wide range of littorinid species although not ubiquitously. Using this novel approach based on intron sequences, we have identified an unprecedented number of potential calmodulin copies in Littorina, exceeding that reported for any other invertebrate. This suggests a higher number of, and more ancient, gene duplications than previously detected in a single genus.

  15. Network analyses reveal novel aspects of ALS pathogenesis.

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    Mario Sanhueza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of motor neurons, muscle atrophy and paralysis. Mutations in the human VAMP-associated protein B (hVAPB cause a heterogeneous group of motor neuron diseases including ALS8. Despite extensive research, the molecular mechanisms underlying ALS pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Genetic screens for key interactors of hVAPB activity in the intact nervous system, however, represent a fundamental approach towards understanding the in vivo function of hVAPB and its role in ALS pathogenesis. Targeted expression of the disease-causing allele leads to neurodegeneration and progressive decline in motor performance when expressed in the adult Drosophila, eye or in its entire nervous system, respectively. By using these two phenotypic readouts, we carried out a systematic survey of the Drosophila genome to identify modifiers of hVAPB-induced neurotoxicity. Modifiers cluster in a diverse array of biological functions including processes and genes that have been previously linked to hVAPB function, such as proteolysis and vesicular trafficking. In addition to established mechanisms, the screen identified endocytic trafficking and genes controlling proliferation and apoptosis as potent modifiers of ALS8-mediated defects. Surprisingly, the list of modifiers was mostly enriched for proteins linked to lipid droplet biogenesis and dynamics. Computational analysis reveals that most modifiers can be linked into a complex network of interacting genes, and that the human genes homologous to the Drosophila modifiers can be assembled into an interacting network largely overlapping with that in flies. Identity markers of the endocytic process were also found to abnormally accumulate in ALS patients, further supporting the relevance of the fly data for human biology. Collectively, these results not only lead to a better understanding of hVAPB function but also point to

  16. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes

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    Silvia eTavares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 151.5 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi. In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1,800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp. Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94 %. The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7,000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research.

  17. Quantitative analyses of the plant cytoskeleton reveal underlying organizational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Breuer, David; Sampathkumar, Arun; Hollandt, Florian; Persson, Staffan; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons are vital structures for cell growth and development across all species. While individual molecular mechanisms underpinning actin and microtubule dynamics have been intensively studied, principles that govern the cytoskeleton organization remain largely unexplored. Here, we captured biologically relevant characteristics of the plant cytoskeleton through a network-driven imaging-based approach allowing to quantitatively assess dynamic features of the cytoskeleton. By introducing suitable null models, we demonstrate that the plant cytoskeletal networks exhibit properties required for efficient transport, namely, short average path lengths and high robustness. We further show that these advantageous features are maintained during temporal cytoskeletal re-arrangements. Interestingly, man-made transportation networks exhibit similar properties, suggesting general laws of network organization supporting diverse transport processes. The proposed network-driven analysis can be ...

  18. Challenges and Opportunities in Analysing Students Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Anaya, Paloma; Justi, Rosária; Díaz de Bustamante, Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Modelling-based teaching activities have been designed and analysed from distinct theoretical perspectives. In this paper, we use one of them--the model of modelling diagram (MMD)--as an analytical tool in a regular classroom context. This paper examines the challenges that arise when the MMD is used as an analytical tool to characterise the…

  19. Externalizing Behaviour for Analysing System Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2013-01-01

    attackers. Therefore, many attacks are considerably easier to be performed for insiders than for outsiders. However, current models do not support explicit specification of different behaviours. Instead, behaviour is deeply embedded in the analyses supported by the models, meaning that it is a complex......, if not impossible task to change behaviours. Especially when considering social engineering or the human factor in general, the ability to use different kinds of behaviours is essential. In this work we present an approach to make the behaviour a separate component in system models, and explore how to integrate......System models have recently been introduced to model organisations and evaluate their vulnerability to threats and especially insider threats. Especially for the latter these models are very suitable, since insiders can be assumed to have more knowledge about the attacked organisation than outside...

  20. Integrated Analyses Resolve Conflicts over Squamate Reptile Phylogeny and Reveal Unexpected Placements for Fossil Taxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Tod W.; Townsend, Ted M.; Mulcahy, Daniel G.; Noonan, Brice P.; Wood, Perry L.; Sites, Jack W.; Wiens, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement. PMID:25803280

  1. Integrated analyses resolve conflicts over squamate reptile phylogeny and reveal unexpected placements for fossil taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Tod W; Townsend, Ted M; Mulcahy, Daniel G; Noonan, Brice P; Wood, Perry L; Sites, Jack W; Wiens, John J

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement.

  2. Modelling and Analysing Socio-Technical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanyan, Zaruhi; Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Nielson, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    with social engineering. Due to this combination of attack steps on technical and social levels, risk assessment in socio-technical systems is complex. Therefore, established risk assessment methods often abstract away the internal structure of an organisation and ignore human factors when modelling...... and assessing attacks. In our work we model all relevant levels of socio-technical systems, and propose evaluation techniques for analysing the security properties of the model. Our approach simplifies the identification of possible attacks and provides qualified assessment and ranking of attacks based...... on the expected impact. We demonstrate our approach on a home-payment system. The system is specifically designed to help elderly or disabled people, who may have difficulties leaving their home, to pay for some services, e.g., care-taking or rent. The payment is performed using the remote control of a television...

  3. Phylogenomic and structural modeling analyses of the PsbP superfamily reveal multiple small segment additions in the evolution of photosystem II-associated PsbP protein in green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoki

    2010-07-01

    PsbP is a thylakoid lumen protein involved in oxygen evolution in photosystem II (PSII) in green plants. Genomic analysis identified a number of PsbP homologs in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. To analyze the transition of cyanobacterial PsbO/U/V complex to PsbO/P/Q complex in green plants, the evolutionary history of the PsbP superfamily was reconstructed. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that PsbP homologs be classified into eight major families (A-H), which were also characterized by specific insertion/deletion of short segments, as found by sequence alignment and homology modeling. Family A represented authentic PsbP proteins involved in oxygen evolution. The cyanobacterial PsbP and plant/algal PPL (Family H), having the simplest structure, should be considered as the root of all other families of PsbP, which subsequently gained various short, family-specific structural motifs during diversification of PsbP families. Interestingly, segments specific to Family A proteins were found arranged as a ring surrounding the modeled Arabidopsis PsbP protein. These results suggest that Family A-specific additions of short segments played a decisive role in the transition of PsbO/U/V to PsbO/P/Q complex in green plants. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-wide analyses reveal a role for peptide hormones in planarian germline development.

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    James J Collins

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides (i.e., neuropeptides or peptide hormones represent the largest class of cell-cell signaling molecules in metazoans and are potent regulators of neural and physiological function. In vertebrates, peptide hormones play an integral role in endocrine signaling between the brain and the gonads that controls reproductive development, yet few of these molecules have been shown to influence reproductive development in invertebrates. Here, we define a role for peptide hormones in controlling reproductive physiology of the model flatworm, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Based on our observation that defective neuropeptide processing results in defects in reproductive system development, we employed peptidomic and functional genomic approaches to characterize the planarian peptide hormone complement, identifying 51 prohormone genes and validating 142 peptides biochemically. Comprehensive in situ hybridization analyses of prohormone gene expression revealed the unanticipated complexity of the flatworm nervous system and identified a prohormone specifically expressed in the nervous system of sexually reproducing planarians. We show that this member of the neuropeptide Y superfamily is required for the maintenance of mature reproductive organs and differentiated germ cells in the testes. Additionally, comparative analyses of our biochemically validated prohormones with the genomes of the parasitic flatworms Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum identified new schistosome prohormones and validated half of all predicted peptide-encoding genes in these parasites. These studies describe the peptide hormone complement of a flatworm on a genome-wide scale and reveal a previously uncharacterized role for peptide hormones in flatworm reproduction. Furthermore, they suggest new opportunities for using planarians as free-living models for understanding the reproductive biology of flatworm parasites.

  5. Comparative sequence and genetic analyses of asparagus BACs reveal no microsynteny with onion or rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakse, Jernej; Telgmann, Alexa; Jung, Christian; Khar, Anil; Melgar, Sergio; Cheung, Foo; Town, Christopher D; Havey, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    The Poales (includes the grasses) and Asparagales [includes onion (Allium cepa L.) and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.)] are the two most economically important monocot orders. The Poales are a member of the commelinoid monocots, a group of orders sister to the Asparagales. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed a high degree of synteny among the grasses; however, it is not known if this synteny extends to other major monocot groups such as the Asparagales. Although we previously reported no evidence for synteny at the recombinational level between onion and rice, microsynteny may exist across shorter genomic regions in the grasses and Asparagales. We sequenced nine asparagus BACs to reveal physically linked genic-like sequences and determined their most similar positions in the onion and rice genomes. Four of the asparagus BACs were selected using molecular markers tightly linked to the sex-determining M locus on chromosome 5 of asparagus. These BACs possessed only two putative coding regions and had long tracts of degenerated retroviral elements and transposons. Five asparagus BACs were selected after hybridization of three onion cDNAs that mapped to three different onion chromosomes. Genic-like sequences that were physically linked on the cDNA-selected BACs or genetically linked on the M-linked BACs showed significant similarities (e < -20) to expressed sequences on different rice chromosomes, revealing no evidence for microsynteny between asparagus and rice across these regions. Genic-like sequences that were linked in asparagus were used to identify highly similar (e < -20) expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of onion. These onion ESTs mapped to different onion chromosomes and no relationship was observed between physical or genetic linkages in asparagus and genetic linkages in onion. These results further indicate that synteny among grass genomes does not extend to a sister order in the monocots and that asparagus may not be an appropriate smaller genome

  6. Hierarchical structure of the Sicilian goats revealed by Bayesian analyses of microsatellite information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwek, M; Finocchiaro, R; Curik, I; Portolano, B

    2011-02-01

    Genetic structure and relationship amongst the main goat populations in Sicily (Girgentana, Derivata di Siria, Maltese and Messinese) were analysed using information from 19 microsatellite markers genotyped on 173 individuals. A posterior Bayesian approach implemented in the program STRUCTURE revealed a hierarchical structure with two clusters at the first level (Girgentana vs. Messinese, Derivata di Siria and Maltese), explaining 4.8% of variation (amovaФ(ST) estimate). Seven clusters nested within these first two clusters (further differentiations of Girgentana, Derivata di Siria and Maltese), explaining 8.5% of variation (amovaФ(SC) estimate). The analyses and methods applied in this study indicate their power to detect subtle population structure.

  7. Externalizing Behaviour for Analysing System Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof; Kammüller, Florian

    Systems models have recently been introduced to model organisationsandevaluate their vulnerability to threats and especially insiderthreats. Especially for the latter these models are very suitable, since insiders can be assumed to have more knowledge about the attacked organisation than outside

  8. Comparative Genome Analyses of Vibrio anguillarum Strains Reveal a Link with Pathogenicity Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Alvise, Paul D.; Xu, Ruiqi; Zhang, Faxing; Middelboe, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio anguillarum is a marine bacterium that can cause vibriosis in many fish and shellfish species, leading to high mortalities and economic losses in aquaculture. Although putative virulence factors have been identified, the mechanism of pathogenesis of V. anguillarum is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed whole-genome sequences of a collection of V. anguillarum strains and compared them to virulence of the strains as determined in larval challenge assays. Previously identified virulence factors were globally distributed among the strains, with some genetic diversity. However, the pan-genome revealed that six out of nine high-virulence strains possessed a unique accessory genome that was attributed to pathogenic genomic islands, prophage-like elements, virulence factors, and a new set of gene clusters involved in biosynthesis, modification, and transport of polysaccharides. In contrast, V. anguillarum strains that were medium to nonvirulent had a high degree of genomic homogeneity. Finally, we found that a phylogeny based on the core genomes clustered the strains with moderate to no virulence, while six out of nine high-virulence strains represented phylogenetically separate clusters. Hence, we suggest a link between genotype and virulence characteristics of Vibrio anguillarum, which can be used to unravel the molecular evolution of V. anguillarum and can also be important from survey and diagnostic perspectives. IMPORTANCE Comparative genome analysis of strains of a pathogenic bacterial species can be a powerful tool to discover acquisition of mobile genetic elements related to virulence. Here, we compared 28 V. anguillarum strains that differed in virulence in fish larval models. By pan-genome analyses, we found that six of nine highly virulent strains had a unique core and accessory genome. In contrast, V. anguillarum strains that were medium to nonvirulent had low genomic diversity. Integration of genomic and phenotypic features provides

  9. Comparative Genome Analyses of Vibrio anguillarum Strains Reveal a Link with Pathogenicity Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Alvise, Paul D; Xu, Ruiqi; Zhang, Faxing; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a marine bacterium that can cause vibriosis in many fish and shellfish species, leading to high mortalities and economic losses in aquaculture. Although putative virulence factors have been identified, the mechanism of pathogenesis of V. anguillarum is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed whole-genome sequences of a collection of V. anguillarum strains and compared them to virulence of the strains as determined in larval challenge assays. Previously identified virulence factors were globally distributed among the strains, with some genetic diversity. However, the pan-genome revealed that six out of nine high-virulence strains possessed a unique accessory genome that was attributed to pathogenic genomic islands, prophage-like elements, virulence factors, and a new set of gene clusters involved in biosynthesis, modification, and transport of polysaccharides. In contrast, V. anguillarum strains that were medium to nonvirulent had a high degree of genomic homogeneity. Finally, we found that a phylogeny based on the core genomes clustered the strains with moderate to no virulence, while six out of nine high-virulence strains represented phylogenetically separate clusters. Hence, we suggest a link between genotype and virulence characteristics of Vibrio anguillarum, which can be used to unravel the molecular evolution of V. anguillarum and can also be important from survey and diagnostic perspectives. IMPORTANCE Comparative genome analysis of strains of a pathogenic bacterial species can be a powerful tool to discover acquisition of mobile genetic elements related to virulence. Here, we compared 28 V. anguillarum strains that differed in virulence in fish larval models. By pan-genome analyses, we found that six of nine highly virulent strains had a unique core and accessory genome. In contrast, V. anguillarum strains that were medium to nonvirulent had low genomic diversity. Integration of genomic and phenotypic features provides insights

  10. Trophic positioning of meiofauna revealed by stable isotopes and food web analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Araya, Jenny M; Schmid, Peter E; Tod, Steven P; Esteban, Genoveva F

    2016-11-01

    Despite important advances in the ecology of river food webs, the strength and nature of the connection between the meio- and macrofaunal components of the web are still debated. Some unresolved issues are the effects of the inclusion of meiofaunal links and their temporal variations on the overall river food web properties, and the significance of autochthonous and allochthonous material for these components. In the present study, we conducted analyses of gut content of macro- and meiofauna and stable isotope analyses of meiofauna to examine seasonal food webs of a chalk stream. The results of the gut content analyses, confirmed by the δ(13) C signatures, revealed a seasonal shift from a dependence on autochthonous (biofilm) to allochthonous food sources. Here, we demonstrate that aggregating basal or meiofaunal species into single categories affects key web properties such as web size, links, linkage density, and predator-prey ratios. More importantly, seasonal variation in attributes characterized the entire web and these changes persist regardless of taxonomic resolution. Furthermore, our analyses evidenced discrete variations in δ(15) N across the meiofauna community with a trophic structure that confirms gut content analyses, placing the meiofauna high in the food web. We, therefore, conclude that small-body-sized taxa can occur high in dynamic river food webs, questioning assumptions that trophic position increases with body size and that webs are static. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Time-Series Analyses of Transcriptomes and Proteomes Reveal Molecular Networks Underlying Oil Accumulation in Canola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Huafang; Cui, Yixin; Ding, Yijuan; Mei, Jiaqin; Dong, Hongli; Zhang, Wenxin; Wu, Shiqi; Liang, Ying; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Jiana; Xiong, Qing; Qian, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of lipid metabolism is vital for genetic engineering of canola (Brassica napus L.) to increase oil yield or modify oil composition. We conducted time-series analyses of transcriptomes and proteomes to uncover the molecular networks associated with oil accumulation and dynamic changes in these networks in canola. The expression levels of genes and proteins were measured at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after pollination (WAP). Our results show that the biosynthesis of fatty acids is a dominant cellular process from 2 to 6 WAP, while the degradation mainly happens after 6 WAP. We found that genes in almost every node of fatty acid synthesis pathway were significantly up-regulated during oil accumulation. Moreover, significant expression changes of two genes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and acyl-ACP desaturase, were detected on both transcriptomic and proteomic levels. We confirmed the temporal expression patterns revealed by the transcriptomic analyses using quantitative real-time PCR experiments. The gene set association analysis show that the biosynthesis of fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids are the most significant biological processes from 2-4 WAP and 4-6 WAP, respectively, which is consistent with the results of time-series analyses. These results not only provide insight into the mechanisms underlying lipid metabolism, but also reveal novel candidate genes that are worth further investigation for their values in the genetic engineering of canola. PMID:28119706

  12. Metabolomic Analyses of Leishmania Reveal Multiple Species Differences and Large Differences in Amino Acid Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth D Westrop

    Full Text Available Comparative genomic analyses of Leishmania species have revealed relatively minor heterogeneity amongst recognised housekeeping genes and yet the species cause distinct infections and pathogenesis in their mammalian hosts. To gain greater information on the biochemical variation between species, and insights into possible metabolic mechanisms underpinning visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, we have undertaken in this study a comparative analysis of the metabolomes of promastigotes of L. donovani, L. major and L. mexicana. The analysis revealed 64 metabolites with confirmed identity differing 3-fold or more between the cell extracts of species, with 161 putatively identified metabolites differing similarly. Analysis of the media from cultures revealed an at least 3-fold difference in use or excretion of 43 metabolites of confirmed identity and 87 putatively identified metabolites that differed to a similar extent. Strikingly large differences were detected in their extent of amino acid use and metabolism, especially for tryptophan, aspartate, arginine and proline. Major pathways of tryptophan and arginine catabolism were shown to be to indole-3-lactate and arginic acid, respectively, which were excreted. The data presented provide clear evidence on the value of global metabolomic analyses in detecting species-specific metabolic features, thus application of this technology should be a major contributor to gaining greater understanding of how pathogens are adapted to infecting their hosts.

  13. Photovoltaic System Modeling. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Clifford W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Curtis E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    We report an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for modeling AC energy from ph otovoltaic systems . Output from a PV system is predicted by a sequence of models. We quantify u ncertainty i n the output of each model using empirical distribution s of each model's residuals. We propagate uncertainty through the sequence of models by sampli ng these distributions to obtain a n empirical distribution of a PV system's output. We consider models that: (1) translate measured global horizontal, direct and global diffuse irradiance to plane - of - array irradiance; (2) estimate effective irradiance; (3) predict cell temperature; (4) estimate DC voltage, current and power ; (5) reduce DC power for losses due to inefficient maximum power point tracking or mismatch among modules; and (6) convert DC to AC power . O ur analysis consider s a notional PV system com prising an array of FirstSolar FS - 387 modules and a 250 kW AC inverter ; we use measured irradiance and weather at Albuquerque, NM. We found the uncertainty in PV syste m output to be relatively small, on the order of 1% for daily energy. We found that unce rtainty in the models for POA irradiance and effective irradiance to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty in predicted daily energy. Our analysis indicates that efforts to reduce the uncertainty in PV system output predictions may yield the greatest improvements by focusing on the POA and effective irradiance models.

  14. Bayesian Uncertainty Analyses Via Deterministic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzysztofowicz, R.

    2001-05-01

    Rational decision-making requires that the total uncertainty about a variate of interest (a predictand) be quantified in terms of a probability distribution, conditional on all available information and knowledge. Suppose the state-of-knowledge is embodied in a deterministic model, which is imperfect and outputs only an estimate of the predictand. Fundamentals are presented of three Bayesian approaches to producing a probability distribution of the predictand via any deterministic model. The Bayesian Processor of Output (BPO) quantifies the total uncertainty in terms of a posterior distribution, conditional on model output. The Bayesian Processor of Ensemble (BPE) quantifies the total uncertainty in terms of a posterior distribution, conditional on an ensemble of model output. The Bayesian Forecasting System (BFS) decomposes the total uncertainty into input uncertainty and model uncertainty, which are characterized independently and then integrated into a predictive distribution.

  15. Analysing Social Epidemics by Delayed Stochastic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-José Santonja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamics of a delayed stochastic mathematical model to understand the evolution of the alcohol consumption in Spain. Sufficient condition for stability in probability of the equilibrium point of the dynamic model with aftereffect and stochastic perturbations is obtained via Kolmanovskii and Shaikhet general method of Lyapunov functionals construction. We conclude that alcohol consumption in Spain will be constant (with stability in time with around 36.47% of nonconsumers, 62.94% of nonrisk consumers, and 0.59% of risk consumers. This approach allows us to emphasize the possibilities of the dynamical models in order to study human behaviour.

  16. Modelling, analyses and design of switching converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuk, S. M.; Middlebrook, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A state-space averaging method for modelling switching dc-to-dc converters for both continuous and discontinuous conduction mode is developed. In each case the starting point is the unified state-space representation, and the end result is a complete linear circuit model, for each conduction mode, which correctly represents all essential features, namely, the input, output, and transfer properties (static dc as well as dynamic ac small-signal). While the method is generally applicable to any switching converter, it is extensively illustrated for the three common power stages (buck, boost, and buck-boost). The results for these converters are then easily tabulated owing to the fixed equivalent circuit topology of their canonical circuit model. The insights that emerge from the general state-space modelling approach lead to the design of new converter topologies through the study of generic properties of the cascade connection of basic buck and boost converters.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA analyses reveal low genetic diversity in Culex quinquefasciatus from residential areas in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, V L; Lim, P E; Chen, C D; Lim, Y A L; Tan, T K; Norma-Rashid, Y; Lee, H L; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2014-06-01

    The present study explored the intraspecific genetic diversity, dispersal patterns and phylogeographic relationships of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) in Malaysia using reference data available in GenBank in order to reveal this species' phylogenetic relationships. A statistical parsimony network of 70 taxa aligned as 624 characters of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene and 685 characters of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene revealed three haplotypes (A1-A3) and four haplotypes (B1-B4), respectively. The concatenated sequences of both COI and COII genes with a total of 1309 characters revealed seven haplotypes (AB1-AB7). Analysis using tcs indicated that haplotype AB1 was the common ancestor and the most widespread haplotype in Malaysia. The genetic distance based on concatenated sequences of both COI and COII genes ranged from 0.00076 to 0.00229. Sequence alignment of Cx. quinquefasciatus from Malaysia and other countries revealed four haplotypes (AA1-AA4) by the COI gene and nine haplotypes (BB1-BB9) by the COII gene. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that Malaysian Cx. quinquefasciatus share the same genetic lineage as East African and Asian Cx. quinquefasciatus. This study has inferred the genetic lineages, dispersal patterns and hypothetical ancestral genotypes of Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  18. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analyses revealed molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The mammalian brain is heterogeneous, containing billions of neurons and trillions of synapses forming various neural circuitries, through which sense, movement, thought, and emotion arise. The cellular heterogeneity of the brain has made it difficult to study the molecular logic of neural circuitry wiring, pruning, activation, and plasticity, until recently, transcriptome analyses with single cell resolution makes decoding of gene regulatory networks underlying aforementioned circuitry properties possible. Here we report success in performing both electrophysiological and whole-genome transcriptome analyses on single human neurons in culture. Using Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analyses (WGCNA, we identified gene clusters highly correlated with neuronal maturation judged by electrophysiological characteristics. A tight link between neuronal maturation and genes involved in ubiquitination and mitochondrial function was revealed. Moreover, we identified a list of candidate genes, which could potentially serve as biomarkers for neuronal maturation. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analysis will serve as powerful tools in the future to unveil molecular logics for neural circuitry functions.

  19. Modelling and Analyses of Embedded Systems Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekling, Aske Wiid

    We present the MoVES languages: a language with which embedded systems can be specified at a stage in the development process where an application is identified and should be mapped to an execution platform (potentially multi- core). We give a formal model for MoVES that captures and gives......-based verification is a promising approach for assisting developers of embedded systems. We provide examples of system verifications that, in size and complexity, point in the direction of industrially-interesting systems....

  20. Multi-tissue omics analyses reveal molecular regulatory networks for puberty in composite beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, Angela; Reverter, Antonio; DeAtley, Kasey L; Ashley, Ryan L; Colgrave, Michelle L; Fortes, Marina R S; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Lehnert, Sigrid; Porto-Neto, Laercio; Rincón, Gonzalo; Silver, Gail A; Snelling, Warren M; Medrano, Juan F; Thomas, Milton G

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a complex physiological event by which animals mature into an adult capable of sexual reproduction. In order to enhance our understanding of the genes and regulatory pathways and networks involved in puberty, we characterized the transcriptome of five reproductive tissues (i.e. hypothalamus, pituitary gland, ovary, uterus, and endometrium) as well as tissues known to be relevant to growth and metabolism needed to achieve puberty (i.e., longissimus dorsi muscle, adipose, and liver). These tissues were collected from pre- and post-pubertal Brangus heifers (3/8 Brahman; Bos indicus x 5/8 Angus; Bos taurus) derived from a population of cattle used to identify quantitative trait loci associated with fertility traits (i.e., age of first observed corpus luteum (ACL), first service conception (FSC), and heifer pregnancy (HPG)). In order to exploit the power of complementary omics analyses, pre- and post-puberty co-expression gene networks were constructed by combining the results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), RNA-Seq, and bovine transcription factors. Eight tissues among pre-pubertal and post-pubertal Brangus heifers revealed 1,515 differentially expressed and 943 tissue-specific genes within the 17,832 genes confirmed by RNA-Seq analysis. The hypothalamus experienced the most notable up-regulation of genes via puberty (i.e., 204 out of 275 genes). Combining the results of GWAS and RNA-Seq, we identified 25 loci containing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with ACL, FSC, and (or) HPG. Seventeen of these SNP were within a gene and 13 of the genes were expressed in uterus or endometrium. Multi-tissue omics analyses revealed 2,450 co-expressed genes relative to puberty. The pre-pubertal network had 372,861 connections whereas the post-pubertal network had 328,357 connections. A sub-network from this process revealed key transcriptional regulators (i.e., PITX2, FOXA1, DACH2, PROP1, SIX6, etc.). Results from these multi-tissue omics

  1. Multi-tissue omics analyses reveal molecular regulatory networks for puberty in composite beef cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cánovas

    Full Text Available Puberty is a complex physiological event by which animals mature into an adult capable of sexual reproduction. In order to enhance our understanding of the genes and regulatory pathways and networks involved in puberty, we characterized the transcriptome of five reproductive tissues (i.e. hypothalamus, pituitary gland, ovary, uterus, and endometrium as well as tissues known to be relevant to growth and metabolism needed to achieve puberty (i.e., longissimus dorsi muscle, adipose, and liver. These tissues were collected from pre- and post-pubertal Brangus heifers (3/8 Brahman; Bos indicus x 5/8 Angus; Bos taurus derived from a population of cattle used to identify quantitative trait loci associated with fertility traits (i.e., age of first observed corpus luteum (ACL, first service conception (FSC, and heifer pregnancy (HPG. In order to exploit the power of complementary omics analyses, pre- and post-puberty co-expression gene networks were constructed by combining the results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS, RNA-Seq, and bovine transcription factors. Eight tissues among pre-pubertal and post-pubertal Brangus heifers revealed 1,515 differentially expressed and 943 tissue-specific genes within the 17,832 genes confirmed by RNA-Seq analysis. The hypothalamus experienced the most notable up-regulation of genes via puberty (i.e., 204 out of 275 genes. Combining the results of GWAS and RNA-Seq, we identified 25 loci containing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP associated with ACL, FSC, and (or HPG. Seventeen of these SNP were within a gene and 13 of the genes were expressed in uterus or endometrium. Multi-tissue omics analyses revealed 2,450 co-expressed genes relative to puberty. The pre-pubertal network had 372,861 connections whereas the post-pubertal network had 328,357 connections. A sub-network from this process revealed key transcriptional regulators (i.e., PITX2, FOXA1, DACH2, PROP1, SIX6, etc.. Results from these multi

  2. Single-Cell Analyses of ESCs Reveal Alternative Pluripotent Cell States and Molecular Mechanisms that Control Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Papatsenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of gene expression in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs cultured in serum and LIF revealed the presence of two distinct cell subpopulations with individual gene expression signatures. Comparisons with published data revealed that cells in the first subpopulation are phenotypically similar to cells isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM. In contrast, cells in the second subpopulation appear to be more mature. Pluripotency Gene Regulatory Network (PGRN reconstruction based on single-cell data and published data suggested antagonistic roles for Oct4 and Nanog in the maintenance of pluripotency states. Integrated analyses of published genomic binding (ChIP data strongly supported this observation. Certain target genes alternatively regulated by OCT4 and NANOG, such as Sall4 and Zscan10, feed back into the top hierarchical regulator Oct4. Analyses of such incoherent feedforward loops with feedback (iFFL-FB suggest a dynamic model for the maintenance of mESC pluripotency and self-renewal.

  3. Genomic and secretomic analyses reveal unique features of the lignocellulolytic enzyme system of Penicillium decumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guodong; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Xiaomin; Zou, Gen; Qin, Yuqi; Ma, Liang; Li, Jie; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Shengyue; Wang, Chengshu; Xun, Luying; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Zhihua; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-01-01

    Many Penicillium species could produce extracellular enzyme systems with good lignocellulose hydrolysis performance. However, these species and their enzyme systems are still poorly understood and explored due to the lacking of genetic information. Here, we present the genomic and secretomic analyses of Penicillium decumbens that has been used in industrial production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in China for more than fifteen years. Comparative genomics analysis with the phylogenetically most similar species Penicillium chrysogenum revealed that P. decumbens has evolved with more genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, but fewer genes in cellular metabolism and regulation. Compared with the widely used cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei, P. decumbens has a lignocellulolytic enzyme system with more diverse components, particularly for cellulose binding domain-containing proteins and hemicellulases. Further, proteomic analysis of secretomes revealed that P. decumbens produced significantly more lignocellulolytic enzymes in the medium with cellulose-wheat bran as the carbon source than with glucose. The results expand our knowledge on the genetic information of lignocellulolytic enzyme systems in Penicillium species, and will facilitate rational strain improvement for the production of highly efficient enzyme systems used in lignocellulose utilization from Penicillium species.

  4. Genomic and secretomic analyses reveal unique features of the lignocellulolytic enzyme system of Penicillium decumbens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Liu

    Full Text Available Many Penicillium species could produce extracellular enzyme systems with good lignocellulose hydrolysis performance. However, these species and their enzyme systems are still poorly understood and explored due to the lacking of genetic information. Here, we present the genomic and secretomic analyses of Penicillium decumbens that has been used in industrial production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in China for more than fifteen years. Comparative genomics analysis with the phylogenetically most similar species Penicillium chrysogenum revealed that P. decumbens has evolved with more genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, but fewer genes in cellular metabolism and regulation. Compared with the widely used cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei, P. decumbens has a lignocellulolytic enzyme system with more diverse components, particularly for cellulose binding domain-containing proteins and hemicellulases. Further, proteomic analysis of secretomes revealed that P. decumbens produced significantly more lignocellulolytic enzymes in the medium with cellulose-wheat bran as the carbon source than with glucose. The results expand our knowledge on the genetic information of lignocellulolytic enzyme systems in Penicillium species, and will facilitate rational strain improvement for the production of highly efficient enzyme systems used in lignocellulose utilization from Penicillium species.

  5. Time series analyses reveal environmental and fisheries controls on Atlantic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) catch rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Time-series models (Dynamic factorial analyses and; Min/max autocorrelation factor analysis) were used to explore the relative influences of environmental variables and fishing pressure of trawl, seine and artisanal fleets on catch rates on Trachurus trachurus in ICES IXa sub-divisions (IXaCN-North coast; IXa- CS-South coast; IXaS-Algarve, South coast, Algarve). Fishing effort influenced catch rates in all areas with a 2 year lag and fishing pressure for each area was related to specific fleet sectors effort. In IXaCN, winter upwelling (spawning peak) and both summer northerly wind and wind magnitude (outside of the spawning peak) were strongly correlated with catch rates. In IXaCS summer/autumn westerly winds were related with catch rates. Northerly winds in spring, upwelling and SST (winter and autumn) were related with catch rates in IXaS-Algarve. For species with a long spawning season such as horse mackerel, seasonal analyses at broad regional scales can detract from a better understanding of variability in short term sub-stock catch rates. Favorable environmental conditions, even during seasons with low spawning activity can positively affect catch rates. Ignoring the role of regional oceanographic features on the spatial distribution of the sub-stocks when analysing variability in catch rates can lead to poor inferences about the productivity of the populations.

  6. Remote camera-trap methods and analyses reveal impacts of rangeland management on Namibian carnivore communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, M.J.; Sanjayan, M.; Lowenstein, J.; Nelson, A.; Jeo, R.M.; Crooks, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    Assessing the abundance and distribution of mammalian carnivores is vital for understanding their ecology and providing for their long-term conservation. Because of the difficulty of trapping and handling carnivores many studies have relied on abundance indices that may not accurately reflect real abundance and distribution patterns. We developed statistical analyses that detect spatial correlation in visitation data from combined scent station and camera-trap surveys, and we illustrate how to use such data to make inferences about changes in carnivore assemblages. As a case study we compared the carnivore communities of adjacent communal and freehold rangelands in central Namibia. We used an index of overdispersion to test for repeat visits to individual camera-trap scent stations and a bootstrap simulation to test for correlations in visits to camera neighbourhoods. After distilling our presence-absence data to the most defensible spatial scale, we assessed overall carnivore visitation using logistic regression. Our analyses confirmed the expected pattern of a depauparate fauna on the communal rangelands compared to the freehold rangelands. Additionally, the species that were not detected on communal sites were the larger-bodied carnivores. By modelling these rare visits as a Poisson process we illustrate a method of inferring whether or not such patterns are because of local extinction of species or are simply a result of low sample effort. Our Namibian case study indicates that these field methods and analyses can detect meaningful differences in the carnivore communities brought about by anthropogenic influences. ?? 2007 FFI.

  7. Global terrestrial water storage connectivity revealed using complex climate network analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Sun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial water storage (TWS exerts a key control in global water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. Although certain causal relationships exist between precipitation and TWS, the latter also reflects impacts of anthropogenic activities. Thus, quantification of the spatial patterns of TWS will not only help to understand feedbacks between climate dynamics and hydrologic cycle, but also provide new model calibration constraints for improving the current land surface models. In this work, the connectivity of TWS is quantified using the climate network theory, which has received broad attention in the climate modeling community in recent years. Complex networks of TWS anomalies are built using two global TWS datasets, a remote-sensing product that is obtained from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellite mission, and a model-generated dataset from the global land data assimilation system's NOAH model (GLDAS-NOAH. Both datasets have 1 ° × 1 ° resolutions and cover most global land areas except for permafrost regions. TWS networks are built by first quantifying pairwise correlation among all valid TWS anomaly time series, and then applying a statistical cutoff threshold to retain only the most important features in the network. Basinwise network connectivity maps are used to illuminate connectivity of individual river basins with other regions. The constructed network degree centrality maps show TWS hotspots around the globe and the patterns are consistent with recent GRACE studies. Parallel analyses of networks constructed using the two datasets indicate that the GLDAS-NOAH model captures many of the spatial patterns shown by GRACE, although significant discrepancies exist in some regions. Thus, our results provide important insights for constraining land surface models, especially in data sparse regions.

  8. Comparative analyses of developmental transcription factor repertoires in sponges reveal unexpected complexity of the earliest animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja

    2015-12-01

    Developmental transcription factors (DTFs) control development of animals by affecting expression of target genes, some of which are transcription factors themselves. In bilaterians and cnidarians, conserved DTFs are involved in homologous processes such as gastrulation or specification of neurons. The genome of Amphimedon queenslandica, the first sponge to be sequenced, revealed that only a fraction of these conserved DTF families are present in demosponges. This finding was in line with the view that morphological complexity in the animal lineage correlates with developmental toolkit complexity. However, as the phylum Porifera is very diverse, Amphimedon's genome may not be representative of all sponges. The recently sequenced genomes of calcareous sponges Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata allowed investigations of DTFs in a sponge lineage evolutionarily distant from demosponges. Surprisingly, the phylogenetic analyses of identified DTFs revealed striking differences between the calcareous sponges and Amphimedon. As these differences appear to be a result of independent gene loss events in the two sponge lineages, the last common ancestor of sponges had to possess a much more diverse repertoire of DTFs than extant sponges. Developmental expression of sponge homologs of genes involved in specification of the Bilaterian endomesoderm and the neurosensory cells suggests that roles of many DTFs date back to the last common ancestor of all animals. Strikingly, even DTFs displaying apparent pan-metazoan conservation of sequence and function are not immune to being lost from individual species genomes. The quest for a comprehensive picture of the developmental toolkit in the last common metazoan ancestor is thus greatly benefitting from the increasing accessibility of sequencing, allowing comparisons of multiple genomes within each phylum.

  9. Transcriptomic and metabolic analyses reveal salvage pathways in creatine-deficient AGAT(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockebrand, Malte; Nejad, Ali Sasani; Neu, Axel; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Sauter, Kathrin; Schillemeit, Stefan; Isbrandt, Dirk; Choe, Chi-Un

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscles require energy either at constant low (e.g., standing and posture) or immediate high rates (e.g., exercise). To fulfill these requirements, myocytes utilize the phosphocreatine (PCr)/creatine (Cr) system as a fast energy buffer and shuttle. We have generated mice lacking L-arginine:glycine amidino transferase (AGAT), the first enzyme of creatine biosynthesis. These AGAT(-/-) (d/d) mice are devoid of the PCr/Cr system and reveal severely altered oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, they exhibit complete resistance to diet-induced obesity, which is associated with a chronic activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in muscle and white adipose tissue. The underlying metabolic rearrangements have not yet been further analyzed. Here, we performed gene expression analysis in skeletal muscle and a serum amino acid profile of d/d mice revealing transcriptomic and metabolic alterations in pyruvate and glucose pathways. Differential pyruvate tolerance tests demonstrated preferential conversion of pyruvate to alanine, which was supported by increased protein levels of enzymes involved in pyruvate and alanine metabolism. Pyruvate tolerance tests suggested severely impaired hepatic gluconeogenesis despite increased availability of pyruvate and alanine. Furthermore, enzymes of serine production and one-carbon metabolism were significantly up-regulated in d/d mice, indicating increased de novo formation of one-carbon units from carbohydrate metabolism linked to NAD(P)H production. Besides the well-established function of the PCr/Cr system in energy metabolism, our transcriptomic and metabolic analyses suggest that it plays a pivotal role in systemic one-carbon metabolism, oxidation/reduction, and biosynthetic processes. Therefore, the PCr/Cr system is not only an energy buffer and shuttle, but also a crucial component involved in numerous systemic metabolic processes.

  10. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčováa, Jana; Knudsen, Rune; Kuhn, Jesper A.; Henriksen, Eirik H.; Siwertsson, Anna; Shaw, Jenny C.; Kuris, Armand M.; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    To identify trematode diversity and life-cycles in the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, Norway, we characterised 120 trematode isolates from mollusc first intermediate hosts, metacercariae from second intermediate host fishes and invertebrates, and adults from fish and invertebrate definitive hosts, using molecular techniques. Phylogenies based on nuclear and/or mtDNA revealed high species richness (24 species or species-level genetic lineages), and uncovered trematode diversity (16 putative new species) from five families typical in lake ecosystems (Allocreadiidae, Diplostomidae, Plagiorchiidae, Schistosomatidae and Strigeidae). Sampling potential invertebrate hosts allowed matching of sequence data for different stages, thus achieving molecular elucidation of trematode life-cycles and exploration of host-parasite interactions. Phylogenetic analyses also helped identify three major mollusc intermediate hosts (Radix balthica, Pisidium casertanum and Sphaerium sp.) in the lake. Our findings increase the known trematode diversity at the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, showing that digenean diversity is high in this otherwise depauperate sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystem, and indicating that sub-Arctic and Arctic ecosystems may be characterised by unique trematode assemblages.

  11. Transcriptome and biochemical analyses revealed a detailed proanthocyanidin biosynthesis pathway in brown cotton fiber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Hua Xiao

    Full Text Available Brown cotton fiber is the major raw material for colored cotton industry. Previous studies have showed that the brown pigments in cotton fiber belong to proanthocyanidins (PAs. To clarify the details of PA biosynthesis pathway in brown cotton fiber, gene expression profiles in developing brown and white fibers were compared via digital gene expression profiling and qRT-PCR. Compared to white cotton fiber, all steps from phenylalanine to PA monomers (flavan-3-ols were significantly up-regulated in brown fiber. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analyses showed that most of free flavan-3-ols in brown fiber were in 2, 3-trans form (gallocatechin and catechin, and the main units of polymeric PAs were trihydroxylated on B ring. Consistent with monomeric composition, the transcript levels of flavonoid 3', 5'-hydroxylase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase in cotton fiber were much higher than their competing enzymes acting on the same substrates (dihydroflavonol 4-reductase and anthocyanidin synthase, respectively. Taken together, our data revealed a detailed PA biosynthesis pathway wholly activated in brown cotton fiber, and demonstrated that flavonoid 3', 5'-hydroxylase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase represented the primary flow of PA biosynthesis in cotton fiber.

  12. Comparative Genome Analyses of Vibrio anguillarum Strains Reveal a Link with Pathogenicity Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; D'Alvise, Paul; Xu, Ruiqi

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a marine bacterium that can cause vibriosis in many fish and shellfish species, leading to high mortalities and economic losses in aquaculture. Although putative virulence factors have been identified, the mechanism of pathogenesis of V. anguillarum is not fully understood....... anguillarum strains that were medium to nonvirulent had a high degree of genomic homogeneity. Finally, we found that a phylogeny based on the core genomes clustered the strains with moderate to no virulence, while six out of nine high-virulence strains represented phylogenetically separate clusters. Hence, we suggest...... be a powerful tool to discover acquisition of mobile genetic elements related to virulence. Here, we compared 28 V. anguillarum strains that differed in virulence in fish larval models. By pan-genome analyses, we found that six of nine highly virulent strains had a unique core and accessory genome. In contrast...

  13. Sequencing and analyses of all known human rhinovirus genomes reveal structure and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmenberg, Ann C; Spiro, David; Kuzmickas, Ryan; Wang, Shiliang; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Rathe, Jennifer A; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M; Liggett, Stephen B

    2009-04-03

    Infection by human rhinovirus (HRV) is a major cause of upper and lower respiratory tract disease worldwide and displays considerable phenotypic variation. We examined diversity by completing the genome sequences for all known serotypes (n = 99). Superimposition of capsid crystal structure and optimal-energy RNA configurations established alignments and phylogeny. These revealed conserved motifs; clade-specific diversity, including a potential newly identified species (HRV-D); mutations in field isolates; and recombination. In analogy with poliovirus, a hypervariable 5' untranslated region tract may affect virulence. A configuration consistent with nonscanning internal ribosome entry was found in all HRVs and may account for rapid translation. The data density from complete sequences of the reference HRVs provided high resolution for this degree of modeling and serves as a platform for full genome-based epidemiologic studies and antiviral or vaccine development.

  14. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  15. Kinetic analyses reveal multiple steps in forming TonB-FhuA complexes from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khursigara, Cezar M; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Pawelek, Peter D; Coulton, James W

    2005-03-08

    FhuA, an outer membrane receptor of Escherichia coli, facilitates transport of hydroxamate siderophores and siderophore-antibiotic conjugates. The cytoplasmic membrane complex TonB-ExbB-ExbD provides energy for transport via the proton motive force. This energy is transduced by protein-protein interactions between TonB and FhuA, but the molecular determinants of these interactions remain uncharacterized. Our analyses of FhuA and two recombinant TonB species by surface plasmon resonance revealed that TonB undergoes a kinetically limiting rearrangement upon initial interaction with FhuA: an intermediate TonB-FhuA complex of 1:1 stoichiometry was detected. The intermediate then recruits a second TonB protein. Addition of ferricrocin, a FhuA-specific ligand, enhanced amounts of the 2:1 complex but was not essential for its formation. To assess the role of the cork domain of FhuA in forming a 2:1 TonB-FhuA complex, we tested a FhuA deletion (residues 21-128) for its ability to interact with TonB. Analytical ultracentrifugation demonstrated that deletion of this region of the cork domain resulted in a 1:1 complex. Furthermore, the high-affinity 2:1 complex requires the N-terminal region of TonB. Together these in vitro experiments establish that TonB-FhuA interactions require sequential steps of kinetically limiting rearrangements. Additionally, domains that contribute to complex formation were identified in TonB and in FhuA.

  16. A combination of transcriptome and methylation analyses reveals embryologically-relevant candidate genes in MRKH patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riess Olaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome is present in at least 1 out of 4,500 female live births and is the second most common cause for primary amenorrhea. It is characterized by vaginal and uterine aplasia in an XX individual with normal secondary characteristics. It has long been considered a sporadic anomaly, but familial clustering occurs. Several candidate genes have been studied although no single factor has yet been identified. Cases of discordant monozygotic twins suggest that the involvement of epigenetic factors is more likely. Methods Differences in gene expression and methylation patterns of uterine tissue between eight MRKH patients and eight controls were identified using whole-genome microarray analyses. Results obtained by expression and methylation arrays were confirmed by qRT-PCR and pyrosequencing. Results We delineated 293 differentially expressed and 194 differentially methylated genes of which nine overlap in both groups. These nine genes are mainly embryologically relevant for the development of the female genital tract. Conclusion Our study used, for the first time, a combined whole-genome expression and methylation approach to reveal the etiology of the MRKH syndrome. The findings suggest that either deficient estrogen receptors or the ectopic expression of certain HOXA genes might lead to abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. In utero exposure to endocrine disruptors or abnormally high maternal hormone levels might cause ectopic expression or anterior transformation of HOXA genes. It is, however, also possible that different factors influence the anti-Mullerian hormone promoter activity during embryological development causing regression of the Müllerian ducts. Thus, our data stimulate new research directions to decipher the pathogenic basis of MRKH syndrome.

  17. DNA Sequence Analyses Reveal Abundant Diversity, Endemism and Evidence for Asian Origin of the Porcini Mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bang; Xu, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Zeng, Nian-Kai; Li, Yan-Chun; Tolgor, Bau; Kost, Gerhard W.; Yang, Zhu L.

    2012-01-01

    The wild gourmet mushroom Boletus edulis and its close allies are of significant ecological and economic importance. They are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but despite their ubiquity there are still many unresolved issues with regard to the taxonomy, systematics and biogeography of this group of mushrooms. Most phylogenetic studies of Boletus so far have characterized samples from North America and Europe and little information is available on samples from other areas, including the ecologically and geographically diverse regions of China. Here we analyzed DNA sequence variation in three gene markers from samples of these mushrooms from across China and compared our findings with those from other representative regions. Our results revealed fifteen novel phylogenetic species (about one-third of the known species) and a newly identified lineage represented by Boletus sp. HKAS71346 from tropical Asia. The phylogenetic analyses support eastern Asia as the center of diversity for the porcini sensu stricto clade. Within this clade, B. edulis is the only known holarctic species. The majority of the other phylogenetic species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore, molecular dating and geological evidence suggest that this group of mushrooms originated during the Eocene in eastern Asia, followed by dispersal to and subsequent speciation in other parts of Asia, Europe, and the Americas from the middle Miocene through the early Pliocene. In contrast to the ancient dispersal of porcini in the strict sense in the Northern Hemisphere, the occurrence of B. reticulatus and B. edulis sensu lato in the Southern Hemisphere was probably due to recent human-mediated introductions. PMID:22629418

  18. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses of silicon metabolism in Phaeodactylum tricornutum reveal the multilevel regulation of silicic acid transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Sapriel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diatoms are largely responsible for production of biogenic silica in the global ocean. However, in surface seawater, Si(OH(4 can be a major limiting factor for diatom productivity. Analyzing at the global scale the genes networks involved in Si transport and metabolism is critical in order to elucidate Si biomineralization, and to understand diatoms contribution to biogeochemical cycles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using whole genome expression analyses we evaluated the transcriptional response to Si availability for the model species Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Among the differentially regulated genes we found genes involved in glutamine-nitrogen pathways, encoding putative extracellular matrix components, or involved in iron regulation. Some of these compounds may be good candidates for intracellular intermediates involved in silicic acid storage and/or intracellular transport, which are very important processes that remain mysterious in diatoms. Expression analyses and localization studies gave the first picture of the spatial distribution of a silicic acid transporter in a diatom model species, and support the existence of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our global analyses revealed that about one fourth of the differentially expressed genes are organized in clusters, underlying a possible evolution of P. tricornutum genome, and perhaps other pennate diatoms, toward a better optimization of its response to variable environmental stimuli. High fitness and adaptation of diatoms to various Si levels in marine environments might arise in part by global regulations from gene (expression level to genomic (organization in clusters, dosage compensation by gene duplication, and by post-transcriptional regulation and spatial distribution of SIT proteins.

  19. Multi-state models: metapopulation and life history analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnason, A. N.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi–state models are designed to describe populations that move among a fixed set of categorical states. The obvious application is to population interchange among geographic locations such as breeding sites or feeding areas (e.g., Hestbeck et al., 1991; Blums et al., 2003; Cam et al., 2004 but they are increasingly used to address important questions of evolutionary biology and life history strategies (Nichols & Kendall, 1995. In these applications, the states include life history stages such as breeding states. The multi–state models, by permitting estimation of stage–specific survival and transition rates, can help assess trade–offs between life history mechanisms (e.g. Yoccoz et al., 2000. These trade–offs are also important in meta–population analyses where, for example, the pre–and post–breeding rates of transfer among sub–populations can be analysed in terms of target colony distance, density, and other covariates (e.g., Lebreton et al. 2003; Breton et al., in review. Further examples of the use of multi–state models in analysing dispersal and life–history trade–offs can be found in the session on Migration and Dispersal. In this session, we concentrate on applications that did not involve dispersal. These applications fall in two main categories: those that address life history questions using stage categories, and a more technical use of multi–state models to address problems arising from the violation of mark–recapture assumptions leading to the potential for seriously biased predictions or misleading insights from the models. Our plenary paper, by William Kendall (Kendall, 2004, gives an overview of the use of Multi–state Mark–Recapture (MSMR models to address two such violations. The first is the occurrence of unobservable states that can arise, for example, from temporary emigration or by incomplete sampling coverage of a target population. Such states can also occur for life history reasons, such

  20. Transcriptomic analyses reveal novel genes with sexually dimorphic expression in the zebrafish gonad and brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Sreenivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our knowledge on zebrafish reproduction is very limited. We generated a gonad-derived cDNA microarray from zebrafish and used it to analyze large-scale gene expression profiles in adult gonads and other organs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified 116638 gonad-derived zebrafish expressed sequence tags (ESTs, 21% of which were isolated in our lab. Following in silico normalization, we constructed a gonad-derived microarray comprising 6370 unique, full-length cDNAs from differentiating and adult gonads. Labeled targets from adult gonad, brain, kidney and 'rest-of-body' from both sexes were hybridized onto the microarray. Our analyses revealed 1366, 881 and 656 differentially expressed transcripts (34.7% novel that showed highest expression in ovary, testis and both gonads respectively. Hierarchical clustering showed correlation of the two gonadal transcriptomes and their similarities to those of the brains. In addition, we have identified 276 genes showing sexually dimorphic expression both between the brains and between the gonads. By in situ hybridization, we showed that the gonadal transcripts with the strongest array signal intensities were germline-expressed. We found that five members of the GTP-binding septin gene family, from which only one member (septin 4 has previously been implicated in reproduction in mice, were all strongly expressed in the gonads. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have generated a gonad-derived zebrafish cDNA microarray and demonstrated its usefulness in identifying genes with sexually dimorphic co-expression in both the gonads and the brains. We have also provided the first evidence of large-scale differential gene expression between female and male brains of a teleost. Our microarray would be useful for studying gonad development, differentiation and function not only in zebrafish but also in related teleosts via cross-species hybridizations. Since several genes have been shown to play similar

  1. Molecular genetic analyses of mating pheromones reveal intervariety mating or hybridization in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Fan, Jinjiang; Stein, Birgit; Behr, Melissa J; Samsonoff, William A; Wickes, Brian L; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2002-09-01

    The sexual mating of the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is important for pathogenesis studies because the fungal virulence is linked to the alpha mating type (MAT(alpha)). We characterized C. neoformans mating pheromones (MF(alpha) 1 and MFa1) from 122 strains to understand intervariety hybridization or mating and intervariety virulence. MF(alpha) 1 in three C. neoformans varieties showed (a) specific nucleotide polymorphisms, (b) different copy numbers and chromosomal localizations, and (c) unique deduced amino acids in two geographic populations of C. neoformans var. gattii. MF(alpha) 1 of different varieties cross-hybridized in Southern hybridizations. Their phylogenetic analyses showed purifying selection (neutral evolution). These observations suggested that MAT(alpha) strains from any of the three C. neoformans varieties could mate or hybridize in nature with MATa strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans. A few serotype A/D diploid strains provided evidence for mating or hybridization, while a majority of A/D strains tested positive for haploid MF(alpha) 1 identical to that of C. neoformans var. grubii. MF(alpha) 1 sequence and copy numbers in diploids were identical to those of C. neoformans var. grubii, while their MFa1 sequences were identical to those of C. neoformans var. neoformans; thus, these strains were hybrids. The mice survival curves and histological lesions revealed A/D diploids to be highly pathogenic, with pathogenicity levels similar to that of the C. neoformans var. grubii type strain and unlike the low pathogenicity levels of C. neoformans var. neoformans strains. In contrast to MF(alpha) 1 in three varieties, MFa1 amplicons and hybridization signals could be obtained only from two C. neoformans var. neoformans reference strains and eight A/D diploids. This suggested that a yet undiscovered MFa pheromone(s) in C. neoformans var. gattii and C. neoformans var. grubii is unrelated to, highly divergent from, or rarer than that in C

  2. Landscape genetic analyses reveal fine-scale effects of forest fragmentation in an insular tropical bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimoun, Aurélie; Peterman, William; Eraud, Cyril; Faivre, Bruno; Navarro, Nicolas; Garnier, Stéphane

    2017-07-20

    Within the framework of landscape genetics, resistance surface modelling is particularly relevant to explicitly test competing hypotheses about landscape effects on gene flow. To investigate how fragmentation of tropical forest affects population connectivity in a forest specialist bird species, we optimized resistance surfaces without a priori specification, using least-cost (LCP) or resistance (IBR) distances. We implemented a two-step procedure in order (i) to objectively define the landscape thematic resolution (level of detail in classification scheme to describe landscape variables) and spatial extent (area within the landscape boundaries) and then (ii) to test the relative role of several landscape features (elevation, roads, land cover) in genetic differentiation in the Plumbeous Warbler (Setophaga plumbea). We detected a small-scale reduction of gene flow mainly driven by land cover, with a negative impact of the nonforest matrix on landscape functional connectivity. However, matrix components did not equally constrain gene flow, as their conductivity increased with increasing structural similarity with forest habitat: urban areas and meadows had the highest resistance values whereas agricultural areas had intermediate resistance values. Our results revealed a higher performance of IBR compared to LCP in explaining gene flow, reflecting suboptimal movements across this human-modified landscape, challenging the common use of LCP to design habitat corridors and advocating for a broader use of circuit theory modelling. Finally, our results emphasize the need for an objective definition of landscape scales (landscape extent and thematic resolution) and highlight potential pitfalls associated with parameterization of resistance surfaces. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Modelling longevity bonds: Analysing the Swiss Re Kortis bond

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A key contribution to the development of the traded market for longevity risk was the issuance of the Kortis bond, the world's first longevity trend bond, by Swiss Re in 2010. We analyse the design of the Kortis bond, develop suitable mortality models to analyse its payoff and discuss the key risk factors for the bond. We also investigate how the design of the Kortis bond can be adapted and extended to further develop the market for longevity risk.

  4. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  5. Phylogeographic analyses of submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans and Etelis "marshi" (family Lutjanidae reveal concordant genetic structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R Andrews

    Full Text Available The Hawaiian Archipelago has become a natural laboratory for understanding genetic connectivity in marine organisms as a result of the large number of population genetics studies that have been conducted across this island chain for a wide taxonomic range of organisms. However, population genetic studies have been conducted for only two species occurring in the mesophotic or submesophotic zones (30+m in this archipelago. To gain a greater understanding of genetic connectivity in these deepwater habitats, we investigated the genetic structure of two submesophotic fish species (occurring ∼200-360 m in this archipelago. We surveyed 16 locations across the archipelago for submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans (N = 787 and E. "marshi" (formerly E. carbunculus; N = 770 with 436-490 bp of mtDNA cytochrome b and 10-11 microsatellite loci. Phylogeographic analyses reveal no geographic structuring of mtDNA lineages and recent coalescence times that are typical of shallow reef fauna. Population genetic analyses reveal no overall structure across most of the archipelago, a pattern also typical of dispersive shallow fishes. However some sites in the mid-archipelago (Raita Bank to French Frigate Shoals had significant population differentiation. This pattern of no structure between ends of the Hawaiian range, and significant structure in the middle, was previously observed in a submesophotic snapper (Pristipomoides filamentosus and a submesophotic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus. Three of these four species also have elevated genetic diversity in the mid-archipelago. Biophysical larval dispersal models from previous studies indicate that this elevated diversity may result from larval supplement from Johnston Atoll, ∼800 km southwest of Hawaii. In this case the boundaries of stocks for fishery management cannot be defined simply in terms of geography, and fishery management in Hawaii may need to incorporate external larval supply into management

  6. Big data analyses reveal patterns and drivers of the movements of southern elephant seals

    KAUST Repository

    Rodríguez, Jorge P.

    2017-03-02

    The growing number of large databases of animal tracking provides an opportunity for analyses of movement patterns at the scales of populations and even species. We used analytical approaches, developed to cope with

  7. Insights revealed by rodent models of sugar binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Susan M; Tulloch, Alastair J; Chen, Eunice Y; Avena, Nicole M

    2015-12-01

    Binge eating is seen across the spectrum of eating disorder diagnoses as well as among individuals who do not meet diagnostic criteria. Analyses of the specific types of foods that are frequently binged upon reveal that sugar-rich items feature prominently in binge-type meals, making the effects of binge consumption of sugar an important focus of study. One avenue to do this involves the use of animal models. Foundational and recent studies of animal models of sugar bingeing, both outlined here, lend insight into the various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that may participate in or be altered by this behavior. Further, several preclinical studies incorporating sugar bingeing paradigms have explored the utility of pharmacological agents that target such neural systems for reducing sugar bingeing in an effort to enhance clinical treatment. Indeed, the translational implications of findings generated using animal models of sugar bingeing are considered here, along with potential avenues for further study.

  8. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusser, D.E.; Blume, T.; Schaefli, B.; Zehe, E.

    2009-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or m

  9. A Calculus for Modelling, Simulating and Analysing Compartmentalized Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Ihekwaba, Adoha

    2007-01-01

    A. Ihekwaba, R. Mardare. A Calculus for Modelling, Simulating and Analysing Compartmentalized Biological Systems. Case study: NFkB system. In Proc. of International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE), American Institute of Physics, AIP Proceedings, N 2...

  10. A Calculus for Modelling, Simulating and Analysing Compartmentalized Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Ihekwaba, Adoha

    2007-01-01

    A. Ihekwaba, R. Mardare. A Calculus for Modelling, Simulating and Analysing Compartmentalized Biological Systems. Case study: NFkB system. In Proc. of International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE), American Institute of Physics, AIP Proceedings, N 2...

  11. The method of characteristics applied to analyse 2DH models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloff, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the physical behaviour of 2D hydraulic models (mathematically formulated as a system of partial differential equations), the method of characteristics is used to analyse the propagation of physical meaningful disturbances. These disturbances propagate as wave fronts along bichar

  12. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Reusser

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. This paper presents a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution and illustrates its application for two very different rainfall-runoff modeling case studies. The first is the Wilde Weisseritz case study, a headwater catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains, simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The second is the Malalcahuello case study, a headwater catchment in the Chilean Andes, simulated with the physics-based model Catflow. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 such error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns which can lead to the identification of model structural errors.

  13. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zehe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. This paper presents a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution and illustrates its application for two very different rainfall-runoff modeling case studies. The first is the Wilde Weisseritz case study, a headwater catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains, simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The second is the Malalcahuello case study, a headwater catchment in the Chilean Andes, simulated with the physics-based model Catflow. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 such error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns, which can lead to the identification of model structural errors.

  14. Metagenomics and in situ analyses reveal Propionivibrio spp. to be abundant GAO in biological wastewater treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Albertsen, Mads; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel;

    to be present at equal levels. Metagenomics was employed to elucidate the identity and recover genomes from the abundant community members. Phylogenetic analyses revealed closely related “Ca. Accumulibacter” and Propionivibrio genera were co-dominant and were both targeted by the PAOmix probes. In situ staining...

  15. Integrative analyses reveal novel strategies in HPV11,-16 and-45 early infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Rossing, Maria; Andersen, Ditte;

    2012-01-01

    of genes not previously implicated in HPV biology, such as the PSG family and ANKRD1, and of genes implicated in the biology of other viruses, e. g. MX1, IFI44 and DDX60. Carcinogenesis-related genes, e. g. ABL2, MGLL and CYR61, were upregulated by high-risk HPV16 and -45. The integrative analysis revealed...

  16. Social Network Analyses and Nutritional Behavior: An Integrated Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair McNair Senior

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animals have evolved complex foraging strategies to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet and associated fitness benefits. Recent advances in nutrition research, combining state-space models of nutritional geometry with agent-based models of systems biology, show how nutrient targeted foraging behavior can also influence animal social interactions, ultimately affecting collective dynamics and group structures. Here we demonstrate how social network analyses can be integrated into such a modeling framework and provide a tangible and practical analytical tool to compare experimental results with theory. We illustrate our approach by examining the case of nutritionally mediated dominance hierarchies. First we show how nutritionally explicit agent-based models that simulate the emergence of dominance hierarchies can be used to generate social networks. Importantly the structural properties of our simulated networks bear similarities to dominance networks of real animals (where conflicts are not always directly related to nutrition. Finally, we demonstrate how metrics from social network analyses can be used to predict the fitness of agents in these simulated competitive environments. Our results highlight the potential importance of nutritional mechanisms in shaping dominance interactions in a wide range of social and ecological contexts. Nutrition likely influences social interaction in many species, and yet a theoretical framework for exploring these effects is currently lacking. Combining social network analyses with computational models from nutritional ecology may bridge this divide, representing a pragmatic approach for generating theoretical predictions for nutritional experiments.

  17. Metagenomic analyses reveal no differences in genes involved in cellulose degradation under different tillage treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Maria; Schöler, Anne; Ertl, Julia; Xu, Zhuofei; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Incorporation of plant litter is a frequent agricultural practice to increase nutrient availability in soil, and relies heavily on the activity of cellulose-degrading microorganisms. Here we address the question of how different tillage treatments affect soil microbial communities and their cellulose-degrading potential in a long-term agricultural experiment. To identify potential differences in microbial taxonomy and functionality, we generated six soil metagenomes of conventional (CT) and reduced (RT) tillage-treated topsoil samples, which differed in their potential extracellular cellulolytic activity as well as their microbial biomass. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic data revealed few differences between RT and CT, and a dominance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, whereas eukaryotic phyla were not prevalent. Prediction of cellulolytic enzymes revealed glycoside hydrolase families 1, 3 and 94, auxiliary activity family 8 and carbohydrate-binding module 2 as the most abundant in soil. These were annotated mainly to the phyla of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. These results suggest that the observed higher cellulolytic activity in RT soils can be explained by a higher microbial biomass or changed expression levels but not by shifts in the soil microbiome. Overall, this study reveals the stability of soil microbial communities and cellulolytic gene composition under the investigated tillage treatments.

  18. Graphic-based musculoskeletal model for biomechanical analyses and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Edmund Y S

    2003-04-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the 'Virtual Human' reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. This paper details the design, capabilities, and features of the VIMS development at Johns Hopkins University, an effort possible only through academic and commercial collaborations. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of this unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system will impact on medical education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal diseases, trauma, and rehabilitation.

  19. Comparative genome analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 reveals its high antagonistic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Li

    Full Text Available S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens.

  20. NFkappaB Selectivity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands Revealed By Comparative Crystallographic Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettles, K.W.; Bruning, J.B.; Gil, G.; Nowak, J.; Sharma, S.K.; Hahm, J.B.; Kulp, K.; Hochberg, R.B.; Zhou, H.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.; Katzenllenbogen, B.S.; Kim, Y.; Joachmiak, A.; Greene, G.L.

    2009-05-22

    Our understanding of how steroid hormones regulate physiological functions has been significantly advanced by structural biology approaches. However, progress has been hampered by misfolding of the ligand binding domains in heterologous expression systems and by conformational flexibility that interferes with crystallization. Here, we show that protein folding problems that are common to steroid hormone receptors are circumvented by mutations that stabilize well-characterized conformations of the receptor. We use this approach to present the structure of an apo steroid receptor that reveals a ligand-accessible channel allowing soaking of preformed crystals. Furthermore, crystallization of different pharmacological classes of compounds allowed us to define the structural basis of NF{kappa}B-selective signaling through the estrogen receptor, thus revealing a unique conformation of the receptor that allows selective suppression of inflammatory gene expression. The ability to crystallize many receptor-ligand complexes with distinct pharmacophores allows one to define structural features of signaling specificity that would not be apparent in a single structure.

  1. Concurrent growth rate and transcript analyses reveal essential gene stringency in Escherichia coli.

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    Shan Goh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genes essential for bacterial growth are of particular scientific interest. Many putative essential genes have been identified or predicted in several species, however, little is known about gene expression requirement stringency, which may be an important aspect of bacterial physiology and likely a determining factor in drug target development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Working from the premise that essential genes differ in absolute requirement for growth, we describe silencing of putative essential genes in E. coli to obtain a titration of declining growth rates and transcript levels by using antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNA and expressed antisense RNA. The relationship between mRNA decline and growth rate decline reflects the degree of essentiality, or stringency, of an essential gene, which is here defined by the minimum transcript level for a 50% reduction in growth rate (MTL(50. When applied to four growth essential genes, both RNA silencing methods resulted in MTL(50 values that reveal acpP as the most stringently required of the four genes examined, with ftsZ the next most stringently required. The established antibacterial targets murA and fabI were less stringently required. CONCLUSIONS: RNA silencing can reveal stringent requirements for gene expression with respect to growth. This method may be used to validate existing essential genes and to quantify drug target requirement.

  2. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

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    Ari J S Ferreira

    Full Text Available Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  3. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Ari J S

    2014-06-12

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world\\'s oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  4. Phylogeographical analyses reveal global migration patterns of the barley scald pathogen Rhynchosporium secalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffarano, Pascal L; McDonald, Bruce A; Linde, Celeste C

    2009-01-01

    A phylogeographical analysis of the scald pathogen Rhynchosporium secalis was conducted using nuclear DNA sequences from two neutral restriction fragment length polymorphism loci and the mating-type idiomorphs. Approximately 500 isolates sampled from more than 60 field populations from five continents were analysed to infer migration patterns and the demographic history of the fungus. Migration rates among continents were generally low, consistent with earlier reports of significant population subdivision among continents. Northern Europe was mainly a source population for global migration. We hypothesize that the pathogen only recently moved out of its centre of origin, resulting in founder populations that are reproductively isolated due to the contemporary absence of long-distance gene flow.

  5. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenomic Analyses Reveal a Conserved Core Genome Shared by Estuarine and Oceanic Cyanopodoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sijun; Zhang, Si; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Podoviruses are among the major viral groups that infect marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Here, we reported the genome sequences of five Synechococcus podoviruses isolated from the estuarine environment, and performed comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses based on a total of 20 cyanopodovirus genomes. The genomes of all the known marine cyanopodoviruses are highly syntenic. A pan-genome of 349 clustered orthologous groups was determined, among which 15 were core genes. These core genes make up nearly half of each genome in length, reflecting the high level of genome conservation among this cyanophage type. The whole genome phylogenies based on concatenated core genes and gene content were highly consistent and confirmed the separation of two discrete marine cyanopodovirus clusters MPP-A and MPP-B. The genomes within cluster MPP-B grouped into subclusters mainly corresponding to Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus host types. Auxiliary metabolic genes tend to occur in a specific phylogenetic group of these cyanopodoviruses. All the MPP-B phages analyzed here encode the photosynthesis gene psbA, which are absent in all the MPP-A genomes thus far. Interestingly, all the MPP-B and two MPP-A Synechococcus podoviruses encode the thymidylate synthase gene thyX, while at the same genome locus all the MPP-B Prochlorococcus podoviruses encode the transaldolase gene talC. Both genes are hypothesized to have the potential to facilitate the biosynthesis of deoxynucleotide for phage replication. Inheritance of specific functional genes could be important to the evolution and ecological fitness of certain cyanophage genotypes. Our analyses demonstrate that cyanopodoviruses of estuarine and oceanic origins share a conserved core genome and suggest that accessory genes may be related to environmental adaptation. PMID:26569403

  6. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenomic Analyses Reveal a Conserved Core Genome Shared by Estuarine and Oceanic Cyanopodoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijun Huang

    Full Text Available Podoviruses are among the major viral groups that infect marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Here, we reported the genome sequences of five Synechococcus podoviruses isolated from the estuarine environment, and performed comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses based on a total of 20 cyanopodovirus genomes. The genomes of all the known marine cyanopodoviruses are highly syntenic. A pan-genome of 349 clustered orthologous groups was determined, among which 15 were core genes. These core genes make up nearly half of each genome in length, reflecting the high level of genome conservation among this cyanophage type. The whole genome phylogenies based on concatenated core genes and gene content were highly consistent and confirmed the separation of two discrete marine cyanopodovirus clusters MPP-A and MPP-B. The genomes within cluster MPP-B grouped into subclusters mainly corresponding to Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus host types. Auxiliary metabolic genes tend to occur in a specific phylogenetic group of these cyanopodoviruses. All the MPP-B phages analyzed here encode the photosynthesis gene psbA, which are absent in all the MPP-A genomes thus far. Interestingly, all the MPP-B and two MPP-A Synechococcus podoviruses encode the thymidylate synthase gene thyX, while at the same genome locus all the MPP-B Prochlorococcus podoviruses encode the transaldolase gene talC. Both genes are hypothesized to have the potential to facilitate the biosynthesis of deoxynucleotide for phage replication. Inheritance of specific functional genes could be important to the evolution and ecological fitness of certain cyanophage genotypes. Our analyses demonstrate that cyanopodoviruses of estuarine and oceanic origins share a conserved core genome and suggest that accessory genes may be related to environmental adaptation.

  7. Genetic diversity among some canola cultivars as revealed by RAPD, SSR and AFLP analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaieb, Reda E A; Mohammed, Etr H K; Youssief, Sawsan S

    2014-08-01

    To assess the genetic diversity among four canola cultivars (namely, Serw-3, Serw-4, Misser L-16 and Semu 249), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), simple sequence repeat polymorphism (SSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses were performed. The data indicated that all of the three molecular markers gave different levels of polymorphism. A total of 118, 31 and 338 markers that show 61, 67.7 and 81 % polymorphism percentages were resulted from the RAPD, SSR and AFLP analyses, respectively. Based on the data obtained the three markers can be used to differentiate between the four canola cultivars. The genotype-specific markers were determined, 18 out of the 72 polymorphic RAPD markers generated were found to be genotype-specific (25 %). The highest number of RAPD specific markers was scored for Semu 249 (15 markers), while Serw-4 scored two markers. On the other hand, Serw-3 scored one marker. The cultivar Semu 249 scored the highest number of unique AFLP markers, giving 57 unique markers, followed by Misser L-16 which was characterized by 40 unique AFLP markers, then Serw-3 giving 31 unique markers. While Serw-4 was characterized by the lowest number producing 14 unique positive markers. The dendrogram built on the basis of combined data from RAPD, SSR and AFLP analysis represents the genetic distances among the four canola cultivars. Understanding the genetic variability among the current canola cultivars opens up a possibility for developing a molecular genetic map that will lead to the application of marker-assisted selection tools in genetic improvement of canola.

  8. Dynamic changes in brewing yeast cells in culture revealed by statistical analyses of yeast morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Enomoto, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The vitality of brewing yeasts has been used to monitor their physiological state during fermentation. To investigate the fermentation process, we used the image processing software, CalMorph, which generates morphological data on yeast mother cells and bud shape, nuclear shape and location, and actin distribution. We found that 248 parameters changed significantly during fermentation. Successive use of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed several important features of yeast, providing insight into the dynamic changes in the yeast population. First, PCA indicated that much of the observed variability in the experiment was summarized in just two components: a change with a peak and a change over time. Second, PCA indicated the independent and important morphological features responsible for dynamic changes: budding ratio, nucleus position, neck position, and actin organization. Thus, the large amount of data provided by imaging analysis can be used to monitor the fermentation processes involved in beer and bioethanol production.

  9. Intact-Brain Analyses Reveal Distinct Information Carried by SNc Dopamine Subcircuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Talia N; Shilyansky, Carrie; Davidson, Thomas J; Evans, Kathryn E; Beier, Kevin T; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Crow, Ailey K; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun; Tomer, Raju; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-07-30

    Recent progress in understanding the diversity of midbrain dopamine neurons has highlighted the importance--and the challenges--of defining mammalian neuronal cell types. Although neurons may be best categorized using inclusive criteria spanning biophysical properties, wiring of inputs, wiring of outputs, and activity during behavior, linking all of these measurements to cell types within the intact brains of living mammals has been difficult. Here, using an array of intact-brain circuit interrogation tools, including CLARITY, COLM, optogenetics, viral tracing, and fiber photometry, we explore the diversity of dopamine neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). We identify two parallel nigrostriatal dopamine neuron subpopulations differing in biophysical properties, input wiring, output wiring to dorsomedial striatum (DMS) versus dorsolateral striatum (DLS), and natural activity patterns during free behavior. Our results reveal independently operating nigrostriatal information streams, with implications for understanding the logic of dopaminergic feedback circuits and the diversity of mammalian neuronal cell types.

  10. Microbial Response to Soil Liming of Damaged Ecosystems Revealed by Pyrosequencing and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendrula-Kotha, Ramya; Nkongolo, Kabwe K.

    2017-01-01

    Aims To assess the effects of dolomitic limestone applications on soil microbial communities’ dynamics and bacterial and fungal biomass, relative abundance, and diversity in metal reclaimed regions. Methods and Results The study was conducted in reclaimed mining sites and metal uncontaminated areas. The limestone applications were performed over 35 years ago. Total microbial biomass was determined by Phospholipid fatty acids. Bacterial and fungal relative abundance and diversity were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. There was a significant increase of total microbial biomass in limed sites (342 ng/g) compared to unlimed areas (149 ng/g). Chao1 estimates followed the same trend. But the total number of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) in limed (463 OTUs) and unlimed (473 OTUs) soil samples for bacteria were similar. For fungi, OTUs were 96 and 81 for limed and unlimed soil samples, respectively. Likewise, Simpson and Shannon diversity indices revealed no significant differences between limed and unlimed sites. Bacterial and fungal groups specific to either limed or unlimed sites were identified. Five major bacterial phyla including Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were found. The latter was the most prevalent phylum in all the samples with a relative abundance of 50%. Bradyrhizobiaceae family with 12 genera including the nitrogen fixing Bradirhizobium genus was more abundant in limed sites compared to unlimed areas. For fungi, Ascomycota was the most predominant phylum in unlimed soils (46%) while Basidiomycota phylum represented 86% of all fungi in the limed areas. Conclusion Detailed analysis of the data revealed that although soil liming increases significantly the amount of microbial biomass, the level of species diversity remain statistically unchanged even though the microbial compositions of the damaged and restored sites are different. Significance and Impact of the study Soil liming still have a significant

  11. Comparing modelling techniques for analysing urban pluvial flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, E; van der Meulen, J; Kluck, J; Straatman, J H M

    2014-01-01

    Short peak rainfall intensities cause sewer systems to overflow leading to flooding of streets and houses. Due to climate change and densification of urban areas, this is expected to occur more often in the future. Hence, next to their minor (i.e. sewer) system, municipalities have to analyse their major (i.e. surface) system in order to anticipate urban flooding during extreme rainfall. Urban flood modelling techniques are powerful tools in both public and internal communications and transparently support design processes. To provide more insight into the (im)possibilities of different urban flood modelling techniques, simulation results have been compared for an extreme rainfall event. The results show that, although modelling software is tending to evolve towards coupled one-dimensional (1D)-two-dimensional (2D) simulation models, surface flow models, using an accurate digital elevation model, prove to be an easy and fast alternative to identify vulnerable locations in hilly and flat areas. In areas at the transition between hilly and flat, however, coupled 1D-2D simulation models give better results since catchments of major and minor systems can differ strongly in these areas. During the decision making process, surface flow models can provide a first insight that can be complemented with complex simulation models for critical locations.

  12. Cloning and comparative analyses of the zebrafish Ugt repertoire reveal its evolutionary diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Huang

    Full Text Available UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugts are a supergene family of phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of numerous hydrophobic small molecules with the UDP-glucuronic acid, converting them into hydrophilic molecules. Here, we report the identification and cloning of the complete zebrafish Ugt gene repertoire. We found that the zebrafish genome contains 45 Ugt genes that can be divided into three families: Ugt1, Ugt2, and Ugt5. Both Ugt1 and Ugt2 have two unlinked clusters: a and b. The Ugt1a, Ugt1b, Ugt2a, and Ugt2b clusters each contain variable and constant regions, similar to that of the protocadherin (Pcdh, immunoglobulin (Ig, and T-cell receptor (Tcr clusters. Cloning the full-length coding sequences confirmed that each of the variable exons is separately spliced to the set of constant exons within each zebrafish Ugt cluster. Comparative analyses showed that both a and b clusters of the zebrafish Ugt1 and Ugt2 genes have orthologs in other teleosts, suggesting that they may be resulted from the "fish-specific" whole-genome duplication event. The Ugt5 genes are a novel family of Ugt genes that exist in teleosts and amphibians. Their entire open reading frames are encoded by single large exons. The zebrafish Ugt1, Ugt2, and Ugt5 genes can generate additional transcript diversity through alternative splicing. Based on phylogenetic analyses, we propose that the ancestral tetrapod and teleost Ugt1 clusters contained multiple Ugt1 paralogs. After speciation, these ancestral Ugt1 clusters underwent lineage-specific gene loss and duplication. The ancestral vertebrate Ugt2 cluster also underwent lineage-specific duplication. The intronless Ugt5 open reading frames may be derived from retrotransposition followed by gene duplication. They have been expanded dramatically in teleosts and have become the most abundant Ugt family in these lineages. These findings have interesting implications regarding the molecular evolution of

  13. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses reveal a response mechanism to cold stress in Santalum album L. leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinhua; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Niu, Meiyun; Li, Mingzhi; He, Chunmei; Zhao, Jinhui; Zeng, Songjun; Duan, Jun; Ma, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    Santalum album L. (Indian sandalwood) is an economically important plant species because of its ability to produce highly valued perfume oils. Little is known about the mechanisms by which S. album adapts to low temperatures. In this study, we obtained 100,445,724 raw reads by paired-end sequencing from S. album leaves. Physiological and transcriptomic changes in sandalwood seedlings exposed to 4 °C for 0–48 h were characterized. Cold stress induced the accumulation of malondialdehyde, proline and soluble carbohydrates, and increased the levels of antioxidants. A total of 4,424 differentially expressed genes were responsive to cold, including 3,075 cold-induced and 1,349 cold-repressed genes. When cold stress was prolonged, there was an increase in the expression of cold-responsive genes coding for transporters, responses to stimuli and stress, regulation of defense response, as well as genes related to signal transduction of all phytohormones. Candidate genes in the terpenoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, eight of which were significantly involved in the cold stress response. Gene expression analyses using qRT-PCR showed a peak in the accumulation of SaCBF2 to 4, 50-fold more than control leaves and roots following 12 h and 24 h of cold stress, respectively. The CBF-dependent pathway may play a crucial role in increasing cold tolerance. PMID:28169358

  14. Proteomic analyses reveal distinct chromatin-associated and soluble transcription factor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Jiadong; Malovannaya, Anna; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Wei; Guerra, Rudy; Hawke, David H; Qin, Jun; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-21

    The current knowledge on how transcription factors (TFs), the ultimate targets and executors of cellular signalling pathways, are regulated by protein-protein interactions remains limited. Here, we performed proteomics analyses of soluble and chromatin-associated complexes of 56 TFs, including the targets of many signalling pathways involved in development and cancer, and 37 members of the Forkhead box (FOX) TF family. Using tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (TAP/MS), we performed 214 purifications and identified 2,156 high-confident protein-protein interactions. We found that most TFs form very distinct protein complexes on and off chromatin. Using this data set, we categorized the transcription-related or unrelated regulators for general or specific TFs. Our study offers a valuable resource of protein-protein interaction networks for a large number of TFs and underscores the general principle that TFs form distinct location-specific protein complexes that are associated with the different regulation and diverse functions of these TFs.

  15. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V. (NIH); (UTSMC)

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  16. Metabolomic and Functional Genomic Analyses Reveal Varietal Differences in Bioactive Compounds of Cooked Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Adam L.; Lewis, Matthew R.; Chen, Ming-Hsuan; Brick, Mark A.; Leach, Jan E.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports that cooked rice (Oryza sativa L.) contains metabolites with biomedical activities, yet little is known about the genetic diversity that is responsible for metabolite variation and differences in health traits. Metabolites from ten diverse varieties of cooked rice were detected using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A total of 3,097 compounds were detected, of which 25% differed among the ten varieties. Multivariate analyses of the metabolite profiles showed that the chemical diversity among the varieties cluster according to their defined subspecies classifications: indica, japonica, and aus. Metabolite-specific genetic diversity in rice was investigated by analyzing a collection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes from biochemical pathways of nutritional importance. Two classes of bioactive compounds, phenolics and vitamin E, contained nonsynonymous SNPs and SNPs in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions for genes in their biosynthesis pathways. Total phenolics and tocopherol concentrations were determined to examine the effect of the genetic diversity among the ten varieties. Per gram of cooked rice, total phenolics ranged from 113.7 to 392.6 µg (gallic acid equivalents), and total tocopherols ranged between 7.2 and 20.9 µg. The variation in the cooked rice metabolome and quantities of bioactive components supports that the SNP-based genetic diversity influenced nutritional components in rice, and that this approach may guide rice improvement strategies for plant and human health. PMID:20886119

  17. Evolutionary trajectories of snake genes and genomes revealed by comparative analyses of five-pacer viper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei; Wang, Zong-ji; Li, Qi-ye; Lian, Jin-ming; Zhou, Yang; Lu, Bing-zheng; Jin, Li-jun; Qiu, Peng-xin; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Wen-bo; Wen, Bo; Huang, Yi-jun; Lin, Zhi-long; Qiu, Bi-tao; Su, Xing-wen; Yang, Huan-ming; Zhang, Guo-jie; Yan, Guang-mei; Zhou, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Snakes have numerous features distinctive from other tetrapods and a rich history of genome evolution that is still obscure. Here, we report the high-quality genome of the five-pacer viper, Deinagkistrodon acutus, and comparative analyses with other representative snake and lizard genomes. We map the evolutionary trajectories of transposable elements (TEs), developmental genes and sex chromosomes onto the snake phylogeny. TEs exhibit dynamic lineage-specific expansion, and many viper TEs show brain-specific gene expression along with their nearby genes. We detect signatures of adaptive evolution in olfactory, venom and thermal-sensing genes and also functional degeneration of genes associated with vision and hearing. Lineage-specific relaxation of functional constraints on respective Hox and Tbx limb-patterning genes supports fossil evidence for a successive loss of forelimbs then hindlimbs during snake evolution. Finally, we infer that the ZW sex chromosome pair had undergone at least three recombination suppression events in the ancestor of advanced snakes. These results altogether forge a framework for our deep understanding into snakes' history of molecular evolution. PMID:27708285

  18. Ancient origins of metazoan gonadotropin-releasing hormone and their receptors revealed by phylogenomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachetzki, David C; Tsai, Pei-San; Kavanaugh, Scott I; Sower, Stacia A

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of genes related to gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) and their receptors from diverse species has driven important advances in comparative endocrinology. However, our view of the evolutionary histories and nomenclature of these gene families has become inconsistent as several different iterations of GnRH and receptor relationships have been proposed. Whole genome sequence data are now available for most of the major lineages of animals, and an exhaustive view of the phylogenies of GnRH and their receptors is now possible. In this paper, we leverage data from publically available whole genome sequences to present a new phylogenomic analysis of GnRH and GnRH receptors and the distant relatives of each across metazoan phylogeny. Our approach utilizes a phylogenomics pipeline that searches data from 36 whole genome sequences and conducts phylogenetic analyses of gene trees. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the major groupings of GnRH peptides, related hormones and their receptors and provide some suggestions for a new nomenclature. Our study provides a framework for understanding the functional diversification of this family of neuromodulatory peptides and their receptors.

  19. Kinetic features revealed by top-hat electrostatic analysers: numerical simulations and instrument response results

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Rossana; Marcucci, Maria Federica; Brienza, Daniele; Bruno, Roberto; Consolini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Denise; Valentini, Franceso; Servidio, Sergio; Stabile, Sara; Pezzi, Oreste; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Lavraud, Benoit; De Keyser, Johan; Retinò, Alessandro; Fazakerley, Andrew; Wicks, Robert; Vaivads, Andris; Salatti, Mario; Veltri, Pierliugi

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission devoted to study energization, acceleration and heating of turbulent space plasmas, and designed to perform field and particle measurements at kinetic scales in different near-Earth regions and in the solar wind. Solar Orbiter (SolO), together with Solar Probe Plus, will provide the first comprehensive remote and in situ measurements which are critical to establish the fundamental physical links between the Sun's dynamic atmosphere and the turbulent solar wind. The fundamental process of turbulent dissipation is mediated by physical mechanism that occur at a variety of temporal and spatial scales, and most efficiently at the kinetics scales. Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations of solar-wind turbulence show that kinetic effects manifest as particle beams, production of temperature anisotropies and ring-like modulations, preferential heating of heavy ions. We use a numerical code able to reproduce the response of a typical electrostatic analyzer of top-hat type starting from velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) numerical simulations. Here, we show how optimized particle measurements by top-hat analysers can capture the kinetic features injected by turbulence in the VDFs.

  20. Molecular phylogeny and morphometric analyses reveal deep divergence between Amazonia and Atlantic Forest species of Dendrophryniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Antoine; Recoder, Renato; Teixeira, Mauro; Cassimiro, José; Amaro, Renata Cecília; Camacho, Agustín; Damasceno, Roberta; Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Moritz, Craig; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut

    2012-03-01

    Dendrophryniscus is an early diverging clade of bufonids represented by few small-bodied species distributed in Amazonia and the Atlantic Forest. We used mitochondrial (414 bp of 12S, 575 bp of 16S genes) and nuclear DNA (785 bp of RAG-1) to investigate phylogenetic relationships and the timing of diversification within the genus. These molecular data were gathered from 23 specimens from 19 populations, including eight out of the 10 nominal species of the genus as well as Rhinella boulengeri. Analyses also included sequences of representatives of 18 other bufonid genera that were publically available. We also examined morphological characters to analyze differences within Dendrophryniscus. We found deep genetic divergence between an Amazonian and an Atlantic Forest clade, dating back to Eocene. Morphological data corroborate this distinction. We thus propose to assign the Amazonian species to a new genus, Amazonella. The species currently named R. boulengeri, which has been previously assigned to the genus Rhamphophryne, is shown to be closely related to Dendrophryniscus species. Our findings illustrate cryptic trends in bufonid morphological evolution, and point to a deep history of persistence and diversification within the Amazonian and Atlantic rainforests. We discuss our results in light of available paleoecological data and the biogeographic patterns observed in other similarly distributed groups.

  1. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses reveal multiple species of Boa and independent origins of insular dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Corbin, Andrew B; Perry, Blair W; Andrew, Audra L; Pasquesi, Giulia I M; Smith, Eric N; Jezkova, Tereza; Boback, Scott M; Booth, Warren; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-09-01

    Boa is a Neotropical genus of snakes historically recognized as monotypic despite its expansive distribution. The distinct morphological traits and color patterns exhibited by these snakes, together with the wide diversity of ecosystems they inhabit, collectively suggest that the genus may represent multiple species. Morphological variation within Boa also includes instances of dwarfism observed in multiple offshore island populations. Despite this substantial diversity, the systematics of the genus Boa has received little attention until very recently. In this study we examined the genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships of Boa populations using mitochondrial sequences and genome-wide SNP data obtained from RADseq. We analyzed these data at multiple geographic scales using a combination of phylogenetic inference (including coalescent-based species delimitation) and population genetic analyses. We identified extensive population structure across the range of the genus Boa and multiple lines of evidence for three widely-distributed clades roughly corresponding with the three primary land masses of the Western Hemisphere. We also find both mitochondrial and nuclear support for independent origins and parallel evolution of dwarfism on offshore island clusters in Belize and Cayos Cochinos Menor, Honduras. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multilocus Analyses Reveal Postglacial Demographic Shrinkage of Juniperus morrisonicola (Cupressaceae), a Dominant Alpine Species in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Chun; Hsu, Tsai-Wen; Wang, Hao-Ven; Liu, Zin-Huang; Chen, Yi-Yen; Chiu, Chi-Te; Huang, Chao-Li; Hung, Kuo-Hsiang; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Postglacial climate changes alter geographical distributions and diversity of species. Such ongoing changes often force species to migrate along the latitude/altitude. Altitudinal gradients represent assemblage of environmental, especially climatic, variable factors that influence the plant distributions. Global warming that triggered upward migrations has therefore impacted the alpine plants on an island. In this study, we examined the genetic structure of Juniperus morrisonicola, a dominant alpine species in Taiwan, and inferred historical, demographic dynamics based on multilocus analyses. Lower levels of genetic diversity in north indicated that populations at higher latitudes were vulnerable to climate change, possibly related to historical alpine glaciers. Neither organellar DNA nor nuclear genes displayed geographical subdivisions, indicating that populations were likely interconnected before migrating upward to isolated mountain peaks, providing low possibilities of seed/pollen dispersal across mountain ranges. Bayesian skyline plots suggested steady population growth of J. morrisonicola followed by recent demographic contraction. In contrast, most lower-elevation plants experienced recent demographic expansion as a result of global warming. The endemic alpine conifer may have experienced dramatic climate changes over the alternation of glacial and interglacial periods, as indicated by a trend showing decreasing genetic diversity with the altitudinal gradient, plus a fact of upward migration.

  3. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poulsen

    Full Text Available Identifying new sources for small molecule discovery is necessary to help mitigate the continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic microbes. Recent studies indicate that one potentially rich source of novel natural products is Actinobacterial symbionts associated with social and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15 of these isolates identified 11 distinct and structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including a novel polyunsaturated and polyoxygenated macrocyclic lactam, which we name sceliphrolactam. By pairing the 15 Streptomyces strains against a collection of fungi and bacteria, we document their antifungal and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest.

  4. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Qiang [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-11-12

    The rational design of materials, the development of accurate and efficient material simulation algorithms, and the determination of the response of materials to environments and loads occurring in practice all require an understanding of mechanics at disparate spatial and temporal scales. The project addresses mathematical and numerical analyses for material problems for which relevant scales range from those usually treated by molecular dynamics all the way up to those most often treated by classical elasticity. The prevalent approach towards developing a multiscale material model couples two or more well known models, e.g., molecular dynamics and classical elasticity, each of which is useful at a different scale, creating a multiscale multi-model. However, the challenges behind such a coupling are formidable and largely arise because the atomistic and continuum models employ nonlocal and local models of force, respectively. The project focuses on a multiscale analysis of the peridynamics materials model. Peridynamics can be used as a transition between molecular dynamics and classical elasticity so that the difficulties encountered when directly coupling those two models are mitigated. In addition, in some situations, peridynamics can be used all by itself as a material model that accurately and efficiently captures the behavior of materials over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Peridynamics is well suited to these purposes because it employs a nonlocal model of force, analogous to that of molecular dynamics; furthermore, at sufficiently large length scales and assuming smooth deformation, peridynamics can be approximated by classical elasticity. The project will extend the emerging mathematical and numerical analysis of peridynamics. One goal is to develop a peridynamics-enabled multiscale multi-model that potentially provides a new and more extensive mathematical basis for coupling classical elasticity and molecular dynamics, thus enabling next

  5. Comparative Systems Analyses Reveal Molecular Signatures of Clinically tested Vaccine Adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn A; Lindqvist, Madelene; Nookaew, Intawat; Andersen, Peter; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Persson, Josefine; Christensen, Dennis; Zhang, Yuan; Anderson, Jenna; Khoomrung, Sakda; Sen, Partho; Agger, Else Marie; Coler, Rhea; Carter, Darrick; Meinke, Andreas; Rappuoli, Rino; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Reed, Steven G; Harandi, Ali M

    2016-12-13

    A better understanding of the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants could inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. Here, we exploited a genome wide transcriptomics analysis combined with a systems biology approach to determine the molecular signatures induced by four clinically tested vaccine adjuvants, namely CAF01, IC31, GLA-SE and Alum in mice. We report signature molecules, pathways, gene modules and networks, which are shared by or otherwise exclusive to these clinical-grade adjuvants in whole blood and draining lymph nodes of mice. Intriguingly, co-expression analysis revealed blood gene modules highly enriched for molecules with documented roles in T follicular helper (TFH) and germinal center (GC) responses. We could show that all adjuvants enhanced, although with different magnitude and kinetics, TFH and GC B cell responses in draining lymph nodes. These results represent, to our knowledge, the first comparative systems analysis of clinically tested vaccine adjuvants that may provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants.

  6. Comparative Systems Analyses Reveal Molecular Signatures of Clinically tested Vaccine Adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Nookaew, Intawat; Andersen, Peter; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Persson, Josefine; Christensen, Dennis; Zhang, Yuan; Anderson, Jenna; Khoomrung, Sakda; Sen, Partho; Agger, Else Marie; Coler, Rhea; Carter, Darrick; Meinke, Andreas; Rappuoli, Rino; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Reed, Steven G.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-12-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants could inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. Here, we exploited a genome wide transcriptomics analysis combined with a systems biology approach to determine the molecular signatures induced by four clinically tested vaccine adjuvants, namely CAF01, IC31, GLA-SE and Alum in mice. We report signature molecules, pathways, gene modules and networks, which are shared by or otherwise exclusive to these clinical-grade adjuvants in whole blood and draining lymph nodes of mice. Intriguingly, co-expression analysis revealed blood gene modules highly enriched for molecules with documented roles in T follicular helper (TFH) and germinal center (GC) responses. We could show that all adjuvants enhanced, although with different magnitude and kinetics, TFH and GC B cell responses in draining lymph nodes. These results represent, to our knowledge, the first comparative systems analysis of clinically tested vaccine adjuvants that may provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of human adjuvants.

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERS IN SPHAERODORIDAE AND ALLIES (ANNELIDA REVEALED BY AN INTEGRATIVE MICROSCOPICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad eHelm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphaerodoridae is a group of benthic marine worms (Annelida characterized by the presence of spherical tubercles covering their whole surface. They are commonly considered as belonging to Phyllodocida although sistergroup relationships are still far from being understood. Primary homology assessment of their morphological features are lacking, hindering the appraisal of evolutionary relationships between taxa. Therefore, our detailed morphological investigation focuses on different Sphaerodoridae as well as on other members of Phyllodocida using an integrative approach combining scanning electron microscopy (SEM as well as immunohistochemistry with standard neuronal (anti-5-HT and muscular (phalloidin-rhodamine markers and subsequent CLSM analysis of whole mounts and sections. Furthermore, we provide histological (HES and light microscopical data to shed light on the structures and hypothetical function of sphaerodorid key morphological features. We provide fundamental details into the sphaerodorid morphology supporting a Phyllodocida ancestry of these enigmatic worms. However, the muscular arrangement and the presence of an axial muscular pharynx is similar to conditions observed in other members of the Errantia too. Furthermore, nervous system and muscle staining as well as SEM and histological observations of different types of tubercles indicate a homology of the so called microtubercles, present in the long-bodied sphaerodorids, to the dorsal cirri of other Errantia. The macrotubercles seem to represent a sphaerodorid autapomorphy based on our investigations. Therefore, our results allow comparisons concerning morphological patterns between Sphaerodoridae and other Phyllodocida and constitute a starting point for further comparative investigations to reveal the evolution of the remarkable Sphaerodoridae.

  8. Phylogenomic analyses reveal convergent patterns of adaptive evolution in elephant and human ancestries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Morris; Sterner, Kirstin N; Islam, Munirul; Uddin, Monica; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Lipovich, Leonard; Jia, Hui; Grossman, Lawrence I; Wildman, Derek E

    2009-12-08

    Specific sets of brain-expressed genes, such as aerobic energy metabolism genes, evolved adaptively in the ancestry of humans and may have evolved adaptively in the ancestry of other large-brained mammals. The recent addition of genomes from two afrotherians (elephant and tenrec) to the expanding set of publically available sequenced mammalian genomes provided an opportunity to test this hypothesis. Elephants resemble humans by having large brains and long life spans; tenrecs, in contrast, have small brains and short life spans. Thus, we investigated whether the phylogenomic patterns of adaptive evolution are more similar between elephant and human than between either elephant and tenrec lineages or human and mouse lineages, and whether aerobic energy metabolism genes are especially well represented in the elephant and human patterns. Our analyses encompassed approximately 6,000 genes in each of these lineages with each gene yielding extensive coding sequence matches in interordinal comparisons. Each gene's nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide substitution rates and dN/dS ratios were determined. Then, from gene ontology information on genes with the higher dN/dS ratios, we identified the more prevalent sets of genes that belong to specific functional categories and that evolved adaptively. Elephant and human lineages showed much slower nucleotide substitution rates than tenrec and mouse lineages but more adaptively evolved genes. In correlation with absolute brain size and brain oxygen consumption being largest in elephants and next largest in humans, adaptively evolved aerobic energy metabolism genes were most evident in the elephant lineage and next most evident in the human lineage.

  9. DEEP DIVISION IN THE CHLOROPHYCEAE (CHLOROPHYTA) REVEALED BY CHLOROPLAST PHYLOGENOMIC ANALYSES(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmel, Monique; Brouard, Jean-Simon; Gagnon, Cédric; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2008-06-01

    The Chlorophyceae (sensu Mattox and Stewart) is a morphologically diverse class of the Chlorophyta displaying biflagellate and quadriflagellate motile cells with varying configurations of the flagellar apparatus. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA data and combined 18S and 26S rDNA data from a broad range of chlorophycean taxa uncovered five major monophyletic groups (Chlamydomonadales, Sphaeropleales, Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales, and Chaetopeltidales) but could not resolve their branching order. To gain insight into the interrelationships of these groups, we analyzed multiple genes encoded by the chloroplast genomes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii P. A. Dang. and Chlamydomonas moewusii Gerloff (Chlamydomonadales), Scenedesmus obliquus (Turpin) Kütz. (Sphaeropleales), Oedogonium cardiacum Wittr. (Oedogoniales), Stigeoclonium helveticum Vischer (Chaetophorales), and Floydiella terrestris (Groover et Hofstetter) Friedl et O'Kelly (Chaetopeltidales). The C. moewusii, Oedogonium, and Floydiella chloroplast DNAs were partly sequenced using a random strategy. Trees were reconstructed from nucleotide and amino acid data sets derived from 44 protein-coding genes of 11 chlorophytes and nine streptophytes as well as from 57 protein-coding genes of the six chlorophycean taxa. All best trees identified two robustly supported major lineages within the Chlorophyceae: a clade uniting the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales, and a clade uniting the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales, and Chaetopeltidales (OCC clade). This dichotomy is independently supported by molecular signatures in chloroplast genes, such as insertions/deletions and the distribution of trans-spliced group II introns. Within the OCC clade, the sister relationship observed for the Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales is also strengthened by independent data. Character state reconstruction of basal body orientation allowed us to refine hypotheses regarding the evolution of the flagellar apparatus.

  10. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Chong, Amanda Y; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C; Ray, David A; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs.

  11. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerachai Jaratlerdsiri

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs.

  12. Comparative analyses of reproductive structures in harvestmen (opiliones) reveal multiple transitions from courtship to precopulatory antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mercedes M; Hedin, Marshal; Shultz, Jeffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Explaining the rapid, species-specific diversification of reproductive structures and behaviors is a long-standing goal of evolutionary biology, with recent research tending to attribute reproductive phenotypes to the evolutionary mechanisms of female mate choice or intersexual conflict. Progress in understanding these and other possible mechanisms depends, in part, on reconstructing the direction, frequency and relative timing of phenotypic evolution of male and female structures in species-rich clades. Here we examine evolution of reproductive structures in the leiobunine harvestmen or "daddy long-legs" of eastern North America, a monophyletic group that includes species in which males court females using nuptial gifts and other species that are equipped for apparent precopulatory antagonism (i.e., males with long, hardened penes and females with sclerotized pregenital barriers). We used parsimony- and Bayesian likelihood-based analyses to reconstruct character evolution in categorical reproductive traits and found that losses of ancestral gift-bearing penile sacs are strongly associated with gains of female pregenital barriers. In most cases, both events occur on the same internal branch of the phylogeny. These coevolutionary changes occurred at least four times, resulting in clade-specific designs in the penis and pregenital barrier. The discovery of convergent origins and/or enhancements of apparent precopulatory antagonism among closely related species offers an unusual opportunity to investigate how major changes in reproductive morphology have occurred. We propose new hypotheses that attribute these enhancements to changes in ecology or life history that reduce the duration of breeding seasons, an association that is consistent with female choice, sexual conflict, and/or an alternative evolutionary mechanism.

  13. Comparative analyses of reproductive structures in harvestmen (opiliones reveal multiple transitions from courtship to precopulatory antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes M Burns

    Full Text Available Explaining the rapid, species-specific diversification of reproductive structures and behaviors is a long-standing goal of evolutionary biology, with recent research tending to attribute reproductive phenotypes to the evolutionary mechanisms of female mate choice or intersexual conflict. Progress in understanding these and other possible mechanisms depends, in part, on reconstructing the direction, frequency and relative timing of phenotypic evolution of male and female structures in species-rich clades. Here we examine evolution of reproductive structures in the leiobunine harvestmen or "daddy long-legs" of eastern North America, a monophyletic group that includes species in which males court females using nuptial gifts and other species that are equipped for apparent precopulatory antagonism (i.e., males with long, hardened penes and females with sclerotized pregenital barriers. We used parsimony- and Bayesian likelihood-based analyses to reconstruct character evolution in categorical reproductive traits and found that losses of ancestral gift-bearing penile sacs are strongly associated with gains of female pregenital barriers. In most cases, both events occur on the same internal branch of the phylogeny. These coevolutionary changes occurred at least four times, resulting in clade-specific designs in the penis and pregenital barrier. The discovery of convergent origins and/or enhancements of apparent precopulatory antagonism among closely related species offers an unusual opportunity to investigate how major changes in reproductive morphology have occurred. We propose new hypotheses that attribute these enhancements to changes in ecology or life history that reduce the duration of breeding seasons, an association that is consistent with female choice, sexual conflict, and/or an alternative evolutionary mechanism.

  14. Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, James B; Anderson, T Michael; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Adler, Peter B; Harpole, W Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; Pärtel, Meelis; Bakker, Jonathan D; Buckley, Yvonne M; Crawley, Michael J; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Hector, Andy; Knops, Johannes M H; MacDougall, Andrew S; Melbourne, Brett A; Morgan, John W; Orrock, John L; Prober, Suzanne M; Smith, Melinda D

    2016-01-21

    How ecosystem productivity and species richness are interrelated is one of the most debated subjects in the history of ecology. Decades of intensive study have yet to discern the actual mechanisms behind observed global patterns. Here, by integrating the predictions from multiple theories into a single model and using data from 1,126 grassland plots spanning five continents, we detect the clear signals of numerous underlying mechanisms linking productivity and richness. We find that an integrative model has substantially higher explanatory power than traditional bivariate analyses. In addition, the specific results unveil several surprising findings that conflict with classical models. These include the isolation of a strong and consistent enhancement of productivity by richness, an effect in striking contrast with superficial data patterns. Also revealed is a consistent importance of competition across the full range of productivity values, in direct conflict with some (but not all) proposed models. The promotion of local richness by macroecological gradients in climatic favourability, generally seen as a competing hypothesis, is also found to be important in our analysis. The results demonstrate that an integrative modelling approach leads to a major advance in our ability to discern the underlying processes operating in ecological systems.

  15. Proteomic and Physiological Analyses Reveal Detoxification and Antioxidation Induced by Cd Stress in Kandelia candel Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoxia Weng; Lingxia Wang; Fanglin Tan; Li Huang; Jianhong Xing; Shipin Chen; Chilien Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The heavy metal Cadmium (Cd),added to the water bodies through weathering of rocks and human activities,constitutes one of the major environmental pollutants toxic to plants.This study examines the proteome changes in roots of actively growing Kandelia candel (L.) Druce when challenged with Cd.This mangrove-like species proliferates in estuaries and bays and is a potential choice for phytoremediation of Cd.A total of 53 proteins were up-or down-regulated following a short-term Cd treatment.The identities of the differentially expressed proteins were determined by MALDI-TOF/TOF.Approximately half of the up-regulated proteins are involved in oxidative response,including antioxidant enzymes,enzymes required for glutathione biosynthesis,enzymes in TCA and PPP cycles for generating ATP,NADH and NADPH.These results support the prediction that a prompt antioxidative response is necessary for the reduction of the oxidative stress caused by Cd and set the stage for further investigating of Cd up-regulated proteins in Kandelia candel.In summary,this investigation of global proteomic changes in K.candel roots reveals a complex cellular network affected by Cd stress.The network covers a broad range of metabolic processes,including protein synthesis,antioxidative/detoxifying reactions,energy generation,and metabolites production against Cd stress.Particularly important,our results support the predicted key roles of glutathione biosynthesis,ascorbate-glutathione cycle and antioxidative defense system in Cd detoxification in K.candel roots.This understanding is necessary for developing the woody plant K.candel for phytoremediation of Cd and other heavy metals and may be critical for maintaining health mangrove ecology.

  16. Hemoglobin analyses in the Netherlands reveal more than 80 different variants including six novel ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zwieten, Rob; Veldthuis, Martijn; Delzenne, Barend; Berghuis, Jeffrey; Groen, Joke; Ait Ichou, Fatima; Clifford, Els; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Stroobants, An K

    2014-01-01

    More than 20,000 blood samples of individuals living in The Netherlands and suspected of hemolytic anemia or diabetes were analyzed by high resolution cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Besides common disease-related hemoglobins (Hbs), rare variants were also detected. The variant Hbs were retrospectively analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and by isoelectric focusing (IEF). For unambiguous identification, the globin genes were sequenced. Most of the 80 Hb variants detected by initial screening on HPLC were also separated by capillary electrophoresis (CE), but a few variants were only detectable with one of these methods. Some variants were unstable, had thalassemic properties or increased oxygen affinity, and some interfered with Hb A2 measurement, detection of sickle cell Hb or Hb A1c quantification. Two of the six novel variants, Hb Enschede (HBA2: c.308G  > A, p.Ser103Asn) and Hb Weesp (HBA1: c.301C > T, p.Leu101Phe), had no clinical consequences. In contrast, two others appeared clinically significant: Hb Ede (HBB: c.53A > T, p.Lys18Met) caused thalassemia and Hb Waterland (HBB: c.428C > T, pAla143Val) was related to mild polycytemia. Hb A2-Venlo (HBD: c.193G > A, p.Gly65Ser) and Hb A2-Rotterdam (HBD: c.38A > C, p.Asn13Thr) interfered with Hb A2 quantification. This survey shows that HPLC analysis followed by globin gene sequencing of rare variants is an effective method to reveal Hb variants.

  17. Replicated landscape genetic and network analyses reveal wide variation in functional connectivity for American pikas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jessica A; Epps, Clinton W; Jeffress, Mackenzie R; Ray, Chris; Rodhouse, Thomas J; Schwalm, Donelle

    2016-09-01

    Landscape connectivity is essential for maintaining viable populations, particularly for species restricted to fragmented habitats or naturally arrayed in metapopulations and facing rapid climate change. The importance of assessing both structural connectivity (physical distribution of favorable habitat patches) and functional connectivity (how species move among habitat patches) for managing such species is well understood. However, the degree to which functional connectivity for a species varies among landscapes, and the resulting implications for conservation, have rarely been assessed. We used a landscape genetics approach to evaluate resistance to gene flow and, thus, to determine how landscape and climate-related variables influence gene flow for American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in eight federally managed sites in the western United States. We used empirically derived, individual-based landscape resistance models in conjunction with predictive occupancy models to generate patch-based network models describing functional landscape connectivity. Metareplication across landscapes enabled identification of limiting factors for dispersal that would not otherwise have been apparent. Despite the cool microclimates characteristic of pika habitat, south-facing aspects consistently represented higher resistance to movement, supporting the previous hypothesis that exposure to relatively high temperatures may limit dispersal in American pikas. We found that other barriers to dispersal included areas with a high degree of topographic relief, such as cliffs and ravines, as well as streams and distances greater than 1-4 km depending on the site. Using the empirically derived network models of habitat patch connectivity, we identified habitat patches that were likely disproportionately important for maintaining functional connectivity, areas in which habitat appeared fragmented, and locations that could be targeted for management actions to improve functional connectivity

  18. Interactome analyses of Salmonella pathogenicity islands reveal SicA indispensable for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Chandrajit; Pawar, Shrikant; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Ashraf, Md Izhar; Chand, Yamini; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2014-12-21

    Serovars of Salmonella enterica, namely Typhi and Typhimurium, reportedly, are the bacterial pathogens causing systemic infections like gastroenteritis and typhoid fever. To elucidate the role and importance in such infection, the proteins of the Type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity islands and two component signal transduction systems, have been mainly focused. However, the most indispensable of these virulent ones and their hierarchical role has not yet been studied extensively. We have adopted a theoretical approach to build an interactome comprising the proteins from the Salmonella pathogeneicity islands (SPI) and two component signal transduction systems. This interactome was then analyzed by using network parameters like centrality and k-core measures. An initial step to capture the fingerprint of the core network resulted in a set of proteins which are involved in the process of invasion and colonization, thereby becoming more important in the process of infection. These proteins pertained to the Inv, Org, Prg, Sip, Spa, Ssa and Sse operons along with chaperone protein SicA. Amongst them, SicA was figured out to be the most indispensable protein from different network parametric analyses. Subsequently, the gene expression levels of all these theoretically identified important proteins were confirmed by microarray data analysis. Finally, we have proposed a hierarchy of the proteins involved in the total infection process. This theoretical approach is the first of its kind to figure out potential virulence determinants encoded by SPI for therapeutic targets for enteric infection. A set of responsible virulent proteins was identified and the expression level of their genes was validated by using independent, published microarray data. The result was a targeted set of proteins that could serve as sensitive predictors and form the foundation for a series of trials in the wet-lab setting. Understanding these regulatory and virulent proteins would

  19. Modeling hard clinical end-point data in economic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Anuraag R; Zheng, Ying; Palencia, Roberto; Ruffolo, Antonio; Hass, Bastian; Sorensen, Sonja V

    2013-11-01

    The availability of hard clinical end-point data, such as that on cardiovascular (CV) events among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, is increasing, and as a result there is growing interest in using hard end-point data of this type in economic analyses. This study investigated published approaches for modeling hard end-points from clinical trials and evaluated their applicability in health economic models with different disease features. A review of cost-effectiveness models of interventions in clinically significant therapeutic areas (CV diseases, cancer, and chronic lower respiratory diseases) was conducted in PubMed and Embase using a defined search strategy. Only studies integrating hard end-point data from randomized clinical trials were considered. For each study included, clinical input characteristics and modeling approach were summarized and evaluated. A total of 33 articles (23 CV, eight cancer, two respiratory) were accepted for detailed analysis. Decision trees, Markov models, discrete event simulations, and hybrids were used. Event rates were incorporated either as constant rates, time-dependent risks, or risk equations based on patient characteristics. Risks dependent on time and/or patient characteristics were used where major event rates were >1%/year in models with fewer health states (rates. The detailed modeling information and terminology varied, sometimes requiring interpretation. Key considerations for cost-effectiveness models incorporating hard end-point data include the frequency and characteristics of the relevant clinical events and how the trial data is reported. When event risk is low, simplification of both the model structure and event rate modeling is recommended. When event risk is common, such as in high risk populations, more detailed modeling approaches, including individual simulations or explicitly time-dependent event rates, are more appropriate to accurately reflect the trial data.

  20. Comparative analyses reveal discrepancies among results of commonly used methods for Anopheles gambiaemolecular form identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto João

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms, the major malaria vectors in the Afro-tropical region, are ongoing a process of ecological diversification and adaptive lineage splitting, which is affecting malaria transmission and vector control strategies in West Africa. These two incipient species are defined on the basis of single nucleotide differences in the IGS and ITS regions of multicopy rDNA located on the X-chromosome. A number of PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches based on form-specific SNPs in the IGS region are used for M and S identification. Moreover, a PCR-method to detect the M-specific insertion of a short interspersed transposable element (SINE200 has recently been introduced as an alternative identification approach. However, a large-scale comparative analysis of four widely used PCR or PCR-RFLP genotyping methods for M and S identification was never carried out to evaluate whether they could be used interchangeably, as commonly assumed. Results The genotyping of more than 400 A. gambiae specimens from nine African countries, and the sequencing of the IGS-amplicon of 115 of them, highlighted discrepancies among results obtained by the different approaches due to different kinds of biases, which may result in an overestimation of MS putative hybrids, as follows: i incorrect match of M and S specific primers used in the allele specific-PCR approach; ii presence of polymorphisms in the recognition sequence of restriction enzymes used in the PCR-RFLP approaches; iii incomplete cleavage during the restriction reactions; iv presence of different copy numbers of M and S-specific IGS-arrays in single individuals in areas of secondary contact between the two forms. Conclusions The results reveal that the PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches most commonly utilized to identify A. gambiae M and S forms are not fully interchangeable as usually assumed, and highlight limits of the actual definition of the two molecular forms, which might

  1. Kinetic and molecular analyses reveal isoprene degradation potential of Methylobacterium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastva, Navnita; Vishwakarma, P; Bhardwaj, Y; Singh, A; Manjunath, K; Dubey, Suresh K

    2017-10-01

    Efforts were made to isolate and characterize bacteria capable of growing on methane and organic compounds, and to achieve the simultaneous degradation of more than one pollutant. Among the methanotrophs, species of Methylobacterium was able to catabolize a variety of hydrocarbons, including the branched-chain alkenes. Therefore, laboratory incubations experiments were carried out in batch mode to assess the potential of Methylobacterium sp. PV1 for degrading isoprene, the low-molecular-weight alkene, the most abundant non-methane volatile hydrocarbon present in the environment. Methylobacterium sp. PV1, isolated from paddy field soil, was characterized by pmoA and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and FAME analysis, and used for isoprene degradation. The kinetics of biodegradation is studied using the Michaelis-Menten model. The optimum degradation (80%) with maximum average relative degradation rate was observed at 150ppm isoprene. The degradation products were also analyzed using FTIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome Wide Analyses Reveal Little Evidence for Adaptive Evolution in Many Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossmann, Toni I.; Song, Bao-Hua; Windsor, Aaron J.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Dixon, Christopher J.; Kapralov, Maxim V.; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The relative contribution of advantageous and neutral mutations to the evolutionary process is a central problem in evolutionary biology. Current estimates suggest that whereas Drosophila, mice, and bacteria have undergone extensive adaptive evolution, hominids show little or no evidence of adaptive evolution in protein-coding sequences. This may be a consequence of differences in effective population size. To study the matter further, we have investigated whether plants show evidence of adaptive evolution using an extension of the McDonald–Kreitman test that explicitly models slightly deleterious mutations by estimating the distribution of fitness effects of new mutations. We apply this method to data from nine pairs of species. Altogether more than 2,400 loci with an average length of ≈280 nucleotides were analyzed. We observe very similar results in all species; we find little evidence of adaptive amino acid substitution in any comparison except sunflowers. This may be because many plant species have modest effective population sizes. PMID:20299543

  3. Comparative analyses of evolutionary rates reveal different pathways to encephalization in bats, carnivorans, and primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaers, Jeroen B; Dechmann, Dina K N; Goswami, Anjali; Soligo, Christophe; Safi, Kamran

    2012-10-30

    Variation in relative brain size is commonly interpreted as the result of selection on neuronal capacity. However, this approach ignores that relative brain size is also linked to another highly adaptive variable: body size. Considering that one-way tradeoff mechanisms are unlikely to provide satisfactory evolutionary explanations, we introduce an analytical framework that describes and quantifies all possible evolutionary scenarios between two traits. To investigate the effects of body mass changes on the interpretation of relative brain size evolution, we analyze three mammalian orders that are expected to be subject to different selective pressures on body size due to differences in locomotor adaptation: bats (powered flight), primates (primarily arboreal), and carnivorans (primarily terrestrial). We quantify rates of brain and body mass changes along individual branches of phylogenetic trees using an adaptive peak model of evolution. We find that the magnitude and variance of the level of integration of brain and body mass rates, and the subsequent relative influence of either brain or body size evolution on the brain-body relationship, differ significantly between orders and subgroups within orders. Importantly, we find that variation in brain-body relationships was driven primarily by variability in body mass. Our approach allows a more detailed interpretation of correlated trait evolution and variation in the underlying evolutionary pathways. Results demonstrate that a principal focus on interpreting relative brain size evolution as selection on neuronal capacity confounds the effects of body mass changes, thereby hiding important aspects that may contribute to explaining animal diversity.

  4. Functional assays and metagenomic analyses reveals differences between the microbial communities inhabiting the soil horizons of a Norway spruce plantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Uroz

    Full Text Available In temperate ecosystems, acidic forest soils are among the most nutrient-poor terrestrial environments. In this context, the long-term differentiation of the forest soils into horizons may impact the assembly and the functions of the soil microbial communities. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the ecology and functional potentials of these microbial communities, a suite of analyses including comparative metagenomics was applied on independent soil samples from a spruce plantation (Breuil-Chenue, France. The objectives were to assess whether the decreasing nutrient bioavailability and pH variations that naturally occurs between the organic and mineral horizons affects the soil microbial functional biodiversity. The 14 Gbp of pyrosequencing and Illumina sequences generated in this study revealed complex microbial communities dominated by bacteria. Detailed analyses showed that the organic soil horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Bacteria, Chordata, Arthropoda and Ascomycota. On the contrary the mineral horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Archaea. Our analyses also highlighted that the microbial communities inhabiting the two soil horizons differed significantly in their functional potentials according to functional assays and MG-RAST analyses, suggesting a functional specialisation of these microbial communities. Consistent with this specialisation, our shotgun metagenomic approach revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of sequences related glycoside hydrolases in the organic horizon compared to the mineral horizon that was significantly enriched in glycoside transferases. This functional stratification according to the soil horizon was also confirmed by a significant correlation between the functional assays performed in this study and the functional metagenomic analyses. Together, our results suggest that the soil stratification and particularly the soil resource

  5. Long-Term Sun Climate Connections, Revealed by the Analyses of Historical and Other Proxy Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Sun, once considered constant, actually goes through 11-year, decadal, centennial, and even longer cycles. Our analysis of historical sunspot and aurora records, carbon-14 and beryllium-10 abundances from long-lived trees and deep polar ice cores, respectively, shows that it has gone through nine long cycles in the past 1800 years. Although these changes amounted to China). Total solar irradiances, reconstructed from historical sunspot records, were 0.25% lower then. This correlates nicely with an estimated 0.5-degree drop in Northern Hemisphere summer surface temperatures during the Little Ice Age [Lean, GRL 22, 3195, 1995]. We have also analyzed Chinese historical weather records for comparison. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by the degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-September) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, rivers and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most frequently during the coldest part of the Little Ice Age. The Category 3 episodes were in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716, and 1718-19. For example the Yangtze River and its lakes froze up to 3-4 times in 1650-1700. The coldest period thus coincides with the Maunder Minimum, and is consistent with general circulation model hindcast winter conditions for China [Shindell, Science, 294, 2149, 2001]. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima--in 1761 (due to a large volcanic eruption); and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)--in 1796 and 1814-17. The Sun has gradually brightened since the Dalton Minimum. But the climate of China remained cold through the 19th century, as in the rest of the world, probably due to increased volcanic aerosol loading of the atmosphere [Sato, JGR 98, 22987, 1993]. The climate of China seems to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Maximum

  6. Analysing regenerative potential in zebrafish models of congenital muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A J; Currie, P D

    2014-11-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders. Clinically hypotonia is present from birth, with progressive muscle weakness and wasting through development. For the most part, CMDs can mechanistically be attributed to failure of basement membrane protein laminin-α2 sufficiently binding with correctly glycosylated α-dystroglycan. The majority of CMDs therefore arise as the result of either a deficiency of laminin-α2 (MDC1A) or hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (dystroglycanopathy). Here we consider whether by filling a regenerative medicine niche, the zebrafish model can address the present challenge of delivering novel therapeutic solutions for CMD. In the first instance the readiness and appropriateness of the zebrafish as a model organism for pioneering regenerative medicine therapies in CMD is analysed, in particular for MDC1A and the dystroglycanopathies. Despite the recent rapid progress made in gene editing technology, these approaches have yet to yield any novel zebrafish models of CMD. Currently the most genetically relevant zebrafish models to the field of CMD, have all been created by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis. Once genetically relevant models have been established the zebrafish has several important facets for investigating the mechanistic cause of CMD, including rapid ex vivo development, optical transparency up to the larval stages of development and relative ease in creating transgenic reporter lines. Together, these tools are well suited for use in live-imaging studies such as in vivo modelling of muscle fibre detachment. Secondly, the zebrafish's contribution to progress in effective treatment of CMD was analysed. Two approaches were identified in which zebrafish could potentially contribute to effective therapies. The first hinges on the augmentation of functional redundancy within the system, such as upregulating alternative laminin chains in the candyfloss

  7. [Approach to depressogenic genes from genetic analyses of animal models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    Human depression or mood disorder is defined as a complex disease, making positional cloning of susceptibility genes a formidable task. We have undertaken genetic analyses of three different animal models for depression, comparing our results with advanced database resources. We first performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on two mouse models of "despair", namely, the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), and detected multiple chromosomal loci that control immobility time in these tests. Since one QTL detected on mouse chromosome 11 harbors the GABA A receptor subunit genes, we tested these genes for association in human mood disorder patients. We obtained significant associations of the alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunit genes with the disease, particularly in females. This result was striking, because we had previously detected an epistatic interaction between mouse chromosomes 11 and X that regulates immobility time in these animals. Next, we performed genome-wide expression analyses using a rat model of depression, learned helplessness (LH). We found that in the frontal cortex of LH rats, a disease implicated region, the LIM kinase 1 gene (Limk 1) showed greatest alteration, in this case down-regulation. By combining data from the QTL analysis of FST/TST and DNA microarray analysis of mouse frontal cortex, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein 1 (Cap 1) as another candidate gene for depression susceptibility. Both Limk 1 and Cap 1 are key players in the modulation of actin G-F conversion. In summary, our current study using animal models suggests disturbances of GABAergic neurotransmission and actin turnover as potential pathophysiologies for mood disorder.

  8. A Formal Model to Analyse the Firewall Configuration Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Myo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The firewall is widely known as a brandmauer (security-edge gateway. To provide the demanded security, the firewall has to be appropriately adjusted, i.e. be configured. Unfortunately, when configuring, even the skilled administrators may make mistakes, which result in decreasing level of a network security and network infiltration undesirable packages.The network can be exposed to various threats and attacks. One of the mechanisms used to ensure network security is the firewall.The firewall is a network component, which, using a security policy, controls packages passing through the borders of a secured network. The security policy represents the set of rules.Package filters work in the mode without inspection of a state: they investigate packages as the independent objects. Rules take the following form: (condition, action. The firewall analyses the entering traffic, based on the IP address of the sender and recipient, the port number of the sender and recipient, and the used protocol. When the package meets rule conditions, the action specified in the rule is carried out. It can be: allow, deny.The aim of this article is to develop tools to analyse a firewall configuration with inspection of states. The input data are the file with the set of rules. It is required to submit the analysis of a security policy in an informative graphic form as well as to reveal discrepancy available in rules. The article presents a security policy visualization algorithm and a program, which shows how the firewall rules act on all possible packages. To represent a result in an intelligible form a concept of the equivalence region is introduced.Our task is the program to display results of rules action on the packages in a convenient graphic form as well as to reveal contradictions between the rules. One of problems is the large number of measurements. As it was noted above, the following parameters are specified in the rule: Source IP address, appointment IP

  9. Magnetic fabric analyses in analogue models of clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lasanta, Cristina; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Casas-Sainz, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies in sedimentary rocks subjected to deformation indicate that magnetic fabrics orientation can be conditioned by multiple factors: sedimentary conditions, magnetic mineralogy, successive tectonic events, etc. All of them difficult the interpretation of the AMS as a marker of the deformation conditions. Analogue modeling allows to isolate the variables that act in a geological process and to determine the factors and in which extent they influence in the process. This study shows the magnetic fabric analyses applied to several analogue models developed with common commercial red clays. This material resembles natural clay materials that, despite their greater degree of impurities and heterogeneity, have been proved to record a robust magnetic signal carried by a mixture of para- and ferromagnetic minerals. The magnetic behavior of the modeled clay has been characterized by temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility curves (from 40 to 700°C). The measurements were performed combining a KLY-3S Kappabridge susceptometer with a CS3 furnace (AGICO Inc., Czech Republic). The obtained results indicate the presence of an important content of hematite as ferromagnetic phase, as well as a remarkable paramagnetic fraction, probably constituted by phyllosilicates. This mineralogy is common in natural materials such as Permo-Triassic red facies, and magnetic fabric analyses in these natural examples have given consistent results in different tectonic contexts. In this study, sedimentary conditions and magnetic mineralogy are kept constant and the influence of the tectonic regime in the magnetic fabrics is analyzed. Our main objective is to reproduce several tectonic contexts (strike-slip and compression) in a sedimentary environment where material is not yet compacted, in order to determine how tectonic conditions influence the magnetic fabric registered in each case. By dispersing the clays in water and after allowing their

  10. Fossil-based comparative analyses reveal ancient marine ancestry erased by extinction in ray-finned fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur-R, Ricardo; Ortí, Guillermo; Pyron, Robert Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The marine-freshwater boundary is a major biodiversity gradient and few groups have colonised both systems successfully. Fishes have transitioned between habitats repeatedly, diversifying in rivers, lakes and oceans over evolutionary time. However, their history of habitat colonisation and diversification is unclear based on available fossil and phylogenetic data. We estimate ancestral habitats and diversification and transition rates using a large-scale phylogeny of extant fish taxa and one containing a massive number of extinct species. Extant-only phylogenetic analyses indicate freshwater ancestry, but inclusion of fossils reveal strong evidence of marine ancestry in lineages now restricted to freshwaters. Diversification and colonisation dynamics vary asymmetrically between habitats, as marine lineages colonise and flourish in rivers more frequently than the reverse. Our study highlights the importance of including fossils in comparative analyses, showing that freshwaters have played a role as refuges for ancient fish lineages, a signal erased by extinction in extant-only phylogenies.

  11. Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed

    CERN Document Server

    Durante, M; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Gauthier, R; Giloux, C; Guinchard, M; Kircher, F; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Millot, J-F; Muñoz Garcia, J-E; Oberli, L; Perez, J-C; Pietrowicz, S; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F; Todesco, E; Viret, P; Ziemianski, D

    2013-01-01

    This report is the deliverable report 7.3.1 “Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed “. The report has four parts: “Design report for the dipole magnet”, “Dipole magnet structure tested in LN2”, “Nb3Sn strand procured for one dipole magnet” and “One test double pancake copper coil made”. The 4 report parts show that, although the magnet construction will be only completed by end 2014, all elements are present for a successful completion. Due to the importance of the project for the future of the participants and given the significant investments done by the participants, there is a full commitment to finish the project.

  12. Dipole model test with one superconducting coil: results analysed

    CERN Document Server

    Bajas, H; Benda, V; Berriaud, C; Bajko, M; Bottura, L; Caspi, S; Charrondiere, M; Clément, S; Datskov, V; Devaux, M; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Gauthier, R; Giloux, C; Guinchard, M; Kircher, F; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Millot, J-F; Muñoz Garcia, J-E; Oberli, L; Perez, J-C; Pietrowicz, S; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F; Todesco, E; Viret, P; Ziemianski, D

    2013-01-01

    This report is the deliverable report 7.3.1 “Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed “. The report has four parts: “Design report for the dipole magnet”, “Dipole magnet structure tested in LN2”, “Nb3Sn strand procured for one dipole magnet” and “One test double pancake copper coil made”. The 4 report parts show that, although the magnet construction will be only completed by end 2014, all elements are present for a successful completion. Due to the importance of the project for the future of the participants and given the significant investments done by the participants, there is a full commitment to finish the project.

  13. Incorporating flood event analyses and catchment structures into model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppel, Henning; Schumann, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The space-time variability in catchment response results from several hydrological processes which differ in their relevance in an event-specific way. An approach to characterise this variance consists in comparisons between flood events in a catchment and between flood responses of several sub-basins in such an event. In analytical frameworks the impact of space and time variability of rainfall on runoff generation due to rainfall excess can be characterised. Moreover the effect of hillslope and channel network routing on runoff timing can be specified. Hence, a modelling approach is needed to specify the runoff generation and formation. Knowing the space-time variability of rainfall and the (spatial averaged) response of a catchment it seems worthwhile to develop new models based on event and catchment analyses. The consideration of spatial order and the distribution of catchment characteristics in their spatial variability and interaction with the space-time variability of rainfall provides additional knowledge about hydrological processes at the basin scale. For this purpose a new procedure to characterise the spatial heterogeneity of catchments characteristics in their succession along the flow distance (differentiated between river network and hillslopes) was developed. It was applied to study of flood responses at a set of nested catchments in a river basin in eastern Germany. In this study the highest observed rainfall-runoff events were analysed, beginning at the catchment outlet and moving upstream. With regard to the spatial heterogeneities of catchment characteristics, sub-basins were separated by new algorithms to attribute runoff-generation, hillslope and river network processes. With this procedure the cumulative runoff response at the outlet can be decomposed and individual runoff features can be assigned to individual aspects of the catchment. Through comparative analysis between the sub-catchments and the assigned effects on runoff dynamics new

  14. A simulation model for analysing brain structure deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Sergio Di [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy); Lutzemberger, Ludovico [Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Neurosurgery, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67-56100 Pisa (Italy); Salvetti, Ovidio [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2003-12-21

    Recent developments of medical software applications from the simulation to the planning of surgical operations have revealed the need for modelling human tissues and organs, not only from a geometric point of view but also from a physical one, i.e. soft tissues, rigid body, viscoelasticity, etc. This has given rise to the term 'deformable objects', which refers to objects with a morphology, a physical and a mechanical behaviour of their own and that reflects their natural properties. In this paper, we propose a model, based upon physical laws, suitable for the realistic manipulation of geometric reconstructions of volumetric data taken from MR and CT scans. In particular, a physically based model of the brain is presented that is able to simulate the evolution of different nature pathological intra-cranial phenomena such as haemorrhages, neoplasm, haematoma, etc and to describe the consequences that are caused by their volume expansions and the influences they have on the anatomical and neuro-functional structures of the brain.

  15. A theoretical model for analysing gender bias in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Eva E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the last decades research has reported unmotivated differences in the treatment of women and men in various areas of clinical and academic medicine. There is an ongoing discussion on how to avoid such gender bias. We developed a three-step-theoretical model to understand how gender bias in medicine can occur and be understood. In this paper we present the model and discuss its usefulness in the efforts to avoid gender bias. In the model gender bias is analysed in relation to assumptions concerning difference/sameness and equity/inequity between women and men. Our model illustrates that gender bias in medicine can arise from assuming sameness and/or equity between women and men when there are genuine differences to consider in biology and disease, as well as in life conditions and experiences. However, gender bias can also arise from assuming differences when there are none, when and if dichotomous stereotypes about women and men are understood as valid. This conceptual thinking can be useful for discussing and avoiding gender bias in clinical work, medical education, career opportunities and documents such as research programs and health care policies. Too meet the various forms of gender bias, different facts and measures are needed. Knowledge about biological differences between women and men will not reduce bias caused by gendered stereotypes or by unawareness of health problems and discrimination associated with gender inequity. Such bias reflects unawareness of gendered attitudes and will not change by facts only. We suggest consciousness-rising activities and continuous reflections on gender attitudes among students, teachers, researchers and decision-makers.

  16. An Illumination Modeling System for Human Factors Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thong; Maida, James C.; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Seeing is critical to human performance. Lighting is critical for seeing. Therefore, lighting is critical to human performance. This is common sense, and here on earth, it is easily taken for granted. However, on orbit, because the sun will rise or set every 45 minutes on average, humans working in space must cope with extremely dynamic lighting conditions. Contrast conditions of harsh shadowing and glare is also severe. The prediction of lighting conditions for critical operations is essential. Crew training can factor lighting into the lesson plans when necessary. Mission planners can determine whether low-light video cameras are required or whether additional luminaires need to be flown. The optimization of the quantity and quality of light is needed because of the effects on crew safety, on electrical power and on equipment maintainability. To address all of these issues, an illumination modeling system has been developed by the Graphics Research and Analyses Facility (GRAF) and Lighting Environment Test Facility (LETF) in the Space Human Factors Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center. The system uses physically based ray tracing software (Radiance) developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, a human factors oriented geometric modeling system (PLAID) and an extensive database of humans and environments. Material reflectivity properties of major surfaces and critical surfaces are measured using a gonio-reflectometer. Luminaires (lights) are measured for beam spread distribution, color and intensity. Video camera performances are measured for color and light sensitivity. 3D geometric models of humans and the environment are combined with the material and light models to form a system capable of predicting lighting conditions and visibility conditions in space.

  17. Comparison of two potato simulation models under climate change. I. Model calibration and sensitivity analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, J.

    2002-01-01

    To analyse the effects of climate change on potato growth and production, both a simple growth model, POTATOS, and a comprehensive model, NPOTATO, were applied. Both models were calibrated and tested against results from experiments and variety trials in The Netherlands. The sensitivity of model

  18. Temporal variations analyses and predictive modeling of microbiological seawater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lušić, Darija Vukić; Kranjčević, Lado; Maćešić, Senka; Lušić, Dražen; Jozić, Slaven; Linšak, Željko; Bilajac, Lovorka; Grbčić, Luka; Bilajac, Neiro

    2017-08-01

    Bathing water quality is a major public health issue, especially for tourism-oriented regions. Currently used methods within EU allow at least a 2.2 day period for obtaining the analytical results, making outdated the information forwarded to the public. Obtained results and beach assessment are influenced by the temporal and spatial characteristics of sample collection, and numerous environmental parameters, as well as by differences of official water standards. This paper examines the temporal variation of microbiological parameters during the day, as well as the influence of the sampling hour, on decision processes in the management of the beach. Apart from the fecal indicators stipulated by the EU Bathing Water Directive (E. coli and enterococci), additional fecal (C. perfringens) and non-fecal (S. aureus and P. aeriginosa) parameters were analyzed. Moreover, the effects of applying different evaluation criteria (national, EU and U.S. EPA) to beach ranking were studied, and the most common reasons for exceeding water-quality standards were investigated. In order to upgrade routine monitoring, a predictive statistical model was developed. The highest concentrations of fecal indicators were recorded early in the morning (6 AM) due to the lack of solar radiation during the night period. When compared to enterococci, E. coli criteria appears to be more stringent for the detection of fecal pollution. In comparison to EU and U.S. EPA criteria, Croatian national evaluation criteria provide stricter public health standards. Solar radiation and precipitation were the predominant environmental parameters affecting beach water quality, and these parameters were included in the predictive model setup. Predictive models revealed great potential for the monitoring of recreational water bodies, and with further development can become a useful tool for the improvement of public health protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative analyses of lipidomes and transcriptomes reveal a concerted action of multiple defensive systems against photooxidative stress in Haematococcus pluvialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Yunho; Hwang, Yong-sic; Wang, Baobei; Kim, Minju; Jeong, Jooyeon; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Hu, Qiang; Han, Danxiang; Jin, EonSeon

    2014-08-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis cells predominantly remain in the macrozooid stage under favourable environmental conditions but are rapidly differentiated into haematocysts upon exposure to various environmental stresses. Haematocysts are characterized by massive accumulations of astaxanthin sequestered in cytosolic oil globules. Lipidomic analyses revealed that synthesis of the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) was substantially stimulated under high irradiance. Simultaneously, remodelling of membrane glycerolipids occurred as a result of dramatic reductions in chloroplast membrane glycolipids but remained unchanged or declined slightly in extraplastidic membrane glycerolipids. De novo assembly of transcriptomes revealed the genomic and metabolic features of this unsequenced microalga. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed that so-called resting cells (haematocysts) may be more active than fast-growing vegetative cells (macrozooids) regarding metabolic pathways and functions. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of astaxanthin biosynthesis suggested that the non-mevalonate pathway mediated the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, as the majority of genes involved in subsequent astaxanthin biosynthesis were substantially up-regulated under high irradiance, with the genes encoding phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and β-carotene hydroxylase identified as the most prominent regulatory components. Accumulation of TAG under high irradiance was attributed to moderate up-regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis at the gene level as well as to moderate elevation of the TAG assembly pathways. Additionally, inferred from transcriptomic differentiation, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity, a decrease in ROS production, and the relaxation of over-reduction of the photosynthetic electron transport chain will work together to protect against photooxidative stress in H. pluvialis under high irradiance. © The Author 2014. Published by

  20. Structural analyses of Legionella LepB reveal a new GAP fold that catalytically mimics eukaryotic RasGAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yu; Liyan Hu; Qing Yao; Yongqun Zhu; Na Dong; Da-Cheng Wang; Feng Shao

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases are emerging targets of diverse bacterial pathogens.Here,we perform biochemical and structural analyses of LepB,a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) effector from Legionellapneumophila.We map LepB GAP domain to residues 313-618 and show that the GAP domain is Rab1 specific with a catalytic activity higher than the canonical eukaryotic TBC GAP and the newly identified VirA/EspG family of bacterial RabGAP effectors.Exhaustive mutation analyses identify Arg444 as the arginine finger,but no catalytically essential glutamine residues.Crystal structures of LepB313-618 alone and the GAP domain of Legionella drancourtii LepB in complex with Rab1-GDP-AIF3 support the catalytic role of Arg444,and also further reveal a 3D architecture and a GTPase-binding mode distinct from all known GAPs.Glu449,structurally equivalent to TBC RabGAP glutamine finger in apo-LepB,undergoes a drastic movement upon Rab1 binding,which induces Rab1 Gin70 side-chain flipping towards GDP-AIF3 through a strong ionic interaction.This conformationally rearranged Gln70 acts as the catalytic cis-glutamine,therefore uncovering an unexpected RasGAP-like catalytic mechanism for LepB.Our studies highlight an extraordinary structural and catalytic diversity of RabGAPs,particularly those from bacterial pathogens.

  1. Genome-wide analyses of Epstein-Barr virus reveal conserved RNA structures and a novel stable intronic sequence RNA

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus implicated in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Little is known concerning the roles of RNA structure in this important human pathogen. This study provides the first comprehensive genome-wide survey of RNA and RNA structure in EBV. Results Novel EBV RNAs and RNA structures were identified by computational modeling and RNA-Seq analyses of EBV. Scans of the genomic sequences of four EBV strains (EBV-1, EBV-2, GD1, and GD2) and of the clo...

  2. Genome-Wide Association and Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Candidate Genes Underlying Yield-determining Traits in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun; Peng, Liu; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Junhua; Yang, Bo; Xiao, Zhongchun; Liang, Ying; Xu, Xingfu; Qu, Cunmin; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Liezhao; Zhu, Qinlong; Fu, Minglian; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Li, Jiana

    2017-01-01

    Yield is one of the most important yet complex crop traits. To improve our understanding of the genetic basis of yield establishment, and to identify candidate genes responsible for yield improvement in Brassica napus, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for seven yield-determining traits [main inflorescence pod number (MIPN), branch pod number (BPN), pod number per plant (PNP), seed number per pod (SPP), thousand seed weight, main inflorescence yield (MIY), and branch yield], using data from 520 diverse B. napus accessions from two different yield environments. In total, we detected 128 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 93 of which were revealed as novel by integrative analysis. A combination of GWAS and transcriptome sequencing on 21 haplotype blocks from samples pooled by four extremely high-yielding or low-yielding accessions revealed the differential expression of 14 crucial candiate genes (such as Bna.MYB83, Bna.SPL5, and Bna.ROP3) associated with multiple traits or containing multiple SNPs associated with the same trait. Functional annotation and expression pattern analyses further demonstrated that these 14 candiate genes might be important in developmental processes and biomass accumulation, thus affecting the yield establishment of B. napus. These results provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying the establishment of high yield in B. napus, and lay the foundation for developing high-yielding B. napus varieties. PMID:28261256

  3. Micromechanical Failure Analyses for Finite Element Polymer Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHAMBERS,ROBERT S.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LO,CHI S.; ADOLF,DOUGLAS B.; GUESS,TOMMY R.

    2000-11-01

    Polymer stresses around sharp corners and in constrained geometries of encapsulated components can generate cracks leading to system failures. Often, analysts use maximum stresses as a qualitative indicator for evaluating the strength of encapsulated component designs. Although this approach has been useful for making relative comparisons screening prospective design changes, it has not been tied quantitatively to failure. Accurate failure models are needed for analyses to predict whether encapsulated components meet life cycle requirements. With Sandia's recently developed nonlinear viscoelastic polymer models, it has been possible to examine more accurately the local stress-strain distributions in zones of likely failure initiation looking for physically based failure mechanisms and continuum metrics that correlate with the cohesive failure event. This study has identified significant differences between rubbery and glassy failure mechanisms that suggest reasonable alternatives for cohesive failure criteria and metrics. Rubbery failure seems best characterized by the mechanisms of finite extensibility and appears to correlate with maximum strain predictions. Glassy failure, however, seems driven by cavitation and correlates with the maximum hydrostatic tension. Using these metrics, two three-point bending geometries were tested and analyzed under variable loading rates, different temperatures and comparable mesh resolution (i.e., accuracy) to make quantitative failure predictions. The resulting predictions and observations agreed well suggesting the need for additional research. In a separate, additional study, the asymptotically singular stress state found at the tip of a rigid, square inclusion embedded within a thin, linear elastic disk was determined for uniform cooling. The singular stress field is characterized by a single stress intensity factor K{sub a} and the applicable K{sub a} calibration relationship has been determined for both fully bonded and

  4. Analyses on Four Models and Cases of Enterprise Informatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Chunsheng(石春生); Han Xinjuan; Yang Cuilan; Zhao Dongbai

    2003-01-01

    The basic conditions of the enterprise informatization in Heilongjiang province are analyzed and 4 models are designed to drive the industrial and commercial information enterprise. The 4 models are the Resource Integration Informatization Model, the Flow Management Informatization Model, the Intranet E-commerce Informatization Model and the Network Enterprise Informatization Model. The conditions for using and problems needing attentions of these 4 models are also analyzed.

  5. Transcriptome sequencing and genome-wide association analyses reveal lysosomal function and actin cytoskeleton remodeling in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z; Xu, J; Chen, J; Kim, S; Reimers, M; Bacanu, S-A; Yu, H; Liu, C; Sun, J; Wang, Q; Jia, P; Xu, F; Zhang, Y; Kendler, K S; Peng, Z; Chen, X

    2015-05-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD) are severe mental disorders with high heritability. Clinicians have long noticed the similarities of clinic symptoms between these disorders. In recent years, accumulating evidence indicates some shared genetic liabilities. However, what is shared remains elusive. In this study, we conducted whole transcriptome analysis of post-mortem brain tissues (cingulate cortex) from SCZ, BPD and control subjects, and identified differentially expressed genes in these disorders. We found 105 and 153 genes differentially expressed in SCZ and BPD, respectively. By comparing the t-test scores, we found that many of the genes differentially expressed in SCZ and BPD are concordant in their expression level (q⩽0.01, 53 genes; q⩽0.05, 213 genes; q⩽0.1, 885 genes). Using genome-wide association data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, we found that these differentially and concordantly expressed genes were enriched in association signals for both SCZ (Pgenes show concordant expression and association for both SCZ and BPD. Pathway analyses of these genes indicated that they are involved in the lysosome, Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, along with several cancer pathways. Functional analyses of these genes revealed an interconnected pathway network centered on lysosomal function and the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. These pathways and their interacting network were principally confirmed by an independent transcriptome sequencing data set of the hippocampus. Dysregulation of lysosomal function and cytoskeleton remodeling has direct impacts on endocytosis, phagocytosis, exocytosis, vesicle trafficking, neuronal maturation and migration, neurite outgrowth and synaptic density and plasticity, and different aspects of these processes have been implicated in SCZ and BPD.

  6. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C Lieblein-Boff

    Full Text Available Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510 were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2 or those driven by single outliers (3 were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region-specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development.

  7. Multilocus assignment analyses reveal multiple units and rare migration events in the recently expanded yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessenkool, Sanne; Star, Bastiaan; Waters, Jonathan M; Seddon, Philip J

    2009-06-01

    The identification of demographically independent populations and the recognition of management units have been greatly facilitated by the continuing advances in genetic tools. Managements units now play a key role in short-term conservation management programmes of declining species, but their importance in expanding populations receives comparatively little attention. The endangered yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) expanded its range from the subantarctic to New Zealand's South Island a few hundred years ago and this new population now represents almost half of the species' total census size. This dramatic expansion attests to M. antipodes' high dispersal abilities and suggests the species is likely to constitute a single demographic population. Here we test this hypothesis of panmixia by investigating genetic differentiation and levels of gene flow among penguin breeding areas using 12 autosomal microsatellite loci along with mitochondrial control region sequence analyses for 350 individuals. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, the analyses reveal two genetically and geographically distinct assemblages: South Island vs. subantarctic populations. Using assignment tests, we recognize just two first-generation migrants between these populations (corresponding to a migration rate of < 2%), indicating that ongoing levels of long-distance migration are low. Furthermore, the South Island population has low genetic variability compared to the subantarctic population. These results suggest that the South Island population was founded by only a small number of individuals, and that subsequent levels of gene flow have remained low. The demographic independence of the two populations warrants their designation as distinct management units and conservation efforts should be adjusted accordingly to protect both populations.

  8. Stimulatory effect of Echinacea purpurea extract on the trafficking activity of mouse dendritic cells: revealed by genomic and proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Wang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Bi-Xue; Aravindaram, Kandan; Hwang, Pei-Ing; Wu, Han-Ming; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2010-11-01

    Several Echinacea species have been used as nutraceuticals or botanical drugs for "immunostimulation", but scientific evidence supporting their therapeutic use is still controversial. In this study, a phytocompound mixture extracted from the butanol fraction (BF) of a stem and leaf (S+L) extract of E. purpurea ([BF/S+L/Ep]) containing stringently defined bioactive phytocompounds was obtained using standardized and published procedures. The transcriptomic and proteomic effects of this phytoextract on mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were analyzed using primary cultures. Treatment of BMDCs with [BF/S+L/Ep] did not significantly influence the phenotypic maturation activity of dendritic cells (DCs). Affymetrix DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses of genes differentially expressed in DCs treated with [BF/S+L/Ep] for 4 or 12 h revealed that the majority of responsive genes were related to cell adhesion or motility (Cdh10, Itga6, Cdh1, Gja1 and Mmp8), or were chemokines (Cxcl2, Cxcl7) or signaling molecules (Nrxn1, Pkce and Acss1). TRANSPATH database analyses of gene expression and related signaling pathways in treated-DCs predicted the JNK, PP2C-α, AKT, ERK1/2 or MAPKAPK pathways as the putative targets of [BF/S+L/Ep]. In parallel, proteomic analysis showed that the expressions of metabolic-, cytoskeleton- or NF-κB signaling-related proteins were regulated by treatment with [BF/S+L/Ep]. In vitro flow cytometry analysis of chemotaxis-related receptors and in vivo cell trafficking assay further showed that DCs treated with [BF/S+L/Ep] were able to migrate more effectively to peripheral lymph node and spleen tissues than DCs treated as control groups. Results from this study suggest that [BF/S+L/Ep] modulates DC mobility and related cellular physiology in the mouse immune system. Moreover, the signaling networks and molecules highlighted here are potential targets for nutritional or clinical application of Echinacea or other candidate medicinal

  9. Proteome and Computational Analyses Reveal New Insights into the Mechanisms of Hepatitis C Virus Mediated Liver Disease Post-Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; McDermott, Jason E.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Dzib, Jose Felipe Golib; Susnow, Nathan; Strom, Susan; Proll, Sean C.; Belisle, Sarah E.; Purdy, David E.; Rasmussen, Angela L.; Walters, Kathie-Anne; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Camp, David G.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Perkins, James D.; Carithers, Robert L.; Liou, Iris W.; Larson, Anne M.; Benecke, Arndt; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplant tissues offer the unique opportunity to model the longitudinal protein abundance changes occurring during hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated liver disease progression in vivo. In this study, our goal was to identify molecular signatures, and potential key regulatory proteins, representative of the processes influencing early progression to fibrosis. We performed global protein profiling analyses on 24 liver biopsy specimens obtained from 15 HCV+ liver transplant recipients at 6 and/or 12 months post-transplantation. Differentially regulated proteins associated with early progression to fibrosis were identified by analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Analysis of serum metabolites was performed on samples obtained from an independent cohort of 60 HCV+ liver transplant patients. Computational modeling approaches were applied to identify potential key regulatory proteins of liver fibrogenesis. Among 4,324 proteins identified, 250 exhibited significant differential regulation in patients with rapidly progressive fibrosis. Patients with rapid fibrosis progression exhibited enrichment in differentially regulated proteins associated with various immune, hepatoprotective, and fibrogenic processes. The observed increase in pro-inflammatory activity and impairment in anti-oxidant defenses suggests that patients who develop significant liver injury experience elevated oxidative stresses. This was supported by an independent study demonstrating the altered abundance of oxidative stress associated serum metabolites in patients who develop severe liver injury. Computational modeling approaches further highlight a potentially important link between HCV-associated oxidative stress and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms impacting on liver fibrogenesis. In conclusion, our proteome and metabolome analyses provide new insights into the role for increased oxidative stress in the rapid fibrosis progression observed in HCV+ liver

  10. Comparative proteomic and physiological analyses reveal the protective effect of exogenous calcium on the germinating soybean response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongqi; Yang, Runqiang; Han, Yongbin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2015-01-15

    suppressed under salt stress condition. According to previous studies, exogenous calcium counters the harmful effect of salt stress and increases the biomass and GABA content of germinating soybeans. Nevertheless, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the role of calcium in resistance to salt stress is still unknown. This paper is the first study employing comparative proteomic and physiological analyses to reveal the protective effect of exogenous calcium in the germinating soybean response to salt stress. Our study links the biological events with proteomic information and provides detailed peptide information on all identified proteins. The functions of those significantly changed proteins are also analyzed. The physiological and comparative proteomic analyses revealed the putative molecular mechanism of exogenous calcium treatment induced salt stress responses. The findings from this paper are beneficial to high GABA-rich germinating soybean biomass. Additionally, these findings also might be applicable to the genetic engineering of soybean plants to improve stress tolerance.

  11. Structural analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid reveal differences in the folding of plus and minus RNA strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Deforges, Jules; Benard, Lionel; Sargueil, Bruno; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Torchet, Claire

    2014-01-29

    Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd), a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle.

  12. Structural Analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid Reveal Differences in the Folding of Plus and Minus RNA Strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Deforges, Jules; Benard, Lionel; Sargueil, Bruno; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Torchet, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd), a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle. PMID:24481250

  13. Structural Analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid Reveal Differences in the Folding of Plus and Minus RNA Strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Delan-Forino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd, a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle.

  14. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunzburger, Max [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2015-02-17

    We have treated the modeling, analysis, numerical analysis, and algorithmic development for nonlocal models of diffusion and mechanics. Variational formulations were developed and finite element methods were developed based on those formulations for both steady state and time dependent problems. Obstacle problems and optimization problems for the nonlocal models were also treated and connections made with fractional derivative models.

  15. Demographic and random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses reveal high levels of genetic diversity in a clonal violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auge, H; Neuffer, B; Erlinghagen, F; Grupe, R; Brandl, R

    2001-07-01

    We performed demographic and molecular investigations on woodland populations of the clonal herb Viola riviniana in central Germany. We investigated the pattern of seedling recruitment, the amount of genotypic (clonal) variation and the partitioning of genetic variation among and within populations. Our demographic study was carried out in six violet populations of different ages and habitat conditions. It revealed that repeated seedling recruitment takes place in all of these populations, and that clonal propagation is accompanied by high ramet mortality. Our molecular investigations were performed on a subset of three of these six violet populations. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses using six primers yielded 45 scorable bands that were used to identify multilocus genotypes, i.e. putative clones. Consistent with our demographic results and independent of population age, we found a large genotypic diversity with a mean proportion of distinguishable genotypes of 0.93 and a mean Simpson's diversity index of 0.99. Using AMOVA we found a strong genetic differentiation among these violet populations with a PhiST value of 0.41. We suggest that a high selfing rate, limited gene flow due to short seed dispersal distances and drift due to founder effects are responsible for this pattern. Although Viola riviniana is a clonal plant, traits associated with sexual reproduction rather than clonality per se are moulding the pattern of genetic variation in this species.

  16. Pronounced genetic differentiation and recent secondary contact in the mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa revealed by population genomic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfang; Yang, Yuchen; Chen, Qipian; Fang, Lu; He, Ziwen; Guo, Wuxia; Qiao, Sitan; Wang, Zhengzhen; Guo, Miaomiao; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Systematically investigating the impacts of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove plants may provide a better understanding of their demographic history and useful information for their conservation. Therefore, we conducted population genomic analyses of 88 nuclear genes to explore the population dynamics of a mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa across the Indo-West Pacific region. Our results revealed pronounced genetic differentiation in this species between the populations from the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, which may be attributable to the long-term isolation between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during sea-level drops in the Pleistocene glacial periods. The mixing of haplotypes from the two highly divergent groups was identified in a Cambodian population at almost all 88 nuclear genes, suggesting genetic admixture of the two lineages at the boundary region. Similar genetic admixture was also found in other populations from Southeast Asia based on the Bayesian clustering analysis of six nuclear genes, which suggests extensive and recent secondary contact of the two divergent lineages in Southeast Asia. Computer simulations indicated substantial migration from the Indian Ocean towards the South China Sea, which likely results in the genetic admixture in Southeast Asia. PMID:27380895

  17. Transcriptome and network analyses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that amphotericin B and lactoferrin synergy disrupt metal homeostasis and stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Lai, Yu-Wen; Campbell, Leona T.; Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Carter, Dee A.; Wilkins, Marc R.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are difficult to treat. The few available antifungal drugs have problems with toxicity or efficacy, and resistance is increasing. To overcome these challenges, existing therapies may be enhanced by synergistic combination with another agent. Previously, we found amphotericin B (AMB) and the iron chelator, lactoferrin (LF), were synergistic against a range of different fungal pathogens. This study investigates the mechanism of AMB-LF synergy, using RNA-seq and network analyses. AMB treatment resulted in increased expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and ATP synthesis. Unexpectedly, AMB-LF treatment did not lead to increased expression of iron and zinc homeostasis genes. However, genes involved in adaptive response to zinc deficiency and oxidative stress had decreased expression. The clustering of co-expressed genes and network analysis revealed that many iron and zinc homeostasis genes are targets of transcription factors Aft1p and Zap1p. The aft1Δ and zap1Δ mutants were hypersensitive to AMB and H2O2, suggesting they are key regulators of the drug response. Mechanistically, AMB-LF synergy could involve AMB affecting the integrity of the cell wall and membrane, permitting LF to disrupt intracellular processes. We suggest that Zap1p- and Aft1p-binding molecules could be combined with existing antifungals to serve as synergistic treatments. PMID:28079179

  18. Genetic Diversity of Marine Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria as Revealed by Genomic and Proteomic Analyses of 'Candidatus Scalindua japonica'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Mizuto, Keisuke; Kimura, Zenichiro; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-09-11

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria affiliated with the genus 'Candidatus Scalindua' are responsible for significant nitrogen loss in oceans, and thus their ecophysiology is of great interest. Here, we enriched a marine anammox bacterium, 'Ca. S. japonica' from a Hiroshima bay sediment in Japan, and comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of 'Ca. S. japonica' were conducted. Sequence of the 4.81-Mb genome containing 4,019 coding regions of genes (CDSs) composed of 47 contigs was determined. In the proteome, 1,762 out of 4,019 CDSs in the 'Ca. S. japonica' genome were detected. Based on the genomic and proteomic data, the core anammox process and carbon fixation of 'Ca. S. japonica' were further investigated. Additionally, the present study provides the first detailed insights into the genetic background responsible for iron acquisition and menaquinone biosynthesis in anammox bacterial cells. Comparative analysis of the 'Ca. Scalindua' genomes revealed that the 1,502 genes found in the 'Ca. S. japonica' genome were not present in the 'Ca. S. profunda' and 'Ca. S. rubra' genomes, showing a high genomic diversity. This result may reflect a high phylogenetic diversity of the genus 'Ca. Scalindua'. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couturier Marie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemicellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process.

  20. Complete genome sequence and transcriptomics analyses reveal pigment biosynthesis and regulatory mechanisms in an industrial strain, Monascus purpureus YY-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Liu, Bin; Du, Xinjun; Li, Ping; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Xiaozhen; Du, Liangcheng; Huang, Di; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shuo

    2015-02-09

    Monascus has been used to produce natural colorants and food supplements for more than one thousand years, and approximately more than one billion people eat Monascus-fermented products during their daily life. In this study, using next-generation sequencing and optical mapping approaches, a 24.1-Mb complete genome of an industrial strain, Monascus purpureus YY-1, was obtained. This genome consists of eight chromosomes and 7,491 genes. Phylogenetic analysis at the genome level provides convincing evidence for the evolutionary position of M. purpureus. We provide the first comprehensive prediction of the biosynthetic pathway for Monascus pigment. Comparative genomic analyses show that the genome of M. purpureus is 13.6-40% smaller than those of closely related filamentous fungi and has undergone significant gene losses, most of which likely occurred during its specialized adaptation to starch-based foods. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals that carbon starvation stress, resulting from the use of relatively low-quality carbon sources, contributes to the high yield of pigments by repressing central carbon metabolism and augmenting the acetyl-CoA pool. Our work provides important insights into the evolution of this economically important fungus and lays a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of this strain.

  1. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

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    Hyun-Seob Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  2. Unmix 6.0 Model for environmental data analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unmix Model is a mathematical receptor model developed by EPA scientists that provides scientific support for the development and review of the air and water quality standards, exposure research, and environmental forensics.

  3. Stimulatory effect of Echinacea purpurea extract on the trafficking activity of mouse dendritic cells: revealed by genomic and proteomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bi-Xue

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several Echinacea species have been used as nutraceuticals or botanical drugs for "immunostimulation", but scientific evidence supporting their therapeutic use is still controversial. In this study, a phytocompound mixture extracted from the butanol fraction (BF of a stem and leaf (S+L extract of E. purpurea ([BF/S+L/Ep] containing stringently defined bioactive phytocompounds was obtained using standardized and published procedures. The transcriptomic and proteomic effects of this phytoextract on mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs were analyzed using primary cultures. Results Treatment of BMDCs with [BF/S+L/Ep] did not significantly influence the phenotypic maturation activity of dendritic cells (DCs. Affymetrix DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses of genes differentially expressed in DCs treated with [BF/S+L/Ep] for 4 or 12 h revealed that the majority of responsive genes were related to cell adhesion or motility (Cdh10, Itga6, Cdh1, Gja1 and Mmp8, or were chemokines (Cxcl2, Cxcl7 or signaling molecules (Nrxn1, Pkce and Acss1. TRANSPATH database analyses of gene expression and related signaling pathways in treated-DCs predicted the JNK, PP2C-α, AKT, ERK1/2 or MAPKAPK pathways as the putative targets of [BF/S+L/Ep]. In parallel, proteomic analysis showed that the expressions of metabolic-, cytoskeleton- or NF-κB signaling-related proteins were regulated by treatment with [BF/S+L/Ep]. In vitro flow cytometry analysis of chemotaxis-related receptors and in vivo cell trafficking assay further showed that DCs treated with [BF/S+L/Ep] were able to migrate more effectively to peripheral lymph node and spleen tissues than DCs treated as control groups. Conclusion Results from this study suggest that [BF/S+L/Ep] modulates DC mobility and related cellular physiology in the mouse immune system. Moreover, the signaling networks and molecules highlighted here are potential targets for nutritional or clinical

  4. Novel evolutionary lineages revealed in the Chaetothyriales (fungi based on multigene phylogenetic analyses and comparison of its secondary structure.

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    Martina Réblová

    Full Text Available Cyphellophora and Phialophora (Chaetothyriales, Pezizomycota comprise species known from skin infections of humans and animals and from a variety of environmental sources. These fungi were studied based on the comparison of cultural and morphological features and phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear loci, i.e., internal transcribed spacer rDNA operon (ITS, large and small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (nuc28S rDNA, nuc18S rDNA, β-tubulin, DNA replication licensing factor (mcm7 and second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2. Phylogenetic results were supported by comparative analysis of ITS1 and ITS2 secondary structure of representatives of the Chaetothyriales and the identification of substitutions among the taxa analyzed. Base pairs with non-conserved, co-evolving nucleotides that maintain base pairing in the RNA transcript and unique evolutionary motifs in the ITS2 that characterize whole clades or individual taxa were mapped on predicted secondary structure models. Morphological characteristics, structural data and phylogenetic analyses of three datasets, i.e., ITS, ITS-β-tubulin and 28S-18S-rpb2-mcm7, define a robust clade containing eight species of Cyphellophora (including the type and six species of Phialophora. These taxa are now accommodated in the Cyphellophoraceae, a novel evolutionary lineage within the Chaetothyriales. Cyphellophora is emended and expanded to encompass species with both septate and nonseptate conidia formed on discrete, intercalary, terminal or lateral phialides. Six new combinations in Cyphellophora are proposed and a dichotomous key to species accepted in the genus is provided. Cyphellophora eugeniae and C. hylomeconis, which grouped in the Chaetothyriaceae, represent another novel lineage and are introduced as the type species of separate genera.

  5. Analysing Models as a Knowledge Technology in Transport Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Models belong to a wider family of knowledge technologies, applied in the transport area. Models sometimes share with other such technologies the fate of not being used as intended, or not at all. The result may be ill-conceived plans as well as wasted resources. Frequently, the blame for such a ......Models belong to a wider family of knowledge technologies, applied in the transport area. Models sometimes share with other such technologies the fate of not being used as intended, or not at all. The result may be ill-conceived plans as well as wasted resources. Frequently, the blame...... critical analytic literature on knowledge utilization and policy influence. A simple scheme based in this literature is drawn up to provide a framework for discussing the interface between urban transport planning and model use. A successful example of model use in Stockholm, Sweden is used as a heuristic...

  6. Analyses of Tsunami Events using Simple Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilvery, Ashwith Kumar; Tan, Arjun; Aggarwal, Mohan

    2012-03-01

    Tsunamis exhibit the characteristics of ``canal waves'' or ``gravity waves'' which belong to the class of ``long ocean waves on shallow water.'' The memorable tsunami events including the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Pacific Ocean tsunami off the coast of Japan are analyzed by constructing simple tsunami propagation models including the following: (1) One-dimensional propagation model; (2) Two-dimensional propagation model on flat surface; (3) Two-dimensional propagation model on spherical surface; and (4) A finite line-source model on two-dimensional surface. It is shown that Model 1 explains the basic features of the tsunami including the propagation speed, depth of the ocean, dispersion-less propagation and bending of tsunamis around obstacles. Models 2 and 3 explain the observed amplitude variations for long-distance tsunami propagation across the Pacific Ocean, including the effect of the equatorial ocean current on the arrival times. Model 3 further explains the enhancement effect on the amplitude due to the curvature of the Earth past the equatorial distance. Finally, Model 4 explains the devastating effect of superposition of tsunamis from two subduction event, which struck the Phuket region during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

  7. Combined genomic and structural analyses of a cultured magnetotactic bacterium reveals its niche adaptation to a dynamic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Vieira Araujo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB are a unique group of prokaryotes that have a potentially high impact on global geochemical cycling of significant primary elements because of their metabolic plasticity and the ability to biomineralize iron-rich magnetic particles called magnetosomes. Understanding the genetic composition of the few cultivated MTB along with the unique morphological features of this group of bacteria may provide an important framework for discerning their potential biogeochemical roles in natural environments. Results Genomic and ultrastructural analyses were combined to characterize the cultivated magnetotactic coccus Magnetofaba australis strain IT-1. Cells of this species synthesize a single chain of elongated, cuboctahedral magnetite (Fe3O4 magnetosomes that cause them to align along magnetic field lines while they swim being propelled by two bundles of flagella at velocities up to 300 μm s−1. High-speed microscopy imaging showed the cells move in a straight line rather than in the helical trajectory described for other magnetotactic cocci. Specific genes within the genome of Mf. australis strain IT-1 suggest the strain is capable of nitrogen fixation, sulfur reduction and oxidation, synthesis of intracellular polyphosphate granules and transporting iron with low and high affinity. Mf. australis strain IT-1 and Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1 are closely related phylogenetically although similarity values between their homologous proteins are not very high. Conclusion Mf. australis strain IT-1 inhabits a constantly changing environment and its complete genome sequence reveals a great metabolic plasticity to deal with these changes. Aside from its chemoautotrophic and chemoheterotrophic metabolism, genomic data indicate the cells are capable of nitrogen fixation, possess high and low affinity iron transporters, and might be capable of reducing and oxidizing a number of sulfur compounds. The relatively

  8. Phylogenetic analyses of eurotiomycetous endophytes reveal their close affinities to Chaetothyriales, Eurotiales, and a new order - Phaeomoniellales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ko-Hsuan; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Molnár, Katalin; Arnold, A Elizabeth; U'Ren, Jana M; Gaya, Ester; Gueidan, Cécile; Lutzoni, François

    2015-04-01

    Symbiotic fungi living in plants as endophytes, and in lichens as endolichenic fungi, cause no apparent symptoms to their hosts. They are ubiquitous, ecologically important, hyperdiverse, and represent a rich source of secondary compounds for new pharmaceutical and biocontrol products. Due in part to the lack of visible reproductive structures and other distinctive phenotypic traits for many species, the diversity and phylogenetic affiliations of these cryptic fungi are often poorly known. The goal of this study was to determine the phylogenetic placement of representative endophytes within the Eurotiomycetes (Pezizomycotina, Ascomycota), one of the most diverse and evolutionarily dynamic fungal classes, and to use that information to infer processes of macroevolution in trophic modes. Sequences of a single locus marker spanning the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (nrITS) and 600 base pairs at the 5' end of the nuclear ribosomal large subunit (nrLSU) were obtained from previous studies of >6000 endophytic and endolichenic fungi from diverse biogeographic locations and hosts. We conducted phylum-wide phylogenetic searches using this marker to determine which fungal strains belonged to Eurotiomycetes and the results were used as the basis for a class-wide, seven-locus phylogenetic study focusing on endophytic and endolichenic Eurotiomycetes. Our cumulative supermatrix-based analyses revealed that representative endophytes within Eurotiomycetes are distributed in three main clades: Eurotiales, Chaetothyriales and Phaeomoniellales ord. nov., a clade that had not yet been described formally. This new order, described herein, is sister to the clade including Verrucariales and Chaetothyriales. It appears to consist mainly of endophytes and plant pathogens. Morphological characters of endophytic Phaeomoniellales resemble those of the pathogenic genus Phaeomoniella. This study highlights the capacity of endophytic and endolichenic fungi to expand our

  9. Genome and phylogenetic analyses of Trypanosoma evansi reveal extensive similarity to T. brucei and multiple independent origins for dyskinetoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Jason; Anupama, Atashi; Balmer, Oliver; Jackson, Andrew; Lewis, Michael; Brown, Rob; Cestari, Igor; Desquesnes, Marc; Gendrin, Claire; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Imamura, Hideo; Ivens, Alasdair; Kořený, Luděk; Lai, De-Hua; MacLeod, Annette; McDermott, Suzanne M; Merritt, Chris; Monnerat, Severine; Moon, Wonjong; Myler, Peter; Phan, Isabelle; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Sivam, Dhileep; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lukeš, Julius; Stuart, Ken; Schnaufer, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Two key biological features distinguish Trypanosoma evansi from the T. brucei group: independence from the tsetse fly as obligatory vector, and independence from the need for functional mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast or kDNA). In an effort to better understand the molecular causes and consequences of these differences, we sequenced the genome of an akinetoplastic T. evansi strain from China and compared it to the T. b. brucei reference strain. The annotated T. evansi genome shows extensive similarity to the reference, with 94.9% of the predicted T. b. brucei coding sequences (CDS) having an ortholog in T. evansi, and 94.6% of the non-repetitive orthologs having a nucleotide identity of 95% or greater. Interestingly, several procyclin-associated genes (PAGs) were disrupted or not found in this T. evansi strain, suggesting a selective loss of function in the absence of the insect life-cycle stage. Surprisingly, orthologous sequences were found in T. evansi for all 978 nuclear CDS predicted to represent the mitochondrial proteome in T. brucei, although a small number of these may have lost functionality. Consistent with previous results, the F1FO-ATP synthase γ subunit was found to have an A281 deletion, which is involved in generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential in the absence of kDNA. Candidates for CDS that are absent from the reference genome were identified in supplementary de novo assemblies of T. evansi reads. Phylogenetic analyses show that the sequenced strain belongs to a dominant group of clonal T. evansi strains with worldwide distribution that also includes isolates classified as T. equiperdum. At least three other types of T. evansi or T. equiperdum have emerged independently. Overall, the elucidation of the T. evansi genome sequence reveals extensive similarity of T. brucei and supports the contention that T. evansi should be classified as a subspecies of T. brucei.

  10. Molecular analyses reveal two geographic and genetic lineages for tapeworms, Taenia solium and Taenia saginata, from Ecuador using mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Danilo; Navarro, Juan Carlos; León-Reyes, Antonio; Benítez-Ortiz, Washington; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar

    2016-12-01

    Tapeworms Taenia solium and Taenia saginata are the causative agents of taeniasis/cysticercosis. These are diseases with high medical and veterinary importance due to their impact on public health and rural economy in tropical countries. The re-emergence of T. solium as a result of human migration, the economic burden affecting livestock industry, and the large variability of symptoms in several human cysticercosis, encourage studies on genetic diversity, and the identification of these parasites with molecular phylogenetic tools. Samples collected from the Ecuadorian provinces: Loja, Guayas, Manabí, Tungurahua (South), and Imbabura, Pichincha (North) from 2000 to 2012 were performed under Maximum Parsimony analyses and haplotype networks using partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA, cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and NADH subunit I (NDI), from Genbank and own sequences of Taenia solium and Taenia saginata from Ecuador. Both species have shown reciprocal monophyly, which confirms its molecular taxonomic identity. The COI and NDI genes results suggest phylogenetic structure for both parasite species from south and north of Ecuador. In T. solium, both genes gene revealed greater geographic structure, whereas in T. saginata, the variability for both genes was low. In conclusion, COI haplotype networks of T. solium suggest two geographical events in the introduction of this species in Ecuador (African and Asian lineages) and occurring sympatric, probably through the most common routes of maritime trade between the XV-XIX centuries. Moreover, the evidence of two NDI geographical lineages in T. solium from the north (province of Imbabura) and the south (province of Loja) of Ecuador derivate from a common Indian ancestor open new approaches for studies on genetic populations and eco-epidemiology.

  11. Dynamics and spatial structure of ENSO from re-analyses versus CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serykh, Ilya; Sonechkin, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Basing on a mathematical idea about the so-called strange nonchaotic attractor (SNA) in the quasi-periodically forced dynamical systems, the currently available re-analyses data are considered. It is found that the El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is driven not only by the seasonal heating, but also by three more external periodicities (incommensurate to the annual period) associated with the ~18.6-year lunar-solar nutation of the Earth rotation axis, ~11-year sunspot activity cycle and the ~14-month Chandler wobble in the Earth's pole motion. Because of the incommensurability of their periods all four forces affect the system in inappropriate time moments. As a result, the ENSO time series look to be very complex (strange in mathematical terms) but nonchaotic. The power spectra of ENSO indices reveal numerous peaks located at the periods that are multiples of the above periodicities as well as at their sub- and super-harmonic. In spite of the above ENSO complexity, a mutual order seems to be inherent to the ENSO time series and their spectra. This order reveals itself in the existence of a scaling of the power spectrum peaks and respective rhythms in the ENSO dynamics that look like the power spectrum and dynamics of the SNA. It means there are no limits to forecast ENSO, in principle. In practice, it opens a possibility to forecast ENSO for several years ahead. Global spatial structures of anomalies during El Niño and power spectra of ENSO indices from re-analyses are compared with the respective output quantities in the CMIP5 climate models (the Historical experiment). It is found that the models reproduce global spatial structures of the near surface temperature and sea level pressure anomalies during El Niño very similar to these fields in the re-analyses considered. But the power spectra of the ENSO indices from the CMIP5 models show no peaks at the same periods as the re-analyses power spectra. We suppose that it is possible to improve modeled

  12. Analysing the Linux kernel feature model changes using FMDiff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dintzner, N.J.R.; Van Deursen, A.; Pinzger, M.

    2015-01-01

    Evolving a large scale, highly variable system is a challenging task. For such a system, evolution operations often require to update consistently both their implementation and its feature model. In this context, the evolution of the feature model closely follows the evolution of the system. The pur

  13. Hyperelastic Modelling and Finite Element Analysing of Rubber Bushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Yavuz ERKEK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to obtain stiffness curves of rubber bushings which are used in automotive industry with hyperelastic finite element model. Hyperelastic material models were obtained with different material tests. Stress and strain values and static stiffness curves were determined. It is shown that, static stiffness curves are nonlinear. The level of stiffness affects the vehicle dynamics behaviour.

  14. Risk Factor Analyses for the Return of Spontaneous Circulation in the Asphyxiation Cardiac Arrest Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Jun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Animal models of asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA are frequently used in basic research to mirror the clinical course of cardiac arrest (CA. The rates of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in ACA animal models are lower than those from studies that have utilized ventricular fibrillation (VF animal models. The purpose of this study was to characterize the factors associated with the ROSC in the ACA porcine model. Methods: Forty-eight healthy miniature pigs underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce CA. Once induced, CA was maintained untreated for a period of 8 min. Two minutes following the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, defibrillation was attempted until ROSC was achieved or the animal died. To assess the factors associated with ROSC in this CA model, logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze gender, the time of preparation, the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA from the beginning of CPR and the pH at the beginning of CPR. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the predictive value of AMSA for ROSC. Results: ROSC was only 52.1% successful in this ACA porcine model. The multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that ROSC significantly depended on the time of preparation, AMSA at the beginning of CPR and pH at the beginning of CPR. The area under the ROC curve in for AMSA at the beginning of CPR was 0.878 successful in predicting ROSC (95% confidence intervals: 0.773∼0.983, and the optimum cut-off value was 15.62 (specificity 95.7% and sensitivity 80.0%. Conclusions: The time of preparation, AMSA and the pH at the beginning of CPR were associated with ROSC in this ACA porcine model. AMSA also predicted the likelihood of ROSC in this ACA animal model.

  15. Reading Ability Development from Kindergarten to Junior Secondary: Latent Transition Analyses with Growth Mixture Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the reading ability development of children in the large scale Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 data; Tourangeau, Nord, Lê, Pollack, & Atkins-Burnett, 2006 under the dynamic systems. To depict children's growth pattern, we extended the measurement part of latent transition analysis to the growth mixture model and found that the new model fitted the data well. Results also revealed that most of the children stayed in the same ability group with few cross-level changes in their classes. After adding the environmental factors as predictors, analyses showed that children receiving higher teachers' ratings, with higher socioeconomic status, and of above average poverty status, would have higher probability to transit into the higher ability group.

  16. Modelling theoretical uncertainties in phenomenological analyses for particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Jérôme; Niess, Valentin; Silva, Luiz Vale

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Model (and its extensions) is often limited by the presence of statistical and theoretical uncertainties. We present several models for the latter uncertainties (random, nuisance, external) in the frequentist framework, and we derive the corresponding $p$-values. In the case of the nuisance approach where theoretical uncertainties are modeled as biases, we highlight the important, but arbitrary, issue of the range of variation chosen for the bias parameters. We introduce the concept of adaptive $p$-value, which is obtained by adjusting the range of variation for the bias according to the significance considered, and which allows us to tackle metrology and exclusion tests with a single and well-defined unified tool, which exhibits interesting frequentist properties. We discuss how the determination of fundamental parameters is impacted by the model chosen for theoretical uncertainties, illustrating several issues with examples from quark flavour p...

  17. Modeling theoretical uncertainties in phenomenological analyses for particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, Jerome [CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ, Universite de Toulon, CPT UMR 7332, Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Descotes-Genon, Sebastien [CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (UMR 8627), Orsay Cedex (France); Niess, Valentin [CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 6533, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Aubiere Cedex (France); Silva, Luiz Vale [CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (UMR 8627), Orsay Cedex (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Groupe de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay Cedex (France); J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P. O. Box 3000, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2017-04-15

    The determination of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Model (and its extensions) is often limited by the presence of statistical and theoretical uncertainties. We present several models for the latter uncertainties (random, nuisance, external) in the frequentist framework, and we derive the corresponding p values. In the case of the nuisance approach where theoretical uncertainties are modeled as biases, we highlight the important, but arbitrary, issue of the range of variation chosen for the bias parameters. We introduce the concept of adaptive p value, which is obtained by adjusting the range of variation for the bias according to the significance considered, and which allows us to tackle metrology and exclusion tests with a single and well-defined unified tool, which exhibits interesting frequentist properties. We discuss how the determination of fundamental parameters is impacted by the model chosen for theoretical uncertainties, illustrating several issues with examples from quark flavor physics. (orig.)

  18. Analysing earthquake slip models with the spatial prediction comparison test

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2014-11-10

    Earthquake rupture models inferred from inversions of geophysical and/or geodetic data exhibit remarkable variability due to uncertainties in modelling assumptions, the use of different inversion algorithms, or variations in data selection and data processing. A robust statistical comparison of different rupture models obtained for a single earthquake is needed to quantify the intra-event variability, both for benchmark exercises and for real earthquakes. The same approach may be useful to characterize (dis-)similarities in events that are typically grouped into a common class of events (e.g. moderate-size crustal strike-slip earthquakes or tsunamigenic large subduction earthquakes). For this purpose, we examine the performance of the spatial prediction comparison test (SPCT), a statistical test developed to compare spatial (random) fields by means of a chosen loss function that describes an error relation between a 2-D field (‘model’) and a reference model. We implement and calibrate the SPCT approach for a suite of synthetic 2-D slip distributions, generated as spatial random fields with various characteristics, and then apply the method to results of a benchmark inversion exercise with known solution. We find the SPCT to be sensitive to different spatial correlations lengths, and different heterogeneity levels of the slip distributions. The SPCT approach proves to be a simple and effective tool for ranking the slip models with respect to a reference model.

  19. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  20. Patterns of juvenile habitat use by the spider crab Maja brachydactyla as revealed by stable isotope analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Freire

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of habitat use by spider crab juveniles, Maja brachydactyla, from two geographic areas on the NW coast of the Iberian Peninsula were studied through the analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope relations in muscle and hepatopancreas. Main potential preys of spider crab juveniles in rocky and sandy habitats and different organic matter sources in coastal food webs were also analysed. Isotopic ratios showed no difference between rocky and sandy habitats. The use of carapace colour and epibiosis as an indicator of habitat use was not supported by our data. These results suggest that movements between the two habitats are much more frequent than suggested in previous studies. In the coastal food web, two main trophic compartments were identified according to their organic matter source: one based on plankton and seaweeds (rocky habitats, and one based on sedimentary particulate organic matter (sandy bottoms. By means of the model of Phillips and Gregg (2003, it was found that juveniles of Maja brachydactyla from both habitats consumed approximately two thirds of the preys in rocky habitats and one third in sedimentary habitats. The results indicate that in exposed environments large juveniles spend most of the time on sedimentary bottoms, where they find more refuge, moving frequently to nearby rocky substrates to feed.

  1. Assessment of a geological model by surface wave analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, R.; Capizzi, P.; Avellone, G.; D'Alessandro, A.; Siragusa, R.; Luzio, D.

    2017-02-01

    A set of horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements, carried out in the Altavilla Milicia (Sicily) area, is analyzed to test a geological model of the area. Statistical techniques have been used in different stages of the data analysis, to optimize the reliability of the information extracted from geophysical measurements. In particular, cluster analysis algorithms have been implemented to select the time windows of the microseismic signal to be used for calculating the spectral ratio H/V and to identify sets of spectral ratio peaks likely caused by the same underground structures. Using results of reflection seismic lines, typical values of P-wave and S-wave velocity were estimated for each geological formation present in the area. These were used to narrow down the research space of parameters for the HVSR interpretation. MASW profiles have been carried out close to each HVSR measuring point, provided the parameters of the shallower layers for the HVSR models. MASW inversion has been constrained by extrapolating thicknesses from a known stratigraphic sequence. Preliminary 1D seismic models were obtained by adding deeper layers to models that resulted from MASW inversion. These justify the peaks of the HVSR curves due to layers deeper than MASW investigation depth. Furthermore, much deeper layers were included in the HVSR model, as suggested by geological setting and stratigraphic sequence. This choice was made considering that these latter layers do not generate other HVSR peaks and do not significantly affect the misfit. The starting models have been used to limit the starting research space for a more accurate interpretation, made considering the noise as a superposition of Rayleigh and Love waves. Results allowed to recognize four main seismic layers and to associate them to the main stratigraphic successions. The lateral correlation of seismic velocity models, joined with tectonic evidences

  2. Trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico revealed by gut content and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain-Counts, Jennifer P.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Ross, Steve W.

    2017-01-01

    Mesopelagic fishes represent an important component of the marine food web due to their global distributions, high abundances and ability to transport organic material throughout a large part of the water column. This study combined stable isotope (SIAs) and gut content analyses (GCAs) to characterize the trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the North-Central Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, this study examined whether mesopelagic fishes utilized chemosynthetic energy from cold seeps. Specimens were collected (9–25 August 2007) over three deep (>1,000 m) cold seeps at discrete depths (surface to 1,503 m) over the diurnal cycle. GCA classified 31 species (five families) of mesopelagic fishes into five feeding guilds: piscivores, large crustacean consumers, copepod consumers, generalists and mixed zooplanktivores. However, these guilds were less clearly defined based on stable isotope mixing model (MixSIAR) results, suggesting diets may be more mixed over longer time periods (weeks–months) and across co-occurring species. Copepods were likely important for the majority of mesopelagic fishes, consistent with GCA (this study) and previous literature. MixSIAR results also identified non-crustacean prey items, including salps and pteropods, as potentially important prey items for mesopelagic fishes, including those fishes not analysed in GCA (Sternoptyx spp. and Melamphaidae). Salps and other soft-bodied species are often missed in GCAs. Mesopelagic fishes had δ13C results consistent with particulate organic matter serving as the baseline organic carbon source, fueling up to three trophic levels. Fishes that undergo diel vertical migration were depleted in 15N relative to weak migrators, consistent with depth-specific isotope trends in sources and consumers, and assimilation of 15N-depleted organic matter in surface waters. Linear correlations between fish size and δ15N values suggested ontogenetic changes in fish diets for several species. While there was

  3. Compound dislocation models (CDMs) for volcano deformation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul R.; Prats-Iraola, Pau

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic crises are often preceded and accompanied by volcano deformation caused by magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Fast and efficient model identification and parameter estimation techniques for various sources of deformation are crucial for process understanding, volcano hazard assessment and early warning purposes. As a simple model that can be a basis for rapid inversion techniques, we present a compound dislocation model (CDM) that is composed of three mutually orthogonal rectangular dislocations (RDs). We present new RD solutions, which are free of artefact singularities and that also possess full rotational degrees of freedom. The CDM can represent both planar intrusions in the near field and volumetric sources of inflation and deflation in the far field. Therefore, this source model can be applied to shallow dikes and sills, as well as to deep planar and equidimensional sources of any geometry, including oblate, prolate and other triaxial ellipsoidal shapes. In either case the sources may possess any arbitrary orientation in space. After systematically evaluating the CDM, we apply it to the co-eruptive displacements of the 2015 Calbuco eruption observed by the Sentinel-1A satellite in both ascending and descending orbits. The results show that the deformation source is a deflating vertical lens-shaped source at an approximate depth of 8 km centred beneath Calbuco volcano. The parameters of the optimal source model clearly show that it is significantly different from an isotropic point source or a single dislocation model. The Calbuco example reflects the convenience of using the CDM for a rapid interpretation of deformation data.

  4. Stable isotope analyses reveal the importance of seagrass beds as feeding areas for juvenile Myrophic punctatus in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The feeding habits and habitats of the speckled worm eel Myrophis punctatus were studied on the mangrove edge of the Indian River Lagoon (Florida) using stomach contents and stable isotope analyses of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). Stomach dietary analyses identified four tax...

  5. Microarray Analyses Reveal Marked Differences in Growth Factor and Receptor Expression Between 8-Cell Human Embryos and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlismas, Antonis; Bletsa, Ritsa; Mavrogianni, Despina; Mamali, Georgina; Pergamali, Maria; Dinopoulou, Vasiliki; Partsinevelos, George; Drakakis, Peter; Loutradis, Dimitris; Kiessling, Ann A

    2016-01-15

    Previous microarray analyses of RNAs from 8-cell (8C) human embryos revealed a lack of cell cycle checkpoints and overexpression of core circadian oscillators and cell cycle drivers relative to pluripotent human stem cells [human embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem (hES/iPS)] and fibroblasts, suggesting growth factor independence during early cleavage stages. To explore this possibility, we queried our combined microarray database for expression of 487 growth factors and receptors. Fifty-one gene elements were overdetected on the 8C arrays relative to hES/iPS cells, including 14 detected at least 80-fold higher, which annotated to multiple pathways: six cytokine family (CSF1R, IL2RG, IL3RA, IL4, IL17B, IL23R), four transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family (BMP6, BMP15, GDF9, ENG), one fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family [FGF14(FH4)], one epidermal growth factor member (GAB1), plus CD36, and CLEC10A. 8C-specific gene elements were enriched (73%) for reported circadian-controlled genes in mouse tissues. High-level detection of CSF1R, ENG, IL23R, and IL3RA specifically on the 8C arrays suggests the embryo plays an active role in blocking immune rejection and is poised for trophectoderm development; robust detection of NRG1, GAB1, -2, GRB7, and FGF14(FHF4) indicates novel roles in early development in addition to their known roles in later development. Forty-four gene elements were underdetected on the 8C arrays, including 11 at least 80-fold under the pluripotent cells: two cytokines (IFITM1, TNFRSF8), five TGFBs (BMP7, LEFTY1, LEFTY2, TDGF1, TDGF3), two FGFs (FGF2, FGF receptor 1), plus ING5, and WNT6. The microarray detection patterns suggest that hES/iPS cells exhibit suppressed circadian competence, underexpression of early differentiation markers, and more robust expression of generic pluripotency genes, in keeping with an artificial state of continual uncommitted cell division. In contrast, gene expression patterns of the 8C embryo suggest that

  6. Microarray Analyses Reveal Marked Differences in Growth Factor and Receptor Expression Between 8-Cell Human Embryos and Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlismas, Antonis; Bletsa, Ritsa; Mavrogianni, Despina; Mamali, Georgina; Pergamali, Maria; Dinopoulou, Vasiliki; Partsinevelos, George; Drakakis, Peter; Loutradis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Previous microarray analyses of RNAs from 8-cell (8C) human embryos revealed a lack of cell cycle checkpoints and overexpression of core circadian oscillators and cell cycle drivers relative to pluripotent human stem cells [human embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem (hES/iPS)] and fibroblasts, suggesting growth factor independence during early cleavage stages. To explore this possibility, we queried our combined microarray database for expression of 487 growth factors and receptors. Fifty-one gene elements were overdetected on the 8C arrays relative to hES/iPS cells, including 14 detected at least 80-fold higher, which annotated to multiple pathways: six cytokine family (CSF1R, IL2RG, IL3RA, IL4, IL17B, IL23R), four transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family (BMP6, BMP15, GDF9, ENG), one fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family [FGF14(FH4)], one epidermal growth factor member (GAB1), plus CD36, and CLEC10A. 8C-specific gene elements were enriched (73%) for reported circadian-controlled genes in mouse tissues. High-level detection of CSF1R, ENG, IL23R, and IL3RA specifically on the 8C arrays suggests the embryo plays an active role in blocking immune rejection and is poised for trophectoderm development; robust detection of NRG1, GAB1, -2, GRB7, and FGF14(FHF4) indicates novel roles in early development in addition to their known roles in later development. Forty-four gene elements were underdetected on the 8C arrays, including 11 at least 80-fold under the pluripotent cells: two cytokines (IFITM1, TNFRSF8), five TGFBs (BMP7, LEFTY1, LEFTY2, TDGF1, TDGF3), two FGFs (FGF2, FGF receptor 1), plus ING5, and WNT6. The microarray detection patterns suggest that hES/iPS cells exhibit suppressed circadian competence, underexpression of early differentiation markers, and more robust expression of generic pluripotency genes, in keeping with an artificial state of continual uncommitted cell division. In contrast, gene expression patterns of the 8C embryo suggest that

  7. Analysing the Organizational Culture of Universities: Two Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, Marina Tomas; Ion, Georgeta

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the findings of two research projects, examining organizational culture by means of two different models of analysis--one at university level and one at department level--which were carried out over the last four years at Catalonian public universities (Spain). Theoretical and methodological approaches for the two…

  8. Enhancing Technology-Mediated Communication: Tools, Analyses, and Predictive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    the home (see, for example, Nagel, Hudson, & Abowd, 2004), in social Chapter 2: Background 17 settings (see Kern, Antifakos, Schiele ...on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2006), pp. 525-528 ACM Press. Kern, N., Antifakos, S., Schiele , B., & Schwaninger, A. (2004). A model

  9. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-Ping Feng; John Mundy

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions,TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also discussed.

  10. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Cai-ping; Mundy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions, TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also...

  11. A new model for analysing thermal stress in granular composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑茂盛; 金志浩; 浩宏奇

    1995-01-01

    A double embedding model of inletting reinforcement grain and hollow matrix ball into the effective media of the particulate-reinforced composite is advanced. And with this model the distributions of thermal stress in different phases of the composite during cooling are studied. Various expressions for predicting elastic and elastoplastic thermal stresses are derived. It is found that the reinforcement suffers compressive hydrostatic stress and the hydrostatic stress in matrix zone is a tensile one when temperature decreases; when temperature further decreases, yield area in matrix forms; when the volume fraction of reinforcement is enlarged, compressive stress on grain and tensile hydrostatic stress in matrix zone decrease; the initial temperature difference of the interface of reinforcement and matrix yielding rises, while that for the matrix yielding overall decreases.

  12. Analysing an Analytical Solution Model for Simultaneous Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ibrahim Chowdhury

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Current mobility models for simultaneous mobility h ave their convolution in designing simultaneous movement where mobile nodes (MNs travel randomly f rom the two adjacent cells at the same time and also have their complexity in the measurement of th e occurrences of simultaneous handover. Simultaneou s mobility problem incurs when two of the MNs start h andover approximately at the same time. As Simultaneous mobility is different for the other mo bility pattern, generally occurs less number of tim es in real time; we analyze that a simplified simultaneou s mobility model can be considered by taking only symmetric positions of MNs with random steps. In ad dition to that, we simulated the model using mSCTP and compare the simulation results in different sce narios with customized cell ranges. The analytical results shows that with the bigger the cell sizes, simultaneous handover with random steps occurrences become lees and for the sequential mobility (where initial positions of MNs is predetermined with ran dom steps, simultaneous handover is more frequent.

  13. Genus-Wide Comparative Genome Analyses of Colletotrichum Species Reveal Specific Gene Family Losses and Gains during Adaptation to Specific Infection Lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Pamela; Narusaka, Mari; Kumakura, Naoyoshi; Tsushima, Ayako; Takano, Yoshitaka; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-05-22

    Members from Colletotrichum genus adopt a diverse range of lifestyles during infection of plants and represent a group of agriculturally devastating pathogens. In this study, we present the draft genome of Colletotrichum incanum from the spaethianum clade of Colletotrichum and the comparative analyses with five other Colletotrichum species from distinct lineages. We show that the C. incanum strain, originally isolated from Japanese daikon radish, is able to infect both eudicot plants, such as certain ecotypes of the eudicot Arabidopsis, and monocot plants, such as lily. Being closely related to Colletotrichum species both in the graminicola clade, whose members are restricted strictly to monocot hosts, and to the destructivum clade, whose members are mostly associated with dicot infections, C. incanum provides an interesting model system for comparative genomics to study how fungal pathogens adapt to monocot and dicot hosts. Genus-wide comparative genome analyses reveal that Colletotrichum species have tailored profiles of their carbohydrate-degrading enzymes according to their infection lifestyles. In addition, we show evidence that positive selection acting on secreted and nuclear localized proteins that are highly conserved may be important in adaptation to specific hosts or ecological niches. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel mechanomyographic recordings reveal heterogeneous activation of wrist extensors in presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A; Samani, Afshin

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we applied multi-channel mechanomyographic (MMG) recordings in combination with linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate muscular and musculotendinous effects of high intensity eccentric exercise. Twelve accelerometers arranged in a 3 × 4 matrix over the dominant elbow muscles were used to detect MMG activity in 12 healthy participants. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by repetitive high intensity eccentric contractions of the wrist extensor muscles. Average rectified values (ARV) as well as percentage of recurrence (%REC) and percentage of determinism (%DET) extracted from recurrence quantification analysis were computed from data obtained during static-dynamic contractions performed before exercise, immediately after exercise, and in presence of muscle soreness. A linear mixed model was used for the statistical analysis. The ARV, %REC, and %DET maps revealed heterogeneous MMG activity over the wrist extensor muscles before, immediately after, and in presence of muscle soreness (P<0.01). The ARVs were higher while the %REC and %DET were lower in presence of muscle soreness compared with before exercise (P<0.05). The study provides new key information on linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel MMG recordings of the wrist extensor muscles following eccentric exercise that results in muscle soreness. Recurrence quantification analysis can be suggested as a tool for detection of MMG changes in presence of muscle soreness.

  15. Analyses of Cometary Silicate Crystals: DDA Spectral Modeling of Forsterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Comets are the Solar System's deep freezers of gases, ices, and particulates that were present in the outer protoplanetary disk. Where comet nuclei accreted was so cold that CO ice (approximately 50K) and other supervolatile ices like ethane (C2H2) were preserved. However, comets also accreted high temperature minerals: silicate crystals that either condensed (greater than or equal to 1400 K) or that were annealed from amorphous (glassy) silicates (greater than 850-1000 K). By their rarity in the interstellar medium, cometary crystalline silicates are thought to be grains that formed in the inner disk and were then radially transported out to the cold and ice-rich regimes near Neptune. The questions that comets can potentially address are: How fast, how far, and over what duration were crystals that formed in the inner disk transported out to the comet-forming region(s)? In comets, the mass fractions of silicates that are crystalline, f_cryst, translate to benchmarks for protoplanetary disk radial transport models. The infamous comet Hale-Bopp has crystalline fractions of over 55%. The values for cometary crystalline mass fractions, however, are derived assuming that the mineralogy assessed for the submicron to micron-sized portion of the size distribution represents the compositional makeup of all larger grains in the coma. Models for fitting cometary SEDs make this assumption because models can only fit the observed features with submicron to micron-sized discrete crystals. On the other hand, larger (0.1-100 micrometer radii) porous grains composed of amorphous silicates and amorphous carbon can be easily computed with mixed medium theory wherein vacuum mixed into a spherical particle mimics a porous aggregate. If crystalline silicates are mixed in, the models completely fail to match the observations. Moreover, models for a size distribution of discrete crystalline forsterite grains commonly employs the CDE computational method for ellipsoidal platelets (c:a:b=8

  16. Phylogeographic Analyses of Submesophotic Snappers Etelis coruscans and Etelis “marshi” (Family Lutjanidae) Reveal Concordant Genetic Structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kimberly R.; Moriwake, Virginia N.; Wilcox, Christie; Grau, E. Gordon; Kelley, Christopher; Pyle, Richard L.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    The Hawaiian Archipelago has become a natural laboratory for understanding genetic connectivity in marine organisms as a result of the large number of population genetics studies that have been conducted across this island chain for a wide taxonomic range of organisms. However, population genetic studies have been conducted for only two species occurring in the mesophotic or submesophotic zones (30+m) in this archipelago. To gain a greater understanding of genetic connectivity in these deepwater habitats, we investigated the genetic structure of two submesophotic fish species (occurring ∼200–360 m) in this archipelago. We surveyed 16 locations across the archipelago for submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans (N = 787) and E. “marshi” (formerly E. carbunculus; N = 770) with 436–490 bp of mtDNA cytochrome b and 10–11 microsatellite loci. Phylogeographic analyses reveal no geographic structuring of mtDNA lineages and recent coalescence times that are typical of shallow reef fauna. Population genetic analyses reveal no overall structure across most of the archipelago, a pattern also typical of dispersive shallow fishes. However some sites in the mid-archipelago (Raita Bank to French Frigate Shoals) had significant population differentiation. This pattern of no structure between ends of the Hawaiian range, and significant structure in the middle, was previously observed in a submesophotic snapper (Pristipomoides filamentosus) and a submesophotic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus). Three of these four species also have elevated genetic diversity in the mid-archipelago. Biophysical larval dispersal models from previous studies indicate that this elevated diversity may result from larval supplement from Johnston Atoll, ∼800 km southwest of Hawaii. In this case the boundaries of stocks for fishery management cannot be defined simply in terms of geography, and fishery management in Hawaii may need to incorporate external larval supply into management plans

  17. Analysing the Competency of Mathematical Modelling in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Redish, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    A primary goal of physics is to create mathematical models that allow both predictions and explanations of physical phenomena. We weave maths extensively into our physics instruction beginning in high school, and the level and complexity of the maths we draw on grows as our students progress through a physics curriculum. Despite much research on the learning of both physics and math, the problem of how to successfully teach most of our students to use maths in physics effectively remains unsolved. A fundamental issue is that in physics, we don't just use maths, we think about the physical world with it. As a result, we make meaning with math-ematical symbology in a different way than mathematicians do. In this talk we analyze how developing the competency of mathematical modeling is more than just "learning to do math" but requires learning to blend physical meaning into mathematical representations and use that physical meaning in solving problems. Examples are drawn from across the curriculum.

  18. Fluctuating selection models and McDonald-Kreitman type analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni I Gossmann

    Full Text Available It is likely that the strength of selection acting upon a mutation varies through time due to changes in the environment. However, most population genetic theory assumes that the strength of selection remains constant. Here we investigate the consequences of fluctuating selection pressures on the quantification of adaptive evolution using McDonald-Kreitman (MK style approaches. In agreement with previous work, we show that fluctuating selection can generate evidence of adaptive evolution even when the expected strength of selection on a mutation is zero. However, we also find that the mutations, which contribute to both polymorphism and divergence tend, on average, to be positively selected during their lifetime, under fluctuating selection models. This is because mutations that fluctuate, by chance, to positive selected values, tend to reach higher frequencies in the population than those that fluctuate towards negative values. Hence the evidence of positive adaptive evolution detected under a fluctuating selection model by MK type approaches is genuine since fixed mutations tend to be advantageous on average during their lifetime. Never-the-less we show that methods tend to underestimate the rate of adaptive evolution when selection fluctuates.

  19. A workflow model to analyse pediatric emergency overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgaya, Hayfa; Ajmi, Ines; Gammoudi, Lotfi; Hammadi, Slim; Martinot, Alain; Beuscart, Régis; Renard, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The greatest source of delay in patient flow is the waiting time from the health care request, and especially the bed request to exit from the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) for hospital admission. It represents 70% of the time that these patients occupied in the PED waiting rooms. Our objective in this study is to identify tension indicators and bottlenecks that contribute to overcrowding. Patient flow mapping through the PED was carried out in a continuous 2 years period from January 2011 to December 2012. Our method is to use the collected real data, basing on accurate visits made in the PED of the Regional University Hospital Center (CHRU) of Lille (France), in order to construct an accurate and complete representation of the PED processes. The result of this representation is a Workflow model of the patient journey in the PED representing most faithfully possible the reality of the PED of CHRU of Lille. This model allowed us to identify sources of delay in patient flow and aspects of the PED activity that could be improved. It must be enough retailed to produce an analysis allowing to identify the dysfunctions of the PED and also to propose and to estimate prevention indicators of tensions. Our survey is integrated into the French National Research Agency project, titled: "Hospital: optimization, simulation and avoidance of strain" (ANR HOST).

  20. Analyses of genome architecture and gene expression reveal novel candidate virulence factors in the secretome of Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Liliana M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans is the most devastating pathogen of potato and a model organism for the oomycetes. It exhibits high evolutionary potential and rapidly adapts to host plants. The P. infestans genome experienced a repeat-driven expansion relative to the genomes of Phytophthora sojae and Phytophthora ramorum and shows a discontinuous distribution of gene density. Effector genes, such as members of the RXLR and Crinkler (CRN families, localize to expanded, repeat-rich and gene-sparse regions of the genome. This distinct genomic environment is thought to contribute to genome plasticity and host adaptation. Results We used in silico approaches to predict and describe the repertoire of P. infestans secreted proteins (the secretome. We defined the "plastic secretome" as a subset of the genome that (i encodes predicted secreted proteins, (ii is excluded from genome segments orthologous to the P. sojae and P. ramorum genomes and (iii is encoded by genes residing in gene sparse regions of P. infestans genome. Although including only ~3% of P. infestans genes, the plastic secretome contains ~62% of known effector genes and shows >2 fold enrichment in genes induced in planta. We highlight 19 plastic secretome genes induced in planta but distinct from previously described effectors. This list includes a trypsin-like serine protease, secreted oxidoreductases, small cysteine-rich proteins and repeat containing proteins that we propose to be novel candidate virulence factors. Conclusions This work revealed a remarkably diverse plastic secretome. It illustrates the value of combining genome architecture with comparative genomics to identify novel candidate virulence factors from pathogen genomes.

  1. Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Catchment Hydrology: A Modified Model Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), typically defined as depressional wetlands surrounded by uplands, support an array of hydrological and ecological processes. However, key research questions concerning the hydrological connectivity of GIWs and their impacts on downgradient surface waters remain unanswered. This is particularly important for regulation and management of these systems. For example, in the past decade United States Supreme Court decisions suggest that GIWs can be afforded protection if significant connectivity exists between these waters and traditional navigable waters. Here we developed a simulation procedure to quantify the effects of various spatial distributions of GIWs across the landscape on the downgradient hydrograph using a refined version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a catchment-scale hydrological simulation model. We modified the SWAT FORTRAN source code and employed an alternative hydrologic response unit (HRU) definition to facilitate an improved representation of GIW hydrologic processes and connectivity relationships to other surface waters, and to quantify their downgradient hydrological effects. We applied the modified SWAT model to an ~ 202 km2 catchment in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA, exhibiting a substantial population of mapped GIWs. Results from our series of GIW distribution scenarios suggest that: (1) Our representation of GIWs within SWAT conforms to field-based characterizations of regional GIWs in most respects; (2) GIWs exhibit substantial seasonally-dependent effects upon downgradient base flow; (3) GIWs mitigate peak flows, particularly following high rainfall events; and (4) The presence of GIWs on the landscape impacts the catchment water balance (e.g., by increasing groundwater outflows). Our outcomes support the hypothesis that GIWs have an important catchment-scale effect on downgradient streamflow.

  2. A model for analysing factors which may influence quality management procedures in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin MAICAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In all universities, the Office for Quality Assurance defines the procedure for assessing the performance of the teaching staff, with a view to establishing students’ perception as regards the teachers’ activity from the point of view of the quality of the teaching process, of the relationship with the students and of the assistance provided for learning. The present paper aims at creating a combined model for evaluation, based on Data Mining statistical methods: starting from the findings revealed by the evaluations teachers performed to students, using the cluster analysis and the discriminant analysis, we identified the subjects which produced significant differences between students’ grades, subjects which were subsequently subjected to an evaluation by students. The results of these analyses allowed the formulation of certain measures for enhancing the quality of the evaluation process.

  3. Spliced leader-based analyses reveal the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on gene expression in the copepod Pseudodiaptomus poplesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yunyun; Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Chen, Hongju; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Guangxing

    2017-02-01

    exposure in P. poplesia. However, gene upregulation was followed by a reduction in expression level towards 96h, indicating a threshold value of exposure time that leads to depressed gene expression. Prolonged exposure may cause dysfunction of detoxification and antioxidant machinery in P. poplesia. The transcriptional responses of GST-T, GPX2 and GPX4 upon pyrene exposure were minimal. Our results reveal the different sensitivity of P. poplesia to two PAHs at both the individual and transcriptional levels. As the first attempt, this study proved that copepod spliced leader is useful for obtaining full-length cDNA in P. poplesia exposed to PAHs and provided a valuable gene resource for this non-model species. This approach can be applied to other calanoid copepods exposed to various stressors, particularly under field conditions.

  4. Using System Dynamic Model and Neural Network Model to Analyse Water Scarcity in Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Tang, C.; Xu, L.; Ye, S.

    2017-07-01

    Many parts of the world are facing the problem of Water Scarcity. Analysing Water Scarcity quantitatively is an important step to solve the problem. Water scarcity in a region is gauged by WSI (water scarcity index), which incorporate water supply and water demand. To get the WSI, Neural Network Model and SDM (System Dynamic Model) that depict how environmental and social factors affect water supply and demand are developed to depict how environmental and social factors affect water supply and demand. The uneven distribution of water resource and water demand across a region leads to an uneven distribution of WSI within this region. To predict WSI for the future, logistic model, Grey Prediction, and statistics are applied in predicting variables. Sudan suffers from severe water scarcity problem with WSI of 1 in 2014, water resource unevenly distributed. According to the result of modified model, after the intervention, Sudan’s water situation will become better.

  5. High overlap of CNVs and selection signatures revealed by varLD analyses of taurine and zebu cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selection Signatures (SS) assessed through analysis of genomic data are being widely studied to discover population specific regions selected via artificial or natural selection. Different methodologies have been proposed for these analyses, each having specific limitations as to the age of the sele...

  6. Single-cell expression analyses during cellular reprogramming reveal an early stochastic and a late hierarchic phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buganim, Y.; Faddah, D.A.; Cheng, A.W.; Itskovich, E.; Markoulaki, S.; Ganz, K.; Klemm, S.L.; van Oudenaarden, A.; Jaenisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    During cellular reprogramming, only a small fraction of cells become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Previous analyses of gene expression during reprogramming were based on populations of cells, impeding single-cell level identification of reprogramming events. We utilized two gene

  7. Random field model reveals structure of the protein recombinational landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A Romero

    Full Text Available We are interested in how intragenic recombination contributes to the evolution of proteins and how this mechanism complements and enhances the diversity generated by random mutation. Experiments have revealed that proteins are highly tolerant to recombination with homologous sequences (mutation by recombination is conservative; more surprisingly, they have also shown that homologous sequence fragments make largely additive contributions to biophysical properties such as stability. Here, we develop a random field model to describe the statistical features of the subset of protein space accessible by recombination, which we refer to as the recombinational landscape. This model shows quantitative agreement with experimental results compiled from eight libraries of proteins that were generated by recombining gene fragments from homologous proteins. The model reveals a recombinational landscape that is highly enriched in functional sequences, with properties dominated by a large-scale additive structure. It also quantifies the relative contributions of parent sequence identity, crossover locations, and protein fold to the tolerance of proteins to recombination. Intragenic recombination explores a unique subset of sequence space that promotes rapid molecular diversification and functional adaptation.

  8. Extensive expansion of A1 family aspartic proteinases in fungi revealed by evolutionary analyses of 107 complete eukaryotic proteomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revuelta, M.V.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Kay, J.; Have, ten A.

    2014-01-01

    The A1 family of eukaryotic aspartic proteinases (APs) forms one of the 16 AP families. Although one of the best characterized families, the recent increase in genome sequence data has revealed many fungal AP homologs with novel sequence characteristics. This study was performed to explore the funga

  9. Analyses of transcriptome sequences reveal multiple ancient large-scale duplication events in the ancestor of Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Nicolas; Szövényi, Péter; Weston, David J; Rothfels, Carl J; Johnson, Matthew G; Shaw, A Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate whether there has been a whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the ancestry of Sphagnum (peatmoss) or the class Sphagnopsida, and to determine if the timing of any such duplication(s) and patterns of paralog retention could help explain the rapid radiation and current ecological dominance of peatmosses. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data were generated for nine taxa in Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta). Analyses of frequency plots for synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks ) between paralogous gene pairs and reconciliation of 578 gene trees were conducted to assess evidence of large-scale or genome-wide duplication events in each transcriptome. Both Ks frequency plots and gene tree-based analyses indicate multiple duplication events in the history of the Sphagnopsida. The most recent WGD event predates divergence of Sphagnum from the two other genera of Sphagnopsida. Duplicate retention is highly variable across species, which might be best explained by local adaptation. Our analyses indicate that the last WGD could have been an important factor underlying the diversification of peatmosses and facilitated their rise to ecological dominance in peatlands. The timing of the duplication events and their significance in the evolutionary history of peat mosses are discussed.

  10. Pan-European modelling of riverine nutrient concentrations - spatial patterns, source detection, trend analyses, scenario modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosova, Alena; Arheimer, Berit; Capell, Rene; Donnelly, Chantal; Strömqvist, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient transport models are important tools for large scale assessments of macro-nutrient fluxes (nitrogen, phosphorus) and thus can serve as support tool for environmental assessment and management. Results from model applications over large areas, i.e. from major river basin to continental scales can fill a gap where monitoring data is not available. Here, we present results from the pan-European rainfall-runoff and nutrient transfer model E-HYPE, which is based on open data sources. We investigate the ability of the E-HYPE model to replicate the spatial and temporal variations found in observed time-series of riverine N and P concentrations, and illustrate the model usefulness for nutrient source detection, trend analyses, and scenario modelling. The results show spatial patterns in N concentration in rivers across Europe which can be used to further our understanding of nutrient issues across the European continent. E-HYPE results show hot spots with highest concentrations of total nitrogen in Western Europe along the North Sea coast. Source apportionment was performed to rank sources of nutrient inflow from land to sea along the European coast. An integrated dynamic model as E-HYPE also allows us to investigate impacts of climate change and measure programs, which was illustrated in a couple of scenarios for the Baltic Sea. Comparing model results with observations shows large uncertainty in many of the data sets and the assumptions used in the model set-up, e.g. point source release estimates. However, evaluation of model performance at a number of measurement sites in Europe shows that mean N concentration levels are generally well simulated. P levels are less well predicted which is expected as the variability of P concentrations in both time and space is higher. Comparing model performance with model set-ups using local data for the Weaver River (UK) did not result in systematically better model performance which highlights the complexity of model

  11. Evaluation of Temperature and Humidity Profiles of Unified Model and ECMWF Analyses Using GRUAN Radiosonde Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chan Noh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and water vapor profiles from the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA and the United Kingdom Met Office (UKMO Unified Model (UM data assimilation systems and from reanalysis fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF were assessed using collocated radiosonde observations from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN for January–December 2012. The motivation was to examine the overall performance of data assimilation outputs. The difference statistics of the collocated model outputs versus the radiosonde observations indicated a good agreement for the temperature, amongst datasets, while less agreement was found for the relative humidity. A comparison of the UM outputs from the UKMO and KMA revealed that they are similar to each other. The introduction of the new version of UM into the KMA in May 2012 resulted in an improved analysis performance, particularly for the moisture field. On the other hand, ECMWF reanalysis data showed slightly reduced performance for relative humidity compared with the UM, with a significant humid bias in the upper troposphere. ECMWF reanalysis temperature fields showed nearly the same performance as the two UM analyses. The root mean square differences (RMSDs of the relative humidity for the three models were larger for more humid conditions, suggesting that humidity forecasts are less reliable under these conditions.

  12. Ancient DNA Analyses Reveal Contrasting Phylogeographic Patterns amongst Kiwi (Apteryx spp.) and a Recently Extinct Lineage of Spotted Kiwi

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, Lara D; Worthy, Trevor H.; Tennyson, Alan J. D.; R Paul Scofield; Ramstad, Kristina M.; Lambert, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii) is a flightless ratite formerly found throughout New Zealand but now greatly reduced in distribution. Previous phylogeographic studies of the related brown kiwi (A. mantelli, A. rowi and A. australis), with which little spotted kiwi was once sympatric, revealed extremely high levels of genetic structuring, with mitochondrial DNA haplotypes often restricted to populations. We surveyed genetic variation throughout the present and pre-human range of littl...

  13. Demand Model Combining Stated And Revealed Preference Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Londero Brandli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The revealed and stated preference methods have been contributing a lot for the development of the econometric literature in the attempt of determining the variables that influence the individual decision in a choice process. This article combines preference data, with the objective of obtaining the advantages of the complementarity of the forces and frankness of both types of data. The approach involves the estimate of a model only with RP data, only with SP data and combining RP and SP data. The application is in the housing market, where it is observed, through the literature, that most of the papers of the consumer's choice has restricted the only one approaches. The utility functions obtained show the relative importance of the attributes, the tendency of behavior through the signs and its significance statistical. The results analysis of the models indicates differences and similarities about the attribute’s behavior.

  14. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  15. Phylogenetic analyses of the subgenus Mollienesia (Poecilia, Poeciliidae, Teleostei) reveal taxonomic inconsistencies, cryptic biodiversity, and spatio-temporal aspects of diversification in Middle America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Maura; Voelker, Gary; Arias Rodriguez, Lenin; Mateos, Mariana; Tobler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The subgenus Mollienesia is a diverse group of freshwater fishes, including species that have served as important models across multiple biological disciplines. Nonetheless, the taxonomic history of this group has been conflictive and convoluted, in part because the evolutionary relationships have not been rigorously resolved. We conducted a comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of the subgenus Mollienesia to identify taxonomic discrepancies and potentially identify undescribed species, estimate ancestral areas of origin and estimate dates of divergence, as well as explore biogeographical patterns. Our findings confirm the presence of three main clades composed of the P. latipinna, P. sphenops, and P. mexicana species complexes. Unlike previously hypothesized morphology-based analyses, species found on the Caribbean Islands are not part of Mollienesia, but are more closely related to species of the subgenus Limia. Our study also revealed several taxonomic inconsistencies and distinct lineages in the P. mexicana species complex that may represent undescribed species. The diversity in the subgenus Mollienesia is a result of dynamic geologic activity leading to vicariant events, dispersal across geologic blocks, and ecological speciation.

  16. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome reveal novel transcripts and variants in the Asian elephant Elephas maximus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Puli Chandramouli Reddy; Ishani Sinha; Ashwin Kelkar; Farhat Habib; Saurabh J Pradhan; Raman Sukumar; Sanjeev Galande

    2015-12-01

    The Asian elephant Elephas maximus and the African elephant Loxodonta africana that diverged 5-7 million years ago exhibit differences in their physiology, behaviour and morphology. A comparative genomics approach would be useful and necessary for evolutionary and functional genetic studies of elephants. We performed sequencing of E. maximus and map to L. africana at ∼ 15X coverage. Through comparative sequence analyses, we have identified Asian elephant specific homozygous, non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that map to 1514 protein coding genes, many of which are involved in olfaction. We also present the first report of a high-coverage transcriptome sequence in E. maximus from peripheral blood lymphocytes. We have identified 103 novel protein coding transcripts and 66-long non-coding (Inc)RNAs. We also report the presence of 181 protein domains unique to elephants when compared to other Afrotheria species. Each of these findings can be further investigated to gain a better understanding of functional differences unique to elephant species, as well as those unique to elephantids in comparison with other mammals. This work therefore provides a valuable resource to explore the immense research potential of comparative analyses of transcriptome and genome sequences in the Asian elephant.

  17. Differential MicroRNA Analyses of Burkholderia pseudomallei- and Francisella tularensis-Exposed hPBMCs Reveal Potential Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Galeano, J. Enrique; Frey, Kenneth G.; Schully, Kevin L.; Luu, Truong V.; Pesce, John; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Keane-Myers, Andrea M.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the immune response against infectious agents suggests that miRNA might be exploitable as signatures of exposure to specific infectious agents. In order to identify potential early miRNA biomarkers of bacterial infections, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) were exposed to two select agents, Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 and Francisella tularensis SHU S4, as well as to the nonpathogenic control Escherichia coli DH5α. RNA samples were harvested at three early time points, 30, 60, and 120 minutes postexposure, then sequenced. RNAseq analyses identified 87 miRNAs to be differentially expressed (DE) in a linear fashion. Of these, 31 miRNAs were tested using the miScript miRNA qPCR assay. Through RNAseq identification and qPCR validation, we identified differentially expressed miRNA species that may be involved in the early response to bacterial infections. Based upon its upregulation at early time points postexposure in two different individuals, hsa-mir-30c-5p is a miRNA species that could be studied further as a potential biomarker for exposure to these gram-negative intracellular pathogens. Gene ontology functional analyses demonstrated that programmed cell death is the first ranking biological process associated with miRNAs that are upregulated in F. tularensis-exposed hPBMCs. PMID:28791299

  18. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome reveal novel transcripts and variants in the Asian elephant Elephas maximus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Sinha, Ishani; Kelkar, Ashwin; Habib, Farhat; Pradhan, Saurabh J; Sukumar, Raman; Galande, Sanjeev

    2015-12-01

    The Asian elephant Elephas maximus and the African elephant Loxodonta africana that diverged 5-7 million years ago exhibit differences in their physiology, behaviour and morphology. A comparative genomics approach would be useful and necessary for evolutionary and functional genetic studies of elephants. We performed sequencing of E. maximus and map to L. africana at ~15X coverage. Through comparative sequence analyses, we have identified Asian elephant specific homozygous, non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that map to 1514 protein coding genes, many of which are involved in olfaction. We also present the first report of a high-coverage transcriptome sequence in E. maximus from peripheral blood lymphocytes. We have identified 103 novel protein coding transcripts and 66-long non-coding (lnc)RNAs. We also report the presence of 181 protein domains unique to elephants when compared to other Afrotheria species. Each of these findings can be further investigated to gain a better understanding of functional differences unique to elephant species, as well as those unique to elephantids in comparison with other mammals. This work therefore provides a valuable resource to explore the immense research potential of comparative analyses of transcriptome and genome sequences in the Asian elephant.

  19. Genomic Analyses Reveal Demographic History and Temperate Adaptation of the Newly Discovered Honey Bee Subspecies Apis mellifera sinisxinyuan n. ssp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Zhiguang; Pan, Qi; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Huihua; Guo, Haikun; Liu, Shidong; Lu, Hongfeng; Tian, Shilin; Li, Ruiqiang; Shi, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Studying the genetic signatures of climate-driven selection can produce insights into local adaptation and the potential impacts of climate change on populations. The honey bee (Apis mellifera) is an interesting species to study local adaptation because it originated in tropical/subtropical climatic regions and subsequently spread into temperate regions. However, little is known about the genetic basis of its adaptation to temperate climates. Here, we resequenced the whole genomes of ten individual bees from a newly discovered population in temperate China and downloaded resequenced data from 35 individuals from other populations. We found that the new population is an undescribed subspecies in the M-lineage of A. mellifera (Apis mellifera sinisxinyuan). Analyses of population history show that long-term global temperature has strongly influenced the demographic history of A. m. sinisxinyuan and its divergence from other subspecies. Further analyses comparing temperate and tropical populations identified several candidate genes related to fat body and the Hippo signaling pathway that are potentially involved in adaptation to temperate climates. Our results provide insights into the demographic history of the newly discovered A. m. sinisxinyuan, as well as the genetic basis of adaptation of A. mellifera to temperate climates at the genomic level. These findings will facilitate the selective breeding of A. mellifera to improve the survival of overwintering colonies.

  20. Multivariate analyses reveal a new assemblage of diverse and small archosauriforms (Reptilia, Diapsida) from the Upper Triassic of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi Bhat, Mohd; Ray, Sanghamitra; Mohan Datta, Pradipendra

    2017-04-01

    The study is based on a large collection of vertebrate microfossils collected from the Upper Triassic Tiki Formation of the Rewa Gondwana basin of India, which is a mud-dominated fluvial succession. About 8600 kg of mudrocks from the Tiki Formation were screen washed to yield 1865 vertebrate microfossils, of which 67% are isolated teeth. Of these, there are about 450 well-preserved teeth, which are leaf-shaped, slightly recurved and have subtriangular crowns with expanded and asymmetric bases, and distinct denticles both on the posterior or anterior carinae. The morphology of these teeth suggests that these belong to Archosauriformes (Heckert, 2004; Irmis et al., 2007). Since the teeth were found isolated, without being associated with any other skeletal elements, it is not possible to ascertain their taxonomic position up to the generic and species level. However, based on their distinct dental attributes, twelve morphotypes are identified, of which five show similarity with the teeth of the basal saurischian dinosaurs. Principal Component and Canonical Variate analyses (PCA and CVA) are performed on these isolated teeth to evaluate the differentiation of the specimens based on the variance of their variables and to assess the consistency of identification by qualitative and quantitative methods (Hammer and Harper, 2006). PCA and CVA are applied to the variance-covariance matrix of the logarithmically transformed variables, the latter including six measured dimensions characterizing the different crown proportions. Since the first three principal components (PCs) account for more than 98% of the total variance, PC4 is discarded. Principal component scores are plotted on PC 1 and PC 2, and PC 2 and PC 3 to show the scatter of the archosauriform teeth examined. Although distinct clustering of specimens belonging to the different morphotypes is seen, there is considerable overlapping as represented by the convex hull polygons. The quantitative analyses show that many

  1. Physiological and proteomic analyses of leaves from the halophyte Tangut Nitraria reveals diverse response pathways critical for high salinity tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tielong eCheng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinization poses a serious threat to the environment and agricultural productivity worldwide. Studies on the physiological and molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytic plants provide valuable information to enhance their salt tolerance. Tangut Nitraria is a widely distributed halophyte in saline–alkali soil in the northern areas of China. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the molecular pathways of the high salt tolerance of T. Nitraria. We analyzed the changes in biomass, photosynthesis, and redox-related enzyme activities in T. Nitraria leaves from plant seedlings treated with high salt concentration. Comparative proteomic analysis of the leaves revealed that the expression of 71 proteins was significantly altered after salinity treatments of T. Nitraria. These salinity-responsive proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, stress/defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction, and membrane transport. Results showed that the reduction of photosynthesis under salt stress was attributed to the down-regulation of the enzymes and proteins involved in the light reaction and Calvin cycle. Protein–protein interaction analysis revealed that the proteins involved in redox homeostasis, photosynthesis, and energy metabolism constructed two types of response networks to high salt stress. T. Nitraria plants developed diverse mechanisms for scavenging reactive oxygen species in their leaves to cope with stress induced by high salinity. This study provides important information regarding the salt tolerance of the halophyte T. Nitraria.

  2. Combined DNA and lipid analyses of sediments reveal changes in Holocene haptophyte and diatom populations in an Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Marco J. L.; Muyzer, Gerard; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Schouten, Stefan; Volkman, John K.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2004-06-01

    Preserved ribosomal DNA of planktonic phototrophic algae was recovered from Holocene anoxic sediments of Ace Lake (Antarctica), and the ancient community members were identified based on comparative sequence analysis. The similar concentration profiles of DNA of haptophytes and their traditional lipid biomarkers (alkenones and alkenoates) revealed that fossil rDNA also served as quantitative biomarkers in this environment. The DNA data clearly revealed the presence of six novel phylotypes related to known alkenone and alkenoate-biosynthesizing haptophytes with Isochrysis galbana UIO 102 as their closest relative. The relative abundance of these phylotypes changed as the lake chemistry, particularly salinity, evolved over time. Changes in the alkenone distributions reflect these population changes rather than a physiological response to salinity by a single haptophyte. Using this novel paleo-ecological approach of combining data from lipid biomarkers and preserved DNA, we showed that the post-glacial development of Ace Lake from freshwater basin to marine inlet and the present-day lacustrine saline system caused major qualitative and quantitative changes in the biodiversity of the planktonic populations over time.

  3. Differential co-expression and regulation analyses reveal different mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder and subsyndromal symptomatic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Yang, Jing; Chen, Jin; Wu, Qingyuan; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Jianguo; Shao, Weihua; Mu, Jun; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yongtao; Li, Zhiwei; Xie, Peng

    2015-04-03

    Recent depression research has revealed a growing awareness of how to best classify depression into depressive subtypes. Appropriately subtyping depression can lead to identification of subtypes that are more responsive to current pharmacological treatment and aid in separating out depressed patients in which current antidepressants are not particularly effective. Differential co-expression analysis (DCEA) and differential regulation analysis (DRA) were applied to compare the transcriptomic profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with two depressive subtypes: major depressive disorder (MDD) and subsyndromal symptomatic depression (SSD). Six differentially regulated genes (DRGs) (FOSL1, SRF, JUN, TFAP4, SOX9, and HLF) and 16 transcription factor-to-target differentially co-expressed gene links or pairs (TF2target DCLs) appear to be the key differential factors in MDD; in contrast, one DRG (PATZ1) and eight TF2target DCLs appear to be the key differential factors in SSD. There was no overlap between the MDD target genes and SSD target genes. Venlafaxine (Efexor™, Effexor™) appears to have a significant effect on the gene expression profile of MDD patients but no significant effect on the gene expression profile of SSD patients. DCEA and DRA revealed no apparent similarities between the differential regulatory processes underlying MDD and SSD. This bioinformatic analysis may provide novel insights that can support future antidepressant R&D efforts.

  4. Whole genome analyses of a well-differentiated liposarcoma reveals novel SYT1 and DDR2 rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Jan B; Barrett, Michael T; Champion, Mia D; Middha, Sumit; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Evers, Lisa; Francis, Princy; Schmidt, Jessica; Shi, Chang-Xin; Van Wier, Scott; Badar, Sandra; Ahmann, Gregory; Kortuem, K Martin; Boczek, Nicole J; Fonseca, Rafael; Craig, David W; Carpten, John D; Borad, Mitesh J; Stewart, A Keith

    2014-01-01

    Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma, but little is known about the genomic basis of this disease. Given the low cell content of this tumor type, we utilized flow cytometry to isolate the diploid normal and aneuploid tumor populations from a well-differentiated liposarcoma prior to array comparative genomic hybridization and whole genome sequencing. This work revealed massive highly focal amplifications throughout the aneuploid tumor genome including MDM2, a gene that has previously been found to be amplified in well-differentiated liposarcoma. Structural analysis revealed massive rearrangement of chromosome 12 and 11 gene fusions, some of which may be part of double minute chromosomes commonly present in well-differentiated liposarcoma. We identified a hotspot of genomic instability localized to a region of chromosome 12 that includes a highly conserved, putative L1 retrotransposon element, LOC100507498 which resides within a gene cluster (NAV3, SYT1, PAWR) where 6 of the 11 fusion events occurred. Interestingly, a potential gene fusion was also identified in amplified DDR2, which is a potential therapeutic target of kinase inhibitors such as dastinib, that are not routinely used in the treatment of patients with liposarcoma. Furthermore, 7 somatic, damaging single nucleotide variants have also been identified, including D125N in the PTPRQ protein. In conclusion, this work is the first to report the entire genome of a well-differentiated liposarcoma with novel chromosomal rearrangements associated with amplification of therapeutically targetable genes such as MDM2 and DDR2.

  5. Whole genome analyses of a well-differentiated liposarcoma reveals novel SYT1 and DDR2 rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B Egan

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma, but little is known about the genomic basis of this disease. Given the low cell content of this tumor type, we utilized flow cytometry to isolate the diploid normal and aneuploid tumor populations from a well-differentiated liposarcoma prior to array comparative genomic hybridization and whole genome sequencing. This work revealed massive highly focal amplifications throughout the aneuploid tumor genome including MDM2, a gene that has previously been found to be amplified in well-differentiated liposarcoma. Structural analysis revealed massive rearrangement of chromosome 12 and 11 gene fusions, some of which may be part of double minute chromosomes commonly present in well-differentiated liposarcoma. We identified a hotspot of genomic instability localized to a region of chromosome 12 that includes a highly conserved, putative L1 retrotransposon element, LOC100507498 which resides within a gene cluster (NAV3, SYT1, PAWR where 6 of the 11 fusion events occurred. Interestingly, a potential gene fusion was also identified in amplified DDR2, which is a potential therapeutic target of kinase inhibitors such as dastinib, that are not routinely used in the treatment of patients with liposarcoma. Furthermore, 7 somatic, damaging single nucleotide variants have also been identified, including D125N in the PTPRQ protein. In conclusion, this work is the first to report the entire genome of a well-differentiated liposarcoma with novel chromosomal rearrangements associated with amplification of therapeutically targetable genes such as MDM2 and DDR2.

  6. Integrative genomic analyses reveal an androgen-driven somatic alteration landscape in early-onset prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Simon, Ronald; Feuerbach, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    comparative assessments with seven elderly-onset PCA genomes. Remarkable age-related differences in structural rearrangement (SR) formation became evident, suggesting distinct disease pathomechanisms. Whereas EO-PCAs harbored a prevalence of balanced SRs, with a specific abundance of androgen-regulated ETS......Early-onset prostate cancer (EO-PCA) represents the earliest clinical manifestation of prostate cancer. To compare the genomic alteration landscapes of EO-PCA with "classical" (elderly-onset) PCA, we performed deep sequencing-based genomics analyses in 11 tumors diagnosed at young age, and pursued...... gene fusions including TMPRSS2:ERG, elderly-onset PCAs displayed primarily non-androgen-associated SRs. Data from a validation cohort of > 10,000 patients showed age-dependent androgen receptor levels and a prevalence of SRs affecting androgen-regulated genes, further substantiating the activity...

  7. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-02-22

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation.

  8. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation. PMID:28223697

  9. Proteomic Analyses Reveal the Mechanism of Dunaliella salina Ds-26-16 Gene Enhancing Salt Tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Wang

    Full Text Available We previously screened the novel gene Ds-26-16 from a 4 M salt-stressed Dunaliella salina cDNA library and discovered that this gene conferred salt tolerance to broad-spectrum organisms, including E. coli (Escherichia coli, Haematococcus pluvialis and tobacco. To determine the mechanism of this gene conferring salt tolerance, we studied the proteome of E. coli overexpressing the full-length cDNA of Ds-26-16 using the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification approach. A total of 1,610 proteins were identified, which comprised 39.4% of the whole proteome. Of the 559 differential proteins, 259 were up-regulated and 300 were down-regulated. GO (gene ontology and KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes enrichment analyses identified 202 major proteins, including those involved in amino acid and organic acid metabolism, energy metabolism, carbon metabolism, ROS (reactive oxygen species scavenging, membrane proteins and ABC (ATP binding cassette transporters, and peptidoglycan synthesis, as well as 5 up-regulated transcription factors. Our iTRAQ data suggest that Ds-26-16 up-regulates the transcription factors in E. coli to enhance salt resistance through osmotic balance, energy metabolism, and oxidative stress protection. Changes in the proteome were also observed in E. coli overexpressing the ORF (open reading frame of Ds-26-16. Furthermore, pH, nitric oxide and glycerol content analyses indicated that Ds-26-16 overexpression increases nitric oxide content but has no effect on glycerol content, thus confirming that enhanced nitric oxide synthesis via lower intercellular pH was one of the mechanisms by which Ds-26-16 confers salt tolerance to E. coli.

  10. Phylogenetic and morphologic analyses of a coastal fish reveals a marine biogeographic break of terrestrial origin in the southern Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Betancur-R

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine allopatric speciation involves interplay between intrinsic organismal properties and extrinsic factors. However, the relative contribution of each depends on the taxon under study and its geographic context. Utilizing sea catfishes in the Cathorops mapale species group, this study tests the hypothesis that both reproductive strategies conferring limited dispersal opportunities and an apparent geomorphologic barrier in the Southern Caribbean have promoted speciation in this group from a little studied area of the world. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mitochondrial gene sequences were obtained from representatives of the Cathorops mapale species group across its distributional range from Colombia to Venezuela. Morphometric and meristic analyses were also done to assess morphologic variation. Along a approximately 2000 km transect, two major lineages, Cathorops sp. and C. mapale, were identified by levels of genetic differentiation, phylogenetic reconstructions, and morphological analyses. The lineages are separated by approximately 150 km at the Santa Marta Massif (SMM in Colombia. The northward displacement of the SMM into the Caribbean in the early Pleistocene altered the geomorphology of the continental margin, ultimately disrupting the natural habitat of C. mapale. The estimated approximately 0.86 my divergence of the lineages from a common ancestor coincides with the timing of the SMM displacement at approximately 0.78 my. MAIN CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results presented here support the hypothesis that organismal properties as well as extrinsic factors lead to diversification of the Cathorops mapale group along the northern coast of South America. While a lack of pelagic larval stages and ecological specialization are forces impacting this process, the identification of the SMM as contributing to allopatric speciation in marine organisms adds to the list of recognized barriers in the Caribbean. Comparative examination of

  11. Phylogenetic and Morphologic Analyses of a Coastal Fish Reveals a Marine Biogeographic Break of Terrestrial Origin in the Southern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur-R, Ricardo; Acero P., Arturo; Duque-Caro, Hermann; Santos, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Marine allopatric speciation involves interplay between intrinsic organismal properties and extrinsic factors. However, the relative contribution of each depends on the taxon under study and its geographic context. Utilizing sea catfishes in the Cathorops mapale species group, this study tests the hypothesis that both reproductive strategies conferring limited dispersal opportunities and an apparent geomorphologic barrier in the Southern Caribbean have promoted speciation in this group from a little studied area of the world. Methodology/Principal Findings Mitochondrial gene sequences were obtained from representatives of the Cathorops mapale species group across its distributional range from Colombia to Venezuela. Morphometric and meristic analyses were also done to assess morphologic variation. Along a ∼2000 km transect, two major lineages, Cathorops sp. and C. mapale, were identified by levels of genetic differentiation, phylogenetic reconstructions, and morphological analyses. The lineages are separated by ∼150 km at the Santa Marta Massif (SMM) in Colombia. The northward displacement of the SMM into the Caribbean in the early Pleistocene altered the geomorphology of the continental margin, ultimately disrupting the natural habitat of C. mapale. The estimated ∼0.86 my divergence of the lineages from a common ancestor coincides with the timing of the SMM displacement at ∼0.78 my. Main Conclusions/Significance Results presented here support the hypothesis that organismal properties as well as extrinsic factors lead to diversification of the Cathorops mapale group along the northern coast of South America. While a lack of pelagic larval stages and ecological specialization are forces impacting this process, the identification of the SMM as contributing to allopatric speciation in marine organisms adds to the list of recognized barriers in the Caribbean. Comparative examination of additional Southern Caribbean taxa, particularly those with

  12. Taxing CO2 and subsidising biomass: Analysed in a macroeconomic and sectoral model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyses the combination of taxes and subsidies as an instrument to enable a reduction in CO2 emission. The objective of the study is to compare recycling of a CO2 tax revenue as a subsidy for biomass use as opposed to traditional recycling such as reduced income or corporate taxation....... A model of Denmark's energy supply sector is used to analyse the e€ect of a CO2 tax combined with using the tax revenue for biomass subsidies. The energy supply model is linked to a macroeconomic model such that the macroeconomic consequences of tax policies can be analysed along with the consequences...

  13. Longitudinal data analyses using linear mixed models in SPSS: concepts, procedures and illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ma, Cecilia M S

    2011-01-05

    Although different methods are available for the analyses of longitudinal data, analyses based on generalized linear models (GLM) are criticized as violating the assumption of independence of observations. Alternatively, linear mixed models (LMM) are commonly used to understand changes in human behavior over time. In this paper, the basic concepts surrounding LMM (or hierarchical linear models) are outlined. Although SPSS is a statistical analyses package commonly used by researchers, documentation on LMM procedures in SPSS is not thorough or user friendly. With reference to this limitation, the related procedures for performing analyses based on LMM in SPSS are described. To demonstrate the application of LMM analyses in SPSS, findings based on six waves of data collected in the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) in Hong Kong are presented.

  14. Comparative genomic analyses reveal a lack of a substantial signature of host adaptation in Rhodococcus equi ('Prescottella equi').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangal, Vartul; Jones, Amanda L; Goodfellow, Michael; Sutcliffe, Iain C; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi ('Prescottella equi') is a pathogenic actinomycete primarily infecting horses but has emerged as an opportunistic human pathogen. We have sequenced the genome of the type strain of this species, R. equi strain C7(T) , and compared the genome with that of another foal isolate 103S and of a human isolate ATCC 33707. The R. equi strains are closely related to each other and yet distantly related to other rhodococci and Nocardia brasiliensis. The comparison of gene contents among R. equi strains revealed minor differences that could be associated with host adaptation from foals to humans, including the presence of a paa operon in the human isolate, which is potentially involved in pathogenesis. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptome and proteomic analyses reveal multiple differences associated with chloroplast development in the spaceflight-induced wheat albino mutant mta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kui; Gu, Jiayu; Guo, Huijun; Zhao, Linshu; Xie, Yongdun; Xiong, Hongchun; Li, Junhui; Zhao, Shirong; Song, Xiyun; Liu, Luxiang

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast development is an integral part of plant survival and growth, and occurs in parallel with chlorophyll biosynthesis. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying chloroplast development in hexaploid wheat. Here, we obtained a spaceflight-induced wheat albino mutant mta. Chloroplast ultra-structural observation showed that chloroplasts of mta exhibit abnormal morphology and distribution compared to wild type. Photosynthetic pigments content was also significantly decreased in mta. Transcriptome and chloroplast proteome profiling of mta and wild type were done to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and proteins (DEPs), respectively. In total 4,588 DEGs including 1,980 up- and 2,608 down-regulated, and 48 chloroplast DEPs including 15 up- and 33 down-regulated were identified in mta. Classification of DEGs revealed that most were involved in chloroplast development, chlorophyll biosynthesis, or photosynthesis. Besides, transcription factors such as PIF3, GLK and MYB which might participate in those pathways were also identified. The correlation analysis between DEGs and DEPs revealed that the transcript-to-protein in abundance was functioned into photosynthesis and chloroplast relevant groups. Real time qPCR analysis validated that the expression level of genes encoding photosynthetic proteins was significantly decreased in mta. Together, our results suggest that the molecular mechanism for albino leaf color formation in mta is a thoroughly regulated and complicated process. The combined analysis of transcriptome and proteome afford comprehensive information for further research on chloroplast development mechanism in wheat. And spaceflight provides a potential means for mutagenesis in crop breeding.

  16. Genetic introgression and hybridization in Antillean freshwater turtles (Trachemys) revealed by coalescent analyses of mitochondrial and cloned nuclear markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, James F; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Dijk, Peter Paul van; Wilson, Byron S; Marte, Cristian; Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez; Brian Simison, W

    2013-04-01

    Determining whether a conflict between gene trees and species trees represents incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) or hybridization involving native and/or invasive species has implications for reconstructing evolutionary relationships and guiding conservation decisions. Among vertebrates, turtles represent an exceptional case for exploring these issues because of the propensity for even distantly related lineages to hybridize. In this study we investigate a group of freshwater turtles (Trachemys) from a part of its range (the Greater Antilles) where it is purported to have undergone reticulation events from both natural and anthropogenic processes. We sequenced mtDNA for 83 samples, sequenced three nuDNA markers for 45 samples, and cloned 29 polymorphic sequences, to identify species boundaries, hybridization, and intergrade zones for Antillean Trachemys and nearby mainland populations. Initial coalescent analyses of phased nuclear alleles (using (*)BEAST) recovered a Bayesian species tree that strongly conflicted with the mtDNA phylogeny and traditional taxonomy, and appeared to be confounded by hybridization. Therefore, we undertook exploratory phylogenetic analyses of mismatched alleles from the "coestimated" gene trees (Heled and Drummond, 2010) in order to identify potential hybrid origins. The geography, morphology, and sampling context of most samples with potential introgressed alleles suggest hybridization over ILS. We identify contact zones between different species on Jamaica (T. decussata × T. terrapen), on Hispaniola (T. decorata × T. stejnegeri), and in Central America (T. emolli × T. venusta). We are unable to determine whether the distribution of T. decussata on Jamaica is natural or the result of prehistoric introduction by Native Americans. This uncertainty means that the conservation status of the Jamaican T. decussata populations and contact zone with T. terrapen are unresolved. Human-mediated dispersal events were more conclusively implicated

  17. Population dynamics and genetic changes of Picea abies in the South Carpathians revealed by pollen and ancient DNA analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Mihály

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on allele length polymorphism designate several glacial refugia for Norway spruce (Picea abies in the South Carpathian Mountains, but infer only limited expansion from these refugia after the last glaciation. To better understand the genetic dynamics of a South Carpathian spruce lineage, we compared ancient DNA from 10,700 and 11,000-year-old spruce pollen and macrofossils retrieved from Holocene lake sediment in the Retezat Mountains with DNA extracted from extant material from the same site. We used eight primer pairs that amplified short and variable regions of the spruce cpDNA. In addition, from the same lake sediment we obtained a 15,000-years-long pollen accumulation rate (PAR record for spruce that helped us to infer changes in population size at this site. Results We obtained successful amplifications for Norway spruce from 17 out of 462 pollen grains tested, while the macrofossil material provided 22 DNA sequences. Two fossil sequences were found to be unique to the ancient material. Population genetic statistics showed higher genetic diversity in the ancient individuals compared to the extant ones. Similarly, statistically significant Ks and Kst values showed a considerable level of differentiation between extant and ancient populations at the same loci. Lateglacial and Holocene PAR values suggested that population size of the ancient population was small, in the range of 1/10 or 1/5 of the extant population. PAR analysis also detected two periods of rapid population growths (from ca. 11,100 and 3900 calibrated years before present (cal yr BP and three bottlenecks (around 9180, 7200 and 2200 cal yr BP, likely triggered by climatic change and human impact. Conclusion Our results suggest that the paternal lineages observed today in the Retezat Mountains persisted at this site at least since the early Holocene. Combination of the results from the genetic and the PAR analyses furthermore suggests that the higher

  18. Rasch analysis reveals comparative analyses of ADL/IADL summary scores from different residential settings is inappropriate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutomski, Jennifer E; Krabbe, Paul Fm; den Elzen, Wendy Pj; Olde-Rikkert, Marcel Gm; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Muntinga, Maaike E; Bleijenberg, Nienke; Kempen, Gertrudis Ijm; Melis, René Jf

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To internally validate a 15-item dichotomous Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL) Index. METHODS: Data were extracted from The Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey Minimal DataSet (TOPICS-MDS). Using Rasch modelling, six aspects of the

  19. Multilocus sequence analyses reveal extensive diversity and multiple origins of fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis from tropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Yan; Guo, Hong; Wang, Hua-Min; Yi, Guo-Hui; Zhou, Li-Min; He, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Candida tropicalis is among the most prevalent human pathogenic yeast species, second only to C. albicans in certain geographic regions such as East Asia and Brazil. However, compared to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the patterns of genetic variation in C. tropicalis. This study analyzed the genetic diversity and relationships among isolates of C. tropicalis from the southern Chinese island of Hainan. A total of 116 isolates were obtained from seven geographic regions located across the Island. For each isolate, a total of 2677 bp from six gene loci were sequenced and 79 (2.96%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were found in our sample. Comparisons with strains reported from other parts of the world identified significant novel diversities in Hainan, including an average of six novel sequences (with a range 1 to 14) per locus and 80 novel diploid sequence types. Most of the genetic variation was found within individual strains and there was abundant evidence for gene flow among the seven geographic locations within Hainan. Interestingly, our analyses identified no significant correlation between the diploid sequence types at the six loci and fluconazole susceptibility, consistent with multiple origins of fluconazole resistance in the Hainan population of C. tropicalis. PMID:28186162

  20. Distinct signal transduction pathways downstream of the (PRR revealed by microarray and ChIP-chip analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zaade

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor ((PRR signaling is involved in different pathophysiologies ranging from cardiorenal end-organ damage via diabetic retinopathy to tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF is an adaptor protein of the (PRR. Furthermore, recent publications suggest that major functions of the (PRR are mediated ligand-independently by its transmembrane and intracellular part, which acts as an accessory protein of V-ATPases. The transcriptome and recruitmentome downstream of the V-ATPase function and PLZF in the context of the (PRR are currently unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of microarray and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip experiments using siRNA against the (PRR, stable overexpression of PLZF, the PLZF translocation inhibitor genistein and the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin to dissect transcriptional pathways downstream of the (PRR. We were able to identify distinct and overlapping genetic signatures as well as novel real-time PCR-validated target genes of the different molecular functions of the (PRR. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses of our data confirm the role of (PRŔs signal transduction pathways in cardiovascular disease and tumorigenesis.

  1. Large-scale phylogenomic analyses reveal that two enigmatic protist lineages, telonemia and centroheliozoa, are related to photosynthetic chromalveolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki, Fabien; Inagaki, Yuji; Bråte, Jon; Archibald, John M; Keeling, Patrick J; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Sakaguchi, Miako; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Horak, Ales; Kumar, Surendra; Klaveness, Dag; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pawlowski, Jan; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2009-07-27

    Understanding the early evolution and diversification of eukaryotes relies on a fully resolved phylogenetic tree. In recent years, most eukaryotic diversity has been assigned to six putative supergroups, but the evolutionary origin of a few major "orphan" lineages remains elusive. Two ecologically important orphan groups are the heterotrophic Telonemia and Centroheliozoa. Telonemids have been proposed to be related to the photosynthetic cryptomonads or stramenopiles and centrohelids to haptophytes, but molecular phylogenies have failed to provide strong support for any phylogenetic hypothesis. Here, we investigate the origins of Telonema subtilis (a telonemid) and Raphidiophrys contractilis (a centrohelid) by large-scale 454 pyrosequencing of cDNA libraries and including new genomic data from two cryptomonads (Guillardia theta and Plagioselmis nannoplanctica) and a haptophyte (Imantonia rotunda). We demonstrate that 454 sequencing of cDNA libraries is a powerful and fast method of sampling a high proportion of protist genes, which can yield ample information for phylogenomic studies. Our phylogenetic analyses of 127 genes from 72 species indicate that telonemids and centrohelids are members of an emerging major group of eukaryotes also comprising cryptomonads and haptophytes. Furthermore, this group is possibly closely related to the SAR clade comprising stramenopiles (heterokonts), alveolates, and Rhizaria. Our results link two additional heterotrophic lineages to the predominantly photosynthetic chromalveolate supergroup, providing a new framework for interpreting the evolution of eukaryotic cell structures and the diversification of plastids.

  2. Genomic and Phenotypic Analyses Reveal the Emergence of an Atypical Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Variant in China

    KAUST Repository

    Abd El Ghany, Moataz

    2016-05-25

    Human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Senftenberg are often associated with exposure to poultry flocks, farm environments, or contaminated food. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates has raised public health concerns. In this study, comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis were used to characterize 14 Salmonella Senftenberg clinical isolates recovered from multiple outbreaks in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, between 2002 and 2011. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses identified two phylogenetically distinct clades of S. Senftenberg, designated SC1 and SC2, harboring variations in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 and exhibiting distinct biochemical and phenotypic signatures. Although the two variants shared the same serotype, the SC2 isolates of sequence type 14 (ST14) harbored intact SPI-1 and -2 and hence were characterized by possessing efficient invasion capabilities. In contrast, the SC1 isolates had structural deletion patterns in both SPI-1 and -2 that correlated with an impaired capacity to invade cultured human cells and also the year of their isolation. These atypical SC1 isolates also lacked the capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide. These findings highlight the emergence of atypical Salmonella Senftenberg variants in China and provide genetic validation that variants lacking SPI-1 and regions of SPI-2, which leads to impaired invasion capacity, can still cause clinical disease. These data have identified an emerging public health concern and highlight the need to strengthen surveillance to detect the prevalence and transmission of nontyphoidal Salmonella species.

  3. Pathway models for analysing and managing the introduction of alien plant pests - an overview and categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, J.C.; Pautasso, M.; Venette, R.C.; Robinet, C.; Hemerik, L.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Schans, J.; Werf, van der W.

    2016-01-01

    Alien plant pests are introduced into new areas at unprecedented rates through global trade, transport, tourism and travel, threatening biodiversity and agriculture. Increasingly, the movement and introduction of pests is analysed with pathway models to provide risk managers with quantitative

  4. Metagenomic analyses reveal the involvement of syntrophic consortia in methanol/electricity conversion in microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Yamamuro

    Full Text Available Methanol is widely used in industrial processes, and as such, is discharged in large quantities in wastewater. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs have the potential to recover electric energy from organic pollutants in wastewater; however, the use of MFCs to generate electricity from methanol has not been reported. In the present study, we developed single-chamber MFCs that generated electricity from methanol at the maximum power density of 220 mW m(-2 (based on the projected area of the anode. In order to reveal how microbes generate electricity from methanol, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA-gene amplicons and Illumina shotgun sequencing of metagenome were conducted. The pyrosequencing detected in abundance Dysgonomonas, Sporomusa, and Desulfovibrio in the electrolyte and anode and cathode biofilms, while Geobacter was detected only in the anode biofilm. Based on known physiological properties of these bacteria, it is considered that Sporomusa converts methanol into acetate, which is then utilized by Geobacter to generate electricity. This speculation is supported by results of shotgun metagenomics of the anode-biofilm microbes, which reconstructed relevant catabolic pathways in these bacteria. These results suggest that methanol is anaerobically catabolized by syntrophic bacterial consortia with electrodes as electron acceptors.

  5. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanistic insight into the adaption of marine Bacillus subtilis C01 to alumina nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Dashuai; Yu, Xiuxia; Xu, Zhenxing; Du, Zongjun; Chen, Guanjun

    2016-07-21

    An increasing number of studies have investigated the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on microbial systems; however, few existing reports have focused on the defense mechanisms of bacteria against NPs. Whether secondary metabolism biosynthesis is a response to NP stress and contributes to the adaption of bacteria to NPs is unclear. Here, a significant induction in the surfactin production and biofilm formation were detected by adding Al2O3 NPs to the B. subtilis fermentation broth. Physiological analysis showed that Al2O3 NP stress could also affect the cell and colony morphogenesis and inhibit the motility and sporulation. Exogenously adding commercial surfactin restored the swarming motility. Additionally, a suite of toxicity assays analyzing membrane damage, cellular ROS generation, electron transport activity and membrane potential was used to determine the molecular mechanisms of toxicity of Al2O3 NPs. Furthermore, whole transcriptomic analysis was used to elucidate the mechanisms of B. subtilis adaption to Al2O3 NPs. These results revealed several mechanisms by which marine B. subtilis C01 adapt to Al2O3 NPs. Additionally, this study broadens the applications of nanomaterials and describes the important effects on secondary metabolism and multicellularity regulation by using Al2O3 NPs or other nano-products.

  6. Distinct and shared functions of ALS-associated proteins TDP-43, FUS and TAF15 revealed by multisystem analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapeli, Katannya; Pratt, Gabriel A; Vu, Anthony Q; Hutt, Kasey R; Martinez, Fernando J; Sundararaman, Balaji; Batra, Ranjan; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J; Huelga, Stephanie C; Chun, Seung J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chang, Jeremy; Donohue, John P; Shiue, Lily; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhu, Haining; Cambi, Franca; Kasarskis, Edward; Hoon, Shawn; Ares, Manuel; Burge, Christopher B; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-07-05

    The RNA-binding protein (RBP) TAF15 is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To compare TAF15 function to that of two ALS-associated RBPs, FUS and TDP-43, we integrate CLIP-seq and RNA Bind-N-Seq technologies, and show that TAF15 binds to ∼4,900 RNAs enriched for GGUA motifs in adult mouse brains. TAF15 and FUS exhibit similar binding patterns in introns, are enriched in 3' untranslated regions and alter genes distinct from TDP-43. However, unlike FUS and TDP-43, TAF15 has a minimal role in alternative splicing. In human neural progenitors, TAF15 and FUS affect turnover of their RNA targets. In human stem cell-derived motor neurons, the RNA profile associated with concomitant loss of both TAF15 and FUS resembles that observed in the presence of the ALS-associated mutation FUS R521G, but contrasts with late-stage sporadic ALS patients. Taken together, our findings reveal convergent and divergent roles for FUS, TAF15 and TDP-43 in RNA metabolism.

  7. Metagenomic analyses reveal the involvement of syntrophic consortia in methanol/electricity conversion in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Ayaka; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Abe, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Methanol is widely used in industrial processes, and as such, is discharged in large quantities in wastewater. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to recover electric energy from organic pollutants in wastewater; however, the use of MFCs to generate electricity from methanol has not been reported. In the present study, we developed single-chamber MFCs that generated electricity from methanol at the maximum power density of 220 mW m(-2) (based on the projected area of the anode). In order to reveal how microbes generate electricity from methanol, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA-gene amplicons and Illumina shotgun sequencing of metagenome were conducted. The pyrosequencing detected in abundance Dysgonomonas, Sporomusa, and Desulfovibrio in the electrolyte and anode and cathode biofilms, while Geobacter was detected only in the anode biofilm. Based on known physiological properties of these bacteria, it is considered that Sporomusa converts methanol into acetate, which is then utilized by Geobacter to generate electricity. This speculation is supported by results of shotgun metagenomics of the anode-biofilm microbes, which reconstructed relevant catabolic pathways in these bacteria. These results suggest that methanol is anaerobically catabolized by syntrophic bacterial consortia with electrodes as electron acceptors.

  8. Functional analyses of a flavonol synthase - like gene from Camellia nitidissima reveal its roles in flavonoid metabolism during floral pigmentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xing-Wen Zhou; Zheng-Qi Fan; Yue Chen; Yu-Lin Zhu; Ji-Yuan Li; Heng-Fu Yin

    2013-09-01

    The flavonoids metabolic pathway plays central roles in floral coloration, in which anthocyanins and flavonols are derived from common precursors, dihydroflavonols. Flavonol synthase (FLS) catalyses dihydroflavonols into flavonols, which presents a key branch of anthocyanins biosynthesis. The yellow flower of Camellia nitidissima Chi. is a unique feature within the genus Camellia, which makes it a precious resource for breeding yellow camellia varieties. In this work, we characterized the secondary metabolites of pigments during floral development of C. nitidissima and revealed that accumulation of flavonols correlates with floral coloration. We first isolated CnFLS1 and showed that it is a FLS of C. nitidissima by gene family analysis. Second, expression analysis during floral development and different floral organs indicated that the expression level of CnFLS1 was regulated by developmental cues, which was in agreement with the accumulating pattern of flavonols. Furthermore, over-expression of CnFLS1 in Nicotiana tabacum altered floral colour into white or light yellow, and metabolic analysis showed significant increasing of flavonols and reducing of anthocyanins in transgenic plants. Our work suggested CnFLS1 plays critical roles in yellow colour pigmentation and is potentially a key point of genetic engineering toward colour modification in Camellia.

  9. NMR spectroscopic and bioinformatic analyses of the LTBP1 C-terminus reveal a highly dynamic domain organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B Robertson

    Full Text Available Proteins from the LTBP/fibrillin family perform key structural and functional roles in connective tissues. LTBP1 forms the large latent complex with TGFβ and its propeptide LAP, and sequesters the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix. Bioinformatics studies suggest the main structural features of the LTBP1 C-terminus are conserved through evolution. NMR studies were carried out on three overlapping C-terminal fragments of LTBP1, comprising four domains with characterised homologues, cbEGF14, TB3, EGF3 and cbEGF15, and three regions with no homology to known structures. The NMR data reveal that the four domains adopt canonical folds, but largely lack the interdomain interactions observed with homologous fibrillin domains; the exception is the EGF3-cbEGF15 domain pair which has a well-defined interdomain interface. (15N relaxation studies further demonstrate that the three interdomain regions act as flexible linkers, allowing a wide range of motion between the well-structured domains. This work is consistent with the LTBP1 C-terminus adopting a flexible "knotted rope" structure, which may facilitate cell matrix interactions, and the accessibility to proteases or other factors that could contribute to TGFβ activation.

  10. Microbial analyses of traditional Italian salami reveal microorganisms transfer from the natural casing to the meat matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, Vincenza; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Puglisi, Edoardo; Dallolio, Giuliano; Rebecchi, Annalisa

    2015-08-17

    In this study the bacterial biodiversity, during the maturation process of traditional sausages (Salame Mantovano), produced with two different kinds of casing (hog middle or "Crespone" and hog bung or "Gentile"), was investigated by means of culture-dependent and -independent methods. In order to assess the natural variability linked to the type of casing used in production, the ingredients, as well as ripening conditions, were identical in both productions. The aim of the study was to understand the contribution of casing microflora during sausage ripening by identifying the dominant species and strains. The bacterial ecology of casings and salami at different ripening stages, as determined by plating, revealed higher staphylococci and enterococci counts for Gentile casing and for the entire ripening period of the salami studied. After molecular identification of 219 Lactobacilli and 225 cocci gram positive catalase positive (GPCP) isolates, the species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus curvatus, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Some L. sakei and S. saprophyticus strains, coming from casing, were also found in the salami at different times of ripening. A richer biodiversity was only detected at the beginning of maturation. We also report the first detection, by PCR-DGGE method, of Arcobacter marinus and Brochothrix thermosphacta species in casings and Kokuria salsicia in fresh sausage. Results suggesting that casing can be an important source of bacteria during natural fermentation when starter cultures are not used.

  11. Ancient DNA analyses reveal contrasting phylogeographic patterns amongst kiwi (Apteryx spp. and a recently extinct lineage of spotted kiwi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara D Shepherd

    Full Text Available The little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii is a flightless ratite formerly found throughout New Zealand but now greatly reduced in distribution. Previous phylogeographic studies of the related brown kiwi (A. mantelli, A. rowi and A. australis, with which little spotted kiwi was once sympatric, revealed extremely high levels of genetic structuring, with mitochondrial DNA haplotypes often restricted to populations. We surveyed genetic variation throughout the present and pre-human range of little spotted kiwi by obtaining mitochondrial DNA sequences from contemporary and ancient samples. Little spotted kiwi and great spotted kiwi (A. haastii formed a monophyletic clade sister to brown kiwi. Ancient samples of little spotted kiwi from the northern North Island, where it is now extinct, formed a lineage that was distinct from remaining little spotted kiwi and great spotted kiwi lineages, potentially indicating unrecognized taxonomic diversity. Overall, little spotted kiwi exhibited much lower levels of genetic diversity and structuring than brown kiwi, particularly through the South Island. Our results also indicate that little spotted kiwi (or at least hybrids involving this species survived on the South Island mainland until more recently than previously thought.

  12. Vitamin E analyses in seeds reveal a dominant presence of tocotrienols over tocopherols in the Arecaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, Laura; Cela, Jana; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-11-01

    Tocopherols are thought to prevent oxidative damage during seed quiescence and dormancy in all angiosperms. However, several monocot species accumulate tocotrienols in seeds and their role remains elusive. Here, we aimed to unravel the distribution of tocopherols and tocotrienols in seeds of the Arecaceae family, to examine possible trends of vitamin E accumulation within different clades of the same family. We examined the tocopherol and tocotrienol content in seeds of 84 species. Furthermore, we evaluated the vitamin E composition of the seed coat, endosperm and embryo of seeds from 6 species, to determine possible tissue-specific functions of particular vitamin E forms. While seeds of 98.8% (83 out of 84) of the species accumulated tocotrienols, only 58.3% (49 out of 84) accumulated tocopherols. The presence of tocopherols did not follow a clear evolutionary trend, and appeared randomly in some clades only. In addition, the tissue-specific location of vitamin E in seeds revealed that the embryo contains mostly α-tocopherol (in seed tocopherol-accumulating species) or α-tocotrienol (in seed tocopherol-deficient species). However, some species such as Socratea exorrhiza mostly accumulate β-tocotrienol, and Parajubaea torallyi accumulates a mixture of tocopherols and tocotrienols in the embryo. This suggests that tocotrienols can play a similar protective role to that exerted by tocopherols in seeds, at least in some species of the Arecaceae family. We conclude that tocotrienol, rather than tocopherol, accumulation is a conserved trait in seeds of the Arecaceae family.

  13. Proteomic Analyses Reveal that Sky1 Modulates Apoptosis and Mitophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Exposed to Cisplatin

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    Silvia Rodríguez-Lombardero

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sky1 is the only member of the SR (Serine–Arginine protein kinase family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When yeast cells are treated with the anti-cancer drug cisplatin, Sky1 kinase activity is necessary to produce the cytotoxic effect. In this study, proteome changes in response to this drug and/or SKY1 deletion have been evaluated in order to understand the role of Sky1 in the response of yeast cells to cisplatin. Results reveal differential expression of proteins previously related to the oxidative stress response, DNA damage, apoptosis and mitophagy. With these precedents, the role of Sky1 in apoptosis, necrosis and mitophagy has been evaluated by flow-cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, biosensors and fluorescence techniques. After cisplatin treatment, an apoptotic-like process diminishes in the ∆sky1 strain in comparison to the wild-type. The treatment does not affect mitophagy in the wild-type strain, while an increase is observed in the ∆sky1 strain. The increased resistance to cisplatin observed in the ∆sky1 strain may be attributable to a decrease of apoptosis and an increase of mitophagy.

  14. Culture-Independent Analyses Reveal Novel Anaerolineaceae as Abundant Primary Fermenters in Anaerobic Digesters Treating Waste Activated Sludge

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    Simon J. McIlroy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion for biogas production is reliant on the tightly coupled synergistic activities of complex microbial consortia. Members of the uncultured A6 phylotype, within the phylum Chloroflexi, are among the most abundant genus-level-taxa of mesophilic anaerobic digester systems treating primary and surplus sludge from wastewater treatment plants, yet are known only by their 16S rRNA gene sequence. This study applied metagenomics to obtain a complete circular genome (2.57 Mbp from a representative of the A6 taxon. Preliminary annotation of the genome indicates these organisms to be anaerobic chemoorganoheterotrophs with a fermentative metabolism. Given their observed abundance, they are likely important primary fermenters in digester systems. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes designed in this study revealed their morphology to be short filaments present within the flocs. The A6 were sometimes co-located with the filamentous Archaea Methanosaeta spp. suggesting potential undetermined synergistic relationships. Based on its genome sequence and morphology we propose the species name Brevefilum fermentans gen. nov. sp. nov.

  15. Ancient DNA analyses reveal contrasting phylogeographic patterns amongst kiwi (Apteryx spp.) and a recently extinct lineage of spotted kiwi.

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    Shepherd, Lara D; Worthy, Trevor H; Tennyson, Alan J D; Scofield, R Paul; Ramstad, Kristina M; Lambert, David M

    2012-01-01

    The little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii) is a flightless ratite formerly found throughout New Zealand but now greatly reduced in distribution. Previous phylogeographic studies of the related brown kiwi (A. mantelli, A. rowi and A. australis), with which little spotted kiwi was once sympatric, revealed extremely high levels of genetic structuring, with mitochondrial DNA haplotypes often restricted to populations. We surveyed genetic variation throughout the present and pre-human range of little spotted kiwi by obtaining mitochondrial DNA sequences from contemporary and ancient samples. Little spotted kiwi and great spotted kiwi (A. haastii) formed a monophyletic clade sister to brown kiwi. Ancient samples of little spotted kiwi from the northern North Island, where it is now extinct, formed a lineage that was distinct from remaining little spotted kiwi and great spotted kiwi lineages, potentially indicating unrecognized taxonomic diversity. Overall, little spotted kiwi exhibited much lower levels of genetic diversity and structuring than brown kiwi, particularly through the South Island. Our results also indicate that little spotted kiwi (or at least hybrids involving this species) survived on the South Island mainland until more recently than previously thought.

  16. Cytogenetic analyses of Azadirachtin reveal absence of genotoxicity but marked antiproliferative effects in human lymphocytes and CHO cells in vitro.

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    Mosesso, Pasquale; Bohm, Lothar; Pepe, Gaetano; Fiore, Mario; Carpinelli, Alice; Gäde, Gerd; Nagini, Siddavaram; Ottavianelli, Alessandro; Degrassi, Francesca

    2012-09-18

    In this work we have examined the genotoxic potential of the bioinsecticide Azadirachtin A (AZA) and its influence on cell proliferation on human lymphocytes and Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cells. AZA genotoxicity was assessed by the analysis of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the absence and presence of rat liver S9 metabolism. Primary DNA damage was also investigated by means of the comet assay. The results obtained clearly indicate that AZA is not genotoxic in mammalian cells. On the other hand, AZA proved to interfere with cell cycle progression as shown by modulation of frequencies of first (M1) and second division (M2) metaphases detected by 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling. Accumulation of M1 metaphases were more pronounced in human lymphocytes. In the transformed CHO cell line, however, significant increases of multinucleated interphases and polyploid cells were observed at long treatment time. At higher dose-levels, the incidence of polyploidy was close to 100%. Identification of spindle structure and number of centrosomes by fluorescent immunostaining with α- and γ-tubulin antibodies revealed aberrant mitoses exhibiting multipolar spindles with several centrosomal signals. These findings suggest that AZA can act either through a stabilizing activity of microtubules or by inhibition of Aurora A, since both mechanisms are able to generate genetically unstable polyploid cells with multipolar spindles and multinucleated interphases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. RNA-Seq Analyses for Two Silkworm Strains Reveals Insight into Their Susceptibility and Resistance to Beauveria bassiana Infection.

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    Xing, Dongxu; Yang, Qiong; Jiang, Liang; Li, Qingrong; Xiao, Yang; Ye, Mingqiang; Xia, Qingyou

    2017-02-10

    The silkworm Bombyx mori is an economically important species. White muscardine caused by Beauveria bassiana is the main fungal disease in sericulture, and understanding the silkworm responses to B. bassiana infection is of particular interest. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying these responses in two silkworm strains Haoyue (HY, sensitive to B. bassiana) and Kang 8 (K8, resistant to B. bassiana) using an RNA-seq approach. For each strain, three biological replicates for immersion treatment, two replicates for injection treatment and three untreated controls were collected to generate 16 libraries for sequencing. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between treated samples and untreated controls, and between the two silkworm strains, were identified. DEGs and the enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of the two strains exhibited an obvious difference. Several genes encoding cuticle proteins, serine proteinase inhibitors (SPI) and antimicrobial peptides (AMP) and the drug metabolism pathway involved in toxin detoxification were considered to be related to the resistance of K8 to B. bassiana. These results revealed insight into the resistance and susceptibility of two silkworm strains against B. bassiana infection and provided a roadmap for silkworm molecular breeding to enhance its resistance to B. bassiana.

  18. Phylogenetic analyses of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria from the Baltic Sea reveal sequence anomalies in the phycocyanin operon.

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    Janson, Sven; Granéli, Edna

    2002-07-01

    The examination of molecular phylogenies of cyanobacteria and other micro-organisms is increasing dramatically. The use of a single locus in these studies leaves the resulting phylogenies unconfirmed. In this study, the partial sequences of two loci containing segments of protein-encoding genes, the hetR and the phycocyanin locus (PC-IGS), were examined. Laboratory strains and natural populations of the heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria Anabaena, Aphanizomenon and Nodularia from the Baltic Sea were used, in total 41 sequences were determined and their phylogenies were analysed with maximum-likelihood methods. The hetR phylogenies suggested that the planktonic Aphanizomenon and Nodularia each comprise one species, while there were numerous Anabaena species present in the Baltic Sea. In the case of Nodularia, the PC-IGS phylogenies were incongruent with this and suggested that several lineages of Nodularia plankton species existed. In the hetR phylogeny, the floating and nodularin-producing strains of Nodularia were grouped together. For both the hetR and PC-IGS loci of cultured species of Nodularia their molecular phylogeny did not correspond well with the affiliation suggested by morphology. In sequences derived from species of Anabaena and Aphanizomenon the PC-IGS and hetR phylogenies were congruent, suggesting that Aphanizomenon sp. from the Baltic Sea is genetically distinct from both Aphanizomenon flos-aquae from lakes and Aphanizomenon sp. TR183 from the Baltic Sea. In both Nodularia and Anabaena/Aphanizomenon, the PC-IGS sequences showed a significant degree of either recombination events or selection, while none was detected within the hetR sequences. This is the first study comprising the phylogenies of multiple loci from all heterocystous cyanobacteria from the Baltic Sea and shows that earlier results using the PC-IGS locus should be interpreted cautiously in the absence of a confirmation using a second locus.

  19. Deconvolution analyses with tent functions reveal delayed and long-sustained increases of BOLD signals with acupuncture stimulation.

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    Murase, Tomokazu; Umeda, Masahiro; Fukunaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    We used deconvolution analysis to examine temporal changes in brain activity after acupuncture stimulation and assess brain responses without expected reference functions. We also examined temporal changes in brain activity after sham acupuncture (noninsertive) and scrubbing stimulation. We divided 26 healthy right-handed adults into a group of 13 who received real acupuncture with manual manipulation and a group of 13 who received both tactical stimulations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sequences consisted of four 15-s stimulation blocks (ON) interspersed between one 30-s and four 45-s rest blocks (OFF) for a total scanning time of 270 s. We analyzed data by using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 (SPM8), MarsBaR, and Analysis of Functional NeuroImages (AFNI) software. For statistical analysis, we used 3dDeconvolve, part of the AFNI package, to extract the impulse response functions (IRFs) of the fMRI signals on a voxel-wise basis, and we tested the time courses of the extracted IRFs for the stimulations. We found stimulus-specific impulse responses of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in various brain regions. We observed significantly delayed and long-sustained increases of BOLD signals in several brain regions following real acupuncture compared to sham acupuncture and palm scrubbing, which we attribute to peripheral nocireceptors, flare responses, and processing of the central nervous system. Acupuncture stimulation induced continued activity that was stronger than activity after the other stimulations. We used tent function deconvolution to process fMRI data for acupuncture stimulation and found delayed increasing and delayed decreasing changes in BOLD signal in the somatosensory areas and areas related to pain perception. Deconvolution analyses with tent functions are expected to be useful in extracting complicated and associated brain activity that is delayed and sustained for a long period after various stimulations.

  20. RAPD and internal transcribed spacer sequence analyses reveal Zea nicaraguensis as a section Luxuriantes species close to Zea luxurians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Lu, Yanli; Zheng, Mingmin; Rong, Tingzhao; Tang, Qilin

    2011-04-15

    Genetic relationship of a newly discovered teosinte from Nicaragua, Zea nicaraguensis with waterlogging tolerance, was determined based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA using 14 accessions from Zea species. RAPD analysis showed that a total of 5,303 fragments were produced by 136 random decamer primers, of which 84.86% bands were polymorphic. RAPD-based UPGMA analysis demonstrated that the genus Zea can be divided into section Luxuriantes including Zea diploperennis, Zea luxurians, Zea perennis and Zea nicaraguensis, and section Zea including Zea mays ssp. mexicana, Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, Zea mays ssp. huehuetenangensis and Zea mays ssp. mays. ITS sequence analysis showed the lengths of the entire ITS region of the 14 taxa in Zea varied from 597 to 605 bp. The average GC content was 67.8%. In addition to the insertion/deletions, 78 variable sites were recorded in the total ITS region with 47 in ITS1, 5 in 5.8S, and 26 in ITS2. Sequences of these taxa were analyzed with neighbor-joining (NJ) and maximum parsimony (MP) methods to construct the phylogenetic trees, selecting Tripsacum dactyloides L. as the outgroup. The phylogenetic relationships of Zea species inferred from the ITS sequences are highly concordant with the RAPD evidence that resolved two major subgenus clades. Both RAPD and ITS sequence analyses indicate that Zea nicaraguensis is more closely related to Zea luxurians than the other teosintes and cultivated maize, which should be regarded as a section Luxuriantes species.

  1. RAPD and internal transcribed spacer sequence analyses reveal Zea nicaraguensis as a section Luxuriantes species close to Zea luxurians.

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    Pei Wang

    Full Text Available Genetic relationship of a newly discovered teosinte from Nicaragua, Zea nicaraguensis with waterlogging tolerance, was determined based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA using 14 accessions from Zea species. RAPD analysis showed that a total of 5,303 fragments were produced by 136 random decamer primers, of which 84.86% bands were polymorphic. RAPD-based UPGMA analysis demonstrated that the genus Zea can be divided into section Luxuriantes including Zea diploperennis, Zea luxurians, Zea perennis and Zea nicaraguensis, and section Zea including Zea mays ssp. mexicana, Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, Zea mays ssp. huehuetenangensis and Zea mays ssp. mays. ITS sequence analysis showed the lengths of the entire ITS region of the 14 taxa in Zea varied from 597 to 605 bp. The average GC content was 67.8%. In addition to the insertion/deletions, 78 variable sites were recorded in the total ITS region with 47 in ITS1, 5 in 5.8S, and 26 in ITS2. Sequences of these taxa were analyzed with neighbor-joining (NJ and maximum parsimony (MP methods to construct the phylogenetic trees, selecting Tripsacum dactyloides L. as the outgroup. The phylogenetic relationships of Zea species inferred from the ITS sequences are highly concordant with the RAPD evidence that resolved two major subgenus clades. Both RAPD and ITS sequence analyses indicate that Zea nicaraguensis is more closely related to Zea luxurians than the other teosintes and cultivated maize, which should be regarded as a section Luxuriantes species.

  2. A systematic review of cost-effectiveness analyses of complex wound interventions reveals optimal treatments for specific wound types.

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    Tricco, Andrea C; Cogo, Elise; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Khan, Paul A; Sanmugalingham, Geetha; Antony, Jesmin; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Straus, Sharon E

    2015-04-22

    Complex wounds present a substantial economic burden on healthcare systems, costing billions of dollars annually in North America alone. The prevalence of complex wounds is a significant patient and societal healthcare concern and cost-effective wound care management remains unclear. This article summarizes the cost-effectiveness of interventions for complex wound care through a systematic review of the evidence base. We searched multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library) for cost-effectiveness studies that examined adults treated for complex wounds. Two reviewers independently screened the literature, abstracted data from full-text articles, and assessed methodological quality using the Drummond 10-item methodological quality tool. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were reported, or, if not reported, calculated and converted to United States Dollars for the year 2013. Overall, 59 cost-effectiveness analyses were included; 71% (42 out of 59) of the included studies scored 8 or more points on the Drummond 10-item checklist tool. Based on these, 22 interventions were found to be more effective and less costly (i.e., dominant) compared to the study comparators: 9 for diabetic ulcers, 8 for venous ulcers, 3 for pressure ulcers, 1 for mixed venous and venous/arterial ulcers, and 1 for mixed complex wound types. Our results can be used by decision-makers in maximizing the deployment of clinically effective and resource efficient wound care interventions. Our analysis also highlights specific treatments that are not cost-effective, thereby indicating areas of resource savings. Please see related article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-015-0288-5.

  3. Analytical pyrolysis and stable isotope analyses reveal past environmental changes in coralloid speleothems from Easter Island (Chile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ana Z; De la Rosa, José M; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T; Pereira, Manuel F C; González-Pérez, José A; Calaforra, José M; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2016-08-26

    This study comprises an innovative approach based on the combination of chromatography (analytical pyrolysis and pyrolysis compound-specific isotope analysis (Py-CSIA)), light stable isotopes, microscopy and mineralogy analyses to characterize the internal layering of coralloid speleothems from the Ana Heva lava tube in Easter Island (Chile). This multidisciplinary proxy showed that the speleothems consist of banded siliceous materials of low crystallinity with different mineralogical compositions and a significant contribution of organic carbon. Opal-A constitutes the outermost grey layer of the coralloids, whereas calcite and amorphous Mg hydrate silicate are the major components of the inner whitish and honey-brown layers, respectively. The differences found in the mineralogical, elemental, molecular and isotopic composition of these distinct coloured layers are related to environmental changes during speleothem development. Stable isotopes and analytical pyrolysis suggested alterations in the water regime, pointing to wetter conditions during the formation of the Ca-rich layer and a possible increase in the amount of water dripping into the cave. The trend observed for δ(15)N values suggested an increase in the average temperature over time, which is consistent with the so-called climate warming during the Holocene. The pyrolysis compound-specific isotope analysis of each speleothem layer showed a similar trend with the bulk δ(13)C values pointing to the appropriateness of direct Py-CSIA in paleoenvironmental studies. The δ(13)C values for n-alkanes reinforced the occurrence of a drastic environmental change, indicating that the outermost Opal layer was developed under drier and more arid environmental conditions.

  4. Integrative genomics analyses reveal molecularly distinct subgroups of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with 13q14 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Laura; Fabris, Sonia; Lionetti, Marta; Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Morabito, Fortunato; Cutrona, Giovanna; Andronache, Adrian; Matis, Serena; Ferrari, Francesco; Gentile, Massimo; Spriano, Mauro; Callea, Vincenzo; Festini, Gianluca; Molica, Stefano; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi; Bicciato, Silvio; Ferrarini, Manlio; Neri, Antonino

    2010-12-01

    Chromosome 13q14 deletion occurs in a substantial number of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and it is believed to play a pathogenetic role. The exact mechanisms involved in this lesion have not yet been fully elucidated because of its heterogeneity and the imprecise knowledge of the implicated genes. This study was addressed to further contribute to the molecular definition of this lesion in CLL. We applied single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-array technology and gene expression profiling data to investigate the 13q14 deletion occurring in a panel of 100 untreated, early-stage (Binet A) patients representative of the major genetics, molecular, and biological features of the disease. Concordantly with FISH analysis, SNP arrays identified 44 patients with del(13)(q14) including 11 cases with a biallelic deletion. The shorter monoallelic deletion was 635-kb long. The loss of the miR-15a/16-1 cluster occurred in all del(13)(q14) cases except in 2 patients with a monoallelic deletion, who retained both copies. MiR-15a/16 expression was significantly downregulated only in patients with the biallelic loss of the miRNA cluster compared to 13q normal cases. Finally, the natural grouping of SNP profiles by nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm showed that patients could be classified into 2 separate clusters, mainly characterized by short/biallelic versus wide/monoallelic 13q14 deletions. Supervised analyses of expression data showed that specific transcriptional profiles are correlated with these 2 genomic subgroups. Overall, our data highlight the presence of 2 distinct molecular types of 13q14 deletions, which may be of clinical relevance in CLL. ©2010 AACR.

  5. The functional potential of high Arctic permafrost revealed by metagenomic sequencing, qPCR and microarray analyses.

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    Yergeau, Etienne; Hogues, Hervé; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The fate of the carbon stocked in permafrost following global warming and permafrost thaw is of major concern in view of the potential for increased CH(4) and CO(2) emissions from these soils. Complex carbon compound degradation and greenhouse gas emissions are due to soil microbial communities, but no comprehensive study has yet addressed their composition and functional potential in permafrost. Here, a 2-m deep permafrost sample and its overlying active layer soil were subjected to metagenomic sequencing, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and microarray analyses. The active layer soil and the 2-m permafrost microbial community structures were very similar, with Actinobacteria being the dominant phylum. The two samples also possessed a highly similar spectrum of functional genes, especially when compared with other already published metagenomes. Key genes related to methane generation, methane oxidation and organic matter degradation were highly diverse for both samples in the metagenomic libraries and some (for example, pmoA) showed relatively high abundance in qPCR assays. Genes related to nitrogen fixation and ammonia oxidation, which could have important roles following climatic change in these nitrogen-limited environments, showed low diversity but high abundance. The 2-m permafrost showed lower abundance and diversity for all the assessed genes and taxa. Experimental biases were also evaluated using qPCR and showed that the whole-community genome amplification technique used caused representational biases in the metagenomic libraries by increasing the abundance of Bacteroidetes and decreasing the abundance of Actinobacteria. This study describes for the first time the detailed functional potential of permafrost-affected soils.

  6. Correlation analyses revealed global microRNA-mRNA expression associations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Zhu, Jiang; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Xie, Fang-Fei; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Qiu, Ying-Hua; Lin, Xiang; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Neng-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2017-09-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate gene expression through binding to complementary sites in the 3'-untranslated regions of target mRNAs, which will lead to existence of correlation in expression between miRNA and mRNA. However, the miRNA-mRNA correlation patterns are complex and remain largely unclear yet. To establish the global correlation patterns in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), multiple miRNA-mRNA correlation analyses and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis were conducted in this study. We predicted and achieved 861 miRNA-mRNA pairs (65 miRNAs, 412 mRNAs) using multiple bioinformatics programs, and found global negative miRNA-mRNA correlations in PBMC from all 46 study subjects. Among the 861 pairs of correlations, 19.5% were significant (P correlation network was complex and highlighted key miRNAs/genes in PBMC. Some miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-148a, regulate a cluster of target genes. Some genes, e.g., TNRC6A, are regulated by multiple miRNAs. The identified genes tend to be enriched in molecular functions of DNA and RNA binding, and biological processes such as protein transport, regulation of translation and chromatin modification. The results provided a global view of the miRNA-mRNA expression correlation profile in human PBMCs, which would facilitate in-depth investigation of biological functions of key miRNAs/mRNAs and better understanding of the pathogenesis underlying PBMC-related diseases.

  7. Multiple correlation analyses revealed complex relationship between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

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    Xie, Fang-Fei; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Hong; Wu, Jian; Guo, Yu-Fan; Zeng, Ke-Qin; Wang, Ming-Jun; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Wang, Lan; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2017-07-22

    DNA methylation is an important regulator on the mRNA expression. However, a genome-wide correlation pattern between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is largely unknown. The comprehensive relationship between mRNA and DNA methylation was explored by using four types of correlation analyses and a genome-wide methylation-mRNA expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in PBMCs in 46 unrelated female subjects. An enrichment analysis was performed to detect biological function for the detected genes. Single pair correlation coefficient (r T1) between methylation level and mRNA is moderate (-0.63-0.62) in intensity, and the negative and positive correlations are nearly equal in quantity. Correlation analysis on each gene (T4) found 60.1% genes showed correlations between mRNA and gene-based methylation at P correlation (R T4 > 0.8). Methylation sites have regulation effects on mRNA expression in eQTL analysis, with more often observations in region of transcription start site (TSS). The genes under significant methylation regulation both in correlation analysis and eQTL analysis tend to cluster to the categories (e.g., transcription, translation, regulation of transcription) that are essential for maintaining the basic life activities of cells. Our findings indicated that DNA methylation has predictive regulation effect on mRNA with a very complex pattern in PBMCs. The results increased our understanding on correlation of methylation and mRNA and also provided useful clues for future epigenetic studies in exploring biological and disease-related regulatory mechanisms in PBMC.

  8. Structural analyses of covalent enzyme-substrate analog complexes reveal strengths and limitations of de novo enzyme design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Althoff, Eric A; Bolduc, Jill; Jiang, Lin; Moody, James; Lassila, Jonathan K; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald; Stoddard, Barry; Baker, David

    2012-01-20

    We report the cocrystal structures of a computationally designed and experimentally optimized retro-aldol enzyme with covalently bound substrate analogs. The structure with a covalently bound mechanism-based inhibitor is similar to, but not identical with, the design model, with an RMSD of 1.4 Å over active-site residues and equivalent substrate atoms. As in the design model, the binding pocket orients the substrate through hydrophobic interactions with the naphthyl moiety such that the oxygen atoms analogous to the carbinolamine and β-hydroxyl oxygens are positioned near a network of bound waters. However, there are differences between the design model and the structure: the orientation of the naphthyl group and the conformation of the catalytic lysine are slightly different; the bound water network appears to be more extensive; and the bound substrate analog exhibits more conformational heterogeneity than typical native enzyme-inhibitor complexes. Alanine scanning of the active-site residues shows that both the catalytic lysine and the residues around the binding pocket for the substrate naphthyl group make critical contributions to catalysis. Mutating the set of water-coordinating residues also significantly reduces catalytic activity. The crystal structure of the enzyme with a smaller substrate analog that lacks naphthyl ring shows the catalytic lysine to be more flexible than in the naphthyl-substrate complex; increased preorganization of the active site would likely improve catalysis. The covalently bound complex structures and mutagenesis data highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the de novo enzyme design strategy.

  9. Fathead minnow steroidogenesis: in silico analyses reveals tradeoffs between nominal target efficacy and robustness to cross-talk

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    Villeneuve Daniel L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpreting proteomic and genomic data is a major challenge in predictive ecotoxicology that can be addressed by a systems biology approach. Mathematical modeling provides an organizational platform to consolidate protein dynamics with possible genomic regulation. Here, a model of ovarian steroidogenesis in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, (FHM is developed to evaluate possible transcriptional regulation of steroid production observed in microarray studies. Results The model was developed from literature sources, integrating key signaling components (G-protein and PKA activation with their ensuing effect on steroid production. The model properly predicted trajectory behavior of estradiol and testosterone when fish were exposed to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, but failed to predict the steroid hormone behavior occurring one week post-exposure as well as the increase in steroid levels when the stressor was removed. In vivo microarray data implicated three modes of regulation which may account for over-production of steroids during a depuration phase (when the stressor is removed: P450 enzyme up-regulation, inhibin down-regulation, and luteinizing hormone receptor up-regulation. Simulation studies and sensitivity analysis were used to evaluate each case as possible source of compensation to endocrine stress. Conclusions Simulation studies of the testosterone and estradiol response to regulation observed in microarray data supported the hypothesis that the FHM steroidogenesis network compensated for endocrine stress by modulating the sensitivity of the ovarian network to global cues coming from the hypothalamus and pituitary. Model predictions of luteinizing hormone receptor regulation were consistent with depuration and in vitro data. These results challenge the traditional approach to network elucidation in systems biology. Generally, the most sensitive interactions in a network are targeted for further

  10. Integrated transcriptional profiling and genomic analyses reveal RPN2 and HMGB1 as promising biomarkers in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialing; Yan, Bin; Späth, Stephan Stanislaw; Qun, Hu; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Guan, Daogang; Shao, Jiaofang; Hagiwara, Koichi; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong; Su, Xiulan; Bi, Yongyi

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease that is associated with a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Among all CRC stages, stage II tumors are highly heterogeneous with a high relapse rate in about 20-25 % of stage II CRC patients following surgery. Thus, a comprehensive analysis of gene signatures to identify aggressive and metastatic phenotypes in stage II CRC is desired for a more accurate disease classification and outcome prediction. By utilizing a Cancer Array, containing 440 oncogenes and tumor suppressors to profile mRNA expression, we identified a larger number of differentially expressed genes in poorly differentiated stage II colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues, compared to their matched normal tissues. Ontology and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that these genes are involved in functional mechanisms associated with several transcription factors. Genomic alterations of these genes were also investigated through The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, utilizing 195 published CRC specimens. The percentage of genomic alterations in these genes was ranked based on their mRNA expression, copy number variations and mutations. This data was further combined with published microarray studies from a large set of CRC tumors classified based on prognostic features. This led to the identification of eight candidate genes including RPN2, HMGB1, AARS, IGFBP3, STAT1, HYOU1, NQO1 and PEA15 that were associated with the progressive phenotype. In particular, RPN2 and HMGB1 displayed a higher genomic alteration frequency in CRC, compared to eight other major solid cancers. Immunohistochemistry was performed on additional 78 stage I-IV CRC samples, where RPN2 protein immunostaining exhibited a significant association with stage III/IV tumors, distant metastasis, and poor differentiation, indicating that RPN2 expression is associated with poor prognosis. Further, our study revealed significant transcriptional regulatory

  11. Pathway Network Analyses for Autism Reveal Multisystem Involvement, Major Overlaps with Other Diseases and Convergence upon MAPK and Calcium Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ya; Alshikho, Mohamad J; Herbert, Martha R

    2016-01-01

    We used established databases in standard ways to systematically characterize gene ontologies, pathways and functional linkages in the large set of genes now associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). These conditions are particularly challenging--they lack clear pathognomonic biological markers, they involve great heterogeneity across multiple levels (genes, systemic biological and brain characteristics, and nuances of behavioral manifestations)-and yet everyone with this diagnosis meets the same defining behavioral criteria. Using the human gene list from Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) we performed gene set enrichment analysis with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway Database, and then derived a pathway network from pathway-pathway functional interactions again in reference to KEGG. Through identifying the GO (Gene Ontology) groups in which SFARI genes were enriched, mapping the coherence between pathways and GO groups, and ranking the relative strengths of representation of pathway network components, we 1) identified 10 disease-associated and 30 function-associated pathways 2) revealed calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction as the most enriched, statistically significant pathways from the enrichment analysis, 3) showed calcium signaling pathways and MAPK signaling pathway to be interactive hubs with other pathways and also to be involved with pervasively present biological processes, 4) found convergent indications that the process "calcium-PRC (protein kinase C)-Ras-Raf-MAPK/ERK" is likely a major contributor to ASD pathophysiology, and 5) noted that perturbations associated with KEGG's category of environmental information processing were common. These findings support the idea that ASD-associated genes may contribute not only to core features of ASD themselves but also to vulnerability to other chronic and systemic problems potentially including cancer, metabolic conditions

  12. Bacterial Communities in Women with Bacterial Vaginosis: High Resolution Phylogenetic Analyses Reveal Relationships of Microbiota to Clinical Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Hoffman, Noah G.; Morgan, Martin T.; Matsen, Frederick A.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Hall, Robert W.; Ross, Frederick J.; McCoy, Connor O.; Bumgarner, Roger; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fredricks, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common condition that is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes and is characterized by poorly understood changes in the vaginal microbiota. We sought to describe the composition and diversity of the vaginal bacterial biota in women with BV using deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene coupled with species-level taxonomic identification. We investigated the associations between the presence of individual bacterial species and clinical diagnostic characteristics of BV. Methodology/Principal Findings Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR and pyrosequencing were performed on vaginal swabs from 220 women with and without BV. BV was assessed by Amsel’s clinical criteria and confirmed by Gram stain. Taxonomic classification was performed using phylogenetic placement tools that assigned 99% of query sequence reads to the species level. Women with BV had heterogeneous vaginal bacterial communities that were usually not dominated by a single taxon. In the absence of BV, vaginal bacterial communities were dominated by either Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus iners. Leptotrichia amnionii and Eggerthella sp. were the only two BV-associated bacteria (BVABs) significantly associated with each of the four Amsel’s criteria. Co-occurrence analysis revealed the presence of several sub-groups of BVABs suggesting metabolic co-dependencies. Greater abundance of several BVABs was observed in Black women without BV. Conclusions/Significance The human vaginal bacterial biota is heterogeneous and marked by greater species richness and diversity in women with BV; no species is universally present. Different bacterial species have different associations with the four clinical criteria, which may account for discrepancies often observed between Amsel and Nugent (Gram stain) diagnostic criteria. Several BVABs exhibited race-dependent prevalence when analyzed in separate groups by BV status which may contribute to increased incidence of BV in

  13. Inverse relationship between chitobiase and transglycosylation activities of chitinase-D from Serratia proteamaculans revealed by mutational and biophysical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuprakash, Jogi; Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.; Singh, Tej Pal; Swamy, Musti J.; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans chitinase-D (SpChiD) has a unique combination of hydrolytic and transglycosylation (TG) activities. The TG activity of SpChiD can be used for large-scale production of chito-oligosaccharides (CHOS). The multiple activities (hydrolytic and/or chitobiase activities and TG) of SpChiD appear to be strongly influenced by the substrate-binding cleft. Here, we report the unique property of SpChiD substrate-binding cleft, wherein, the residues Tyr28, Val35 and Thr36 control chitobiase activity and the residues Trp160 and Trp290 are crucial for TG activity. Mutants with reduced (V35G and T36G/F) or no (SpChiDΔ30–42 and Y28A) chitobiase activity produced higher amounts of the quantifiable even-chain TG product with degree of polymerization (DP)-6, indicating that the chitobiase and TG activities are inversely related. In addition to its unprecedented catalytic properties, unlike other chitinases, the single modular SpChiD showed dual unfolding transitions. Ligand-induced thermal stability studies with the catalytically inactive mutant of SpChiD (E153A) showed that the transition temperature increased upon binding of CHOS with DP2–6. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed the exceptionally high binding affinities for E153A to CHOS with DP2–6. These observations strongly support that the architecture of SpChiD substrate-binding cleft adopted to control chitobiase and TG activities, in addition to usual chitinase-mediated hydrolysis. PMID:26493546

  14. Comparative analyses of six solanaceous transcriptomes reveal a high degree of sequence conservation and species-specific transcripts

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    Ouyang Shu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Solanaceae is a family of closely related species with diverse phenotypes that have been exploited for agronomic purposes. Previous studies involving a small number of genes suggested sequence conservation across the Solanaceae. The availability of large collections of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs for the Solanaceae now provides the opportunity to assess sequence conservation and divergence on a genomic scale. Results All available ESTs and Expressed Transcripts (ETs, 449,224 sequences for six Solanaceae species (potato, tomato, pepper, petunia, tobacco and Nicotiana benthamiana, were clustered and assembled into gene indices. Examination of gene ontologies revealed that the transcripts within the gene indices encode a similar suite of biological processes. Although the ESTs and ETs were derived from a variety of tissues, 55–81% of the sequences had significant similarity at the nucleotide level with sequences among the six species. Putative orthologs could be identified for 28–58% of the sequences. This high degree of sequence conservation was supported by expression profiling using heterologous hybridizations to potato cDNA arrays that showed similar expression patterns in mature leaves for all six solanaceous species. 16–19% of the transcripts within the six Solanaceae gene indices did not have matches among Solanaceae, Arabidopsis, rice or 21 other plant gene indices. Conclusion Results from this genome scale analysis confirmed a high level of sequence conservation at the nucleotide level of the coding sequence among Solanaceae. Additionally, the results indicated that part of the Solanaceae transcriptome is likely to be unique for each species.

  15. Benzaldehyde is a precursor of phenylpropylamino alkaloids as revealed by targeted metabolic profiling and comparative biochemical analyses in Ephedra spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizevski, Raz; Bar, Einat; Shalit, O R; Levy, Asaf; Hagel, Jillian M; Kilpatrick, Korey; Marsolais, Frédéric; Facchini, Peter J; Ben-Shabat, Shimon; Sitrit, Yaron; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2012-09-01

    Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are phenylpropylamino alkaloids widely used in modern medicine. Some Ephedra species such as E. sinica Stapf (Ephedraceae), a widely used Chinese medicinal plant (Chinese name: Ma Huang), accumulate ephedrine alkaloids as active constituents. Other Ephedra species, such as E. foeminea Forssk. (syn. E. campylopoda C.A. Mey) lack ephedrine alkaloids and their postulated metabolic precursors 1-phenylpropane-1,2-dione and (S)-cathinone. Solid-phase microextraction analysis of freshly picked young E. sinica and E. foeminea stems revealed the presence of increased benzaldehyde levels in E. foeminea, whereas 1-phenylpropane-1,2-dione was detected only in E. sinica. Soluble protein preparations from E. sinica and E. foeminea stems catalyzed the conversion of benzaldehyde and pyruvate to (R)-phenylacetylcarbinol, (S)-phenylacetylcarbinol, (R)-2-hydroxypropiophenone (S)-2-hydroxypropiophenone and 1-phenylpropane-1,2-dione. The activity, termed benzaldehyde carboxyligase (BCL) required the presence of magnesium and thiamine pyrophosphate and was 40 times higher in E. sinica as compared to E. foeminea. The distribution patterns of BCL activity in E. sinica tissues correlates well with the distribution pattern of the ephedrine alkaloids. (S)-Cathinone reductase enzymatic activities generating (1R,2S)-norephedrine and (1S,1R)-norephedrine were significantly higher in E. sinica relative to the levels displayed by E. foeminea. Surprisingly, (1R,2S)-norephedrine N-methyltransferase activity which is a downstream enzyme in ephedrine biosynthesis was significantly higher in E. foeminea than in E. sinica. Our studies further support that benzaldehyde is the metabolic precursor to phenylpropylamino alkaloids in E. sinica.

  16. Integration of deep transcriptome and proteome analyses reveals the components of alkaloid metabolism in opium poppy cell cultures

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    Schriemer David C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papaver somniferum (opium poppy is the source for several pharmaceutical benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including morphine, the codeine and sanguinarine. In response to treatment with a fungal elicitor, the biosynthesis and accumulation of sanguinarine is induced along with other plant defense responses in opium poppy cell cultures. The transcriptional induction of alkaloid metabolism in cultured cells provides an opportunity to identify components of this process via the integration of deep transcriptome and proteome databases generated using next-generation technologies. Results A cDNA library was prepared for opium poppy cell cultures treated with a fungal elicitor for 10 h. Using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing, 427,369 expressed sequence tags (ESTs with an average length of 462 bp were generated. Assembly of these sequences yielded 93,723 unigenes, of which 23,753 were assigned Gene Ontology annotations. Transcripts encoding all known sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes were identified in the EST database, 5 of which were represented among the 50 most abundant transcripts. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS of total protein extracts from cell cultures treated with a fungal elicitor for 50 h facilitated the identification of 1,004 proteins. Proteins were fractionated by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and digested with trypsin prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Query of an opium poppy-specific EST database substantially enhanced peptide identification. Eight out of 10 known sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes and many relevant primary metabolic enzymes were represented in the peptide database. Conclusions The integration of deep transcriptome and proteome analyses provides an effective platform to catalogue the components of secondary metabolism, and to identify genes encoding uncharacterized enzymes. The establishment of corresponding transcript and protein databases generated by next-generation technologies in a

  17. Comparative analyses of vertebrate posterior HoxD clusters reveal atypical cluster architecture in the caecilian Typhlonectes natans

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    Amemiya Chris T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posterior genes of the HoxD cluster play a crucial role in the patterning of the tetrapod limb. This region is under the control of a global, long-range enhancer that is present in all vertebrates. Variation in limb types, as is the case in amphibians, can probably not only be attributed to variation in Hox genes, but is likely to be the product of differences in gene regulation. With a collection of vertebrate genome sequences available today, we used a comparative genomics approach to study the posterior HoxD cluster of amphibians. A frog and a caecilian were included in the study to compare coding sequences as well as to determine the gain and loss of putative regulatory sequences. Results We sequenced the posterior end of the HoxD cluster of a caecilian and performed comparative analyses of this region using HoxD clusters of other vertebrates. We determined the presence of conserved non-coding sequences and traced gains and losses of these footprints during vertebrate evolution, with particular focus on amphibians. We found that the caecilian HoxD cluster is almost three times larger than its mammalian counterpart. This enlargement is accompanied with the loss of one gene and the accumulation of repeats in that area. A similar phenomenon was observed in the coelacanth, where a different gene was lost and expansion of the area where the gene was lost has occurred. At least one phylogenetic footprint present in all vertebrates was lost in amphibians. This conserved region is a known regulatory element and functions as a boundary element in neural tissue to prevent expression of Hoxd genes. Conclusion The posterior part of the HoxD cluster of Typhlonectes natans is among the largest known today. The loss of Hoxd-12 and the expansion of the intergenic region may exert an influence on the limb enhancer, by having to bypass a distance seven times that of regular HoxD clusters. Whether or not there is a correlation with the

  18. Comparative Genomic, MicroRNA, and Tissue Analyses Reveal Subtle Differences between Non-Diabetic and Diabetic Foot Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Horacio A; Liang, Liang; Pastar, Irena; Rosa, Ashley M; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Zwick, Thomas G; Kirsner, Robert S; Maione, Anna G; Garlick, Jonathan A; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a chronic, severe disease rapidly increasing in incidence and prevalence and is associated with numerous complications. Patients with DM are at high risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) that often lead to lower limb amputations, long term disability, and a shortened lifespan. Despite this, the effects of DM on human foot skin biology are largely unknown. Thus, the focus of this study was to determine whether DM changes foot skin biology predisposing it for healing impairment and development of DFU. Foot skin samples were collected from 20 patients receiving corrective foot surgery and, using a combination of multiple molecular and cellular approaches, we performed comparative analyses of non-ulcerated non-neuropathic diabetic foot skin (DFS) and healthy non-diabetic foot skin (NFS). MicroRNA (miR) profiling of laser captured epidermis and primary dermal fibroblasts from both DFS and NFS samples identified 5 miRs de-regulated in the epidermis of DFS though none reached statistical significance. MiR-31-5p and miR-31-3p were most profoundly induced. Although none were significantly regulated in diabetic fibroblasts, miR-29c-3p showed a trend of up-regulation, which was confirmed by qPCR in a prospective set of 20 skin samples. Gene expression profiling of full thickness biopsies identified 36 de-regulated genes in DFS (>2 fold-change, unadjusted p-value ≤ 0.05). Of this group, three out of seven tested genes were confirmed by qPCR: SERPINB3 was up-regulated whereas OR2A4 and LGR5 were down-regulated in DFS. However no morphological differences in histology, collagen deposition, and number of blood vessels or lymphocytes were found. No difference in proliferative capacity was observed by quantification of Ki67 positive cells in epidermis. These findings suggest DM causes only subtle changes to foot skin. Since morphology, mRNA and miR levels were not affected in a major way, additional factors, such as neuropathy, vascular

  19. Comparative Genomic, MicroRNA, and Tissue Analyses Reveal Subtle Differences between Non-Diabetic and Diabetic Foot Skin.

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    Horacio A Ramirez

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a chronic, severe disease rapidly increasing in incidence and prevalence and is associated with numerous complications. Patients with DM are at high risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFU that often lead to lower limb amputations, long term disability, and a shortened lifespan. Despite this, the effects of DM on human foot skin biology are largely unknown. Thus, the focus of this study was to determine whether DM changes foot skin biology predisposing it for healing impairment and development of DFU. Foot skin samples were collected from 20 patients receiving corrective foot surgery and, using a combination of multiple molecular and cellular approaches, we performed comparative analyses of non-ulcerated non-neuropathic diabetic foot skin (DFS and healthy non-diabetic foot skin (NFS. MicroRNA (miR profiling of laser captured epidermis and primary dermal fibroblasts from both DFS and NFS samples identified 5 miRs de-regulated in the epidermis of DFS though none reached statistical significance. MiR-31-5p and miR-31-3p were most profoundly induced. Although none were significantly regulated in diabetic fibroblasts, miR-29c-3p showed a trend of up-regulation, which was confirmed by qPCR in a prospective set of 20 skin samples. Gene expression profiling of full thickness biopsies identified 36 de-regulated genes in DFS (>2 fold-change, unadjusted p-value ≤ 0.05. Of this group, three out of seven tested genes were confirmed by qPCR: SERPINB3 was up-regulated whereas OR2A4 and LGR5 were down-regulated in DFS. However no morphological differences in histology, collagen deposition, and number of blood vessels or lymphocytes were found. No difference in proliferative capacity was observed by quantification of Ki67 positive cells in epidermis. These findings suggest DM causes only subtle changes to foot skin. Since morphology, mRNA and miR levels were not affected in a major way, additional factors, such as neuropathy

  20. Small and ugly? Phylogenetic analyses of the "selfing syndrome" reveal complex evolutionary fates of monomorphic primrose flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Jurriaan M; Wüest, Rafael O; Conti, Elena

    2014-04-01

    One of the most common trends in plant evolution, loss of self-incompatibility and ensuing increases in selfing, is generally assumed to be associated with a suite of phenotypic changes, notably a reduction of floral size, termed the selfing syndrome. We investigate whether floral morphological traits indeed decrease in a deterministic fashion after losses of self-incompatibility, as traditionally expected, using a phylogeny of 124 primrose species containing nine independent transitions from heterostyly (heteromorphic incompatibility) to homostyly (monomorphic self-compatibility), a classic system for evolution of selfing. We find similar overall variability of homostylous and heterostylous species, except for diminished herkogamy in homostyles. Bayesian mixed models demonstrate differences between homostylous and heterostylous species in all traits, but net effects across species are small (except herkogamy) and directionality differs among traits. Strongly drift-like evolutionary trajectories of corolla tube length and corolla diameter inferred by Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models contrast with expected deterministic trajectories toward small floral size. Lineage-specific population genetic effects associated with evolution of selfing may explain that reductions of floral size represent one of several possible outcomes of floral evolution after loss of heterostyly in primroses. Contrary to the traditional paradigm, selfing syndromes may, but do not necessarily evolve in response to increased selfing.

  1. Multiple independent analyses reveal only transcription factors as an enriched functional class associated with microRNAs

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    Croft Larry

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs have long been known to be principally activators of transcription in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The growing awareness of the ubiquity of microRNAs (miRNAs as suppressive regulators in eukaryotes, suggests the possibility of a mutual, preferential, self-regulatory connectivity between miRNAs and TFs. Here we investigate the connectivity from TFs and miRNAs to other genes and each other using text mining, TF promoter binding site and 6 different miRNA binding site prediction methods. Results In the first approach text mining of PubMed abstracts reveal statistically significant associations between miRNAs and both TFs and signal transduction gene classes. Secondly, prediction of miRNA targets in human and mouse 3’UTRs show enrichment only for TFs but not consistently across prediction methods for signal transduction or other gene classes. Furthermore, a random sample of 986 TarBase entries was scored for experimental evidence by manual inspection of the original papers, and enrichment for TFs was observed to increase with score. Low-scoring TarBase entries, where experimental evidence is anticorrelated miRNA:mRNA expression with predicted miRNA targets, appear not to select for real miRNA targets to any degree. Our manually validated text-mining results also suggests that miRNAs may be activated by more TFs than other classes of genes, as 7% of miRNA:TF co-occurrences in the literature were TFs activating miRNAs. This was confirmed when thirdly, we found enrichment for predicted, conserved TF binding sites in miRNA and TF genes compared to other gene classes. Conclusions We see enrichment of connections between miRNAs and TFs using several independent methods, suggestive of a network of mutual activating and suppressive regulation. We have also built regulatory networks (containing 2- and 3-loop motifs for mouse and human using predicted miRNA and TF binding sites and we have developed a web server

  2. Genome-wide analyses reveal lineage specific contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of Listeria monocytogenes

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    Sun Qi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Listeria includes two closely related pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. L. monocytogenes is an opportunistic human foodborne and animal pathogen that includes two common lineages. While lineage I is more commonly found among human listeriosis cases, lineage II appears to be overrepresented among isolates from foods and environmental sources. This study used the genome sequences for one L. innocua strain and four L. monocytogenes strains representing lineages I and II, to characterize the contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of the L. innocua/L. monocytogenes core genome. Results Among the 2267 genes in the L. monocytogenes/L. innocua core genome, 1097 genes showed evidence for recombination and 36 genes showed evidence for positive selection. Positive selection was strongly associated with recombination. Specifically, 29 of the 36 genes under positive selection also showed evidence for recombination. Recombination was more common among isolates in lineage II than lineage I; this trend was confirmed by sequencing five genes in a larger isolate set. Positive selection was more abundant in the ancestral branch of lineage II (20 genes as compared to the ancestral branch of lineage I (9 genes. Additional genes under positive selection were identified in the branch separating the two species; for this branch, genes in the role category "Cell wall and membrane biogenesis" were significantly more likely to have evidence for positive selection. Positive selection of three genes was confirmed in a larger isolate set, which also revealed occurrence of multiple premature stop codons in one positively selected gene involved in flagellar motility (flaR. Conclusion While recombination and positive selection both contribute to evolution of L. monocytogenes, the relative contributions of these evolutionary forces seem to differ by L. monocytogenes lineages and

  3. "Contrasting patterns of selection at Pinus pinaster Ait. Drought stress candidate genes as revealed by genetic differentiation analyses".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveno, Emmanuelle; Collada, Carmen; Guevara, M Angeles; Léger, Valérie; Soto, Alvaro; Díaz, Luis; Léger, Patrick; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Cervera, M Teresa; Plomion, Christophe; Garnier-Géré, Pauline H

    2008-02-01

    The importance of natural selection for shaping adaptive trait differentiation among natural populations of allogamous tree species has long been recognized. Determining the molecular basis of local adaptation remains largely unresolved, and the respective roles of selection and demography in shaping population structure are actively debated. Using a multilocus scan that aims to detect outliers from simulated neutral expectations, we analyzed patterns of nucleotide diversity and genetic differentiation at 11 polymorphic candidate genes for drought stress tolerance in phenotypically contrasted Pinus pinaster Ait. populations across its geographical range. We compared 3 coalescent-based methods: 2 frequentist-like, including 1 approach specifically developed for biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) here and 1 Bayesian. Five genes showed outlier patterns that were robust across methods at the haplotype level for 2 of them. Two genes presented higher F(ST) values than expected (PR-AGP4 and erd3), suggesting that they could have been affected by the action of diversifying selection among populations. In contrast, 3 genes presented lower F(ST) values than expected (dhn-1, dhn2, and lp3-1), which could represent signatures of homogenizing selection among populations. A smaller proportion of outliers were detected at the SNP level suggesting the potential functional significance of particular combinations of sites in drought-response candidate genes. The Bayesian method appeared robust to low sample sizes, flexible to assumptions regarding migration rates, and powerful for detecting selection at the haplotype level, but the frequentist-like method adapted to SNPs was more efficient for the identification of outlier SNPs showing low differentiation. Population-specific effects estimated in the Bayesian method also revealed populations with lower immigration rates, which could have led to favorable situations for local adaptation. Outlier patterns are discussed

  4. Multivariate and Cladistic Analyses of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Oliver; Wings, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Remains of theropod dinosaurs are very rare in Northern Germany because the area was repeatedly submerged by a shallow epicontinental sea during the Mesozoic. Here, 80 Late Jurassic theropod teeth are described of which the majority were collected over decades from marine carbonates in nowadays abandoned and backfilled quarries of the 19th century. Eighteen different morphotypes (A-R) could be distinguished and 3D models based on micro-CT scans of the best examples of all morphotypes are included as supplements. The teeth were identified with the assistance of discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis based on updated datamatrices. The results show that a large variety of theropod groups were present in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany. Identified specimens comprise basal Tyrannosauroidea, as well as Allosauroidea, Megalosauroidea cf. Marshosaurus, Megalosauridae cf. Torvosaurus and probably Ceratosauria. The formerly reported presence of Dromaeosauridae in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany could not be confirmed. Some teeth of this study resemble specimens described as pertaining to Carcharodontosauria (morphotype A) and Abelisauridae (morphotype K). This interpretation is however, not supported by discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis. Two smaller morphotypes (N and Q) differ only in some probably size-related characteristics from larger morphotypes (B and C) and could well represent juveniles of adult specimens. The similarity of the northern German theropods with groups from contemporaneous localities suggests faunal exchange via land-connections in the Late Jurassic between Germany, Portugal and North America.

  5. Multivariate and Cladistic Analyses of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Oliver; Wings, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Remains of theropod dinosaurs are very rare in Northern Germany because the area was repeatedly submerged by a shallow epicontinental sea during the Mesozoic. Here, 80 Late Jurassic theropod teeth are described of which the majority were collected over decades from marine carbonates in nowadays abandoned and backfilled quarries of the 19th century. Eighteen different morphotypes (A—R) could be distinguished and 3D models based on micro-CT scans of the best examples of all morphotypes are included as supplements. The teeth were identified with the assistance of discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis based on updated datamatrices. The results show that a large variety of theropod groups were present in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany. Identified specimens comprise basal Tyrannosauroidea, as well as Allosauroidea, Megalosauroidea cf. Marshosaurus, Megalosauridae cf. Torvosaurus and probably Ceratosauria. The formerly reported presence of Dromaeosauridae in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany could not be confirmed. Some teeth of this study resemble specimens described as pertaining to Carcharodontosauria (morphotype A) and Abelisauridae (morphotype K). This interpretation is however, not supported by discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis. Two smaller morphotypes (N and Q) differ only in some probably size-related characteristics from larger morphotypes (B and C) and could well represent juveniles of adult specimens. The similarity of the northern German theropods with groups from contemporaneous localities suggests faunal exchange via land-connections in the Late Jurassic between Germany, Portugal and North America. PMID:27383054

  6. Multivariate and Cladistic Analyses of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Gerke

    Full Text Available Remains of theropod dinosaurs are very rare in Northern Germany because the area was repeatedly submerged by a shallow epicontinental sea during the Mesozoic. Here, 80 Late Jurassic theropod teeth are described of which the majority were collected over decades from marine carbonates in nowadays abandoned and backfilled quarries of the 19th century. Eighteen different morphotypes (A-R could be distinguished and 3D models based on micro-CT scans of the best examples of all morphotypes are included as supplements. The teeth were identified with the assistance of discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis based on updated datamatrices. The results show that a large variety of theropod groups were present in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany. Identified specimens comprise basal Tyrannosauroidea, as well as Allosauroidea, Megalosauroidea cf. Marshosaurus, Megalosauridae cf. Torvosaurus and probably Ceratosauria. The formerly reported presence of Dromaeosauridae in the Late Jurassic of northern Germany could not be confirmed. Some teeth of this study resemble specimens described as pertaining to Carcharodontosauria (morphotype A and Abelisauridae (morphotype K. This interpretation is however, not supported by discriminant function analysis and cladistic analysis. Two smaller morphotypes (N and Q differ only in some probably size-related characteristics from larger morphotypes (B and C and could well represent juveniles of adult specimens. The similarity of the northern German theropods with groups from contemporaneous localities suggests faunal exchange via land-connections in the Late Jurassic between Germany, Portugal and North America.

  7. Genomic Analyses of Sperm Fate Regulator Targets Reveal a Common Set of Oogenic mRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Daniel C; Aoki, Scott T; Ortiz, Marco A; Kim, Kyung Won; Verheyden, Jamie M; Kimble, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell specification as sperm or oocyte is an ancient cell fate decision, but its molecular regulation is poorly understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the FOG-1 and FOG-3 proteins behave genetically as terminal regulators of sperm fate specification. Both are homologous to well-established RNA regulators, suggesting that FOG-1 and FOG-3 specify the sperm fate post-transcriptionally. We predicted that FOG-1 and FOG-3, as terminal regulators of the sperm fate, might regulate a battery of gamete-specific differentiation genes. Here we test that prediction by exploring on a genomic scale the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) associated with FOG-1 and FOG-3. Immunoprecipitation of the proteins and their associated mRNAs from spermatogenic germlines identifies 81 FOG-1 and 722 FOG-3 putative targets. Importantly, almost all FOG-1 targets are also FOG-3 targets, and these common targets are strongly biased for oogenic mRNAs. The discovery of common target mRNAs suggested that FOG-1 and FOG-3 work together. Consistent with that idea, we find that FOG-1 and FOG-3 proteins co-immunoprecipitate from both intact nematodes and mammalian tissue culture cells and that they colocalize in germ cells. Taking our results together, we propose a model in which FOG-1 and FOG-3 work in a complex to repress oogenic transcripts and thereby promote the sperm fate.

  8. An improved lake model for climate simulations: Model structure, evaluation, and sensitivity analyses in CESM1

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    Zachary Subin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lakes can influence regional climate, yet most general circulation models have, at best, simple and largely untested representations of lakes. We developed the Lake, Ice, Snow, and Sediment Simulator(LISSS for inclusion in the land-surface component (CLM4 of an earth system model (CESM1. The existing CLM4 lake modelperformed poorly at all sites tested; for temperate lakes, summer surface water temperature predictions were 10–25uC lower than observations. CLM4-LISSS modifies the existing model by including (1 a treatment of snow; (2 freezing, melting, and ice physics; (3 a sediment thermal submodel; (4 spatially variable prescribed lakedepth; (5 improved parameterizations of lake surface properties; (6 increased mixing under ice and in deep lakes; and (7 correction of previous errors. We evaluated the lake model predictions of water temperature and surface fluxes at three small temperate and boreal lakes where extensive observational data was available. We alsoevaluated the predicted water temperature and/or ice and snow thicknesses for ten other lakes where less comprehensive forcing observations were available. CLM4-LISSS performed very well compared to observations for shallow to medium-depth small lakes. For large, deep lakes, the under-prediction of mixing was improved by increasing the lake eddy diffusivity by a factor of 10, consistent with previouspublished analyses. Surface temperature and surface flux predictions were improved when the aerodynamic roughness lengths were calculated as a function of friction velocity, rather than using a constant value of 1 mm or greater. We evaluated the sensitivity of surface energy fluxes to modeled lake processes and parameters. Largechanges in monthly-averaged surface fluxes (up to 30 W m22 were found when excluding snow insulation or phase change physics and when varying the opacity, depth, albedo of melting lake ice, and mixing strength across ranges commonly found in real lakes. Typical

  9. A modified Lee-Carter model for analysing short-base-period data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bojuan Barbara

    2012-03-01

    This paper introduces a new modified Lee-Carter model for analysing short-base-period mortality data, for which the original Lee-Carter model produces severely fluctuating predicted age-specific mortality. Approximating the unknown parameters in the modified model by linearized cubic splines and other additive functions, the model can be simplified into a logistic regression when fitted to binomial data. The expected death rate estimated from the modified model is smooth, not only over ages but also over years. The analysis of mortality data in China (2000-08) demonstrates the advantages of the new model over existing models.

  10. The unique architecture and function of cellulose-interacting proteins in oomycetes revealed by genomic and structural analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larroque Mathieu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oomycetes are fungal-like microorganisms evolutionary distinct from true fungi, belonging to the Stramenopile lineage and comprising major plant pathogens. Both oomycetes and fungi express proteins able to interact with cellulose, a major component of plant and oomycete cell walls, through the presence of carbohydrate-binding module belonging to the family 1 (CBM1. Fungal CBM1-containing proteins were implicated in cellulose degradation whereas in oomycetes, the Cellulose Binding Elicitor Lectin (CBEL, a well-characterized CBM1-protein from Phytophthora parasitica, was implicated in cell wall integrity, adhesion to cellulosic substrates and induction of plant immunity. Results To extend our knowledge on CBM1-containing proteins in oomycetes, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis on 60 fungi and 7 oomycetes genomes leading to the identification of 518 CBM1-containing proteins. In plant-interacting microorganisms, the larger number of CBM1-protein coding genes is expressed by necrotroph and hemibiotrophic pathogens, whereas a strong reduction of these genes is observed in symbionts and biotrophs. In fungi, more than 70% of CBM1-containing proteins correspond to enzymatic proteins in which CBM1 is associated with a catalytic unit involved in cellulose degradation. In oomycetes more than 90% of proteins are similar to CBEL in which CBM1 is associated with a non-catalytic PAN/Apple domain, known to interact with specific carbohydrates or proteins. Distinct Stramenopile genomes like diatoms and brown algae are devoid of CBM1 coding genes. A CBM1-PAN/Apple association 3D structural modeling was built allowing the identification of amino acid residues interacting with cellulose and suggesting the putative interaction of the PAN/Apple domain with another type of glucan. By Surface Plasmon Resonance experiments, we showed that CBEL binds to glycoproteins through galactose or N-acetyl-galactosamine motifs. Conclusions This study

  11. Transcriptome-based network analysis reveals a spectrum model of human macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jia; Schmidt, Susanne V; Sander, Jil; Draffehn, Astrid; Krebs, Wolfgang; Quester, Inga; De Nardo, Dominic; Gohel, Trupti D; Emde, Martina; Schmidleithner, Lisa; Ganesan, Hariharasudan; Nino-Castro, Andrea; Mallmann, Michael R; Labzin, Larisa; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Latz, Eicke; Freeman, Tom C; Ulas, Thomas; Schultze, Joachim L

    2014-02-20

    Macrophage activation is associated with profound transcriptional reprogramming. Although much progress has been made in the understanding of macrophage activation, polarization, and function, the transcriptional programs regulating these processes remain poorly characterized. We stimulated human macrophages with diverse activation signals, acquiring a data set of 299 macrophage transcriptomes. Analysis of this data set revealed a spectrum of macrophage activation states extending the current M1 versus M2-polarization model. Network analyses identified central transcriptional regulators associated with all macrophage activation complemented by regulators related to stimulus-specific programs. Applying these transcriptional programs to human alveolar macrophages from smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) revealed an unexpected loss of inflammatory signatures in COPD patients. Finally, by integrating murine data from the ImmGen project we propose a refined, activation-independent core signature for human and murine macrophages. This resource serves as a framework for future research into regulation of macrophage activation in health and disease.

  12. Comparison of linear measurements and analyses taken from plaster models and three-dimensional images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Betina Grehs; Porto, Thiago Soares; Silva, Monica Barros; Grehs, Renésio Armindo; Pinto, Ary dos Santos; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins

    2014-11-01

    Digital models are an alternative for carrying out analyses and devising treatment plans in orthodontics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and the reproducibility of measurements of tooth sizes, interdental distances and analyses of occlusion using plaster models and their digital images. Thirty pairs of plaster models were chosen at random, and the digital images of each plaster model were obtained using a laser scanner (3Shape R-700, 3Shape A/S). With the plaster models, the measurements were taken using a caliper (Mitutoyo Digimatic(®), Mitutoyo (UK) Ltd) and the MicroScribe (MS) 3DX (Immersion, San Jose, Calif). For the digital images, the measurement tools used were those from the O3d software (Widialabs, Brazil). The data obtained were compared statistically using the Dahlberg formula, analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p plaster models using the caliper and from the digital models using O3d software were identical.

  13. Three-dimensional lake water quality modeling: sensitivity and uncertainty analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaghi, Shahram; Hondzo, Miki; Melching, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Two sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methods are applied to a three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic-ecological model (ELCOM-CAEDYM) of a morphologically complex lake. The primary goals of the analyses are to increase confidence in the model predictions, identify influential model parameters, quantify the uncertainty of model prediction, and explore the spatial and temporal variabilities of model predictions. The influence of model parameters on four model-predicted variables (model output) and the contributions of each of the model-predicted variables to the total variations in model output are presented. The contributions of predicted water temperature, dissolved oxygen, total phosphorus, and algal biomass contributed 3, 13, 26, and 58% of total model output variance, respectively. The fraction of variance resulting from model parameter uncertainty was calculated by two methods and used for evaluation and ranking of the most influential model parameters. Nine out of the top 10 parameters identified by each method agreed, but their ranks were different. Spatial and temporal changes of model uncertainty were investigated and visualized. Model uncertainty appeared to be concentrated around specific water depths and dates that corresponded to significant storm events. The results suggest that spatial and temporal variations in the predicted water quality variables are sensitive to the hydrodynamics of physical perturbations such as those caused by stream inflows generated by storm events. The sensitivity and uncertainty analyses identified the mineralization of dissolved organic carbon, sediment phosphorus release rate, algal metabolic loss rate, internal phosphorus concentration, and phosphorus uptake rate as the most influential model parameters.

  14. Processes models, environmental analyses, and cognitive architectures: quo vadis quantum probability theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marewski, Julian N; Hoffrage, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    A lot of research in cognition and decision making suffers from a lack of formalism. The quantum probability program could help to improve this situation, but we wonder whether it would provide even more added value if its presumed focus on outcome models were complemented by process models that are, ideally, informed by ecological analyses and integrated into cognitive architectures.

  15. Genetic Analyses and Simulations of Larval Dispersal Reveal Distinct Populations and Directional Connectivity across the Range of the Hawaiian Grouper (Epinephelus quernus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malia Ana J. Rivera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of ecological and genetic data to study patterns of biological connectivity can aid in ecosystem-based management. Here we investigated connectivity of the Hawaiian grouper Epinephelus quernus, a species of management concern within the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI, by comparing genetic analyses with simulated larval dispersal patterns across the species range in the Hawaiian Archipelago and Johnston Atoll. Larval simulations revealed higher dispersal from the MHI to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI than in the opposite direction and evidence for a dispersal corridor between Johnston and the middle of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Genetic analyses using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region sequences and microsatellites revealed relatively high connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago, with the exception of genetically distinct populations and higher mtDNA diversity in the mid-Archipelago. These analyses support the preservation of the mid-archipelago as a source of genetic diversity and a region of connectivity with locations outside the Hawaiian Archipelago. Additionally, our evidence for directional dispersal away from the MHI lends caution to any management decisions that would rely on the NWHI replenishing depleted MHI stocks.

  16. Analyses and simulations in income frame regulation model for the network sector from 2007; Analyser og simuleringer i inntektsrammereguleringsmodellen for nettbransjen fra 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askeland, Thomas Haave; Fjellstad, Bjoern

    2007-07-01

    Analyses of the income frame regulation model for the network sector in Norway, introduced 1.st of January 2007. The model's treatment of the norm cost is evaluated, especially the effect analyses carried out by a so called Data Envelopment Analysis model. It is argued that there may exist an age lopsidedness in the data set, and that this should and can be corrected in the effect analyses. The adjustment is proposed corrected for by introducing an age parameter in the data set. Analyses of how the calibration effects in the regulation model affect the business' total income frame, as well as each network company's income frame have been made. It is argued that the calibration, the way it is presented, is not working according to its intention, and should be adjusted in order to provide the sector with the rate of reference in return (ml)

  17. USE OF THE SIMPLE LINEAR REGRESSION MODEL IN MACRO-ECONOMICAL ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin ANGHELACHE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the fundamental aspects of the linear regression, as a toolbox which can be used in macroeconomic analyses. The article describes the estimation of the parameters, the statistical tests used, the homoscesasticity and heteroskedasticity. The use of econometrics instrument in macroeconomics is an important factor that guarantees the quality of the models, analyses, results and possible interpretation that can be drawn at this level.

  18. Sensitivity analyses of spatial population viability analysis models for species at risk and habitat conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naujokaitis-Lewis, Ilona R; Curtis, Janelle M R; Arcese, Peter; Rosenfeld, Jordan

    2009-02-01

    Population viability analysis (PVA) is an effective framework for modeling species- and habitat-recovery efforts, but uncertainty in parameter estimates and model structure can lead to unreliable predictions. Integrating complex and often uncertain information into spatial PVA models requires that comprehensive sensitivity analyses be applied to explore the influence of spatial and nonspatial parameters on model predictions. We reviewed 87 analyses of spatial demographic PVA models of plants and animals to identify common approaches to sensitivity analysis in recent publications. In contrast to best practices recommended in the broader modeling community, sensitivity analyses of spatial PVAs were typically ad hoc, inconsistent, and difficult to compare. Most studies applied local approaches to sensitivity analyses, but few varied multiple parameters simultaneously. A lack of standards for sensitivity analysis and reporting in spatial PVAs has the potential to compromise the ability to learn collectively from PVA results, accurately interpret results in cases where model relationships include nonlinearities and interactions, prioritize monitoring and management actions, and ensure conservation-planning decisions are robust to uncertainties in spatial and nonspatial parameters. Our review underscores the need to develop tools for global sensitivity analysis and apply these to spatial PVA.

  19. A novel substance flow analysis model for analysing multi-year phosphorus flow at the regional scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rubel Biswas; Moore, Graham A; Weatherley, Anthony J; Arora, Meenakshi

    2016-12-01

    Achieving sustainable management of phosphorus (P) is crucial for both global food security and global environmental protection. In order to formulate informed policy measures to overcome existing barriers of achieving sustainable P management, there is need for a sound understanding of the nature and magnitude of P flow through various systems at different geographical and temporal scales. So far, there is a limited understanding on the nature and magnitude of P flow over multiple years at the regional scale. In this study, we have developed a novel substance flow analysis (SFA) model in the MATLAB/Simulink® software platform that can be effectively utilized to analyse the nature and magnitude of multi-year P flow at the regional scale. The model is inclusive of all P flows and storage relating to all key systems, subsystems, processes or components, and the associated interactions of P flow required to represent a typical P flow system at the regional scale. In an annual time step, this model can analyse P flow and storage over as many as years required at a time, and therefore, can indicate the trends and changes in P flow and storage over many years, which is not offered by the existing regional scale SFA models of P. The model is flexible enough to allow any modification or the inclusion of any degree of complexity, and therefore, can be utilized for analysing P flow in any region around the world. The application of the model in the case of Gippsland region, Australia has revealed that the model generates essential information about the nature and magnitude of P flow at the regional scale which can be utilized for making improved management decisions towards attaining P sustainability. A systematic reliability check on the findings of model application also indicates that the model produces reliable results.

  20. Design evaluation and optimisation in crossover pharmacokinetic studies analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bazzoli, Caroline; Mentré, France

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Bioequivalence or interaction trials are commonly studied in crossover design and can be analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models as an alternative to noncompartmental approach. We propose an extension of the population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effects models to design crossover pharmacokinetic trials, using a linearisation of the model around the random effect expectation, including within-subject variability and discrete covariates fixed or chan...

  1. Analysing outsourcing policies in an asset management context: a six-stage model

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenmaker, R.; Verlaan, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Asset managers of civil infrastructure are increasingly outsourcing their maintenance. Whereas maintenance is a cyclic process, decisions to outsource decisions are often project-based, and confusing the discussion on the degree of outsourcing. This paper presents a six-stage model that facilitates the top-down discussion for analysing the degree of outsourcing maintenance. The model is based on the cyclic nature of maintenance. The six-stage model can: (1) give clear statements about the pre...

  2. Geographical variation of sporadic Legionnaires' disease analysed in a grid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbeck, M.; Jepsen, Martin Rudbeck; Sonne, I.B.;

    2010-01-01

    clusters. Four cells had excess incidence in all three time periods. The analysis in 25 different grid positions indicated a low risk of overlooking cells with excess incidence in a random grid. The coefficient of variation ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 independent of the threshold. By application of a random......The aim was to analyse variation in incidence of sporadic Legionnaires' disease in a geographical information system in three time periods (1990-2005) by the application of a grid model and to assess the model's validity by analysing variation according to grid position. Coordinates...

  3. X-ray CT analyses, models and numerical simulations: a comparison with petrophysical analyses in an experimental CO2 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Steven; Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Reitenbach, Viktor; Albrecht, Daniel; Ganzer, Leonhard; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    An essential part of the collaborative research project H2STORE (hydrogen to store), which is funded by the German government, was a comparison of various analytical methods for characterizing reservoir sandstones from different stratigraphic units. In this context Permian, Triassic and Tertiary reservoir sandstones were analysed. Rock core materials, provided by RWE Gasspeicher GmbH (Dortmund, Germany), GDF Suez E&P Deutschland GmbH (Lingen, Germany), E.ON Gas Storage GmbH (Essen, Germany) and RAG Rohöl-Aufsuchungs Aktiengesellschaft (Vienna, Austria), were processed by different laboratory techniques; thin sections were prepared, rock fragments were crushed and cubes of 1 cm edge length and plugs 3 to 5 cm in length with a diameter of about 2.5 cm were sawn from macroscopic homogeneous cores. With this prepared sample material, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, coupled with image analyses, specific surface area measurements (after Brunauer, Emmet and Teller, 1938; BET), He-porosity and N2-permeability measurements and high-resolution microcomputer tomography (μ-CT), which were used for numerical simulations, were applied. All these methods were practised on most of the same sample material, before and on selected Permian sandstones also after static CO2 experiments under reservoir conditions. A major concern in comparing the results of these methods is an appraisal of the reliability of the given porosity, permeability and mineral-specific reactive (inner) surface area data. The CO2 experiments modified the petrophysical as well as the mineralogical/geochemical rock properties. These changes are detectable by all applied analytical methods. Nevertheless, a major outcome of the high-resolution μ-CT analyses and following numerical data simulations was that quite similar data sets and data interpretations were maintained by the different petrophysical standard methods. Moreover, the μ-CT analyses are not only time saving, but also non

  4. Complete genomic sequence analyses of the first group A giraffe rotavirus reveals close evolutionary relationship with rotaviruses infecting other members of the Artiodactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Helen; Mulherin, Emily; Matthijnssens, Jelle; McCusker, Matthew P; Collins, P J; Cashman, Olivia; Gunn, Lynda; Beltman, Marijke E; Fanning, Séamus

    2014-05-14

    Group A Rotaviruses (RVA) have been established as significant contributory agents of acute gastroenteritis in young children and many animal species. In 2008, we described the first RVA strain detected in a giraffe calf (RVA/Giraffe-wt/IRL/GirRV/2008/G10P[11]), presenting with acute diarrhoea. Molecular characterisation of the VP7 and VP4 genes revealed the bovine-like genotypes G10 and P[11], respectively. To further investigate the origin of this giraffe RVA strain, the 9 remaining gene segments were sequenced and analysed, revealing the following genotype constellation: G10-P[11]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. This genotype constellation is very similar to RVA strains isolated from cattle or other members of the artiodactyls. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the close relationship between GirRV and RVA strains with a bovine-like genotype constellation detected from several host species, including humans. These results suggest that RVA strain GirRV was the result of an interspecies transmission from a bovine host to the giraffe calf. However, we cannot rule out completely that this bovine-like RVA genotype constellation may be enzootic in giraffes. Future RVA surveillance in giraffes may answer this intriguing question.

  5. Gene expression profiling and phenotype analyses of S. cerevisiae in response to changing copper reveals six genes with new roles in copper and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm; Strengman, Eric; Wijmenga, Cisca; Holstege, Frank C P

    2005-08-11

    Exhaustive microarray time course analyses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during copper starvation and copper excess reveal new aspects of metal-induced gene regulation. Aside from identifying targets of established copper- and iron-responsive transcription factors, we find that genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are downregulated and that copper-independent iron transport genes are preferentially upregulated, both during prolonged copper deprivation. The experiments also suggest the presence of a small regulatory iron pool that links copper and iron responses. One hundred twenty-eight genes with putative roles in metal metabolism were further investigated by several systematic phenotype screens. Of the novel phenotypes uncovered, hsp12-Delta and arn1-Delta display increased sensitivity to copper, cyc1-Delta and crr1-Delta show resistance to high copper, vma13-Delta exhibits increased sensitivity to iron deprivation, and pep12-Delta results in reduced growth in high copper and low iron. Besides revealing new components of eukaryotic metal trafficking pathways, the results underscore the previously determined intimate links between iron and copper metabolism and mitochondrial and vacuolar function in metal trafficking. The analyses further suggest that copper starvation can specifically lead to downregulation of respiratory function to preserve iron and copper for other cellular processes.

  6. Gene set based integrated data analysis reveals phenotypic differences in a brain cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Petersen

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the data analysis of biological high-throughput experiments is to handle the often low number of samples in the experiments compared to the number of biomolecules that are simultaneously measured. Combining experimental data using independent technologies to illuminate the same biological trends, as well as complementing each other in a larger perspective, is one natural way to overcome this challenge. In this work we investigated if integrating proteomics and transcriptomics data from a brain cancer animal model using gene set based analysis methodology, could enhance the biological interpretation of the data relative to more traditional analysis of the two datasets individually. The brain cancer model used is based on serial passaging of transplanted human brain tumor material (glioblastoma--GBM through several generations in rats. These serial transplantations lead over time to genotypic and phenotypic changes in the tumors and represent a medically relevant model with a rare access to samples and where consequent analyses of individual datasets have revealed relatively few significant findings on their own. We found that the integrated analysis both performed better in terms of significance measure of its findings compared to individual analyses, as well as providing independent verification of the individual results. Thus a better context for overall biological interpretation of the data can be achieved.

  7. RooStatsCms: a tool for analyses modelling, combination and statistical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piparo, D.; Schott, G.; Quast, G.

    2009-12-01

    The RooStatsCms (RSC) software framework allows analysis modelling and combination, statistical studies together with the access to sophisticated graphics routines for results visualisation. The goal of the project is to complement the existing analyses by means of their combination and accurate statistical studies.

  8. RooStatsCms: a tool for analyses modelling, combination and statistical studies

    CERN Document Server

    Piparo, D; Quast, Prof G

    2008-01-01

    The RooStatsCms (RSC) software framework allows analysis modelling and combination, statistical studies together with the access to sophisticated graphics routines for results visualisation. The goal of the project is to complement the existing analyses by means of their combination and accurate statistical studies.

  9. Combined Task and Physical Demands Analyses towards a Comprehensive Human Work Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    velocities, and accelerations over time for each postural sequence. Neck strain measures derived from biomechanical analyses of these postural...and whole missions. The result is a comprehensive model of tasks and associated physical demands from which one can estimate the accumulative neck ...Griffon Helicopter aircrew (Pilots and Flight Engineers) reported neck pain particularly when wearing Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) (Forde et al. , 2011

  10. Dutch AG-MEMOD model; A tool to analyse the agri-food sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van M.G.A.; Tabeau, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Agricultural policies in the European Union (EU) have a history of continuous reform. AG-MEMOD, acronym for Agricultural sector in the Member states and EU: econometric modelling for projections and analysis of EU policies on agriculture, forestry and the environment, provides a system for analysing

  11. Supply Chain Modeling for Fluorspar and Hydrofluoric Acid and Implications for Further Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    analysis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS supply chain , model, fluorspar, hydrofluoric acid, shortfall, substitution, Defense Logistics Agency, National Defense...unlimited. IDA Document D-5379 Log: H 15-000099 INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES 4850 Mark Center Drive Alexandria, Virginia 22311-1882 Supply Chain ...E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-5379 D. Sean Barnett Jerome Bracken Supply Chain Modeling for Fluorspar and Hydrofluoric Acid and

  12. Wavelet-based spatial comparison technique for analysing and evaluating two-dimensional geophysical model fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saux Picart

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex numerical models of the Earth's environment, based around 3-D or 4-D time and space domains are routinely used for applications including climate predictions, weather forecasts, fishery management and environmental impact assessments. Quantitatively assessing the ability of these models to accurately reproduce geographical patterns at a range of spatial and temporal scales has always been a difficult problem to address. However, this is crucial if we are to rely on these models for decision making. Satellite data are potentially the only observational dataset able to cover the large spatial domains analysed by many types of geophysical models. Consequently optical wavelength satellite data is beginning to be used to evaluate model hindcast fields of terrestrial and marine environments. However, these satellite data invariably contain regions of occluded or missing data due to clouds, further complicating or impacting on any comparisons with the model. A methodology has recently been developed to evaluate precipitation forecasts using radar observations. It allows model skill to be evaluated at a range of spatial scales and rain intensities. Here we extend the original method to allow its generic application to a range of continuous and discontinuous geophysical data fields, and therefore allowing its use with optical satellite data. This is achieved through two major improvements to the original method: (i all thresholds are determined based on the statistical distribution of the input data, so no a priori knowledge about the model fields being analysed is required and (ii occluded data can be analysed without impacting on the metric results. The method can be used to assess a model's ability to simulate geographical patterns over a range of spatial scales. We illustrate how the method provides a compact and concise way of visualising the degree of agreement between spatial features in two datasets. The application of the new method, its

  13. A Model for Integrating Fixed-, Random-, and Mixed-Effects Meta-Analyses into Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mike W.-L.

    2008-01-01

    Meta-analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM) are two important statistical methods in the behavioral, social, and medical sciences. They are generally treated as two unrelated topics in the literature. The present article proposes a model to integrate fixed-, random-, and mixed-effects meta-analyses into the SEM framework. By applying an…

  14. Stellar abundance analyses in the light of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Asplund, M

    2003-01-01

    I describe recent progress in terms of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres and 3D line formation and their applications to stellar abundance analyses of late-type stars. Such 3D studies remove the free parameters inherent in classical 1D investigations (mixing length parameters, macro- and microturbulence) yet are highly successful in reproducing a large arsenal of observational constraints such as detailed line shapes and asymmetries. Their potential for abundance analyses is illustrated by discussing the derived oxygen abundances in the Sun and in metal-poor stars, where they seem to resolve long-standing problems as well as significantly alter the inferred conclusions.

  15. WOMBAT: a tool for mixed model analyses in quantitative genetics by restricted maximum likelihood (REML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Karin

    2007-11-01

    WOMBAT is a software package for quantitative genetic analyses of continuous traits, fitting a linear, mixed model; estimates of covariance components and the resulting genetic parameters are obtained by restricted maximum likelihood. A wide range of models, comprising numerous traits, multiple fixed and random effects, selected genetic covariance structures, random regression models and reduced rank estimation are accommodated. WOMBAT employs up-to-date numerical and computational methods. Together with the use of efficient compilers, this generates fast executable programs, suitable for large scale analyses. Use of WOMBAT is illustrated for a bivariate analysis. The package consists of the executable program, available for LINUX and WINDOWS environments, manual and a set of worked example, and can be downloaded free of charge from (http://agbu. une.edu.au/~kmeyer/wombat.html).

  16. Application of an approximate vectorial diffraction model to analysing diffractive micro-optical elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Chun-Hui; Li Zhi-Yuan; Ye Jia-Sheng; Gu Ben-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Scalar diffraction theory, although simple and efficient, is too rough for analysing diffractive micro-optical elements.Rigorous vectorial diffraction theory requires extensive numerical efforts, and is not a convenient design tool. In this paper we employ a simple approximate vectorial diffraction model which combines the principle of the scalar diffraction theory with an approximate local field model to analyse the diffraction of optical waves by some typical two-dimensional diffractive micro-optical elements. The TE and TM polarization modes are both considered. We have found that the approximate vectorial diffraction model can agree much better with the rigorous electromagnetic simulation results than the scalar diffraction theory for these micro-optical elements.

  17. Analysing and combining atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by prescribed SST. Tropical response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, V. [Universite' de Provence, UFR des sciences geographiques et de l' amenagement, Aix-en-Provence (France); Navarra, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Ward, M. N. [University of Oklahoma, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman OK (United States); Foland, C. K. [Hadley Center for Climate Prediction and Research, Meteorological Office, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Friederichs, P. [Meteorologisches Institute des Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Maynard, K.; Polcher, J. [Paris Universite' Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France). Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris

    2001-08-01

    The ECHAM 3.2 (T21), ECHAM (T30) and LMD (version 6, grid-point resolution with 96 longitudes x 72 latitudes) atmospheric general circulation models were integrated through the period 1961 to 1993 forces with the same observed Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) as compiled at the Hadley Centre. Three runs were made for each model starting from different initial conditions. The large-scale tropical inter-annual variability is analysed to give a picture of a skill of each model and of some sort of combination of the three models. To analyse the similarity of model response averaged over the same key regions, several widely-used indices are calculated: Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), large-scale wind shear indices of the boreal summer monsoon in Asia and West Africa and rainfall indices for NE Brazil, Sahel and India. Even for the indices where internal noise is large, some years are consistent amongst all the runs, suggesting inter-annual variability of the strength of SST forcing. Averaging the ensemble mean of the three models (the super-ensemble mean) yields improved skill. When each run is weighted according to its skill, taking three runs from different models instead of three runs of the same model improves the mean skill. There is also some indication that one run of a given model could be better than another, suggesting that persistent anomalies could change its sensitivity to SST. The index approach lacks flexibility to assess whether a model's response to SST has been geographically displaced. It can focus on the first mode in the global tropics, found through singular value decomposition analysis, which is clearly related to El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in all seasons. The Observed-Model and Model-Model analyses lead to almost the same patterns, suggesting that the dominant pattern of model response is also the most skilful mode. Seasonal modulation of both skill and spatial patterns (both model and observed) clearly exists with highest skill

  18. Analysing, Interpreting, and Testing the Invariance of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareau, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although in recent years researchers have begun to utilize dyadic data analyses such as the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM, certain limitations to the applicability of these models still exist. Given the complexity of APIMs, most researchers will often use observed scores to estimate the model's parameters, which can significantly limit and underestimate statistical results. The aim of this article is to highlight the importance of conducting a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA of equivalent constructs between dyad members (i.e. measurement equivalence/invariance; ME/I. Different steps for merging CFA and APIM procedures will be detailed in order to shed light on new and integrative methods.

  19. Distinguishing Mediational Models and Analyses in Clinical Psychology: Atemporal Associations Do Not Imply Causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, E Samuel; Cervone, Daniel; Bryant, Jessica; McKinney, Cliff; Liu, Richard T; Nadorff, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    A popular way to attempt to discern causality in clinical psychology is through mediation analysis. However, mediation analysis is sometimes applied to research questions in clinical psychology when inferring causality is impossible. This practice may soon increase with new, readily available, and easy-to-use statistical advances. Thus, we here provide a heuristic to remind clinical psychological scientists of the assumptions of mediation analyses. We describe recent statistical advances and unpack assumptions of causality in mediation, underscoring the importance of time in understanding mediational hypotheses and analyses in clinical psychology. Example analyses demonstrate that statistical mediation can occur despite theoretical mediation being improbable. We propose a delineation of mediational effects derived from cross-sectional designs into the terms temporal and atemporal associations to emphasize time in conceptualizing process models in clinical psychology. The general implications for mediational hypotheses and the temporal frameworks from within which they may be drawn are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Whole-genome analyses reveals the animal origin of a rotavirus G4P[6] detected in a child with severe diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Magaly; Galeano, Maria E; Akopov, Asmik; Palacios, Ruth; Russomando, Graciela; Kirkness, Ewen F; Parra, Gabriel I

    2014-10-01

    Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Currently, two rotavirus vaccines are being used in vaccination programs, and one of the factors involved in lower vaccine efficacy is the mismatch among the circulating strains and the vaccine strains. Thus, the emergence of animal strains in the human population could affect the efficacy of vaccination programs. Here we report the presence of a G4P[6] strain in a Paraguayan child presenting acute gastroenteritis in 2009. Genomic analyses revealed that the strain presents a porcine-like genome (G4-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1), suggesting a direct animal-to-human transmission. Continuous surveillance of rotaviruses in humans and animals will help us to better understand rotavirus epidemiology and evolution.

  1. Iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana: transcriptomic analyses reveal novel FIT-regulated genes, iron deficiency marker genes and functional gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Hans-Jörg; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Bauer, Petra

    2016-10-03

    FIT (FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR) is the central regulator of iron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We performed transcriptome analyses of six day-old seedlings and roots of six week-old plants using wild type, a fit knock-out mutant and a FIT over-expression line grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. We compared genes regulated in a FIT-dependent manner depending on the developmental stage of the plants. We assembled a high likelihood dataset which we used to perform co-expression and functional analysis of the most stably iron deficiency-induced genes. 448 genes were found FIT-regulated. Out of these, 34 genes were robustly FIT-regulated in root and seedling samples and included 13 novel FIT-dependent genes. Three hundred thirty-one genes showed differential regulation in response to the presence and absence of FIT only in the root samples, while this was the case for 83 genes in the seedling samples. We assembled a virtual dataset of iron-regulated genes based on a total of 14 transcriptomic analyses of iron-deficient and iron-sufficient wild-type plants to pinpoint the best marker genes for iron deficiency and analyzed this dataset in depth. Co-expression analysis of this dataset revealed 13 distinct regulons part of which predominantly contained functionally related genes. We could enlarge the list of FIT-dependent genes and discriminate between genes that are robustly FIT-regulated in roots and seedlings or only in one of those. FIT-regulated genes were mostly induced, few of them were repressed by FIT. With the analysis of a virtual dataset we could filter out and pinpoint new candidates among the most reliable marker genes for iron deficiency. Moreover, co-expression and functional analysis of this virtual dataset revealed iron deficiency-induced and functionally distinct regulons.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three bats species and whole genome mitochondrial analyses reveal patterns of codon bias and lend support to a basal split in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meganathan, P R; Pagan, Heidi J T; McCulloch, Eve S; Stevens, Richard D; Ray, David A

    2012-01-15

    Order Chiroptera is a unique group of mammals whose members have attained self-powered flight as their main mode of locomotion. Much speculation persists regarding bat evolution; however, lack of sufficient molecular data hampers evolutionary and conservation studies. Of ~1200 species, complete mitochondrial genome sequences are available for only eleven. Additional sequences should be generated if we are to resolve many questions concerning these fascinating mammals. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of three bats: Corynorhinus rafinesquii, Lasiurus borealis and Artibeus lituratus. We also compare the currently available mitochondrial genomes and analyze codon usage in Chiroptera. C. rafinesquii, L. borealis and A. lituratus mitochondrial genomes are 16438 bp, 17048 bp and 16709 bp, respectively. Genome organization and gene arrangements are similar to other bats. Phylogenetic analyses using complete mitochondrial genome sequences support previously established phylogenetic relationships and suggest utility in future studies focusing on the evolutionary aspects of these species. Comprehensive analyses of available bat mitochondrial genomes reveal distinct nucleotide patterns and synonymous codon preferences corresponding to different chiropteran families. These patterns suggest that mutational and selection forces are acting to different extents within Chiroptera and shape their mitochondrial genomes.

  3. The genetic diversity of genus Bacillus and the related genera revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequences and ardra analyses isolated from geothermal regions of turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Coleri Cihan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously isolated 115 endospore-forming bacilli were basically grouped according to their temperature requirements for growth: the thermophiles (74%, the facultative thermophiles (14% and the mesophiles (12%. These isolates were taken into 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, and they were clustered among the 7 genera: Anoxybacillus, Aeribacillus, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Thermoactinomycetes. Of these bacilli, only the thirty two isolates belonging to genera Bacillus (16, Brevibacillus (13, Paenibacillus (1 and Thermoactinomycetes (2 were selected and presented in this paper. The comparative sequence analyses revealed that the similarity values were ranged as 91.4-100 %, 91.8- 99.2 %, 92.6- 99.8 % and 90.7 - 99.8 % between the isolates and the related type strains from these four genera, respectively. Twenty nine of them were found to be related with the validly published type strains. The most abundant species was B. thermoruber with 9 isolates followed by B. pumilus (6, B. lichenformis (3, B. subtilis (3, B. agri (3, B. smithii (2, T. vulgaris (2 and finally P. barengoltzii (1. In addition, isolates of A391a, B51a and D295 were proposed as novel species as their 16S rRNA gene sequences displayed similarities ≤ 97% to their closely related type strains. The AluI-, HaeIII- and TaqI-ARDRA results were in congruence with the 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The ARDRA results allowed us to differentiate these isolates, and their discriminative restriction fragments were able to be determined. Some of their phenotypic characters and their amylase, chitinase and protease production were also studied and biotechnologically valuable enzyme producing isolates were introduced in order to use in further studies.

  4. Deciphering the cryptic genome: genome-wide analyses of the rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi reveal complex regulation of secondary metabolism and novel metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Wiemann

    Full Text Available The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes "bakanae" disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs, but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium. Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi, suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene (PKS19 and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (NRPS31 are unique to F. fujikuroi. The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19-derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary

  5. Deciphering the Cryptic Genome: Genome-wide Analyses of the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi Reveal Complex Regulation of Secondary Metabolism and Novel Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studt, Lena; Niehaus, Eva-Maria; Espino, Jose J.; Huß, Kathleen; Michielse, Caroline B.; Albermann, Sabine; Wagner, Dominik; Bergner, Sonja V.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Fischer, Andreas; Reuter, Gunter; Kleigrewe, Karin; Bald, Till; Wingfield, Brenda D.; Ophir, Ron; Freeman, Stanley; Hippler, Michael; Smith, Kristina M.; Brown, Daren W.; Proctor, Robert H.; Münsterkötter, Martin; Freitag, Michael; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Güldener, Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes “bakanae” disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs), but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium. Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi, suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene (PKS19) and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (NRPS31) are unique to F. fujikuroi. The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19-derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary success of F

  6. Classification and regression tree (CART analyses of genomic signatures reveal sets of tetramers that discriminate temperature optima of archaea and bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsey Dexter Dyer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification and regression tree (CART analysis was applied to genome-wide tetranucleotide frequencies (genomic signatures of 195 archaea and bacteria. Although genomic signatures have typically been used to classify evolutionary divergence, in this study, convergent evolution was the focus. Temperature optima for most of the organisms examined could be distinguished by CART analyses of tetranucleotide frequencies. This suggests that pervasive (nonlinear qualities of genomes may reflect certain environmental conditions (such as temperature in which those genomes evolved. The predominant use of GAGA and AGGA as the discriminating tetramers in CART models suggests that purine-loading and codon biases of thermophiles may explain some of the results.

  7. Insights into the evolution of tectonically-active glaciated mountain ranges from digital elevation model analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, S. H.; Whipple, K. X.

    2003-12-01

    Glaciers have played an important role in the development of most active mountain ranges around the world during the Quaternary, but the interaction between glacial erosion (as modulated by climate change) and tectonic processes is poorly understood. The so-called glacial buzzsaw hypothesis (Brozovic et al., 1997) proposes that glaciers can incise as rapidly as the most rapid rock uplift rates, such that glaciated landscapes experiencing different rock uplift rates but the same snowline elevation will look essentially the same, with mean elevations close to the snowline. Digital elevation model-based analyses of the glaciated landscapes of the Nanga Parbat region, Pakistan, and the Southern Alps, New Zealand, lend some support to this hypothesis, but also reveal considerably more variety to the landscapes of glaciated, tectonically-active mountain ranges. Larger glaciers in the Nanga Parbat region maintain a low downvalley gradient and valley floor elevations close to the snowline, even in the face of extremely rapid rock uplift. However, smaller glaciers steepen in response to rapid uplift, similar to the response of rivers. A strong correlation between the height of hillslopes rising from the cirque floors and rock uplift rates implies that erosion processes on hillslopes cannot initially keep up with more rapid glacial incision rates. It is these staggering hillslopes that permit mountain peaks to rise above 8000m. The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis does not describe the evolution of the Southern Alps as well, because here mean elevations rise in areas of more rapid rock uplift. The buzzsaw hypothesis may work well in the Nanga Parbat region because the zone of rapid rock uplift is structurally confined to a narrow region. Alternatively, the Southern Alps may not have been rising sufficiently rapidly or sufficiently long for the glacial buzzsaw to be imposed outside the most rapidly uplifting region, around Mount Cook. The challenge now is to understand in detail

  8. Proteomic analyses of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 derivatives reveal highly conserved patterns of viral and cellular proteins in infected fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyda, Sabine; Büscher, Nicole; Tenzer, Stefan; Plachter, Bodo

    2014-01-07

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) particle morphogenesis in infected cells is an orchestrated process that eventually results in the release of enveloped virions. Proteomic analysis has been employed to reveal the complexity in the protein composition of these extracellular particles. Only limited information is however available regarding the proteome of infected cells preceding the release of HCMV virions. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to address the pattern of viral and cellular proteins in cells, infected with derivatives of the AD169 laboratory strain. Our analyses revealed a remarkable conservation in the patterns of viral and of abundant cellular proteins in cells, infected for 2 hours, 2 days, or 4 days. Most viral proteins increased in abundance as the infection progressed over time. Of the proteins that were reliably detectable by mass spectrometry, only IE1 (pUL123), pTRS1, and pIRS1 were downregulated at 4 days after infection. In addition, little variation of viral proteins in the virions of the different viruses was detectable, independent of the expression of the major tegument protein pp65. Taken together these data suggest that there is little variation in the expression program of viral and cellular proteins in cells infected with related HCMVs, resulting in a conserved pattern of viral proteins ultimately associated with extracellular virions.

  9. Spatial genetic analyses reveal cryptic population structure and migration patterns in a continuously harvested grey wolf (Canis lupus population in north-eastern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Hindrikson

    Full Text Available Spatial genetics is a relatively new field in wildlife and conservation biology that is becoming an essential tool for unravelling the complexities of animal population processes, and for designing effective strategies for conservation and management. Conceptual and methodological developments in this field are therefore critical. Here we present two novel methodological approaches that further the analytical possibilities of STRUCTURE and DResD. Using these approaches we analyse structure and migrations in a grey wolf (Canislupus population in north-eastern Europe. We genotyped 16 microsatellite loci in 166 individuals sampled from the wolf population in Estonia and Latvia that has been under strong and continuous hunting pressure for decades. Our analysis demonstrated that this relatively small wolf population is represented by four genetic groups. We also used a novel methodological approach that uses linear interpolation to statistically test the spatial separation of genetic groups. The new method, which is capable of using program STRUCTURE output, can be applied widely in population genetics to reveal both core areas and areas of low significance for genetic groups. We also used a recently developed spatially explicit individual-based method DResD, and applied it for the first time to microsatellite data, revealing a migration corridor and barriers, and several contact zones.

  10. REVEAL: An Extensible Reduced Order Model Builder for Simulation and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Khushbu; Sharma, Poorva; Ma, Jinliang; Lo, Chaomei; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2013-04-30

    Many science domains need to build computationally efficient and accurate representations of high fidelity, computationally expensive simulations. These computationally efficient versions are known as reduced-order models. This paper presents the design and implementation of a novel reduced-order model (ROM) builder, the REVEAL toolset. This toolset generates ROMs based on science- and engineering-domain specific simulations executed on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. The toolset encompasses a range of sampling and regression methods that can be used to generate a ROM, automatically quantifies the ROM accuracy, and provides support for an iterative approach to improve ROM accuracy. REVEAL is designed to be extensible in order to utilize the core functionality with any simulator that has published input and output formats. It also defines programmatic interfaces to include new sampling and regression techniques so that users can ‘mix and match’ mathematical techniques to best suit the characteristics of their model. In this paper, we describe the architecture of REVEAL and demonstrate its usage with a computational fluid dynamics model used in carbon capture.

  11. FluxExplorer: A general platform for modeling and analyses of metabolic networks based on stoichiometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Stoichiometry-based analyses of meta- bolic networks have aroused significant interest of systems biology researchers in recent years. It is necessary to develop a more convenient modeling platform on which users can reconstruct their network models using completely graphical operations, and explore them with powerful analyzing modules to get a better understanding of the properties of metabolic systems. Herein, an in silico platform, FluxExplorer, for metabolic modeling and analyses based on stoichiometry has been developed as a publicly available tool for systems biology research. This platform integrates various analytic approaches, in- cluding flux balance analysis, minimization of meta- bolic adjustment, extreme pathways analysis, shadow prices analysis, and singular value decom- position, providing a thorough characterization of the metabolic system. Using a graphic modeling process, metabolic networks can be reconstructed and modi- fied intuitively and conveniently. The inconsistencies of a model with respect to the FBA principles can be proved automatically. In addition, this platform sup- ports systems biology markup language (SBML). FluxExplorer has been applied to rebuild a metabolic network in mammalian mitochondria, producing meaningful results. Generally, it is a powerful and very convenient tool for metabolic network modeling and analysis.

  12. Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Gardner, William Payton; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Mariner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

  13. Calibration of back-analysed model parameters for landslides using classification statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Jose; Henderson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Back-analyses are useful for characterizing the geomorphological and mechanical processes and parameters involved in the initiation and propagation of landslides. These processes and parameters can in turn be used for improving forecasts of scenarios and hazard assessments in areas or sites which have similar settings to the back-analysed cases. The selection of the modeled landslide that produces the best agreement with the actual observations requires running a number of simulations by varying the type of model and the sets of input parameters. The comparison of the simulated and observed parameters is normally performed by visual comparison of geomorphological or dynamic variables (e.g., geometry of scarp and final deposit, maximum velocities and depths). Over the past six years, a method developed by NGI has been used by some researchers for a more objective selection of back-analysed input model parameters. That method includes an adaptation of the equations for calculation of classifiers, and a comparative evaluation of classifiers of the selected parameter sets in the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) space. This contribution presents an updating of the methodology. The proposed procedure allows comparisons between two or more "clouds" of classifiers. Each cloud represents the performance of a model over a range of input parameters (e.g., samples of probability distributions). Considering the fact that each cloud does not necessarily produce a full ROC curve, two new normalised ROC-space parameters are introduced for characterizing the performance of each cloud. The first parameter is representative of the cloud position relative to the point of perfect classification. The second parameter characterizes the position of the cloud relative to the theoretically perfect ROC curve and the no-discrimination line. The methodology is illustrated with back-analyses of slope stability and landslide runout of selected case studies. This research activity has been

  14. Volvo Logistics Corporation Returnable Packaging System : a model for analysing cost savings when switching packaging system

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is a study for analysing costs affected by packaging in a producing industry. The purpose is to develop a model that will calculate and present possible cost savings for the customer by using Volvo Logistics Corporations, VLC’s, returnable packaging instead of other packaging solutions. The thesis is based on qualitative data gained from both theoretical and empirical studies. The methodology for gaining information has been to study theoretical sources such as course literature a...

  15. Evolution: Ocean Models Reveal Life in Deep Seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2016-09-26

    Even though the deep sea represents the largest area in the world, evolution of species from those environments remains largely unstudied. A series of recent papers indicate that combining molecular tools with biophysical models can help us resolve some of these deep mysteries.

  16. Mechanistic species distribution modeling reveals a niche shift during invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Daniel S; Scalone, Romain; Štefanić, Edita; Bullock, James M

    2017-06-01

    Niche shifts of nonnative plants can occur when they colonize novel climatic conditions. However, the mechanistic basis for niche shifts during invasion is poorly understood and has rarely been captured within species distribution models. We quantified the consequence of between-population variation in phenology for invasion of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) across Europe. Ragweed is of serious concern because of its harmful effects as a crop weed and because of its impact on public health as a major aeroallergen. We developed a forward mechanistic species distribution model based on responses of ragweed development rates to temperature and photoperiod. The model was parameterized and validated from the literature and by reanalyzing data from a reciprocal common garden experiment in which native and invasive populations were grown within and beyond the current invaded range. It could therefore accommodate between-population variation in the physiological requirements for flowering, and predict the potentially invaded ranges of individual populations. Northern-origin populations that were established outside the generally accepted climate envelope of the species had lower thermal requirements for bud development, suggesting local adaptation of phenology had occurred during the invasion. The model predicts that this will extend the potentially invaded range northward and increase the average suitability across Europe by 90% in the current climate and 20% in the future climate. Therefore, trait variation observed at the population scale can trigger a climatic niche shift at the biogeographic scale. For ragweed, earlier flowering phenology in established northern populations could allow the species to spread beyond its current invasive range, substantially increasing its risk to agriculture and public health. Mechanistic species distribution models offer the possibility to represent niche shifts by varying the traits and niche responses of individual

  17. Computational model for supporting SHM systems design: Damage identification via numerical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorato, Murilo; de Medeiros, Ricardo; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a computational model to simulate thin structures monitored by piezoelectric sensors in order to support the design of SHM systems, which use vibration based methods. Thus, a new shell finite element model was proposed and implemented via a User ELement subroutine (UEL) into the commercial package ABAQUS™. This model was based on a modified First Order Shear Theory (FOST) for piezoelectric composite laminates. After that, damaged cantilever beams with two piezoelectric sensors in different positions were investigated by using experimental analyses and the proposed computational model. A maximum difference in the magnitude of the FRFs between numerical and experimental analyses of 7.45% was found near the resonance regions. For damage identification, different levels of damage severity were evaluated by seven damage metrics, including one proposed by the present authors. Numerical and experimental damage metrics values were compared, showing a good correlation in terms of tendency. Finally, based on comparisons of numerical and experimental results, it is shown a discussion about the potentials and limitations of the proposed computational model to be used for supporting SHM systems design.

  18. Model error analyses of photochemistry mechanisms using the BEATBOX/BOXMOX data assimilation toy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knote, C. J.; Eckl, M.; Barré, J.; Emmons, L. K.

    2016-12-01

    Simplified descriptions of photochemistry in the atmosphere ('photochemical mechanisms') necessary to reduce the computational burden of a model simulation contribute significantly to the overall uncertainty of an air quality model. Understanding how the photochemical mechanism contributes to observed model errors through examination of results of the complete model system is next to impossible due to cancellation and amplification effects amongst the tightly interconnected model components. Here we present BEATBOX, a novel method to evaluate photochemical mechanisms using the underlying chemistry box model BOXMOX. With BOXMOX we can rapidly initialize various mechanisms (e.g. MOZART, RACM, CBMZ, MCM) with homogenized observations (e.g. from field campaigns) and conduct idealized 'chemistry in a jar' simulations under controlled conditions. BEATBOX is a data assimilation toy model built upon BOXMOX which allows to simulate the effects of assimilating observations (e.g., CO, NO2, O3) into these simulations. In this presentation we show how we use the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, U Leeds) as benchmark for more simplified mechanisms like MOZART, use BEATBOX to homogenize the chemical environment and diagnose errors within the more simplified mechanisms. We present BEATBOX as a new, freely available tool that allows researchers to rapidly evaluate their chemistry mechanism against a range of others under varying chemical conditions.

  19. Modeling and performance analyses of evaporators in frozen-food supermarket display cabinets at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getu, H.M.; Bansal, P.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents modeling and experimental analyses of evaporators in 'in situ' frozen-food display cabinets at low temperatures in the supermarket industry. Extensive experiments were conducted to measure store and display cabinet relative humidities and temperatures, and pressures, temperatures and mass flow rates of the refrigerant. The mathematical model adopts various empirical correlations of heat transfer coefficients and frost properties in a fin-tube heat exchanger in order to investigate the influence of indoor conditions on the performance of the display cabinets. The model is validated with the experimental data of 'in situ' cabinets. The model would be a good guide tool to the design engineers to evaluate the performance of supermarket display cabinet heat exchangers under various store conditions. (author)

  20. Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffhammer, M.; Hsiang, S. M.; Schlenker, W.; Sobel, A.

    2013-06-28

    Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

  1. Genetic and Modeling Approaches Reveal Distinct Components of Impulsive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Wall, Melanie M; Wang, Shuai; Magalong, Valerie M; Ahmari, Susanne E; Balsam, Peter D; Blanco, Carlos; Hen, René

    2017-01-18

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype found in many psychiatric disorders including substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two behavioral features often considered in impulsive behavior are behavioral inhibition (impulsive action) and delayed gratification (impulsive choice). However, the extent to which these behavioral constructs represent distinct facets of behavior with discrete biological bases is unclear. To test the hypothesis that impulsive action and impulsive choice represent statistically independent behavioral constructs in mice, we collected behavioral measures of impulsivity in a single cohort of mice using well-validated operant behavioral paradigms. Mice with manipulation of serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) expression were included as a model of disordered impulsivity. A factor analysis was used to characterize correlations between the measures of impulsivity and to identify covariates. Using two approaches, we dissociated impulsive action from impulsive choice. First, the absence of 5-HT1BRs caused increased impulsive action, but not impulsive choice. Second, based on an exploratory factor analysis, a two-factor model described the data well, with measures of impulsive action and choice separating into two independent factors. A multiple-indicator multiple-causes analysis showed that 5-HT1BR expression and sex were significant covariates of impulsivity. Males displayed increased impulsivity in both dimensions, whereas 5-HT1BR expression was a predictor of increased impulsive action only. These data support the conclusion that impulsive action and impulsive choice are distinct behavioral phenotypes with dissociable biological influences that can be modeled in mice. Our work may help inform better classification, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disorders, which present with disordered impulsivity.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 18 January 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.277.

  2. Analyses of expressed sequence tags in Neurospora reveal rapid evolution of genes associated with the early stages of sexual reproduction in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nygren Kristiina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The broadly accepted pattern of rapid evolution of reproductive genes is primarily based on studies of animal systems, although several examples of rapidly evolving genes involved in reproduction are found in diverse additional taxa. In fungi, genes involved in mate recognition have been found to evolve rapidly. However, the examples are too few to draw conclusions on a genome scale. Results In this study, we performed microarray hybridizations between RNA from sexual and vegetative tissues of two strains of the heterothallic (self-sterile filamentous ascomycete Neurospora intermedia, to identify a set of sex-associated genes in this species. We aligned Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs from sexual and vegetative tissue of N. intermedia to orthologs from three closely related species: N. crassa, N. discreta and N. tetrasperma. The resulting four-species alignments provided a dataset for molecular evolutionary analyses. Our results confirm a general pattern of rapid evolution of fungal sex-associated genes, compared to control genes with constitutive expression or a high relative expression during vegetative growth. Among the rapidly evolving sex-associated genes, we identified candidates that could be of importance for mating or fruiting-body development. Analyses of five of these candidate genes from additional species of heterothallic Neurospora revealed that three of them evolve under positive selection. Conclusions Taken together, our study represents a novel finding of a genome-wide pattern of rapid evolution of sex-associated genes in the fungal kingdom, and provides a list of candidate genes important for reproductive isolation in Neurospora.

  3. Prediction Uncertainty Analyses for the Combined Physically-Based and Data-Driven Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Y. K.; Valocchi, A. J.; Minsker, B. S.; Bailey, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    The unavoidable simplification associated with physically-based mathematical models can result in biased parameter estimates and correlated model calibration errors, which in return affect the accuracy of model predictions and the corresponding uncertainty analyses. In this work, a physically-based groundwater model (MODFLOW) together with error-correcting artificial neural networks (ANN) are used in a complementary fashion to obtain an improved prediction (i.e. prediction with reduced bias and error correlation). The associated prediction uncertainty of the coupled MODFLOW-ANN model is then assessed using three alternative methods. The first method estimates the combined model confidence and prediction intervals using first-order least- squares regression approximation theory. The second method uses Monte Carlo and bootstrap techniques for MODFLOW and ANN, respectively, to construct the combined model confidence and prediction intervals. The third method relies on a Bayesian approach that uses analytical or Monte Carlo methods to derive the intervals. The performance of these approaches is compared with Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) and Calibration-Constrained Monte Carlo (CCMC) intervals of the MODFLOW predictions alone. The results are demonstrated for a hypothetical case study developed based on a phytoremediation site at the Argonne National Laboratory. This case study comprises structural, parameter, and measurement uncertainties. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed three approaches yield comparable confidence and prediction intervals, thus making the computationally efficient first-order least-squares regression approach attractive for estimating the coupled model uncertainty. These results will be compared with GLUE and CCMC results.

  4. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröning, Flora; Jones, Marc E. H.; Curtis, Neil; Herrel, Anthony; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-based simulation techniques such as multi-body dynamics analysis are becoming increasingly popular in the field of skull mechanics. Multi-body models can be used for studying the relationships between skull architecture, muscle morphology and feeding performance. However, to be confident in the modelling results, models need to be validated against experimental data, and the effects of uncertainties or inaccuracies in the chosen model attributes need to be assessed with sensitivity analyses. Here, we compare the bite forces predicted by a multi-body model of a lizard (Tupinambis merianae) with in vivo measurements, using anatomical data collected from the same specimen. This subject-specific model predicts bite forces that are very close to the in vivo measurements and also shows a consistent increase in bite force as the bite position is moved posteriorly on the jaw. However, the model is very sensitive to changes in muscle attributes such as fibre length, intrinsic muscle strength and force orientation, with bite force predictions varying considerably when these three variables are altered. We conclude that accurate muscle measurements are crucial to building realistic multi-body models and that subject-specific data should be used whenever possible. PMID:23614944

  5. Analysing adverse events by time-to-event models: the CLEOPATRA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Tanja; Schumacher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    When analysing primary and secondary endpoints in a clinical trial with patients suffering from a chronic disease, statistical models for time-to-event data are commonly used and accepted. This is in contrast to the analysis of data on adverse events where often only a table with observed frequencies and corresponding test statistics is reported. An example is the recently published CLEOPATRA study where a three-drug regimen is compared with a two-drug regimen in patients with HER2-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer. Here, as described earlier, primary and secondary endpoints (progression-free and overall survival) are analysed using time-to-event models, whereas adverse events are summarized in a simple frequency table, although the duration of study treatment differs substantially. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of time-to-event models to first serious adverse events using the data of the CLEOPATRA study. This will cover the broad range between a simple incidence rate approach over survival and competing risks models (with death as a competing event) to multi-state models. We illustrate all approaches by means of graphical displays highlighting the temporal dynamics and compare the obtained results. For the CLEOPATRA study, the resulting hazard ratios are all in the same order of magnitude. But the use of time-to-event models provides valuable and additional information that would potentially be overlooked by only presenting incidence proportions. These models adequately address the temporal dynamics of serious adverse events as well as death of patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Mars Organic Matter Revealed by the Detection of Organo-chlorinated Molecules from Pyro-GCMS Analyses of Yellowknife Bay Mudstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Coll, P. J.; Cabane, M.; Millan, M.; Belmahadi, I.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Steele, A.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Mudstones collected on the Yellowknife Bay site in Gale crater by the Curiosity rover, were analyzed with the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) chemical laboratory with the aim (among others) to detect and identify organic molecules in the Martian reglith [1]. The pyrolysis (to 900°C)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Pyro-GCMS) analytical mode was systematically used to reach that goal. It revealed the existence of complex interactions between compounds present in the soil sample (e.g. oxychlorines [2]) and internal components of the SAM experiment (e.g. derivatization reactant) resulting in signals complex to interpret [3]. By comparing these results with those obtained for the other Mars samples analysed with SAM, and by carefully identifying, from laboratory work, the possible SAM internal contributions to the organic molecules detected [4], chlorobenzene has already been identified as mainly originating from organics present in the mudstone [5]. Since this discovery, we did additional studies of the chromatograms that reveal the presence of dichlorobenzene originating from an organic source endogenous to the sample. Even if the exact original source of these organic molecules cannot be strictly identified, the detection of several chlorinated aromatic molecules suggests the presence of a significant amount of aromatized materials which are in an oxidized state involving oxygen in the mudstone. We present here the corresponding results and the implication it can have on the origin of these organic materials References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Glavin, D. et al. (2013), JGR. [3] Ming D. et al. (2013), Science 32, 64, [4] Miller K. et al. (In press), JGR, [5] Freissinet et al., (2015), JGR Pla. 120, 495.

  7. Comparative live-cell imaging analyses of SPA-2, BUD-6 and BNI-1 in Neurospora crassa reveal novel features of the filamentous fungal polarisome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lichius

    Full Text Available A key multiprotein complex involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and secretory machinery required for polarized growth in fungi, is the polarisome. Recognized core constituents in budding yeast are the proteins Spa2, Pea2, Aip3/Bud6, and the key effector Bni1. Multicellular fungi display a more complex polarized morphogenesis than yeasts, suggesting that the filamentous fungal polarisome might fulfill additional functions. In this study, we compared the subcellular organization and dynamics of the putative polarisome components BUD-6 and BNI-1 with those of the bona fide polarisome marker SPA-2 at various developmental stages of Neurospora crassa. All three proteins exhibited a yeast-like polarisome configuration during polarized germ tube growth, cell fusion, septal pore plugging and tip repolarization. However, the localization patterns of all three proteins showed spatiotemporally distinct characteristics during the establishment of new polar axes, septum formation and cytokinesis, and maintained hyphal tip growth. Most notably, in vegetative hyphal tips BUD-6 accumulated as a subapical cloud excluded from the Spitzenkörper (Spk, whereas BNI-1 and SPA-2 partially colocalized with the Spk and the tip apex. Novel roles during septal plugging and cytokinesis, connected to the reinitiation of tip growth upon physical injury and conidial maturation, were identified for BUD-6 and BNI-1, respectively. Phenotypic analyses of gene deletion mutants revealed additional functions for BUD-6 and BNI-1 in cell fusion regulation, and the maintenance of Spk integrity. Considered together, our findings reveal novel polarisome-independent functions of BUD-6 and BNI-1 in Neurospora, but also suggest that all three proteins cooperate at plugged septal pores, and their complex arrangement within the apical dome of mature hypha might represent a novel aspect of filamentous fungal polarisome architecture.

  8. Models and analyses for inertial-confinement fusion-reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes models and analyses devised at Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the technical characteristics of different inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor elements required for component integration into a functional unit. We emphasize the generic properties of the different elements rather than specific designs. The topics discussed are general ICF reactor design considerations; reactor cavity phenomena, including the restoration of interpulse ambient conditions; first-wall temperature increases and material losses; reactor neutronics and hydrodynamic blanket response to neutron energy deposition; and analyses of loads and stresses in the reactor vessel walls, including remarks about the generation and propagation of very short wavelength stress waves. A discussion of analytic approaches useful in integrations and optimizations of ICF reactor systems concludes the report.

  9. Experiments and sensitivity analyses for heat transfer in a meter-scale regularly fractured granite model with water flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LU; Yan-yong XIANG

    2012-01-01

    Experiments of saturated water flow and heat transfer were conducted for a meter-scale model of regularly fractured granite.The fractured rock model (height 1502.5 mm,width 904 mm,and thickness 300 mm),embedded with two vertical and two horizontal fractures of pre-set apertures,was constructed using 18 pieces of intact granite.The granite was taken from a site currently being investigated for a high-level nuclear waste repository in China.The experiments involved different heat source temperatures and vertical water fluxes in the embedded fractures either open or filled with sand.A finite difference scheme and computer code for calculation of water flow and heat transfer in regularly fractured rocks was developed,verified against both the experimental data and calculations from the TOUGH2 code,and employed for parametric sensitivity analyses.The experiments revealed that,among other things,the temperature distribution was influenced by water flow in the fractures,especially the water flow in the vertical fracture adjacent to the heat source,and that the heat conduction between the neighboring rock blocks in the model with sand-filled fractures was enhanced by the sand,with larger range of influence of the heat source and longer time for approaching asymptotic steady-state than those of the model with open fractures.The temperatures from the experiments were in general slightly smaller than those from the numerical calculations,probably due to the fact that a certain amount of outward heat transfer at the model perimeter was unavoidable in the experiments.The parametric sensitivity analyses indicated that the temperature distribution was highly sensitive to water flow in the fractures,and the water temperature in the vertical fracture adjacent to the heat source was rather insensitive to water flow in other fractures.

  10. Transcriptome and membrane fatty acid analyses reveal different strategies for responding to permeating and non-permeating solutes in the bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson David R

    2011-11-01

    opposite effect and decreased after perturbation with PEG8000. Conclusions A combination of growth assays, transcriptome profiling, and membrane fatty acid analyses revealed that permeating and non-permeating solutes trigger different adaptive responses in strain RW1, suggesting these solutes affect cells in fundamentally different ways. Future work is now needed that connects these responses with the responses observed in more realistic scenarios of soil desiccation.

  11. Design evaluation and optimisation in crossover pharmacokinetic studies analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bazzoli, Caroline; Mentré, France

    2012-05-20

    Bioequivalence or interaction trials are commonly studied in crossover design and can be analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models as an alternative to noncompartmental approach. We propose an extension of the population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effects models to design crossover pharmacokinetic trials, using a linearisation of the model around the random effect expectation, including within-subject variability and discrete covariates fixed or changing between periods. We use the expected standard errors of treatment effect to compute the power for the Wald test of comparison or equivalence and the number of subjects needed for a given power. We perform various simulations mimicking crossover two-period trials to show the relevance of these developments. We then apply these developments to design a crossover pharmacokinetic study of amoxicillin in piglets and implement them in the new version 3.2 of the r function PFIM.

  12. An age-dependent model to analyse the evolutionary stability of bacterial quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mund, A; Kuttler, C; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Hense, B A

    2016-09-21

    Bacterial communication is enabled through the collective release and sensing of signalling molecules in a process called quorum sensing. Cooperative processes can easily be destabilized by the appearance of cheaters, who contribute little or nothing at all to the production of common goods. This especially applies for planktonic cultures. In this study, we analyse the dynamics of bacterial quorum sensing and its evolutionary stability under two levels of cooperation, namely signal and enzyme production. The model accounts for mutation rates and switches between planktonic and biofilm state of growth. We present a mathematical approach to model these dynamics using age-dependent colony models. We explore the conditions under which cooperation is stable and find that spatial structuring can lead to long-term scenarios such as coexistence or bistability, depending on the non-linear combination of different parameters like death rates and production costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing Cognitive Processes with Diffusion Model Analyses: A Tutorial based on fast-dm-30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eVoss

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion models can be used to infer cognitive processes involved in fast binary decision tasks. The model assumes that information is accumulated continuously until one of two thresholds is hit. In the analysis, response time distributions from numerous trials of the decision task are used to estimate a set of parameters mapping distinct cognitive processes. In recent years, diffusion model analyses have become more and more popular in different fields of psychology. This increased popularity is based on the recent development of several software solutions for the parameter estimation. Although these programs make the application of the model relatively easy, there is a shortage of knowledge about different steps of a state-of-the-art diffusion model study. In this paper, we give a concise tutorial on diffusion modelling, and we present fast-dm-30, a thoroughly revised and extended version of the fast-dm software (Voss & Voss, 2007 for diffusion model data analysis. The most important improvement of the fast-dm version is the possibility to choose between different optimization criteria (i.e., Maximum Likelihood, Chi-Square, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov, which differ in applicability for different data sets.

  14. Models of population-based analyses for data collected from large extended families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Fabsitz, Richard R; Devereux, Richard B; MacCluer, Jean W; Laston, Sandra; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Shara, Nawar M; Welty, Thomas K

    2010-12-01

    Large studies of extended families usually collect valuable phenotypic data that may have scientific value for purposes other than testing genetic hypotheses if the families were not selected in a biased manner. These purposes include assessing population-based associations of diseases with risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics such as disease prevalence and incidence. Relatedness among participants however, violates the traditional assumption of independent observations in these classic analyses. The commonly used adjustment method for relatedness in population-based analyses is to use marginal models, in which clusters (families) are assumed to be independent (unrelated) with a simple and identical covariance (family) structure such as those called independent, exchangeable and unstructured covariance structures. However, using these simple covariance structures may not be optimally appropriate for outcomes collected from large extended families, and may under- or over-estimate the variances of estimators and thus lead to uncertainty in inferences. Moreover, the assumption that families are unrelated with an identical family structure in a marginal model may not be satisfied for family studies with large extended families. The aim of this paper is to propose models incorporating marginal models approaches with a covariance structure for assessing population-based associations of diseases with their risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics for epidemiological studies while adjusting for the complicated relatedness among outcomes (continuous/categorical, normally/non-normally distributed) collected from large extended families. We also discuss theoretical issues of the proposed models and show that the proposed models and covariance structure are appropriate for and capable of achieving the aim.

  15. A modeling approach to compare ΣPCB concentrations between congener-specific analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Polly P.; Mills, Marc A.; Kraus, Johanna M.; Walters, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in analytical methods over time pose problems for assessing long-term trends in environmental contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Congener-specific analyses vary widely in the number and identity of the 209 distinct PCB chemical configurations (congeners) that are quantified, leading to inconsistencies among summed PCB concentrations (ΣPCB) reported by different studies. Here we present a modeling approach using linear regression to compare ΣPCB concentrations derived from different congener-specific analyses measuring different co-eluting groups. The approach can be used to develop a specific conversion model between any two sets of congener-specific analytical data from similar samples (similar matrix and geographic origin). We demonstrate the method by developing a conversion model for an example data set that includes data from two different analytical methods, a low resolution method quantifying 119 congeners and a high resolution method quantifying all 209 congeners. We used the model to show that the 119-congener set captured most (93%) of the total PCB concentration (i.e., Σ209PCB) in sediment and biological samples. ΣPCB concentrations estimated using the model closely matched measured values (mean relative percent difference = 9.6). General applications of the modeling approach include (a) generating comparable ΣPCB concentrations for samples that were analyzed for different congener sets; and (b) estimating the proportional contribution of different congener sets to ΣPCB. This approach may be especially valuable for enabling comparison of long-term remediation monitoring results even as analytical methods change over time. 

  16. Mechanisms for the adverse effects of late gestational increases in maternal cortisol on the heart revealed by transcriptomic analyses of the fetal septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Elaine M; Wood, Charles E; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2014-08-01

    We have previously shown in sheep that 10 days of modest chronic increase in maternal cortisol resulting from maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg/kg/day) caused fetal heart enlargement and Purkinje cell apoptosis. In subsequent studies we extended the cortisol infusion to term, finding a dramatic incidence of stillbirth in the pregnancies with chronically increased cortisol. To investigate effects of maternal cortisol on the heart, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the septa using ovine microarrays and Webgestalt and Cytoscape programs for pathway inference. Analyses of the transcriptomic effects of maternal cortisol infusion for 10 days (130 day cortisol vs 130 day control), or ∼25 days (140 day cortisol vs 140 day control) and of normal maturation (140 day control vs 130 day control) were performed. Gene ontology terms related to immune function and cytokine actions were significantly overrepresented as genes altered by both cortisol and maturation in the septa. After 10 days of cortisol, growth factor and muscle cell apoptosis pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with our previous histologic findings. In the term fetuses (∼25 days of cortisol) nutrient pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with altered metabolism and reduced mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial number by mitochondrial DNA expression confirmed a significant decrease in mitochondria. The metabolic pathways modeled as altered by cortisol treatment to term were different from those modeled during maturation of the heart to term, and thus changes in gene expression in these metabolic pathways may be indicative of the fetal heart pathophysiologies seen in pregnancies complicated by stillbirth, including gestational diabetes, Cushing's disease and chronic stress.

  17. Animal Model Reveals Potential Waterborne Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne H. pylori could cause gastric infection. Groups of immunocompetent C57/BL6 Helicobacter-free mice were exposed to static concentrations (1.29 × 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), 10(8), and 10(9) CFU/L) of H. pylori in their drinking water for 4 weeks. One group of Helicobacter-free mice was exposed to uncontaminated water as a negative control. H. pylori morphology changes in water were examined using microscopy Live/Dead staining. Following exposure, H. pylori infection and inflammation status in the stomach were evaluated using quantitative culture, PCR, the rapid urease test, and histology. None of the mice in the negative control or 10(5) groups were infected. One of 20 cages (one of 40 mice) of the 10(6) group, three of 19 cages (four of 38 mice) of the 10(7) CFU/L group, 19 of 20 cages (33 of 40 mice) of the 10(8) group, and 20 of 20 cages (39 of 40 mice) of the 10(9) CFU/L group were infected. Infected mice had significantly higher gastric inflammation than uninfected mice (27.86% higher inflammation, p < .0001). We offer proof that H. pylori in water is infectious in mice, suggesting that humans drinking contaminated water may be at risk of contracting H. pylori infection. Much work needs to be performed to better understand the risk of infection from drinking H. pylori-contaminated water. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sampling and sensitivity analyses tools (SaSAT for computational modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson David P

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SaSAT (Sampling and Sensitivity Analysis Tools is a user-friendly software package for applying uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to mathematical and computational models of arbitrary complexity and context. The toolbox is built in Matlab®, a numerical mathematical software package, and utilises algorithms contained in the Matlab® Statistics Toolbox. However, Matlab® is not required to use SaSAT as the software package is provided as an executable file with all the necessary supplementary files. The SaSAT package is also designed to work seamlessly with Microsoft Excel but no functionality is forfeited if that software is not available. A comprehensive suite of tools is provided to enable the following tasks to be easily performed: efficient and equitable sampling of parameter space by various methodologies; calculation of correlation coefficients; regression analysis; factor prioritisation; and graphical output of results, including response surfaces, tornado plots, and scatterplots. Use of SaSAT is exemplified by application to a simple epidemic model. To our knowledge, a number of the methods available in SaSAT for performing sensitivity analyses have not previously been used in epidemiological modelling and their usefulness in this context is demonstrated.

  19. Sampling and sensitivity analyses tools (SaSAT) for computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Alexander; Regan, David G; Wilson, David P

    2008-02-27

    SaSAT (Sampling and Sensitivity Analysis Tools) is a user-friendly software package for applying uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to mathematical and computational models of arbitrary complexity and context. The toolbox is built in Matlab, a numerical mathematical software package, and utilises algorithms contained in the Matlab Statistics Toolbox. However, Matlab is not required to use SaSAT as the software package is provided as an executable file with all the necessary supplementary files. The SaSAT package is also designed to work seamlessly with Microsoft Excel but no functionality is forfeited if that software is not available. A comprehensive suite of tools is provided to enable the following tasks to be easily performed: efficient and equitable sampling of parameter space by various methodologies; calculation of correlation coefficients; regression analysis; factor prioritisation; and graphical output of results, including response surfaces, tornado plots, and scatterplots. Use of SaSAT is exemplified by application to a simple epidemic model. To our knowledge, a number of the methods available in SaSAT for performing sensitivity analyses have not previously been used in epidemiological modelling and their usefulness in this context is demonstrated.

  20. Analysing animal social network dynamics: the potential of stochastic actor-oriented models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David N; Ilany, Amiyaal; Silk, Matthew J; Tregenza, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Animals are embedded in dynamically changing networks of relationships with conspecifics. These dynamic networks are fundamental aspects of their environment, creating selection on behaviours and other traits. However, most social network-based approaches in ecology are constrained to considering networks as static, despite several calls for such analyses to become more dynamic. There are a number of statistical analyses developed in the social sciences that are increasingly being applied to animal networks, of which stochastic actor-oriented models (SAOMs) are a principal example. SAOMs are a class of individual-based models designed to model transitions in networks between discrete time points, as influenced by network structure and covariates. It is not clear, however, how useful such techniques are to ecologists, and whether they are suited to animal social networks. We review the recent applications of SAOMs to animal networks, outlining findings and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of SAOMs when applied to animal rather than human networks. We go on to highlight the types of ecological and evolutionary processes that SAOMs can be used to study. SAOMs can include effects and covariates for individuals, dyads and populations, which can be constant or variable. This allows for the examination of a wide range of questions of interest to ecologists. However, high-resolution data are required, meaning SAOMs will not be useable in all study systems. It remains unclear how robust SAOMs are to missing data and uncertainty around social relationships. Ultimately, we encourage the careful application of SAOMs in appropriate systems, with dynamic network analyses likely to prove highly informative. Researchers can then extend the basic method to tackle a range of existing questions in ecology and explore novel lines of questioning. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society.

  1. Power analyses for negative binomial models with application to multiple sclerosis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettiganti, Mallik; Nagaraja, H N

    2012-01-01

    We use negative binomial (NB) models for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based brain lesion count data from parallel group (PG) and baseline versus treatment (BVT) trials for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients, and describe the associated likelihood ratio (LR), score, and Wald tests. We perform power analyses and sample size estimation using the simulated percentiles of the exact distribution of the test statistics for the PG and BVT trials. When compared to the corresponding nonparametric test, the LR test results in 30-45% reduction in sample sizes for the PG trials and 25-60% reduction for the BVT trials.

  2. Analysing and modelling battery drain of 3G terminals due to port scan attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual Trigos, Mar

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis there is detected a threat in 3G mobile phone, specifically in the eventual draining terminal's battery due to undesired data traffic. The objectives of the thesis are to analyse the battery drain of 3G mobile phones because of uplink and downlink traffic and to model the battery drain. First of all, there is described how we can make a mobile phone to increase its consumption, and therefore to shorten its battery life time. Concretely, we focus in data traffic. This traffic ca...

  3. Analysing the Effects of Flood-Resilience Technologies in Urban Areas Using a Synthetic Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Schinke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Flood protection systems with their spatial effects play an important role in managing and reducing flood risks. The planning and decision process as well as the technical implementation are well organized and often exercised. However, building-related flood-resilience technologies (FReT are often neglected due to the absence of suitable approaches to analyse and to integrate such measures in large-scale flood damage mitigation concepts. Against this backdrop, a synthetic model-approach was extended by few complementary methodical steps in order to calculate flood damage to buildings considering the effects of building-related FReT and to analyse the area-related reduction of flood risks by geo-information systems (GIS with high spatial resolution. It includes a civil engineering based investigation of characteristic properties with its building construction including a selection and combination of appropriate FReT as a basis for derivation of synthetic depth-damage functions. Depending on the real exposition and the implementation level of FReT, the functions can be used and allocated in spatial damage and risk analyses. The application of the extended approach is shown at a case study in Valencia (Spain. In this way, the overall research findings improve the integration of FReT in flood risk management. They provide also some useful information for advising of individuals at risk supporting the selection and implementation of FReT.

  4. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krempl, E. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  5. Incorporating uncertainty of management costs in sensitivity analyses of matrix population models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Yacov; McCarthy, Michael A; Taylor, Peter; Wintle, Brendan A

    2013-02-01

    The importance of accounting for economic costs when making environmental-management decisions subject to resource constraints has been increasingly recognized in recent years. In contrast, uncertainty associated with such costs has often been ignored. We developed a method, on the basis of economic theory, that accounts for the uncertainty in population-management decisions. We considered the case where, rather than taking fixed values, model parameters are random variables that represent the situation when parameters are not precisely known. Hence, the outcome is not precisely known either. Instead of maximizing the expected outcome, we maximized the probability of obtaining an outcome above a threshold of acceptability. We derived explicit analytical expressions for the optimal allocation and its associated probability, as a function of the threshold of acceptability, where the model parameters were distributed according to normal and uniform distributions. To illustrate our approach we revisited a previous study that incorporated cost-efficiency analyses in management decisions that were based on perturbation analyses of matrix population models. Incorporating derivations from this study into our framework, we extended the model to address potential uncertainties. We then applied these results to 2 case studies: management of a Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population and conservation of an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) population. For low aspirations, that is, when the threshold of acceptability is relatively low, the optimal strategy was obtained by diversifying the allocation of funds. Conversely, for high aspirations, the budget was directed toward management actions with the highest potential effect on the population. The exact optimal allocation was sensitive to the choice of uncertainty model. Our results highlight the importance of accounting for uncertainty when making decisions and suggest that more effort should be placed on

  6. Genetic analyses using GGE model and a mixed linear model approach, and stability analyses using AMMI bi-plot for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in bread wheat genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Fofana, Bourlaye

    2017-06-01

    Low falling number and discounting grain when it is downgraded in class are the consequences of excessive late-maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Grain expressing high LMAA produces poorer quality bread products. To effectively breed for low LMAA, it is necessary to understand what genes control it and how they are expressed, particularly when genotypes are grown in different environments. In this study, an International Collection (IC) of 18 spring wheat genotypes and another set of 15 spring wheat cultivars adapted to South Dakota (SD), USA were assessed to characterize the genetic component of LMAA over 5 and 13 environments, respectively. The data were analysed using a GGE model with a mixed linear model approach and stability analysis was presented using an AMMI bi-plot on R software. All estimated variance components and their proportions to the total phenotypic variance were highly significant for both sets of genotypes, which were validated by the AMMI model analysis. Broad-sense heritability for LMAA was higher in SD adapted cultivars (53%) compared to that in IC (49%). Significant genetic effects and stability analyses showed some genotypes, e.g. 'Lancer', 'Chester' and 'LoSprout' from IC, and 'Alsen', 'Traverse' and 'Forefront' from SD cultivars could be used as parents to develop new cultivars expressing low levels of LMAA. Stability analysis using an AMMI bi-plot revealed that 'Chester', 'Lancer' and 'Advance' were the most stable across environments, while in contrast, 'Kinsman', 'Lerma52' and 'Traverse' exhibited the lowest stability for LMAA across environments.

  7. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-08-18

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

  8. Comprehensive transcriptional and functional analyses of melatonin synthesis genes in cassava reveal their novel role in hypersensitive-like cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunxie; Hu, Wei; Wang, Qiannan; Liu, Wei; Wu, Chunjie; Zeng, Hongqiu; Yan, Yu; Li, Xiaolin; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is a widely known hormone in animals. Since melatonin was discovered in plants, more and more studies highlight its involvement in a wide range of physiological processes including plant development and stress responses. Many advances have been made in the terms of melatonin-mediated abiotic stress resistance and innate immunity in plants, focusing on model plants such as rice and Arabidopsis. In this study, 7 melatonin synthesis genes were systematically analyzed in cassava. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that all these genes were commonly regulated by melatonin, flg22, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv manihotis (Xam) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed the subcellular locations and possible roles of these melatonin synthesis genes. Notably, we highlight novel roles of these genes in hypersensitive-like cell death, as confirmed by the results of several physiological parameters. Moreover, transient expression of these genes had significant effects on the transcripts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and defense-related genes, and triggered the burst of callose depositions and papillae-associated plant defense, indicating the possible role of them in plant innate immunity. Taken together, this study reveals the comprehensive transcripts and putative roles of melatonin synthesis genes as well as melatonin in immune responses in cassava. PMID:27739451

  9. Oogonial biometry and phylogenetic analyses of the Pythium vexans species group from woody agricultural hosts in South Africa reveal distinct groups within this taxon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Christoffel F J; Mazzola, Mark; Botha, Wilhelm J; Van Der Rijst, Marieta; Mostert, Lizel; Mcleod, Adéle

    2011-02-01

    Pythium vexans fits into the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) clade K sensu Lévesque & De Cock (2004). Within clade K, P. vexans forms a distinct clade containing two enigmatic species, Pythium indigoferae and Pythium cucurbitacearum of which no ex-type strains are available. In South Africa, as well as in other regions of the world, P. vexans isolates are known to be heterogeneous in their ITS sequences and may consist of more than one species. This study aimed to investigate the diversity of South African P. vexans isolates, mainly from grapevines, but also citrus and apple using (i) phylogenetic analyses of the ITS, cytochrome c oxidase (cox) I, cox II, and β-tubulin regions and (ii) seven biometric oogonial parameters. Each of the phylogenies clustered P. vexans isolates into a single well-supported clade, distinct from other clade K species. The β-tubulin region was phylogenetically uninformative regarding the P. vexans group. The ITS phylogeny and combined cox I and II phylogenies, although each revealing several P. vexans subclades, were incongruent. One of the most striking incongruences was the presence of one cox subclade that contained two distinct ITS subclades (Ib and IV). Three groups (A-C) were subjectively identified among South African P. vexans isolates using (i) phylogenetic clades (ITS and cox), (ii) univariate analysis of oogonial diameters, and (iii) multivariate analyses of biometric oogonial parameters. Group A is considered to be P. vexans s. str. since it contained the P. vexans CBS reference strain from Van der Plaats-Niterink (1981). This group had significantly smaller oogonial diameters than group B and C isolates. Group B contained the isolates from ITS subclades Ib and IV, which formed a single cox subclade. The ITS subclade IV isolates were all sexually sterile or produced mainly abortive oospores, as opposed to the sexually fertile subclade Ib isolates, and may thus represent a distinct assemblage within group B. Although ITS

  10. Likelihood and Bayesian analyses reveal major genes affecting body composition, carcass, meat quality and the number of false teats in a Chinese European pig line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Roy Pascale

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Segregation analyses were performed using both maximum likelihood – via a Quasi Newton algorithm – (ML-QN and Bayesian – via Gibbs sampling – (Bayesian-GS approaches in the Chinese European Tiameslan pig line. Major genes were searched for average ultrasonic backfat thickness (ABT, carcass fat (X2 and X4 and lean (X5 depths, days from 20 to 100 kg (D20100, Napole technological yield (NTY, number of false (FTN and good (GTN teats, as well as total teat number (TTN. The discrete nature of FTN was additionally considered using a threshold model under ML methodology. The results obtained with both methods consistently suggested the presence of major genes affecting ABT, X2, NTY, GTN and FTN. Major genes were also suggested for X4 and X5 using ML-QN, but not the Bayesian-GS, approach. The major gene affecting FTN was confirmed using the threshold model. Genetic correlations as well as gene effect and genotype frequency estimates suggested the presence of four different major genes. The first gene would affect fatness traits (ABT, X2 and X4, the second one a leanness trait (X5, the third one NTY and the last one GTN and FTN. Genotype frequencies of breeding animals and their evolution over time were consistent with the selection performed in the Tiameslan line.

  11. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  12. A conceptual model for analysing informal learning in online social networks for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Gray, Kathleen; Chang, Shanton; Elliott, Kristine; Barnett, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Online social networking (OSN) provides a new way for health professionals to communicate, collaborate and share ideas with each other for informal learning on a massive scale. It has important implications for ongoing efforts to support Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the health professions. However, the challenge of analysing the data generated in OSNs makes it difficult to understand whether and how they are useful for CPD. This paper presents a conceptual model for using mixed methods to study data from OSNs to examine the efficacy of OSN in supporting informal learning of health professionals. It is expected that using this model with the dataset generated in OSNs for informal learning will produce new and important insights into how well this innovation in CPD is serving professionals and the healthcare system.

  13. Rockslide and Impulse Wave Modelling in the Vajont Reservoir by DEM-CFD Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Utili, S.; Crosta, G. B.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the generation of hydrodynamic water waves due to rockslides plunging into a water reservoir. Quasi-3D DEM analyses in plane strain by a coupled DEM-CFD code are adopted to simulate the rockslide from its onset to the impact with the still water and the subsequent generation of the wave. The employed numerical tools and upscaling of hydraulic properties allow predicting a physical response in broad agreement with the observations notwithstanding the assumptions and characteristics of the adopted methods. The results obtained by the DEM-CFD coupled approach are compared to those published in the literature and those presented by Crosta et al. (Landslide spreading, impulse waves and modelling of the Vajont rockslide. Rock mechanics, 2014) in a companion paper obtained through an ALE-FEM method. Analyses performed along two cross sections are representative of the limit conditions of the eastern and western slope sectors. The max rockslide average velocity and the water wave velocity reach ca. 22 and 20 m/s, respectively. The maximum computed run up amounts to ca. 120 and 170 m for the eastern and western lobe cross sections, respectively. These values are reasonably similar to those recorded during the event (i.e. ca. 130 and 190 m, respectively). Therefore, the overall study lays out a possible DEM-CFD framework for the modelling of the generation of the hydrodynamic wave due to the impact of a rapid moving rockslide or rock-debris avalanche.

  14. Economic modeling of electricity production from hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs: methodology and analyses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, R.G.; Morris, G.E.

    1979-09-01

    An analytical methodology is developed for assessing alternative modes of generating electricity from hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy sources. The methodology is used in sensitivity analyses to explore relative system economics. The methodology used a computerized, intertemporal optimization model to determine the profit-maximizing design and management of a unified HDR electric power plant with a given set of geologic, engineering, and financial conditions. By iterating this model on price, a levelized busbar cost of electricity is established. By varying the conditions of development, the sensitivity of both optimal management and busbar cost to these conditions are explored. A plausible set of reference case parameters is established at the outset of the sensitivity analyses. This reference case links a multiple-fracture reservoir system to an organic, binary-fluid conversion cycle. A levelized busbar cost of 43.2 mills/kWh ($1978) was determined for the reference case, which had an assumed geothermal gradient of 40/sup 0/C/km, a design well-flow rate of 75 kg/s, an effective heat transfer area per pair of wells of 1.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 2/, and plant design temperature of 160/sup 0/C. Variations in the presumed geothermal gradient, size of the reservoir, drilling costs, real rates of return, and other system parameters yield minimum busbar costs between -40% and +76% of the reference case busbar cost.

  15. Establishing a Numerical Modeling Framework for Hydrologic Engineering Analyses of Extreme Storm Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Hossain, Faisal; Leung, L. Ruby

    2017-08-01

    In this study a numerical modeling framework for simulating extreme storm events was established using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Such a framework is necessary for the derivation of engineering parameters such as probable maximum precipitation that are the cornerstone of large water management infrastructure design. Here this framework was built based on a heavy storm that occurred in Nashville (USA) in 2010, and verified using two other extreme storms. To achieve the optimal setup, several combinations of model resolutions, initial/boundary conditions (IC/BC), cloud microphysics and cumulus parameterization schemes were evaluated using multiple metrics of precipitation characteristics. The evaluation suggests that WRF is most sensitive to IC/BC option. Simulation generally benefits from finer resolutions up to 5 km. At the 15km level, NCEP2 IC/BC produces better results, while NAM IC/BC performs best at the 5km level. Recommended model configuration from this study is: NAM or NCEP2 IC/BC (depending on data availability), 15km or 15km-5km nested grids, Morrison microphysics and Kain-Fritsch cumulus schemes. Validation of the optimal framework suggests that these options are good starting choices for modeling extreme events similar to the test cases. This optimal framework is proposed in response to emerging engineering demands of extreme storm events forecasting and analyses for design, operations and risk assessment of large water infrastructures.

  16. Estimating required information size by quantifying diversity in random-effects model meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Thorlund, Kristian; Brok, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    an intervention effect suggested by trials with low-risk of bias. METHODS: Information size calculations need to consider the total model variance in a meta-analysis to control type I and type II errors. Here, we derive an adjusting factor for the required information size under any random-effects model meta......-analysis. RESULTS: We devise a measure of diversity (D2) in a meta-analysis, which is the relative variance reduction when the meta-analysis model is changed from a random-effects into a fixed-effect model. D2 is the percentage that the between-trial variability constitutes of the sum of the between...... and interpreted using several simulations and clinical examples. In addition we show mathematically that diversity is equal to or greater than inconsistency, that is D2 >or= I2, for all meta-analyses. CONCLUSION: We conclude that D2 seems a better alternative than I2 to consider model variation in any random...

  17. Development of steady-state model for MSPT and detailed analyses of receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Minoru; Sonoda, Masanori; Hino, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Molten salt parabolic trough system (MSPT) uses molten salt as heat transfer fluid (HTF) instead of synthetic oil. The demonstration plant of MSPT was constructed by Chiyoda Corporation and Archimede Solar Energy in Italy in 2013. Chiyoda Corporation developed a steady-state model for predicting the theoretical behavior of the demonstration plant. The model was designed to calculate the concentrated solar power and heat loss using ray tracing of incident solar light and finite element modeling of thermal energy transferred into the medium. This report describes the verification of the model using test data on the demonstration plant, detailed analyses on the relation between flow rate and temperature difference on the metal tube of receiver and the effect of defocus angle on concentrated power rate, for solar collector assembly (SCA) development. The model is accurate to an extent of 2.0% as systematic error and 4.2% as random error. The relationships between flow rate and temperature difference on metal tube and the effect of defocus angle on concentrated power rate are shown.

  18. A STRONGLY COUPLED REACTOR CORE ISOLATION COOLING SYSTEM MODEL FOR EXTENDED STATION BLACK-OUT ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Laboratory; Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup cooling water to the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. The RCIC system operates independently of AC power, service air, or external cooling water systems. The only required external energy source is from the battery to maintain the logic circuits to control the opening and/or closure of valves in the RCIC systems in order to control the RPV water level by shutting down the RCIC pump to avoid overfilling the RPV and flooding the steam line to the RCIC turbine. It is generally considered in almost all the existing station black-out accidents (SBO) analyses that loss of the DC power would result in overfilling the steam line and allowing liquid water to flow into the RCIC turbine, where it is assumed that the turbine would then be disabled. This behavior, however, was not observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accidents, where the Unit 2 RCIC functioned without DC power for nearly three days. Therefore, more detailed mechanistic models for RCIC system components are needed to understand the extended SBO for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the next generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, we have developed a strongly coupled RCIC system model, which consists of a turbine model, a pump model, a check valve model, a wet well model, and their coupling models. Unlike the traditional SBO simulations where mass flow rates are typically given in the input file through time dependent functions, the real mass flow rates through the turbine and the pump loops in our model are dynamically calculated according to conservation laws and turbine/pump operation curves. A simplified SBO demonstration RELAP-7 model with this RCIC model has been successfully developed. The demonstration model includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety

  19. Evaluation of hydrological models for scenario analyses: signal-to-noise-ratio between scenario effects and model uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bormann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many model applications suffer from the fact that although it is well known that model application implies different sources of uncertainty there is no objective criterion to decide whether a model is suitable for a particular application or not. This paper introduces a comparative index between the uncertainty of a model and the change effects of scenario calculations which enables the modeller to objectively decide about suitability of a model to be applied in scenario analysis studies. The index is called "signal-to-noise-ratio", and it is applied for an exemplary scenario study which was performed within the GLOWA-IMPETUS project in Benin. The conceptual UHP model was applied on the upper Ouémé basin. Although model calibration and validation were successful, uncertainties on model parameters and input data could be identified. Applying the "signal-to-noise-ratio" on regional scale subcatchments of the upper Ouémé comparing water availability indicators for uncertainty studies and scenario analyses the UHP model turned out to be suitable to predict long-term water balances under the present poor data availability and changing environmental conditions in subhumid West Africa.

  20. CREB3 subfamily transcription factors are not created equal: Recent insights from global analyses and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chi-Ping

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CREB3 subfamily of membrane-bound bZIP transcription factors has five members in mammals known as CREB3 and CREB3L1-L4. One current model suggests that CREB3 subfamily transcription factors are similar to ATF6 in regulated intramembrane proteolysis and transcriptional activation. Particularly, they were all thought to be proteolytically activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress to stimulate genes that are involved in unfolded protein response (UPR. Although the physiological inducers of their proteolytic activation remain to be identified, recent findings from microarray analyses, RNAi screens and gene knockouts not only demonstrated their critical roles in regulating development, metabolism, secretion, survival and tumorigenesis, but also revealed cell type-specific patterns in the activation of their target genes. Members of the CREB3 subfamily show differential activity despite their structural similarity. The spectrum of their biological function expands beyond ER stress and UPR. Further analyses are required to elucidate the mechanism of their proteolytic activation and the molecular basis of their target recognition.

  1. Genetic Structuration, Demography and Evolutionary History of Mycobacterium tuberculosis LAM9 Sublineage in the Americas as Two Distinct Subpopulations Revealed by Bayesian Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Yann; Millet, Julie; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains broadly present in the Americas despite intense global efforts for its control and elimination. Starting from a large dataset comprising spoligotyping (n = 21183 isolates) and 12-loci MIRU-VNTRs data (n = 4022 isolates) from a total of 31 countries of the Americas (data extracted from the SITVIT2 database), this study aimed to get an overview of lineages circulating in the Americas. A total of 17119 (80.8%) strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage 4, among which the most predominant genotypic family belonged to the Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM) lineage (n = 6386, 30.1% of strains). By combining classical phylogenetic analyses and Bayesian approaches, this study revealed for the first time a clear genetic structuration of LAM9 sublineage into two subpopulations named LAM9C1 and LAM9C2, with distinct genetic characteristics. LAM9C1 was predominant in Chile, Colombia and USA, while LAM9C2 was predominant in Brazil, Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe and French Guiana. Globally, LAM9C2 was characterized by higher allelic richness as compared to LAM9C1 isolates. Moreover, LAM9C2 sublineage appeared to expand close to twenty times more than LAM9C1 and showed older traces of expansion. Interestingly, a significant proportion of LAM9C2 isolates presented typical signature of ancestral LAM-RDRio MIRU-VNTR type (224226153321). Further studies based on Whole Genome Sequencing of LAM strains will provide the needed resolution to decipher the biogeographical structure and evolutionary history of this successful family.

  2. Medulloblastoma in China: clinicopathologic analyses of SHH, WNT, and non-SHH/WNT molecular subgroups reveal different therapeutic responses to adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Jian; Ren, Yong; Li, Kay Ka-Wai; Ng, Ho-Keung; Mao, Ying; Zhong, Ping; Yao, Yu; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is one of the most common primary central nervous system tumors in children. Data is lacking of a large cohort of medulloblastoma patients in China. Also, our knowledge on the sensitivity of different molecular subgroups of MB to adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) or chemotherapy (CHT) is still limited. The authors performed a retrospective study of 173 medulloblastoma patients treated at two institutions from 2002 to 2011. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues were available in all the cases and sections were stained to classify histological and molecular subgroups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to investigate prognostic factors. Of 173 patients, there were 118 children and 55 adults, 112 males and 61 females. Estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for all patients, children and adults were 52%, 48% and 63%, respectively. After multivariate analysis, postoperative primary radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CHT) were revealed as favorable prognostic factors influencing OS and EFS. Postoperative primary chemotherapy (CHT) was found significantly improving the survival of children (pSHH and Non-SHH/WNT subtypes) given postoperative adjuvant therapies. Postoperative primary RT was found to be a strong prognostic factor influencing the survival in all histological and molecular subgroups (pSHH subgroup (OS p = 0.020, EFS p = 0.049) and WNT subgroup (OS p = 0.003, EFS p = 0.016) but not in desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma (DMB) (OS p = 0.361, EFS p = 0.834) and Non-SHH/WNT subgroup (OS p = 0.127, EFS p = 0.055). Our study showed postoperative primary CHT significantly influence the survival of CMB, SHH subgroup and WNT subgroup but not in DMB and Non-SHH/WNT subgroup of MB.

  3. Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified

  4. Physiological and proteomics analyses reveal the mechanism of Eichhornia crassipes tolerance to high-concentration cadmium stress compared with Pistia stratiotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Li

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd pollution is an environmental problem worldwide. Phytoremediation is a convenient method of removing Cd from both soil and water, but its efficiency is still low, especially in aquatic environments. Scientists have been trying to improve the ability of plants to absorb and accumulate Cd based on interactions between plants and Cd, especially the mechanism by which plants resist Cd. Eichhornia crassipes and Pistia stratiotes are aquatic plants commonly used in the phytoremediation of heavy metals. In the present study, we conducted physiological and biochemical analyses to compare the resistance of these two species to Cd stress at 100 mg/L. E. crassipes showed stronger resistance and was therefore used for subsequent comparative proteomics to explore the potential mechanism of E. crassipes tolerance to Cd stress at the protein level. The expression patterns of proteins in different functional categories revealed that the physiological activities and metabolic processes of E. crassipes were affected by exposure to Cd stress. However, when some proteins related to these processes were negatively inhibited, some analogous proteins were induced to compensate for the corresponding functions. As a result, E. crassipes could maintain more stable physiological parameters than P. stratiotes. Many stress-resistance substances and proteins, such as proline and heat shock proteins (HSPs and post translational modifications, were found to be involved in the protection and repair of functional proteins. In addition, antioxidant enzymes played important roles in ROS detoxification. These findings will facilitate further understanding of the potential mechanism of plant response to Cd stress at the protein level.

  5. Genetic Structuration, Demography and Evolutionary History of Mycobacterium tuberculosis LAM9 Sublineage in the Americas as Two Distinct Subpopulations Revealed by Bayesian Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Reynaud

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains broadly present in the Americas despite intense global efforts for its control and elimination. Starting from a large dataset comprising spoligotyping (n = 21183 isolates and 12-loci MIRU-VNTRs data (n = 4022 isolates from a total of 31 countries of the Americas (data extracted from the SITVIT2 database, this study aimed to get an overview of lineages circulating in the Americas. A total of 17119 (80.8% strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage 4, among which the most predominant genotypic family belonged to the Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM lineage (n = 6386, 30.1% of strains. By combining classical phylogenetic analyses and Bayesian approaches, this study revealed for the first time a clear genetic structuration of LAM9 sublineage into two subpopulations named LAM9C1 and LAM9C2, with distinct genetic characteristics. LAM9C1 was predominant in Chile, Colombia and USA, while LAM9C2 was predominant in Brazil, Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe and French Guiana. Globally, LAM9C2 was characterized by higher allelic richness as compared to LAM9C1 isolates. Moreover, LAM9C2 sublineage appeared to expand close to twenty times more than LAM9C1 and showed older traces of expansion. Interestingly, a significant proportion of LAM9C2 isolates presented typical signature of ancestral LAM-RDRio MIRU-VNTR type (224226153321. Further studies based on Whole Genome Sequencing of LAM strains will provide the needed resolution to decipher the biogeographical structure and evolutionary history of this successful family.

  6. Genes for the Major Structural Components of Thermotogales Species' Togas Revealed by Proteomic and Evolutionary Analyses of OmpA and OmpB Homologs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrus, Amanda K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Swithers, Kristen S. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Ranjit, Chaman R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Wu, Si [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brewer, Heather M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gogarten, J. Peter [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Noll, Kenneth M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2012-06-29

    The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell, often called a toga. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been identified in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (previously termed Ompα) and the porin OmpB (previously termed Ompβ). The gene encoding OmpA (ompA1) was assigned in the genome sequence to TM0477, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB) was not annotated. Here we identify the ompB gene as TM0476, determined by LC/MS/MS analysis of the native OmpB protein purified from T. maritima cells. The purified OmpB had β-sheet secondary structure as determined by circular dichroism. Analysis of the sequence of ompB product shows it has porin characteristics including a carboxy terminus anchoring motif and a porin-specific amino acid composition. Orthologs of ompB were found in the genomes of some, but not all, Thermotogales. Those without orthologs have putative analogs. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one to three OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1(TM0477) and ompA2 (TM1729), both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath.

  7. Genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of bollworm-infested developing cotton bolls revealed the genes and pathways involved in the insect pest defence mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saravanan; Kanakachari, Mogilicherla; Gurusamy, Dhandapani; Kumar, Krishan; Narayanasamy, Prabhakaran; Kethireddy Venkata, Padmalatha; Solanke, Amolkumar; Gamanagatti, Savita; Hiremath, Vamadevaiah; Katageri, Ishwarappa S; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda; Reddy, Vanga Siva

    2016-06-01

    Cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, is a major insect pest that feeds on cotton bolls causing extensive damage leading to crop and productivity loss. In spite of such a major impact, cotton plant response to bollworm infection is yet to be witnessed. In this context, we have studied the genome-wide response of cotton bolls infested with bollworm using transcriptomic and proteomic approaches. Further, we have validated this data using semi-quantitative real-time PCR. Comparative analyses have revealed that 39% of the transcriptome and 35% of the proteome were differentially regulated during bollworm infestation. Around 36% of significantly regulated transcripts and 45% of differentially expressed proteins were found to be involved in signalling followed by redox regulation. Further analysis showed that defence-related stress hormones and their lipid precursors, transcription factors, signalling molecules, etc. were stimulated, whereas the growth-related counterparts were suppressed during bollworm infestation. Around 26% of the significantly up-regulated proteins were defence molecules, while >50% of the significantly down-regulated were related to photosynthesis and growth. Interestingly, the biosynthesis genes for synergistically regulated jasmonate, ethylene and suppressors of the antagonistic factor salicylate were found to be up-regulated, suggesting a choice among stress-responsive phytohormone regulation. Manual curation of the enzymes and TFs highlighted the components of retrograde signalling pathways. Our data suggest that a selective regulatory mechanism directs the reallocation of metabolic resources favouring defence over growth under bollworm infestation and these insights could be exploited to develop bollworm-resistant cotton varieties.

  8. Genetic diversity within the genus Francisella as revealed by comparative analyses of the genomes of two North American isolates from environmental sources

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    Siddaramappa Shivakumara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen that causes tularemia in humans and the public health importance of this bacterium has been well documented in recent history. Francisella philomiragia, a distant relative of F. tularensis, is thought to constitute an environmental lineage along with Francisella novicida. Nevertheless, both F. philomiragia and F. novicida have been associated with human disease, primarily in immune-compromised individuals. To understand the genetic relationships and evolutionary contexts among different lineages within the genus Francisella, the genome of Francisella spp. strain TX07-7308 was sequenced and compared to the genomes of F. philomiragia strains ATCC 25017 and 25015, F. novicida strain U112, and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. Results The size of strain ATCC 25017 chromosome was 2,045,775 bp and contained 1,983 protein-coding genes. The size of strain TX07-7308 chromosome was 2,035,931 bp and contained 1,980 protein-coding genes. Pairwise BLAST comparisons indicated that strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 contained 1,700 protein coding genes in common. NUCmer analyses revealed that the chromosomes of strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 were mostly collinear except for a few gaps, translocations, and/or inversions. Using the genome sequence data and comparative analyses with other members of the genus Francisella (e.g., F. novicida strain U112 and F. tularensis strain Schu S4, several strain-specific genes were identified. Strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 contained an operon with six open reading frames encoding proteins related to enzymes involved in thiamine biosynthesis that was absent in F. novicida strain U112 and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. Strain ATCC 25017 contained an operon putatively involved in lactose metabolism that was absent in strain TX07-7308, F. novicida strain U112, and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. In contrast, strain TX07-7308 contained an operon putatively

  9. A model intercomparison analysing the link between column ozone and geopotential height anomalies in January

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    P. Braesicke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A statistical framework to evaluate the performance of chemistry-climate models with respect to the interaction between meteorology and column ozone during northern hemisphere mid-winter, in particularly January, is used. Different statistical diagnostics from four chemistry-climate models (E39C, ME4C, UMUCAM, ULAQ are compared with the ERA-40 re-analysis. First, we analyse vertical coherence in geopotential height anomalies as described by linear correlations between two different pressure levels (30 and 200 hPa of the atmosphere. In addition, linear correlations between column ozone and geopotential height anomalies at 200 hPa are discussed to motivate a simple picture of the meteorological impacts on column ozone on interannual timescales. Secondly, we discuss characteristic spatial structures in geopotential height and column ozone anomalies as given by their first two empirical orthogonal functions. Finally, we describe the covariance patterns between reconstructed anomalies of geopotential height and column ozone. In general we find good agreement between the models with higher horizontal resolution (E39C, ME4C, UMUCAM and ERA-40. The Pacific-North American (PNA pattern emerges as a useful qualitative benchmark for the model performance. Models with higher horizontal resolution and high upper boundary (ME4C and UMUCAM show good agreement with the PNA tripole derived from ERA-40 data, including the column ozone modulation over the Pacfic sector. The model with lowest horizontal resolution does not show a classic PNA pattern (ULAQ, and the model with the lowest upper boundary (E39C does not capture the PNA related column ozone variations over the Pacific sector. Those discrepancies have to be taken into account when providing confidence intervals for climate change integrations.

  10. PASMet: a web-based platform for prediction, modelling and analyses of metabolic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Arita, Masanori; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-07-01

    PASMet (Prediction, Analysis and Simulation of Metabolic networks) is a web-based platform for proposing and verifying mathematical models to understand the dynamics of metabolism. The advantages of PASMet include user-friendliness and accessibility, which enable biologists and biochemists to easily perform mathematical modelling. PASMet offers a series of user-functions to handle the time-series data of metabolite concentrations. The functions are organised into four steps: (i) Prediction of a probable metabolic pathway and its regulation; (ii) Construction of mathematical models; (iii) Simulation of metabolic behaviours; and (iv) Analysis of metabolic system characteristics. Each function contains various statistical and mathematical methods that can be used independently. Users who may not have enough knowledge of computing or programming can easily and quickly analyse their local data without software downloads, updates or installations. Users only need to upload their files in comma-separated values (CSV) format or enter their model equations directly into the website. Once the time-series data or mathematical equations are uploaded, PASMet automatically performs computation on server-side. Then, users can interactively view their results and directly download them to their local computers. PASMet is freely available with no login requirement at http://pasmet.riken.jp/ from major web browsers on Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems.

  11. Correlation of Klebsiella pneumoniae comparative genetic analyses with virulence profiles in a murine respiratory disease model.

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    Ramy A Fodah

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterial pathogen of worldwide importance and a significant contributor to multiple disease presentations associated with both nosocomial and community acquired disease. ATCC 43816 is a well-studied K. pneumoniae strain which is capable of causing an acute respiratory disease in surrogate animal models. In this study, we performed sequencing of the ATCC 43816 genome to support future efforts characterizing genetic elements required for disease. Furthermore, we performed comparative genetic analyses to the previously sequenced genomes from NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 to gain an understanding of the conservation of known virulence determinants amongst the three strains. We found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 both possess the known virulence determinant for yersiniabactin, as well as a Type 4 secretion system (T4SS, CRISPR system, and an acetonin catabolism locus, all absent from MGH 78578. While both NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 are clinical isolates, little is known about the disease potential of these strains in cell culture and animal models. Thus, we also performed functional analyses in the murine macrophage cell lines RAW264.7 and J774A.1 and found that MGH 78578 (K52 serotype was internalized at higher levels than ATCC 43816 (K2 and NTUH-K2044 (K1, consistent with previous characterization of the antiphagocytic properties of K1 and K2 serotype capsules. We also examined the three K. pneumoniae strains in a novel BALB/c respiratory disease model and found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 are highly virulent (LD50<100 CFU while MGH 78578 is relatively avirulent.

  12. Kinetic analyses and mathematical modeling of primary photochemical and photoelectrochemical processes in plant photosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenberg, Wim

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the model and simulation of primary photochemical and photo-electrochemical reactions in dark-adapted intact plant leaves is presented. A descriptive algorithm has been derived from analyses of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence and P700 oxidation kinetics upon excitation with multi-turnover pulses (MTFs) of variable intensity and duration. These analyses have led to definition and formulation of rate equations that describe the sequence of primary linear electron transfer (LET) steps in photosystem II (PSII) and of cyclic electron transport (CET) in PSI. The model considers heterogeneity in PSII reaction centers (RCs) associated with the S-states of the OEC and incorporates in a dark-adapted state the presence of a 15-35% fraction of Q(B)-nonreducing RCs that probably is identical with the S₀ fraction. The fluorescence induction algorithm (FIA) in the 10 μs-1s excitation time range considers a photochemical O-J-D, a photo-electrochemical J-I and an I-P phase reflecting the response of the variable fluorescence to the electric trans-thylakoid potential generated by the proton pump fuelled by CET in PSI. The photochemical phase incorporates the kinetics associated with the double reduction of the acceptor pair of pheophytin (Phe) and plastoquinone Q(A) [PheQ(A)] in Q(B) nonreducing RCs and the associated doubling of the variable fluorescence, in agreement with the three-state trapping model (TSTM) of PS II. The decline in fluorescence emission during the so called SMT in the 1-100s excitation time range, known as the Kautsky curve, is shown to be associated with a substantial decrease of CET-powered proton efflux from the stroma into the chloroplast lumen through the ATPsynthase of the photosynthetic machinery.

  13. D Recording for 2d Delivering - the Employment of 3d Models for Studies and Analyses -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, A.; Baratti, G.; Jiménez, B.; Girardi, S.; Remondino, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last years, thanks to the advances of surveying sensors and techniques, many heritage sites could be accurately replicated in digital form with very detailed and impressive results. The actual limits are mainly related to hardware capabilities, computation time and low performance of personal computer. Often, the produced models are not visible on a normal computer and the only solution to easily visualized them is offline using rendered videos. This kind of 3D representations is useful for digital conservation, divulgation purposes or virtual tourism where people can visit places otherwise closed for preservation or security reasons. But many more potentialities and possible applications are available using a 3D model. The problem is the ability to handle 3D data as without adequate knowledge this information is reduced to standard 2D data. This article presents some surveying and 3D modeling experiences within the APSAT project ("Ambiente e Paesaggi dei Siti d'Altura Trentini", i.e. Environment and Landscapes of Upland Sites in Trentino). APSAT is a multidisciplinary project funded by the Autonomous Province of Trento (Italy) with the aim documenting, surveying, studying, analysing and preserving mountainous and hill-top heritage sites located in the region. The project focuses on theoretical, methodological and technological aspects of the archaeological investigation of mountain landscape, considered as the product of sequences of settlements, parcelling-outs, communication networks, resources, and symbolic places. The mountain environment preserves better than others the traces of hunting and gathering, breeding, agricultural, metallurgical, symbolic activities characterised by different lengths and environmental impacts, from Prehistory to the Modern Period. Therefore the correct surveying and documentation of this heritage sites and material is very important. Within the project, the 3DOM unit of FBK is delivering all the surveying and 3D material to

  14. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network and pathway analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette J. A. Kogelman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH and differentially wired (DW networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g. NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g. metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways

  15. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network, and pathway analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Pant, Sameer D; Fredholm, Merete; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) and differentially wired (DW) networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g., NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g., metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic) obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways that underlie

  16. ChIP-seq and in vivo transcriptome analyses of the Aspergillus fumigatus SREBP SrbA reveals a new regulator of the fungal hypoxia response and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawoon Chung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Aspergillus fumigatus sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP SrbA belongs to the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH family of transcription factors and is crucial for antifungal drug resistance and virulence. The latter phenotype is especially striking, as loss of SrbA results in complete loss of virulence in murine models of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA. How fungal SREBPs mediate fungal virulence is unknown, though it has been suggested that lack of growth in hypoxic conditions accounts for the attenuated virulence. To further understand the role of SrbA in fungal infection site pathobiology, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq was used to identify genes under direct SrbA transcriptional regulation in hypoxia. These results confirmed the direct regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis and iron uptake by SrbA in hypoxia and revealed new roles for SrbA in nitrate assimilation and heme biosynthesis. Moreover, functional characterization of an SrbA target gene with sequence similarity to SrbA identified a new transcriptional regulator of the fungal hypoxia response and virulence, SrbB. SrbB co-regulates genes involved in heme biosynthesis and demethylation of C4-sterols with SrbA in hypoxic conditions. However, SrbB also has regulatory functions independent of SrbA including regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Loss of SrbB markedly attenuates A. fumigatus virulence, and loss of both SREBPs further reduces in vivo fungal growth. These data suggest that both A. fumigatus SREBPs are critical for hypoxia adaptation and virulence and reveal new insights into SREBPs' complex role in infection site adaptation and fungal virulence.

  17. Normalisation genes for expression analyses in the brown alga model Ectocarpus siliculosus

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    Rousvoal Sylvie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brown algae are plant multi-cellular organisms occupying most of the world coasts and are essential actors in the constitution of ecological niches at the shoreline. Ectocarpus siliculosus is an emerging model for brown algal research. Its genome has been sequenced, and several tools are being developed to perform analyses at different levels of cell organization, including transcriptomic expression analyses. Several topics, including physiological responses to osmotic stress and to exposure to contaminants and solvents are being studied in order to better understand the adaptive capacity of brown algae to pollution and environmental changes. A series of genes that can be used to normalise expression analyses is required for these studies. Results We monitored the expression of 13 genes under 21 different culture conditions. These included genes encoding proteins and factors involved in protein translation (ribosomal protein 26S, EF1alpha, IF2A, IF4E and protein degradation (ubiquitin, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme or folding (cyclophilin, and proteins involved in both the structure of the cytoskeleton (tubulin alpha, actin, actin-related proteins and its trafficking function (dynein, as well as a protein implicated in carbon metabolism (glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The stability of their expression level was assessed using the Ct range, and by applying both the geNorm and the Normfinder principles of calculation. Conclusion Comparisons of the data obtained with the three methods of calculation indicated that EF1alpha (EF1a was the best reference gene for normalisation. The normalisation factor should be calculated with at least two genes, alpha tubulin, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme or actin-related proteins being good partners of EF1a. Our results exclude actin as a good normalisation gene, and, in this, are in agreement with previous studies in other organisms.

  18. DESCRIPTION OF MODELING ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF THE 200-ZP-1 REMEDIAL DESIGN/REMEDIAL ACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VONGARGEN BH

    2009-11-03

    The Feasibility Study/or the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-28) and the Proposed Plan/or Remediation of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-33) describe the use of groundwater pump-and-treat technology for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) as part of an expanded groundwater remedy. During fiscal year 2008 (FY08), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport (flow and transport) model was developed to support remedy design decisions at the 200-ZP-1 OU. This model was developed because the size and influence of the proposed 200-ZP-1 groundwater pump-and-treat remedy will have a larger areal extent than the current interim remedy, and modeling is required to provide estimates of influent concentrations and contaminant mass removal rates to support the design of the aboveground treatment train. The 200 West Area Pre-Conceptual Design/or Final Extraction/Injection Well Network: Modeling Analyses (DOE/RL-2008-56) documents the development of the first version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS model of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau, as well as the initial application of that model to simulate a potential well field for the 200-ZP-1 remedy (considering only the contaminants carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99). This document focuses on the use of the flow and transport model to identify suitable extraction and injection well locations as part of the 200 West Area 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan (DOEIRL-2008-78). Currently, the model has been developed to the extent necessary to provide approximate results and to lay a foundation for the design basis concentrations that are required in support of the remedial design/remediation action (RD/RA) work plan. The discussion in this document includes the following: (1) Assignment of flow and transport parameters for the model; (2) Definition of initial conditions for the transport model for each simulated contaminant of concern (COC) (i.e., carbon

  19. Assessing the hydrodynamic boundary conditions for risk analyses in coastal areas: a stochastic storm surge model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wahl

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a methodology to stochastically simulate a large number of storm surge scenarios (here: 10 million. The applied model is very cheap in computation time and will contribute to improve the overall results from integrated risk analyses in coastal areas. Initially, the observed storm surge events from the tide gauges of Cuxhaven (located in the Elbe estuary and Hörnum (located in the southeast of Sylt Island are parameterised by taking into account 25 parameters (19 sea level parameters and 6 time parameters. Throughout the paper, the total water levels are considered. The astronomical tides are semidiurnal in the investigation area with a tidal range >2 m. The second step of the stochastic simulation consists in fitting parametric distribution functions to the data sets resulting from the parameterisation. The distribution functions are then used to run Monte-Carlo-Simulations. Based on the simulation results, a large number of storm surge scenarios are reconstructed. Parameter interdependencies are considered and different filter functions are applied to avoid inconsistencies. Storm surge scenarios, which are of interest for risk analyses, can easily be extracted from the results.

  20. Models for regionalizing economic data and their applications within the scope of forensic disaster analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hanns-Maximilian; Wiens, rer. pol. Marcus, , Dr.; Schultmann, rer. pol. Frank, Prof. _., Dr.

    2015-04-01

    The impact of natural hazards on the economic system can be observed in many different regions all over the world. Once the local economic structure is hit by an event direct costs instantly occur. However, the disturbance on a local level (e.g. parts of city or industries along a river bank) might also cause monetary damages in other, indirectly affected sectors. If the impact of an event is strong, these damages are likely to cascade and spread even on an international scale (e.g. the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull and its impact on the automotive sector in Europe). In order to determine these special impacts, one has to gain insights into the directly hit economic structure before being able to calculate these side effects. Especially, regarding the development of a model used for near real-time forensic disaster analyses any simulation needs to be based on data that is rapidly available or easily to be computed. Therefore, we investigated commonly used or recently discussed methodologies for regionalizing economic data. Surprisingly, even for German federal states there is no official input-output data available that can be used, although it might provide detailed figures concerning economic interrelations between different industry sectors. In the case of highly developed countries, such as Germany, we focus on models for regionalizing nationwide input-output table which is usually available at the national statistical offices. However, when it comes to developing countries (e.g. South-East Asia) the data quality and availability is usually much poorer. In this case, other sources need to be found for the proper assessment of regional economic performance. We developed an indicator-based model that can fill this gap because of its flexibility regarding the level of aggregation and the composability of different input parameters. Our poster presentation brings up a literature review and a summary on potential models that seem to be useful for this specific task

  1. Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    REPORT Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...TERMS AA5083, friction stir welding , Johnson-Cook material model M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, C.-F. Yen, B. A. Cheeseman Clemson University Office of...Use in Friction Stir Welding Computational Analyses Report Title ABSTRACT Johnson-Cook strength material model is frequently used in finite-element

  2. Robust hierarchical state-space models reveal diel variation in travel rates of migrating leatherback turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsen, Ian D; Myers, Ransom A; James, Michael C

    2006-09-01

    1. Biological and statistical complexity are features common to most ecological data that hinder our ability to extract meaningful patterns using conventional tools. Recent work on implementing modern statistical methods for analysis of such ecological data has focused primarily on population dynamics but other types of data, such as animal movement pathways obtained from satellite telemetry, can also benefit from the application of modern statistical tools. 2. We develop a robust hierarchical state-space approach for analysis of multiple satellite telemetry pathways obtained via the Argos system. State-space models are time-series methods that allow unobserved states and biological parameters to be estimated from data observed with error. We show that the approach can reveal important patterns in complex, noisy data where conventional methods cannot. 3. Using the largest Atlantic satellite telemetry data set for critically endangered leatherback turtles, we show that the diel pattern in travel rates of these turtles changes over different phases of their migratory cycle. While foraging in northern waters the turtles show similar travel rates during day and night, but on their southward migration to tropical waters travel rates are markedly faster during the day. These patterns are generally consistent with diving data, and may be related to changes in foraging behaviour. Interestingly, individuals that migrate southward to breed generally show higher daytime travel rates than individuals that migrate southward in a non-breeding year. 4. Our approach is extremely flexible and can be applied to many ecological analyses that use complex, sequential data.

  3. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange.

  4. Analyses of Research Topics in the Field of Informetrics Based on the Method of Topic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chien Lin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used the approach of topic modeling to uncover the possible structure of research topics in the field of Informetrics, to explore the distribution of the topics over years, and to compare the core journals. In order to infer the structure of the topics in the field, the data of the papers published in the Journal of Informetricsand Scientometrics during 2007 to 2013 are retrieved from the database of the Web of Science as input of the approach of topic modeling. The results of this study show that when the number of topics was set to 10, the topic model has the smallest perplexity. Although data scopes and analysis methodsare different to previous studies, the generating topics of this study are consistent with those results produced by analyses of experts. Empirical case studies and measurements of bibliometric indicators were concerned important in every year during the whole analytic period, and the field was increasing stability. Both the two core journals broadly paid more attention to all of the topics in the field of Informetrics. The Journal of Informetricsput particular emphasis on construction and applications ofbibliometric indicators and Scientometrics focused on the evaluation and the factors of productivity of countries, institutions, domains, and journals.

  5. Controls on the long term earthquake behavior of an intraplate fault revealed by U-Th and stable isotope analyses of syntectonic calcite veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randolph; Goodwin, Laurel; Sharp, Warren; Mozley, Peter

    2017-04-01

    U-Th dates on calcite precipitated in coseismic extension fractures in the Loma Blanca normal fault zone, Rio Grande rift, NM, USA, constrain earthquake recurrence intervals from 150-565 ka. This is the longest direct record of seismicity documented for a fault in any tectonic environment. Combined U-Th and stable isotope analyses of these calcite veins define 13 distinct earthquake events. These data show that for more than 400 ka the Loma Blanca fault produced earthquakes with a mean recurrence interval of 40 ± 7 ka. The coefficient of variation for these events is 0.40, indicating strongly periodic seismicity consistent with a time-dependent model of earthquake recurrence. Stochastic statistical analyses further validate the inference that earthquake behavior on the Loma Blanca was time-dependent. The time-dependent nature of these earthquakes suggests that the seismic cycle was fundamentally controlled by a stress renewal process. However, this periodic cycle was punctuated by an episode of clustered seismicity at 430 ka. Recurrence intervals within the earthquake cluster were as low as 5-11 ka. Breccia veins formed during this episode exhibit carbon isotope signatures consistent with having formed through pronounced degassing of a CO2 charged brine during post-failure, fault-localized fluid migration. The 40 ka periodicity of the long-term earthquake record of the Loma Blanca fault is similar in magnitude to recurrence intervals documented through paleoseismic studies of other normal faults in the Rio Grande rift and Basin and Range Province. We propose that it represents a background rate of failure in intraplate extension. The short-term, clustered seismicity that occurred on the fault records an interruption of the stress renewal process, likely by elevated fluid pressure in deeper structural levels of the fault, consistent with fault-valve behavior. The relationship between recurrence interval and inferred fluid degassing suggests that pore fluid pressure

  6. Testing a dual-systems model of adolescent brain development using resting-state connectivity analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijvenvoorde, A C K; Achterberg, M; Braams, B R; Peters, S; Crone, E A

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to test a dual-systems model of adolescent brain development by studying changes in intrinsic functional connectivity within and across networks typically associated with cognitive-control and affective-motivational processes. To this end, resting-state and task-related fMRI data were collected of 269 participants (ages 8-25). Resting-state analyses focused on seeds derived from task-related neural activation in the same participants: the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) from a cognitive rule-learning paradigm and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) from a reward-paradigm. Whole-brain seed-based resting-state analyses showed an age-related increase in dlPFC connectivity with the caudate and thalamus, and an age-related decrease in connectivity with the (pre)motor cortex. nAcc connectivity showed a strengthening of connectivity with the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and subcortical structures such as the hippocampus, and a specific age-related decrease in connectivity with the ventral medial PFC (vmPFC). Behavioral measures from both functional paradigms correlated with resting-state connectivity strength with their respective seed. That is, age-related change in learning performance was mediated by connectivity between the dlPFC and thalamus, and age-related change in winning pleasure was mediated by connectivity between the nAcc and vmPFC. These patterns indicate (i) strengthening of connectivity between regions that support control and learning, (ii) more independent functioning of regions that support motor and control networks, and (iii) more independent functioning of regions that support motivation and valuation networks with age. These results are interpreted vis-à-vis a dual-systems model of adolescent brain development.

  7. Comparative modeling analyses of Cs-137 fate in the rivers impacted by Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleznyak, M.; Kivva, S. [Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, Fukushima University (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The consequences of two largest nuclear accidents of the last decades - at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) (1986) and at Fukushima Daiichi NPP (FDNPP) (2011) clearly demonstrated that radioactive contamination of water bodies in vicinity of NPP and on the waterways from it, e.g., river- reservoir water after Chernobyl accident and rivers and coastal marine waters after Fukushima accident, in the both cases have been one of the main sources of the public concerns on the accident consequences. The higher weight of water contamination in public perception of the accidents consequences in comparison with the real fraction of doses via aquatic pathways in comparison with other dose components is a specificity of public perception of environmental contamination. This psychological phenomenon that was confirmed after these accidents provides supplementary arguments that the reliable simulation and prediction of the radionuclide dynamics in water and sediments is important part of the post-accidental radioecological research. The purpose of the research is to use the experience of the modeling activities f conducted for the past more than 25 years within the Chernobyl affected Pripyat River and Dnieper River watershed as also data of the new monitoring studies in Japan of Abukuma River (largest in the region - the watershed area is 5400 km{sup 2}), Kuchibuto River, Uta River, Niita River, Natsui River, Same River, as also of the studies on the specific of the 'water-sediment' {sup 137}Cs exchanges in this area to refine the 1-D model RIVTOX and 2-D model COASTOX for the increasing of the predictive power of the modeling technologies. The results of the modeling studies are applied for more accurate prediction of water/sediment radionuclide contamination of rivers and reservoirs in the Fukushima Prefecture and for the comparative analyses of the efficiency of the of the post -accidental measures to diminish the contamination of the water bodies. Document

  8. Development of microbial-enzyme-mediated decomposition model parameters through steady-state and dynamic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Microbial-ENzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model, based on the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, that describes the dynamics of physically defined pools of soil organic matter (SOC). These include particulate, mineral-associated, dissolved organic matter (POC, MOC, and DOC, respectively), microbial biomass, and associated exoenzymes. The ranges and/or distributions of parameters were determined by both analytical steady-state and dynamic analyses with SOC data from the literature. We used an improved multi-objective parameter sensitivity analysis (MOPSA) to identify the most important parameters for the full model: maintenance of microbial biomass, turnover and synthesis of enzymes, and carbon use efficiency (CUE). The model predicted an increase of 2 C (baseline temperature =12 C) caused the pools of POC-Cellulose, MOC, and total SOC to increase with dynamic CUE and decrease with constant CUE, as indicated by the 50% confidence intervals. Regardless of dynamic or constant CUE, the pool sizes of POC, MOC, and total SOC varied from 8% to 8% under +2 C. The scenario analysis using a single parameter set indicates that higher temperature with dynamic CUE might result in greater net increases in both POC-Cellulose and MOC pools. Different dynamics of various SOC pools reflected the catalytic functions of specific enzymes targeting specific substrates and the interactions between microbes, enzymes, and SOC. With the feasible parameter values estimated in this study, models incorporating fundamental principles of microbial-enzyme dynamics can lead to simulation results qualitatively different from traditional models with fast/slow/passive pools.

  9. Genomic analyses with biofilter 2.0: knowledge driven filtering, annotation, and model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Sarah A; Frase, Alex; Wallace, John; Wolfe, Daniel; Katiyar, Neerja; Moore, Carrie; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2013-12-30

    The ever-growing wealth of biological information available through multiple comprehensive database repositories can be leveraged for advanced analysis of data. We have now extensively revised and updated the multi-purpose software tool Biofilter that allows researchers to annotate and/or filter data as well as generate gene-gene interaction models based on existing biological knowledge. Biofilter now has the Library of Knowledge Integration (LOKI), for accessing and integrating existing comprehensive database information, including more flexibility for how ambiguity of gene identifiers are handled. We have also updated the way importance scores for interaction models are generated. In addition, Biofilter 2.0 now works with a range of types and formats of data, including single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identifiers, rare variant identifiers, base pair positions, gene symbols, genetic regions, and copy number variant (CNV) location information. Biofilter provides a convenient single interface for accessing multiple publicly available human genetic data sources that have been compiled in the supporting database of LOKI. Information within LOKI includes genomic locations of SNPs and genes, as well as known relationships among genes and proteins such as interaction pairs, pathways and ontological categories.Via Biofilter 2.0 researchers can:• Annotate genomic location or region based data, such as results from association studies, or CNV analyses, with relevant biological knowledge for deeper interpretation• Filter genomic location or region based data on biological criteria, such as filtering a series SNPs to retain only SNPs present in specific genes within specific pathways of interest• Generate Predictive Models for gene-gene, SNP-SNP, or CNV-CNV interactions based on biological information, with priority for models to be tested based on biological relevance, thus narrowing the search space and reducing multiple hypothesis-testing. Biofilter is a software

  10. Stable isotope analyses reveal the importance of seagrass beds as feeding areas for juvenile Myrophis punctatus (Angulliformes: Ophichthidae) inthe coastal waters of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The feeding habits and habitats of the speckled worm eel Myrophis punctatus were studied on the mangrove edge of the Indian River Lagoon (Florida) using stomach contents and stable isotope analyses of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). Stomach dietary analyses identified four tax...

  11. Medulloblastoma in China: clinicopathologic analyses of SHH, WNT, and non-SHH/WNT molecular subgroups reveal different therapeutic responses to adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is one of the most common primary central nervous system tumors in children. Data is lacking of a large cohort of medulloblastoma patients in China. Also, our knowledge on the sensitivity of different molecular subgroups of MB to adjuvant radiation therapy (RT or chemotherapy (CHT is still limited. The authors performed a retrospective study of 173 medulloblastoma patients treated at two institutions from 2002 to 2011. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues were available in all the cases and sections were stained to classify histological and molecular subgroups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to investigate prognostic factors. Of 173 patients, there were 118 children and 55 adults, 112 males and 61 females. Estimated 5-year overall survival (OS rates for all patients, children and adults were 52%, 48% and 63%, respectively. After multivariate analysis, postoperative primary radiation therapy (RT and chemotherapy (CHT were revealed as favorable prognostic factors influencing OS and EFS. Postoperative primary chemotherapy (CHT was found significantly improving the survival of children (p<0.001 while it was not a significant prognostic factor for adult patients. Moreover, patients in WNT subtype had better OS (p = 0.028 than others (SHH and Non-SHH/WNT subtypes given postoperative adjuvant therapies. Postoperative primary RT was found to be a strong prognostic factor influencing the survival in all histological and molecular subgroups (p<0.001. Postoperative primary CHT was found significantly to influence the survival of classic medulloblastoma (CMB (OS p<0.001, EFS p<0.001, SHH subgroup (OS p = 0.020, EFS p = 0.049 and WNT subgroup (OS p = 0.003, EFS p = 0.016 but not in desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma (DMB (OS p = 0.361, EFS p = 0.834 and Non-SHH/WNT subgroup (OS p = 0.127, EFS p = 0.055. Our study showed postoperative primary CHT significantly influence the

  12. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo, E-mail: shinks@dju.kr [Division of Life Science, Daejeon University, Daejeon, 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Biomedical Omics Team, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Ohcang, 368-883 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Analytical Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bio-Analytical Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae-Hyuk, E-mail: jyu1@wisc.edu [Departments of Bacteriology and Genetics, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

  13. Genes for the major structural components of Thermotogales species' togas revealed by proteomic and evolutionary analyses of OmpA and OmpB homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Petrus

    Full Text Available The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is their toga, an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been purified and characterized in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (or Ompα and the porin OmpB (or Ompβ. The gene encoding OmpA1 (ompA1 was cloned and sequenced and later assigned to TM0477 in the genome sequence, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB was not annotated. We identified six porin candidates in the genome sequence of T. maritima. Of these candidates, only one, encoded by TM0476, has all the characteristics reported for OmpB and characteristics expected of a porin including predominant β-sheet structure, a carboxy terminus porin anchoring motif, and a porin-specific amino acid composition. We highly enriched a toga fraction of cells for OmpB by sucrose gradient centrifugation and hydroxyapatite chromatography and analyzed it by LC/MS/MS. We found that the only porin candidate that it contained was the TM0476 product. This cell fraction also had β-sheet character as determined by circular dichroism, consistent with its enrichment for OmpB. We conclude that TM0476 encodes OmpB. A phylogenetic analysis of OmpB found orthologs encoded in syntenic locations in the genomes of all but two Thermotogales species. Those without orthologs have putative isofunctional genes in their place. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one or two OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1 (TM0477 and ompA2 (TM1729, both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath.

  14. Genes for the Major Structural Components of Thermotogales Species’ Togas Revealed by Proteomic and Evolutionary Analyses of OmpA and OmpB Homologs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrus, Amanda K.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Ranjit, Chaman R.; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M.; Gogarten, J Peter; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Noll, Kenneth M.

    2012-06-29

    The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is their toga, an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been purified and characterized in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (or Ompa) and the porin OmpB (or Ompb). The gene encoding OmpA1 (ompA1) was cloned and sequenced and later assigned to TM0477 in the genome sequence, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB) was not annotated. We identified six porin candidates in the genome sequence of T. maritima. Of these candidates, only one, encoded by TM0476, has all the characteristics reported for OmpB and characteristics expected of a porin including predominant b-sheet structure, a carboxy terminus porin anchoring motif, and a porin-specific amino acid composition. We highly enriched a toga fraction of cells for OmpB by sucrose gradient centrifugation and hydroxyapatite chromatography and analyzed it by LC/MS/MS. We found that the only porin candidate that it contained was the TM0476 product. This cell fraction also had b-sheet character as determined by circular dichroism, consistent with its enrichment for OmpB. We conclude that TM0476 encodes OmpB. A phylogenetic analysis of OmpB found orthologs encoded in syntenic locations in the genomes of all but two Thermotogales species. Those without orthologs have putative isofunctional genes in their place. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one or two OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1 (TM0477) and ompA2 (TM1729), both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath.

  15. Genes for the Major Structural Components of Thermotogales Species’ Togas Revealed by Proteomic and Evolutionary Analyses of OmpA and OmpB Homologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrus, Amanda K.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Ranjit, Chaman; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Noll, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is their toga, an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been purified and characterized in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (or Ompα) and the porin OmpB (or Ompβ). The gene encoding OmpA1 (ompA1) was cloned and sequenced and later assigned to TM0477 in the genome sequence, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB) was not annotated. We identified six porin candidates in the genome sequence of T. maritima. Of these candidates, only one, encoded by TM0476, has all the characteristics reported for OmpB and characteristics expected of a porin including predominant β-sheet structure, a carboxy terminus porin anchoring motif, and a porin-specific amino acid composition. We highly enriched a toga fraction of cells for OmpB by sucrose gradient centrifugation and hydroxyapatite chromatography and analyzed it by LC/MS/MS. We found that the only porin candidate that it contained was the TM0476 product. This cell fraction also had β-sheet character as determined by circular dichroism, consistent with its enrichment for OmpB. We conclude that TM0476 encodes OmpB. A phylogenetic analysis of OmpB found orthologs encoded in syntenic locations in the genomes of all but two Thermotogales species. Those without orthologs have putative isofunctional genes in their place. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one or two OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1 (TM0477) and ompA2 (TM1729), both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath. PMID:22768259

  16. Expression atlas and comparative coexpression network analyses reveal important genes involved in the formation of lignified cell wall in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibout, Richard; Proost, Sebastian; Hansen, Bjoern Oest; Vaid, Neha; Giorgi, Federico M; Ho-Yue-Kuang, Severine; Legée, Frédéric; Cézart, Laurent; Bouchabké-Coussa, Oumaya; Soulhat, Camille; Provart, Nicholas; Pasha, Asher; Le Bris, Philippe; Roujol, David; Hofte, Herman; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lapierre, Catherine; Persson, Staffan; Mutwil, Marek

    2017-08-01

    While Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) is an emerging model for grasses, no expression atlas or gene coexpression network is available. Such tools are of high importance to provide insights into the function of Brachypodium genes. We present a detailed Brachypodium expression atlas, capturing gene expression in its major organs at different developmental stages. The data were integrated into a large-scale coexpression database ( www.gene2function.de), enabling identification of duplicated pathways and conserved processes across 10 plant species, thus allowing genome-wide inference of gene function. We highlight the importance of the atlas and the platform through the identification of duplicated cell wall modules, and show that a lignin biosynthesis module is conserved across angiosperms. We identified and functionally characterised a putative ferulate 5-hydroxylase gene through overexpression of it in Brachypodium, which resulted in an increase in lignin syringyl units and reduced lignin content of mature stems, and led to improved saccharification of the stem biomass. Our Brachypodium expression atlas thus provides a powerful resource to reveal functionally related genes, which may advance our understanding of important biological processes in grasses. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Metabolic model for the filamentous ‘Candidatus Microthrix parvicella' based on genomic and metagenomic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jon McIlroy, Simon; Kristiansen, Rikke; Albertsen, Mads; Michael Karst, Søren; Rossetti, Simona; Lund Nielsen, Jeppe; Tandoi, Valter; James Seviour, Robert; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2013-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Microthrix parvicella' is a lipid-accumulating, filamentous bacterium so far found only in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants, where it is a common causative agent of sludge separation problems. Despite attracting considerable interest, its detailed physiology is still unclear. In this study, the genome of the RN1 strain was sequenced and annotated, which facilitated the construction of a theoretical metabolic model based on available in situ and axenic experimental data. This model proposes that under anaerobic conditions, this organism accumulates preferentially long-chain fatty acids as triacylglycerols. Utilisation of trehalose and/or polyphosphate stores or partial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids may supply the energy required for anaerobic lipid uptake and storage. Comparing the genome sequence of this isolate with metagenomes from two full-scale wastewater treatment plants with enhanced biological phosphorus removal reveals high similarity, with few metabolic differences between the axenic and the dominant community ‘Ca. M. parvicella' strains. Hence, the metabolic model presented in this paper could be considered generally applicable to strains in full-scale treatment systems. The genomic information obtained here will provide the basis for future research into in situ gene expression and regulation. Such information will give substantial insight into the ecophysiology of this unusual and biotechnologically important filamentous bacterium. PMID:23446830

  18. Controls on Yardang Morphology: Insights from Field Measurements, Lidar Topographic Analyses, and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J. D.; Kapp, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Yardangs are streamlined bedforms sculpted by the wind and wind-blown sand. They can form as relatively resistant exposed rocks erode more slowly than surrounding exposed rocks, thus causing the more resistant rocks to stand higher in the landscape and deflect the wind and wind-blown sand into adjacent troughs in a positive feedback. How this feedback gives rise to streamlined forms that locally have a consistent size is not well understood theoretically. In this study we combine field measurements in the yardangs of Ocotillo Wells SVRA with analyses of airborne and terrestrial lidar datasets and numerical modeling to quantify and understand the controls on yardang morphology. The classic model for yardang morphology is that they evolve to an ideal 4:1 length-to-width aspect ratio that minimizes aerodynamic drag. We show using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling that this model is incorrect: the 4:1 aspect ratio is the value corresponding to minimum drag for free bodies, i.e. obstacles around which air flows on all sides. Yardangs, in contrast, are embedded in Earth's surface. For such rough streamlined half-bodies, the aspect ratio corresponding to minimum drag is larger than 20:1. As an alternative to the minimum-drag model, we propose that the aspect ratio of yardangs not significantly influenced by structural controls is controlled by the angle of dispersion of the aerodynamic jet created as deflected wind and wind-blown sand exits the troughs between incipient yardang noses. Aerodynamic jets have a universal dispersion angle of 11.8 degrees, thus predicting a yardang aspect ratio of ~5:1. We developed a landscape evolution model that combines the physics of boundary layer flow with aeolian saltation and bedrock erosion to form yardangs with a range of sizes and aspect ratios similar to those observed in nature. Yardangs with aspect ratios both larger and smaller than 5:1 occur in the model since the strike and dip of the resistant rock unit also exerts

  19. Exploring prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretation of student thinking through analysing students' work in modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Makbule Gozde; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Cetinkaya, Bulent; Cakiroglu, Erdinc; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2016-09-01

    Researchers point out the importance of teachers' knowledge of student thinking and the role of examining student work in various contexts to develop a knowledge base regarding students' ways of thinking. This study investigated prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretations of students' thinking as manifested in students' work that embodied solutions of mathematical modelling tasks. The data were collected from 25 prospective mathematics teachers enrolled in an undergraduate course through four 2-week-long cycles. Analysis of data revealed that the prospective teachers interpreted students' thinking in four ways: describing, questioning, explaining, and comparing. Moreover, whereas some of the prospective teachers showed a tendency to increase their attention to the meaning of students' ways of thinking more while they engaged in students' work in depth over time and experience, some of them continued to focus on only judging the accuracy of students' thinking. The implications of the findings for understanding and developing prospective teachers' ways of interpreting students' thinking are discussed.

  20. Analysing Amazonian forest productivity using a new individual and trait-based model (TFS v.1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyllas, N. M.; Gloor, E.; Mercado, L. M.; Sitch, S.; Quesada, C. A.; Domingues, T. F.; Galbraith, D. R.; Torre-Lezama, A.; Vilanova, E.; Ramírez-Angulo, H.; Higuchi, N.; Neill, D. A.; Silveira, M.; Ferreira, L.; Aymard C., G. A.; Malhi, Y.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.

    2014-07-01

    Repeated long-term censuses have revealed large-scale spatial patterns in Amazon basin forest structure and dynamism, with some forests in the west of the basin having up to a twice as high rate of aboveground biomass production and tree recruitment as forests in the east. Possible causes for this variation could be the climatic and edaphic gradients across the basin and/or the spatial distribution of tree species composition. To help understand causes of this variation a new individual-based model of tropical forest growth, designed to take full advantage of the forest census data available from the Amazonian Forest Inventory Network (RAINFOR), has been developed. The model allows for within-stand variations in tree size distribution and key functional traits and between-stand differences in climate and soil physical and chemical properties. It runs at the stand level with four functional traits - leaf dry mass per area (Ma), leaf nitrogen (NL) and phosphorus (PL) content and wood density (DW) varying from tree to tree - in a way that replicates the observed continua found within each stand. We first applied the model to validate canopy-level water fluxes at three eddy covariance flux measurement sites. For all three sites the canopy-level water fluxes were adequately simulated. We then applied the model at seven plots, where intensive measurements of carbon allocation are available. Tree-by-tree multi-annual growth rates generally agreed well with observations for small trees, but with deviations identified for larger trees. At the stand level, simulations at 40 plots were used to explore the influence of climate and soil nutrient availability on the gross (ΠG) and net (ΠN) primary production rates as well as the carbon use efficiency (CU). Simulated ΠG, ΠN and CU were not associated with temperature. On the other hand, all three measures of stand level productivity were positively related to both mean annual precipitation and soil nutrient status

  1. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šimůnek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šimůnek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary

  2. A Hidden Markov model web application for analysing bacterial genomotyping DNA microarray experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Hinds, Jason; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2006-01-01

    Whole genome DNA microarray genomotyping experiments compare the gene content of different species or strains of bacteria. A statistical approach to analysing the results of these experiments was developed, based on a Hidden Markov model (HMM), which takes adjacency of genes along the genome into account when calling genes present or absent. The model was implemented in the statistical language R and applied to three datasets. The method is numerically stable with good convergence properties. Error rates are reduced compared with approaches that ignore spatial information. Moreover, the HMM circumvents a problem encountered in a conventional analysis: determining the cut-off value to use to classify a gene as absent. An Apache Struts web interface for the R script was created for the benefit of users unfamiliar with R. The application may be found at http://hmmgd.cryst.bbk.ac.uk/hmmgd. The source code illustrating how to run R scripts from an Apache Struts-based web application is available from the corresponding author on request. The application is also available for local installation if required.

  3. Global isoprene emissions estimated using MEGAN, ECMWF analyses and a detailed canopy environment model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Müller

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The global emissions of isoprene are calculated at 0.5° resolution for each year between 1995 and 2006, based on the MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2 model (Guenther et al., 2006 and a detailed multi-layer canopy environment model for the calculation of leaf temperature and visible radiation fluxes. The calculation is driven by meteorological fields – air temperature, cloud cover, downward solar irradiance, windspeed, volumetric soil moisture in 4 soil layers – provided by analyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. The estimated annual global isoprene emission ranges between 374 Tg (in 1996 and 449 Tg (in 1998 and 2005, for an average of ca. 410 Tg/year over the whole period, i.e. about 30% less than the standard MEGAN estimate (Guenther et al., 2006. This difference is due, to a large extent, to the impact of the soil moisture stress factor, which is found here to decrease the global emissions by more than 20%. In qualitative agreement with past studies, high annual emissions are found to be generally associated with El Niño events. The emission inventory is evaluated against flux measurement campaigns at Harvard forest (Massachussets and Tapajós in Amazonia, showing that the model can capture quite well the short-term variability of emissions, but that it fails to reproduce the observed seasonal variation at the tropical rainforest site, with largely overestimated wet season fluxes. The comparison of the HCHO vertical columns calculated by a chemistry and transport model (CTM with HCHO distributions retrieved from space provides useful insights on tropical isoprene emissions. For example, the relatively low emissions calculated over Western Amazonia (compared to the corresponding estimates in the inventory of Guenther et al., 1995 are validated by the excellent agreement found between the CTM and HCHO data over this region. The parameterized impact of the soil moisture

  4. Stream Tracer Integrity: Comparative Analyses of Rhodamine-WT and Sodium Chloride through Transient Storage Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smull, E. M.; Wlostowski, A. N.; Gooseff, M. N.; Bowden, W. B.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    Solute transport in natural channels describes the transport of water and dissolved matter through a river reach of interest. Conservative tracers allow us to label a parcel of stream water, such that we can track its movement downstream through space and time. A transient storage model (TSM) can be fit to the breakthrough curve (BTC) following a stream tracer experiment, as a way to quantify advection, dispersion, and transient storage processes. Arctic streams and rivers, in particular, are continuously underlain by permafrost, which provides for a simplified surface water-groundwater exchange. Sodium chloride (NaCl) and Rhodamine-WT (RWT) are widely used tracers, and differences between the two in conservative behavior and detection limits have been noted in small-scale field and laboratory studies. This study seeks to further this understanding by applying the OTIS model to NaCl and RWT BTC data from a field study on the Kuparuk River, Alaska, at varying flow rates. There are two main questions to be answered: 1) Do differences in NaCl and RWT manifest in OTIS parameter values? 2) Are the OTIS model results reliable for NaCl, RWT, or both? Fieldwork was performed in the summer of 2012 on the Kuparuk River, and modeling was performed using a modified OTIS framework, which provided for parameter optimization and further global sensitivity analyses. The results of this study will contribute to the greater body of literature surrounding Arctic stream hydrology, and it will assist in methodology for future tracer field studies. Additionally, the modeling work will provide an analysis for OTIS parameter identifiability, and assess stream tracer integrity (i.e. how well the BTC data represents the system) and its relation to TSM performance (i.e. how well the TSM can find a unique fit to the BTC data). The quantitative tools used can be applied to other solute transport studies, to better understand potential deviations in model outcome due to stream tracer choice and

  5. Analysing Amazonian forest productivity using a new individual and trait-based model (TFS v.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Fyllas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated long-term censuses have revealed large-scale spatial patterns in Amazon Basin forest structure and dynamism, with some forests in the west of the Basin having up to a twice as high rate of aboveground biomass production and tree recruitment as forests in the east. Possible causes for this variation could be the climatic and edaphic gradients across the Basin and/or the spatial distribution of tree species composition. To help understand causes of this variation a new individual-based model of tropical forest growth designed to take full advantage of the forest census data available from the Amazonian Forest Inventory Network (RAINFOR has been developed. The model incorporates variations in tree size distribution, functional traits and soil physical properties and runs at the stand level with four functional traits, leaf dry mass per area (Ma, leaf nitrogen (NL and phosphorus (PL content and wood density (DW used to represent a continuum of plant strategies found in tropical forests. We first applied the model to validate canopy-level water fluxes at three Amazon eddy flux sites. For all three sites the canopy-level water fluxes were adequately simulated. We then applied the model at seven plots, where intensive measurements of carbon allocation are available. Tree-by-tree multi-annual growth rates generally agreed well with observations for small trees, but with deviations identified for large trees. At the stand-level, simulations at 40 plots were used to explore the influence of climate and soil fertility on the gross (ΠG and net (ΠN primary production rates as well as the carbon use efficiency (CU. Simulated ΠG, ΠN and CU were not associated with temperature. However all three measures of stand level productivity were positively related to annual precipitation and soil fertility.

  6. Neural Spike-Train Analyses of the Speech-Based Envelope Power Spectrum Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha H. Rallapalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing and treating hearing impairment is challenging because people with similar degrees of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL often have different speech-recognition abilities. The speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM has demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRENV from a modulation filter bank provides a robust speech-intelligibility measure across a wider range of degraded conditions than many long-standing models. In the sEPSM, noise (N is assumed to: (a reduce S + N envelope power by filling in dips within clean speech (S and (b introduce an envelope noise floor from intrinsic fluctuations in the noise itself. While the promise of SNRENV has been demonstrated for normal-hearing listeners, it has not been thoroughly extended to hearing-impaired listeners because of limited physiological knowledge of how SNHL affects speech-in-noise envelope coding relative to noise alone. Here, envelope coding to speech-in-noise stimuli was quantified from auditory-nerve model spike trains using shuffled correlograms, which were analyzed in the modulation-frequency domain to compute modulation-band estimates of neural SNRENV. Preliminary spike-train analyses show strong similarities to the sEPSM, demonstrating feasibility of neural SNRENV computations. Results suggest that individual differences can occur based on differential degrees of outer- and inner-hair-cell dysfunction in listeners currently diagnosed into the single audiological SNHL category. The predicted acoustic-SNR dependence in individual differences suggests that the SNR-dependent rate of susceptibility could be an important metric in diagnosing individual differences. Future measurements of the neural SNRENV in animal studies with various forms of SNHL will provide valuable insight for understanding individual differences in speech-in-noise intelligibility.

  7. Coupled biophysical global ocean model and molecular genetic analyses identify multiple introductions of cryptogenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Michael N; Sen Gupta, Alex; England, Matthew H

    2005-08-23

    The anthropogenic introduction of exotic species is one of the greatest modern threats to marine biodiversity. Yet exotic species introductions remain difficult to predict and are easily misunderstood because knowledge of natural dispersal patterns, species diversity, and biogeography is often insufficient to distinguish between a broadly dispersed natural population and an exotic one. Here we compare a global molecular phylogeny of a representative marine meroplanktonic taxon, the moon-jellyfish Aurelia, with natural dispersion patterns predicted by a global biophysical ocean model. Despite assumed high dispersal ability, the phylogeny reveals many cryptic species and predominantly regional structure with one notable exception: the globally distributed Aurelia sp.1, which, molecular data suggest, may occasionally traverse the Pacific unaided. This possibility is refuted by the ocean model, which shows much more limited dispersion and patterns of distribution broadly consistent with modern biogeographic zones, thus identifying multiple introductions worldwide of this cryptogenic species. This approach also supports existing evidence that (i) the occurrence in Hawaii of Aurelia sp. 4 and other native Indo-West Pacific species with similar life histories is most likely due to anthropogenic translocation, and (ii) there may be a route for rare natural colonization of northeast North America by the European marine snail Littorina littorea, whose status as endemic or exotic is unclear.

  8. Mental model mapping as a new tool to analyse the use of information in decision-making in integrated water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, M. J.; Kok, M.; van der Veen, A.

    The solution of complex, unstructured problems is faced with policy controversy and dispute, unused and misused knowledge, project delay and failure, and decline of public trust in governmental decisions. Mental model mapping (also called concept mapping) is a technique to analyse these difficulties on a fundamental cognitive level, which can reveal experiences, perceptions, assumptions, knowledge and subjective beliefs of stakeholders, experts and other actors, and can stimulate communication and learning. This article presents the theoretical framework from which the use of mental model mapping techniques to analyse this type of problems emerges as a promising technique. The framework consists of the problem solving or policy design cycle, the knowledge production or modelling cycle, and the (computer) model as interface between the cycles. Literature attributes difficulties in the decision-making process to communication gaps between decision makers, stakeholders and scientists, and to the construction of knowledge within different paradigm groups that leads to different interpretation of the problem situation. Analysis of the decision-making process literature indicates that choices, which are made in all steps of the problem solving cycle, are based on an individual decision maker’s frame of perception. This frame, in turn, depends on the mental model residing in the mind of the individual. Thus we identify three levels of awareness on which the decision process can be analysed. This research focuses on the third level. Mental models can be elicited using mapping techniques. In this way, analysing an individual’s mental model can shed light on decision-making problems. The steps of the knowledge production cycle are, in the same manner, ultimately driven by the mental models of the scientist in a specific discipline. Remnants of this mental model can be found in the resulting computer model. The characteristics of unstructured problems (complexity

  9. Distributed Modeling Reveals the Ecohydrological Dynamics Linked with Woody Plant Encroachment in the Sonoran Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, N. A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C.; Saripalli, S.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2012-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is an important issue facing semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern United States that is associated with grazing pressures, fire suppression, and the invasion of shrub species into historical grasslands. In this study, we present observational and distributed modeling activities conducted in two small rangeland watersheds of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, Arizona. This Sonoran Desert landscape is representative of the vegetation shift from grasslands to a woody savanna due to the encroachment of velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina). The paired basins are similar in size and in close proximity, leading to equivalent meteorological and soil conditions. Nevertheless, they vary substantially in mesquite cover, with one basin having undergone a removal treatment several decades ago, while the other watershed represents the regional encroachment process. This distinction presents an excellent case study for analyzing the effects of mesquite encroachment on dryland ecohydrological dynamics. Observational datasets are obtained from a high-resolution environmental sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, twenty-one soil moisture and temperature profiles, five channel runoff flumes and an eddy covariance tower with a complete set of radiation, energy, carbon and water fluxes. In addition, high-resolution digital terrain models and image orthomosaics were obtained from a piloted aircraft with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera. These two remote sensing platforms allowed characterizing the topography, stream network and plant species distributions at a high resolution (<1 m) in both basins. Using the sensor network, we present comparative analyses of watershed rainfall-runoff transformation in the paired basins, illustrating the role that mesquite trees have in runoff generation at the two outlet flumes. We further explore the impact of mesquite trees on the soil

  10. Transcriptomics and proteomics analyses of the PACAP38 influenced ischemic brain in permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion model mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Motohide

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is considered to be a potential therapeutic agent for prevention of cerebral ischemia. Ischemia is a most common cause of death after heart attack and cancer causing major negative social and economic consequences. This study was designed to investigate the effect of PACAP38 injection intracerebroventrically in a mouse model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (PMCAO along with corresponding SHAM control that used 0.9% saline injection. Methods Ischemic and non-ischemic brain tissues were sampled at 6 and 24 hours post-treatment. Following behavioral analyses to confirm whether the ischemia has occurred, we investigated the genome-wide changes in gene and protein expression using DNA microarray chip (4x44K, Agilent and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS, respectively. Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining were also used to further examine the identified protein factor. Results Our results revealed numerous changes in the transcriptome of ischemic hemisphere (ipsilateral treated with PACAP38 compared to the saline-injected SHAM control hemisphere (contralateral. Previously known (such as the interleukin family and novel (Gabra6, Crtam genes were identified under PACAP influence. In parallel, 2-DGE analysis revealed a highly expressed protein spot in the ischemic hemisphere that was identified as dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DPYL2. The DPYL2, also known as Crmp2, is a marker for the axonal growth and nerve development. Interestingly, PACAP treatment slightly increased its abundance (by 2-DGE and immunostaining at 6 h but not at 24 h in the ischemic hemisphere, suggesting PACAP activates neuronal defense mechanism early on. Conclusions This study provides a detailed inventory of PACAP influenced gene expressions

  11. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals inherent biological variation in yeast and nematode model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Lemire, Bernard D., E-mail: bernard.lemire@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, School of Molecular and Systems Medicine (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    The application of metabolomics to human and animal model systems is poised to provide great insight into our understanding of disease etiology and the metabolic changes that are associated with these conditions. However, metabolomic studies have also revealed that there is significant, inherent biological variation in human samples and even in samples from animal model systems where the animals are housed under carefully controlled conditions. This inherent biological variability is an important consideration for all metabolomics analyses. In this study, we examined the biological variation in {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling of two model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using relative standard deviations (RSD) as a measure of variability, our results reveal that both model systems have significant amounts of biological variation. The C. elegans metabolome possesses greater metabolic variance with average RSD values of 29 and 39%, depending on the food source that was used. The S. cerevisiae exometabolome RSD values ranged from 8% to 12% for the four strains examined. We also determined whether biological variation occurs between pairs of phenotypically identical yeast strains. Multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to discriminate between pair members based on their metabolic phenotypes. Our results highlight the variability of the metabolome that exists even for less complex model systems cultured under defined conditions. We also highlight the efficacy of metabolic profiling for defining these subtle metabolic alterations.

  12. Parallel phylogenetic analyses using the N, G or Nv gene from a fixed group of VHSV isolates reveal the same overall genetic typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Ahrens, Peter; Lorenzen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Different genetic regions representing the viral phospho-(P), nucleocapsid-(N) or glyco-protein (G) gene have been used for phylogenetic studies of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Since these analyses were performed on different virus isolates using various genomic regions, it has been...

  13. Integrated transcript and genome analyses reveal NKX2-1 and MEF2C as potential oncogenes in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homminga, I.; Pieters, R.; Langerak, A.W.; de Rooi, J.J.; Stubbs, A.; Verstegen, M.; Vuerhard, M.; Buijs-Gladdines, J.; Kooi, C.; Klous, P.; van Vlierberghe, P.; Ferrando, A.A.; Cayuela, J.M.; Verhaaf, B.; Beverloo, H.B.; Horstmann, M.; de Haas, V.; Wiekmeijer, A.S.; Pike-Overzet, K.; Staal, F.J.; de Laat, W.; Soulier, J.; Sigaux, F.; Meijerink, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    To identify oncogenic pathways in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we combined expression profiling of 117 pediatric patient samples and detailed molecular-cytogenetic analyses including the Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip (4C) method. Two T-ALL subtypes were identified that lack

  14. RNA-Seq transcriptomics and pathway analyses reveal potential regulatory genes and molecular mechanisms in high- and low-residual feed intake in Nordic dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salleh, M. S.; Mazzoni, G.; Höglund, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    genes and biomarkers was derived for their potential inclusion in breeding programmes to improve FE. The bovine RNA-Seq gene expression data from the liver was analysed to identify DEGs and, subsequently, identify the molecular mechanisms, pathways and possible candidate biomarkers of feed efficiency...

  15. The usefulness of optical analyses for detecting vulnerable plaques using rabbit models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kanji; Ishihara, Miya; Kawauchi, Satoko; Shiomi, Masashi; Kikuchi, Makoto; Kaji, Tatsumi

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has become a widely used option for treatment of carotid stenosis. Although technical improvements have led to a decrease in complications related to CAS, distal embolism continues to be a problem. The purpose of this research was to investigate the usefulness of optical methods (Time-Resolved Laser- Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy [TR-LIFS] and reflection spectroscopy [RS] as diagnostic tools for assessment of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions, using rabbit models of vulnerable plaque. Materials & Methods: Male Japanese white rabbits were divided into a high cholesterol diet group and a normal diet group. In addition, we used a Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit, because we confirmed the reliability of our animal model for this study. Experiment 1: TR-LIFS. Fluorescence was induced using the third harmonic wave of a Q switch Nd:YAG laser. The TR-LIFS was performed using a photonic multi-channel analyzer with ICCD (wavelength range, 200 - 860 nm). Experiment 2: RS. Refection spectra in the wavelength range of 900 to 1700 nm were acquired using a spectrometer. Results: In the TR-LIFS, the wavelength at the peak was longer by plaque formation. The TR-LIFS method revealed a difference in peak levels between a normal aorta and a lipid-rich aorta. The RS method showed increased absorption from 1450 to 1500 nm for lipid-rich plaques. We observed absorption around 1200 nm due to lipid only in the WHHL group. Conclusion: These methods using optical analysis might be useful for diagnosis of vulnerable plaques. Keywords: Carotid artery stenting, vulnerable plaque, Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence

  16. Modeling Acequia Irrigation Systems Using System Dynamics: Model Development, Evaluation, and Sensitivity Analyses to Investigate Effects of Socio-Economic and Biophysical Feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Turner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture-based irrigation communities of northern New Mexico have survived for centuries despite the arid environment in which they reside. These irrigation communities are threatened by regional population growth, urbanization, a changing demographic profile, economic development, climate change, and other factors. Within this context, we investigated the extent to which community resource management practices centering on shared resources (e.g., water for agricultural in the floodplains and grazing resources in the uplands and mutualism (i.e., shared responsibility of local residents to maintaining traditional irrigation policies and upholding cultural and spiritual observances embedded within the community structure influence acequia function. We used a system dynamics modeling approach as an interdisciplinary platform to integrate these systems, specifically the relationship between community structure and resource management. In this paper we describe the background and context of acequia communities in northern New Mexico and the challenges they face. We formulate a Dynamic Hypothesis capturing the endogenous feedbacks driving acequia community vitality. Development of the model centered on major stock-and-flow components, including linkages for hydrology, ecology, community, and economics. Calibration metrics were used for model evaluation, including statistical correlation of observed and predicted values and Theil inequality statistics. Results indicated that the model reproduced trends exhibited by the observed system. Sensitivity analyses of socio-cultural processes identified absentee decisions, cumulative income effect on time in agriculture, and land use preference due to time allocation, community demographic effect, effect of employment on participation, and farm size effect as key determinants of system behavior and response. Sensitivity analyses of biophysical parameters revealed that several key parameters (e.g., acres per

  17. Robust and portable capacity computing method for many finite element analyses of a high-fidelity crustal structure model aimed for coseismic slip estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agata, Ryoichiro; Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hori, Takane; Hori, Muneo

    2016-09-01

    Computation of many Green's functions (GFs) in finite element (FE) analyses of crustal deformation is an essential technique in inverse analyses of coseismic slip estimations. In particular, analysis based on a high-resolution FE model (high-fidelity model) is expected to contribute to the construction of a community standard FE model and benchmark solution. Here, we propose a naive but robust and portable capacity computing method to compute many GFs using a high-fidelity model, assuming that various types of PC clusters are used. The method is based on the master-worker model, implemented using the Message Passing Interface (MPI), to perform robust and efficient input/output operations. The method was applied to numerical experiments of coseismic slip estimation in the Tohoku region of Japan; comparison of the estimated results with those generated using lower-fidelity models revealed the benefits of using a high-fidelity FE model in coseismic slip distribution estimation. Additionally, the proposed method computes several hundred GFs more robustly and efficiently than methods without the master-worker model and MPI.

  18. Usefulness of non-linear input-output models for economic impact analyses in tourism and recreation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, J.; Peerlings, J.H.M.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In tourism and recreation management it is still common practice to apply traditional input–output (IO) economic impact models, despite their well-known limitations. In this study the authors analyse the usefulness of applying a non-linear input–output (NLIO) model, in which price-induced input subs

  19. A model using marginal efficiency of investment to analyse carbon and nitrogen interactions in forested ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. Q.; Williams, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles are coupled in terrestrial ecosystems through multiple processes including photosynthesis, tissue allocation, respiration, N fixation, N uptake, and decomposition of litter and soil organic matter. Capturing the constraint of N on terrestrial C uptake and storage has been a focus of the Earth System modelling community. Here we explore the trade-offs and sensitivities of allocating C and N to different tissues in order to optimize the productivity of plants using a new, simple model of ecosystem C-N cycling and interactions (ACONITE). ACONITE builds on theory related to plant economics in order to predict key ecosystem properties (leaf area index, leaf C:N, N fixation, and plant C use efficiency) based on the optimization of the marginal change in net C or N uptake associated with a change in allocation of C or N to plant tissues. We simulated and evaluated steady-state and transient ecosystem stocks and fluxes in three different forest ecosystems types (tropical evergreen, temperate deciduous, and temperate evergreen). Leaf C:N differed among the three ecosystem types (temperate deciduous traits. Gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP) estimates compared well to observed fluxes at the simulation sites. A sensitivity analysis revealed that parameterization of the relationship between leaf N and leaf respiration had the largest influence on leaf area index and leaf C:N. Also, a widely used linear leaf N-respiration relationship did not yield a realistic leaf C:N, while a more recently reported non-linear relationship simulated leaf C:N that compared better to the global trait database than the linear relationship. Overall, our ability to constrain leaf area index and allow spatially and temporally variable leaf C:N can help address challenges simulating these properties in ecosystem and Earth System models. Furthermore, the simple approach with emergent properties based on coupled C-N dynamics has

  20. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-01-29

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases.

  1. Rembrandt and/ or studio, Saul and David, c.1655: revealing the curtain using cross-section analyses and X-ray fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, P.; van Loon, A.; Alfeld, M.; Janssens, K.; Dik, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent technical investigation of a late Rembrandt painting - Saul and David, c.1655 - from the collection of the Mauritshuis in The Hague has revealed important new information regarding the picture’s condition and original appearance. As already known, at some point in the past, the two figures we

  2. Rembrandt and/ or studio, Saul and David, c.1655: revealing the curtain using cross-section analyses and X-ray fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, P.; van Loon, A.; Alfeld, M.; Janssens, K.; Dik, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent technical investigation of a late Rembrandt painting - Saul and David, c.1655 - from the collection of the Mauritshuis in The Hague has revealed important new information regarding the picture’s condition and original appearance. As already known, at some point in the past, the two figures

  3. A simple beam model to analyse the durability of adhesively bonded tile floorings in presence of shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. de Miranda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple beam model for the evaluation of tile debonding due to substrate shrinkage is presented. The tile-adhesive-substrate package is modeled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam laying on a two-layer elastic foundation. An effective discrete model for inter-tile grouting is introduced with the aim of modelling workmanship defects due to partial filled groutings. The model is validated using the results of a 2D FE model. Different defect configurations and adhesive typologies are analysed, focusing the attention on the prediction of normal stresses in the adhesive layer under the assumption of Mode I failure of the adhesive.

  4. An alternative model for the early peopling of southern South America revealed by analyses of three mitochondrial DNA haplogroups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Saint Pierre, Michelle; Bravi, Claudio M; Motti, Josefina M B; Fuku, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Llop, Elena; Bonatto, Sandro L; Moraga, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    ... seven complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. We identified two novel mtDNA monophyletic clades, preliminarily designated B2l and C1b13, which together with the recently described D1g sub-haplogroup have locally high frequencies...

  5. Species-richness of the Anopheles annulipes Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) Revealed by Tree and Model-Based Allozyme Clustering Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    and systematics ofAnopheles: insights from a molecular phy· logeny of Australasian mosquitoes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 9: 262-275. Foley... systematics and pop- ulation studies. Sydney: Academic Press. Roscnberg NA, Burke T, Elo K, Feldman MW, Freidlin PJ, Groenen MAM, Hillel J, Maki·Taniia...of molecular-functional variation patterns among butterfly species complexes IColias: Lepidoptera , Pieridae). Molecular Ecology 12: 1265-1275. © 2007

  6. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA-booster subcritical assembly part 1: analytical models and main neutronics parameters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-09-11

    This study was carried out to model and analyze the YALINA-Booster facility, of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus, with the long term objective of advancing the utilization of accelerator driven systems for the incineration of nuclear waste. The YALINA-Booster facility is a subcritical assembly, driven by an external neutron source, which has been constructed to study the neutron physics and to develop and refine methodologies to control the operation of accelerator driven systems. The external neutron source consists of Californium-252 spontaneous fission neutrons, 2.45 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium reactions, or 14.1 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Tritium reactions. In the latter two cases a deuteron beam is used to generate the neutrons. This study is a part of the collaborative activity between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus. In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a coordinated research project benchmarking and comparing the results of different numerical codes with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility and ANL has a leading role coordinating the IAEA activity. The YALINA-Booster facility has been modeled according to the benchmark specifications defined for the IAEA activity without any geometrical homogenization using the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCNP/MCNPX/MCB. The MONK model perfectly matches the MCNP one. The computational analyses have been extended through the MCB code, which is an extension of the MCNP code with burnup capability because of its additional feature for analyzing source driven multiplying assemblies. The main neutronics parameters of the YALINA-Booster facility were calculated using these computer codes with different nuclear data libraries based on ENDF/B-VI-0, -6, JEF-2.2, and JEF-3.1.

  7. Bacterial dive