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Sample records for model zone sequence

  1. THE HABITABLE ZONES OF PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa [Institute for Pale Blue Dots, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We calculate the pre-main-sequence habitable zone (HZ) for stars of spectral classes F-M. The spatial distribution of liquid water and its change during the pre-main-sequence phase of protoplanetary systems is important for understanding how planets become habitable. Such worlds are interesting targets for future missions because the coolest stars could provide habitable conditions for up to 2.5 billion years post-accretion. Moreover, for a given star type, planetary systems are more easily resolved because of higher pre-main-sequence stellar luminosities, resulting in larger planet-star separation for cool stars than is the case for the traditional main-sequence (MS) HZ. We use one-dimensional radiative-convective climate and stellar evolutionary models to calculate pre-main-sequence HZ distances for F1-M8 stellar types. We also show that accreting planets that are later located in the traditional MS HZ orbiting stars cooler than a K5 (including the full range of M stars) receive stellar fluxes that exceed the runaway greenhouse threshold, and thus may lose substantial amounts of water initially delivered to them. We predict that M-star planets need to initially accrete more water than Earth did, or, alternatively, have additional water delivered later during the long pre-MS phase to remain habitable. Our findings are also consistent with recent claims that Venus lost its water during accretion.

  2. The Habitable Zones of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, Ramses M

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the pre-main-sequence HZ for stars of spectral classes F to M. The spatial distribution of liquid water and its change during the pre-main-sequence phase of protoplanetary systems is important in understanding how planets become habitable. Such worlds are interesting targets for future missions because the coolest stars could provide habitable conditions for up to 2.5 billion years post-accretion. Moreover, for a given star type, planetary systems are more easily resolved because of higher pre-main-sequence stellar luminosities, resulting in larger planet to star separation for cool stars than is the case for the traditional main-sequence (MS) habitable zone (HZ). We use 1D radiative-convective climate and stellar evolutionary models to calculate pre-main-sequence HZ distances for F1 to M8 stellar types. We also show that accreting planets that are later located in the traditional MS HZ orbiting stars cooler than a K5 (including the full range of M-stars) receive stellar fluxes that exceed the ru...

  3. Habitable zone lifetimes of exoplanets around main sequence stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Andrew J; Claire, Mark W; Osborn, Hugh; Watson, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    The potential habitability of newly discovered exoplanets is initially assessed by determining whether their orbits fall within the circumstellar habitable zone of their star. However, the habitable zone (HZ) is not static in time or space, and its boundaries migrate outward at a rate proportional to the increase in luminosity of a star undergoing stellar evolution, possibly including or excluding planets over the course of the star's main sequence lifetime. We describe the time that a planet spends within the HZ as its "habitable zone lifetime." The HZ lifetime of a planet has strong astrobiological implications and is especially important when considering the evolution of complex life, which is likely to require a longer residence time within the HZ. Here, we present results from a simple model built to investigate the evolution of the "classic" HZ over time, while also providing estimates for the evolution of stellar luminosity over time in order to develop a "hybrid" HZ model. These models return estimates for the HZ lifetimes of Earth and 7 confirmed HZ exoplanets and 27 unconfirmed Kepler candidates. The HZ lifetime for Earth ranges between 6.29 and 7.79×10⁹ years (Gyr). The 7 exoplanets fall in a range between ∼1 and 54.72 Gyr, while the 27 Kepler candidate planets' HZ lifetimes range between 0.43 and 18.8 Gyr. Our results show that exoplanet HD 85512b is no longer within the HZ, assuming it has an Earth analog atmosphere. The HZ lifetime should be considered in future models of planetary habitability as setting an upper limit on the lifetime of any potential exoplanetary biosphere, and also for identifying planets of high astrobiological potential for continued observational or modeling campaigns.

  4. Habitable Zones of Post-Main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, Ramses

    2016-01-01

    Once a star leaves the main sequence and becomes a red giant, its Habitable Zone (HZ) moves outward, promoting detectable habitable conditions at larger orbital distances. We use a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate and stellar evolutionary models to calculate post-MS HZ distances for a grid of stars from 3,700K to 10,000K (~M1 to A5 stellar types) for different stellar metallicities. The post-MS HZ limits are comparable to the distances of known directly imaged planets. We model the stellar as well as planetary atmospheric mass loss during the Red Giant Branch (RGB) and Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phases for super-Moons to super-Earths. A planet can stay between 200 million years up to 9 Gyr in the post-MS HZ for our hottest and coldest grid stars, respectively, assuming solar metallicity. These numbers increase for increased stellar metallicity. Total atmospheric erosion only occurs for planets in close-in orbits. The post-MS HZ orbital distances are within detection capabilities of direct imagi...

  5. Large Zero Autocorrelation Zone of Golay Sequences and $4^q$-QAM Golay Complementary Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Guang; Yang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Sequences with good correlation properties have been widely adopted in modern communications, radar and sonar applications. In this paper, we present our new findings on some constructions of single $H$-ary Golay sequence and $4^q$-QAM Golay complementary sequence with a large zero autocorrelation zone, where $H\\ge 2$ is an arbitrary even integer and $q\\ge 2$ is an arbitrary integer. Those new results on Golay sequences and QAM Golay complementary sequences can be explored during synchronization and detection at the receiver end and thus improve the performance of the communication system.

  6. Habitable Zones Around Main-Sequence Stars: New Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Kopparapu, Ravi kumar; Kasting, James F; Eymet, Vincent; Robinson, Tyler D; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Terrien, Ryan C; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Meadows, Victoria; Deshpande, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Identifying terrestrial planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of other stars is one of the primary goals of ongoing radial velocity and transit exoplanet surveys and proposed future space missions. Most current estimates of the boundaries of the HZ are based on 1-D, cloud-free, climate model calculations by Kasting et al.(1993). The inner edge of the HZ in Kasting et al.(1993) model was determined by loss of water, and the outer edge was determined by the maximum greenhouse provided by a CO2 atmosphere. A conservative estimate for the width of the HZ from this model in our Solar system is 0.95-1.67 AU. Here, an updated 1-D radiative-convective, cloud-free climate model is used to obtain new estimates for HZ widths around F, G, K and M stars. New H2O and CO2 absorption coefficients, derived from the HITRAN 2008 and HITEMP 2010 line-by-line databases, are important improvements to the climate model. According to the new model, the water loss (inner HZ) and maximum greenhouse (outer HZ) limits for our Solar Syste...

  7. HABITABLE ZONES AROUND MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: NEW ESTIMATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James F. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, 443 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Eymet, Vincent [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, Universite de Bordeaux 1, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Robinson, Tyler D.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Meadows, Victoria [NASA Astrobiology Institute' s Virtual Planetary Laboratory (United States); Mahadevan, Suvrath; Terrien, Ryan C.; Deshpande, Rohit [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    Identifying terrestrial planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of other stars is one of the primary goals of ongoing radial velocity (RV) and transit exoplanet surveys and proposed future space missions. Most current estimates of the boundaries of the HZ are based on one-dimensional (1D), cloud-free, climate model calculations by Kasting et al. However, this model used band models that were based on older HITRAN and HITEMP line-by-line databases. The inner edge of the HZ in the Kasting et al. model was determined by loss of water, and the outer edge was determined by the maximum greenhouse provided by a CO{sub 2} atmosphere. A conservative estimate for the width of the HZ from this model in our solar system is 0.95-1.67 AU. Here an updated 1D radiative-convective, cloud-free climate model is used to obtain new estimates for HZ widths around F, G, K, and M stars. New H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} absorption coefficients, derived from the HITRAN 2008 and HITEMP 2010 line-by-line databases, are important improvements to the climate model. According to the new model, the water-loss (inner HZ) and maximum greenhouse (outer HZ) limits for our solar system are at 0.99 and 1.70 AU, respectively, suggesting that the present Earth lies near the inner edge. Additional calculations are performed for stars with effective temperatures between 2600 and 7200 K, and the results are presented in parametric form, making them easy to apply to actual stars. The new model indicates that, near the inner edge of the HZ, there is no clear distinction between runaway greenhouse and water-loss limits for stars with T{sub eff} {approx}< 5000 K, which has implications for ongoing planet searches around K and M stars. To assess the potential habitability of extrasolar terrestrial planets, we propose using stellar flux incident on a planet rather than equilibrium temperature. This removes the dependence on planetary (Bond) albedo, which varies depending on the host star's spectral type. We suggest

  8. Building fire zone model with symbolic mathematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武红梅; 郜冶; 周允基

    2009-01-01

    To apply the fire modelling for the fire engineer with symbolic mathematics,the key equations of a zone model were demonstrated. There were thirteen variables with nine constraints,so only four ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were required to solve. A typical fire modelling with two-room structure was studied. Accordingly,the source terms included in the ODEs were simplified and modelled,and the fourth Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with symbolic mathematics. Then a zone model could be used with symbolic mathematics. It is proposed that symbolic mathematics is possible for use by fire engineer.

  9. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  10. MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS MASQUERADING AS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CENTRAL MOLECULAR ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Morales, Esteban F. E.; Johnston, Katharine G., E-mail: koepferl@mpia.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-01-20

    In contrast to most other galaxies, star formation rates in the Milky Way can be estimated directly from young stellar objects (YSOs). In the central molecular zone the star formation rate calculated from the number of YSOs with 24 μm emission is up to an order of magnitude higher than the value estimated from methods based on diffuse emission (such as free-free emission). Whether this effect is real or whether it indicates problems with either or both star formation rate measures is not currently known. In this paper, we investigate whether estimates based on YSOs could be heavily contaminated by more evolved objects such as main-sequence stars. We present radiative transfer models of YSOs and of main-sequence stars in a constant ambient medium which show that the main-sequence objects can indeed mimic YSOs at 24 μm. However, we show that in some cases the main-sequence models can be marginally resolved at 24 μm, whereas the YSO models are always unresolved. Based on the fraction of resolved MIPS 24 μm sources in the sample of YSOs previously used to compute the star formation rate, we estimate the fraction of misclassified ''YSOs'' to be at least 63%, which suggests that the star formation rate previously determined from YSOs is likely to be at least a factor of three too high.

  11. Main-sequence stars masquerading as Young Stellar Objects in the central molecular zone

    CERN Document Server

    Koepferl, Christine M; Morales, Esteban F E; Johnston, Katharine G

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to most other galaxies, star-formation rates in the Milky Way can be estimated directly from Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). In the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) the star-formation rate calculated from the number of YSOs with 24 microns emission is up to order of magnitude higher than the value estimated from methods based on diffuse emission (such as free-free emission). Whether this effect is real or whether it indicates problems with either or both star formation rate measures is not currently known. In this paper, we investigate whether estimates based on YSOs could be heavily contaminated by more evolved objects such as main-sequence stars. We present radiative transfer models of YSOs and of main-sequence stars in a constant ambient medium which show that the main-sequence objects can indeed mimic YSOs at 24 microns. However, we show that in some cases the main-sequence models can be marginally resolved at 24 microns, whereas the YSO models are always unresolved. Based on the fraction of resolve...

  12. Lower bounds on the periodic Hamming correlations of frequency hopping sequences with low hit zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, several periodic Hamming correlation lower bounds for frequency hopping sequences with low hit zone, with respect to the size p of the frequency slot set, the sequence length L, the family size M, low hit zone LH ( or no hit zone NH ), the maximum periodic Hamming autocorrelation sidelobe Ha and the maximum periodic Hamming crosscorrelation Hc, are established. It is shown that the new bounds include the known Lempel-Greenberger bounds, T.S. Seay bounds and Peng-Fan bounds for the conventional frequency hopping sequences as special cases.

  13. Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppersmith, K. J.

    1997-05-30

    This report presents results of the Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation (UZFMEE) project at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. (Geomatrix), for TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc. The objective of this project was to identify and assess the uncertainties associated with certain key components of the unsaturated zone flow system at Yucca Mountain. This assessment reviewed the data inputs, modeling approaches, and results of the unsaturated zone flow model (termed the ''UZ site-scale model'') being developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). In addition to data input and modeling issues, the assessment focused on percolation flux (volumetric flow rate per unit cross-sectional area) at the potential repository horizon. An understanding of unsaturated zone processes is critical to evaluating the performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A major goal of the project was to capture the uncertainties involved in assessing the unsaturated flow processes, including uncertainty in both the models used to represent physical controls on unsaturated zone flow and the parameter values used in the models. To ensure that the analysis included a wide range of perspectives, multiple individual judgments were elicited from members of an expert panel. The panel members, who were experts from within and outside the Yucca Mountain project, represented a range of experience and expertise. A deliberate process was followed in facilitating interactions among the experts, in training them to express their uncertainties, and in eliciting their interpretations. The resulting assessments and probability distributions, therefore, provide a reasonable aggregate representation of the knowledge and uncertainties about key issues regarding the unsaturated zone at the Yucca

  14. Vadose zone measurement and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Hopmans, J.W.; V. Clausnitzer; K.I. Kosugi; Nielsen,D.R.; Somma, F.

    1997-01-01

    The following treatise is a summary of some of the ongoing research activities in the soil physics program at the University of California in Davis. Each of the four listed areas win be presented at the Workshop on special topics on soil physics and crop modeling in Piracicaba at the University of Sao Paulo. We limited ourselves to a general overview of each area, but will present a more thorough discussion with examples at the Workshop.

  15. Optimizing Locations of Stream Restoration Structures to Maximize Hyporheic Zone Path Lengths in a Pool and Riffle Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M.; Lowry, C.

    2016-12-01

    The exchange of surface water and groundwater in the hyporheic zone encourages biogeochemical reactions that naturally attenuate nutrients in streams. Stream restoration efforts often include instream, dam-like structures that increase hyporheic exchange, with the goal of enhancing natural attenuation. The effectiveness of these structures on improving stream quality has been widely researched, however the ideal installation location for these structures along a stream reach to achieve maximum hyporheic exchange must be optimized based on physical and temporal changes in bed forms and hydrologic drivers. Through the use of the finite difference model MODFLOW and particle tracking code MODPATH, the optimal location for emplacement of these stream barriers to maximize the spatial extent of the hyporheic zone was explored. In addition, impacts of seasonal changes in stream stage were also evaluated based on hyporheic zone path lengths. A total of sixteen realizations were created to vary the location of the stream barrier relative to a pool and riffle sequence. Once the ideal location of the barrier was determined, a region of variable groundwater discharge was prescribed to determine the effect of focused discharge. Using MODPATH, imaginary particles identify areas of maximized hyporheic exchange. The results show that the optimal location of the stream restoration structure changes based on stream stage and groundwater discharge zones. The spatial location of the instream barrier relative to zones of concentrated groundwater discharge as well as the location along a pool and riffle sequence has a significant effect on the extent of the hyporheic zone.

  16. Multiplicative LSTM for sequence modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Ben; Lu, Liang; Murray, Iain; Renals, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces multiplicative LSTM, a novel hybrid recurrent neural network architecture for sequence modelling that combines the long short-term memory (LSTM) and multiplicative recurrent neural network architectures. Multiplicative LSTM is motivated by its flexibility to have very different recurrent transition functions for each possible input, which we argue helps make it more expressive in autoregressive density estimation. We show empirically that multiplicative LSTM outperforms ...

  17. Modelling of temperatures in continental convergence zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toksoz, M.N.; Bird, P.

    1977-08-03

    The thermal histories of continent-continent convergence zones are modelled by a finite-difference technique in an attempt to explain geologic observations of heating and melting in such zones. The suture zone between two converging continents divides a passively heated overriding plate from a quiet continental margin which is suddenly deformed in the collision. Both regions may be metamorphosed and intruded. On the continental-shelf side where mountains are formed by underthrusting within the crust, it was found that adiabatic and radioactive heating are negligible during the orogeny. Shear-strain heating may raise the fault zones to about 500/sup 0/C. At higher temperatures, dislocation creep of crustal rocks would be expected from laboratory results. Even high crustal radioactivity will not produce melting in less than 40 m.y. Thus any plutons in this zone (the granites of the Zagros, Urals, and Himalayas) probably result indirectly by melting of crust that is heated by deep asthenospheric intrusions, which may reach the crust at the time of detachment of the oceanic slab, combined with the effects of friction and water along the subduction plane. Across the suture, the thermal history begins before the collision during the oceanic subduction phase. The sinking slab creates asthenospheric circulations, which warm the passive plate from below and intrude it in an Andean-type arc along the suture (Zagros and Himalayan region). If total subduction exceeds about 3000 km the slow warming has time to weaken the plate and extensive crustal shortening may follow the collision. Crustal shortening and thickening is accompanied by differentiation and volcanism (Tibetan and Grenville orogenies). Thermal modelling of Tibet shows that volcanism cannot be produced in the available time by crustal thickening alone, but requires the initial warming phase as well.

  18. Zoning for Day Care (from Models for Day Care Licensing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day Care and Child Development Council of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Recommendations and regulations regarding the zoning of child development day care programs are discussed. Zoning in general is discussed, as is the treatment of child development day care in zoning ordinance, the background of program planning, modular housing, the impelmentation of zoning, and model provisions regarding characteristics of…

  19. SCPRED: Accurate prediction of protein structural class for sequences of twilight-zone similarity with predicting sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure prediction methods provide accurate results when a homologous protein is predicted, while poorer predictions are obtained in the absence of homologous templates. However, some protein chains that share twilight-zone pairwise identity can form similar folds and thus determining structural similarity without the sequence similarity would be desirable for the structure prediction. The folding type of a protein or its domain is defined as the structural class. Current structural class prediction methods that predict the four structural classes defined in SCOP provide up to 63% accuracy for the datasets in which sequence identity of any pair of sequences belongs to the twilight-zone. We propose SCPRED method that improves prediction accuracy for sequences that share twilight-zone pairwise similarity with sequences used for the prediction. Results SCPRED uses a support vector machine classifier that takes several custom-designed features as its input to predict the structural classes. Based on extensive design that considers over 2300 index-, composition- and physicochemical properties-based features along with features based on the predicted secondary structure and content, the classifier's input includes 8 features based on information extracted from the secondary structure predicted with PSI-PRED and one feature computed from the sequence. Tests performed with datasets of 1673 protein chains, in which any pair of sequences shares twilight-zone similarity, show that SCPRED obtains 80.3% accuracy when predicting the four SCOP-defined structural classes, which is superior when compared with over a dozen recent competing methods that are based on support vector machine, logistic regression, and ensemble of classifiers predictors. Conclusion The SCPRED can accurately find similar structures for sequences that share low identity with sequence used for the prediction. The high predictive accuracy achieved by SCPRED is

  20. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  1. Effect of land fraction on weathering and tenure in the habitable zone of terrestrial planets around main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, D. S.; Ciesla, F. J.; Pierrehumbert, R.; Archer, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    According to current models of volatile delivery, the water fraction of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone of main-sequence stars is likely to be highly variable. This will affect the continental land fraction, and consequently the functioning of weathering and the carbon cycle. We construct a low-order analytical model of climate, continental silicate weathering, and seafloor weathering to investigate, in a general sense, the effect of land fraction on the long-term carbon cycle. This model is useful for gaining physical insight, rather than for making specific predictions. Using our model, we reach the following conclusions: (1) The surface temperature increases with decreasing land fraction, with waterworlds 10's of K warmer than planets with 50% continental coverage. (2) There can be no weathering feedback on a waterworld. The tenure of a waterworld in the habitable zone is therefore likely to be much shorter than the tenure of a planet with some continent in the habitable zone. (3) The silicate weathering feedback is effective even at very low land fractions. The rate of change of a planet's surface temperature as the star it orbits evolves on the main sequence is similar if the land fraction is 0.3 or 0.01.

  2. GIS modeling of introduction zones in Sochi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annenkova Irina Vladimirovna

    2014-11-01

    Defined the mean monthly temperature and precipitation for each zone. The diagram shows the dependence of the probability distribution of the three groups resistance from the mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation. Describes the climatic conditions of the zones.

  3. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle

  4. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle

  5. Calibrating Vadose Zone Models with Time-Lapse Gravity Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Hansen, A. B.; Looms, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    hydrogeological parameters. These studies focused on the saturated zone with specific yield as the most prominent target parameter. Any change in storage in the vadose zone has been considered as noise. Our modeling results show a measureable change in gravity from the vadose zone during a forced infiltration...... experiment on 10m by 10m grass land. Simulation studies show a potential for vadose zone model calibration using gravity data in conjunction with other geophysical data, e.g. cross-borehole georadar. We present early field data and calibration results from a forced infiltration experiment conducted over 30...... days and discuss the potential for gravity measurements in vadose zone model parameter estimation....

  6. An extended multi-zone combustion model for PCI simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodavasal, Janardhan; Keum, SeungHwan; Babajimopoulos, Aristotelis

    2011-12-01

    Novel combustion modes are becoming an important area of research with emission regulations more stringent than ever before, and with fuel economy being assigned greater importance every day. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and Premixed Compression Ignition (PCI) modes in particular promise better fuel economy and lower emissions in internal combustion engines. Multi-zone combustion models have been popular in modelling HCCI combustion. In this work, an improved multi-zone model is suggested for PCI combustion modelling. A new zoning scheme is suggested based on incorporating the internal energy of formation into an earlier conventional HCCI multi-zone approach, which considers a two-dimensional reaction space defined by equivalence ratio and temperature. It is shown that the added dimension improves zoning by creating more representative zones, and thus reducing errors compared to the conventional zoning approach, when applied to PCI simulation.

  7. Burrow casts from the Lystrosaurus-Procolophon Assemblage-zone, Karoo Sequence, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Groenewald

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Five types of burrow casts from the Lystrosaurus- Procolophon Assemblage-zone (Palingkloof Member and Katberg Formation, Triassic, Karoo sequence. South Africa are associated with casts of desiccation cracks and red mudstone. Vertebrate remains of Lystrosaurus sp. and Procolophon sp. indicate that these animals probably made the burrows during the Triassic. It is possible that burrowing was an adaptive advantage during periods of severe and unfavourable climatic conditions. Similar burrow casts were found in the Dicynodon-Theriognathus Assemblage-zone, suggesting a burrowing habit for fauna represented in this zone. In structure, the burrow casts resemble those of Scoyenia, Thalassinoides, Histioderma, Gyrolithes and Planolites reported from Germany, France, Asia, Ireland, Spain and the United States of America.

  8. A protein block based fold recognition method for the annotation of twilight zone sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, V; Ganesan, K; Parthasarathy, S

    2013-03-01

    The description of protein backbone was recently improved with a group of structural fragments called Structural Alphabets instead of the regular three states (Helix, Sheet and Coil) secondary structure description. Protein Blocks is one of the Structural Alphabets used to describe each and every region of protein backbone including the coil. According to de Brevern (2000) the Protein Blocks has 16 structural fragments and each one has 5 residues in length. Protein Blocks fragments are highly informative among the available Structural Alphabets and it has been used for many applications. Here, we present a protein fold recognition method based on Protein Blocks for the annotation of twilight zone sequences. In our method, we align the predicted Protein Blocks of a query amino acid sequence with a library of assigned Protein Blocks of 953 known folds using the local pair-wise alignment. The alignment results with z-value ≥ 2.5 and P-value ≤ 0.08 are predicted as possible folds. Our method is able to recognize the possible folds for nearly 35.5% of the twilight zone sequences with their predicted Protein Block sequence obtained by pb_prediction, which is available at Protein Block Export server.

  9. Seismic event, sequence and tectonic significance in Canglangpu Stage in Paleo-Tanlu Fault Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO; Xiufu(乔秀夫); GAO; Linzhi(高林志); PENG; Yang(彭阳); LI; Haibing(李海兵)

    2002-01-01

    The Canglangpu Stage of Lower Cambrian Series is widely distributed along both sides of the Tanlu (Tancheng-Lujiang) Fault Zone in the Jiao-Liao-Xu-Huai regions. In the Liaodong Peninsula, the Canglangpu Stage consists of three formations, i.e. Gejiatun, Dalinzi and Jianchang formations in ascending order (lying on the eastern side of the Tanlu Fault Zone). The Dalinzi Formation, developing in a littoral Sabkha environment, is full of catastrophic event records of violent seism, such as liquefied muddy-sandy veins, hydroplastic folds, hydroplastic micro-faults (three forming an organic whole), liquefied crinkled deformations, liquefied breccia and sandy dikes. Based on such records, the seismic liquified sequence of argillaceous rocks in Sabkha is built up. In northern Jiangsu and Anhui provinces, however, there hardly observe seismic records in the Canglangpu Stage, which consists of Jinshanzhai and lower Gouhou and upper Gouhou formations (lying on the western side of the Tanlu Fault Zone). Even if the Gouhou Formation, developing in a lagoon-dry environment, is in the same climate zone as the Dalinzi Formation, and 4 depositional sequences have been identified in the Canglangpu Stage in Northern Jiangsu and Anhui provinces, however, in the same stage in the Liaodong Peninsula, there exist only 3 ones. Therefore, it is not supported by the above mentioned evidence (such as catastrophic events, sequences stratigraphy and lithologic correlation of formations) that the Canglangpu Stage in the Liaodong Peninsula came from northern Jiangsu and Anhui provinces through a long-distance, about hundreds kilometers, left-hand displacement of the Tanlu Fault in the Mesozoic era.

  10. Simulation of a compartment fire using a zone model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lizhong; GUO Zaifu; JI Jingwei; FAN Weicheng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the zone modeling analysis of a single compartment flashover fire. Two criteria are applied in the model to judge the onset of ignition for different combustibles. By calculating the total received energy through radiation or the surface temperature of the combustible, the fire growth can be quantitatively determined. The improved zone fire model shows the influence of different combustibles upon the fire growth. This model is better than the traditional zone model because the common criteria of flashover, i.e. an upper layer temperature of 600℃ and the heat radiation intensity received by the floor of 20 kW/m2, have not been applied in it.

  11. ZONE package of the Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the model grid, active cells in model layers 2 and 3, and geologic province arrays of the ZONE package used in the transient hydrologic...

  12. Mushy-zone model with an exact solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, A. D.; Wilson, D. G.; Alexiades, V.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we propose a very simple model of a mushy zone which admits of an explicit solution. To our knowledge, it is the only instance where an actual observation of the mushy zone width and structure is used as a partial basis for the model definition. The model rests upon two unknown parameters. The first determines the relation between the equilibrium temperature gradient and the mushy zone width. The second depends upon the dendritic structure in the mushy zone, and is related to the solid fraction. Both can be estimated from experiments. We will limit ourselves to defining the model, presenting its closed form solution, and giving tables from which the solution can be found explicitly. It is shown that in most cases the predicted mushy zone is of very negligible importance.

  13. Habitable Zones Around Main-Sequence Stars: Dependence on Planetary Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kotte, James Schottel; Kasting, James F.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Eymet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing discoveries of extra-solar planets are unveiling a wide range of terrestrial mass (size) planets around their host stars. In this Letter, we present estimates of habitable zones (HZs) around stars with stellar effective temperatures in the range 2600 K-7200 K, for planetary masses between 0.1M and 5M. Assuming H2O-(inner HZ) and CO2-(outer HZ) dominated atmospheres, and scaling the background N2 atmospheric pressure with the radius of the planet, our results indicate that larger planets have wider HZs than do smaller ones. Specifically, with the assumption that smaller planets will have less dense atmospheres, the inner edge of the HZ (runaway greenhouse limit) moves outward (approx.10% lower than Earth flux) for low mass planets due to larger greenhouse effect arising from the increased H2O column depth. For larger planets, the H2O column depth is smaller, and higher temperatures are needed before water vapor completely dominates the outgoing long-wave radiation. Hence the inner edge moves inward (approx.7% higher than Earth's flux). The outer HZ changes little due to the competing effects of the greenhouse effect and an increase in albedo. New, three-dimensional climate model results from other groups are also summarized, and we argue that further, independent studies are needed to verify their predictions. Combined with our previous work, the results presented here provide refined estimates of HZs around main-sequence stars and provide a step toward a more comprehensive analysis of HZs.

  14. HABITABLE ZONES AROUND MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: DEPENDENCE ON PLANETARY MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kasting, James F. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, 443 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); SchottelKotte, James [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Domagal-Goldman, Shawn [NASA Astrobiology Institute' s Virtual Planetary Laboratory, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Eymet, Vincent, E-mail: ruk15@psu.edu [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, Universite de Bordeaux 1, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France)

    2014-06-01

    The ongoing discoveries of extra-solar planets are unveiling a wide range of terrestrial mass (size) planets around their host stars. In this Letter, we present estimates of habitable zones (HZs) around stars with stellar effective temperatures in the range 2600 K-7200 K, for planetary masses between 0.1 M {sub ⊕} and 5 M {sub ⊕}. Assuming H{sub 2}O-(inner HZ) and CO{sub 2}-(outer HZ) dominated atmospheres, and scaling the background N{sub 2} atmospheric pressure with the radius of the planet, our results indicate that larger planets have wider HZs than do smaller ones. Specifically, with the assumption that smaller planets will have less dense atmospheres, the inner edge of the HZ (runaway greenhouse limit) moves outward (∼10% lower than Earth flux) for low mass planets due to larger greenhouse effect arising from the increased H{sub 2}O column depth. For larger planets, the H{sub 2}O column depth is smaller, and higher temperatures are needed before water vapor completely dominates the outgoing longwave radiation. Hence the inner edge moves inward (∼7% higher than Earth's flux). The outer HZ changes little due to the competing effects of the greenhouse effect and an increase in albedo. New, three-dimensional climate model results from other groups are also summarized, and we argue that further, independent studies are needed to verify their predictions. Combined with our previous work, the results presented here provide refined estimates of HZs around main-sequence stars and provide a step toward a more comprehensive analysis of HZs.

  15. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  16. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  17. Glutenite bodies sequence division of the upper Es4 in northern Minfeng zone of Dongying Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xupeng

    2017-04-01

    Glutenite bodies are widely developed in northern Minfeng zone of Dongying Sag. Their litho-electric relationship is not clear. In addition, as the conventional sequence stratigraphic research method drawbacks of involving too many subjective human factors, it has limited deepening of the regional sequence stratigraphic research. The wavelet transform technique based on logging data and the time-frequency analysis technique based on seismic data have advantages of dividing sequence stratigraphy quantitatively comparing with the conventional methods. Under the basis of the conventional sequence research method, this paper used the above techniques to divide the fourth-order sequence of the upper Es4 in northern Minfeng zone of Dongying Sag. The research shows that the wavelet transform technique based on logging data and the time-frequency analysis technique based on seismic data are essentially consistent, both of which divide sequence stratigraphy quantitatively in the frequency domain; wavelet transform technique has high resolutions. It is suitable for areas with wells. The seismic time-frequency analysis technique has wide applicability, but a low resolution. Both of the techniques should be combined; the upper Es4 in northern Minfeng zone of Dongying Sag is a complete set of third-order sequence, which can be further subdivided into 5 fourth-order sequences that has the depositional characteristics of fine-upward sequence in granularity. Key words: Dongying sag, northern Minfeng zone, wavelet transform technique, time-frequency analysis technique ,the upper Es4, sequence stratigraphy

  18. Modeling impact of storage zones on stream dissolved oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapra, S.C.; Runkel, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    The Streeter-Phelps dissolved oxygen model is modified to incorporate storage zones. A dimensionless number reflecting enhanced decomposition caused by the increased residence time of the biochemical oxygen demand in the storage zone parameterizes the impact. This result provides a partial explanation for the high decomposition rates observed in shallow streams. An application suggests that the storage zone increases the critical oxygen deficit and moves it closer to the point source. It also indicates that the storage zone should have lower oxygen concentration than the main channel. An analysis of a dimensionless enhancement factor indicates that the biochemical oxygen demand decomposition in small streams could be up to two to three times more than anticipated based on the standard Streeter-Phelps model without storage zones. For larger rivers, enhancements of up to 1.5 could occur.The Streeter-Phelps dissolved oxygen model is modified to incorporate storage zones. A dimensionless number reflecting enhanced decomposition caused by the increased residence time of the biochemical oxygen demand in the storage zone parameterizes the impact. This result provides a partial explanation for the high decomposition rates observed in shallow streams. An application suggests that the storage zone increases the critical oxygen deficit and moves it closer to the point source. It also indicates that the storage zone should have lower oxygen concentration than the main channel. An analysis of a dimensionless enhancement factor indicates that the biochemical oxygen demand decomposition in small streams could be up to two to three times more than anticipated based on the standard Streeter-Phelps model without storage zones. For larger rivers, enhancements of up to 1.5 could occur.

  19. A viscoplastic shear-zone model for episodic slow slip events in oceanic subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, A.; Meng, L.

    2016-12-01

    Episodic slow slip events occur widely along oceanic subduction zones at the brittle-ductile transition depths ( 20-50 km). Although efforts have been devoted to unravel their mechanical origins, it remains unclear about the physical controls on the wide range of their recurrence intervals and slip durations. In this study we present a simple mechanical model that attempts to account for the observed temporal evolution of slow slip events. In our model we assume that slow slip events occur in a viscoplastic shear zone (i.e., Bingham material), which has an upper static and a lower dynamic plastic yield strength. We further assume that the hanging wall deformation is approximated as an elastic spring. We envision the shear zone to be initially locked during forward/landward motion but is subsequently unlocked when the elastic and gravity-induced stress exceeds the static yield strength of the shear zone. This leads to backward/trenchward motion damped by viscous shear-zone deformation. As the elastic spring progressively loosens, the hanging wall velocity evolves with time and the viscous shear stress eventually reaches the dynamic yield strength. This is followed by the termination of the trenchward motion when the elastic stress is balanced by the dynamic yield strength of the shear zone and the gravity. In order to account for the zig-saw slip-history pattern of typical repeated slow slip events, we assume that the shear zone progressively strengthens after each slow slip cycle, possibly caused by dilatancy as commonly assumed or by progressive fault healing through solution-transport mechanisms. We quantify our conceptual model by obtaining simple analytical solutions. Our model results suggest that the duration of the landward motion increases with the down-dip length and the static yield strength of the shear zone, but decreases with the ambient loading velocity and the elastic modulus of the hanging wall. The duration of the backward/trenchward motion depends

  20. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  1. Theoretical model of the helium zone plate microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Palau, Adrià; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    Neutral helium microscopy is a new technique currently under development. Its advantages are the low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms, a potential large depth of field, and the fact that at thermal energies the helium atoms do not penetrate into any solid material. This opens the possibility, among others, for the creation of an instrument that can measure surface topology on the nanoscale, even on surfaces with high aspect ratios. One of the most promising designs for helium microscopy is the zone plate microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by an aperture (skimmer) focused by a Fresnel zone plate onto a sample. The resolution is determined by the focal spot size, which depends on the size of the skimmer, the optics of the system, and the velocity spread of the beam through the chromatic aberrations of the zone plate. An important factor for the optics of the zone plate is the width of the outermost zone, corresponding to the smallest opening in the zone plate. The width of the outermost zone is fabrication limited to around 10 nm with present-day state-of-the-art technology. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and width of the outermost zone. Here we present an optimization model for the helium zone plate microscope. Assuming constant resolution and width of the outermost zone, we are able to reduce the problem to a two-variable problem (zone plate radius and object distance) and we show that for a given beam temperature and pressure, there is always a single intensity maximum. We compare our model with the highest-resolution zone plate focusing images published and show that the intensity can be increased seven times. Reducing the width of the outermost zone to 10 nm leads to an increase in intensity of more than 8000

  2. Coastal zone simulations with variational Boussinesq modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adytia, Didit

    2012-01-01

    The main challenge in deriving a Boussinesq model for water wave is to model accurately the dispersion and nonlinearity of waves. The dispersion is a depth-dependent relation between the wave speed and the wavelength. A Boussinesq-type model can be derived from the so-called variational principle

  3. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  4. Modeling of Prepregs during Automated Draping Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Christian; Glud, Jens Ammitzbøll; Jakobsen, Johnny

    of the prepreg material which is the scope of the PhD project. The models will aid in generating feasible robot trajectories, i.e. draping sequences. Here feasible entails that the fiber plies do not deform undesirably while being manipulated by the robot as well as drapes onto the mold without wrinkles, air...

  5. Genetic differentiation of strongyloides stercoralis from two different climate zones revealed by 18S ribosomal DNA sequence comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdee, Wallop; Thaenkham, Urusa; Dekumyoy, Paron; Sa-Nguankiat, Surapol; Maipanich, Wanna; Pubampen, Somchit

    2012-11-01

    Over 70 countries in tropical and subtropical zones are endemic areas for Strongyloides stercoralis, with a higher prevalence of the parasite often occurring in tropical regions compared to subtropical ones. In order to explore genetic variations of S. stercoralis form different climate zones, 18S ribosomal DNA of parasite specimens obtained from Thailand were sequenced and compared with those from Japan. The maximum likelihood indicates that S. stercoralis populations from these two different climate zones have genetically diverged. The genetic relationship between S. stercoralis populations is not related to the host species, but rather to moisture and temperature. These factors may directly drive genetic differentiation among isolated populations of S. stercoralis.

  6. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuqureque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially non-uniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated.

  7. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    In accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation regarding groundwater travel times at geologic repositories, various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially nonuniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated.

  8. Magneto-Vortex Dynamo Model in Solar convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkov, Sergey V

    2011-01-01

    Here is presented a new magneto-vortex dynamo model for modeling & predicting of a processes in Solar plasma convection zone. Solar convection zone is located above the level r > 0,6-0,7 R, where R is a Solar radius. A key feature of such a model is that equation of Solar plasma motion as well as equation of magnetic fields evolution - are reduced to Helmholtz's vortex equation, which is up-graded in according with alpha-effect (Coriolis force forms an additional vorticity field or magnetic field due to Sun's differential rotation). Such an additional vorticity or magnetic field are proved to be concentrated at the proper belt in Solar convection zone under the influence of Coriolis force (at the middle latitudes of the Sun in respect to equator). Besides, such an an additional vorticity & magnetic fields are to be the basic sources of well-known phenomena "Maunder's butterfly" diagram.

  9. `Dhara': An Open Framework for Critical Zone Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.

    2016-12-01

    Processes in the Critical Zone, which sustain terrestrial life, are tightly coupled across hydrological, physical, biological, chemical, pedological, geomorphological and ecological domains over both short and long timescales. Observations and quantification of the Earth's surface across these domains using emerging high resolution measurement technologies such as light detection and ranging (lidar) and hyperspectral remote sensing are enabling us to characterize fine scale landscape attributes over large spatial areas. This presents a unique opportunity to develop novel approaches to model the Critical Zone that can capture fine scale intricate dependencies across the different processes in 3D. The development of interdisciplinary tools that transcend individual disciplines and capture new levels of complexity and emergent properties is at the core of Critical Zone science. Here we introduce an open framework for high-performance computing model (`Dhara') for modeling complex processes in the Critical Zone. The framework is designed to be modular in structure with the aim to create uniform and efficient tools to facilitate and leverage process modeling. It also provides flexibility to maintain, collaborate, and co-develop additional components by the scientific community. We show the essential framework that simulates ecohydrologic dynamics, and surface - sub-surface coupling in 3D using hybrid parallel CPU-GPU. We demonstrate that the open framework in Dhara is feasible for detailed, multi-processes, and large-scale modeling of the Critical Zone, which opens up exciting possibilities. We will also present outcomes from a Modeling Summer Institute led by Intensively Managed Critical Zone Observatory (IMLCZO) with representation from several CZOs and international representatives.

  10. Cohesive zone modelling and the fracture process of structural tape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stigh, Ulf; Biel, Anders; Svensson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Structural tapes provide comparable toughness as structural adhesives at orders of magnitude lower stresses. This is potentially useful to minimize the effects of differences in thermal expansion in the joining of mixed materials. The strength properties are modelled using the cohesive zone model....... Thus, a cohesive zone represents the tape, i.e. stresses in the tape are transmitted to the substrates through tractions determined by the separations of the surfaces of substrates. This simplification allows for structural analysis of large complex structures. The relation between the traction...

  11. A six-zone simulation model for HCCI engines with a non-segregated solver of zone state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarac, Darko; Lulic, Zoran; Sagi, Goran

    2010-07-01

    A new six-zone simulation model for the calculation of changes in an HCCI engine has been developed and tested. The model uses comprehensive chemical kinetics and a non-sequential solver of zone states. This means that the state vector comprises the states in all zones, and that the changes in states in all zones are calculated simultaneously. In this manner, physical accuracy during the calculation of a new state is maintained at the expense of the calculation time. The model comprises the wall heat transfer, zone heat transfer and zone mass transfer as means of zone interactions. The cylinder is divided into two central zones, three boundary layer zones and one crevice zone. Since the model calculates only the high pressure part of an engine cycle, it has been connected with the cycle simulation software AVL Boost. In this way, a relatively easy-to-use, higher accuracy, simulation tool for HCCI engines has been obtained. The model was tested by comparing simulation results with experimental ones. The comparison was made with a single cylinder engine running on isooctane. The calculated pressure and net rate of heat release correspond to the experimental results very well in the entire operating region. By using the six-zone simulation model, a big improvement, compared to the single zone simulation, is obtained in operating points where combustion efficiency is over 90%. Results of emissions of unburned HC and CO show that predictions of these species are greatly improved, but it has also been noticed that these emissions are still slightly underpredicted. Predictions of emissions that come from crevice regions are good, but emissions that come from the corners of boundary layers are not captured very well. A detailed description of the simulation model is given, and validation results and possibilities of a further development are discussed.

  12. A shallow aftershock sequence in the north-eastern end of the Wenchuan earthquake aftershock zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies show that mature faults are filled with fault gouge in the shallow part and thus cannot accumulate enough strain energy for earthquakes. Therefore most earthquakes are deeper than 5 km, except those events occurring on new faults or in intact rocks. From field observation, Wenchuan earthquake is found to rupture the free surface about 200 km, but the rupture may extend underground much further from teleseismic body waves inversion and aftershocks distribution. In the northeastern end of the rupture zone, deep rupture may induce stress increase near the free surface, and trigger shallow earthquakes. An Ms 5.7 aftershock occurred at Qingchuan, northeast end of Wenchuan earthquake fault on July 24, 2008, featuring thrust mechanism with a 3 km source centroid depth. The shallow focal depth is confirmed with the sPL phase recorded at station L0205. As Rayleigh wave is well only developed for source depth less than 1/5 of epicentral distance, the observed large amplitude of Rg at a distance of 15 km implied depth of 3 km or less. Dozens of aftershocks’ sPL waveforms are also analyzed to confirm the source depths less than 3 km. On the other hand, no surface ruptures are found by geological survey or InSAR studies. It is strongly suggested that these aftershock sequences initiate fresh rupture in intact rocks triggered by stress increase from the deep co-seismic rupture of the Wenchuan mainshock.

  13. Enhanced phytoremediation in the vadose zone: Modeling and column studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K.; Chang, Y.; Corapcioglu, M.; Cho, C.

    2002-05-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant-based technique with potential for enhancing the remediation of vadoese zone soils contaminated by pollutants. The use of deep-rooted plants is an alternative to conventional methodologies. However, when the phytoremediation is applied to the vadose zone, it might have some restrictions since it uses solely naturally driven energy and mechanisms in addition to the complesxity of the vadose zone. As a more innovative technique than conventional phytoremediation methods, air injected phytoremediation technique is introduced to enhance the remediation efficiency or to apply at the former soil vapor extraction or bio venting sites. Effects of air injection, vegetation treatment, and air injection with vegetation treatments on the removal of hydrocarbon were investigated by column studies to simulate the field situation. Both the removal efficiency and the microbial activity were highest in air-injected and vegetated column soils. It was suggested that increased microorganisms activity stimulated by plant root exudates enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds. Air injection provided sufficient opportunity for promoting the microbial activity at depths where the conditions are anaerobic. Air injection can enhance the physicochemical properties of the medium and contaminant and increase the bioavailability i.e., the plant and microbial accessibility to the contaminant. A mathematical model that can be applied to phytoremediation, especially to air injected phytoremediation, for simulating the fate and the transport of a diesel contaminant in the vadose zone is developed. The approach includes a two-phase model of water flow in vegetated and unplanted vadose zone soil. A time-specific root distribution model and a microbial growth model in the rhizosphere of vegetated soil were combined with an unsaturated soil water flow equation as well as with a contaminant transport equation. The proposed model showed a satisfactory representation of

  14. Assessing Circumbinary Habitable Zones using Latitudinal Energy Balance Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Previous attempts to describe circumbinary habitable zones have been concerned with the spatial extent of the zone, calculated analytically according to the combined radiation field of both stars. By contrast to these "spatial HZs", we present a numerical analysis of the "orbital HZ", a habitable zone defined as a function of planet orbital elements. This orbital HZ is better equipped to handle (for example) eccentric planet orbits, and is more directly connected to the data returned by exoplanet observations. Producing an orbital HZ requires a large number of climate simulations to be run to investigate the parameter space - we achieve this using Latitudinal Energy Balance Models (LEBMs), which handle the insolation of the planet by both stars (including mutual eclipses), as well as the planetary atmosphere's ability to absorb, transfer and lose heat. We present orbital HZs for several known circumbinary planetary systems: Kepler-16, Kepler-34, Kepler-35, Kepler-47 and PH-1. Generally, the orbital HZs at zer...

  15. Design of Zero Correlation Zone Sequences via Interleaving Perfect Sequence%基于交织最佳自相关序列的ZCZ序列设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王龙业; 王献

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the limit on the relevant parameters during constructing zero correlation zone (ZCZ) sequences, a novel construction method was proposed to design the near-optimal sequence set with ZCZ. Using the interleaving technique and recursive algorithm, a new ZCZ sequence set can be generated from an arbitrary perfect sequence with a period longer than 4. With the size (I. E. The number of sequences) of the new sequence set kept unchanged, the length and ZCZ width of the new sequence can be doubled by each recursive operation. The constructed near-optimal ZCZ sequence set can approach the mathematical bound, and can successfully provide quasi-synchronous CDMA communication without co-channel interference.%为了减少零相关区序列设计中对相关参数的限制,基于任意一个周期大于4的最佳自相关序列,运用交织技术和递归运算,提出了一类新型的接近最优零相关区序列集的构造方法.通过递归运算,在保持ZCZ( zero correlation zone)序列集包含的序列数目不变的条件下,可以将序列长度和零相关区宽度成倍扩展.构造的ZCZ序列集接近理论界,可应用于准同步CDMA (code division multiple access)通信系统,消除共道干扰,提高通信质量.

  16. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  17. Live sequence charts to model medical information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslakson Eric

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical records accumulate data concerning patient health and the natural history of disease progression. However, methods to mine information systematically in a form other than an electronic health record are not yet available. The purpose of this study was to develop an object modeling technique as a first step towards a formal database of medical records. Method Live Sequence Charts (LSC were used to formalize the narrative text obtained during a patient interview. LSCs utilize a visual scenario-based programming language to build object models. LSC extends the classical language of UML message sequence charts (MSC, predominantly through addition of modalities and providing executable semantics. Inter-object scenarios were defined to specify natural history event interactions and different scenarios in the narrative text. Result A simulated medical record was specified into LSC formalism by translating the text into an object model that comprised a set of entities and events. The entities described the participating components (i.e., doctor, patient and record and the events described the interactions between elements. A conceptual model is presented to illustrate the approach. An object model was generated from data extracted from an actual new patient interview, where the individual was eventually diagnosed as suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. This yielded a preliminary formal designated vocabulary for CFS development that provided a basis for future formalism of these records. Conclusions Translation of medical records into object models created the basis for a formal database of the patient narrative that temporally depicts the events preceding disease, the diagnosis and treatment approach. The LSCs object model of the medical narrative provided an intuitive, visual representation of the natural history of the patient’s disease.

  18. A continuum three-zone model for swarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer M; Kolpas, Allison; Juchem Neto, Joao Plinio; Rossi, Louis F

    2012-03-01

    We present a progression of three distinct three-zone, continuum models for swarm behavior based on social interactions with neighbors in order to explain simple coherent structures in popular biological models of aggregations. In continuum models, individuals are replaced with density and velocity functions. Individual behavior is modeled with convolutions acting within three interaction zones corresponding to repulsion, orientation, and attraction, respectively. We begin with a variable-speed first-order model in which the velocity depends directly on the interactions. Next, we present a variable-speed second-order model. Finally, we present a constant-speed second-order model that is coordinated with popular individual-based models. For all three models, linear stability analysis shows that the growth or decay of perturbations in an infinite, uniform swarm depends on the strength of attraction relative to repulsion and orientation. We verify that the continuum models predict the behavior of a swarm of individuals by comparing the linear stability results with an individual-based model that uses the same social interaction kernels. In some unstable regimes, we observe that the uniform state will evolve toward a radially symmetric attractor with a variable density. In other unstable regimes, we observe an incoherent swarming state.

  19. Mixing effects on nitrogen and oxygen concentrations and the relationship to mean residence time in a hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Clinton Davis,

    2015-01-01

    Flow paths and residence times in the hyporheic zone are known to influence biogeochemical processes such as nitrification and denitrification. The exchange across the sediment-water interface may involve mixing of surface water and groundwater through complex hyporheic flow paths that contribute to highly variable biogeochemically active zones. Despite the recognition of these patterns in the literature, conceptualization and analysis of flow paths and nitrogen transformations beneath riffle-pool sequences often neglect to consider bed form driven exchange along the entire reach. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) were monitored in the hyporheic zone beneath a riffle-pool sequence on a losing section of the Truckee River, NV. Spatially-varying hyporheic exchange and the occurrence of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells are shown to influence concentrations of DO and NO3- and the mean residence time (MRT) of riffle and pool areas. Distinct patterns observed in piezometers are shown to be influenced by the first large flow event following a steady 8 month period of low flow conditions. Increases in surface water discharge resulted in reversed hydraulic gradients and production of nitrate through nitrification at small vertical spatial scales (0.10 to 0.25 m) beneath the sediment-water interface. In areas with high downward flow rates and low MRT, denitrification may be limited. The use of a longitudinal two-dimensional flow model helped identify important mechanisms such as multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells and spatially varying MRT, an important driver for nitrogen transformation in the riverbed. Our observations of DO and NO3- concentrations and model simulations highlight the role of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells on MRT and nitrogen transformations in the hyporheic zone of riffle-pool sequences. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. A NOVEL SOFT COMPUTING MODEL ON LANDSLIDE HAZARD ZONE MAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Quraishi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of landslide is very prominent in India as well as world over. In India North-East region and all the areas beneath the Himalayan range is prone to landslide. As state wise Uttrakhand, Himachal Pradesh and northern part of West Bengal are identified as a risk zone for landslide. In West Bengal, Darjeeling area is identified as our focus zone. There are several types of landslides depending upon various conditions. Most contributing factor of landslide is Earthquakes. Both field and the GIS data are very versatile and large in amount. Creating a proper data warehouse includes both Remote and field studies. Our proposed soft computing model merge the field and remote sensing data and create an optimized landslide susceptible map of the zone and also provide a broad risk assessment. It takes into account census and economic survey data as an input to calculate and predict the probable number of damaged houses, roads, other amenities including the effect on GDP. The model is highly customizable and tends to provide situation specific results. A fuzzy logic based approach has been considered to partially implement the model in terms of different parameter data sets to show the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  1. Testing conceptual unsaturated zone flow models for Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.P.; Lehman, L.L. [L. Lehman & Associates, Inc., Burnsville, MN (United States); Nieber, J.L. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    An important component of site characterization and suitability assessment of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is determination of the most appropriate conceptual model of the hydrologic mechanisms governing saturated and unsaturated flow for the site. As observers in the ITNRAVAL Unsaturated Zone Working Group, L. Lehman & Associates conducted a modeling exercise which numerically examined alternative conceptual flow models. Information was provided to the Working Group by the U.S. Geological Survey. Additional published data were utilized to fill in data gaps and to provide additional confidence in results. Data were modeled utilizing one and two dimensional matrix and fracture numerical models. Good agreement was obtained using a 2-dimensional dual porosity fracture flow model. Additional measures are needed to constrain the field conditions enough to validate conceptual models using numerical models. Geochemical data on tritium, chlorine-36, or carbon-14 concentrations or temperature profiles which can give estimates of time since recharge for water in the unsaturated zone, are needed to eliminate the non-uniqueness of various model solutions.

  2. COHESIVE ZONE FINITE ELEMENT-BASED MODELING OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuorong Chen; A.P. Bunger; Xi Zhang; Robert G. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a powerful technology used to stimulate fluid production from reservoirs. The fully 3-D numerical simulation of the hydraulic fracturing process is of great importance to the efficient application of this technology, but is also a great challenge because of the strong nonlinear coupling between the viscous flow of fluid and fracture propagation. By taking advantage of a cohesive zone method to simulate the fracture process, a finite element model based on the existing pore pressure cohesive finite elements has been established to investigate the propagation of a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture in an infinite elastic medium. The effect of cohesive material parameters and fluid viscosity on the hydraulic fracture behaviour has been investigated. Excellent agreement between the finite element results and analytical solutions for the limiting case where the fracture process is dominated by rock fracture toughness demonstrates the ability of the cohesive zone finite element model in simulating the hydraulic fracture growth for this case.

  3. The Cascadia Subduction Zone: two contrasting models of lithospheric structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyuk, T.V.; Blakely, R.; Mooney, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    The Pacific margin of North America is one of the most complicated regions in the world in terms of its structure and present day geodynamic regime. The aim of this work is to develop a better understanding of lithospheric structure of the Pacific Northwest, in particular the Cascadia subduction zone of Southwest Canada and Northwest USA. The goal is to compare and contrast the lithospheric density structure along two profiles across the subduction zone and to interpet the differences in terms of active processes. The subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath North America changes markedly along the length of the subduction zone, notably in the angle of subduction, distribution of earthquakes and volcanism, goelogic and seismic structure of the upper plate, and regional horizontal stress. To investigate these characteristics, we conducted detailed density modeling of the crust and mantle along two transects across the Cascadia subduction zone. One crosses Vancouver Island and the Canadian margin, the other crosses the margin of central Oregon.

  4. Simulation modeling of stratigraphic sequences along the Louisiana offshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, C.G.S.C. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (USA)); Lowrie, A.

    1990-09-01

    Sequence stratigraphic analysis of a representative (schematic) dip seismic section along the Louisiana offshore reveals 4th order (Milankovitch) sea-level cycles within 3rd order sequences. This representative line is characteristic of a dip section along the western area where progradation has exceeded subsidence by multifold since the upper Miocene, the last 6.7 m.y., and by twofold through the rest of the Miocene, back to at least 22 m.y. ago. Lowstands cause the outer shelf to act as a sediment bypass zone with shelf deposition during highstands. Salt-sediment interaction is isostatic, the adjustments occurring principally during lowstands. This interpreted stratigraphy has been simulated on an interactive computer program (SEDPAK) developed at the University of South Carolina. SEDPAK erects models of sedimentary geometries by filling in a two-dimensional basin from both sides with a combination of clastic sediment and/or in situ and transported carbonate sediments. Data inputs include the initial basin configuration, local tectonic behavior, sea-level curves, and the amount and source direction of clastic sediment as a function of water depth. The modeled geometries of clastic sediments evolve through time and respond to depositional processes that include tectonic movement, eustasy, sedimentation, sediment compaction, and isostatic response, sedimentary bypass, erosion, and deposition in various physiographic settings such as coastal plains, continental shelf, basin slope, and basin floor. The computer simulation allows for a quantification of the various processes noted and described in the interpretation. Sedimentation rates, isostatic adjustment, and tectonic movement are given in cm/year. Simulation modeling of sequence stratigraphy is seen as a next logical step in the quest for detailed and quantified interpretations.

  5. Mechanical modelling of the Singoe deformation zone. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark stage 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glamheden, Rune; Maersk Hansen, Lars; Fredriksson, Anders; Bergkvist, Lars; Markstroem, Ingemar; Elfstroem, Mats [Golder Associates AB (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    This project aims at demonstrating the theoretical approach developed by SKB for determination of mechanical properties of large deformation zones, in particular the Singoe deformation zone. Up to now, only bedrock and minor deformation zones have been characterized by means of this methodology, which has been modified for this project. The Singoe deformation zone is taken as a reference object to get a more comprehensive picture of the structure, which could be incorporated in a future version of the SDM of Forsmark. Furthermore, the Singoe Zone has been chosen because of available data from four tunnels. Scope of work has included compilation and analysis of geological information from site investigations and documentation of existing tunnels. Results have been analyzed and demonstrated by means of RVS-visualization. Numerical modelling has been used to obtain mechanical properties. Numerical modelling has also been carried out in order to verify the results by comparison of calculated and measured deformations. Compilation of various structures in the four tunnels coincides largely with a magnetic anomaly and also with the estimated width. Based on the study it is clear that the Singoe deformation zone has a heterogeneous nature. The number of fracture zones associated with the deformation zone varies on either side of the zone, as does the transition zone between host rock and the Singoe zone. The overall impression from the study is that the results demonstrate that the methodology used for simulating of equivalent mechanical properties is an applicable and adequate method, also in case of large deformation zones. Typical rock mechanical parameters of the Singoe deformations that can be used in the regional stress model considering the zone to be a single fracture are: 200 MPa/m in normal stiffness, 10-15 MPa/m in shear stiffness, 0.4 MPa in cohesion and 31.5 degrees in friction angle.

  6. A Fracture Mechanical Model and a Cohesive Zone Model of Interface Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2006-01-01

    A comparison between the prediction of crack propagation through an adhesive interface based on a fracture mechanics approach and a cohesive zone approach is presented. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical stress required to propagate the crack under...... quasi-static conditions. The cohesive zone model has several advantages over the fracture mechanics based model. It is easier to generalise the cohesive zone model to take into account effects such as plastic deformation in the adherends, and to take into account effects of large local curvatures...... of the interface crack front. The comparison shows a convergence of the results based on the cohesive zone model towards the results based on a fracture mechanics approach in the limit where the size of the cohesive zone becomes smaller than other relevant geometrical lengths for the problem....

  7. Numerical models of slab migration in continental collision zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Continental collision is an intrinsic feature of plate tectonics. The closure of an oceanic basin leads to the onset of subduction of buoyant continental material, which slows down and eventually stops the subduction process. In natural cases, evidence of advancing margins has been recognized in continental collision zones such as India-Eurasia and Arabia-Eurasia. We perform a parametric study of the geometrical and rheological influence on subduction dynamics during the subduction of continental lithosphere. In our 2-D numerical models of a free subduction system with temperature and stress-dependent rheology, the trench and the overriding plate move self-consistently as a function of the dynamics of the system (i.e. no external forces are imposed. This setup enables to study how continental subduction influences the trench migration. We found that in all models the slab starts to advance once the continent enters the subduction zone and continues to migrate until few million years after the ultimate slab detachment. Our results support the idea that the advancing mode is favoured and, in part, provided by the intrinsic force balance of continental collision. We suggest that the advance is first induced by the locking of the subduction zone and the subsequent steepening of the slab, and next by the sinking of the deepest oceanic part of the slab, during stretching and break-off of the slab. These processes are responsible for the migration of the subduction zone by triggering small-scale convection cells in the mantle that, in turn, drag the plates. The amount of advance ranges from 40 to 220 km and depends on the dip angle of the slab before the onset of collision.

  8. Statistic inversion of multi-zone transition probability models for aquifer characterization in alluvial fans

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Gable, Carl; Teatini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity arising from the complex architecture of sedimentary sequences in alluvial fans is challenging. This paper develops a statistical inverse framework in a multi-zone transition probability approach for characterizing the heterogeneity in alluvial fans. An analytical solution of the transition probability matrix is used to define the statistical relationships among different hydrofacies and their mean lengths, integral scales, and volumetric proportions. A statistical inversion is conducted to identify the multi-zone transition probability models and estimate the optimal statistical parameters using the modified Gauss-Newton-Levenberg-Marquardt method. The Jacobian matrix is computed by the sensitivity equation method, which results in an accurate inverse solution with quantification of parameter uncertainty. We use the Chaobai River alluvial fan in the Beijing Plain, China, as an example for elucidating the methodology of alluvial fan characterization. The alluvial fan is divided...

  9. Numerical Modelling of Subduction Zones: a New Beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficini, Eleonora; Dal Zilio, Luca; Doglioni, Carlo; Gerya, Taras V.

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zones are one of the most studied although still controversial geodynamic process. Is it a passive or an active mechanism in the frame of plate tectonics? How subduction initiates? What controls the differences among the slabs and related orogens and accretionary wedges? The geometry and kinematics at plate boundaries point to a "westerly" polarized flow of plates, which implies a relative opposed flow of the underlying Earth's mantle, being the decoupling located at about 100-200 km depth in the low-velocity zone or LVZ (Doglioni and Panza, 2015 and references therein). This flow is the simplest explanation for determining the asymmetric pattern of subduction zones; in fact "westerly" directed slabs are steeper and deeper with respect to the "easterly or northeasterly" directed ones, that are less steep and shallower, and two end members of orogens associated to the downgoing slabs can be distinguished in terms of topography, type of rocks, magmatism, backarc spreading or not, foredeep subsidence rate, etc.. The classic asymmetry comparing the western Pacific slabs and orogens (low topography and backarc spreading in the upper plate) and the eastern Pacific subduction zones (high topography and deep rocks involved in the upper plate) cannot be ascribed to the age of the subducting lithosphere. In fact, the same asymmetry can be recognized all over the world regardless the type and age of the subducting lithosphere, being rather controlled by the geographic polarity of the subduction. All plate boundaries move "west". Present numerical modelling set of subduction zones is based on the idea that a subducting slab is primarily controlled by its negative buoyancy. However, there are several counterarguments against this assumption, which is not able to explain the global asymmetric aforementioned signatures. Moreover, petrological reconstructions of the lithospheric and underlying mantle composition, point for a much smaller negative buoyancy than predicted

  10. Compact Sets without Converging Sequences in the Random Real Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fremlin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that in the model obtained by adding any number of random reals to a model of CH, there is a compact Hausdorff space of weight w1 which contains no non-trivial converging sequences. It is shown that for certain spaces with noconverging sequences, the addition of random reals will not add any converging sequences.

  11. Quantum Rabi model in the Brillouin zone with ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Simone; Rico, Enrique; Sabin, Carlos; Ockenfels, Till; Koch, Johannes; Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin; Solano, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The quantum Rabi model describes the interaction between a two-level quantum system and a single bosonic mode. We propose a method to perform a quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model, introducing an implementation of the two-level system provided by the occupation of Bloch bands in the first Brillouin zone by ultracold atoms in tailored optical lattices. The effective qubit interacts with a quantum harmonic oscillator implemented in an optical dipole trap. Our realistic proposal allows one to experimentally investigate the quantum Rabi model for extreme parameter regimes, which are not achievable with natural light-matter interactions. When the simulated wave function exceeds the validity region of the simulation, we identify a generalized version of the quantum Rabi model in a periodic phase space.

  12. An alternative tectonic model for the Yarlung Zangbo suture zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The new field investigations along the Yarlung Zangbo ophiolites zone show that these series underwent low green-schist metamorphism and were then fractured and occurred as slabs in tectonic melanges,without regional tectonic polarity.No large shear zone in north-south direction has been identified between ophiolite bodies and flysch layers on both side and a conformable contact relationship can be observed locally between them.A great mass of tectonic mélange has been substantiated as submarine olistolith bodies.The Mesozoic sedimentary facies and its evolution in both north and south of the ophiolite zone are corresponding in time.The ophiolite zone has often been divided into parallel branches,separated by narrow flysch slats.There is also a similarity of the Paleozoic and the basement of the High Himalaya,Lhasa and Qiangtang Terranes,and they are distinctly different from those of the Indian continent.The geologic information does not warrant a postulate that the Himalaya and Tibet were once separated by a great ocean;it is therefore consistent with an alternative tectonic model by back-arc basin collapse with its juvenile narrow oceanic crust.The real plate tectonic suture,the Neotethys might be covered under the Miocene Siwalik molasse in the southern slope of the High Himalaya range.Based on the new model,the Neotethyan ocean floor was subducted beneath the Asia since the Late Triassic.The outer continental margin of Eurasia was split from the Lhasa Terrane so that a back-arc basin came into existence.Hemi-pelagic and deep sea sediments were deposited before the Late Cretaceous flysch sedimentation,with the linear juvenile oceanic crust when back-arc volcanism occurred in the Gandese region.The Yarlung Zangbo back-arc basin was eventually eliminated when the High Himalayas were sutured onto Eurasia.The ocean floor lightly underthrusted to north and south sides,sediments of the basin were deformed as fold-thrusting.The Neotethys was eliminated during the

  13. Unraveling topography around subduction zones from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, Laurent; Guillaume, Benjamin; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio; Royden, Leigh H.

    2012-03-01

    The relief around subduction zones results from the interplay of dynamic processes that may locally exceed the (iso)static contributions. The viscous dissipation of the energy in and around subduction zones is capable of generating kilometer scale vertical ground movements. In order to evaluate dynamic topography in a self-consistent subduction system, we carried out a set of laboratory experiments, wherein the lithosphere and mantle are simulated by means of Newtonian viscous materials, namely silicone putty and glucose syrup. Models are kept in their most simple form and are made of negative buoyancy plates, of variable width and thickness, freely plunging into the syrup. The surface of the model and the top of the slab are scanned in three dimensions. A forebulge systematically emerges from the bending of the viscous plate, adjacent to the trench. With a large wavelength, dynamic pressure offsets the foreside and backside of the slab by ~ 500 m on average. The suction, that accompanies the vertical descent of the slab depresses the surface on both sides. At a distance equal to the half-width of the slab, the topographic depression amounts to ~ 500 m on average and becomes negligible at a distance that equals the width of the slab. In order to explore the impact of slab rollback on the topography, the trailing edge of the plates is alternatively fixed to (fixed mode) and freed from (free mode) the end wall of the tank. Both the pressure and suction components of the topography are ~ 30% lower in the free mode, indicating that slab rollback fosters the dynamic subsidence of upper plates. Our models are compatible with first order observations of the topography around the East Scotia, Tonga, Kermadec and Banda subduction zones, which exhibit anomalous depths of nearly 1 km as compared to adjacent sea floor of comparable age.

  14. Composite Binary Sequences with a Large Ensemble and Zero Correlation Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Yudachev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a proposed class of derived signals such as composite binary sequences for application in advanced spread spectrum radio systems of various purposes, using signals based on spectrum spreading by direct sequence method. Considered composite sequences, having a representative set of lengths and unique correlation properties, compares favorably with the widely used at present large ensembles formed on a single algorithmic basis. To evaluate the properties of the composite sequences generated on the basis of two components - the Barker code and Kerdock sequences, expressions of periodic and aperiodic correlation functions are given.An algorithm for generating practical ensembles of composite sequences is presented. On the basis of the algorithm and its software implementation in C #, the samples of the sequence ensembles of various lengths were obtained and their periodic and aperiodic correlation functions and statistical characteristics were studied in detail. As an illustration, some of the most typical correlation functions are presented. The most remarkable characteristics allowing a ssessing the feasibility of using this type of sequences in the design of specific types of radio systems are considered.On the basis of the proposed program and the performed calculations the conclusions can be drawn about the possibility of using the sequences of these classes, with the aim of reducing intra-system disturbance in the projected spread spectrum CDMA.

  15. Unsteady lubrication modeling of inlet zone in metal rolling processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛明智; 谭建平

    2002-01-01

    An unsteady lubrication model of inlet zone in metal rolling was established. The simulation computations show that for the variation amplitude of the inlet film thickness, the variation of the inlet angle contributes the largest, the surface mean speed contributes the second and the back tension stress the least. The higher the input frequency is, the smaller the amplitude output of the inlet film thickness will be. For a sinusoidal input, the inlet film thickness varies periodically but is not a sine wave because the system is not linear.

  16. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, Torsten

    1984-01-01

    the results of complete or partial sequence determination of a random selection of 38 tryptic peptides covering 685 residues of the subunit of PZP, that PZP and alpha 2M indeed are extensively homologous. In the stretches of PZP sequenced so far, the degree of identically placed residues in the two proteins...

  17. Modelling of ultrasonic motor with dead-zone based on Hammerstein model structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor (USM) possesses heavy nonlinearities which vary with driving conditions and load-dependent characteristics such as the dead-zone. In this paper, an identification method for the rotary travelling-wave type ultrasonic motor (RTWUSM) with dead-zone is proposed based on a modified Hammerstein model structure. The driving voltage contributing effect on the nonlinearities of the RTWUSM was transformed to the change of dynamic parameters against the driving voltage.The dead-zone of the RTWUSM is identified based upon the above transformation. Experiment results showed good agreement between the output of the proposed model and actual measured output.

  18. Dynamics of Vadose Zone Transport: a Field and Modeling Study using the Vadose Zone Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, C R

    2001-01-01

    A stated need of the DOE EM program is a better understanding of basic vadose zone fluid flow and contaminant transport processes for the purpose of making improved estimates of contaminant release rates and fluxes across the vadose zone to the water table at DOE sites such as the tank farms at Hanford. We investigate details of the modes of contaminant transport with the aid of infiltration experiments designed to elucidate how vadose zone characteristics such as preferential pathways, heterogeneities, and relative permeabilities influence the transport of contamination in liquid, gas and colloidal phases to the water table. Beyond enhancing our basic understanding of vadose zone transport processes, this EMSP project is designed result in a vadose-zone-transport-characterization methodology that can be generalized to other DOE sites.

  19. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, Torsten;

    1984-01-01

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated protein. Its quaternary structure (two covalently bound 180-kDa subunits, which are further non-covalently assembled into a tetramer of 720 kDa) is similar to that of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). Here we show, from the ...

  20. Stochastic modelling of daily rainfall sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buishand, T.A.

    1977-01-01

    Rainfall series of different climatic regions were analysed with the aim of generating daily rainfall sequences. A survey of the data is given in I, 1. When analysing daily rainfall sequences one must be aware of the following points:
    a. Seasonality. Because of seasonal variation

  1. Spiking neuron model for temporal sequence recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Sean; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B; Meffin, Hamish

    2010-01-01

    A biologically inspired neuronal network that stores and recognizes temporal sequences of symbols is described. Each symbol is represented by excitatory input to distinct groups of neurons (symbol pools). Unambiguous storage of multiple sequences with common subsequences is ensured by partitioning each symbol pool into subpools that respond only when the current symbol has been preceded by a particular sequence of symbols. We describe synaptic structure and neural dynamics that permit the selective activation of subpools by the correct sequence. Symbols may have varying durations of the order of hundreds of milliseconds. Physiologically plausible plasticity mechanisms operate on a time scale of tens of milliseconds; an interaction of the excitatory input with periodic global inhibition bridges this gap so that neural events representing successive symbols occur on this much faster timescale. The network is shown to store multiple overlapping sequences of events. It is robust to variation in symbol duration, it is scalable, and its performance degrades gracefully with perturbation of its parameters.

  2. Modeling the Migration of Soluble Methanol in Unsaturated Soil Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; LI Xin-Gang; HUANG Guo-Qiang; JIANG Bin

    2007-01-01

    A combined model of solute transport and water flow was developed to simulate the migration of methanol, a soluble organic chemical, in unsaturated soil zone. The solute transport equation considered convective-dispersive transport in the liquid phase as well as diffusion in the gas phase. The effect of rainfall and evapotranspiration on transport was considered at the boundary conditions of the governing equations. Data on the characteristics of a loam soil and the climatic conditions in southern California were also introduced to compare the results with those from a study in the USA in which the profiles of methanol distribution and water content in the soil zone at different times had been depicted. This comparison showed that there was good agreement between the two studies. The results showed that methanol contamination reached a depth of about 250 cm after 8 760 h. In contrast, if rainfall and evapotranspiration were not considered, the depth was only about 140 cm. The model therefore confirmed that rainfall strongly affected solute transport.

  3. Numerical models of trench migration in continental collision zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Continental collision is an intrinsic feature of plate tectonics. The closure of an oceanic basin leads to the onset of subduction of buoyant continental material, which slows down and eventually stops the subduction process. We perform a parametric study of the geometrical and rheological influence on subduction dynamics during the subduction of continental lithosphere. In 2-D numerical models of a free subduction system with temperature and stress-dependent rheology, the trench and the overriding plate move self-consistently as a function of the dynamics of the system (i.e. no external forces are imposed. This setup enables to study how continental subduction influences the trench migration. We found that in all models the trench starts to advance once the continent enters the subduction zone and continues to migrate until few million years after the ultimate slab detachment. Our results support the idea that the trench advancing is favoured and, in part provided by, the intrinsic force balance of continental collision. We suggest that the trench advance is first induced by the locking of the subduction zone and the subsequent steepening of the slab, and next by the sinking of the deepest oceanic part of the slab, during stretching and break-off of the slab. The amount of trench advancing ranges from 40 to 220 km and depends on the dip angle of the slab before the onset of collision.

  4. Definition of zones with different levels of productivity within an agricultural field using fuzzy modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoning of agricultural fields is an important task for utilization of precision farming technology. One method for the definition of zones with different levels of productivity is based on fuzzy indicator model. Fuzzy indicator model for identification of zones with different levels of productivit...

  5. Geodynamic Modeling of the Subduction Zone around the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, S.

    2017-06-01

    In this review, which focuses on our research, we describe the development of the thermomechanical modeling of subduction zones, paying special attention to those around the Japanese Islands. Without a sufficient amount of data and observations, models tended to be conceptual and general. However, the increasing power of computational tools has resulted in simple analytical and numerical models becoming more realistic, by incorporating the mantle flow around the subducting slab. The accumulation of observations and data has made it possible to construct regional models to understand the detail of the subduction processes. Recent advancements in the study of the seismic tomography and geology around the Japanese Islands has enabled new aspects of modeling the mantle processes. A good correlation between the seismic velocity anomalies and the finger-like distribution of volcanoes in northeast Japan has been recognized and small-scale convection (SSC) in the mantle wedge has been proposed to explain such a feature. The spatial and temporal evolution of the distribution of past volcanoes may reflect the characteristics of the flow in the mantle wedge, and points to the possibility of the flip-flopping of the finger-like pattern of the volcano distribution and the migration of volcanic activity from the back-arc side to the trench side. These observations are found to be qualitatively consistent with the results of the SSC model. We have also investigated the expected seismic anisotropy in the presence of SSC. The fast direction of the P-wave anisotropy generally shows the trench-normal direction with a reduced magnitude compared to the case without SSC. An analysis of full 3D seismic anisotropy is necessary to confirm the existence and nature of SSC. The 3D mantle flow around the subduction zone of plate-size scale has been modeled. It was found that the trench-parallel flow in the sub-slab mantle around the northern edge of the Pacific plate at the junction between

  6. Multivariate models to classify Tuscan virgin olive oils by zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandri, Stefano

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study and classify Tuscan virgin olive oils, 179 samples were collected. They were obtained from drupes harvested during the first half of November, from three different zones of the Region. The sampling was repeated for 5 years. Fatty acids, phytol, aliphatic and triterpenic alcohols, triterpenic dialcohols, sterols, squalene and tocopherols were analyzed. A subset of variables was considered. They were selected in a preceding work as the most effective and reliable, from the univariate point of view. The analytical data were transformed (except for the cycloartenol to compensate annual variations, the mean related to the East zone was subtracted from each value, within each year. Univariate three-class models were calculated and further variables discarded. Then multivariate three-zone models were evaluated, including phytol (that was always selected and all the combinations of palmitic, palmitoleic and oleic acid, tetracosanol, cycloartenol and squalene. Models including from two to seven variables were studied. The best model shows by-zone classification errors less than 40%, by-zone within-year classification errors that are less than 45% and a global classification error equal to 30%. This model includes phytol, palmitic acid, tetracosanol and cycloartenol.

    Para estudiar y clasificar aceites de oliva vírgenes Toscanos, se utilizaron 179 muestras, que fueron obtenidas de frutos recolectados durante la primera mitad de Noviembre, de tres zonas diferentes de la Región. El muestreo fue repetido durante 5 años. Se analizaron ácidos grasos, fitol, alcoholes alifáticos y triterpénicos, dialcoholes triterpénicos, esteroles, escualeno y tocoferoles. Se consideró un subconjunto de variables que fueron seleccionadas en un trabajo anterior como el más efectivo y fiable, desde el punto de vista univariado. Los datos analíticos se transformaron (excepto para el cicloartenol para compensar las variaciones anuales, rest

  7. Three-dimensional Thermal Model of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, J. C.; Pimentel, F. D. C.; Currie, C. A.; He, J.; Harris, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Along the Mexican section of the Middle America Trench (MAT), the Cocos plate subducts beneath the North American plate. The most important feature of this subduction zone is the flat-slab section below central Mexico, extending approximately 250 km landward from the trench at a depth of 50 km. Further west, the dip changes to 45-50º. This particular geometry has several unique consequences, such as a volcanic arc that is not aligned with the trench and very shallow slab seismicity. For the mantle wedge, the abrupt change in slab geometry could lead to a three-dimensional (3D) mantle wedge flow that departs from the classical 2D subduction-driven corner flow. Evidence of 3D flow in the region comes from seismic anisotropy studies, which show that olivine fast-direction axes have a component that is parallel to the MAT. In other subduction zones, such as Costa Rica-Nicaragua and Japan, 3D flow has been observed to increase temperatures by >50º C relative to corner flow models.For this study, we have created the first 3D finite-element model of the Mexican subduction zone in order to analyze its thermal structure. Our objective is to assess the effects of 3D mantle flow and hydrothermal circulation (HC) in the subducting slab. In this region, low surface heat flow values near the trench indicate that HC may remove heat from the oceanic plate. Our model incorporates the effect of HC through conductivity proxies in the subducting crust and a 2D oceanic geotherm that includes the age variations of the Cocos plate along the MAT. For an isoviscous mantle, our model shows that the slab dip variations induce a flow that departs from 2D corner flow near the transition between the flat-slab and normal-dipping sections. The mantle flows in eastward direction toward the flat slab, and its orientation is consistent with seismic anisotropy studies. The maximum along-margin flow rate is nearly 2 cm/yr, which is >30% of the convergence rate. Temperatures at the location of this

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Grain-Boundary Fracture: Cohesive Zone Models Parameterized From Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Saether, Erik; Phillips, Dawn R.; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2006-01-01

    A multiscale modeling strategy is developed to study grain boundary fracture in polycrystalline aluminum. Atomistic simulation is used to model fundamental nanoscale deformation and fracture mechanisms and to develop a constitutive relationship for separation along a grain boundary interface. The nanoscale constitutive relationship is then parameterized within a cohesive zone model to represent variations in grain boundary properties. These variations arise from the presence of vacancies, intersticies, and other defects in addition to deviations in grain boundary angle from the baseline configuration considered in the molecular dynamics simulation. The parameterized cohesive zone models are then used to model grain boundaries within finite element analyses of aluminum polycrystals.

  9. Model of the Streamer Zone of a Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milikh, G. M.; Raina, A.; Shneider, M.; Likhanskii, A.; George, A.

    2015-12-01

    Developed leaders represent highly conductive plasma channels, continuously emitting a fan of streamers, termed the streamer zone. The tip moves at a speed much slower than that of individual streamers. A huge number of short-lived streamers in the corona generate the space charge field required to maintain the streamer propagation. A critical issue is the conversion from the streamer to leader phase [Da Silva and Pasko, 2013]. The objective of this paper is to present simulations of the formation and propagation of the streamer zone of a leader. In these simulations we generated a group of streamers that propagate in a discharge gap while they interact with each other. We use the modified numerical model [Likhanskii et al., 2007] developed to simulate discharge plasma actuators driven by nanosecond pulses. The model uses 2D rectangular computational box, and the discharge gap is filled with the air at normal conditions. Furthermore the model considers electrons, positive and negative ions. The plasma kinetics and interaction with neutral molecules is modeled in a drift-diffusion approximation [Likhanskii et al., 2007]. The electric field and potential are related to the density of charged species according to the Poisson equation. The latter was solved by the successive over-relaxation method. It is shown that interaction between the streamers significantly reduces their propagation velocity. Furthermore the streamer velocity depends on the distance between the streamers. The smaller is that distance the stronger is the suppression of the streamer velocity. This explains why the leader, which consists of many streamers, is much slower than a single streamer formed in the same discharge gap. C.L. Da Silva and V.P. Pasko, J. Geophys. Res.: Atmospheres, 118, 1-30, 2013 A.V. Likhanskii et al., Phys. Plasmas, 14, 073501, 2007.

  10. Mesoscopic Model for Free Energy Landscape Analysis of DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tapia-Rojo, R; Mazo, J J; Falo, F; 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021908

    2012-01-01

    A mesoscopic model which allows us to identify and quantify the strength of binding sites in DNA sequences is proposed. The model is based on the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model for the DNA chain coupled to a Brownian particle which explores the sequence interacting more importantly with open base pairs of the DNA chain. We apply the model to promoter sequences of different organisms. The free energy landscape obtained for these promoters shows a complex structure that is strongly connected to their biological behavior. The analysis method used is able to quantify free energy differences of sites within genome sequences.

  11. Structural modelling of thrust zones utilizing photogrammetry: Western Champsaur basin, SE France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totake, Yukitsugu; Butler, Rob; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in photogrammetric technologies allow geoscientists to easily obtain a high-resolution 3D geospatial data across multiple scales, from rock specimen to landscape. Although resolution and accuracy of photogrammetry models are dependent on various factors (a quality of photography, number of overlapping photo images, distance to targets, etc), modern photogrammetry techniques can even provide a comparable data resolution to laser scanning technologies (modelling of various geological objects. Another advantages of photogrammetry techniques, high portability and low costs for infrastructures, ease to incorporate these techniques with conventional geological surveys. Photogrammetry techniques have a great potential to enhance performances of geological surveys. We present a workflow for building basin-scale 3D structural models utilizing the ground-based photogrammetry along with field observations. The workflow is applied to model thrust zones in Eocene-Oligocene turbidite sequences called Champsaur Sandstone (Gres du Champsaur) filling an Alpine fore-deep basin, Western Champsaur basin, in southeastern France. The study area is located ca. 20km northeast from Gap, and approximately extends 10 km from east to west and 6 km from north to south. During a 2-week fieldwork, over 9400 photographs were taken at 133 locations by a handheld digital camera from ground, and were georeferenced with a handheld GPS. Photo images were processed within software PhotoScan to build a 3D photogrammetric model. The constructed photogrammetry model was then imported into software Move to map faults and geological layers along with georeferenced field data so that geological cross sections and 3D surfaces are produced. The workflow succeeded to produce a detailed topography and textures of landscape at ~1m resolution, and enabled to characterize thrust systems in the study area at bed-scale resolution. Three-dimensionally characterized architectures of thrust zones at high

  12. Chaos game representation walk model for the protein sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jie; Jiang Li-Li; Xu Zhen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A new chaos game representation of protein sequences based on the detailed hydrophobic-hydrophilic(HP)model has been proposed by Yu et al(Physica A 337(2004)171). A CGR-walk model is proposed based on the new CGR coordinates for the protein sequences from complete genomes in the present paper. The new CGR coordinates based on the detailed HP model are converted into a time series, and a long-memory ARFIMA(p, d, q)model is introduced into the protein sequence analysis. This model is applied to simulating real CGR-walk sequence data of twelve protein sequences. Remarkably long-range correlations are uncovered in the data and the results obtained from these models are reasonably coneistent with those available from the ARFIMA(p, d, q)model.

  13. Continuous Online Sequence Learning with an Unsupervised Neural Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuwei; Ahmad, Subutar; Hawkins, Jeff

    2016-09-14

    The ability to recognize and predict temporal sequences of sensory inputs is vital for survival in natural environments. Based on many known properties of cortical neurons, hierarchical temporal memory (HTM) sequence memory recently has been proposed as a theoretical framework for sequence learning in the cortex. In this letter, we analyze properties of HTM sequence memory and apply it to sequence learning and prediction problems with streaming data. We show the model is able to continuously learn a large number of variableorder temporal sequences using an unsupervised Hebbian-like learning rule. The sparse temporal codes formed by the model can robustly handle branching temporal sequences by maintaining multiple predictions until there is sufficient disambiguating evidence. We compare the HTM sequence memory with other sequence learning algorithms, including statistical methods: autoregressive integrated moving average; feedforward neural networks-time delay neural network and online sequential extreme learning machine; and recurrent neural networks-long short-term memory and echo-state networks on sequence prediction problems with both artificial and real-world data. The HTM model achieves comparable accuracy to other state-of-the-art algorithms. The model also exhibits properties that are critical for sequence learning, including continuous online learning, the ability to handle multiple predictions and branching sequences with high-order statistics, robustness to sensor noise and fault tolerance, and good performance without task-specific hyperparameter tuning. Therefore, the HTM sequence memory not only advances our understanding of how the brain may solve the sequence learning problem but is also applicable to real-world sequence learning problems from continuous data streams.

  14. The normal zone propagation in ATLAS B00 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The B00 model coil has been successfully tested in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility at CERN. The coil consists of two double pancakes wound with aluminum stabilized cables of the barrel- and end-cap toroids conductors for the ATLAS detector. The magnet current is applied up to 24 kA and quenches are induced by firing point heaters. The normal zone velocity is measured over a wide range of currents by using pickup coils, voltage taps and superconducting quench detectors. The signals coming from various sensors are presented and analyzed. The results extracted from the various detection methods are in good agreement. It is found that the characteristic velocities vary from 5 to 20 m/s at 15 and 24 kA respectively. In addition, the minimum quench energies at different applied magnet currents are presented. (6 refs).

  15. Modelling the ancestral sequence distribution and model frequencies in context-dependent models for primate non-coding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baele Guy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent approaches for context-dependent evolutionary modelling assume that the evolution of a given site depends upon its ancestor and that ancestor's immediate flanking sites. Because such dependency pattern cannot be imposed on the root sequence, we consider the use of different orders of Markov chains to model dependence at the ancestral root sequence. Root distributions which are coupled to the context-dependent model across the underlying phylogenetic tree are deemed more realistic than decoupled Markov chains models, as the evolutionary process is responsible for shaping the composition of the ancestral root sequence. Results We find strong support, in terms of Bayes Factors, for using a second-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence along with a context-dependent model throughout the remainder of the phylogenetic tree in an ancestral repeats dataset, and for using a first-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence in a pseudogene dataset. Relaxing the assumption of a single context-independent set of independent model frequencies as presented in previous work, yields a further drastic increase in model fit. We show that the substitution rates associated with the CpG-methylation-deamination process can be modelled through context-dependent model frequencies and that their accuracy depends on the (order of the Markov chain imposed at the ancestral root sequence. In addition, we provide evidence that this approach (which assumes that root distribution and evolutionary model are decoupled outperforms an approach inspired by the work of Arndt et al., where the root distribution is coupled to the evolutionary model. We show that the continuous-time approximation of Hwang and Green has stronger support in terms of Bayes Factors, but the parameter estimates show minimal differences. Conclusions We show that the combination of a dependency scheme at the ancestral root sequence and a context

  16. An Ant-Based Model for Multiple Sequence Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Guinand, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a key process in today's biology, and finding a relevant alignment of several sequences is much more challenging than just optimizing some improbable evaluation functions. Our approach for addressing multiple sequence alignment focuses on the building of structures in a new graph model: the factor graph model. This model relies on block-based formulation of the original problem, formulation that seems to be one of the most suitable ways for capturing evolutionary aspects of alignment. The structures are implicitly built by a colony of ants laying down pheromones in the factor graphs, according to relations between blocks belonging to the different sequences.

  17. Using heat as a tracer to estimate spatially distributed mean residence times in the hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical reactions that occur in the hyporheic zone are highly dependent on the time solutes that are in contact with sediments of the riverbed. In this investigation, we developed a 2-D longitudinal flow and solute-transport model to estimate the spatial distribution of mean residence time in the hyporheic zone. The flow model was calibrated using observations of temperature and pressure, and the mean residence times were simulated using the age-mass approach for steady-state flow conditions. The approach used in this investigation includes the mixing of different ages and flow paths of water through advection and dispersion. Uncertainty of flow and transport parameters was evaluated using standard Monte Carlo and the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation method. Results of parameter estimation support the presence of a low-permeable zone in the riffle area that induced horizontal flow at a shallow depth within the riffle area. This establishes shallow and localized flow paths and limits deep vertical exchange. For the optimal model, mean residence times were found to be relatively long (9–40.0 days). The uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity resulted in a mean interquartile range (IQR) of 13 days across all piezometers and was reduced by 24% with the inclusion of temperature and pressure observations. To a lesser extent, uncertainty in streambed porosity and dispersivity resulted in a mean IQR of 2.2 and 4.7 days, respectively. Alternative conceptual models demonstrate the importance of accounting for the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity in simulating mean residence times in a riffle-pool sequence.

  18. Permafrost degradation risk zone assessment using simulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Daanen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this proof-of-concept study we focus on linking large scale climate and permafrost simulations to small scale engineering projects by bridging the gap between climate and permafrost sciences on the one hand and on the other technical recommendation for adaptation of planned infrastructures to climate change in a region generally underlain by permafrost. We present the current and future state of permafrost in Greenland as modelled numerically with the GIPL model driven by HIRHAM climate projections up to 2080. We develop a concept called Permafrost Thaw Potential (PTP, defined as the potential active layer increase due to climate warming and surface alterations. PTP is then used in a simple risk assessment procedure useful for engineering applications. The modelling shows that climate warming will result in continuing wide-spread permafrost warming and degradation in Greenland, in agreement with present observations. We provide examples of application of the risk zone assessment approach for the two towns of Sisimiut and Ilulissat, both classified with high PTP.

  19. Modelling of composite concrete block pavement systems applying a cohesive zone model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skar, Asmus; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of the fracture behaviour of the cement bound base material in composite concrete block pavement systems, using a cohesive zone model. The functionality of the proposed model is tested on experimental and numerical investigations of beam bending tests...

  20. Modeling and Simulation for a Surf Zone Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    on a surf zone vehicle focused on negative buoyancy using tracked platforms that used traditional tank drive mechanisms to remain on the sea floor...through the surf zone transit and drive on to the beach. Provided by the Surf Zone Crawler Group of Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City, a Foster...with the traction and obstacle scaling of a leg [2]. Further work elaborated this concept into an entire drivetrain concept. Focused on the

  1. Vadose Zone Modeling Workshop proceedings, March 29--30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, R.

    1993-08-01

    At the Hanford Site, the record of decision for remediation of CERCLA sites is largely based on results of the baseline risk and performance assessment of the remedial action alternatives. These assessments require the ability to predict the fate and transport of contaminants along appropriate exposure pathways which, in case of the Hanford Site, includes the migration of contaminants through the vadose zone to the water table. Listed below are some of the requirements, as prescribed by the regulators, relative to CERCLA risk and performance assessment at Hanford. A workshop was organized by the Environmental Risk and Performance Assessment Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company on March 29--30, 1993 at the Richland Best Western Tower Inn. During the workshop, an assessment was made of the need for and scope of various tasks being conducted or planned as part of the Hanford Site waste isolation performance assessment/risk assessment activities. Three external, nationally-recognized experts served as part of a review panel for the workshop: (a) Professor Lynn Gelhar of MIT; (b) Professor Peter Wierenga of University of Arizona; and (c) Dr. Rien van Genuchten of US Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, California. The technical experts provided their perspectives on the current state-of-the-art in vadose zone flow and transport modeling. In addition, the technical experts provided an outside independent assessment of the work being performed or planned in support of various activities identified in TPA Milestone M-29-02. This document includes the following: Recommendations from the three peer reviewers; areas of expertise of the three peer reviewers; workshop agenda; copies of viewgraphs (where available) from presenters at the workshop; workshop minutes; and list of workshop attendees.

  2. Static stress transfer within the Cephalonia Transfer Fault Zone (CTFZ) during the 2014 seismic sequence in Cephalonia and the 2015 earthquake in Lefkada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sboras, Sotiris; Chatzipetros, Alexandros; Pavlides, Spyros; Karastathis, Vassilis; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos

    2017-04-01

    The 2014 seismic sequence in Cephalonia and the following 2015 earthquake in Lefkada Islands, Greece, showed that the Cephalonia Transfer Fault Zone (CTFZ), which runs along the western coasts of both islands, comprises a wide fault zone of parallel to sub-parallel fault segments. The January-February 2014 sequence of Cephalonia consisted of three moderate to strong events. According to published focal mechanisms, the first strongest shock (January 26, Mw 6.1) was produced by a W-dipping, oblique (right-lateral reverse) fault, the second (January 26, Mw 5.3) by a ENE-dipping, pure reverse fault and the third by a ESE-dipping, almost pure right-lateral strike slip fault. The November 17 2015 (Mw 6.4) Lefkada earthquake was produced by a WNW-dipping, roughly vertical, almost pure right-lateral strike-slip fault. None of the shocks above produced any direct coseismic ground rupture, while published relocated hypocentral locations for the Cephalonia sequence revealed various depths indicating a complex fault pattern. Based on published seismological, geological and satellite data (i.e. InSAR), the respective seismic sources were modelled in order to calculate the static stress changes i) during the Cephalonia and Lefkada sequences, and ii) after the sequences for the surrounding faults from the Greek Database of Seismogenic Sources (GreDaSS). Results showed that the February 3 2014 Cephalonia fault was variously affected by the rupture of the two January 26 faults. Stress change distribution on the fault plane showed that both stress drop and rise occurred. The November 17 2015 Lefkada fault was slightly loaded after the rupture of the whole Cephalonia fault system due to the great distance. The post-sequence stress changes variously affect the surrounding faults: the southern segment of the CTFZ is relieved from stresses, while the central ones show a mixed situation. The large northern segment, offshore from Lefkada Island, is mainly under stress drop. Stress drop is

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF EARTHQUAKE AFTERSHOCK AND SWARM SEQUENCES IN THE BAIKAL RIFT ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Radziminovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The catalog of earthquakes (КR³6.6 which occurred in the Baikal rift zone (BRZ was declastered, and the results are presented in the article. Aftershocks of seismic events (КR³12.5 were determined by the software developed by V.B. Smirnov (Lomonosov Moscow State University with application of the algorithm co-authored by G.M. Molchan and O.E. Dmitrieva. To ensure proper control of the software application, aftershocks were also selected manually. The results of declustering show that aftershocks of the earthquakes (КR³12.5 account for about 25 per cent of all seismic events in the regional catalog. Aftershocks accompanied 90 per cent of all the earthquakes considered as main shocks. Besides, earthquake swarms, including events with КR³11, were identified. The results of this study show that, in the BRZ, the swarms and strong events with aftershocks are not spatially separated, and this conclusion differs from the views of the previous studies that reviewed data from a shorter observation period. Moreover, it is noted that the swarms may consist of several main shocks accompanied by aftershocks. The data accumulated over the last fifty years of instrumental observations support the conclusion made earlier that the swarms in BRZ occur mainly in the north-eastward direction from Lake Baikal and also confirm the trend of a small number of aftershocks accompanying earthquakes in the south-western part of the Baikal rift zone.

  4. Angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves. IV - Wave generation by surface convection zone, from the pre-main sequence to the early-AGB in intermediate mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Talon, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of papers that deal with angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves in stellar interiors. Here, we want to examine the potential role of waves in other evolutionary phases than the main sequence. We study the evolution of a 3Msun Population I model from the pre-main sequence to the early-AGB phase and examine whether waves can lead to angular momentum redistribution and/or element diffusion at the external convection zone boundary. We find that, although waves produced by the surface convection zone can be ignored safely for such a star during the main sequence, it is not the case for later evolutionary stages. In particular, angular momentum transport by internal waves could be quite important at the end of the sub-giant branch and during the early-AGB phase. Wave-induced mixing of chemicals is expected during the early-AGB phase.

  5. Modelling komatiitic melt accumulation and segregation in the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, H.; Arndt, N.

    2017-08-01

    Komatiites are probably produced in very hot mantle upwellings or plumes. Under such conditions, melting will take place deep within the upper mantle or even within the mantle transition zone. Due to its compressibility at such pressures, melt might be denser than olivine, but would remain buoyant with respect to a peridotitic mantle both above and below the olivine-wadsleyite phase boundary because of the presence of its higher temperature and denser garnet. We studied the physics of melting and melt segregation within hot upwelling mantle passing through the transition zone, with particular emphasis on the effect of depth-dependent density contrasts between melt and ambient mantle. Assuming a 1D plume, we solved the two-phase flow equations of the melt-matrix system accounting for matrix compaction and porosity-dependent shear and bulk viscosity. We assumed a constant ascent velocity and melt generation rate. In a first model series, the level of neutral buoyancy zneutr is assumed to lie above the depth of onset of melting, i.e. there exists a region where dense melt may lag behind the solid phases within the rising plume. Depending on two non-dimensional numbers (accumulation number Ac, compaction resistance number Cr) we find four regimes: 1) time-dependent melt accumulation in standing porosity waves that scale with the compaction length. The lowermost of these waves broadens with time until a high melt accumulation zone is formed in steady state. During this transient solitary porosity waves may cross the depth of neutral density and escape. 2) steady-state weak melt accumulation near zneutr, 3) no melt accumulation due to small density contrast or, 4) high matrix viscosity. In regime 4 the high mantle viscosity prevents the opening of pore space necessary to accumulate melt. In a second series, the rising mantle crosses the olivine-wadsleyite phase boundary, which imposes a jump in density contrast between melt and ambient mantle. A sharp melt porosity

  6. Zoning of agricultural field using a fuzzy indicators model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoning of agricultural fields is an important task for utilization of precision farming technology. One method for deciding how to subdivide a field into a few relatively homogenous zones is using applications of fuzzy sets theory. Data collected from a precision agriculture study in central Texas...

  7. EIA modelling for coastal zone management. Part 2

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    stream_size 15 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Summer_Sch_EIA_Manage_Coast_Zone_2001_95.pdf.txt stream_source_info Summer_Sch_EIA_Manage_Coast_Zone_2001_95.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  8. Cohesive zone modelling of interface fracture near flaws in adhesive joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Feraren; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2004-01-01

    A cohesive zone model is suggested for modelling of interface fracture near flaws in adhesive joints. A shear-loaded adhesive joint bonded with a planar circular bond region is modelled using both the cohesive zone model and a fracture mechanical model. Results from the models show good agreement...... of crack propagation on the location and shape of the crack front and on the initial joint strength. Subsequently, the cohesive zone model is used to model interface fracture through a planar adhesive layer containing a periodic array of elliptical flaws. The effects of flaw shape are investigated, as well...... on the fracture process zone width relative to the flaw dimensions. It is also seen that with increasing fracture process zone width, the strength variation with the flaw shape decreases, however, the strength is effected over a wider range of propagation, (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Work zone safety analysis and modeling: a state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Ozbay, Kaan; Ozturk, Ozgur; Xie, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Work zone safety is one of the top priorities for transportation agencies. In recent years, a considerable volume of research has sought to determine work zone crash characteristics and causal factors. Unlike other non-work zone-related safety studies (on both crash frequency and severity), there has not yet been a comprehensive review and assessment of methodological approaches for work zone safety. To address this deficit, this article aims to provide a comprehensive review of the existing extensive research efforts focused on work zone crash-related analysis and modeling, in the hopes of providing researchers and practitioners with a complete overview. Relevant literature published in the last 5 decades was retrieved from the National Work Zone Crash Information Clearinghouse and the Transport Research International Documentation database and other public digital libraries and search engines. Both peer-reviewed publications and research reports were obtained. Each study was carefully reviewed, and those that focused on either work zone crash data analysis or work zone safety modeling were identified. The most relevant studies are specifically examined and discussed in the article. The identified studies were carefully synthesized to understand the state of knowledge on work zone safety. Agreement and inconsistency regarding the characteristics of the work zone crashes discussed in the descriptive studies were summarized. Progress and issues about the current practices on work zone crash frequency and severity modeling are also explored and discussed. The challenges facing work zone safety research are then presented. The synthesis of the literature suggests that the presence of a work zone is likely to increase the crash rate. Crashes are not uniformly distributed within work zones and rear-end crashes are the most prevalent type of crashes in work zones. There was no across-the-board agreement among numerous papers reviewed on the relationship between work zone

  10. Chaos game representation (CGR)-walk model for DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jie; Xu Zhen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Chaos game representation (CGR) is an iterative mapping technique that processes sequences of units, such as nucleotides in a DNA sequence or amino acids in a protein, in order to determine the coordinates of their positions in a continuous space. This distribution of positions has two features: one is unique, and the other is source sequence that can be recovered from the coordinates so that the distance between positions may serve as a measure of similarity between the corresponding sequences. A CGR-walk model is proposed based on CGR coordinates for the DNA sequences. The CGR coordinates are converted into a time series, and a long-memory ARFIMA (p, d, q) model, where ARFIMA stands for autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average, is introduced into the DNA sequence analysis. This model is applied to simulating real CGR-walk sequence data of ten genomic sequences. Remarkably long-range correlations are uncovered in the data, and the results from these models are reasonably fitted with those from the ARFIMA (p, d, q) model.

  11. Protein comparative sequence analysis and computer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Brett D; Oakley, Cecily E; Fajer, Piotr G

    2008-01-01

    A problem frequently encountered by the biological scientist is the identification of a previously unknown gene or protein sequence, where there are few or no clues as to the biochemical function, ligand specificity, gene regulation, protein-protein interactions, tissue specificity, cellular localization, developmental phase of activity, or biological role. Through the process of bioinformatics there are now many approaches for predicting answers to at least some of these questions, often then allowing the design of more insightful experiments to characterize more definitively the new protein.

  12. Habitable Zones Around Main-Sequence Stars: Dependence on Planetary Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Kopparapu, Ravi kumar; SchottelKotte, James; Kasting, James F; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Eymet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing discoveries of extrasolar planets are unveiling a wide range of terrestrial mass (size) planets around their host stars. In this letter, we present estimates of habitable zones (HZs) around stars with stellar effective temperatures in the range 2600 K - 7200 K, for planetary masses between 0.1 ME and 5 ME. Assuming H2O (inner HZ) and CO2 (outer HZ) dominated atmospheres, and scaling the background N2 atmospheric pressure with the radius of the planet, our results indicate that larger planets have wider HZs than do smaller ones. Specifically, with the assumption that smaller planets will have less dense atmospheres, the inner edge of the HZ (runaway greenhouse limit) moves outward (~10% lower than Earth flux) for low mass planets due to larger greenhouse effect arising from the increased H2O column depth. For larger planets, the H2O column depth is smaller, and higher temperatures are needed before water vapor completely dominates the outgoing longwave radiation. Hence the inner edge moves inward (...

  13. Modeling of formation of intraplate partial melting zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepechko, Y. V.; Sorokin, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    This study suggests the mathematical model of dynamics of partial melting in lithosphere causing formation of magmatic systems. The intraplate magmatic systems can be formed at achievement of required thermodynamic conditions, which can be developed due to the following mechanisms: contact heating; decompression melting at mantle matter penetration into lithosphere; and heating by filtering mantle melts and fluids in the weakened lithosphere zones above the asthenospheric structure related to a hotspot. The most efficient mechanism from the point of time and heating degree is the latter one. It is heating of lithosphere matter by mantle melts and fluids, which is especially important for development of melting sites in these systems. At formation of intraplate magmatic systems the fluid is filtered in a porous medium, porous matrix melts partially, and finally a granulated medium is formed there. To decrease the processes of heat and mass transfer in this system, the equations of dynamics of multiphase multivelocity media are derived in this study. In contrast to the Darcy-type models used in previous studies, the suggested two-velocity hydrodynamics theory describing fluid motions in a porous medium with complex reology is the thermodynamically consistent one and allows the description of nonstationary nonlinear processes. The governing equations of the model describe both the process of filtration through the deformed porous matrix and hydrodynamics of heterophase granulated medium without pressure equilibrium in phases. The work was supported by the grants 08-05-00467, 09-05-00602, 09-05-01084 from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.

  14. Ultralow-velocity zone geometries resolved by multidimensional waveform modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Rost, S.; Thorne, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) are thin patches of material with strongly reduced seismic wave speeds situated on top of the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A common phase used to detect ULVZs is SPdKS (SKPdS), an SKS wave with a short diffracted P leg along the CMB. Most previous efforts have examined ULVZ properties using 1-D waveform modelling approaches. We present waveform modelling results using the 2.5-D finite-difference algorithm PSVaxi allowing us better insight into ULVZ structure and location. We characterize ULVZ waveforms based on ULVZ elastic properties, shape and position along the SPdKS ray path. In particular, we vary the ULVZ location (e.g. source or receiver side), ULVZ topographical profiles (e.g. boxcar, trapezoidal or Gaussian) and ULVZ lateral scale along great circle path (2.5°, 5°, 10°). We observe several waveform effects absent in 1-D ULVZ models and show evidence for waveform effects allowing the differentiation between source and receiver side ULVZs. Early inception of the SPdKS/SKPdS phase is difficult to detect for receiver-side ULVZs with maximum shifts in SKPdS initiation of ˜3° in epicentral distance, whereas source-side ULVZs produce maximum shifts of SPdKS initiation of ˜5°, allowing clear separation of source- versus receiver-side structure. We present a case study using data from up to 300 broad-band stations in Turkey recorded between 2005 and 2010. We observe a previously undetected ULVZ in the southern Atlantic Ocean region centred near 45°S, 12.5°W, with a lateral scale of ˜3°, VP reduction of 10 per cent, VS reduction of 30 per cent and density increase of 10 per cent relative to PREM.

  15. Probabilistic models for semisupervised discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Kyoung; Choi, Seungjin

    2011-01-01

    Methods for discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), searching only for patterns that differentiate two sets (positive and negative sets) of sequences. On one hand, discriminative methods increase the sensitivity and specificity of motif discovery, compared to generative models. On the other hand, generative models can easily exploit unlabeled sequences to better detect functional motifs when labeled training samples are limited. In this paper, we develop a hybrid generative/discriminative model which enables us to make use of unlabeled sequences in the framework of discriminative motif discovery, leading to semisupervised discriminative motif discovery. Numerical experiments on yeast ChIP-chip data for discovering DNA motifs demonstrate that the best performance is obtained between the purely-generative and the purely-discriminative and the semisupervised learning improves the performance when labeled sequences are limited.

  16. The genome sequence of the model ascomycete fungus Podospora anserina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espagne, Eric; Lespinet, Olivier; Malagnac, Fabienne; Da Silva, Corinne; Jaillon, Olivier; Porcel, Betina M; Couloux, Arnaud; Aury, Jean-Marc; Ségurens, Béatrice; Poulain, Julie; Anthouard, Véronique; Grossetete, Sandrine; Khalili, Hamid; Coppin, Evelyne; Déquard-Chablat, Michelle; Picard, Marguerite; Contamine, Véronique; Arnaise, Sylvie; Bourdais, Anne; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Gautheret, Daniel; de Vries, Ronald P; Battaglia, Evy; Coutinho, Pedro M; Danchin, Etienne Gj; Henrissat, Bernard; Khoury, Riyad El; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie; Boivin, Antoine; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Sellem, Carole H; Debuchy, Robert; Wincker, Patrick; Weissenbach, Jean; Silar, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dung-inhabiting ascomycete fungus Podospora anserina is a model used to study various aspects of eukaryotic and fungal biology, such as ageing, prions and sexual development. RESULTS: We present a 10X draft sequence of P. anserina genome, linked to the sequences of a large expressed

  17. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  18. A Mini-Megathrust Event in an Incipient Subduction Zone: The 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahbod, A.; Kao, H.; Shan, S.

    2013-12-01

    The 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake (Mw 7.8) is the largest event recorded by modern seismograph networks in Canada. The source region is associated with a complicated tectonic system that constitutes the boundary between the North America and Pacific plates. In addition to the strike-slip Queen Charlotte Fault located immediately offshore west of the Haida Gwaii island, the oblique convergence between the two plates also create an incipient subduction zone that is confirmed by previous seismic velocity studies. In this study, we systematically examine the seismic waveforms of the Haida Gwaii earthquake sequence as recorded by the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN) stations. Because of the sparse station density in the source region, precise determination of earthquake hypocenters is challenging. We add the information of back-azimuth and incident angle, both are derived from the cross-correlation of 3-component waveforms, into the locating process to better constrain the distribution of aftershocks. For the first 24 hours, we are able to locate 264 aftershock events whereas the routine location catalogue gives only 106 events. The corresponding b-value is 0.56 with a magnitude of completeness of 2.3. The main shock shows low-angle thrust focal mechanism with the slip consistent in the direction of relative convergence. The distribution of aftershocks forms two major clusters. One is directly updip from the main rupture zone but within the subducting Pacific plate. Focal mechanisms of events with Mw >= 4.5 in this cluster are mostly normal-faulting, probably in response to plate bending. The other cluster is located within the overriding crust of the North America plate. These events show a mixture of normal and strike-slip faulting. Few aftershocks occurred on the main rupture zone, but were all too small for moment-tensor inversion. Most events within the down-going slab beneath the plate interface show downdip extensional mechanisms. We have not observed

  19. Dynamical vegetation-atmosphere modelling of the boreal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Stordal, Frode; Berntsen, Terje K.; Bryn, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation interacts with climate on seasonal to inter-annual time scales through albedo, roughness, evapotranspiration, CO2 sequestration and by influencing snow accumulation and ablation. The Scandinavian mountains and high latitudes is a hot spot for land-atmosphere feedback, as the future's increased winter minimum temperature supports a boreal tree line advance, lowering the surface albedo. The northern ecosystem is dominated by mires, boreal forests and alpine heaths, in addition to agricultural land. Model studies have shown that vegetation-climate feedbacks are strong enough to lead to regime shifts in vegetation and local climate in boreal regions. Biogeophysical factors, such as albedo, the Bowen ratio, and surface roughness, are all involved in these feedbacks, and they are also altered by land use change such as reforestation. For calculations of the dynamical coupling between the atmosphere and the vegetation we have used the Earth System Model NorESM, which includes several advanced features in its land surface model (CLM4.5), such as the inclusion of the radiative forcing due to black carbon and dust deposit onto snow, improved representation of fire, permafrost and its hydrological impact, a new snow cover fraction parameterization reflecting the hysteresis in fractional snow cover for a given snow depth between accumulation and melt phases, as well as dynamic vegetation coupled with carbon-nitrogen cycles. These new features improve the representation of surface albedo feedback in Arctic. We have performed experiments with coupled as well fixed ocean for the current as a quadrupled atmospheric CO2 situation. This model configuration is used to study changes in vegetation in a high end radiative forcing case. It is contrasted with an experiment where vegetation dynamics is neglected. Changes in the features of the vegetation along with surface fluxes, albedo and atmospheric temperatures are analysed, with main emphasis on the boreal zone. In

  20. 2-D and 3-D Models of Convective Turbulence and Oscillations in Intermediate-Mass Main-Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Joyce A; Nelson, N J; Lovekin, C; Kosak, K; Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Kosovichev, A

    2016-01-01

    We present multidimensional modeling of convection and oscillations in main-sequence stars somewhat more massive than the Sun, using three separate approaches: 1) Using the 3-D planar StellarBox radiation hydrodynamics code to model the envelope convection zone and part of the radiative zone. Our goals are to examine the interaction of stellar pulsations with turbulent convection in the envelope, excitation of acoustic modes, and the role of convective overshooting; 2) Applying the spherical 3-D MHD ASH (Anelastic Spherical Harmonics) code to simulate the core convection and radiative zone. Our goal is to determine whether core convection can excite low-frequency gravity modes, and thereby explain the presence of low frequencies for some hybrid gamma Doradus/delta Scuti variables for which the envelope convection zone is too shallow for the convective blocking mechanism to drive gravity modes; 3) Applying the ROTORC 2-D stellar evolution and dynamics code to calculate evolution with a variety of initial rotat...

  1. A new statistical model of wave heights based on the concept of wave breaking critical zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiaxuan; LI Xunqiang; ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing; WANG Lei

    2015-01-01

    When waves propagate from deep water to shallow water, wave heights and steepness increase and then waves roll back and break. This phenomenon is called surf. Currently, the present statistical calculation model of surf was derived mainly from the wave energy conservation equation and the linear wave dispersion relation, but it cannot reflect accurately the process which is a rapid increasing in wave height near the broken point. So, the concept of a surf breaking critical zone is presented. And the nearshore is divided as deep water zone, shallow water zone, surf breaking critical zone and after breaking zone. Besides, the calculation formula for the height of the surf breaking critical zone has founded based on flume experiments, thereby a new statistical calculation model on the surf has been established. Using the new model, the calculation error of wave height maximum is reduced from 17.62% to 6.43%.

  2. Rapid Texture Mapping from Image Sequences for Building Geometry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zuxun; WU Jun; ZHANG Jianqing

    2003-01-01

    An effective approach,mapping the texture for building model based on the digital photogrammetric theory, is proposed. The easily-acquired image sequences from digital video camera on helicopter are used astexture resource, and the correspon-dence between the space edge in building geometry model and its line feature in image sequences is determined semiautomatically. The experimental results in production of three-dimensional data for car navigation show us an attractive future both in efficiency and effect.

  3. A simple evolutional model of Habitable Zone around host stars with various mass and low metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Midori; Kamaya, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    Habitable Zone (HZ) is defined as a life existence area, where water at the surface of the terrestrial planet is in liquid phase. This is caused by the balance of flux from the host star and effective radiative cooling with greenhouse effect of the planet. However, the flux varies according to evolutional phase of the host star. So, a simple but newest HZ model considering stellar mass range from 0.08 to 4.00 M⊙ has been proposed. It studies both at zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) and terminal-age main sequence (TMS) phases to examine persistence of HZ. By the way, it discusses the case of the metallicity like the Sun. Actually, it is interesting to study a HZ model considering host stars with low metallicity. So, we examine the effect of metallicity, following the precedent simple model. In our analysis, metallicity affects little for HZ orbital range at ZAMS, while it affects clearly in case of TMS. Since the inner and outer HZ boundaries at TMS are shifted outward especially in the mass range from 1.5 to 2.0 M⊙, we find persistent HZ is allowed above about 1.8 M⊙. The age of the universe is 13.8 Gyr, which is comparable to main sequence life time of about 0.8 M⊙ for the low metallicity case. Then, the effect of metallicity to estimate HZ of low metallicity host stars is important for the mass range from 0.8 to 1.8 M⊙.

  4. A Probabilistic Genome-Wide Gene Reading Frame Sequence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Mørk, Søren

    We introduce a new type of probabilistic sequence model, that model the sequential composition of reading frames of genes in a genome. Our approach extends gene finders with a model of the sequential composition of genes at the genome-level -- effectively producing a sequential genome annotation...... and are evaluated by the effect on prediction performance. Since bacterial gene finding to a large extent is a solved problem it forms an ideal proving ground for evaluating the explicit modeling of larger scale gene sequence composition of genomes. We conclude that the sequential composition of gene reading frames...... as output. The model can be used to obtain the most probable genome annotation based on a combination of i: a gene finder score of each gene candidate and ii: the sequence of the reading frames of gene candidates through a genome. The model --- as well as a higher order variant --- is developed and tested...

  5. Bidirectional LSTM-CRF Models for Sequence Tagging

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Zhiheng; Xu, Wei; Yu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a variety of Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) based models for sequence tagging. These models include LSTM networks, bidirectional LSTM (BI-LSTM) networks, LSTM with a Conditional Random Field (CRF) layer (LSTM-CRF) and bidirectional LSTM with a CRF layer (BI-LSTM-CRF). Our work is the first to apply a bidirectional LSTM CRF (denoted as BI-LSTM-CRF) model to NLP benchmark sequence tagging data sets. We show that the BI-LSTM-CRF model can efficiently use both past and fu...

  6. Development of geoinformation zoning model of urban territories for use in urban cadaster systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Денис Вікторович Горковчук

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure and composition of zoning spatial resources is explored. Geoinformation mode of geospatial zoning data on the basis of object-relational database management system is developed. Developed zoning model is tested in the environment of open-source database management system PostgreSQL. Applied SQL-function for automatic creation of build conditions and restrictions of land development is implemented

  7. Hydrogeological characterisation and modelling of deformation zones and fracture domains, Forsmark modelling stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (SE)); Leven, Jakob (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE)); Hartley, Lee; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steve; Roberts, David; Swift, Ben (Serco Assurance, Harwell (GB))

    2007-09-15

    The work reported here collates the structural-hydraulic information gathered in 21 cored boreholes and 32 percussion-drilled boreholes belonging to Forsmark site description, modelling stage 2.2. The analyses carried out provide the hydrogeological input descriptions of the bedrock in Forsmark needed by the end users Repository Engineering, Safety Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment; that is, hydraulic properties of deformation zones and fracture domains. The same information is also needed for constructing 3D groundwater flow models of the Forsmark site and surrounding area. The analyses carried out render the following conceptual model regarding the observed heterogeneity in deformation zone transmissivity: We find the geological division of the deterministically modelled deformation zones into eight categories (sets) useful from a hydrogeological point of view. Seven of the eight categories are steeply dipping, WNW, NW, NNW, NNE, NE, ENE and EW, and on is gently dipping, G. All deformation zones, regardless of orientation (strike and dip), are subjected to a substantial decrease in transmissivity with depth. The data gathered suggest a contrast of c. 20,000 times for the uppermost one kilometre of bedrock, i.e. more than four orders of magnitude. The hydraulic properties below this depth are not investigated. The lateral heterogeneity is also substantial but more irregular in its appearance. For instance, for a given elevation and deformation zone category (orientation), the spatial variability in transmissivity within a particular deformation zone appears to be as large as the variability between all deformation zones. This suggests that the lateral correlation length is shorter than the shortest distance between two adjacent observation points and shorter than the category spacing. The observation that the mean transmissivity of the gently-dipping deformation zones is c. one to two orders of magnitude greater than the mean transmissivities of all

  8. A random effects epidemic-type aftershock sequence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng-Chang

    2011-04-01

    We consider an extension of the temporal epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model with random effects as a special case of a well-known doubly stochastic self-exciting point process. The new model arises from a deterministic function that is randomly scaled by a nonnegative random variable, which is unobservable but assumed to follow either positive stable or one-parameter gamma distribution with unit mean. Both random effects models are of interest although the one-parameter gamma random effects model is more popular when modeling associated survival times. Our estimation is based on the maximum likelihood approach with marginalized intensity. The methods are shown to perform well in simulation experiments. When applied to an earthquake sequence on the east coast of Taiwan, the extended model with positive stable random effects provides a better model fit, compared to the original ETAS model and the extended model with one-parameter gamma random effects.

  9. Model identification for DNA sequence-structure relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Stephen Dwyer; Chiu, Anita; Chizeck, Howard Jay

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the use of algebraic state-space models for the sequence dependent properties of DNA. By considering the DNA sequence as an input signal, rather than using an all atom physical model, computational efficiency is achieved. A challenge in deriving this type of model is obtaining its structure and estimating its parameters. Here we present two candidate model structures for the sequence dependent structural property Slide and a method of encoding the models so that a recursive least squares algorithm can be applied for parameter estimation. These models are based on the assumption that the value of Slide at a base-step is determined by the surrounding tetranucleotide sequence. The first model takes the four bases individually as inputs and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.90 A. The second model takes the four bases pairwise and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.88 A. These values indicate that the accuracy of these models is within the useful range for structure prediction. Performance is comparable to published predictions of a more physically derived model, at significantly less computational cost.

  10. A Dynamic Process Model for the Beach-Inlet Transition Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    A0-A87 096 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA TAMPA DEPT OF GEOLOGY F/S 8/3 A DYNAMIC PROCESS MODEL FOR THE REACH-INLET TRANSITION ZONE. UI N MAY 80 R A...cz80 7 A DYNAMIC PROCESS MODEL FOR THE BEACH-INLET TRANSITION ZONE by Richard A. Davis, Jr., University of South Florida and William T. Fox, Williams...during the study period have permitted construction of a dynami, process model for the beach-inlet transition zone during the tidal cycle. This model

  11. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Faults may either impede or enhance fluid flow in the subsurface, which is relevant to a number of economic issues (hydrocarbon migration and entrapment, formation and distribution of mineral deposits) and environmental problems (movement of contaminants). Fault zones typically comprise a low-permeability core made up of intensely deformed fault rock and a high-permeability damage zone defined by fault-related fractures. The geometry, petrophysical properties and continuity of both the fault core and the damage zone have an important influence on the mechanical properties of the fault systems and on subsurface fluid flow. Information about fault components from remote seismic methods is limited and is available only for large faults (slip larger than 20-100m). It is therefore essential to characterize faults and associated damage zones in field analogues, and to develop conceptual models of how faults and related structures form and evolve. Here we present such an attempt to better understand the evolution of fault damage zones in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone of the Valley of Fire State Park (SE Nevada). We document the formation and evolution of the damage zone associated with strike-slip faults through detailed field studies of faults of increasing slip magnitudes. The faults initiate as sheared joints with discontinuous pockets of damage zone located at fault tips and fault surface irregularities. With increasing slip (slip >5m), the damage zone becomes longer and wider by progressive fracture infilling, and is organized into two distinct components with different geometrical and statistical characteristics. The first component of the damage zone is the inner damage zone, directly flanking the fault core, with a relatively high fracture frequency and a thickness that scales with the amount of fault slip. Parts of this inner zone are integrated into the fault core by the development of the fault rock, contributing to the core's progressive widening. The second

  12. Recurrent Network Models of Sequence Generation and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Kanaka; Harvey, Christopher D; Tank, David W

    2016-04-01

    Sequential activation of neurons is a common feature of network activity during a variety of behaviors, including working memory and decision making. Previous network models for sequences and memory emphasized specialized architectures in which a principled mechanism is pre-wired into their connectivity. Here we demonstrate that, starting from random connectivity and modifying a small fraction of connections, a largely disordered recurrent network can produce sequences and implement working memory efficiently. We use this process, called Partial In-Network Training (PINning), to model and match cellular resolution imaging data from the posterior parietal cortex during a virtual memory-guided two-alternative forced-choice task. Analysis of the connectivity reveals that sequences propagate by the cooperation between recurrent synaptic interactions and external inputs, rather than through feedforward or asymmetric connections. Together our results suggest that neural sequences may emerge through learning from largely unstructured network architectures.

  13. Optimization and evaluation of probabilistic-logic sequence models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Lassen, Ole Torp

    Analysis of biological sequence data demands more and more sophisticated and fine-grained models, but these in turn introduce hard computational problems. A class of probabilistic-logic models is considered, which increases the expressibility from HMM's and SCFG's regular and context-free languages...... for preprocessing or splitting them into submodels. An evaluation method for approximating models is suggested based on automatic generation of samples. These models and evaluation processes are illustrated in the PRISM system developed by other authors....

  14. Statistical approaches to use a model organism for regulatory sequences annotation of newly sequenced species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Liò

    Full Text Available A major goal of bioinformatics is the characterization of transcription factors and the transcriptional programs they regulate. Given the speed of genome sequencing, we would like to quickly annotate regulatory sequences in newly-sequenced genomes. In such cases, it would be helpful to predict sequence motifs by using experimental data from closely related model organism. Here we present a general algorithm that allow to identify transcription factor binding sites in one newly sequenced species by performing Bayesian regression on the annotated species. First we set the rationale of our method by applying it within the same species, then we extend it to use data available in closely related species. Finally, we generalise the method to handle the case when a certain number of experiments, from several species close to the species on which to make inference, are available. In order to show the performance of the method, we analyse three functionally related networks in the Ascomycota. Two gene network case studies are related to the G2/M phase of the Ascomycota cell cycle; the third is related to morphogenesis. We also compared the method with MatrixReduce and discuss other types of validation and tests. The first network is well known and provides a biological validation test of the method. The two cell cycle case studies, where the gene network size is conserved, demonstrate an effective utility in annotating new species sequences using all the available replicas from model species. The third case, where the gene network size varies among species, shows that the combination of information is less powerful but is still informative. Our methodology is quite general and could be extended to integrate other high-throughput data from model organisms.

  15. From Field- to Landscape-Scale Vadose Zone Processes: Scale Issues, Modeling, and Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corwin, D.L.; Hopmans, J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and monitoring vadose zone processes across multiple scales is a fundamental component of many environmental and natural resource issues including nonpoint source (NPS) pollution, watershed management, and nutrient management, to mention just a few. In this special section in Vadose Zone Jo

  16. Calibrating vadose zone models with time-lapse gravity data: a forced infiltration experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Hansen, Allan Bo; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    in the unsaturated zone. These results are confirmed by field measurements of gravity and georadar data at a forced infiltration experiment conducted over 14 days on a grassland area of 10 m by 10 m. An unsaturated zone infiltration model can be calibrated using the gravity data with good agreement to the field data...

  17. Calibrating vadose zone models with time-lapse gravity data: a forced infiltration experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Hansen, Allan Bo; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    in the unsaturated zone. These results are confirmed by field measurements of gravity and georadar data at a forced infiltration experiment conducted over 14 days on a grassland area of 10 m by 10 m. An unsaturated zone infiltration model can be calibrated using the gravity data with good agreement to the field data...

  18. A Novel Scheme of Fast-frequency Hopping Optical CDMA System with No-hit-zone Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianhua; liu, Ling; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Zhipeng; Xu, Ming

    2013-09-01

    In traditional fast frequency-hopping OCDMA (FFH-OCDMA) system, beat noise and multiple-access interference are the main performance limitations, and complicated power control must be employed to eliminate the near-far effect. In this paper, a novel scheme of FFH-OCDMA with no-hit-zone sequence is proposed, which is named NHZ FFH-OCDMA. In NHZ FFH-OCDMA, the synchronization among users can be controlled within permissible time delay, and the code cross-correlation for different users equals zero. Therefore, near-far effect can be eliminated. Furthermore, beat noise and multiple-access interference also can be removed. Simulation of eight simultaneous users with dada rate 100 Mbit/s is demonstrated, where the fiber link consists of 50 km single-mode fiber, plus 5 km dispersion compensating fiber. Simulation results show that the near-far problem of NHZ FFH-OCDMA can be eliminated, and complicated power control can be removed. Therefore, this scheme is a good candidate for optical access network.

  19. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  20. Provenance of the Walash-Naopurdan back-arc-arc clastic sequences in the Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sarmad A.; Sleabi, Rajaa S.; Talabani, Mohammad J. A.; Jones, Brian G.

    2017-01-01

    Marine clastic rocks occurring in the Walash and Naopurdan Groups in the Hasanbag and Qalander areas, Kurdistan region, Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone, are lithic arenites with high proportions of volcanic rock fragments. Geochemical classification of the Eocene Walash and Oligocene Naopurdan clastic rocks indicates that they were mainly derived from associated sub-alkaline basalt and andesitic basalt in back-arc and island arc tectonic settings. Major and trace element geochemical data reveal that the Naopurdan samples are chemically less mature than the Walash samples and both were subjected to moderate weathering. The seaway in the southern Neotethys Ocean was shallow during both Eocene and Oligocene permitting mixing of sediment from the volcanic arcs with sediment derived from the Arabian continental margin. The Walash and Naopurdan clastic rocks enhance an earlier tectonic model of the Zagros Suture Zone with their deposition occurring during the Eocene Walash calc-alkaline back-arc magmatism and Early Oligocene Naopurdan island arc magmatism in the final stages of intra-oceanic subduction before the Miocene closure and obduction of the Neotethys basin.

  1. An applied model for the height of the daytime mixed layer and the entrainment zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1994-01-01

    -layer height: friction velocity, kinematic heat flux near the ground and potential temperature gradient in the free atmosphere above the entrainment zone. When information is available on the horizontal divergence of the large-scale flow field, the model also takes into account the effect of subsidence......A model is presented for the height of the mixed layer and the depth of the entrainment zone under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. It is based on the zero-order mixed layer height model of Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) and the parameterization of the entrainment zone depth...

  2. Modeling of precipitate-free zone formed upon homogenization in a multi-component alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandin, Ch.-A. [CEMEF UMR CNRS-ENSMP 7635, Ecole des Mines, BP207, 06904 Sophia Antipolis (France) and LSG2M UMR CNRS-INPL-UHP 7584, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy (France)]. E-mail: charles-andre.gandin@ensmp.fr; Jacot, A. [LSMX, MX-G, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); CALCOM ESI SA, PSE, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    A comprehensive model is presented for the simulation of microstructure evolution during industrial solidification and homogenization processing of aluminum alloys. The model combines on the one hand microsegregation due to long-range diffusion during solidification and subsequent heat treatment with, on the other hand, precipitation in the primary Al phase. The thermodynamic data are directly obtained from a CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) approach to thermodynamic equilibrium in multicomponent systems. The model is applied to the prediction of structure and segregation evolutions in a 3003 aluminum alloy for typical industrial solidification and homogenization sequences. It is shown that: (i) accounting for the nucleation undercooling of the eutectic/peritectic structures solidifying from the melt is essential to retrieval of the measured volume fractions of intergranular precipitates; (ii) calculations of intragranular precipitation are generally not applicable if long-range diffusion is neglected; (iii) the precipitate-free zone can be quantitatively predicted only based on the coupling between intergranular and intragranular precipitation calculations.

  3. Source Mechanisms and Stress Fields of the 15-16 June 2013 Crete Earthquake Sequence Along Hellenic Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgün, Ethem

    2017-03-01

    15 June 2013 M w 6.1 off-shore southern Crete earthquake and its aftershock sequence along Hellenic Subduction Zone are examined. Centroid moment tensors (CMTs) for 40 earthquakes with moment magnitudes ( M w) between 3.5 and 6.1 are determined by applying a waveform inversion method. The mainshock is shallow focus thrust event with a minor strike-slip component at a depth of 20 km. The seismic moment ( M o) of the mainshock is estimated as 2.07 × 1018 Nm, and rupture duration of the mainshock is 4 s. The focal mechanisms of aftershocks are mainly thrust faulting with a strike-slip component. The geometry of the moment tensors ( M w ≥ 3.5) reveals a thrust faulting regime with N-S trending direction of P axis in the entire activated region. According to high-resolution CMT solutions of the off-shore southern Crete earthquake sequence, one main cluster consisting of 40 events is revealed. The aftershock activity in the observation period between 15 June and 15 July 2013 extends from N to S and NW to SE directions. Seismic cross sections indicate a complex pattern of the hypocenter distribution with the activation of two segments. The subduction interface is clearly revealed with high-resolution hypocenter source relocation and moment tensor solution. The best-constrained focal depths indicate that the aftershock sequence is mainly confined in the upper plate (depth < 30 km) and is ranging from about 5-28 km depth. A stress tensor inversion of focal mechanism data is performed to obtain a more precise picture of the off-shore southern Crete stress field. The stress tensor inversion results indicate a predominant thrust stress regime with a NE-SW-oriented maximum horizontal compressive stress ( S H). According to variance of the stress tensor inversion, to first order, the southern Crete region is characterized by a homogeneous interplate stress field. We also investigate the Coulomb stress change associated with the mainshock to evaluate any significant

  4. Effect of a protection zone in the diffusive Leslie predator-prey model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yihong; Peng, Rui; Wang, Mingxin

    In this paper, we consider the diffusive Leslie predator-prey model with large intrinsic predator growth rate, and investigate the change of behavior of the model when a simple protection zone Ω for the prey is introduced. As in earlier work [Y. Du, J. Shi, A diffusive predator-prey model with a protection zone, J. Differential Equations 229 (2006) 63-91; Y. Du, X. Liang, A diffusive competition model with a protection zone, J. Differential Equations 244 (2008) 61-86] we show the existence of a critical patch size of the protection zone, determined by the first Dirichlet eigenvalue of the Laplacian over Ω and the intrinsic growth rate of the prey, so that there is fundamental change of the dynamical behavior of the model only when Ω is above the critical patch size. However, our research here reveals significant difference of the model's behavior from the predator-prey model studied in [Y. Du, J. Shi, A diffusive predator-prey model with a protection zone, J. Differential Equations 229 (2006) 63-91] with the same kind of protection zone. We show that the asymptotic profile of the population distribution of the Leslie model is governed by a standard boundary blow-up problem, and classical or degenerate logistic equations.

  5. Controls on sequence development and preservation offshore Namibia: Implications for sequence stratigraphic models and hydrocarbon prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagguley, J.G. [Oxford Brookes Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom); Prosser, S. [Saga Petroleum, Sandvika (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    Regional seismic interpretation of the passive margin offshore Namibia has enabled a sequence stratigraphic framework to be established for this previously under-studied region. Within this framework potential hydrocarbon plays, for example the location of source, seal and reservoir rocks can be pinpointed. The history of sequence stratigraphic models suggests that the passive margin offshore Namibia should provide an ideal setting for applying and testing sequence stratigraphic concepts. Results from this study however suggest that alongside the documented controls in sequence stratigraphy (i.e. tectonics, eustacy and sediment flux), additional factors act to influence sequence development and preservation along this margin. Detailed seismic interpretation of the post rift section of the Namibian margin has led to the identification of a member of erosional and depositional events; for example, charmers, canyons and slumps. Seismic facies analysis allows causative mechanisms to be inferred for the different geometries observed. In addition, the recognition of characteristic seismic facies enables reservoir and non-reservoir targets to be identified, thus aiding the prediction of potential hydrocarbon plays. Backstripping studies provide further information as to the evolution of the Namibian margin. For example, estimates can be made regarding changes in the rates of tectonics and sedimentation and the relative importance of these factors on the development of the margin can be assessed.

  6. Controls on sequence development and preservation offshore Namibia: Implications for sequence stratigraphic models and hydrocarbon prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagguley, J.G. (Oxford Brookes Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom)); Prosser, S. (Saga Petroleum, Sandvika (Norway))

    1996-01-01

    Regional seismic interpretation of the passive margin offshore Namibia has enabled a sequence stratigraphic framework to be established for this previously under-studied region. Within this framework potential hydrocarbon plays, for example the location of source, seal and reservoir rocks can be pinpointed. The history of sequence stratigraphic models suggests that the passive margin offshore Namibia should provide an ideal setting for applying and testing sequence stratigraphic concepts. Results from this study however suggest that alongside the documented controls in sequence stratigraphy (i.e. tectonics, eustacy and sediment flux), additional factors act to influence sequence development and preservation along this margin. Detailed seismic interpretation of the post rift section of the Namibian margin has led to the identification of a member of erosional and depositional events; for example, charmers, canyons and slumps. Seismic facies analysis allows causative mechanisms to be inferred for the different geometries observed. In addition, the recognition of characteristic seismic facies enables reservoir and non-reservoir targets to be identified, thus aiding the prediction of potential hydrocarbon plays. Backstripping studies provide further information as to the evolution of the Namibian margin. For example, estimates can be made regarding changes in the rates of tectonics and sedimentation and the relative importance of these factors on the development of the margin can be assessed.

  7. Calibrating vadose zone models with time-lapse gravity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Binning, Philip John; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The vadose zone plays an important role in the hydrologic cycle. Various geophysical methods can determine soil water content variations in time and space in volumes ranging from a few cubic centimeters to several cubic meters. In contrast to the established methods, time-lapse gravity measurements...... of changes in soil water content do not rely on a petrophysical relationship between the measured quantity and the water content but give a direct measure of the mass change in the soil. Only recently has the vadose zone been systematically incorporated when ground-based gravity data are used to infer...... hydrologic information. In this study, changes in the soil water content gave rise to a measurable signal in a forced infiltration experiment on a 107-m2 grassland area. Time-lapse gravity data were able to constrain the van Genuchten soil hydraulic parameters in both a synthetic example and a field...

  8. Lakeshore zoning has heterogeneous ecological effects: an application of a coupled economic-ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsic, Van; Lewis, David J; Radeloff, Volker C

    2010-04-01

    Housing growth has been widely shown to be negatively correlated with wildlife populations, avian richness, anadromous fish, and exotic invasion. Zoning is the most frequently used public policy to manage housing development and is often motivated by a desire to protect the environment. Zoning is also pervasive, taking place in all 50 states. One relevant question that has received little research concerns the effectiveness of zoning to meet ecological goals. In this paper, we examined whether minimum frontage zoning policies have made a positive impact on the lakes they were aimed to protect in Vilas County, Wisconsin, U.S.A. We used an economic model that estimated when a given lot will be subdivided and how many new lots will be created as a function of zoning. Using the economic model, we simulated the effects of multiple zoning scenarios on lakeshore development. The simulated development patterns were then input to ecological models that predicted the amount of coarse woody debris (CWD) and the growth rate of bluegills as a function of residential density. Comparison of the ecological outcomes under different simulated zoning scenarios quantified the effect of zoning policies on residential density, CWD, and bluegill growth rates. Our results showed that zoning significantly affected residential density, CWD counts, and bluegill growth rates across our study area, although the effect was less clear at the scale of individual lake. Our results suggest that homogeneous zoning (i.e., for a county) is likely to have mixed results when applied to a heterogeneous landscape. Further, our results suggest that zoning regimes with a higher minimum shoreline frontage are likely to have larger ecological effects when applied to lakes that are less developed.

  9. Self-Exciting Point Process Modeling of Conversation Event Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Takaguchi, Taro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo

    Self-exciting processes of Hawkes type have been used to model various phenomena including earthquakes, neural activities, and views of online videos. Studies of temporal networks have revealed that sequences of social interevent times for individuals are highly bursty. We examine some basic properties of event sequences generated by the Hawkes self-exciting process to show that it generates bursty interevent times for a wide parameter range. Then, we fit the model to the data of conversation sequences recorded in company offices in Japan. In this way, we can estimate relative magnitudes of the self excitement, its temporal decay, and the base event rate independent of the self excitation. These variables highly depend on individuals. We also point out that the Hawkes model has an important limitation that the correlation in the interevent times and the burstiness cannot be independently modulated.

  10. Self-exciting point process modeling of conversation event sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, Naoki; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Self-exciting processes of Hawkes type have been used to model various phenomena including earthquakes, neural activities, and views of online videos. Studies of temporal networks have revealed that sequences of social interevent intervals for individuals are highly bursty. We examine some basic properties of event sequences generated by the Hawkes self-exciting process to show that it generates bursty interevent intervals for a wide parameter range. Then, we fit the model to the data of conversation sequences recorded in company offices in Japan. In this way, we can estimate relative magnitudes of the self excitement, its temporal decay, and the base event rate independent of the self excitation. These variables highly depend on individuals. We also point out that the Hawkes model has an important limitation that the correlation in the interevent intervals and the burstiness cannot be independently modulated.

  11. Analysis of Sequence Diagram Layout in Advanced UML Modelling Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ņikiforova Oksana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available System modelling using Unified Modelling Language (UML is the task that should be solved for software development. The more complex software becomes the higher requirements are stated to demonstrate the system to be developed, especially in its dynamic aspect, which in UML is offered by a sequence diagram. To solve this task, the main attention is devoted to the graphical presentation of the system, where diagram layout plays the central role in information perception. The UML sequence diagram due to its specific structure is selected for a deeper analysis on the elements’ layout. The authors research represents the abilities of modern UML modelling tools to offer automatic layout of the UML sequence diagram and analyse them according to criteria required for the diagram perception.

  12. Modeling surface and ground water mixing in the hyporheic zone using MODFLOW and MT3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, Laura K.; Siegel, Donald I.

    2006-11-01

    We used a three-dimensional MODFLOW model, paired with MT3D, to simulate hyporheic zones around debris dams and meanders along a semi-arid stream. MT3D simulates both advective transport and sink/source mixing of solutes, in contrast to particle tracking (e.g. MODPATH), which only considers advection. We delineated the hydrochemically active hyporheic zone based on a new definition, specifically as near-stream subsurface zones receiving a minimum of 10% surface water within a 10-day travel time. Modeling results indicate that movement of surface water into the hyporheic zone is predominantly an advective process. We show that debris dams are a key driver of surface water into the subsurface along the experimental reach, causing the largest flux rates of water across the streambed and creating hyporheic zones with up to twice the cross-sectional area of other hyporheic zones. Hyporheic exchange was also found in highly sinuous segments of the experimental reach, but flux rates are lower and the cross-sectional areas of these zones are generally smaller. Our modeling approach simulated surface and ground water mixing in the hyporheic zone, and thus provides numerical approximations that are more comparable to field-based observations of surface-groundwater exchange than standard particle-tracking simulations.

  13. Groundwater suitability recharge zones modelling - A GIS application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabral, S.; Bhatt, B.; Joshi, J. P.; Sharma, N.

    2014-11-01

    Groundwater quality in Gujarat state is highly variable and due to multiplicity of factors viz. influenced by direct sea water encroachment, inherent sediment salinity, water logging, overexploitation leading to overall deterioration in ground water quality, coupled with domestic and industrial pollution etc. The groundwater scenario in the state is not very encouraging due to imbalance between recharge and groundwater exploitation. Further, the demand for water has increased manifold owing to agricultural, industrial and domestic requirement and this has led to water scarcity in many parts of the state, which is likely to become more severe in coming future due to both natural and manmade factors. Therefore, sustainable development of groundwater resource requires precise quantitative assessment based on reasonably valid scientific principles. Hence, delineation of groundwater potential zones (GWPZ), has acquired great significance. The present study focuses on the integrated Geospatial and Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) techniques to determine the most important contributing factors that affect the groundwater resources and also to delineate the potential zones for groundwater recharge. The multiple thematic layers of influencing parameters viz. geology, geomorphology, soil, slope, drainage density and land use, weightages were assigned to the each factor according to their relative importance as per subject experts opinion owing to the natural setup of the region. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was applied to these factors and potential recharge zones were identified. The study area for the assessment of groundwater recharge potential zones is Mahi-Narmada inter-stream region of Gujarat state. The study shows that around 28 % region has the excellent suitability of the ground water recharge.

  14. Configuring Random Graph Models with Fixed Degree Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Fosdick, Bailey K; Nishimura, Joel; Ugander, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Random graph null models have found widespread application in diverse research communities analyzing network datasets. The most popular family of random graph null models, called configuration models, are defined as uniform distributions over a space of graphs with a fixed degree sequence. Commonly, properties of an empirical network are compared to properties of an ensemble of graphs from a configuration model in order to quantify whether empirical network properties are meaningful or whether they are instead a common consequence of the particular degree sequence. In this work we study the subtle but important decisions underlying the specification of a configuration model, and investigate the role these choices play in graph sampling procedures and a suite of applications. We place particular emphasis on the importance of specifying the appropriate graph labeling---stub-labeled or vertex-labeled---under which to consider a null model, a choice that closely connects the study of random graphs to the study of...

  15. Motif Yggdrasil: sampling sequence motifs from a tree mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Samuel A; Lagergren, Jens

    2007-06-01

    In phylogenetic foot-printing, putative regulatory elements are found in upstream regions of orthologous genes by searching for common motifs. Motifs in different upstream sequences are subject to mutations along the edges of the corresponding phylogenetic tree, consequently taking advantage of the tree in the motif search is an appealing idea. We describe the Motif Yggdrasil sampler; the first Gibbs sampler based on a general tree that uses unaligned sequences. Previous tree-based Gibbs samplers have assumed a star-shaped tree or partially aligned upstream regions. We give a probabilistic model (MY model) describing upstream sequences with regulatory elements and build a Gibbs sampler with respect to this model. The model allows toggling, i.e., the restriction of a position to a subset of nucleotides, but does not require aligned sequences nor edge lengths, which may be difficult to come by. We apply the collapsing technique to eliminate the need to sample nuisance parameters, and give a derivation of the predictive update formula. We show that the MY model improves the modeling of difficult motif instances and that the use of the tree achieves a substantial increase in nucleotide level correlation coefficient both for synthetic data and 37 bacterial lexA genes. We investigate the sensitivity to errors in the tree and show that using random trees MY sampler still has a performance similar to the original version.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of the MIDREX Shaft Furnace: Reduction, Transition and Cooling Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Alireza; Moazeni, Faegheh

    2015-11-01

    Metallic iron used in steel industries is mostly obtained from a direct reduction process. The focus of this study is to simulate the furnace of the MIDREX technology. MIDREX technology which is the most important gas-based direct reduced iron (DRI) process in the world, includes reduction, transition and cooling zones. The reduction zone considered as a counter current gas-solid reactor produces sponge iron from iron ore pellets. The transition zone has sufficient height to isolate the reduction zone and cooling zone from each other and the cooling zone cools the solid product down to around 50°C. Each zone has a system of reactions. Simultaneous mass and energy balances along the reduction zone lead to a set of ordinary differential equations with two points of boundary conditions. The transitions and cooling zone are investigated at the equilibrium condition leading to a set of algebraic equations. By solving these systems of equations, we determined the materials concentration, temperature, and pressure along the furnace. Our results are in a good agreement with data reported by Parisi and Laborde (2004) for a real MIDREX plant. Using this model, the effect of reactor length and cooling gas flow on the metallization and the effect of cooling gas flow on the outlet temperature of the solid phase have been studied. These new findings can be used to minimize the consumed energy.

  17. TIN Dataset Model of Overburden Above the Mahogany Zone in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI TIN data model of the overburden material above the Mahogany Zone was needed to perform calculations in the Piceance Basin, Colorado as part of a 2009...

  18. Raster Dataset Model of Overburden Above the Mahogany Zone in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the overburden material above the Mahogany Zone was needed to perform calculations in the Piceance Basin, Colorado as part of a...

  19. TIN Dataset Model of the Mahogany Zone Structure in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI TIN data model of the Mahogany Zone structure was needed to perform overburden calculations in the Piceance Basin, Colorado as part of a 2009 National Oil...

  20. Raster Dataset Model of the Mahogany Zone Structure in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the Mahogany Zone structure was needed to perform overburden calculations in the Piceance Basin, Colorado as part of a 2009...

  1. Evaluation of methods for modeling transcription-factor sequence specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirauch, Matthew T.; Cote, Atina; Norel, Raquel; Annala, Matti; Zhao, Yue; Riley, Todd R.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cokelaer, Thomas; Vedenko, Anastasia; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Morris, Quaid D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic analyses often involve scanning for potential transcription-factor (TF) binding sites using models of the sequence specificity of DNA binding proteins. Many approaches have been developed to model and learn a protein’s binding specificity, but these methods have not been systematically compared. Here we applied 26 such approaches to in vitro protein binding microarray data for 66 mouse TFs belonging to various families. For 9 TFs, we also scored the resulting motif models on in vivo data, and found that the best in vitro–derived motifs performed similarly to motifs derived from in vivo data. Our results indicate that simple models based on mononucleotide position weight matrices learned by the best methods perform similarly to more complex models for most TFs examined, but fall short in specific cases (<10%). In addition, the best-performing motifs typically have relatively low information content, consistent with widespread degeneracy in eukaryotic TF sequence preferences. PMID:23354101

  2. An empirical exploration of the world oil price under the target zone model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linghui Tang; Shawkat Hammoudeh [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Lebow College of Business

    2002-11-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of the world oil price based on the first-generation target zone model. Using anecdotal data during the period of 1988-1999, we found that OPEC has tried to maintain a weak target zone regime for the oil price. Our econometric tests suggest that the movement of the oil price is not only manipulated by actual and substantial interventions by OPEC but also tempered by market participants' expectations of interventions. As a consequence, the non-linear model based on the target zone theory has very good forecasting ability when the oil price approaches the upper or lower limit of the band. (author)

  3. An empirical exploration of the world oil price under the target zone model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Linghui; Hammoudeh, Shawkat [Department of Economics and International Business, Lebow College of Business, Drexel University, 19104 Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2002-11-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of the world oil price based on the first-generation target zone model. Using anecdotal data during the period of 1988-1999, we found that OPEC has tried to maintain a weak target zone regime for the oil price. Our econometric tests suggest that the movement of the oil price is not only manipulated by actual and substantial interventions by OPEC but also tempered by market participants' expectations of interventions. As a consequence, the non-linear model based on the target zone theory has very good forecasting ability when the oil price approaches the upper or lower limit of the band.

  4. A novel fluence map optimization model incorporating leaf sequencing constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Renchao; Min, Zhifang; Song, Enmin; Liu, Hong; Ye, Yinyu

    2010-02-21

    A novel fluence map optimization model incorporating leaf sequencing constraints is proposed to overcome the drawbacks of the current objective inside smoothing models. Instead of adding a smoothing item to the objective function, we add the total number of monitor unit (TNMU) requirement directly to the constraints which serves as an important factor to balance the fluence map optimization and leaf sequencing optimization process at the same time. Consequently, we formulate the fluence map optimization models for the trailing (left) leaf synchronized, leading (right) leaf synchronized and the interleaf motion constrained non-synchronized leaf sweeping schemes, respectively. In those schemes, the leaves are all swept unidirectionally from left to right. Each of those models is turned into a linear constrained quadratic programming model which can be solved effectively by the interior point method. Those new models are evaluated with two publicly available clinical treatment datasets including a head-neck case and a prostate case. As shown by the empirical results, our models perform much better in comparison with two recently emerged smoothing models (the total variance smoothing model and the quadratic smoothing model). For all three leaf sweeping schemes, our objective dose deviation functions increase much slower than those in the above two smoothing models with respect to the decreasing of the TNMU. While keeping plans in the similar conformity level, our new models gain much better performance on reducing TNMU.

  5. Mapping sensorimotor sequences to word sequences: a connectionist model of language acquisition and sentence generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takac, Martin; Benuskova, Lubica; Knott, Alistair

    2012-11-01

    In this article we present a neural network model of sentence generation. The network has both technical and conceptual innovations. Its main technical novelty is in its semantic representations: the messages which form the input to the network are structured as sequences, so that message elements are delivered to the network one at a time. Rather than learning to linearise a static semantic representation as a sequence of words, our network rehearses a sequence of semantic signals, and learns to generate words from selected signals. Conceptually, the network's use of rehearsed sequences of semantic signals is motivated by work in embodied cognition, which posits that the structure of semantic representations has its origin in the serial structure of sensorimotor processing. The rich sequential structure of the network's semantic inputs also allows it to incorporate certain Chomskyan ideas about innate syntactic knowledge and parameter-setting, as well as a more empiricist account of the acquisition of idiomatic syntactic constructions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Boolean network model predicts cell cycle sequence of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Davidich

    Full Text Available A Boolean network model of the cell-cycle regulatory network of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe is constructed solely on the basis of the known biochemical interaction topology. Simulating the model in the computer faithfully reproduces the known activity sequence of regulatory proteins along the cell cycle of the living cell. Contrary to existing differential equation models, no parameters enter the model except the structure of the regulatory circuitry. The dynamical properties of the model indicate that the biological dynamical sequence is robustly implemented in the regulatory network, with the biological stationary state G1 corresponding to the dominant attractor in state space, and with the biological regulatory sequence being a strongly attractive trajectory. Comparing the fission yeast cell-cycle model to a similar model of the corresponding network in S. cerevisiae, a remarkable difference in circuitry, as well as dynamics is observed. While the latter operates in a strongly damped mode, driven by external excitation, the S. pombe network represents an auto-excited system with external damping.

  7. Modeling ChIP sequencing in silico with applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengdong D Zhang

    Full Text Available ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq is a new method for genomewide mapping of protein binding sites on DNA. It has generated much excitement in functional genomics. To score data and determine adequate sequencing depth, both the genomic background and the binding sites must be properly modeled. To develop a computational foundation to tackle these issues, we first performed a study to characterize the observed statistical nature of this new type of high-throughput data. By linking sequence tags into clusters, we show that there are two components to the distribution of tag counts observed in a number of recent experiments: an initial power-law distribution and a subsequent long right tail. Then we develop in silico ChIP-seq, a computational method to simulate the experimental outcome by placing tags onto the genome according to particular assumed distributions for the actual binding sites and for the background genomic sequence. In contrast to current assumptions, our results show that both the background and the binding sites need to have a markedly nonuniform distribution in order to correctly model the observed ChIP-seq data, with, for instance, the background tag counts modeled by a gamma distribution. On the basis of these results, we extend an existing scoring approach by using a more realistic genomic-background model. This enables us to identify transcription-factor binding sites in ChIP-seq data in a statistically rigorous fashion.

  8. Plantagora: modeling whole genome sequencing and assembly of plant genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Barthelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly

  9. A Sequence of Relaxations Constraining Hidden Variable Models

    CERN Document Server

    Steeg, Greg Ver

    2011-01-01

    Many widely studied graphical models with latent variables lead to nontrivial constraints on the distribution of the observed variables. Inspired by the Bell inequalities in quantum mechanics, we refer to any linear inequality whose violation rules out some latent variable model as a "hidden variable test" for that model. Our main contribution is to introduce a sequence of relaxations which provides progressively tighter hidden variable tests. We demonstrate applicability to mixtures of sequences of i.i.d. variables, Bell inequalities, and homophily models in social networks. For the last, we demonstrate that our method provides a test that is able to rule out latent homophily as the sole explanation for correlations on a real social network that are known to be due to influence.

  10. Model and Method of Debris Flow Risk Zoning Based on Momentum Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fangqiang; ZHANG Yu; HU Kaiheng; GAO Kechang

    2006-01-01

    A model of debris flow risk zoning is carried out with momentum analysis of debris flow. This model zones the debris flow inundation fan with density and velocity calculated by numerical simulation. The risk classification standard is determined according to the ultimate bearing capacities of different structures under impacting. And the ultimate bearing capacities are tested by impact failure experiment of destruction. Two structures typical in Chinese mountain towns, reinforced concrete frame construction and brickwork with concrete, are chosen in the experiment. The model makes debris flow risk zoning quantitative and the results comparable widely. The results differ much from that of other methods especially in the identification of medium and low risk zones.

  11. Hydrogeologic Framework Model for the Saturated Zone Site Scale flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Miller

    2004-11-15

    The purpose of this report is to document the 19-unit, hydrogeologic framework model (19-layer version, output of this report) (HFM-19) with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The HFM-19 is developed as a conceptual model of the geometric extent of the hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain and is intended specifically for use in the development of the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Primary inputs to this model report include the GFM 3.1 (DTN: MO9901MWDGFM31.000 [DIRS 103769]), borehole lithologic logs, geologic maps, geologic cross sections, water level data, topographic information, and geophysical data as discussed in Section 4.1. Figure 1-1 shows the information flow among all of the saturated zone (SZ) reports and the relationship of this conceptual model in that flow. The HFM-19 is a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the hydrogeologic units surrounding the location of the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The HFM-19 represents the hydrogeologic setting for the Yucca Mountain area that covers about 1,350 km2 and includes a saturated thickness of about 2.75 km. The boundaries of the conceptual model were primarily chosen to be coincident with grid cells in the Death Valley regional groundwater flow model (DTN: GS960808312144.003 [DIRS 105121]) such that the base of the site-scale SZ flow model is consistent with the base of the regional model (2,750 meters below a smoothed version of the potentiometric surface), encompasses the exploratory boreholes, and provides a framework over the area of interest for groundwater flow and radionuclide transport modeling. In depth, the model domain extends from land surface to the base of the regional groundwater flow model (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131], p 2). For the site

  12. Modeling the influence of varying hydraulic conditions on aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Exchange of water and solutes across the stream-sediment interface is an important control for biogeochemical transformations in the hyporheic zone (HZ) with measurable impacts on nutrient cycling and solute attenuation in fluvial systems. Here we investigate the interplay between turbulent stream flow and HZ flow under various hydraulic conditions applied to two cases: a) three-dimensional generic pool-riffle sequences with different morphological properties, and b) a real mid-stream gravel-bar. Stream flow is simulated by the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM which provides the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. It is sequentially coupled to the top of the groundwater model code MIN3P, simulating flow, solute transport, aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. Flow in the HZ is directly influenced by the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed surface and the ambient groundwater flow. Three reactive transport scenarios are considered: 1) stream water as the primary source of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 2) upwelling groundwater as an additionally source of NO3, and 3) upwelling groundwater as an additional source of DO in various concentrations. Results show an increase in hyporheic exchange flow for increasing stream discharge with a concurrent decrease in residence time. The fraction of circulating stream water through the HZ is in the range of 1x10-5 to 1x10-6 per unit stream length, decreasing with increasing discharge. Ambient groundwater flow in both the up- and downwelling direction diminishes significantly the hyporheic exchange flow and extent. Biogeochemical processes in the HZ are strongly controlled by ambient groundwater flow, even more so than by changes in stream discharge. AR and DN efficiencies of the HZ are significantly reduced by up- and downwelling groundwater and are positively correlated with median residence times. AR occurs in

  13. Extracting protein alignment models from the sequence database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwald, A F; Liu, J S; Lipman, D J; Lawrence, C E

    1997-05-01

    Biologists often gain structural and functional insights into a protein sequence by constructing a multiple alignment model of the family. Here a program called Probe fully automates this process of model construction starting from a single sequence. Central to this program is a powerful new method to locate and align only those, often subtly, conserved patterns essential to the family as a whole. When applied to randomly chosen proteins, Probe found on average about four times as many relationships as a pairwise search and yielded many new discoveries. These include: an obscure subfamily of globins in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans ; two new superfamilies of metallohydrolases; a lipoyl/biotin swinging arm domain in bacterial membrane fusion proteins; and a DH domain in the yeast Bud3 and Fus2 proteins. By identifying distant relationships and merging families into superfamilies in this way, this analysis further confirms the notion that proteins evolved from relatively few ancient sequences. Moreover, this method automatically generates models of these ancient conserved regions for rapid and sensitive screening of sequences.

  14. Probabilistic model based error correction in a set of various mutant sequences analyzed by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Takuyo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the evolutionary dynamics of a mutant population in an evolutionary experiment, it is necessary to sequence a vast number of mutants by high-throughput (next-generation) sequencing technologies, which enable rapid and parallel analysis of multikilobase sequences. However, the observed sequences include many errors of base call. Therefore, if next-generation sequencing is applied to analysis of a heterogeneous population of various mutant sequences, it is necessary to discriminate between true bases as point mutations and errors of base call in the observed sequences, and to subject the sequences to error-correction processes. To address this issue, we have developed a novel method of error correction based on the Potts model and a maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimate of its parameters corresponding to the "true sequences". Our method of error correction utilizes (1) the "quality scores" which are assigned to individual bases in the observed sequences and (2) the neighborhood relationship among the observed sequences mapped in sequence space. The computer experiments of error correction of artificially generated sequences supported the effectiveness of our method, showing that 50-90% of errors were removed. Interestingly, this method is analogous to a probabilistic model based method of image restoration developed in the field of information engineering.

  15. Sensitivity of WRF model estimates to various PBL parameterizations in different climatic zones over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunwani, Preeti; Mohan, Manju

    2017-09-01

    In the present work sensitivity of Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) Model has been carried out using five planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes - Yonsei University Scheme (YSU), Mellor-Yamada-Janjić scheme (MYJ), Aymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2), Quasi Normal Scale Elimination scheme (QNSE), Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino scheme (MYNN) in different climatic zones over India namely Tropical, Temperate and Arid for surface meteorological parameters, upper air variables and planetary boundary layer height during summer and winter season. The model outputs have been compared with observations through standard statistical measures. The aim is to study the relative performance of these schemes, selecting the best option climatic zone-wise and thereby minimizing uncertainty in model predictions. WRF model performance evaluation shows better agreement for temperature and relative humidity compared to wind speed. Overall for India, ACM2, QNSE show good performance for temperature and relative humidity whereas ACM2, MYNN show better performance for wind speed though these may vary for different climatic zones. Geopotential height and wind over 850 hPa is well simulated by ACM2 and MYNN over India. For PBL height ACM2, MYNN and MYJ works best for Chennai, New Delhi and Kolkata respectively during summer period. However, for winter period MYJ works best for Chennai while, QNSE works best for New Delhi and Kolkata. Considering all meteorological parameters together, it is seen that for arid zone ACM2, QNSE and MYJ schemes work reasonably well. For temperate zone, ACM2, QNSE and MYNN schemes show better results. For tropical zone all PBL schemes work closely. Hence, depending on the application, parameter and climate zone, this study provides suitable recommendations for choosing PBL schemes appropriately for each zone and parameter separately for the Indian region.

  16. Modelling Nonlinear Sequence Generators in terms of Linear Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Fúster-Sabater, Amparo; 10.1016/j.apm.2005.08.013

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a wide family of LFSR-based sequence generators, the so-called Clock-Controlled Shrinking Generators (CCSGs), has been analyzed and identified with a subset of linear Cellular Automata (CA). In fact, a pair of linear models describing the behavior of the CCSGs can be derived. The algorithm that converts a given CCSG into a CA-based linear model is very simple and can be applied to CCSGs in a range of practical interest. The linearity of these cellular models can be advantageously used in two different ways: (a) for the analysis and/or cryptanalysis of the CCSGs and (b) for the reconstruction of the output sequence obtained from this kind of generators.

  17. Sequence alignments and pair hidden Markov models using evolutionary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Bjarne; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2003-10-17

    This work presents a novel pairwise statistical alignment method based on an explicit evolutionary model of insertions and deletions (indels). Indel events of any length are possible according to a geometric distribution. The geometric distribution parameter, the indel rate, and the evolutionary time are all maximum likelihood estimated from the sequences being aligned. Probability calculations are done using a pair hidden Markov model (HMM) with transition probabilities calculated from the indel parameters. Equations for the transition probabilities make the pair HMM closely approximate the specified indel model. The method provides an optimal alignment, its likelihood, the likelihood of all possible alignments, and the reliability of individual alignment regions. Human alpha and beta-hemoglobin sequences are aligned, as an illustration of the potential utility of this pair HMM approach.

  18. Implications of an inverse branching aftershock sequence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, D L; Abaimov, S G; Dobson, I; Rundle, J B

    2009-01-01

    The branching aftershock sequence (BASS) model is a self-similar statistical model for earthquake aftershock sequences. A prescribed parent earthquake generates a first generation of daughter aftershocks. The magnitudes and times of occurrence of the daughters are obtained from statistical distributions. The first generation daughter aftershocks then become parent earthquakes that generate second generation aftershocks. The process is then extended to higher generations. The key parameter in the BASS model is the magnitude difference Deltam* between the parent earthquake and the largest expected daughter earthquake. In the application of the BASS model to aftershocks Deltam* is positive, the largest expected daughter event is smaller than the parent, and the sequence of events (aftershocks) usually dies out, but an exponential growth in the number of events with time is also possible. In this paper we explore this behavior of the BASS model as Deltam* varies, including when Deltam* is negative and the largest expected daughter event is larger than the parent. The applications of this self-similar branching process to biology and other fields are discussed.

  19. Regulation of ion gradients across myocardial ischemic border zones: a biophysical modelling analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Niederer

    Full Text Available The myocardial ischemic border zone is associated with the initiation and sustenance of arrhythmias. The profile of ionic concentrations across the border zone play a significant role in determining cellular electrophysiology and conductivity, yet their spatial-temporal evolution and regulation are not well understood. To investigate the changes in ion concentrations that regulate cellular electrophysiology, a mathematical model of ion movement in the intra and extracellular space in the presence of ionic, potential and material property heterogeneities was developed. The model simulates the spatial and temporal evolution of concentrations of potassium, sodium, chloride, calcium, hydrogen and bicarbonate ions and carbon dioxide across an ischemic border zone. Ischemia was simulated by sodium-potassium pump inhibition, potassium channel activation and respiratory and metabolic acidosis. The model predicted significant disparities in the width of the border zone for each ionic species, with intracellular sodium and extracellular potassium having discordant gradients, facilitating multiple gradients in cellular properties across the border zone. Extracellular potassium was found to have the largest border zone and this was attributed to the voltage dependence of the potassium channels. The model also predicted the efflux of [Formula: see text] from the ischemic region due to electrogenic drift and diffusion within the intra and extracellular space, respectively, which contributed to [Formula: see text] depletion in the ischemic region.

  20. Parameter Estimation of Dynamic Multi-zone Models for Livestock Indoor Climate Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Zhuang; Stoustrup, Jakob; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-zone modeling concept is proposed based on a simplified energy balance formulation to provide a better prediction of the indoor horizontal temperature variation inside the livestock building. The developed mathematical models reflect the influences from the weather, the liv......In this paper, a multi-zone modeling concept is proposed based on a simplified energy balance formulation to provide a better prediction of the indoor horizontal temperature variation inside the livestock building. The developed mathematical models reflect the influences from the weather...

  1. Ranking zones model – a multicriterial approach to the spatial management of urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Marović

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Urban investment planning is highly complex and different views are provided by stakeholders and experts as to the scope, scale and potential solutions. The evaluation of such investments requires explicit consideration of multiple, conflicting and incommensurate criteria that have an important social, economic, and environmental influence on various stakeholders in different ways. To take into account all the dimensions, the proposed model is the Ranking Zones Model (RZM, based on PROMETHEE methods. The RZM comprises several steps providing a rank-list of all observed zones. It helps decision-makers come up with consistent decisions as to which zones to invest in and, at the same time, provides reassurance that the decision was based on a proper comparison of all relevant urban zone areas. The advantage of this approach is that even with a change in the decision-making structure, the actual procedure remains consistent.

  2. Development of a two zone turbulence model and its application to the cycle-simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjerić Momir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a two zone k-ε turbulence model for the cycle-simulation software is presented. The in-cylinder turbulent flow field of internal combustion engines plays the most important role in the combustion process. Turbulence has a strong influence on the combustion process because the convective deformation of the flame front as well as the additional transfer of the momentum, heat and mass can occur. The development and use of numerical simulation models are prompted by the high experimental costs, lack of measurement equipment and increase in computer power. In the cycle-simulation codes, multi zone models are often used for rapid and robust evaluation of key engine parameters. The extension of the single zone turbulence model to the two zone model is presented and described. Turbulence analysis was focused only on the high pressure cycle according to the assumption of the homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow field. Specific modifications of differential equation derivatives were made in both cases (single and two zone. Validation was performed on two engine geometries for different engine speeds and loads. Results of the cyclesimulation model for the turbulent kinetic energy and the combustion progress variable are compared with the results of 3D-CFD simulations. Very good agreement between the turbulent kinetic energy during the high pressure cycle and the combustion progress variable was obtained. The two zone k-ε turbulence model showed a further progress in terms of prediction of the combustion process by using only the turbulent quantities of the unburned zone.

  3. Accident sequence precursor analysis level 2/3 model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program currently uses simple Level 1 models to assess the conditional core damage probability for operational events occurring in commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Since not all accident sequences leading to core damage will result in the same radiological consequences, it is necessary to develop simple Level 2/3 models that can be used to analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude of the resulting radioactive releases to the environment, and calculate the consequences associated with these releases. The simple Level 2/3 model development work was initiated in 1995, and several prototype models have been completed. Once developed, these simple Level 2/3 models are linked to the simple Level 1 models to provide risk perspectives for operational events. This paper describes the methods implemented for the development of these simple Level 2/3 ASP models, and the linkage process to the existing Level 1 models.

  4. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Testing one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton models with spectral energy distributions of Mrk 421

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Qianqian; Zhang, Pengfei; Yin, Qian-Qing; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    We test one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models with high-quality multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) data of Mrk 421. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to fit twelve day-scale SEDs of Mrk 421 with one-zone SSC models. Three types of electron energy distribution (EED), a log-parabola (LP) EED, a power-law log-parabola (PLLP) EED and a broken power-law (BPL) EED, are assumed in fits. We find that the one-zone SSC model with the PLLP EED provides successful fits to all the twelve SEDs. However, the one-zone SSC model with the LP and BPL EEDs fail to provide acceptable fits to the highest energy X-ray data or GeV data in several states. We therefore conclude that the one-zone SSC model works well in explaining the SEDs of Mrk 421, and the PLLP EED is preferred over the LP and BPL EEDs for Mrk 421 during the flare in March 2010. We derive magnetic field $B'\\sim0.01$\\ G, Doppler factor $\\delta_{\\rm D}\\sim$30--50, and the curvature parameter of EED $r\\sim1$--$10$ in the model wi...

  6. Variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of a super-high arch dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhongwen; Gu, Chongshi; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study determines dam deformation similarity indexes based on an analysis of deformation zoning features and panel data clustering theory, with comprehensive consideration to the actual deformation law of super-high arch dams and the spatial-temporal features of dam deformation. Measurement methods of these indexes are studied. Based on the established deformation similarity criteria, the principle used to determine the number of dam deformation zones is constructed through entropy weight method. This study proposes the deformation zoning method for super-high arch dams and the implementation steps, analyzes the effect of special influencing factors of different dam zones on the deformation, introduces dummy variables that represent the special effect of dam deformation, and establishes a variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of super-high arch dams. Based on different patterns of the special effect in the variable-intercept panel model, two panel analysis models were established to monitor fixed and random effects of dam deformation. Hausman test method of model selection and model effectiveness assessment method are discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of established models is verified through a case study.

  7. The combined effect of attraction and orientation zones in 2D flocking models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliass, Tarras; Cambui, Dorilson

    2016-01-01

    In nature, many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex motion of these systems, we study the Vicsek model of self-propelled particles (SPP) which is an important tool to investigate the behavior of collective motion of live organisms. This model reproduces the biological behavior patterns in the two-dimensional (2D) space. Within the framework of this model, the particles move with the same absolute velocity and interact locally in the zone of orientation by trying to align their direction with that of the neighbors. In this paper, we model the collective movement of SPP using an agent-based model which follows biologically motivated behavioral rules, by adding a second region called the attraction zone, where each particles move towards each other avoiding being isolated. Our main goal is to present a detailed numerical study on the effect of the zone of attraction on the kinetic phase transition of our system. In our study, the consideration of this zone seems to play an important role in the cohesion. Consequently, in the directional orientation, the zone that we added forms the compact particle group. In our simulation, we show clearly that the model proposed here can produce two collective behavior patterns: torus and dynamic parallel group. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Measuring and modeling suspended sediment concentration profiles in the surf zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles across the surf zone were measured in a large-scale three-dimensional movable bed laboratory facility (LSTF:Large-scale Sediment Transport Facility). Sediment suspension under two different types of breaking waves, spilling and plunging breakers, was investigated. The magnitudes and shapes of the concentration profiles varied substantially at different locations across the surf zone, reflecting the different intensities of breaking-induced turbulence. Sediment sus- pension at the energetic plunging breaker-line was much more active, resulting in nearly homogeneous concentration profiles throughout most of the water column, as compared to the reminder of the surf zone and at the spilling breaker-line. Four suspended sediment concentration models were examined based on the LSTF data, including the mixing turbulence length approach, segment eddy viscosity model, breaking-induced wave-energy dissipation approach, and a combined breaking and turbulence length model developed by this study. Neglecting the breaking-induced turbulence and subsequent sediment mixing, suspended sediment concentration models failed to predict the across-shore variations of the sediment suspension, especially at the plunging breaker-line. Wave-energy dissipation rate provided an accurate method for estimating the intensity of turbulence generated by wave breaking. By incorporating the breaking-induced turbulence, the combined breaking and turbulence length model reproduced the across-shore variation of sediment suspension in the surf zone. The combined model reproduced the measured time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles reasonably well across the surf zone.

  9. Alternative zoning scenarios for regional sustainable land use controls in China: a knowledge-based multiobjective optimisation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yin; Liu, Dianfeng; Liu, Yaolin; He, Jianhua; Hong, Xiaofeng

    2014-08-28

    Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements of land use stakeholders and managers. This model combined multiple zoning objectives, i.e., maximum zoning suitability, maximum planning compatibility and maximum spatial compactness, with land use constraints by using goal programming technique, and employed a modified simulated annealing algorithm to search for the optimal zoning solutions. The land use zoning knowledge was incorporated into the initialisation operator and neighbourhood selection strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm to improve its efficiency. The case study indicates that the model is both effective and robust. Five optimal zoning scenarios of the study area were helpful for satisfying the requirements of land use controls in loess hilly regions, e.g., land use intensification, agricultural protection and environmental conservation.

  10. Fast, Sequence Adaptive Parcellation of Brain MR Using Parametric Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    -of-the-art segmentation performance in both cortical and subcortical structures, while retaining all the benefits of generative parametric models, including high computational speed, automatic adaptiveness to changes in image contrast when different scanner platforms and pulse sequences are used, and the ability......In this paper we propose a method for whole brain parcellation using the type of generative parametric models typically used in tissue classification. Compared to the non-parametric, multi-atlas segmentation techniques that have become popular in recent years, our method obtains state...... to handle multi-contrast (vector-valued intensities) MR data. We have validated our method by comparing its segmentations to manual delineations both within and across scanner platforms and pulse sequences, and show preliminary results on multi-contrast test-retest scans, demonstrating the feasibility...

  11. Transport and degradation of propylene glycol in the vadose zone: model development and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotanus, D; Meeussen, J C L; Lissner, H; van der Ploeg, M J; Wehrer, M; Totsche, K U; van der Zee, S E A T M

    2014-01-01

    Transport and degradation of de-icing chemical (containing propylene glycol, PG) in the vadose zone were studied with a lysimeter experiment and a model, in which transient water flow, kinetic degradation of PG and soil chemistry were combined. The lysimeter experiment indicated that aerobic as well as anaerobic degradation occurs in the vadose zone. Therefore, the model included both types of degradation, which was made possible by assuming advection-controlled (mobile) and diffusion-controlled (immobile) zones. In the mobile zone, oxygen can be transported by diffusion in the gas phase. The immobile zone is always water-saturated, and oxygen only diffuses slowly in the water phase. Therefore, the model is designed in a way that the redox potential can decrease when PG is degraded, and thus, anaerobic degradation can occur. In our model, manganese oxide (MnO2, which is present in the soil) and NO3- (applied to enhance biodegradation) can be used as electron acceptors for anaerobic degradation. The application of NO3- does not result in a lower leaching of PG nor in a slower depletion of MnO2. The thickness of the snowcover influences the leached fraction of PG, as with a high infiltration rate, transport is fast, there is less time for degradation and thus more PG will leach. The model showed that, in this soil, the effect of the water flow dominates over the effect of the degradation parameters on the leaching at a 1-m depth.

  12. The Approximative Hamiltonian for the Dicce model defined in term one-zone potential

    CERN Document Server

    Rasulova, M Yu

    2002-01-01

    The Approximative Hamiltonian (AHM) for the Dicce model is defined in terms of the one-zone potential. We investigate the Dicce model on the base of Petrins-Belokolos's method. This method offers the following advantages. It makes it possible to simplify the construction of the self-consistent equation and the structure of approximative Hamiltonians. In addition, the AHM allows the exact solution of the self-consistent equation to be found and, thus, the approximative Hamiltonian for the Dicce model to be defined in terms of one-zone potential.

  13. The Iquique earthquake sequence of April 2014: Bayesian modeling accounting for prediction uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duputel, Zacharie; Jiang, Junle; Jolivet, Romain; Simons, Mark; Rivera, Luis; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Riel, Bryan; Owen, Susan E; Moore, Angelyn W; Samsonov, Sergey V; Ortega Culaciati, Francisco; Minson, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The subduction zone in northern Chile is a well-identified seismic gap that last ruptured in 1877. On 1 April 2014, this region was struck by a large earthquake following a two week long series of foreshocks. This study combines a wide range of observations, including geodetic, tsunami, and seismic data, to produce a reliable kinematic slip model of the Mw=8.1 main shock and a static slip model of the Mw=7.7 aftershock. We use a novel Bayesian modeling approach that accounts for uncertainty in the Green's functions, both static and dynamic, while avoiding nonphysical regularization. The results reveal a sharp slip zone, more compact than previously thought, located downdip of the foreshock sequence and updip of high-frequency sources inferred by back-projection analysis. Both the main shock and the Mw=7.7 aftershock did not rupture to the trench and left most of the seismic gap unbroken, leaving the possibility of a future large earthquake in the region.

  14. Dimensionless model to determine spontaneous combustion danger zone in the longwall gob

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-hai; DENG Jun; WEN Hu

    2011-01-01

    According to spontaneous combustion propensity,the longwall gob is divided into three zones,including heat dissipation zone,self-heating zone and the choking zone.Only in the self-heating zone can temperature of coal rise due to oxidation.Studying the distribution of the “Three Zones” in gob is important for predicting and preventing spontaneous combustion in coalmine.In normal mining operations,temperature of coal is roughly constant.The process of mass transfer in the gob is considered to be steady.Based on mass conservation,gas species conservation,darcy' s law,Ficks law of diffusion and coal oxidation 1-grade reaction rule,governing equation for air leakage intensity and species concentration are deduced.With critical value of coal spontaneous combustion and the size of longwall workface as basic dimension,a dimensionless steady coupled model of air flow diffusion and chemical reaction in loose coal of Fully Mechanized Top-Coal Caving Mining Workface (FMTCCMW) is setup.By solving the model numerically,regulation of three zones' distribution and spontaneous combustion in the gob can be obtained.The results can be easily popularized to prediction of spontaneous combustion in other coalmines' longwall gob.

  15. Modelling Vertical Variation of Turbulent Flow Across a Surf Zone Using SWASH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlema, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the open source non-hydrostatic wave-flow model SWASH to propagation of irregular waves in a barred surf zone, and the model results are discussed by comparing against an extensive laboratory data set. This study focus not only on wave transformation in the sur

  16. Multi-Zone hybrid model for failure detection of the stable ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Mehdi; Schiøler, Henrik; Soltani, Mohsen;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a conceptual multi-zone model for climate control of a live stock building is elaborated. The main challenge of this research is to estimate the parameters of a nonlinear hybrid model. A recursive estimation algorithm, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is implemented for estimation....

  17. Effects of Aftershock Declustering in Risk Modeling: Case Study of a Subduction Sequence in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D. L.; Nyst, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake hazard and risk models often assume that earthquake rates can be represented by a stationary Poisson process, and that aftershocks observed in historical seismicity catalogs represent a deviation from stationarity that must be corrected before earthquake rates are estimated. Algorithms for classifying individual earthquakes as independent mainshocks or as aftershocks vary widely, and analysis of a single catalog can produce considerably different earthquake rates depending on the declustering method implemented. As these rates are propagated through hazard and risk models, the modeled results will vary due to the assumptions implied by these choices. In particular, the removal of large aftershocks following a mainshock may lead to an underestimation of the rate of damaging earthquakes and potential damage due to a large aftershock may be excluded from the model. We present a case study based on the 1907 - 1911 sequence of nine 6.9 Mexico in order to illustrate the variability in risk under various declustering approaches. Previous studies have suggested that subduction zone earthquakes in Mexico tend to occur in clusters, and this particular sequence includes events that would be labeled as aftershocks in some declustering approaches yet are large enough to produce significant damage. We model the ground motion for each event, determine damage ratios using modern exposure data, and then compare the variability in the modeled damage from using the full catalog or one of several declustered catalogs containing only "independent" events. We also consider the effects of progressive damage caused by each subsequent event and how this might increase or decrease the total losses expected from this sequence.

  18. Spatial modeling of coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes for the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tague, C.

    2007-12-01

    One of the primary roles of modeling in critical zone research studies is to provide a framework for integrating field measurements and theory and for generalizing results across space and time. In the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (SCZO), significant spatial heterogeneity associated with mountainous terrain combined with high inter-annual and seasonal variation in climate, necessitates the use of spatial-temporal models for generating landscape scale understanding and predictions. Science questions related to coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes within the critical zone require a framework that can account for multiple and interacting processes. One of the core tools for the SCZO will be RHESSYs (Regional hydro-ecologic simulation system). RHESSys is an existing GIS-based model of hydrology and biogeochemical cycling. For the SCZO, we use RHESSys as an open-source, objected oriented model that can be extended to incorporate findings from field-based monitoring and analysis. We use the model as a framework for data assimilation, spatial-temporal interpolation, prediction, and scenario and hypothesis generation. Here we demonstrate the use of RHESSys as a hypothesis generation tool. We show how initial RHESSys predictions can be used to estimate when and where connectivity within the critical zone will lead to significant spatial or temporal gradients in vegetation carbon and moisture fluxes. We use the model to explore the potential implications of heterogeneity in critical zone controls on hydrologic processes at two scales: micro and macro. At the micro scale, we examine the role of preferential flowpaths. At the macro scale we consider the importance of upland-riparian zone connectivity. We show how the model can be used to design efficient field experiments by, a-priori providing quantitative estimate of uncertainty and highlighting when and where measurements might most effectively reduce that uncertainty.

  19. Bacterial DNA Sequence Compression Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando J. Pinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the advances in DNA sequencing techniques have contributed to an unprecedented growth of genomic data. This fact has increased the interest in DNA compression, not only from the information theory and biology points of view, but also from a practical perspective, since such sequences require storage resources. Several compression methods exist, and particularly, those using finite-context models (FCMs have received increasing attention, as they have been proven to effectively compress DNA sequences with low bits-per-base, as well as low encoding/decoding time-per-base. However, the amount of run-time memory required to store high-order finite-context models may become impractical, since a context-order as low as 16 requires a maximum of 17.2 x 109 memory entries. This paper presents a method to reduce such a memory requirement by using a novel application of artificial neural networks (ANN to build such probabilistic models in a compact way and shows how to use them to estimate the probabilities. Such a system was implemented, and its performance compared against state-of-the art compressors, such as XM-DNA (expert model and FCM-Mx (mixture of finite-context models , as well as with general-purpose compressors. Using a combination of order-10 FCM and ANN, similar encoding results to those of FCM, up to order-16, are obtained using only 17 megabytes of memory, whereas the latter, even employing hash-tables, uses several hundreds of megabytes.

  20. Permafrost Degradation Risk Zone Assessment using Simulation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daanen, R.P.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Marchenko, S.;

    2011-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study we focus on linking large scale climate and permafrost simulations to small scale engineering projects by bridging the gap between climate and permafrost sciences on the one hand and on the other technical recommendation for adaptation of planned infrastructures...... to climate change in a region generally underlain by permafrost. We present the current and future state of permafrost in Greenland as modelled numerically with the GIPL model driven by HIRHAM climate projections up to 2080. We develop a concept called Permafrost Thaw Potential (PTP), defined...... as the potential active layer increase due to climate warming and surface alterations. PTP is then used in a simple risk assessment procedure useful for engineering applications. The modelling shows that climate warming will result in continuing wide-spread permafrost warming and degradation in Greenland...

  1. Root zone water quality model (RZWQM2): Model use, calibration and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liwang; Ahuja, Lajpat; Nolan, B.T.; Malone, Robert; Trout, Thomas; Qi, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM2) has been used widely for simulating agricultural management effects on crop production and soil and water quality. Although it is a one-dimensional model, it has many desirable features for the modeling community. This article outlines the principles of calibrating the model component by component with one or more datasets and validating the model with independent datasets. Users should consult the RZWQM2 user manual distributed along with the model and a more detailed protocol on how to calibrate RZWQM2 provided in a book chapter. Two case studies (or examples) are included in this article. One is from an irrigated maize study in Colorado to illustrate the use of field and laboratory measured soil hydraulic properties on simulated soil water and crop production. It also demonstrates the interaction between soil and plant parameters in simulated plant responses to water stresses. The other is from a maize-soybean rotation study in Iowa to show a manual calibration of the model for crop yield, soil water, and N leaching in tile-drained soils. Although the commonly used trial-and-error calibration method works well for experienced users, as shown in the second example, an automated calibration procedure is more objective, as shown in the first example. Furthermore, the incorporation of the Parameter Estimation Software (PEST) into RZWQM2 made the calibration of the model more efficient than a grid (ordered) search of model parameters. In addition, PEST provides sensitivity and uncertainty analyses that should help users in selecting the right parameters to calibrate.

  2. A stochastic model for EEG microstate sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Matthias; Brodbeck, Verena; Laufs, Helmut; Schneider, Gaby

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of spontaneous resting state neuronal activity is assumed to give insight into the brain function. One noninvasive technique to study resting state activity is electroencephalography (EEG) with a subsequent microstate analysis. This technique reduces the recorded EEG signal to a sequence of prototypical topographical maps, which is hypothesized to capture important spatio-temporal properties of the signal. In a statistical EEG microstate analysis of healthy subjects in wakefulness and three stages of sleep, we observed a simple structure in the microstate transition matrix. It can be described with a first order Markov chain in which the transition probability from the current state (i.e., map) to a different map does not depend on the current map. The resulting transition matrix shows a high agreement with the observed transition matrix, requiring only about 2% of mass transport (1/2 L1-distance). In the second part, we introduce an extended framework in which the simple Markov chain is used to make inferences on a potential underlying time continuous process. This process cannot be directly observed and is therefore usually estimated from discrete sampling points of the EEG signal given by the local maxima of the global field power. Therefore, we propose a simple stochastic model called sampled marked intervals (SMI) model that relates the observed sequence of microstates to an assumed underlying process of background intervals and thus, complements approaches that focus on the analysis of observable microstate sequences.

  3. Zone-specific logistic regression models improve classification of prostate cancer on multi-parametric MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikaios, Nikolaos; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Departments of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Alkalbani, Jokha; Sidhu, Harbir Singh [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Abd-Alazeez, Mohamed; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark [University College London, Research Department of Urology, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, London (United Kingdom); Kirkham, Alex [University College London Hospital, Departments of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Freeman, Alex [University College London Hospital, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    To assess the interchangeability of zone-specific (peripheral-zone (PZ) and transition-zone (TZ)) multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) logistic-regression (LR) models for classification of prostate cancer. Two hundred and thirty-one patients (70 TZ training-cohort; 76 PZ training-cohort; 85 TZ temporal validation-cohort) underwent mp-MRI and transperineal-template-prostate-mapping biopsy. PZ and TZ uni/multi-variate mp-MRI LR-models for classification of significant cancer (any cancer-core-length (CCL) with Gleason > 3 + 3 or any grade with CCL ≥ 4 mm) were derived from the respective cohorts and validated within the same zone by leave-one-out analysis. Inter-zonal performance was tested by applying TZ models to the PZ training-cohort and vice-versa. Classification performance of TZ models for TZ cancer was further assessed in the TZ validation-cohort. ROC area-under-curve (ROC-AUC) analysis was used to compare models. The univariate parameters with the best classification performance were the normalised T2 signal (T2nSI) within the TZ (ROC-AUC = 0.77) and normalized early contrast-enhanced T1 signal (DCE-nSI) within the PZ (ROC-AUC = 0.79). Performance was not significantly improved by bi-variate/tri-variate modelling. PZ models that contained DCE-nSI performed poorly in classification of TZ cancer. The TZ model based solely on maximum-enhancement poorly classified PZ cancer. LR-models dependent on DCE-MRI parameters alone are not interchangeable between prostatic zones; however, models based exclusively on T2 and/or ADC are more robust for inter-zonal application. (orig.)

  4. Nucleotide divergence vs. gene expression differentiation: comparative transcriptome sequencing in natural isolates from the carrion crow and its hybrid zone with the hooded crow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Bayer, Till; Haubold, Bernhard; Schilhabel, Markus; Rosenstiel, Philip; Tautz, Diethard

    2010-03-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technology promise to provide new strategies for studying population differentiation and speciation phenomena in their earliest phases. We focus here on the black carrion crow (Corvus [corone] corone), which forms a zone of hybridization and overlap with the grey coated hooded crow (Corvus [corone] cornix). However, although these semispecies are taxonomically distinct, previous analyses based on several types of genetic markers did not reveal significant molecular differentiation between them. We here corroborate this result with sequence data obtained from a set of 25 nuclear intronic loci. Thus, the system represents a case of a very early phase of species divergence that requires new molecular approaches for its description. We have therefore generated RNAseq expression profiles using barcoded massively parallel pyrosequencing of brain mRNA from six individuals of the carrion crow and five individuals from a hybrid zone with the hooded crow. We obtained 856 675 reads from two runs, with average read length of 270 nt and coverage of 8.44. Reads were assembled de novo into 19 552 contigs, 70% of which could be assigned to annotated genes in chicken and zebra finch. This resulted in a total of 7637 orthologous genes and a core set of 1301 genes that could be compared across all individuals. We find a clear clustering of expression profiles for the pure carrion crow animals and disperse profiles for the animals from the hybrid zone. These results suggest that gene expression differences may indeed be a sensitive indicator of initial species divergence.

  5. Estimating the ETAS model from an early aftershock sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Takahiro; Ogata, Yosihiko; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-02-01

    Forecasting aftershock probabilities, as early as possible after a main shock, is required to mitigate seismic risks in the disaster area. In general, aftershock activity can be complex, including secondary aftershocks or even triggering larger earthquakes. However, this early forecasting implementation has been difficult because numerous aftershocks are unobserved immediately after the main shock due to dense overlapping of seismic waves. Here we propose a method for estimating parameters of the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model from incompletely observed aftershocks shortly after the main shock by modeling an empirical feature of data deficiency. Such an ETAS model can effectively forecast the following aftershock occurrences. For example, the ETAS model estimated from the first 24 h data after the main shock can well forecast secondary aftershocks after strong aftershocks. This method can be useful in early and unbiased assessment of the aftershock hazard.

  6. Luminosity variation in the extended one-zone RR Lyrae model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pricopi D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stellingwerf one-zone stellar model is extended by assuming, a slow and uniform rotation that leads to a very small oblateness of the star. The matter in the core-surrounding shell is supposed to consists of a mixture of ideal gas and radiation. This one-zone stellar pulsation model is proposed as a tool to investigate the factors affecting luminosity variations of pulsating stars. Linear and nonlinear analyses of the resulting equations are described. The results are in very good agreement with the observed RR Lyrae light curves. .

  7. Method and its application of the momentum model for debris flow risk zoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to ascertain the distribution of flow depth and velocity of debris flow, the combination of numerical modeling and the GIS technology has been used to simulate the movement process of debris flow out of the outlet. The main model of momentum classification of risk zoning of debris flow is Z=Khv. Based on the distribution of the velocity and depth of debris flow, the distribution of momentum can be ascertained. Thereby the classification of risk zoning of debris flow can be worked out. A case study of Chacaito Valley in Caracas, Venezuela, is presented to illustrate the application of the method.

  8. Seismic-sequence stratigraphy and geologic structure of the Floridan aquifer system near "Boulder Zone" deep wells in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, acquired, processed, and interpreted seismic-reflection data near the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields to determine if geologic factors may contribute to the upward migration of injected effluent into that upper part of the Floridan aquifer system designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an underground source of drinking water. The depth of the Boulder Zone at the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields ranges from about 2,750 to 3,300 feet below land surface (ft bls), whereas overlying permeable zones used as alternative drinking water supply range in depth from about 825 to 1,580 ft bls at the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields. Seismic-sequence stratigraphy and geologic structures imaged on seismic-reflection profiles created for the study describe the part of the Floridan aquifer system overlying and within the Boulder Zone. Features of the Floridan aquifer system underlying the Boulder Zone were not studied because seismic-reflection profiles acquired near the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields lacked adequate resolution at such depths.

  9. Modelling turbulent stellar convection zones: sub-grid scales effects

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, A; Brun, A S; Charbonneau, P; Mathis, S; Smolarkiewicz, P K

    2016-01-01

    The impressive development of global numerical simulations of turbulent stellar interiors unveiled a variety of possible differential rotation (solar or anti-solar), meridional circulation (single or multi-cellular), and dynamo states (stable large scale toroidal field or periodically reversing magnetic fields). Various numerical schemes, based on the so-called anelastic set of equations, were used to obtain these results. It appears today mandatory to assess their robustness with respect to the details of the numerics, and in particular to the treatment of turbulent sub-grid scales. We report on an ongoing comparison between two global models, the ASH and EULAG codes. In EULAG the sub-grid scales are treated implicitly by the numerical scheme, while in ASH their effect is generally modelled by using enhanced dissipation coefficients. We characterize the sub-grid scales effect in a turbulent convection simulation with EULAG. We assess their effect at each resolved scale with a detailed energy budget. We deriv...

  10. Predicting Freeway Work Zone Delays and Costs with a Hybrid Machine-Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Du

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid machine-learning model, integrating an artificial neural network (ANN and a support vector machine (SVM model, is developed to predict spatiotemporal delays, subject to road geometry, number of lane closures, and work zone duration in different periods of a day and in the days of a week. The model is very user friendly, allowing the least inputs from the users. With that the delays caused by a work zone on any location of a New Jersey freeway can be predicted. To this end, tremendous amounts of data from different sources were collected to establish the relationship between the model inputs and outputs. A comparative analysis was conducted, and results indicate that the proposed model outperforms others in terms of the least root mean square error (RMSE. The proposed hybrid model can be used to calculate contractor penalty in terms of cost overruns as well as incentive reward schedule in case of early work competition. Additionally, it can assist work zone planners in determining the best start and end times of a work zone for developing and evaluating traffic mitigation and management plans.

  11. Quantitative modeling of a gene's expression from its intergenic sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abul Hassan Samee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling a gene's expression from its intergenic locus and trans-regulatory context is a fundamental goal in computational biology. Owing to the distributed nature of cis-regulatory information and the poorly understood mechanisms that integrate such information, gene locus modeling is a more challenging task than modeling individual enhancers. Here we report the first quantitative model of a gene's expression pattern as a function of its locus. We model the expression readout of a locus in two tiers: 1 combinatorial regulation by transcription factors bound to each enhancer is predicted by a thermodynamics-based model and 2 independent contributions from multiple enhancers are linearly combined to fit the gene expression pattern. The model does not require any prior knowledge about enhancers contributing toward a gene's expression. We demonstrate that the model captures the complex multi-domain expression patterns of anterior-posterior patterning genes in the early Drosophila embryo. Altogether, we model the expression patterns of 27 genes; these include several gap genes, pair-rule genes, and anterior, posterior, trunk, and terminal genes. We find that the model-selected enhancers for each gene overlap strongly with its experimentally characterized enhancers. Our findings also suggest the presence of sequence-segments in the locus that would contribute ectopic expression patterns and hence were "shut down" by the model. We applied our model to identify the transcription factors responsible for forming the stripe boundaries of the studied genes. The resulting network of regulatory interactions exhibits a high level of agreement with known regulatory influences on the target genes. Finally, we analyzed whether and why our assumption of enhancer independence was necessary for the genes we studied. We found a deterioration of expression when binding sites in one enhancer were allowed to influence the readout of another enhancer. Thus, interference

  12. Coseismic and interseismic displacements at a subduction zone - a parameter study using finite-element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Hampel, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Tide-gauge and geodetic measurements of coseismic and interseismic displacements in the forearc of subduction zones showed that the coastal region undergoes uplift during the interseismic phase and subsidence during the coseismic phase, while opposite vertical movements are observed in the neighbouring regions (e.g., Savage & Thatcher 1992; Hyndman & Wang 1995). Horizontal displacements during the interseismic phase are typically directed landward, whereas the forearc moves seaward during the earthquake (e.g., Klotz et al. 1999). Here we use two-dimensional finite-element modelling to evaluate how the friction coefficient along the plate interface, the length and the position of the downdip end of the locked zone affect the coseismic and interseismic displacements. Our model consists of a deformable, rheologically stratified upper plate and an undeformable oceanic plate, which rotates at a prescribed angular velocity (cf. Cailleau & Oncken, 2008). The frictional plate interface is divided - from the trench to the base of the continental lithosphere - into a seismogenic zone, a transition zone and a landward free slip zone. During an initial phase, the seismogenic zone is locked, which leads to the accumulation of elastic strain in the forearc. During the subsequent coseismic phase, the strain is released and causes sudden slip of several meters on the plate interface. During the next interseismic phase, the seismogenic zone is locked again. Our model results show patterns of vertical and horizontal displacements that are in general agreement with geodetically observed patterns. A sensitivity analysis reveals that the magnitude of the vertical displacements is strongly influenced by the friction coefficients of the seismogenic zone and the transition zone. The location of the zones of maximum interseismic uplift and coseismic subsidence in the coastal regions depends on the length and position of the locked zone. Preliminary results from three-dimensional models

  13. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 2 models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A.; Rempe, J.L. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Sequence Precursor program pursues the ultimate objective of performing risk significant evaluations on operational events (precursors) occurring in commercial nuclear power plants. To achieve this objective, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is supporting the development of simple probabilistic risk assessment models for all commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) in the U.S. Presently, only simple Level 1 plant models have been developed which estimate core damage frequencies. In order to provide a true risk perspective, the consequences associated with postulated core damage accidents also need to be considered. With the objective of performing risk evaluations in an integrated and consistent manner, a linked event tree approach which propagates the front end results to back end was developed. This approach utilizes simple plant models that analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude and timing of a radioactive release to the environment, and calculate the consequences for a given release. Detailed models and results from previous studies, such as the NUREG-1150 study, are used to quantify these simple models. These simple models are then linked to the existing Level 1 models, and are evaluated using the SAPHIRE code. To demonstrate the approach, prototypic models have been developed for a boiling water reactor, Peach Bottom, and a pressurized water reactor, Zion.

  14. Sequence Stratigraphy of lower zones of Asmari Formation in Marun Oilfield by using of microfacies analysis, isolith maps and γ- Ray log

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirmarghabi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Oligo- Miocene Asmari Formation is one of the most important reservoir units of the Marun Oilfield in Dezful Embayment SW Iran, deposited in Zagros foreland basin. The goal of this study is to interpret depositional environment and sequence stratigraphy of lower zones of the Asmari Formation in Well No.281, 342 and 312in Marun Oilfield based on changes in the shape of γ- Ray, isolith maps and microfacies properties. Accordingly, identification of 9 carbonate microfacies and 2 siliciclastic petrofacies were identified that are deposited in four depositional environment including open marine, barrier, lagoon and tidal flat in a homoclinal ramp (consisting of outer, middle and inner ramp. Also, based on the shape of γ- Ray log, There sediment were deposited in marine environment. In open marine and barrier environments, The shape of γ- Ray log is serrated bell-shaped, serrated funnel-shaped, left bow-shaped, serrated shape and right boxcar shape, Whole in the beach environment it is cylinder and funnel shape and in lagoon and tidal flat environment can be seen on right bow to cylinder-shaped. Based on the isolith maps, sandstone of lower zones of the Asmari Formation in Marun Oilfield expanded by deltaic system along the southwestern margin of the basin and influenced by changes in sea level constantly. Sequence stratigraphic analysis led to identification of three third- order (DS1, DS2 and DS3 depositional sequences.

  15. Numerical modelling of liquid material flow in the fusion zone of hybrid welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kubiak

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns modelling of liquid metal motion in the fusion zone of laser-arc hybrid butt-welded plate. Velocity field in the fusion zone and temperature field in welded plate were obtained on the basis of the solution of mass, momentum and energy conservationsequations. Differential equations were solved using Chorin’s projection method and finite volume method. Melting and solidificationprocesses were taken into account in calculations assuming fuzzy solidification front where fluid flow is treated as a flow through porous medium. Double-ellipsoidal heat source model was used to describe electric arc and laser beam heat sources. On the basis of developed solution algorithms simulation of hybrid welding process was performed and the influence of liquid metal motion in the fusion zone on the results of calculations was analyzed.

  16. Modeling turbulent stellar convection zones: Sub-grid scales effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, A.; Beaudoin, P.; Brun, A. S.; Charbonneau, P.; Mathis, S.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    The impressive development of global numerical simulations of turbulent stellar interiors unveiled a variety of possible differential rotation (solar or anti-solar), meridional circulation (single or multi-cellular), and dynamo states (stable large scale toroidal field or periodically reversing magnetic fields). Various numerical schemes, based on the so-called anelastic set of equations, were used to obtain these results. It appears today mandatory to assess their robustness with respect to the details of the numerics, and in particular to the treatment of turbulent sub-grid scales. We report on an ongoing comparison between two global models, the ASH and EULAG codes. In EULAG the sub-grid scales are treated implicitly by the numerical scheme, while in ASH their effect is generally modeled by using enhanced dissipation coefficients. We characterize the sub-grid scales effect in a turbulent convection simulation with EULAG. We assess their effect at each resolved scale with a detailed energy budget. We derive equivalent eddy-diffusion coefficients and use the derived diffusivities in twin ASH numerical simulations. We find a good agreement between the large-scale flows developing in the two codes in the hydrodynamic regime, which encourages further investigation in the magnetohydrodynamic regime for various dynamo solutions.

  17. Analogue modelling of inclined, brittle-ductile transpression: Testing analytical models through natural shear zones (external Betics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcos, L.; Díaz-Azpiroz, M.; Balanyá, J. C.; Expósito, I.; Jiménez-Bonilla, A.; Faccenna, C.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of analytical and analogue models gives new opportunities to better understand the kinematic parameters controlling the evolution of transpression zones. In this work, we carried out a set of analogue models using the kinematic parameters of transpressional deformation obtained by applying a general triclinic transpression analytical model to a tabular-shaped shear zone in the external Betic Chain (Torcal de Antequera massif). According to the results of the analytical model, we used two oblique convergence angles to reproduce the main structural and kinematic features of structural domains observed within the Torcal de Antequera massif (α = 15° for the outer domains and α = 30° for the inner domain). Two parallel inclined backstops (one fixed and the other mobile) reproduce the geometry of the shear zone walls of the natural case. Additionally, we applied digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) method to calculate the velocity field of the incremental deformation. Our results suggest that the spatial distribution of the main structures observed in the Torcal de Antequera massif reflects different modes of strain partitioning and strain localization between two domain types, which are related to the variation in the oblique convergence angle and the presence of steep planar velocity - and rheological - discontinuities (the shear zone walls in the natural case). In the 15° model, strain partitioning is simple and strain localization is high: a single narrow shear zone is developed close and parallel to the fixed backstop, bounded by strike-slip faults and internally deformed by R and P shears. In the 30° model, strain partitioning is strong, generating regularly spaced oblique-to-the backstops thrusts and strike-slip faults. At final stages of the 30° experiment, deformation affects the entire model box. Our results show that the application of analytical modelling to natural transpressive zones related to upper crustal deformation

  18. Mojave Compliant Zone Structure and Properties: Constraints from InSAR and Mechanical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, E. H.; Fialko, Y.; Finzi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Long-lived zones with significantly lower elastic strength than their surroundings are associated with active Mojave faults (e.g., Li et al., 1999; Fialko et al., 2002, 2004). In an earthquake these weak features concentrate strain, causing them to show up as anomalous, short length-scale features in SAR interferograms (Fialko et al., 2002). Fault-zone trapped wave studies indicate that the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake caused a small reduction in P- and S-wave velocities in a compliant zone along the Landers earthquake rupture (Vidale and Li, 2003). This suggests that coseismic strain concentration, and the resulting damage, in the compliant zone caused a further reduction in its elastic strength. Even a small coseismic strength drop should make a compliant zone (CZ) deform, in response to the total (not just the coseismic) stress. The strain should be in the sense which is compatible with the orientations and values of the region's principal stresses. However, as indicated by Fialko and co-workers (2002, 2004), the sense of coseismic strain of Mojave compliant zones was consistent with coseismic stress change, not the regional (background) stress. Here we use finite-element models to investigate how InSAR measurements of Mojave compliant zone coseismic strain places limits on their dimensions and on upper crustal stresses. We find that unless the CZ is shallow, narrow, and has a high Poisson's ratio (e.g., 0.4), CZ contraction under lithostatic stress overshadows deformation due to deviatoric background stress or coseismic stress change. We present ranges of CZ dimensions which are compatible with the observed surface deformation and address how these dimensions compare with new results from damage-controlled fault evolution models.

  19. Model of the Crustal Magnetic Field in the Martian Aurora Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Dong-Sheng; CHEN Chu-Xin

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that aurorae are prominent on planets with a global magnetic field and occur where open magnetic Geld lines converge. The UV spectrometer used for investigating the characteristics of the atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) on board the Mars Express made the first observation of auroral-type emission in the cusp region of the strong crustal magnetic field on Mars and found that the arc of the Martian aurora zone is very narrow in width, which obviously differs from that of other planets. Based on the observation, we put forward a model of a crustal magnetic field on the Martian aurora zone through the morphology of Martian aurorae. In the model, equivalent currents are proposed; the topology and magnitude of the magnetic field generated by these equivalent currents are consistent with that of the crustal magnetic field in the Martian aurora zone. The morphology of the Martian aurora zone generated through the model matches well with the observations made by the Mars Express orbiter.%It is well known that aurorae are prominent on planets with a global magnetic field and occur where open magnetic field lines converge.The UV spectrometer used for investigating the characteristics of the atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) on board the Mars Express made the first observation of auroral-type emission in the cusp region of the strong crustal magnetic field on Mars and found that the arc of the Martian aurora zone is very narrow in width,which obviously differs from that of other planets.Based on the observation,we put forward a model of a crustal magnetic field on the Martian aurora zone through the morphology of Martian aurorae.In the model,equivalent currents are proposed;the topology and magnitude of the magnetic field generated by these equivalent currents are consistent with that of the crustal magnetic field in the Martian aurora zone.The morphology of the Martian aurora zone generated through the model matches well with the observations made by the Mars Express

  20. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 1 models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattison, M.B.; Thatcher, T.A.; Knudsen, J.K.; Schroeder, J.A.; Siu, N.O. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-03-01

    INEL has been involved in the development of plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models for the past two years. These models were developed for use with the SAPHIRE suite of PRA computer codes. They contained event tree/linked fault tree Level 1 risk models for the following initiating events: general transient, loss-of-offsite-power, steam generator tube rupture, small loss-of-coolant-accident, and anticipated transient without scram. Early in 1995 the ASP models were revised based on review comments from the NRC and an independent peer review. These models were released as Revision 1. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has sponsored several projects at the INEL this fiscal year to further enhance the capabilities of the ASP models. Revision 2 models incorporates more detailed plant information into the models concerning plant response to station blackout conditions, information on battery life, and other unique features gleaned from an Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation quick review of the Individual Plant Examination submittals. These models are currently being delivered to the NRC as they are completed. A related project is a feasibility study and model development of low power/shutdown (LP/SD) and external event extensions to the ASP models. This project will establish criteria for selection of LP/SD and external initiator operational events for analysis within the ASP program. Prototype models for each pertinent initiating event (loss of shutdown cooling, loss of inventory control, fire, flood, seismic, etc.) will be developed. A third project concerns development of enhancements to SAPHIRE. In relation to the ASP program, a new SAPHIRE module, GEM, was developed as a specific user interface for performing ASP evaluations. This module greatly simplifies the analysis process for determining the conditional core damage probability for a given combination of initiating events and equipment failures or degradations.

  1. The single-zone numerical model of homogeneous charge compression ignition engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanov, E. A.; Itkis, E. M.; Kuzmin, V. N.; Shumskiy, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    The single-zone model of methane-air mixture combustion in the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engine was developed. First modeling efforts resulted in the selection of the detailed kinetic reaction mechanism, most appropriate for the conditions of the HCCI process. Then, the model was completed so as to simulate the performance of the four-stroke engine and was coupled by physically reasonable adjusting functions. Validation of calculations against experimental data showed acceptable agreement.

  2. Comparison between cohesive zone models and a coupled criterion for prediction of edge debonding

    OpenAIRE

    Vandellos, T.; Martin, E.; Leguillon, D.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The onset of edge debonding within a bonded specimen submitted to bending is modeled with two numerical approaches: the coupled criterion and the cohesive zone model. The comparison of the results obtained with the both approaches evidences that (i) the prediction of edge debonding strongly depends on the shape of the cohesive law and (ii) the trapezoidal cohesive law is the most relevant model to predict the edge debonding as compared with the coupled criterion.

  3. Modelling of sediment movement in the surf and swash zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TOKPOHOZIN N B; KOUNOUHEWA B; AVOSSEVOU G Y H; HOUEKPOHEHAM A; AWANOU C N

    2015-01-01

    Under the action of marine currents, non-cohesive sediments evolve by bed-load, by saltation or suspension depending on their granulometry. Several authors have considered that the movement of sediment is bidimensional and modelized the effects of swell by a constant velocitynear the seabed. Here we have studied the velocity profile of fluctuating currents near the seabed and studied the movement of sediment in 3D. The results show that in the areas of study (surf and swash) the movement of sediment occurs in a volume, and the evolution of sediment varies from an areato another. The obtained theoretical profiles of the position and velocity vectors confirm the observations of several authors.

  4. Creep model of unsaturated sliding zone soils and long-term deformation analysis of landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liangchao; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Yeming

    2015-04-01

    Sliding zone soil is a special soil layer formed in the development of a landslide. Its creep behavior plays a significant role in long-term deformation of landslides. Due to rainfall infiltration and reservoir water level fluctuation, the soils in the slide zone are often in unsaturated state. Therefore, the investigation of creep behaviors of the unsaturated sliding zone soils is of great importance for understanding the mechanism of the long-term deformation of a landslide in reservoir areas. In this study, the full-process creep curves of the unsaturated soils in the sliding zone in different net confining pressure, matric suctions and stress levels were obtained from a large number of laboratory triaxial creep tests. A nonlinear creep model for unsaturated soils and its three-dimensional form was then deduced based on the component model theory and unsaturated soil mechanics. This creep model was validated with laboratory creep data. The results show that this creep model can effectively and accurately describe the nonlinear creep behaviors of the unsaturated sliding zone soils. In order to apply this creep model to predict the long-term deformation process of landslides, a numerical model for simulating the coupled seepage and creep deformation of unsaturated sliding zone soils was developed based on this creep model through the finite element method (FEM). By using this numerical model, we simulated the deformation process of the Shuping landslide located in the Three Gorges reservoir area, under the cycling reservoir water level fluctuation during one year. The simulation results of creep displacement were then compared with the field deformation monitoring data, showing a good agreement in trend. The results show that the creeping deformations of landslides have strong connections with the changes of reservoir water level. The creep model of unsaturated sliding zone soils and the findings obtained by numerical simulations in this study are conducive to

  5. CRACK PROPAGATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINE ELASTIC-VISCOPLASTIC MATERIALS USING COHESIVE ZONE MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Cohesive zone model was used to simulate two-dimensional plane strain crack propagation at the grain level model including grain boundary zones. Simulated results show that the original crack-tip may not be separated firstly in an elastic-viscoplastic polycrystals. The grain interior's material properties (e.g. strain rate sensitivity) characterize the competitions between plastic and cohesive energy dissipation mechanisms.The higher the strain rate sensitivity is, the larger amount of the external work is transformed into plastic dissipation energy than into cohesive energy, which delays the cohesive zone rupturing. With the strain rate sensitivity decreased, the material property tends to approach the elastic-plastic responses. In this case, the plastic dissipation energy decreases and the cohesive dissipation energy increases which accelerates the cohesive zones debonding. Increasing the cohesive strength or the critical separation displacement will reduce the stress triaxiality at grain interiors and grain boundaries. Enhancing the cohesive zones ductility can improve the matrix materials resistance to void damage.

  6. Modelling and control design for SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work presents a complete model of the SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence. The dynamics of the reactor were explored pointing out the different scales of the rates in the system: slow microbial...... metabolism against fast chemical reaction and mass transfer. Likewise, the analysis of the dynamics contributed to establish qualitatively the requirements for control of the reactors, both for regulation and for optimal operation. Work in progress on quantitatively analysing different control structure...

  7. Universal power law behaviors in genomic sequences and evolutionary models

    CERN Document Server

    Martignetti, L

    2007-01-01

    We study the length distribution of a particular class of DNA sequences known as 5'UTR exons. These exons belong to the messanger RNA of protein coding genes, but they are not coding (they are located upstream of the coding portion of the mRNA) and are thus less constrained from an evolutionary point of view. We show that both in mouse and in human these exons show a very clean power law decay in their length distribution and suggest a simple evolutionary model which may explain this finding. We conjecture that this power law behaviour could indeed be a general feature of higher eukaryotes.

  8. Validation of a Perceptual Distraction Model in a Complex Personal Sound Zone System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rämö, Jussi; Marsh, Steven; Bech, Søren

    2016-01-01

    tested using more complex sound systems. A listening experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of the model, using music target and speech interferer reproduced by a complex personal sound-zone system. The model was found to successfully predict the perceived distraction of a more complex......This paper evaluates a previously proposed perceptual model predicting user’s perceived distraction caused by interfering audio programmes. The distraction model was originally trained using a simple sound reproduction system for music-on-music interference situations and it has not been formally...... sound reproducing system with different target-interferer pairs than it was originally trained for. Thus, the model can be used as a tool for personal sound-zone evaluation and optimization tasks....

  9. Measuring and modeling suspended sediment concentration profiles in the surf zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles across the surf zone were measured in a large-scale three-dimensional movable bed laboratory facility (LSTF: Large-scale Sediment Transport Facility. Sediment suspension under two different types of breaking waves, spilling and plunging breakers, was investigated. The magnitudes and shapes of the concentration profiles varied substantially at different locations across the surf zone, reflecting the different intensities of breaking-induced turbulence. Sediment suspension at the energetic plunging breaker-line was much more active, resulting in nearly homogeneous concentration profiles throughout most of the water column, as compared to the reminder of the surf zone and at the spilling breaker-line. Four suspended sediment concentration models were examined based on the LSTF data, including the mixing turbulence length approach, segment eddy viscosity model, breaking-induced wave-energy dissipation approach, and a combined breaking and turbulence length model developed by this study. Neglecting the breaking-induced turbulence and subsequent sediment mixing, suspended sediment concentration models failed to predict the across-shore variations of the sediment suspension, especially at the plunging breaker-line. Wave-energy dissipation rate provided an accurate method for estimating the intensity of turbulence generated by wave breaking. By incorporating the breaking-induced turbulence, the combined breaking and turbulence length model reproduced the across-shore variation of sediment suspension in the surf zone. The combined model reproduced the measured time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles reasonably well across the surf zone.

  10. Corn stover harvest increases herbicide movement to subsurface drains – Root Zone Water Quality Model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Removal of crop residues for bioenergy production can alter soil hydrologic properties, but there is little information on its impact on transport of herbicides and their degradation products to subsurface drains. The Root Zone Water Quality Model, previously calibrated using measured fl...

  11. A hybrid model of swash-zone longshore sediment transport on refelctive beaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, A.W.; Hughes, M.; Cowell, P.; Gordon, A.; Savioli, J.C.; Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrodynamics and sediment transport in the swash zone is currently outside the domain of coastal-area models, which is a significant limitation in obtaining littoral sediment-transport estimates, especially on steep reflective beaches where the waves practically break on the beachface. In this

  12. A model for the spray zone in early-stage fluidized bed granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, S. H.; Vonk, P.; Kossen, N. W. F.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of granules in the spray zone of a top-spray fluid-bed granulation process using a known and uniform drop-size is studied experimentally and theoretically. Experimental results indicate a multi-modal size distribution of spherically-shaped granules. A model is presented to explain this

  13. Comparing Performance and Parameterization of a One-Dimensional Unsaturated Zone Model across Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheikh, V.; Loon, van E.E.

    2007-01-01

    Received for publication 29 May 2006. The utility of an unsaturated zone soil moisture model is not only its ability to describe the soil moisture dynamics at a given point but also the possibility to generalize the results to larger areas. In this study we investigated the predictive performance of

  14. Transport and degradation of propylene glycol in the vadose zone: model development and sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, D.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Lissner, H.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Wehrer, M.; Totsche, K.U.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Transport and degradation of de-icing chemical (containing propylene glycol, PG) in the vadose zone were studied with a lysimeter experiment and a model, in which transient water flow, kinetic degradation of PG and soil chemistry were combined. The lysimeter experiment indicated that aerobic as well

  15. Transport and degradation of propylene glycol in the vadose zone: model development and sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, D.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Lissner, H.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Wehrer, M.; Totsche, K.U.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Transport and degradation of de-icing chemical (containing propylene glycol, PG) in the vadose zone were studied with a lysimeter experiment and a model, in which transient water flow, kinetic degradation of PG and soil chemistry were combined. The lysimeter experiment indicated that aerobic as well

  16. A Groundwater Model to Assess Water Resource Impacts at the Imperial East Solar Energy Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Greer, Chris [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); O' Connor, Ben L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tompson, Andrew F.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a groundwater flow model to examine the influence of potential groundwater withdrawal to support the utility-scale solar energy development at the Imperial East Solar Energy Zone (SEZ) as a part of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) solar energy program.

  17. A hybrid model of swash-zone longshore sediment transport on refelctive beaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, A.W.; Hughes, M.; Cowell, P.; Gordon, A.; Savioli, J.C.; Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrodynamics and sediment transport in the swash zone is currently outside the domain of coastal-area models, which is a significant limitation in obtaining littoral sediment-transport estimates, especially on steep reflective beaches where the waves practically break on the beachface. In this

  18. Using a cylindrical vortex model to assess the induction zone infront of aligned and yawed rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Meyer Forsting, Alexander Raul

    2015-01-01

    Analytical formulae for the velocity field induced by a cylindrical vortex wake model areapplied to assess the induction zone in front of aligned and yawed rotors. The results arecompared to actuator disk (AD) simulations for different operating conditions, includingfinite tip-speed ratios...

  19. A Groundwater Model to Assess Water Resource Impacts at the Brenda Solar Energy Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Carr, Adrianne E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Greer, Chris [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bowen, Esther E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a groundwater flow model to examine the influence of potential groundwater withdrawal to support utility-scale solar energy development at the Brenda Solar Energy Zone (SEZ), as a part of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) Solar Energy Program.

  20. Application of Holdridge life-zone model based on the terrain factor in Xinjiang Automous Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Yong-ming; OUYANG Zhi-yun; WANG Xiao-ke

    2005-01-01

    This study improved the application of the Holdridge life-zone model to simulate the distribution of desert vegetation in China which gives statistics to support eco-recovery and ecosystem reconstruction in desert area. This study classified the desert vegetation into four types: (1) LAD: little arbor desert; (2) SD: shrub desert; (3) HLHSD: half-shrub, little half-shrub desert; (4) LHSCD: little halfshrub cushion desert. Based on the classification of Xinjiang desert vegetation, the classical Holdridge life-zone model was used to simulate Xinjiang desert vegetation's distribution and compare the Kappa coefficient result of the model with table of accuracy represented by Kappa values. The Kappa value of the model was only 0.19, it means the simulation result was poor. To improve the life-zone model application to Xinjiang desert vegetation type, a set of plot standards for terrain factors was developed by using the plot standard as the reclassification criterion to climate sub-regime. Then the desert vegetation in Xinjiang was simulated. The average Kappa value of the second simulation to the respective climate regime was 0.45. The Kappa value of final modeling result was 0.64, which is the better value.The modification of the model made it in more application region. In the end, the model' s ecological relevance to the Xinjiang desert vegetation types was studied.

  1. Stellar Winds on the Main-Sequence I: Wind Model

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, C P; Lüftinger, T; Toth, G; Brott, I

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 and 1.1 solar masses at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run ...

  2. Modeling of the bottom water flow through the Romanche Fracture Zone with a primitive equation model - Part I: Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ferron, Bruno; Mercier, Herle; Treguier, Anne-marie

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) flow through the Romanche Fracture Zone (RFZ) in a primitive equation model with a high horizontal and vertical resolution. Two examples of Rows over simple bathymetries show that a reduced gravity model captures the essential dynamics of the primitive equation model. The reduced gravity model is then used as a tool to identify what are the bathymetric structures (sills, narrows) that mostly constrain the AABW flow thro...

  3. Modeling a bus through a sequence of traffic lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Penagos, Juan Felipe; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    We propose a model of a bus traveling through a sequence of traffic lights, which is required to stop between the traffic signals to pick up passengers. A two dimensional model, of velocity and traveled time at each traffic light, is constructed, which shows non-trivial and chaotic behaviors for realistic city traffic parameters. We restrict the parameter values where these non-trivial and chaotic behaviors occur, by following analytically and numerically the fixed points and period 2 orbits. We define conditions where chaos may arise by determining regions in parameter space where the maximum Lyapunov exponent is positive. Chaos seems to occur as long as the ratio of the braking and accelerating capacities are greater than about ∼3.

  4. Radiative heat transfer modelling in a PWR severe accident sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magali Zabiego; Florian Fichot [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - BP 3 - 13115 Saint-paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pablo Rubiolo [Westinghouse Science and Technology - 1344 Beulah Road - Pittsburgh - PA 15235 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The present study is devoted to the estimation of the radiative heat transfers during a severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor. In such a situation, the residual nuclear power released by the fuel rods can not be evacuated and heats up the core. As a result, the cylindrical rods and the structures initially composing the core undergo a degradation process: swelling, breaking or melting of the rods and structures and eventual collapse to form a heap of fragments called a debris bed. As the solid matrix loses its original shape, the core geometry continuously evolves from standing, regularly-spaced cylinders to a non-homogeneous system including deformed remaining rods and structures and debris particles. To predict this type of sequence, the ICARE/CATHARE software [1] is developed by IRSN. Since the temperatures can reach values greater than 3000 K, it was of major interest to provide the code with an accurate radiative transfer model usable whatever the geometry of the system. Considering the size of a reactor core compared to the mean penetration length of radiation, the core can be seen as an optically thick medium. This observation led us to use the diffusion approximation to treat the radiation propagation. In this approach, the radiative flux is calculated in a way similar to thermal conduction: q{sub r} = [K{sub e}].{nabla}T where [K{sub e}] is the equivalent conductivity tensor of the system accounting for thermal and radiative transfer. An homogenization technique is applied to estimate the equivalent conductivity. Given the temperature level, the radiative contribution to the equivalent conductivity tensor quickly becomes dominant. This model was described earlier in [2] in which it was shown that an equivalent conductivity can be continuously calculated in the system when the geometry evolves from standing regular cylinder rods to swollen or broken ones, surrounded or not by a film of liquid materials, to

  5. Modeling and Experimental Investigation of Pressure Field in the Grinding Zone with Nanoparticle Jet of MQL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid nano particles were added in minimum quantity lubrication (MQL fluid medium to make nanofluids, that is, after the mixing and atomization of nanoparticle, lubricants and high pressure gas, to inject solid nano particle in the grinding zone with the form of jet flow. The mathematical model of two-phase flow pressure field of grinding zone with nanoparticle jet flow of MQL was established, and the simulation study was conducted. The results show that pressures in the grinding zone increased with the acceleration of grinding wheel, sharply decreased with the increased minimum clearance, and increased with the acceleration of jet flow. At three spraying angles of nozzles, when the nozzle angle was 15°, the pressure of grinding zone along the speed of grinding wheel was larger than the rest two angles. On the experimental platform built by KP-36 precision grinder and nanoparticle jet flow feed way, CY3018 pressure sensor was used to test the regularities of pressure field variations. The impact of the speed of grinding wheel, the gap between workpiece and grinding wheel, jet flow velocity, and spraying angles of nozzles on the pressure field of grinding zone was explored. The experimental result was generally consistent with the theoretical simulation, which verified the accuracy of the theoretical analysis.

  6. Automated Translation and Thermal Zoning of Digital Building Models for Energy Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Nathaniel L. [Cornell University; McCrone, Colin J. [Cornell University; Walter, Bruce J. [Cornell University; Pratt, Kevin B. [Cornell University; Greenberg, Donald P. [Cornell University

    2013-08-26

    Building energy simulation is valuable during the early stages of design, when decisions can have the greatest impact on energy performance. However, preparing digital design models for building energy simulation typically requires tedious manual alteration. This paper describes a series of five automated steps to translate geometric data from an unzoned CAD model into a multi-zone building energy model. First, CAD input is interpreted as geometric surfaces with materials. Second, surface pairs defining walls of various thicknesses are identified. Third, normal directions of unpaired surfaces are determined. Fourth, space boundaries are defined. Fifth, optionally, settings from previous simulations are applied, and spaces are aggregated into a smaller number of thermal zones. Building energy models created quickly using this method can offer guidance throughout the design process.

  7. Analysis for Fracture Characteristics of Porous Materials by using Cohesive Zone Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Hyun; Ha, Sang Yul; Kim, Ki Tae [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    The effect of porosity on the crack propagation is studied by using the cohesive zone model. Standard mode I fracture test were done by using compact tension specimens with various porosities. Load-load line displacement curves and {delta}5-crack resistance curves for various porosities were obtained from experiments. The cohesive zone model proposed by Xu and Needleman was employed to describe the crack propagation in porous media, and the Gurson model is used for constitutive relation of porous materials. These models were implemented into user subroutines of a finite element program ABAQUS. The fracture mode changes from ductile fracture to brittle fracture as the porosity increases. Numerical calculations agree well with experimental results.

  8. A multi-layer zone model for predicting temperature distribution in a fire room

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaojun; YANG Lizhong; DENG Zhihua; FAN Weicheng

    2004-01-01

    A multi-layer zone fire growth model is developed to predict the vertical distributions of the temperature in a single room. The fire room volume is divided into a number of horizontal layers, in which the temperature and other physical properties are assumed to be uniform. The principal equations for each laminated horizontal layer are derived from the conservation equations of mass and energy. The implemented fire sub-models are introduced, including the combustion, fluid flow and heat transfer models. Combined with these sub-models, the zone equations for the gas temperature of each layer are solved by Runge-Kutta method for each time step. The results of the sample calculations compare well with the results of experiments conducted by Steckler et al.

  9. Development of agroclimatic zoning model to delimit the potential growing areas for macaw palm (Acrocomia aculeata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Silvia; Ulberich, Ana; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    The growing biodiesel production requires the use of new technologies and alternative feedstocks to maintain the growing demand of this biofuel. The macaw (Acrocomia aculeata) is a palm native to Argentina whose fruits present high oil content. Due to its tolerance to prolonged drought, it is a promising crop for biodiesel and biokerosene production. The aim of this work was to design an agroclimatic zoning model to define the potential growing areas from macaw in Argentina. To define the agroclimatic suitability to produce oil, it was necessary to identify the requirements, limits, and biometeorological tolerance for this palm. In order to define the agroclimatic fitness of this crop in Argentina, the meteorological data corresponding to the period 1981-2010 were employed. The agroclimatic indices were integrated in a Geographic Information System. The maps were superimposed and the overlapping regions delineated the agroclimatic zoning. The agroclimatic zonation classified zones with homogeneous characteristics responding to bioclimatic requirements of this species, resulting in optimal, very suitable, suitable, and nonsuitable areas for macaw cultivation. The authors designed an agroclimatic zoning model based on bibliography. This model can be used in any part of the world, employing the same agroclimatic indices presented in this work.

  10. Development of agroclimatic zoning model to delimit the potential growing areas for macaw palm ( Acrocomia aculeata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Silvia; Ulberich, Ana; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    The growing biodiesel production requires the use of new technologies and alternative feedstocks to maintain the growing demand of this biofuel. The macaw ( Acrocomia aculeata) is a palm native to Argentina whose fruits present high oil content. Due to its tolerance to prolonged drought, it is a promising crop for biodiesel and biokerosene production. The aim of this work was to design an agroclimatic zoning model to define the potential growing areas from macaw in Argentina. To define the agroclimatic suitability to produce oil, it was necessary to identify the requirements, limits, and biometeorological tolerance for this palm. In order to define the agroclimatic fitness of this crop in Argentina, the meteorological data corresponding to the period 1981-2010 were employed. The agroclimatic indices were integrated in a Geographic Information System. The maps were superimposed and the overlapping regions delineated the agroclimatic zoning. The agroclimatic zonation classified zones with homogeneous characteristics responding to bioclimatic requirements of this species, resulting in optimal, very suitable, suitable, and nonsuitable areas for macaw cultivation. The authors designed an agroclimatic zoning model based on bibliography. This model can be used in any part of the world, employing the same agroclimatic indices presented in this work.

  11. Modelling the Formation of Liver Zones within the Scope of Fractional Order Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdon Atangana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop and extend earlier results related to mathematical modelling of the liver formation zone by the adoption of noninteger order derivative. The hidden uncertainties in the model are captured and controlled thanks to the Caputo derivative. The stationary states are investigated and the time-dependent solution is approximated using two recent iteration methods. In particular, we discuss the convergence of these methods by constructing a suitable Hilbert space.

  12. Modelling the Formation of Liver Zones within the Scope of Fractional Order Derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atangana, Abdon; Oukouomi Noutchie, Suares Clovis

    2014-01-01

    We develop and extend earlier results related to mathematical modelling of the liver formation zone by the adoption of noninteger order derivative. The hidden uncertainties in the model are captured and controlled thanks to the Caputo derivative. The stationary states are investigated and the time-dependent solution is approximated using two recent iteration methods. In particular, we discuss the convergence of these methods by constructing a suitable Hilbert space. PMID:25276791

  13. On the Penetration of Meridional Circulation below the Solar Convection Zone II: Models with Convection Zone, the Taylor-Proudman constraint and Applications to Other Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Garaud, P

    2009-01-01

    The solar convection zone exhibits a strong level of differential rotation, whereby the rotation period of the polar regions is about 25-30% longer than the equatorial regions. The Coriolis force associated with these zonal flows perpetually "pumps" the convection zone fluid, and maintains a quasi-steady circulation, poleward near the surface. What is the influence of this meridional circulation on the underlying radiative zone, and in particular, does it provide a significant source of mixing between the two regions? In Paper I, we began to study this question by assuming a fixed meridional flow pattern in the convection zone and calculating its penetration depth into the radiative zone. We found that the amount of mixing caused depends very sensitively on the assumed flow structure near the radiative--convective interface. We continue this study here by including a simple model for the convection zone "pump", and calculating in a self-consistent manner the meridional flows generated in the whole Sun. We fin...

  14. Universal sequence replication, reversible polymerization and early functional biopolymers: a model for the initiation of prebiotic sequence evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Imari Walker

    Full Text Available Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for

  15. Universal Sequence Replication, Reversible Polymerization and Early Functional Biopolymers: A Model for the Initiation of Prebiotic Sequence Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sara Imari; Grover, Martha A.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2012-01-01

    Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles) that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for regularly varying monomer

  16. Vadose zone-attenuated artificial recharge for input to a ground water model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, William E; Wurstner, Signe K; Eslinger, Paul W

    2007-01-01

    Accurate representation of artificial recharge is requisite to calibration of a ground water model of an unconfined aquifer for a semiarid or arid site with a vadose zone that imparts significant attenuation of liquid transmission and substantial anthropogenic liquid discharges. Under such circumstances, artificial recharge occurs in response to liquid disposal to the vadose zone in areas that are small relative to the ground water model domain. Natural recharge, in contrast, is spatially variable and occurs over the entire upper boundary of a typical unconfined ground water model. An improved technique for partitioning artificial recharge from simulated total recharge for inclusion in a ground water model is presented. The improved technique is applied using data from the semiarid Hanford Site. From 1944 until the late 1980s, when Hanford's mission was the production of nuclear materials, the quantities of liquid discharged from production facilities to the ground vastly exceeded natural recharge. Nearly all hydraulic head data available for use in calibrating a ground water model at this site were collected during this period or later, when the aquifer was under the diminishing influence of the massive water disposals. The vadose zone is typically 80 to 90 m thick at the Central Plateau where most production facilities were located at this semiarid site, and its attenuation of liquid transmission to the aquifer can be significant. The new technique is shown to improve the representation of artificial recharge and thereby contribute to improvement in the calibration of a site-wide ground water model.

  17. CAPRG: sequence assembling pipeline for next generation sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Rawat

    Full Text Available Our goal is to introduce and describe the utility of a new pipeline "Contigs Assembly Pipeline using Reference Genome" (CAPRG, which has been developed to assemble "long sequence reads" for non-model organisms by leveraging a reference genome of a closely related phylogenetic relative. To facilitate this effort, we utilized two avian transcriptomic datasets generated using ROCHE/454 technology as test cases for CAPRG assembly. We compared the results of CAPRG assembly using a reference genome with the results of existing methods that utilize de novo strategies such as VELVET, PAVE, and MIRA by employing parameter space comparisons (intra-assembling comparison. CAPRG performed as well or better than the existing assembly methods based on various benchmarks for "gene-hunting." Further, CAPRG completed the assemblies in a fraction of the time required by the existing assembly algorithms. Additional advantages of CAPRG included reduced contig inflation resulting in lower computational resources for annotation, and functional identification for contigs that may be categorized as "unknowns" by de novo methods. In addition to providing evaluation of CAPRG performance, we observed that the different assembly (inter-assembly results could be integrated to enhance the putative gene coverage for any transcriptomics study.

  18. CAPRG: sequence assembling pipeline for next generation sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Arun; Elasri, Mohamed O; Gust, Kurt A; George, Glover; Pham, Don; Scanlan, Leona D; Vulpe, Chris; Perkins, Edward J

    2012-01-01

    Our goal is to introduce and describe the utility of a new pipeline "Contigs Assembly Pipeline using Reference Genome" (CAPRG), which has been developed to assemble "long sequence reads" for non-model organisms by leveraging a reference genome of a closely related phylogenetic relative. To facilitate this effort, we utilized two avian transcriptomic datasets generated using ROCHE/454 technology as test cases for CAPRG assembly. We compared the results of CAPRG assembly using a reference genome with the results of existing methods that utilize de novo strategies such as VELVET, PAVE, and MIRA by employing parameter space comparisons (intra-assembling comparison). CAPRG performed as well or better than the existing assembly methods based on various benchmarks for "gene-hunting." Further, CAPRG completed the assemblies in a fraction of the time required by the existing assembly algorithms. Additional advantages of CAPRG included reduced contig inflation resulting in lower computational resources for annotation, and functional identification for contigs that may be categorized as "unknowns" by de novo methods. In addition to providing evaluation of CAPRG performance, we observed that the different assembly (inter-assembly) results could be integrated to enhance the putative gene coverage for any transcriptomics study.

  19. Subduction zone decoupling/retreat modeling explains south Tibet (Xigaze) and other supra-subduction zone ophiolites and their UHP mineral phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jared P.; Beaumont, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The plate tectonic setting in which proto-ophiolite 'oceanic' lithosphere is created remains controversial with a number of environments suggested. Recent opinions tend to coalesce around supra-subduction zone (SSZ) forearc extension, with a popular conceptual model in which the proto-ophiolite forms during foundering of oceanic lithosphere at the time of spontaneous or induced onset of subduction. This mechanism is favored in intra-oceanic settings where the subducting lithosphere is old and the upper plate is young and thin. We investigate an alternative mechanism; namely, decoupling of the subducting oceanic lithosphere in the forearc of an active continental margin, followed by subduction zone (trench) retreat and creation of a forearc oceanic rift basin, containing proto-ophiolite lithosphere, between the continental margin and the retreating subduction zone. A template of 2D numerical model experiments examines the trade-off between strength of viscous coupling in the lithospheric subduction channel and net slab pull of the subducting lithosphere. Three tectonic styles are observed: 1) C, continuous subduction without forearc decoupling; 2) R, forearc decoupling followed by rapid subduction zone retreat; 3) B, breakoff of subducting lithosphere followed by re-initiation of subduction and in some cases, forearc decoupling (B-R). In one case (BA-B-R; where BA denotes backarc) subduction zone retreat follows backarc rifting. Subduction zone decoupling is analyzed using frictional-plastic yield theory and the Stefan solution for the separation of plates containing a viscous fluid. The numerical model results are used to explain the formation of Xigaze group ophiolites, southern Tibet, which formed in the Lhasa terrane forearc, likely following earlier subduction and not necessarily during subduction initiation. Either there was normal coupled subduction before subduction zone decoupling, or precursor slab breakoff, subduction re-initiation and then decoupling

  20. Numerical simulation of fatigue crack growth rate and crack retardation due to an overload using a cohesive zone model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silitonga, S.; Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Snijder, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a numerical method is pursued based on a cohesive zone model (CZM). The method is aimed at simulating fatigue crack growth as well as crack growth retardation due to an overload. In this cohesive zone model, the degradation of the material strength is represented by a variation of the

  1. Collagen model peptides: Sequence dependence of triple-helix stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persikov, A V; Ramshaw, J A; Brodsky, B

    2000-01-01

    The triple helix is a specialized protein motif, found in all collagens as well as in noncollagenous proteins involved in host defense. Peptides will adopt a triple-helical conformation if the sequence contains its characteristic features of Gly as every third residue and a high content of Pro and Hyp residues. Such model peptides have proved amenable to structural studies by x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, suitable for thermodynamic and kinetic analysis, and a valuable tool in characterizing the binding activities of the collagen triple helix. A systematic approach to understanding the amino acid sequence dependence of the collagen triple helix has been initiated, based on a set of host-guest peptides of the form, (Gly-Pro-Hyp)(3)-Gly-X-Y-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(4). Comparison of their thermal stabilities has led to a propensity scale for the X and Y positions, and the additivity of contributions of individual residues is now under investigation. The local and global stability of the collagen triple helix is normally modulated by the residues in the X and Y positions, with every third position occupied by Gly in fibril-forming collagens. However, in collagen diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta, a single Gly may be substituted by another residue. Host-guest studies where the Gly is replaced by various amino acids suggest that the identity of the residue in the Gly position affects the degree of destabilization and the clinical severity of the disease.

  2. Three-Dimensional Thermal Model of the Costa Rica-Nicaragua Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Juan Carlos; Currie, Claire A.; He, Jiangheng

    2016-10-01

    The thermal structure of a subduction zone controls many key processes, including subducting plate metamorphism and dehydration, the megathrust earthquake seismogenic zone and volcanic arc magmatism. Here, we present the first three-dimensional (3D), steady-state kinematic-dynamic thermal model for the Costa Rica-Nicaragua subduction zone. The model consists of the subducting Cocos plate, the overriding Caribbean Plate, and a viscous mantle wedge in which flow is driven by interactions with the downgoing slab. The Cocos plate geometry includes along-strike variations in slab dip, which induce along-strike flow in the mantle wedge. Along-strike flow occurs primarily below Costa Rica, with a maximum magnitude of 4 cm/year (~40 % of the convergence rate) for a mantle with a dislocation creep rheology; an isoviscous mantle has lower velocities. Along-margin flow causes temperatures variations of up to 80 °C in the subducting slab and mantle wedge at the volcanic arc and backarc. The 3D effects do not strongly alter the shallow (<35 km) thermal structure of the subduction zone. The models predict that the megathrust seismogenic zone width decreases from ~100 km below Costa Rica to just a few kilometers below Nicaragua; the narrow width in the north is due to hydrothermal cooling of the oceanic plate. These results are in good agreement with previous 2D models and with the rupture area of recent earthquakes. In the models, along-strike mantle flow is induced only by variations in slab dip, with flow directed toward the south where the dip angle is smallest. In contrast, geochemical and seismic observations suggest a northward flow of 6-19 cm/year. We do not observe this in our models, suggesting that northward flow may be driven by additional factors, such as slab rollback or proximity to a slab edge (slab window). Such high velocities may significantly affect the thermal structure, especially at the southern end of the subduction zone. In this area, 3D models that

  3. Model Simulation of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Birgit; Segschneider, Joachim; Xu, Xu; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2016-04-01

    The intensification/expansion of the tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), as observed during the last decades, is usually assigned to anthropogenic climate change. However, natural variability may also affect OMZ variations. To assess the amplitude of natural (millennial-scale) variability in the oxygen minimum zone in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP), a global coupled climate-ocean biogeochemical model has been applied to the mid-Holocene (approx. 6 kyrs BP). We find that during the mid-Holocene, the ETSP OMZ may have been better ventilated than today, which is entirely due to ocean circulation effects in the model. The enhanced ventilation is overriding the effect of increased biological production which in large parts of the equatorial Pacific, is driving oxygen towards lower values. The model result is in qualitative agreement with proxy data.

  4. Modelling the CO2 atmosphere-ocean flux in the upwelling zones using radiative transfer tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapivin, Vladimir F.; Varotsos, Costas A.

    2016-12-01

    An advanced mathematical model of the radiation forcing on the ocean surface is proposed for the assessment of the CO2 fluxes between atmosphere and ocean boundary in the upwelling zones. Two types of the upwelling are considered: coastal and local in the open ocean that are closely associated with changes in solar irradiance. The proposed model takes into account the maximal number of the carbon fluxes in the upwelling ecosystem considering that in the latter the only original source of energy and matter for all forms of life is the energy of the solar radiation. The vertical structure of the upwelling zone is represented by four levels: the upper mixed layer above the thermocline, the intermediate photic layer below the thermocline, the deep ocean and the near-bottom layer. Peruvian upwelling and typical local upwelling of tropical pelagic region are considered as examples for the model calculations.

  5. Coupling on the northern Cascadia subduction zone from geodetic measurements and physics-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhat, Lucile; Segall, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Kinematic inversions of GPS and tide gauge/leveling data display an unresolved "gap" between the downdip limit of the locked megathrust and the top of the episodic tremor and slip (ETS) zone in northern Cascadia. This work combines physics-based models of slow-slip events with both mean ETS displacements and decadal-averaged deformation rates to explain the gap and determine how interseismic stress accumulates on the megathrust. While physics-based predictions match the average ETS displacements, they significantly misfit long-term rates, implying faster slip rates within both the gap and the ETS region. Heterogeneous Green's functions or velocity-strengthening friction within the gap cannot explain the decadal rates. The observed uplift rates require steeper gradients in slip rate at the base of the locked zone. We invert for the smallest possible shear stress rate on the creeping megathrust below a locked zone that satisfactorily fits the data. A nonzero shear stress rate within the ETS zone, reaching -2.5 kPa/yr at a depth of 25-30 km, is required. Finally, of all the models that adequately fit both horizontal and vertical data, only those with deep locking depths, around 21 km, significantly improve the fit to the uplift rates.

  6. Hydrodynamic modelling in the Polish Zone of the Baltic Sea - an overview of Polish achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jasińska

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a general overview of Polish experience and achievements with regard to hydrodynamic modelling in the Polish zone of the Baltic Sea. The first work started already at the end of the sixties when the first 1D and 2D hydrodynamic models were set up. With the development of numerical methods and increasing computational power a number of 1D, 2D and 3D models were set up and tested. Global, regional and local models cover the most important water bodies,i.e. the Pomeranian Bay - Szczecin Lagoon and Gulf of Gdansk - Vistula Lagoon systems.

  7. BUILDING CONCEPTUAL AND MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR WATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT KOSNICA SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanko Ružičić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual model of flow and solute transport in unsaturated zone at Kosnica site, which is the basis for modeling pollution migration through the unsaturated zone to groundwater, is set up. The main characteristics of the unsaturated zone of the Kosnica site are described. Detailed description of investigated profile of unsaturated zone, with all necessary analytical results performed and used in building of conceptual models, is presented. Experiments that are in progress and processes which are modeled are stated. Monitoring of parameters necessary for calibration of models is presented. The ultimate goal of research is risk assessment of groundwater contamination at Kosnica site that has its source in or on unsaturated zone.

  8. A saturated zone site-scale flow model for Yucca mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddebbarh, Al Aziz [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    A saturated zone site-scale flow model (YMSZFM) was developed for licensing requirements for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository to incorporate recent data and analyses including recent stratigraphic and water-level data from Nye County wells, single-and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and recent hydrochemistry data. Analyses include use of data from the 2004 transient Death Valley Regional (ground-water) Flow System (DVRFS) model, the 2003 unsaturated zone flow model, and the latest hydrogeologic framework model (HFM). This model includes: (1) the latest understanding of SZ flow, (2) enhanced model validation and uncertainty analyses, (3) improved locations and definitions of fault zones, (4) refined grid resolution (500-to 250-m grid spacing), and (5) use of new data. The flow model was completed using the three-dimensional, Finite-Element Heat and Mass Transfer computer code (FEHM). The SZ site-scale flow model was calibrated with the commercial parameter estimation code, PEST to achieve a minimum difference between observed water levels and predicted water levels, and also between volumetric/mass flow rates along specific boundary segments as supplied by the DVRFS. A total of 161 water level and head measurements with varied weights were used for calibration. A comparison between measured water-level data and the potentiometric surface yielded an RMSE of 20.7 m (weighted RMSE of 8.8 m). The calibrated model was used to generate flow paths and specific discharge predictions. Model confidence was built by comparing: (l) calculated to observed hydraulic heads, and (2) calibrated to measured permeabilities (and therefore specific discharge). In addition, flowpaths emanating from below the repository footprint are consistent with those inferred both from gradients of measured head and from independent water-chemistry data. Uncertainties in the SZ site-scale flow model were quantified because all uncertainty contributes to inaccuracy in system

  9. Comparing the Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII) with root zone storage in a lumped conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwongsitanon, Nutchanart; Gao, Hongkai; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Maekan, Ekkarin; Saengsawang, Sirikanya; Thianpopirug, Sansarith

    2016-08-01

    With remote sensing we can readily observe the Earth's surface, but direct observation of the sub-surface remains a challenge. In hydrology, but also in related disciplines such as agricultural and atmospheric sciences, knowledge of the dynamics of soil moisture in the root zone of vegetation is essential, as this part of the vadose zone is the core component controlling the partitioning of water into evaporative fluxes, drainage, recharge, and runoff. In this paper, we compared the catchment-scale soil moisture content in the root zone of vegetation, computed by a lumped conceptual model, with the remotely sensed Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII) in the Upper Ping River basin (UPRB) in northern Thailand. The NDII is widely used to monitor the equivalent water thickness (EWT) of leaves and canopy. Satellite data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were used to determine the NDII over an 8-day period, covering the study area from 2001 to 2013. The results show that NDII values decrease sharply at the end of the wet season in October and reach lowest values near the end of the dry season in March. The values then increase abruptly after rains have started, but vary in an insignificant manner from the middle to the late rainy season. This paper investigates if the NDII can be used as a proxy for moisture deficit and hence for the amount of moisture stored in the root zone of vegetation, which is a crucial component of hydrological models. During periods of moisture stress, the 8-day average NDII values were found to correlate well with the 8-day average soil moisture content (Su) simulated by the lumped conceptual hydrological rainfall-runoff model FLEX for eight sub-catchments in the Upper Ping basin. Even the deseasonalized Su and NDII (after subtracting the dominant seasonal signal) showed good correlation during periods of moisture stress. The results illustrate the potential of the NDII as a proxy for catchment-scale root zone

  10. Sequence Determination from Overlapping Fragments: A Simple Model of Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Fink, Thomas M.

    2002-02-01

    Assembling fragments randomly sampled from along a sequence is the basis of whole-genome shotgun sequencing, a technique used to map the DNA of the human and other genomes. We calculate the probability that a random sequence can be recovered from a collection of overlapping fragments. We provide an exact solution for an infinite alphabet and in the case of constant overlaps. For the general problem we apply two assembly strategies and give the probability that the assembly puzzle can be solved in the limit of infinitely many fragments.

  11. Slab2 - Providing updated subduction zone geometries and modeling tools to the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G. P.; Hearne, M. G.; Portner, D. E.; Borjas, C.; Moore, G.; Flamme, H.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0) combines a variety of geophysical data sets (earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active source seismic survey images of the shallow subduction zone, bathymetry, trench locations, and sediment thickness information) to image the shape of subducting slabs in three dimensions, at approximately 85% of the world's convergent margins. The database is used extensively for a variety of purposes, from earthquake source imaging, to magnetotelluric modeling. Gaps in Slab1.0 exist where input data are sparse and/or where slabs are geometrically complex (and difficult to image with an automated approach). Slab1.0 also does not include information on the uncertainty in the modeled geometrical parameters, or the input data used to image them, and provides no means to reproduce the models it described. Currently underway, Slab2 will update and replace Slab1.0 by: (1) extending modeled slab geometries to all global subduction zones; (2) incorporating regional data sets that may describe slab geometry in finer detail than do previously used teleseismic data; (3) providing information on the uncertainties in each modeled slab surface; (4) modifying our modeling approach to a fully-three dimensional data interpolation, rather than following the 2-D to 3-D steps of Slab1.0; (5) migrating the slab modeling code base to a more universally distributable language, Python; and (6) providing the code base and input data we use to create our models, such that the community can both reproduce the slab geometries, and add their own data sets to ours to further improve upon those models in the future. In this presentation we describe our vision for Slab2, and the first results of this modeling process.

  12. Insights into the damage zones in fault-bend folds from geomechanical models and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Wei; Hou, Guiting; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the rock mass deformation and stress states, the fracture development and distribution are critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and development, and geothermal reservoir characterization and management. Geomechanical modeling can be used to simulate the forming processes of faults and folds, and predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables the development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., the bed thickness, bedding planes and competence contrasts), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the geometry of the fold structures, and allow tracking strain and stress through the whole deformation process. In this present study, we combine field observations and finite element models to calibrate the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds, and discuss the mechanical controls (e.g., the slip displacement, ramp cutoff angle, frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults) that are able to influence the development and distribution of fractures during fault-bend folding. A linear relationship between the slip displacement and the fracture damage zone, the ramp cutoff angle and the fracture damage zone, and the frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults and the fracture damage zone was established respectively based on the geomechanical modeling results. These mechanical controls mentioned above altogether contribute to influence and control the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds.

  13. FLUID-SOLID COUPLING MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN UNSATURATED ZONE AND ITS ASYMPTOTICAL SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛强; 梁冰; 刘晓丽; 李宏艳

    2003-01-01

    The process of contaminant transport is a problem of multicomponent and multiphase flow in unsaturated zone. Under the presupposition that gas existence affects water transport , a coupled mathematical model of contaminant transport in unsaturated zone has been established based on fluid-solid interaction mechanics theory. The asymptotical solutions to the nonlinear coupling mathematical model were accomplished by the perturbation and integral transformation method. The distribution law of pore pressure,pore water velocity and contaminant concentration in unsaturated zone has been presented under the conditions of with coupling and without coupling gas phase. An example problem was used to provide a quantitative verification and validation of the model. The asymptotical solution was compared with Faust model solution. The comparison results show reasonable agreement between asymptotical solution and Faust solution, and the gas effect and media deformation has a large impact on the contaminant transport. The theoretical basis is provided for forecasting contaminant transport and the determination of the relationship among pressure-saturation-permeability in laboratory.

  14. Initial Steps Toward a Hydrologic "Watershed" Model for the Ablation Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M. G.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Pitcher, L. H.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Ryan, J.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Surface meltwater production on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is a well-documented phenomenon but we lack understanding of the physical mechanisms that control the production, transport, and fate of the meltwater. To address this, we present initial steps toward the development of a novel hydrologic model for supraglacial streamflow on the GrIS. Ice ablation and surface meteorology were measured during a 6-day field campaign in a 112 km2 ablation zone of southwest Greenland. We modeled ablation using SnowModel, an energy balance snow- and ice-ablation model. The required model inputs included standard surface meteorology and a digital elevation model (DEM), and the model outputs include all components of the energy balance and surface meltwater production for each grid cell in the ice-sheet watershed. Our next steps toward developing a complete hydrologic model for supraglacial streamflow in the ablation zone of the GrIS include the application of the meltwater-routing model HydroFlow to compare with in-situ measurements of supraglacial river discharge.

  15. Variation of b and p values from aftershocks sequences along the Mexican subduction zone and their relation to plate characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Barrientos, L.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Q.; Guzmán-Speziale, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aftershock sequences along the Mexican subduction margin (between coordinates 110ºW and 91ºW) were analyzed by means of the p value from the Omori-Utsu relation and the b value from the Gutenberg-Richter relation. We focused on recent medium to large (Mw > 5.6) events considered susceptible of generating aftershock sequences suitable for analysis. The main goal was to try to find a possible correlation between aftershock parameters and plate characteristics, such as displacement rate, age and segmentation. The subduction regime of Mexico is one of the most active regions of the world with a high frequency of occurrence of medium to large events and plate characteristics change along the subduction margin. Previous studies have observed differences in seismic source characteristics at the subduction regime, which may indicate a difference in rheology and possible segmentation. The results of the analysis of the aftershock sequences indicate a slight tendency for p values to decrease from west to east with increasing of plate age although a statistical significance is undermined by the small number of aftershocks in the sequences, a particular feature distinctive of the region as compared to other world subduction regimes. The b values show an opposite, increasing trend towards the east even though the statistical significance is not enough to warrant the validation of such a trend. A linear regression between both parameters provides additional support for the inverse relation. Moreover, we calculated the seismic coupling coefficient, showing a direct relation with the p and b values. While we cannot undoubtedly confirm the hypothesis that aftershock generation depends on certain tectonic characteristics (age, thickness, temperature), our results do not reject it thus encouraging further study into this question.

  16. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part I: Forward models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of coastal processes, including waves, currents, and sediment transport, can be obtained from a variety of detailed geophysical-process models with many simulations showing significant skill. This capability supports a wide range of research and applied efforts that can benefit from accurate numerical predictions. However, the predictions are only as accurate as the data used to drive the models and, given the large temporal and spatial variability of the surf zone, inaccuracies in data are unavoidable such that useful predictions require corresponding estimates of uncertainty. We demonstrate how a Bayesian-network model can be used to provide accurate predictions of wave-height evolution in the surf zone given very sparse and/or inaccurate boundary-condition data. The approach is based on a formal treatment of a data-assimilation problem that takes advantage of significant reduction of the dimensionality of the model system. We demonstrate that predictions of a detailed geophysical model of the wave evolution are reproduced accurately using a Bayesian approach. In this surf-zone application, forward prediction skill was 83%, and uncertainties in the model inputs were accurately transferred to uncertainty in output variables. We also demonstrate that if modeling uncertainties were not conveyed to the Bayesian network (i.e., perfect data or model were assumed), then overly optimistic prediction uncertainties were computed. More consistent predictions and uncertainties were obtained by including model-parameter errors as a source of input uncertainty. Improved predictions (skill of 90%) were achieved because the Bayesian network simultaneously estimated optimal parameters while predicting wave heights.

  17. Effect of upstream fencing on shelter zone behind solid models simulating sand formations and dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Moreover, results indicate that some dune/fence combinations may cause shifting of the dune upwind (instead of downwind in the absence of fence. This effect means that, with such combinations, a dune would eventually disappear. The distance between the model downwind base line and the location of reattachment (length of shelter zone was plotted against the distance of fence from upwind base line of model to determine the best possible dune/fence combination. Solid fencing (constructed from masonry bricks or stones to shelter isolated sand humps and dunes is effective in alleviating dangers on nearby structures (dune shifting upwind and to less sand drift and saltation downwind. Also, the results indicated that, it is recommended to start by dune fencing and give enough time for the project zone to widen and be effectively protected before starting the construction.

  18. Optimal harvesting policy of predator-prey model with free fishing and reserve zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toaha, Syamsuddin; Rustam

    2017-03-01

    The present paper deals with an optimal harvesting of predator-prey model in an ecosystem that consists of two zones, namely the free fishing and prohibited zones. The dynamics of prey population in the ecosystem can migrate from the free fishing to the prohibited zone and vice versa. The predator and prey populations in the free fishing zone are then harvested with constant efforts. The existence of the interior equilibrium point is analyzed and its stability is determined using Routh-Hurwitz stability test. The stable interior equilibrium point is then related to the problem of maximum profit and the problem of present value of net revenue. We follow the Pontryagin's maximal principle to get the optimal harvesting policy of the present value of the net revenue. From the analysis, we found a critical point of the efforts that makes maximum profit. There also exists certain conditions of the efforts that makes the present value of net revenue becomes maximal. In addition, the interior equilibrium point is locally asymptotically stable which means that the optimal harvesting is reached and the unharvested prey, harvested prey, and harvested predator populations remain sustainable. Numerical examples are given to verify the analytical results.

  19. CronoClock: A Multiagent Mobile Model to Assist Drivers in Park Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María NAVARRO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a model based on multiagent environment to help users of park zones. A multiagent system is built to communicate the different roles and devices belonging to the system. The result is a model that assists the different users in their payments and identifies the vehicle plate by image recognition and NFC (Near Field Communication technology. An evaluation of the system is provided to know the efficiency of the model.

  20. Modelling flow through unsaturated zones: Sensitivity to unsaturated soil properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Hari Prasad; M S Mohan Kumar; M Sekhar

    2001-12-01

    A numerical model to simulate moisture flow through unsaturated zones is developed using the finite element method, and is validated by comparing the model results with those available in the literature. The sensitivities of different processes such as gravity drainage and infiltration to the variations in the unsaturated soil properties are studied by varying the unsaturated parameters and over a wide range. The model is also applied to predict moisture contents during a field internal drainage test.

  1. IMPROVED COHESIVE ZONE MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION IN INTERFACE CONTACT ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Wang; J.Chen; H.B.Li

    2008-01-01

    An improved interface cohesive zone model is developed for the simulation of inter-face contact,under mixed-mode loading.A new debonding initiation criterion and propagation of debonding law,taking into account the pressure stress influence on contact shear strength,is proposed.The model is implemented in a finite-element program using subroutine VUINTER of ABA QUS Explicit.An edge-notch four-point bending process and laminated vibration damping steel sheet punch forming test are simulated with the improved model in ABAQUS Explicit.The numerical predictions agree satisfactorily with the corresponding experimental results.

  2. MODELLING AND SIMULATION OF A SINGLE-ZONE HEATING AND VENTILATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut ŞENGİRGİN

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, modelling and simulation results of a single-zone heating and ventilation system of a large office room are introduced. Heating system is controlled by an on-off controller. By considering the sinusoidal outdoor air tempareture variation and various outdoor/return air ratios as input parameters, dynamic behaviour of room air tempereture are investigated. For this purpose, MATLAB/Simulink code is used.

  3. Wave Climate and Wave Mixing in the Marginal Ice Zones of Arctic Seas, Observations and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    PROJECTS Section). With the group of Rogers, observation/modeling study of an energetic wave event in the Arctic marginal zone was conducted ...floe. (right) Surface elevation in the lee of a 5 mm thick polypropylene floe (thick black curves) and incident wave (grey), normalised with respect...Toffoli, A., Marusic, I., Klewicki, J., Hutchins, N., Suslov, S., Walker, D., Chung, D., “A Thermally Stratified Sea-Ice-Wave Interaction Facility”, ARC

  4. Modeling water infiltration and pesticides transport in unsaturated zone of a sedimentary aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, Pauline; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Baran, Nicole; Lassabatère, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality monitoring has become an important environmental, economic and community issue since increasing needs drinking water at the same time with high anthropic pressure on aquifers. Leaching of various contaminants as pesticide into the groundwater is closely bound to water infiltration in the unsaturated zone which whom solute transport can occur. Knowledge's about mechanisms involved in the transfer of pesticides in the deep unsaturated zone are lacking today. This study aims to evaluate and to model leaching of pesticides and metabolites in the unsaturated zone, very heterogeneous, of a fluvio-glacial aquifer, in the South-East of France, where contamination of groundwater resources by pesticides is frequently observed as a consequence of intensive agricultural activities. Water flow and pesticide transport were evaluated from column tests under unsaturated conditions and from adsorption batch experiments onto the predominant lithofacies collected, composed of a mixture of sand and gravel. A maize herbicide, S-metolachlor, applied on the study site and worldwide and its two major degradation products (metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid and metolachlor oxanilic acid) were studied here. A conservative tracer, bromide ion, was used to determine water dispersive parameters of porous media. Elution curves were obtained from pesticide concentrations analyzed by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography system interfaced to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and from bromide concentrations measured by ionic chromatography system. Experimental data were implemented into Hydrus to model flow and solute transfer through a 1D profile in the vadose zone. Nonequilibrium solute transport model based on dual-porosity model with mobile and immobile water is fitting correctly elution curves. Water dispersive parameters show flow pattern realized in the mobile phase. Exchanges between mobile and immobile water are very limited. Because of low adsorptions onto

  5. Longitudinal dispersion in natural channels: 3. An aggregated dead zone model applied to the River Severn, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P. M.; Atkinson, T. C.

    An Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) model is presented for longitudinal dispersion of tracer in river channels, in which the channel cross-section is divided into two parallel regions: the bulk flow and dead zone storage. Tracer particles in the bulk flow are assumed to obey plug-flow advection at the discharge velocity U without any mixing effects. The dispersive properties of the model are completely embodied in the residence time for tracer storage in the dead zone. The model provides an excellent description and prediction of empirical concentration-time distributions, for times t ADZ model is a potentially useful tool for practical prediction of dispersion in natural channels.

  6. Cohesive Zone Model Based Numerical Analysis of Steel-Concrete Composite Structure Push-Out Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Push-out tests were widely used to determine the shear bearing capacity and shear stiffness of shear connectors in steel-concrete composite structures. The finite element method was one efficient alternative to push-out testing. This paper focused on a simulation analysis of the interface between concrete slabs and steel girder flanges as well as the interface of the shear connectors and the surrounding concrete. A cohesive zone model was used to simulate the tangential sliding and normal separation of the interfaces. Then, a zero-thickness cohesive element was implemented via the user-defined element subroutine UEL in the software ABAQUS, and a multiple broken line mode was used to define the constitutive relations of the cohesive zone. A three-dimensional numerical analysis model was established for push-out testing to analyze the load-displacement curves of the push-out test process, interface relative displacement, and interface stress distribution. This method was found to accurately calculate the shear capacity and shear stiffness of shear connectors. The numerical results showed that the multiple broken lines mode cohesive zone model could describe the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the interface between steel and concrete and that a discontinuous deformation numerical simulation could be implemented.

  7. Complete coding sequence, sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase (TbOST II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baticados, Waren N; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Baticados, Abigail M

    2011-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence of putative Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense oligosaccharyl transferase gene was previously reported. Here, we describe the determination of its full-length nucleotide sequence by Inverse PCR (IPCR), subsequent biological sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling. The full-length DNA sequence has an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2406 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 801 amino acid residues. Protein and DNA sequence analyses revealed that homologues within the genome of other kinetoplastid and various origins exist. Protein topology analysis predicted that Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase clone II (TbOST II) is a transmembrane protein with transmembrane helices in probably an N(cytosol)-C(cytosol) orientation. Data from the GenBank database assembly and sequence analyses in general clearly state that TbOST II is the STT3 subunit of OST in T.b. rhodesiense that necessitates further characterisation and functional studies with RNAi. TbOST II sequence had been deposited in the GenBank (accession number GU245937).

  8. Full waveform modelling using the VERCE platform - application to aftershock seismicity in the Chile subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Thomas; Rietbrock, Andreas; Hicks, Steve; Fuenzalida Velasco, Amaya; Casarotti, Emanuele; Spinuso, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    The VERCE platform is an online portal that allows full waveform simulations to be run for any region where a suitable velocity model exists. We use this facility to simulate the waveforms from aftershock earthquakes from the 2014 Pisagua earthquake, and 2010 Maule earthquake that occurred at the subduction zone mega thrust in Northern and Central Chile respectively. Simulations are performed using focal mechanisms from both global earthquake catalogues, and regional earthquake catalogues. The VERCE platform supports specFEM Cartesian, and simulations are run using meshes produced by CUBIT. The full waveform modelling techniques supported on the VERCE platform are used to test the validity of a number of subduction zone velocity models from the Chilean subduction zone. For the Maule earthquake we use a 2D and 3D travel time tomography model of the rupture area (Hicks et al. 2011; 2014). For the Pisagua earthquake we test a 2D/3D composite velocity model based on tomographic studies of the region (e.g. Husen et al. 2000, Contreyes-Reyes et al. 2012) and slab1.0 (Hayes et al. 2012). Focal mechanisms from the cGMT catalogue and local focal mechanisms calculated using ISOLA (e.g. Agurto et al. 2012) are used in the simulations. The waveforms produced are directly compared to waveforms recorded on the temporary deployment for the Maule earthquake aftershocks, and waveforms recorded on the IPOC network for the Pisagua earthquake aftershocks. This work demonstrates how the VERCE platform allows waveforms from the full 3D simulations to be easily produced, allowing us to quantify the validity of both the velocity model and the source mechanisms. These simulations therefore provide an independent test of the velocity models produced synthetically and by travel time tomography studies. Initial results show that the waveform is reasonably well reproduced in the 0.05 - 0.25 frequency band using a refined 3D travel time tomography, and locally calculated focal mechanisms.

  9. The 2016 central Italy earthquake sequence: surface effects, fault model and triggering scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzipetros, Alexandros; Pavlides, Spyros; Papathanassiou, George; Sboras, Sotiris; Valkaniotis, Sotiris; Georgiadis, George

    2017-04-01

    The results of fieldwork performed during the 2016 earthquake sequence around the karstic basins of Norcia and La Piana di Castelluccio, at an altitude of 1400 m, on the Monte Vettore (altitude 2476 m) and Vettoretto, as well as the three mapped seismogenic faults, striking NNW-SSW, are presented in this paper. Surface co-seismic ruptures were observed in the Vettore and Vettoretto segment of the fault for several kilometres ( 7 km) in the August earthquakes at high altitudes, and were re-activated and expanded northwards during the October earthquakes. Coseismic ruptures and the neotectonic Mt. Vettore fault zone were modelled in detail using images acquired from specifically planned UAV (drone) flights. Ruptures, typically with displacement of up to 20 cm, were observed after the August event both in the scree and weathered mantle (elluvium), as well as the bedrock, consisting mainly of fragmented carbonate rocks with small tectonic surfaces. These fractures expanded and new ones formed during the October events, typically of displacements of up to 50 cm, although locally higher displacements of up to almost 2 m were observed. Hundreds of rock falls and landslides were mapped through satellite imagery, using pre- and post- earthquake Sentinel 2A images. Several of them were also verified in the field. Based on field mapping results and seismological information, the causative faults were modelled. The model consists of five seismogenic sources, each one associated with a strong event in the sequence. The visualisation of the seismogenic sources follows INGV's DISS standards for the Individual Seismogenic Sources (ISS) layer, while strike, dip and rake of the seismic sources are obtained from selected focal mechanisms. Based on this model, the ground deformation pattern was inferred, using Okada's dislocation solution formulae, which shows that the maximum calculated vertical displacement is 0.53 m. This is in good agreement with the statistical analysis of the

  10. Galactic habitable zone around M and FGK stars with chemical evolution models that include dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitoni, E.; Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The Galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with a metallicity that is high enough to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life. Life in this zone needs to survive the destructive effects of nearby supernova explosion events. Aims: Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful tools for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. Our aim here is to find the Galactic habitable zone using chemical evolution models for the Milky Way disk, adopting the most recent prescriptions for the evolution of dust and for the probability of finding planetary systems around M and FGK stars. Moreover, for the first time, we express these probabilities in terms of the dust-to-gas ratio of the interstellar medium in the solar neighborhood as computed by detailed chemical evolution models. Methods: At a fixed Galactic time and Galactocentric distance, we determined the number of M and FGK stars that host earths (but no gas giant planets) that survived supernova explosions, using the formalism of our Paper I. Results: The probabilities of finding terrestrial planets but not gas giant planets around M stars deviate substantially from the probabilities around FGK stars for supersolar values of [Fe/H]. For both FGK and M stars, the maximum number of stars hosting habitable planets is at 8 kpc from the Galactic Center when destructive effects by supernova explosions are taken into account. Currently, M stars with habitable planets are ≃10 times more frequent than FGK stars. Moreover, we provide a sixth-order polynomial fit (and a linear fit, but that is more approximated) for the relation found with chemical evolution models in the solar neighborhood between the [Fe/H] abundances and the dust-to-gas ratio. Conclusions: The most likely Galactic zone in which to find terrestrial habitable planets around M and FGK stars is the annular 2 kpc wide region that is centered at 8 kpc from the

  11. Late Paleozoic tectonics of the Solonker Zone in the Wuliji area, Inner Mongolia, China: Insights from stratigraphic sequence, chronology, and sandstone geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guanzhong; Song, Guangzeng; Wang, Hua; Huang, Chuanyan; Zhang, Lidong; Tang, Jianrong

    2016-09-01

    The geology in the Wuliji area (including the Enger Us and Quagan Qulu areas) is important for understanding the Late Paleozoic tectonics of the Solonker Zone. Ultramafic/mafic rocks in the Enger Us area, previously interpreted as an ophiolitic suture, are actually lava flows and sills in a Permian turbiditic sequence and a small body of fault breccia containing serpentinite. Subduction zone features, such as accretionary complexes, magmatic arc volcanics or LP/HP metamorphism are absent. Early Permian N-MORB mafic rocks and Late Permian radiolarian cherts accompanied by turbidites and tuffeous rocks indicate a deep water setting. In the Quagan Qulu area, outcrops of the Late Carboniferous to Permian Amushan Formation are composed of volcano-sedimenary rocks and guyot-like reef limestone along with a Late Permian volcano-sedimentary unit. A dacite lava in the Late Permian volcano-sedimentary unit yields a zircon U-Pb age of 254 Ma. The gabbros in the Quagan Qulu area are intruded into the Amushan Formation and caused contact metamorphism of country rocks. Sandstones in the Upper Member of the Amushan Formation contain detrital clasts of volcanic fragments and mineral clasts of crystalline basement rocks (i.e. biotite, muscovite and garnet). Geochemical analysis of volcaniclastic sandstones shows a magmatic affinity to both continental island arc (CIA) and active continental margin (ACM) tectonic settings. A Late Permian incipient rift setting is suggested by analyzing the lithostratigraphic sequence and related magmatism in the Wuliji area. The volcano-sedimentary rocks in the Wuliji area experienced a nearly N-S shortening that was probably related to the Early Mesozoic nearly N-S compression well developed in other areas close to the Wuliji area.

  12. A new predictive multi-zone model for HCCI engine combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissoli, M.; Frassoldati, A.; Cuoci, A.; Ranzi, E.; Mehl, M.; Faravelli, T.

    2016-09-01

    This work introduces a new predictive multi-zone model for the description of combustion in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines. The model exploits the existing OpenSMOKE++ computational suite to handle detailed kinetic mechanisms, providing reliable predictions of the in-cylinder auto-ignition processes. All the elements with a significant impact on the combustion performances and emissions, like turbulence, heat and mass exchanges, crevices, residual burned gases, thermal and feed stratification are taken into account. Compared to other computational approaches, this model improves the description of mixture stratification phenomena by coupling a wall heat transfer model derived from CFD application with a proper turbulence model. Furthermore, the calibration of this multi-zone model requires only three parameters, which can be derived from a non-reactive CFD simulation: these adaptive variables depend only on the engine geometry and remain fixed across a wide range of operating conditions, allowing the prediction of auto-ignition, pressure traces and pollutants. This computational framework enables the use of detail kinetic mechanisms, as well as Rate of Production Analysis (RoPA) and Sensitivity Analysis (SA) to investigate the complex chemistry involved in the auto-ignition and the pollutants formation processes. In the final sections of the paper, these capabilities are demonstrated through the comparison with experimental data.

  13. An overview of comparative modelling and resources dedicated to large-scale modelling of genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Su Datt; Das, Sayoni; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine

    2017-08-01

    Computational modelling of proteins has been a major catalyst in structural biology. Bioinformatics groups have exploited the repositories of known structures to predict high-quality structural models with high efficiency at low cost. This article provides an overview of comparative modelling, reviews recent developments and describes resources dedicated to large-scale comparative modelling of genome sequences. The value of subclustering protein domain superfamilies to guide the template-selection process is investigated. Some recent cases in which structural modelling has aided experimental work to determine very large macromolecular complexes are also cited.

  14. Visualizing Life Zone Boundary Sensitivities Across Climate Models and Temporal Spans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisneros, Roberto R [ORNL; Huang, Jian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ostrouchov, George [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Life zones are a convenient and quantifiable method for delineating areas with similar plant and animal communities based on bioclimatic conditions. Such ecoregionalization techniques have proved useful for defining habitats and for studying how these habitats may shift due to environmental change. The ecological impacts of climate change are of particular interest. Here we show that visualizations of the geographic projection of life zones may be applied to the investigation of potential ecological impacts of climate change using the results of global climate model simulations. Using a multi-factor classification scheme, we show how life zones change over time based on quantitative model results into the next century. Using two straightforward metrics, we identify regions of high sensitivity to climate changes from two global climate simulations under two different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Finally, we identify how preferred human habitats may shift under these scenarios. We apply visualization methods developed for the purpose of displaying multivariate relationships within data, especially for situations that involve a large number of concurrent relationships. Our method is based on the concept of multivariate classification, and is implemented directly in VisIt, a production quality visualization package.

  15. Large-scale modeling of reactive solute transport in fracture zones of granitic bedrocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Final disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep repositories located in fractured granite formations is being considered by several countries. The assessment of the safety of such repositories requires using numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical processes. These models are being developed from data and knowledge gained from in situ experiments such as the Redox Zone Experiment carried out at the underground laboratory of Äspö in Sweden. This experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of the construction of the access tunnel on the hydrogeological and hydrochemical conditions of a fracture zone intersected by the tunnel. Most chemical species showed dilution trends except for bicarbonate and sulphate which unexpectedly increased with time. Molinero and Samper [Molinero, J. and Samper, J. Groundwater flow and solute transport in fracture zones: an improved model for a large-scale field experiment at Äspö (Sweden). J. Hydraul. Res., 42, Extra Issue, 157-172] presented a two-dimensional water flow and solute transport finite element model which reproduced measured drawdowns and dilution curves of conservative species. Here we extend their model by using a reactive transport which accounts for aqueous complexation, acid-base, redox processes, dissolution-precipitation of calcite, quartz, hematite and pyrite, and cation exchange between Na + and Ca 2+. The model provides field-scale estimates of cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and redox potential of groundwater recharge. It serves also to identify the mineral phases controlling the solubility of iron. In addition, the model is useful to test the relevance of several geochemical processes. Model results rule out calcite dissolution as the process causing the increase in bicarbonate concentration and reject the following possible sources of sulphate: (1) pyrite dissolution, (2) leaching of alkaline sulphate-rich waters from a nearby rock landfill and (3) dissolution of

  16. A nonsteady-state firn-densification model for the percolation zone of a glacier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels

    2008-01-01

    A simple steady state firn-densification model is modified to account for short-term time variations of accumulation rate and surface temperature. The temporal surface-elevation- and mass changes at two sites in the percolation zone of an ice sheet in response to various climate histories...... occur even in periods of constant surface climate, and consequently unchanged mass balance, as a delayed response to previous changes of the local surface climate. Forcing the model with cyclic temperature variations mimicking fluctuations of West Greenland instrumental temperature records during...

  17. Godunov-Based Model of Swash Zone Dynamics to Advance Coastal Flood Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri Majd, M.; Sanders, B. F.

    2012-12-01

    Urbanized lowlands in southern California are defended against coastal flooding by sandy beaches that dynamically adjust to changes in water level and wave conditions, particularly during storm events. Recent research has shown that coastal flood impacts are scaled by the volume of beach overtopping flows, and an improved characterization of dynamic overtopping rates is needed to improve coastal flood forecasting (Gallien et al. 2012). However, uncertainty in the beach slope and height makes it difficult to predict the onset of overtopping and the magnitude of resulting flooding. That is, beaches may evolve significantly over a storm event. Sallenger (Sallenger, 2000) describes Impact Levels to distinguish different impact regimes (swash, collision, overwash and inundation) on dunes and barrier islands. Our goal is to model processes in different regimes as was described by him. Godunov-based models adopt a depth-integrated, two-phase approach and the shallow-water hypothesis to resolve flow and sediment transport in a tightly coupled manner that resolves shocks in the air/fluid and fluid/sediment interface. These models are best known in the context of debris flow modeling where the ability to predict the flow of highly concentrated sediment/fluid mixtures is required. Here, the approach is directed at the swash zone. Existing Godunov-based models are reviewed and shown to have drawbacks relative to wetting and drying and "avalanching"—important processes in the swash zone. This nonphysical erosion can be described as the natural tendency of the schemes to smear out steep bed slopes. To denote and reduce these numerical errors, new numerical methods are presented to address these limitations and the resulting model is applied to a set of laboratory-scale test problems. The shallow-water hypothesis limits the applicability of the model to the swash zone, so it is forced by a time series of water level and cross-shore velocity that accounts for surf zone wave

  18. EVOLUTIONARY MODEL OF FREE ECONOMIC ZONES --Different Generations and Structural Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Guang-wen

    2005-01-01

    Free economic zone (FEZ) has a long history and plays a more and more important role in the world economy. Most studies, however, focused on the theoretical analysis of benefit and cost as well as the economic role of FEZ in the less developed countries and little attention has been paid to the evolution of FEZ. This paper will improve the above-mentioned studies and put forward the structural and spatial evolutionary model of FEZ by analyzing the development of objectives, preferential policy, governance structure, industrial sectors and location of FEZs based on the international economic and political development. FEZs develop towards: 1) more comprehensive and macro objectives, 2) more industry-oriented and multi-preferential policies, 3) more cross-national and combination zones with administrative areas, 4) more technology-intensive and multi-industries, 5) more flexible location and larger spatial dimensions, 6) more rapid evolution and typologies, and 7) more economic integration to the host economy.

  19. The galactic habitable zone of the Milky Way and M31 from chemical evolution models with gas radial flows

    CERN Document Server

    Spitoni, E; Sozzetti, A

    2014-01-01

    The galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with sufficient abundance of heavy elements to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life, after surviving to close supernova explosion events. Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. We apply detailed chemical evolution models including radial gas flows to study the galactic habitable zones in our Galaxy and M31. We compare the results to the relative galactic habitable zones found with "classical" (independent ring) models, where no gas inflows were included. For both the Milky Way and Andromeda, the main effect of the gas radial inflows is to enhance the number of stars hosting a habitable planet with respect to the "classical" model results, in the region of maximum probability for this occurrence, relative to the classical model results. These results are obtained by taking into account the supernova destruction process...

  20. Modeling Root Zone Effects on Preferred Pathways for the Passive Transport of Ions and Water in Plant Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kylie J; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    We extend a model of ion and water transport through a root to describe transport along and through a root exhibiting a complexity of differentiation zones. Attention is focused on convective and diffusive transport, both radially and longitudinally, through different root tissue types (radial differentiation) and root developmental zones (longitudinal differentiation). Model transport parameters are selected to mimic the relative abilities of the different tissues and developmental zones to transport water and ions. For each transport scenario in this extensive simulations study, we quantify the optimal 3D flow path taken by water and ions, in response to internal barriers such as the Casparian strip and suberin lamellae. We present and discuss both transient and steady state results of ion concentrations as well as ion and water fluxes. We find that the peak in passive uptake of ions and water occurs at the start of the differentiation zone. In addition, our results show that the level of transpiration has a significant impact on the distribution of ions within the root as well as the rate of ion and water uptake in the differentiation zone, while not impacting on transport in the elongation zone. From our model results we infer information about the active transport of ions in the different developmental zones. In particular, our results suggest that any uptake measured in the elongation zone under steady state conditions is likely to be due to active transport.

  1. 3D Numerical modelling of topography development associated with curved subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, Jessica; Ueda, Kosuke; Burg, Jean-Pierre; May, Dave; Gerya, Taras

    2017-04-01

    Curved subduction zones, also called oroclines, are geological features found in various places on Earth. They occur in diverse geodynamic settings: 1) single slab subduction in oceanic domain (e.g. Sandwich trench in the Southern Atlantic); 2) single slab subduction in continental domain, (e.g. Gibraltar-Alboran orocline in the Western Mediterranean) 3); multi-slab subduction (e.g. Caribbean orocline in the South-East of the Gulf of Mexico). These systems present various curvatures, lengths (few hundreds to thousands of km) and ages (less than 35 Ma for Gibraltar Alboran orocline, up to 100 Ma for the Caribbean). Recent studies suggested that the formation of curved subduction systems depends on slab properties (age, length, etc) and may be linked with processes such as retreating subduction and delamination. Plume induced subduction initiation has been proposed for the Caribbean. All of these processes involve deep mechanisms such as mantle and slab dynamics. However, subduction zones always generate topography (trenches, uplifts, etc), which is likely to be influenced by surface processes. Hence, surface processes may also influence the evolution of subduction zones. We focus on different kinds of subduction systems initiated by plume-lithosphere interactions (single slab subduction/multi-slab subduction) and scrutinize their surface expression. We use numerical modeling to examine large-scale subduction initiation and three-dimensional slab retreat. We perform two kinds of simulations: 1) large scale subduction initiation with the 3D-thermomechanical code I3ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen, 2007) in an oceanic domain and 2) large scale subduction initiation in oceanic domain using I3ELVIS coupled with a robust new surface processes model (SPM). One to several retreating slabs form in the absence of surface processes, when the conditions for subduction initiation are reached (c.f. Gerya et al., 2015), and ridges occur in the middle of the extensional domain opened by slab

  2. Geological modeling of a fault zone in clay rocks at the Mont-Terri laboratory (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, M.; Guglielmi, Y.; Nussbaum, C.; Valley, B.

    2016-12-01

    Clay-rich formations are considered to be a natural barrier for radionuclides or fluids (water, hydrocarbons, CO2) migration. However, little is known about the architecture of faults affecting clay formations because of their quick alteration at the Earth's surface. The Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory provides exceptional conditions to investigate an un-weathered, perfectly exposed clay fault zone architecture and to conduct fault activation experiments that allow explore the conditions for stability of such clay faults. Here we show first results from a detailed geological model of the Mont Terri Main Fault architecture, using GoCad software, a detailed structural analysis of 6 fully cored and logged 30-to-50m long and 3-to-15m spaced boreholes crossing the fault zone. These high-definition geological data were acquired within the Fault Slip (FS) experiment project that consisted in fluid injections in different intervals within the fault using the SIMFIP probe to explore the conditions for the fault mechanical and seismic stability. The Mont Terri Main Fault "core" consists of a thrust zone about 0.8 to 3m wide that is bounded by two major fault planes. Between these planes, there is an assembly of distinct slickensided surfaces and various facies including scaly clays, fault gouge and fractured zones. Scaly clay including S-C bands and microfolds occurs in larger zones at top and bottom of the Mail Fault. A cm-thin layer of gouge, that is known to accommodate high strain parts, runs along the upper fault zone boundary. The non-scaly part mainly consists of undeformed rock block, bounded by slickensides. Such a complexity as well as the continuity of the two major surfaces are hard to correlate between the different boreholes even with the high density of geological data within the relatively small volume of the experiment. This may show that a poor strain localization occurred during faulting giving some perspectives about the potential for

  3. A model of ischemia-induced neuroblast activation in the adult subventricular zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vergni

    Full Text Available We have developed a rat brain organotypic culture model, in which tissue slices contain cortex-subventricular zone-striatum regions, to model neuroblast activity in response to in vitro ischemia. Neuroblast activation has been described in terms of two main parameters, proliferation and migration from the subventricular zone into the injured cortex. We observed distinct phases of neuroblast activation as is known to occur after in vivo ischemia. Thus, immediately after oxygen/glucose deprivation (6-24 hours, neuroblasts reduce their proliferative and migratory activity, whereas, at longer time points after the insult (2 to 5 days, they start to proliferate and migrate into the damaged cortex. Antagonism of ionotropic receptors for extracellular ATP during and after the insult unmasks an early activation of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone, which responded with a rapid and intense migration of neuroblasts into the damaged cortex (within 24 hours. The process is further enhanced by elevating the production of the chemoattractant SDf-1alpha and may also be boosted by blocking the activation of microglia. This organotypic model which we have developed is an excellent in vitro system to study neurogenesis after ischemia and other neurodegenerative diseases. Its application has revealed a SOS response to oxygen/glucose deprivation, which is inhibited by unfavorable conditions due to the ischemic environment. Finally, experimental quantifications have allowed us to elaborate a mathematical model to describe neuroblast activation and to develop a computer simulation which should have promising applications for the screening of drug candidates for novel therapies of ischemia-related pathologies.

  4. A Model of Ischemia-Induced Neuroblast Activation in the Adult Subventricular Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergni, Davide; Castiglione, Filippo; Briani, Maya; Middei, Silvia; Alberdi, Elena; Reymann, Klaus G.; Natalini, Roberto; Volonté, Cinzia; Matute, Carlos; Cavaliere, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a rat brain organotypic culture model, in which tissue slices contain cortex-subventricular zone-striatum regions, to model neuroblast activity in response to in vitro ischemia. Neuroblast activation has been described in terms of two main parameters, proliferation and migration from the subventricular zone into the injured cortex. We observed distinct phases of neuroblast activation as is known to occur after in vivo ischemia. Thus, immediately after oxygen/glucose deprivation (6–24 hours), neuroblasts reduce their proliferative and migratory activity, whereas, at longer time points after the insult (2 to 5 days), they start to proliferate and migrate into the damaged cortex. Antagonism of ionotropic receptors for extracellular ATP during and after the insult unmasks an early activation of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone, which responded with a rapid and intense migration of neuroblasts into the damaged cortex (within 24 hours). The process is further enhanced by elevating the production of the chemoattractant SDf-1α and may also be boosted by blocking the activation of microglia. This organotypic model which we have developed is an excellent in vitro system to study neurogenesis after ischemia and other neurodegenerative diseases. Its application has revealed a SOS response to oxygen/glucose deprivation, which is inhibited by unfavorable conditions due to the ischemic environment. Finally, experimental quantifications have allowed us to elaborate a mathematical model to describe neuroblast activation and to develop a computer simulation which should have promising applications for the screening of drug candidates for novel therapies of ischemia-related pathologies. PMID:19390597

  5. A parameter model of gas exchange for the seasonal sea ice zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Loose

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon budgets for the polar oceans require better constraint on air-sea gas exchange in the sea ice zone (SIZ. Here, we utilize recent advances in the theory of turbulence, mixing and air-sea flux in the ice-ocean boundary layer (IOBL to formulate a simple model for gas exchange when the surface ocean is partially covered by sea ice. The gas transfer velocity (k is related to shear-driven and convection-driven turbulence in the aqueous mass boundary layer, and to the mean-squared wave slope at the air–sea interface. We use the model to estimate k along the drift track of Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITPs in the Arctic. Individual estimates of daily-averaged k from ITP drifts ranged between 1.1 and 22 m d−1, and the fraction of open water (f ranged from 0 to 0.83. Converted to area-weighted effective transfer velocities (keff, the minimum value of keff was 10−5 m d−1 near f = 0 with values exceeding keff = 5 m d−1 at f = 0.4. The largest values of k occurred during the periods when ice cover around the ITP was changing rapidly; either in advance or retreat. The model indicates that effects from shear and convection in the sea ice zone contribute an additional 40% to the magnitude of keff, beyond what would be predicted from an estimate of keff based solely upon a windspeed parameterization. Although the ultimate scaling relationship for gas exchange in the sea ice zone will require validation in laboratory and field studies, the basic parameter model described here demonstrates that it is feasible to formulate estimates of k based upon properties of the IOBL using data sources that presently exist.

  6. A Kinetic Ladle Furnace Process Simulation Model: Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone Model Using FactSage Macro Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ende, Marie-Aline; Jung, In-Ho

    2017-02-01

    The ladle furnace (LF) is widely used in the secondary steelmaking process in particular for the de-sulfurization, alloying, and reheating of liquid steel prior to the casting process. The Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone model using the FactSage macro processing code was applied to develop a kinetic LF process model. The slag/metal interactions, flux additions to slag, various metallic additions to steel, and arcing in the LF process were taken into account to describe the variations of chemistry and temperature of steel and slag. The LF operation data for several steel grades from different plants were accurately described using the present kinetic model.

  7. Using EARTH Model to Estimate Groundwater Recharge at Five Representative Zones in the Hebei Plain, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingguo Wang; Menggui Jin; Xing Liang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of groundwater recharge is essential for efficient and sustainable groundwater management in many semi-arid regions. In this paper, a lumped parameter model (EARTH) was established to simulate the recharge rate and recharge process in typical areas by the ob-servation datum of weather, soil water and groundwater synthetically, and the spatial and temporal variation law of groundwater recharge in the Hebei Plain was revealed. The mean annual recharge rates at LQ, LC, HS, DZ and CZ representative zones are 220.1, 196.7, 34.1, 141.0 and 188.0 mm/a and the recharge coefficients are 26.5%, 22.3%, 7.2%, 20.4%, and 22.0%, respectively. Recharge rate and re-charge coefficient are gradually reduced from piedmont plain to coastal plain. Groundwater recharge appears as only yearly waves, with higher frequency components of the input series filtered by the deep complicated unsaturated zone (such as LC). While at other zones, groundwater recharge series strongly dependent on the daily rainfall and irrigation because of the shallow water table or coarse lithology.

  8. Numerical modeling of fracking fluid migration through fault zones and fractures in the North German Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfunt, Helena; Houben, Georg; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Gas production from shale formations by hydraulic fracturing has raised concerns about the effects on the quality of fresh groundwater. The migration of injected fracking fluids towards the surface was investigated in the North German Basin, based on the known standard lithology. This included cases with natural preferential pathways such as permeable fault zones and fracture networks. Conservative assumptions were applied in the simulation of flow and mass transport triggered by a high pressure boundary of up to 50 MPa excess pressure. The results show no significant fluid migration for a case with undisturbed cap rocks and a maximum of 41 m vertical transport within a permeable fault zone during the pressurization. Open fractures, if present, strongly control the flow field and migration; here vertical transport of fracking fluids reaches up to 200 m during hydraulic fracturing simulation. Long-term transport of the injected water was simulated for 300 years. The fracking fluid rises vertically within the fault zone up to 485 m due to buoyancy. Progressively, it is transported horizontally into sandstone layers, following the natural groundwater flow direction. In the long-term, the injected fluids are diluted to minor concentrations. Despite the presence of permeable pathways, the injected fracking fluids in the reported model did not reach near-surface aquifers, either during the hydraulic fracturing or in the long term. Therefore, the probability of impacts on shallow groundwater by the rise of fracking fluids from a deep shale-gas formation through the geological underground to the surface is small.

  9. Strip-coalesced interior zone model for two unequal collinear cracks weakening piezoelectric media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.R.BHARGAVA; K.JANGID

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical strip-saturation model is proposed for a poled transversely isotropic piezoelectric plate weakened by two impermeable unequal-collinear hairline straight cracks. Remotely applied in-plane unidirectional electromechanical loads open the cracks in mode-I such that the saturation zone developed at the interior tips of cracks gets coalesced. The developed saturation zones are arrested by distributing over their rims in-plane normal cohesive electrical displacement. The problem is solved using the Stroh formalism and the complex variable technique. The expressions are derived for the stress intensity factors (SIFs), the lengths of the saturation zones developed, the crack opening displacement (COD), and the energy release rate. An illustrative numerical case study is presented for the poled PZT-5H ceramic to investigate the effect of prescribed electromechanical loads on parameters affecting crack arrest. Also, the effect of different lengths of cracks on the SIFs and the local energy release rate (LERR) has been studied. The results obtained are graphically presented and analyzed.

  10. Ignition and growth modeling of detonation reaction zone experiments on single crystals of PETN and HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bradley W.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2017-01-01

    It has long been known that detonating single crystals of solid explosives have much larger failure diameters than those of heterogeneous charges of the same explosive pressed or cast to 98 - 99% theoretical maximum density (TMD). In 1957, Holland et al. demonstrated that PETN single crystals have failure diameters of about 8 mm, whereas heterogeneous PETN charges have failure diameters of less than 0.5 mm. Recently, Fedorov et al. quantitatively determined nanosecond time resolved detonation reaction zone profiles of single crystals of PETN and HMX by measuring the interface particle velocity histories of the detonating crystals and LiF windows using a PDV system. The measured reaction zone time durations for PETN and HMX single crystal detonations were approximately 100 and 260 nanoseconds, respectively. These experiments provided the necessary data to develop Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model parameters for the single crystal detonation reaction zones. Using these parameters, the calculated unconfined failure diameter of a PETN single crystal was 7.5 +/- 0.5 mm, close to the 8 mm experimental value. The calculated failure diameter of an unconfined HMX single crystal was 15 +/- 1 mm. The unconfined failure diameter of an HMX single crystal has not yet been determined precisely, but Fedorov et al. detonated 14 mm diameter crystals confined by detonating a HMX-based plastic bonded explosive (PBX) without initially overdriving the HMX crystals.

  11. Quantifying the relevance of adaptive thermal comfort models in moderate thermal climate zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoof, Joost van; Hensen, Jan L.M. [Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Vertigo 6.18, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2007-01-15

    Standards governing thermal comfort evaluation are on a constant cycle of revision and public review. One of the main topics being discussed in the latest round was the introduction of an adaptive thermal comfort model, which now forms an optional part of ASHRAE Standard 55. Also on a national level, adaptive thermal comfort guidelines come into being, such as in the Netherlands. This paper discusses two implementations of the adaptive comfort model in terms of usability and energy use for moderate maritime climate zones by means of literature study, a case study comprising temperature measurements, and building performance simulation. It is concluded that for moderate climate zones the adaptive model is only applicable during summer months, and can reduce energy for naturally conditioned buildings. However, the adaptive thermal comfort model has very limited application potential for such climates. Additionally we suggest a temperature parameter with a gradual course to replace the mean monthly outdoor air temperature to avoid step changes in optimum comfort temperatures. (author)

  12. A model of blind zone for in situ monitoring the solid/liquid interface using ultrasonic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Song; Ouyang, Qi; Zhu, Z Z; Zhang, X L

    2015-07-01

    To in situ monitor a solid/liquid interface to control metal qualities, the paper analysis blind models of the ultrasonic propagation in the solidifying molten metal with a solid/liquid interface in the Bridgman type furnace, and a mathematical calculation model of blind zone with different source locations and surface concavities is built. The study points out that the blind zone I is caused by ray bending in the interface edge, and the blind zone II is caused by totally reflection which is related with initial ray angle, critical refraction angle of solid/liquid media. A serial of simulation experiments are operated on the base of the model, and numerical computation results coincide with model calculated results very well. Therefore, receiver should locate beyond these blind zones in the right boundary to obtain time of flight data which is used to reconstruct the solid/liquid interface.

  13. ANALYSIS MODEL ON GRADUAL CHANGE PRINCIPLE OF EFFECT ZONES OF LAYER FACE FOR ROLLED CONTROL CONCRETE DAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Chong-shi; SONG Jing-xiang; FANG Hai-ting

    2006-01-01

    The effect zones of layer face for RCC (rolled control concrete) dam have gradual change characteristics. Based on the analysis thought of complex material, a model was built to analyze above principle of RCC dam by use of series-wound and shunt-wound connection. Some methods were proposed to determine the instantaneous Young's modulus, delayed Young's modulus and viscosity coefficient of effect zones of layer face. Above models and methods were used to mine the principle of gradual change of key calculation parameters which can response the characteristics of effect zones. The principle of gradual change was described. A model was established to analyze the threedimensional viscoelastic problem of RCC dam. Above programs were developed. The examples show that the proposed models and methods to determine the key calculation parameters of effect zones can reflect the status of RCC darn accurately.

  14. Analytical modelling of stable isotope fractionation of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, D; Höhener, P; Hunkeler, D; 10.1016/j.jconhyd.2010.09.006

    2011-01-01

    Analytical models were developed that simulate stable isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near a point source contamination in the unsaturated zone. The models describe diffusive transport of VOCs, biodegradation and source ageing. The mass transport is governed by Fick's law for diffusion, and the equation for reactive transport of VOCs in the soil gas phase was solved for different source geometries and for different boundary conditions. Model results were compared to experimental data from a one-dimensional laboratory column and a radial-symmetric field experiment, and the comparison yielded a satisfying agreement. The model results clearly illustrate the significant isotope fractionation by gas-phase diffusion under transient state conditions. This leads to an initial depletion of heavy isotopes with increasing distance from the source. The isotope evolution of the source is governed by the combined effects of isotope fractionation due to vaporization, diffusion and biodegradation. The net...

  15. Visco-elastic stress triggering model of Tangshan earthquake sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Yong-ge; SHEN Zheng-kang; ZENG Yue-hua; SHENG Shu-zhong; XU Xiao-feng

    2008-01-01

    We calculated the Coulomb failure stress change generated by the 1976 Tangshan earthquake that is projected onto the fault planes and slip directions of large subsequent aftershocks. Results of previous studies on the seismic failure distribution, crustal velocity and viscosity structures of the Tangshan earthquake are used as model constraints. Effects of the local pore fluid pressure and impact of soft medium near the fault are also considered. Our result shows that the subsequent Luanxian and Ninghe earthquakes occurred in the regions with a positive Coulomb failure stress produced by the Tangshan earthquake. To study the triggering effect of the Tangshan, Luanxian, and Ninghe earthquakes on the follow-up small earthquakes, we first evaluate the possible focal mechanisms of small earthquakes according to the regional stress field and co-seismic slip distributions derived from previous studies, assuming the amplitude of regional tectonic stress as 10 MPa. By projecting the stress changes generated by the above three earthquakes onto the possible fault planes and slip directions of small earthquakes, we find that the "butterfly" distribution pattern of increased Coulomb failure stress is consistent with the spatial distribution of follow-up earthquakes, and 95% of the aftershocks occurred in regions where Coulomb failure stresses increase, indicating that the former large earthquakes modulated occurrences of follow-up earthquakes in the Tangshan earthquake sequence. This result has some significance in rapid assessment of aftershock hazard after a large earthquake. If detailed failure distribution, seismogenic fault in the focal area and their slip features can be rapidly determined after a large earthquake, our algorithm can be used to predict the locations of large aftershocks.

  16. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanella, Daniela; Busato, Laura; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew; Putti, Mario; Consoli, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  17. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Tucci

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

  18. 3D-modeling for determination of axial forces acting in elements of the end zone of power turbogenerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.A.Haydenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A field mathematical model of the end zone of a powerful generator type TVV-1000-2U3 in the 3D-setting is developed. Modelling of the nominal mode of turbogenerator operation is done. The distribution of the electromagnetic field, eddy currents, and the Ampere force appearing in such elements of the end zone of turbogenerator as the pressure plate, push pins and electrically conductive screen.

  19. Models of oxic respiration, denitrification and sulfate reduction in zones of coastal upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, D. E.

    2006-12-01

    Coastal upwelling zones support some of the highest rates of primary production in the oceans. The settling and subsequent decomposition of this organic matter promotes oxygen depletion. In the Eastern tropical North and South Pacific and the Arabian Sea, large tracts of anoxic water develop, where intensive N 2 production through denitrification and anammox accounts for about 1/3 of the total loss of fixed nitrogen in the marine realm. It is curious that despite extensive denitrification in these waters, complete nitrate removal and the onset of sulfate reduction is extremely rare. A simple box model is constructed here to reproduce the dynamics of carbon, oxygen and nutrient cycling in coastal upwelling zones. The model is constructed with five boxes, where water is exchanged between the boxes by vertical and horizontal mixing and advection. These primary physical drivers control the dynamics of the system. The model demonstrates that in the absence of nitrogen fixation, the anoxic waters in a coastal upwelling system will not become nitrate free. This is because nitrate is the limiting nutrient controlling primary production, and if nitrate concentration becomes too low, primary production rate drops and this reduces rates of nitrate removal through N 2 production. With nitrogen fixation, however, complete nitrate depletion can occur and sulfate reduction will ensue. This situation is extremely rare in coastal upwelling zones, probably because nitrogen-fixing bacteria do not prosper in the high nutrient, turbid waters as typically in these areas. Finally, it is predicted here that the chemistry of the upwelling system will develop in a similar matter regardless whether N 2 production is dominated by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or canonical heterotrophic denitrification.

  20. Thermal-mechanical Numerical Models of Evolution For Different Precambrian Collisional Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parphenuk, O.

    Precambrian continental shields such as the Anabar, Baltic and Canadian, are the structurally stable areas for at least the last 1.6 Ga. Deeply eroded structures of the shields formed in the process of multistage tectonic evolution including horizontal shortening and collision by overthrusting expose at the surface middle to the lower crustal rocks uplifted along the faults from the depths 20-40 km. Thermal-mechanical model of horizontal shortening and continental crust formation in collisional zones is developed and applied to the modelling of thermal and dynamic evolution of different Archean and Proterozoic structures. The thermal structure of the lithosphere subjected to compression and shortening resulted in crustal thickening determines in large scale the further tectonic and thermal evolution of collisional zones. The lithospheric exten- sion in orogenic structures can be the possible reaction to the increase of vertical stress due to the uplift and crustal roots formation. But the number of examples exist of the areas which did not experience post-orogenic extension: the collisional structures of the Anabar Shield, the Kapuskasing structural zone of the Canadian Shield etc. The numerical modelling of the process of brittle overthrusting in the upper crust and the lower crustal viscous flow demonstrated the possibility of different structural forma- tions with thickened upper crust, uplift at the surface and progressively increasing erosion level of the rocks exumated from different depths. The thermal and rheolog- ical conditions are discussed for the formation and preservation of crustal roots. The topography of the uplift and crustal roots strongly depends on the number of param- eters, the most important of which are the viscosity values and contrast for the lower crust and lithospheric upper mantle, the initial dip angle of fault, the rate of shortening and erosion, the thermal regime of the region.

  1. Structure of the Koyna-Warna Seismic Zone, Maharashtra, India: A possible model for large induced earthquakes elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Dixit, M.M.; Goldman, Mark R.; Kumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Koyna-Warna area of India is one of the best worldwide examples of reservoir-induced seismicity, with the distinction of having generated the largest known induced earthquake (M6.3 on 10 December 1967) and persistent moderate-magnitude (>M5) events for nearly 50 years. Yet, the fault structure and tectonic setting that has accommodated the induced seismicity is poorly known, in part because the seismic events occur beneath a thick sequence of basalt layers. On the basis of the alignment of earthquake epicenters over an ~50 year period, lateral variations in focal mechanisms, upper-crustal tomographic velocity images, geophysical data (aeromagnetic, gravity, and magnetotelluric), geomorphic data, and correlation with similar structures elsewhere, we suggest that the Koyna-Warna area lies within a right step between northwest trending, right-lateral faults. The sub-basalt basement may form a local structural depression (pull-apart basin) caused by extension within the step-over zone between the right-lateral faults. Our postulated model accounts for the observed pattern of normal faulting in a region that is dominated by north-south directed compression. The right-lateral faults extend well beyond the immediate Koyna-Warna area, possibly suggesting a more extensive zone of seismic hazards for the central India area. Induced seismic events have been observed many places worldwide, but relatively large-magnitude induced events are less common because critically stressed, preexisting structures are a necessary component. We suggest that releasing bends and fault step-overs like those we postulate for the Koyna-Warna area may serve as an ideal tectonic environment for generating moderate- to large- magnitude induced (reservoir, injection, etc.) earthquakes.

  2. DYNAMIC MIXING MODEL OF THE CHIGNAHUAPAN THERMAL SPRING IN THE GEOTHERMAL ZONE OF THE ACOCULCO CALDERA, PUEBLA, MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Cirlos, A.; Torres-Rodriguez, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Acoculco Caldera, of Pliocenic age, is located within the limits of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (CVT) and the Sierra Madre Oriental (SMOr). The Acoculco geothermal zone consists of a 790m thick igneous sequence, related to a volcanic complex formed by andesites and rhyolitic domes emplaced in an 18 Km diameter annular fracture. It unconformably overlies a 5000 m thick section of folded and faulted Jurassic-Cretaceous carbonate rocks. The Chignahuapan Spring, located in the extreme eastern part of the Geothermal Zone of the Acoculco Caldera, yields temperatures of 49°C and discharges an estimated of 98 lps from the karstified Lower Cretaceous limestone. Both major and trace element geochemical analysis were carried out, and results were interpreted using Piper and Stiff diagrams, as well as geothermometry. The results indicate that water belongs to the calcium-bicarbonate type and yield temperatures in a range of 70-80°C at depth, which suggest an extensive lateral flow from the main reservoir and mixing with shallow groundwaters. The spring suffers significant variations in its temperature throughout the year, especially during the rainy season, when water temperature decreases up to 10°C. Analyzing the hot spring water temperature data from of the last 10 years and comparing it with the precipitation and air temperature curves of the region, we expect to develop a dynamic mixing model which depicts the relation between these factors and the importance of each one in the water temperature variation. We also look forward to be able to forecast water temperature trends for the next several years and correlate it with climate change in the area.

  3. A simulation-optimization model for effective water resources management in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    Coastal areas are the most densely-populated areas in the world. Consequently water demand is high, posing great pressure on fresh water resources. Climatic change and its direct impacts on meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation) and indirect impact on sea level rise, as well as anthropogenic pressures (e.g. groundwater abstraction), are strong drivers causing groundwater salinisation and subsequently affecting coastal wetlands salinity with adverse effects on the corresponding ecosystems. Coastal zones are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes and variable-density flow conditions. Simulation of sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater mathematical models. In the past few decades several computer codes have been developed to simulate coupled surface and groundwater flow. However, most integrated surface water-groundwater models are based on the assumption of constant fluid density and therefore their applicability to coastal regions is questionable. Thus, most of the existing codes are not well-suited to represent surface water-groundwater interactions in coastal areas. To this end, the 3D integrated surface water-groundwater model IRENE (Spanoudaki et al., 2009; Spanoudaki, 2010) has been modified in order to simulate surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone. IRENE, in its original form, couples the 3D shallow water equations to the equations describing 3D saturated groundwater flow of constant density. A semi-implicit finite difference scheme is used to solve the surface water flow equations, while a fully implicit finite difference scheme is used for the groundwater equations. Pollution interactions are simulated by coupling the advection

  4. 3D modeling of doping from the atmosphere in floating zone silicon crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanskis, A.; Surovovs, K.; Virbulis, J.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the inert gas flow, melt flow and dopant transport in both phases are carried out for silicon single crystal growth using the floating zone method. The mathematical model allows to predict the cooling heat flux density at silicon surfaces and realistically describes the dopant transport in case of doping from the atmosphere. A very good agreement with experiment is obtained for the radial resistivity variation profiles by taking into account the temperature dependence of chemical reaction processes at the free surface.

  5. Modeling the Philippine Mobile Belt: Tectonic blocks in a deforming plate boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgana, G. A.; Hamburger, M. W.; McCaffrey, R.; Bacolcol, T. C.; Aurelio, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Philippine Mobile Belt, a seismically active, rapidly deforming plate boundary zone situated along the convergent Philippine Sea/Eurasian plate boundary, is examined using geodetic and seismological data. Oblique convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian plate is accommodated by nearly orthogonal subduction along the Philippine Trench and the Manila Trench, as well as by strike-slip faulting along the Philippine Fault system. We develop a model of active plate boundary deformation in this region, using elastic block models constrained by known fault geometries, published GPS observations and focal mechanism solutions. We then present an estimate of block rotations, fault coupling, and intra-block deformation, based on the best-fit model that minimizes the misfit between observed and predicted geodetic vectors and earthquake slip vectors. Slip rates along the Philippine fault vary from ~22 - 36 mm/yr in the Central Visayas and about 10 to 40 mm/yr in Luzon, trending almost parallel to the fault trace. In northern Luzon, Philippine Fault splays accommodate transpressional strain. The Central Visayas block experiences convergence with the Sundaland block along the Negros Trench and the Mindoro-Palawan collision zone. On the eastern side of Central Visayas, sinistral strike-slip faulting occurs along the NNW-SSE-trending Philippine Fault. Mindanao Island in southern Philippines is dominated by east-verging subduction along the Cotabato Trench, and strain partitioning (strike- slip faulting with west-verging subduction) in eastern Mindanao along the southern Philippine Fault and Philippine Trench, respectively. Oblique active sinistral strike slip faults in Central and Eastern Mindanao that were hypothesized to be responsible for basin formation are obvious boundaries for tectonic blocks. Located south of Mindanao Island we define an adjoining oceanic block defined by the N-S trending complex dual subduction zone of Sangihe and Halmahera

  6. Numerical modeling of fracking fluid and methane migration through fault zones in shale gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherdangkoo, Reza; Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operation in shale gas reservoir has gained growing interest over the last few years. Groundwater contamination is one of the most important environmental concerns that have emerged surrounding shale gas development (Reagan et al., 2015). The potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing could be studied through the possible pathways for subsurface migration of contaminants towards overlying aquifers (Kissinger et al., 2013; Myers, 2012). The intent of this study is to investigate, by means of numerical simulation, two failure scenarios which are based on the presence of a fault zone that penetrates the full thickness of overburden and connect shale gas reservoir to aquifer. Scenario 1 addresses the potential transport of fracturing fluid from the shale into the subsurface. This scenario was modeled with COMSOL Multiphysics software. Scenario 2 deals with the leakage of methane from the reservoir into the overburden. The numerical modeling of this scenario was implemented in DuMux (free and open-source software), discrete fracture model (DFM) simulator (Tatomir, 2012). The modeling results are used to evaluate the influence of several important parameters (reservoir pressure, aquifer-reservoir separation thickness, fault zone inclination, porosity, permeability, etc.) that could affect the fluid transport through the fault zone. Furthermore, we determined the main transport mechanisms and circumstances in which would allow frack fluid or methane migrate through the fault zone into geological layers. The results show that presence of a conductive fault could reduce the contaminant travel time and a significant contaminant leakage, under certain hydraulic conditions, is most likely to occur. Bibliography Kissinger, A., Helmig, R., Ebigbo, A., Class, H., Lange, T., Sauter, M., Heitfeld, M., Klünker, J., Jahnke, W., 2013. Hydraulic fracturing in unconventional gas reservoirs: risks in the geological system, part 2. Environ Earth Sci 70, 3855

  7. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Gulikova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal mining area, exploring spatial data from 3D laser scanners, GPS measurements, aerial images, time series of meteorological observations, inputs/outputs form numerical models and existing geographic resources. To achieve this, digital terrain models, layers including GPS thematic mapping, and scenes with simulation of wind flows are created to visualize and interpret coal dust transport over the mine area and a neighbouring residential zone. A temporary coal storage and sorting site, located near the residential zone, is one of the dominant sources of emissions. Using numerical simulations, the possible effects of wind flows are observed over the surface, modified by natural objects and man-made obstacles. The coal dust drifts with the wind in the direction of the residential zone and is partially deposited in this area. The simultaneous display of the digital map layers together with the location of the dominant emission source, wind flows and protected areas enables a risk assessment of the dust deposition in the area of interest to be performed. In order to obtain a more accurate simulation of wind flows over the temporary storage and sorting site, 3D laser scanning and GPS thematic mapping are used to create a more detailed digital terrain model. Thus, visualization of wind flows over the area of interest combined with 3D map layers enables the exploration of the processes of coal dust

  8. Data Assimilation for Vadose Zone Flow Modeling Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Schaap, M. G.; Zha, Y.; Xue, L.

    2015-12-01

    The natural system is open and complex and the hydraulic parameters needed for describing flow and transport in the vadose zone are often poorly known, making it prone to multiple interpretations, mathematical descriptions and uncertainty. Quite often a reasonable "handle" on a sites flow characteristics can be gained only through direct observation of the flow processes itself, determination of the spatial- and probability distributions of material properties combined with computationally expensive inversions of the Richards equation. In groundwater systems, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has proven to be an effective alternative to model inversions by assimilating observations directly into an ensemble of groundwater models from which time and/or space-variable variable probabilistic quantities of the flow process can be derived. Application of EnKF to Richards equation-type unsaturated flow problems, however, is more challenging than in groundwater systems because the relation of state and model parameters is strongly nonlinear. In addition, the type of functional dependence of moisture content and hydraulic conductivity on matric potential leads to high-dimensional (in the parameter space) problems even under conditions where closed-form expressions of these models such as van Genuchten-Mualem formulations are used. In this study, we updated soil water retention parameters and hydraulic conductivity together and used Restart EnKF, which rerun the nonlinear model from the initial time to obtain the updated state variables, in synthetic cases to explore the factors that may influence estimation results, including the initial estimate, the ensemble size, the observation error, and the assimilation interval. We embedded the EnKF into the Bayesian model averaging framework to enhance the model reliability and reduce predictive uncertainties. This approach is evaluated from a 15 m deep semi-arid highly heterogeneous and anisotropic vadose zone site at the

  9. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  10. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  11. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate causes the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. This uplift and subsidence pattern correlates well with our modelled topography changes.

  12. Subduction zone and crustal dynamics of western Washington; a tectonic model for earthquake hazards evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dal; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley

    1999-01-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone is extremely complex in the western Washington region, involving local deformation of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate and complicated block structures in the crust. It has been postulated that the Cascadia subduction zone could be the source for a large thrust earthquake, possibly as large as M9.0. Large intraplate earthquakes from within the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Puget Sound region have accounted for most of the energy release in this century and future such large earthquakes are expected. Added to these possible hazards is clear evidence for strong crustal deformation events in the Puget Sound region near faults such as the Seattle fault, which passes through the southern Seattle metropolitan area. In order to understand the nature of these individual earthquake sources and their possible interrelationship, we have conducted an extensive seismotectonic study of the region. We have employed P-wave velocity models developed using local earthquake tomography as a key tool in this research. Other information utilized includes geological, paleoseismic, gravity, magnetic, magnetotelluric, deformation, seismicity, focal mechanism and geodetic data. Neotectonic concepts were tested and augmented through use of anelastic (creep) deformation models based on thin-plate, finite-element techniques developed by Peter Bird, UCLA. These programs model anelastic strain rate, stress, and velocity fields for given rheological parameters, variable crust and lithosphere thicknesses, heat flow, and elevation. Known faults in western Washington and the main Cascadia subduction thrust were incorporated in the modeling process. Significant results from the velocity models include delineation of a previously studied arch in the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The axis of the arch is oriented in the direction of current subduction and asymmetrically deformed due to the effects of a northern buttress mapped in the velocity models. This

  13. Extension of the QUASAR river water quality model to incorporate dead-zone mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Lees

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A modification to the well-known water quality model 'Quality Simulation Along River Systems' (QUASAR is presented, extending its utility to real-time forecasting applications such as the management and control of pollution incidents. Two aggregated dead-zone (ADZ parameters, namely time delay and dispersive fraction, are incorporated into the existing model formulation, extending the current continuously stirred tank reactor based model processes to account for advective and active mixing volume dispersive processes. The resulting river water quality model combines the strengths of the QUASAR model, which has proven non-conservative pollutant modelling capabilities, with the accurate advection and dispersion characterisation of the ADZ model. A discrete-time mathematical representation of the governing equations is developed that enables efficient system identification methods of parameter estimation to be utilised. The enhanced water quality model and associated methods of parameter estimation are validated using data from tracer experiments conducted on the River Mimram. The revised model produces accurate predictions of observed concentration-time curves for conservative substances.

  14. Extension of the QUASAR river water quality model to incorporate dead-zone mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, M. J.; Camacho, L.; Whitehead, P.

    A modification to the well-known water quality model "Quality Simulation Along River Systems" (QUASAR) is presented, extending its utility to real-time forecasting applications such as the management and control of pollution incidents. Two aggregated dead-zone (ADZ) parameters, namely time delay and dispersive fraction, are incorporated into the existing model formulation, extending the current continuously stirred tank reactor based model processes to account for advective and active mixing volume dispersive processes. The resulting river water quality model combines the strengths of the QUASAR model, which has proven non-conservative pollutant modelling capabilities, with the accurate advection and dispersion characterisation of the ADZ model. A discrete-time mathematical representation of the governing equations is developed that enables efficient system identification methods of parameter estimation to be utilised. The enhanced water quality model and associated methods of parameter estimation are validated using data from tracer experiments conducted on the River Mimram. The revised model produces accurate predictions of observed concentration-time curves for conservative substances.

  15. Detailed investigation of the analysis conditions in the evaluation of bonded joints by cohesive zone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, R. J. B.; Campilho, R. D. S. G.

    2017-05-01

    Cohesive Zone Models (CZM) are widely used for the strength prediction of adhesive joints. This work studies the influence of different conditions used in CZM simulations to model a thin adhesive layer in single-lap joints (SLJ) under a tensile loading, for an estimation of their influence on the strength prediction under diverse geometrical and material conditions. Adhesives ranging from brittle to highly ductile and overlap lengths (LO) between 12.5 and 50 mm were considered. Several damage initiation and growth criteria were tested. The analysis carried out in this work allowed to conclude that CZM is a powerful technique for strength prediction of bonded joints, provided that the modelling conditions are properly defined.

  16. A VOF-based numerical model for breaking waves in surf zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a numerical model for studying the evolution of a periodic wave train,shoaling, and breaking in surf zone. The model can solve the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for a mean flow, and the k-ε equations for turbulence kinetic energy k and turbulence dissipation rate ε. To track a free surface, the volume of fluid (VOF) function, satisfying the advection equation was introduced. In the numerical treatment, third-order upwind difference scheme was applied to the convection terms of the RANS equations in order to reduce the effect of numerical viscosity. The shoaling and breaking processes of a periodic wave train on gently sloping beaches were modeled. The computed wave heights of a sloping beach and the distribution of breaking wave pressure on a vertical wall were compared with laboratory data.

  17. Mathematical modelling of the feed rod shape in floating zone silicon crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plāte, M.; Krauze, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2017-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) transient multi-physical model of the feed rod melting in the floating zone (FZ) silicon single-crystal growth process is presented. Coupled temperature, electromagnetic (EM), and melt film simulations are performed for a 4 inch FZ system, and the time evolution of the open melting front is studied. The 3D model uses phase boundaries and parameters from a converged solution of a quasi-stationary axisymmetric (2D) model of the FZ system as initial conditions for the time dependent simulations. A parameter study with different feed rod rotation, crystal pull rates and widths of the inductor main slit is carried out to analyse their influence on the evolution of the asymmetric feed rod shape. The feed rod rotation is shown to have a smoothing effect on the shape of the open melting front.

  18. A LINEAR HYBRID MODEL OF MSE AND BEM FOR FLOATING STRUCTURES IN COASTAL ZONES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; MIAO Guo-ping

    2006-01-01

    A linear hybrid model of Mild Slope Equation (MSE) and Boundary Element Method (BEM) is developed to study the wave propagation around floating structures in coastal zones. Both the wave refraction under the influence of topography and the wave diffraction by floating structures are considered. Hence, the model provides wave properties around the coastal floating structures of arbitrary shape but also the wave forces on and the hydrodynamic characteristics of the structures. Different approaches are compared to demonstrate the validity of the present hybrid model. Several numerical tests are carried out for the cases of pontoons under different circumstances. The results show that the influence of topography on the hydrodynamic characteristics of floating structures in coastal regions is important and must not be ignored in the most wave period range with practical interests.

  19. Model of oscillatory zoning in two dimensions: simulation and mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Tanja; Heuer, Andreas; Burger, Martin; Lubashevsky, Ihor

    2010-05-01

    Oscillatory zoning (OZ) occurs in all major classes of minerals and also in a wide range of geological environments. It is caused by self-organization and describes fluctuations of the spatial chemical composition profile of the crystal. We present here a two-dimensional model of OZ based on our previous one-dimensional (1D) analysis and investigate whether the results of the 1D stability analysis remain valid. With the additional second dimension we were able to study the origin of the spatially homogeneous layer formation by linear stability analysis. Numerical solutions of the model are presented and the results of a Fourier analysis delivers a detailed understanding of the crystal growth behavior as well as the limits of the model. Effects beyond linear stability analysis are important to finally understand the final structure formation.

  20. A Simulation Method for High-Cycle Fatigue-Driven Delamination using a Cohesive Zone Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Brian Lau Verndal; Turon, A.; Lindgaard, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    on parameter fitting of any kind. The method has been implemented as a zero-thickness eight-node interface element for Abaqus and as a spring element for a simple finite element model in MATLAB. The method has been validated in simulations of mode I, mode II, and mixed-mode crack loading for both self......A novel computational method for simulating fatigue-driven mixed-mode delamination cracks in laminated structures under cyclic loading is presented. The proposed fatigue method is based on linking a cohesive zone model for quasi-static crack growth and a Paris' law-like model described......-similar and non-self-similar crack propagation. The method produces highly accurate results compared with currently available methods and is capable of simulating general mixed-mode non-self-similar crack growth problems....

  1. Numerical modelling of wind effects on breaking waves in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua

    2017-10-01

    Wind effects on periodic breaking waves in the surf zone have been investigated in this study using a two-phase flow model. The model solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k - 𝜖 turbulence model simultaneously for the flows both in the air and water. Both spilling and plunging breakers over a 1:35 sloping beach have been studied under the influence of wind, with a focus during wave breaking. Detailed information of the distribution of wave amplitudes and mean water level, wave-height-to-water-depth ratio, the water surface profiles, velocity, vorticity, and turbulence fields have been presented and discussed. The inclusion of wind alters the air flow structure above water waves, increases the generation of vorticity, and affects the wave shoaling, breaking, overturning, and splash-up processes. Wind increases the water particle velocities and causes water waves to break earlier and seaward, which agrees with the previous experiment.

  2. Linking geological evidence from the Eurasian suture zones to a regional Indian Ocean plate tectonic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, A.; Aitchison, J.; Müller, R.; Whittaker, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a revised regional plate tectonic model for the Indian Ocean from the Late Jurassic to present, which assimilates both marine geophysical data constraining the seafloor spreading history as well as a variety of geological observations from the Eurasian collision zone. This model includes relative motion between Greater India, Sri Lanka, West Australia, East Antarctica, East Madagascar, the Seychelles and Argoland, a continental sliver which began migrating towards Eurasia in the Late Jurassic, forming the northern margins of Greater India and western Australia. Recently collected data offshore northwest Australia suggest that the majority of Greater India reached only halfway along the West Australian margin in an Early Mesozoic reconstruction, bounded by the Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone. The revised geometries and relative motion histories redefine the timing and nature of collisional events, as well as the history of back-arc basins and intra-oceanic arcs, such as the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc in northwest India and Pakistan. Abundant ophiolites have been identified throughout the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture Zone, between the Indian-Himalaya and Tibet, several have boninitic compositions and almost all date to either the Mid Jurassic or late Early Cretaceous. Further evidence suggests that an intra-oceanic arc collided with Greater India before colliding with Eurasia. Our model features a transform boundary running north of East Africa, which initiated an oceanic arc following short-lived compression between the western and central Mesotethys in the Late Jurassic, coinciding with the initial motion of Argoland. The arc developed through extension and ophiolite generation until at least the mid-Cretaceous and consumed a narrow thinned sliver of West Argoland between ~120-65 Ma. The arc remained active in the same position until its eventual collision with Greater India ~55 Ma. The eastern portion of the intra-oceanic arc accreted to eastern Eurasia

  3. Species distribution models contribute to determine the effect of climate and interspecific interactions in moving hybrid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, J O; Rödder, D; Elle, O; Hochkirch, A; Secondi, J

    2013-11-01

    Climate is a major factor delimiting species' distributions. However, biotic interactions may also be prominent in shaping geographical ranges, especially for parapatric species forming hybrid zones. Determining the relative effect of each factor and their interaction of the contact zone location has been difficult due to the lack of broad scale environmental data. Recent developments in species distribution modelling (SDM) now allow disentangling the relative contributions of climate and species' interactions in hybrid zones and their responses to future climate change. We investigated the moving hybrid zone between the breeding ranges of two parapatric passerines in Europe. We conducted SDMs representing the climatic conditions during the breeding season. Our results show a large mismatch between the realized and potential distributions of the two species, suggesting that interspecific interactions, not climate, account for the present location of the contact zone. The SDM scenarios show that the southerly distributed species, Hippolais polyglotta, might lose large parts of its southern distribution under climate change, but a similar gain of novel habitat along the hybrid zone seems unlikely, because interactions with the other species (H. icterina) constrain its range expansion. Thus, whenever biotic interactions limit range expansion, species may become 'trapped' if range loss due to climate change is faster than the movement of the contact zone. An increasing number of moving hybrid zones are being reported, but the proximate causes of movement often remain unclear. In a global context of climate change, we call for more interest in their interactions with climate change.

  4. Experimental determination of the long-term strength and stability of laterally bounding fault zones in CO2 storage reservoirs based on kinetic modeling of fault zone evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, J. E.; Koenen, M.; Tambach, T.

    2011-12-01

    Long-term sequestration of CO2, harvested from point sources such as coal burning power plants and cement manufactories, in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is considered to be one of the most attractive options for short- to medium-term mitigation of anthropogenic forcing of climate change. Many such reservoirs are laterally bounded by low-permeability fault zones which could potentially be reactivated either by changes in stress state during and after the injection process, and also by alterations in the frictional strength of fault gouge material. Of additional concern is how the stability of the fault zones will change as a result of the influence of supercritical CO2, specifically whether the rate and state frictional constitutive parameters (a, b, DC) of the fault zone will change in such a way as to enhance the likelihood of seismic activity on the fault zone. The short-term influence of CO2 on frictional strength and stability of simulated fault gouges prepared from mixtures of cap rock and reservoir rock has been analyzed recently [Samuelson et al., In Prep.], concluding that CO2 has little influence on frictional constitutive behavior on the timescale of a typical experiment (CO2 is intended to be sequestered, we have chosen to model the long-term mineralogical alteration of a fault zone with a simple starting mineralogy of 33% quartz, 33% illite, and 33% dolomite by weight using the geochemical modeling program PHREEQC and the THERMODDEM database, assuming instantaneous mixing of the CO2 with the fault gouge. The geochemical modeling predicts that equilibrium will be reached between fault gouge, reservoir brine, and CO2 in approximately 440 years, assuming an average grain-size (davg) of 20 μm, and ~90 years assuming davg =4 μm, a reasonable range of grain-sizes for natural fault gouges. The main change to gouge mineralogy comes from the complete dissolution of illite, and the precipitation of muscovite. The final equilibrium mineralogy of the fault

  5. Understanding Stress and Strain Accumulation at Subduction Zones Using a Web-Based Modeling Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foutz, L. J.; Williams, C. A.; McCaffrey, R.; Spooner, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    Surface geodetic data can provide significant insights into the patterns of stress and strain accumulation at subduction zones. There are presently two primary limitations on studies utilizing this data. The first is the relative difficulty of obtaining suitable data to be used in an investigation. The second is the limited number of forward models available for evaluating the data. We attempt to address both of these limitations by providing a web-based modeling environment that provides a database of available surface geodetic data as well as a selection of at least two forward models. Our modeling environment allows users to select geodetic data for a particular region from our database, filtered by user-specified criteria. It is also possible to contribute data to the database. Two types of forward models are available: an enhanced elastic half-space dislocation (EHSD) model or a finite elastic plate (FP) model, both with user-specified elastic properties. After selecting a fault geometry, an appropriate finite element mesh is used to generate Green's functions for use in an inversion. Parameters controlling an inversion are then specified, including the option to determine the rotation poles of blocks that rotate with respect to the overriding plate. Once the inversion has been performed, we provide visualization facilities for viewing the results, or the user can simply download the desired results. We provide an overview of the modeling environment and provide a demonstration using Cascadia as an example.

  6. Evaluation of unsaturated-zone solute-transport models for studies of agricultural chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Bayless, E. Randall; Green, Christopher T.; Garg, Sheena; Voss, Frank D.; Lampe, David C.; Barbash, Jack E.; Capel, Paul D.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Seven unsaturated-zone solute-transport models were tested with two data sets to select models for use by the Agricultural Chemical Team of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The data sets were from a bromide tracer test near Merced, California, and an atrazine study in the White River Basin, Indiana. In this study the models are designated either as complex or simple based on the water flux algorithm. The complex models, HYDRUS2D, LEACHP, RZWQM, and VS2DT, use Richards' equation to simulate water flux and are well suited to process understanding. The simple models, CALF, GLEAMS, and PRZM, use a tipping-bucket algorithm and are more amenable to extrapolation because they require fewer input parameters. The purpose of this report is not to endorse a particular model, but to describe useful features, potential capabilities, and possible limitations that emerged from working with the model input data sets. More rigorous assessment of model applicability involves proper calibration, which was beyond the scope of this study.

  7. Facial pressure zones of an oronasal interface for noninvasive ventilation: a computer model analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Souto Barros

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of an oronasal interface (OI for noninvasive ventilation, using a three-dimensional (3D computational model with the ability to simulate and evaluate the main pressure zones (PZs of the OI on the human face. METHODS: We used a 3D digital model of the human face, based on a pre-established geometric model. The model simulated soft tissues, skull, and nasal cartilage. The geometric model was obtained by 3D laser scanning and post-processed for use in the model created, with the objective of separating the cushion from the frame. A computer simulation was performed to determine the pressure required in order to create the facial PZs. We obtained descriptive graphical images of the PZs and their intensity. RESULTS: For the graphical analyses of each face-OI model pair and their respective evaluations, we ran 21 simulations. The computer model identified several high-impact PZs in the nasal bridge and paranasal regions. The variation in soft tissue depth had a direct impact on the amount of pressure applied (438-724 cmH2O. CONCLUSIONS: The computer simulation results indicate that, in patients submitted to noninvasive ventilation with an OI, the probability of skin lesion is higher in the nasal bridge and paranasal regions. This methodology could increase the applicability of biomechanical research on noninvasive ventilation interfaces, providing the information needed in order to choose the interface that best minimizes the risk of skin lesion.

  8. Evolution of the habitable zone of low-mass stars. Detailed stellar models and analytical relationships for different masses and chemical compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Degl'Innocenti, S

    2014-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the habitable zone (HZ) of low-mass stars - only due to stellar evolution - and evaluate the related uncertainties. These uncertainties are then compared with those due to the adoption of different climate models. We computed stellar evolutionary tracks from the pre-main sequence phase to the helium flash at the red-giant branch tip for stars with masses in the range [0.70 - 1.10] Msun, metallicity Z in the range [0.005 - 0.04], and various initial helium contents. We evaluated several characteristics of the HZ, such as the distance from the host star at which the habitability is longest, the duration of this habitability, the width of the zone for which the habitability lasts one half of the maximum, and the boundaries of the continuously habitable zone (CHZ) for which the habitability lasts at least 4 Gyr. We developed analytical models, accurate to the percent level or lower, which allowed to obtain these characteristics in dependence on the mass and the chemical composit...

  9. Intellectual Capital in Enterprises and a Model Study in an Industrial Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk Kendirli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual Capital in Enterprises and a Model Study in an Industrial Zone   Abstract The study mainly consists of two parts. The first part includes theoretical knowledge, the second part includes application-oriented information. In the theoretical part of the study, intellectual capital and SMEs are emphasized in general. In the application-oriented part of the study, a field research will be done for Corum SME. In this study, the demographic structure of Corum SMEs, intellectual capital structure and financial performance of this structure will be evaluated. The resulting data will be analyzed in this context. The businesses operating in the Organized Industrial Zone of Corum and those matching the definition of SME will be considered within the research scope. Surveys will be applied by interviewers face to face and each survey will be evaluated individually. After the evaluation, a model will be proposed. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between components of intellectual capital in SMEs and business performance. For this reason, a survey will be conducted for SMEs. Since the results of the study will be shared with scientific circles and the public, they will prove to be guiding for Çorum SMEs.

  10. Risk zone of wrack hitting marine structure simulated by 2D hydraulic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jin-rong; GUO Ya-qiong; NAN Wei

    2010-01-01

    The wrack or the ship out of control will drift with flow.One of the most important factors that drive the ship is flow current which moves circularly in tidal area.The wrack from same place always drifts in different ways if the start time is different.So,during the ship drifting period,the drift trace is also determined by both wave and wind forces.The drift direction is limited by water depth which must be deeper than ship draft.These marine structures that can not afford the hit of wrack or will destroy the wrack must be well considered when they are placed near harbor and waterway or other water area with ship running.The risk zone should be consulted according to tide and weather conditions to protect structures and ships in necessary.A method is presented here to simulate the risk zone by 2D numerical hydraulic model with tidal current,wave,wind and water depth considered.This model can be used to built early-warning and protect system for special maline structure.

  11. Numerical simulation of a crack in the cement stabilized stone using cohesive zone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-hui; Wang, Duan-yi

    2008-11-01

    Reflective cracking arising from cracks in base materials has been a major distress of semi-rigid asphalt concrete road. Previous studies in base mixture cracking have typically considered the materials homogeneity. Adopting Digital Image Processing techniques and Finite Element Method, in the micro scale, the cement and aggregates are treated as distinct materials with different materials parameters. The potential crack zones are simulated by Cohesive Zone Model. The initiation and propagation of the crack in the cylindrical specimen under conventional Indirect Tensile Test (IDT) are modeled. The numerical results from the micromechanical analysis match well with the results from the macro experiment. Even though this study only presented a attempt to a numerical simulation of a simple IDT test, the theory and methods adopted by this study can be applied to the fatigue damage scenario under complicated loading conditions including material heterogeneity. It effectively allows researchers to link the micro-scale damage observed on the local scale with the real pavements failing on the global scale.

  12. Analysis of vadose zone tritium transport from an underground storage tank release using numerical modeling and geostatistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H.

    1997-09-01

    Numerical and geostatistical analyses show that the artificial smoothing effect of kriging removes high permeability flow paths from hydrogeologic data sets, reducing simulated contaminant transport rates in heterogeneous vadose zone systems. therefore, kriging alone is not recommended for estimating the spatial distribution of soil hydraulic properties for contaminant transport analysis at vadose zone sites. Vadose zone transport if modeled more effectively by combining kriging with stochastic simulation to better represent the high degree of spatial variability usually found in the hydraulic properties of field soils. However, kriging is a viable technique for estimating the initial mass distribution of contaminants in the subsurface.

  13. Generalized Fibonacci zone plates

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Jie; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a family of zone plates which are produced by the generalized Fibonacci sequences and their axial focusing properties are analyzed in detail. Compared with traditional Fresnel zone plates, the generalized Fibonacci zone plates present two axial foci with equal intensity. Besides, we propose an approach to adjust the axial locations of the two foci by means of different optical path difference, and further give the deterministic ratio of the two focal distances which attributes to their own generalized Fibonacci sequences. The generalized Fibonacci zone plates may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics.

  14. Unsaturated zone leaching models for assessing risk to groundwater of contaminated sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Mads; Binning, Philip John; Nielsen, Signe;

    2009-01-01

    Risk assessments of sites contaminated with organic contaminants are typically conducted using models that ignore gas phase transport in the unsaturated zone. Here a general approach to developing analytical solutions to multiphase transport is presented. The approach is based on a combined gas...... are important mechanisms for attenuation of contaminant concentrations at the water table. Finally, model results are compared with field data to illustrate the applicability of the solutions in risk assessment....... and aqueous phase contaminant transport equation. The equation has the same general form as the standard advection-diffusion equation for which many analytical solutions have been derived. Four new analytical solutions are developed using this approach: a three-dimensional solution accounting for infiltration...

  15. Current diffusion and normal zone propagation inside the aluminum stabilized superconductor of ATLAS model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; Pellegatta, M; ten Kate, H H J

    2003-01-01

    The normal zone propagation inside the B/sub O/ model coil of the ATLAS Toroidal magnet has been measured over a large range of applied currents. Typical values for the longitudinal propagation vary from 0.3 to 15 m/s at 8 and 24 kA, respectively. A new analytical expression for the longitudinal quench propagation inside superconducting cables is presented. It describes the propagation inside superconducting wires as well as the propagation inside large stabilized superconductors. It is found that in the limit case of high currents, the stabilizer functions only as a heat-sink. The model is compared to experimental data and a good correlation is found. (10 refs).

  16. 3D Thermochemical Numerical Model of a Convergent Zone With an Overriding Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, W. G.; Moresi, L.; Betts, P. G.

    2008-12-01

    We have created a new three dimensional thermochemical numerical model of a convergent zone, in which a viscoplastic oceanic plate subducts beneath a viscous overriding plate, using the finite element Geoscience research code Underworld. Subduction is initiated by mantle flow induced by the gravitational instability of a slab tip, and buoyancy of the overriding plate. A cold thermal boundary layer envelopes both plates, and is partially dragged into the mantle along with the subducting slab. The trench rolls back as the slab subducts, and the overriding plate follows the retreating trench without being entrained into the upper mantle. The model is repeated with the overriding plate excluded, to analyse the influence of the overriding plate. The overriding plate retards the rate of subduction. Maximum strain rates, evident along the trench in the absence of an overriding plate, extend to a greater depth within the subducted portion of the slab in the presence of an overriding plate.

  17. The time-dependent one-zone hadronic model - First principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrakoudis, S; Protheroe, R J; Reimer, A

    2012-01-01

    We present a time-dependent approach to the one-zone hadronic model in the case where the photon spectrum is produced by ultrarelativistic protons interacting with soft photons that are produced from protons and low magnetic fields. Assuming that protons are injected at a certain rate in a homogeneous spherical volume containing a magnetic field, the evolution of the system can be described by five coupled kinetic equations, for protons, electrons, photons, neutrons, and neutrinos. Photopair and photopion interactions are modelled using the results of Monte-Carlo simulations and, in particular from the SOPHIA code for the latter. The coupling of energy losses and injection introduces a self-consistency in our approach and allows the study of the comparative relevancy of processes at various conditions, the efficiency of the conversion of proton luminosity to radiation, the resulting neutrino spectra, and the effects of time variability on proton injection, among other topics. We present some characteristic ex...

  18. Development and application of a screening model for evaluating bioenhanced dissolution in DNAPL source zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Thomas J.; Abriola, Linda M.; Gibson, Jenny L.; Smits, Kathleen M.; Christ, John A.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation, a widely applied treatment technology for source zones contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), has proven economical and reasonably efficient for long-term management of contaminated sites. Successful application of this remedial technology, however, requires an understanding of the complex interaction of transport, mass transfer, and biotransformation processes. The bioenhancement factor, which represents the ratio of DNAPL mass transfer under microbially active conditions to that which would occur under abiotic conditions, is commonly used to quantify the effectiveness of a particular bioremediation remedy. To date, little research has been directed towards the development and validation of methods to predict bioenhancement factors under conditions representative of real sites. This work extends an existing, first-order, bioenhancement factor expression to systems with zero-order and Monod kinetics, representative of many source-zone scenarios. The utility of this model for predicting the bioenhancement factor for previously published laboratory and field experiments is evaluated. This evaluation demonstrates the applicability of these simple bioenhancement factors for preliminary experimental design and analysis, and for assessment of dissolution enhancement in ganglia-contaminated source zones. For ease of application, a set of nomographs is presented that graphically depicts the dependence of bioenhancement factor on physicochemical properties. Application of these nomographs is illustrated using data from a well-documented field site. Results suggest that this approach can successfully capture field-scale, as well as column-scale, behavior. Sensitivity analyses reveal that bioenhanced dissolution will critically depend on in-situ biomass concentrations.

  19. Modeling the Ductile Brittle Fracture Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels using a Cohesive Zone Model based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    Fracture properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels show large variations with changes in temperature and irradiation levels. Brittle behavior is observed at lower temperatures and/or higher irradiation levels whereas ductile mode of failure is predominant at higher temperatures and/or lower irradiation levels. In addition to such temperature and radiation dependent fracture behavior, significant scatter in fracture toughness has also been observed. As a consequence of such variability in fracture behavior, accurate estimates of fracture properties of RPV steels are of utmost importance for safe and reliable operation of reactor pressure vessels. A cohesive zone based approach is being pursued in the present study where an attempt is made to obtain a unified law capturing both stable crack growth (ductile fracture) and unstable failure (cleavage fracture). The parameters of the constitutive model are dependent on both temperature and failure probability. The effect of irradiation has not been considered in the present study. The use of such a cohesive zone based approach would allow the modeling of explicit crack growth at both stable and unstable regimes of fracture. Also it would provide the possibility to incorporate more physical lower length scale models to predict DBT. Such a multi-scale approach would significantly improve the predictive capabilities of the model, which is still largely empirical.

  20. Typhoon disaster zoning and prevention criteria——A double layer nested multi-objective probability model and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    For prevention and mitigation of typhoon disasters in China, in this paper a double layer nested multi-objective probability model of typhoon disaster zoning and prevention criteria is proposed. The multivariate compound extreme value distribution (MCEVD) is used to predict the joint probability of seven typhoon characteristics and corresponding typhoon induced disasters. Predicted results can be used for both typhoon disaster zoning and corresponding prevention criteria along China coast.

  1. Typhoon disaster zoning and prevention criteria——A double layer nested multiobjective probability model and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU DeFu; PANG Liang; XIE BoTao; WU YuanKang

    2008-01-01

    For prevention and mitigation of typhoon disasters in China,in this paper a double layer nested multi-objective probability model of typhoon disaster zoning and prevention criteria is proposed.The multivariate compound extreme value distri-bution (MCEVD) is used to predict the joint probability of seven typhoon charac-teristics and corresponding typhoon induced disasters.Predicted results can be used for both typhoon disaster zoning and corresponding prevention criteria along China coast.

  2. A Web-Based Environment for Modeling Deformation at Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foutz, L. J.; Williams, C. A.; McCaffrey, R.; Spooner, D. L.

    2005-05-01

    Subduction zones compose a large percentage of the plate boundaries on earth, and are capable of producing the largest and most devastating earthquakes. One of the critical problems for these regions is the determination of the portions of the plate boundary along which stress is accumulating and earthquakes are likely to initiate. Surface geodetic data, in conjunction with a suitable forward model, can help to constrain these stress accumulation patterns. We have developed a web-based tool that attempts to provide a complete environment for such problems. Our modeling environment allows users to select geodetic data for a particular region from our database, filtered by user-specified criteria. It is also possible to contribute data to the database. Two types of forward models are available: an enhanced elastic half-space dislocation (EHSD) model or a finite elastic plate (FP) model, both with user-specified elastic properties. After selecting a fault geometry, an appropriate finite element mesh is used to generate Green's functions for use in an inversion. Parameters controlling an inversion are then specified, including the option to determine the rotation poles of blocks that rotate with respect to the overriding plate. Once the inversion has been performed, we provide visualization facilities for viewing the results, or the user can simply download the desired results. We provide an overview of the modeling environment and demonstrate its use.

  3. A 3-D thermal regime model suitable for cold accumulation zones of polythermal mountain glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, A.; Gagliardini, O.; Vincent, C.; Wagnon, P.

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of the thermal and mechanical response of high altitude glaciers to climate change is crucial to assess future glacier hazards associated with thermal regime changes. This paper presents a new fully thermo-mechanically coupled transient thermal regime model including enthalpy transport, firn densification, full-Stokes porous flow, free surface evolution, strain heating, surface meltwater percolation, and refreezing. The model is forced by daily air temperature data and can therefore be used to perform prognostic simulations for different future climate scenarios. The set of equations is solved using the finite element ice sheet/ice flow model Elmer/Ice. This model is applied to the Col du Dôme glacier (Mont Blanc area, 4250 m a.s.l., France) where a comprehensive data set is available. The results show that the model is capable of reproducing observed density and velocity fields as well as borehole temperature evolution. The strong spatial variability of englacial temperature change observed at Col du Dôme is well reproduced. This spatial variability is mainly a result of the variability of the slope aspect of the glacier surface and snow accumulation. Results support the use of this model to study the influence of climate change on cold accumulation zones, in particular to estimate where and under what conditions glaciers will become temperate in the future.

  4. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Rehfeldt

    2004-10-08

    This report is an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]) (referred to as the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow model or site-scale SZ flow model in this report) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for calibration of groundwater flow models. This report also contains an expanded discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. The analysis of the potentiometric data presented in Revision 00 of this report (USGS 2001 [DIRS 154625]) provides the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target heads, and hydraulic gradients for the calibration of the SZ site-scale flow model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Revision 01 of this report (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) used updated water-level data for selected wells through the year 2000 as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain based on an alternative interpretation of perched water conditions. That revision developed computer files containing: Water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002); A table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS010908312332.003); and A potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternative concept from that presented by USGS (2001 [DIRS 154625]) for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data presented in USGS (2004 [DIRS 168473]) include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) Phases I and II and data from Borehole USW WT-24. This document is based on Revision 01 (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) and expands the discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. This uncertainty assessment includes an analysis of the impact of more recent water-level data and the impact of adding data from the EWDP Phases III and IV wells. In

  5. Strain localisation in mechanically layered rocks beneath detachment zones: insights from numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Le Pourhiet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We have designed a series of fully dynamic numerical simulations aimed at assessing how the orientation of mechanical layering in rocks controls the orientation of shear bands and the depth of penetration of strain in the footwall of detachment zones. Two parametric studies are presented. In the first one, the influence of stratification orientation on the occurrence and mode of strain localisation is tested by varying initial dip of inherited layering in the footwall with regard to the orientation of simple shear applied at the rigid boundary simulating a rigid hanging wall, all scaling and rheological parameter kept constant. It appears that when Mohr–Coulomb plasticity is being used, shear bands are found to localise only when the layering is being stretched. This corresponds to early deformational stages for inital layering dipping in the same direction as the shear is applied, and to later stages for intial layering dipping towards the opposite direction of shear. In all the cases, localisation of the strain after only γ=1 requires plastic yielding to be activated in the strong layer. The second parametric study shows that results are length-scale independent and that orientation of shear bands is not sensitive to the viscosity contrast or the strain rate. However, decreasing or increasing strain rate is shown to reduce the capacity of the shear zone to localise strain. In the later case, the strain pattern resembles a mylonitic band but the rheology is shown to be effectively linear. Based on the results, a conceptual model for strain localisation under detachment faults is presented. In the early stages, strain localisation occurs at slow rates by viscous shear instabilities but as the layered media is exhumed, the temperature drops and the strong layers start yielding plastically, forming shear bands and localising strain at the top of the shear zone. Once strain localisation has occured, the deformation in the shear band becomes

  6. Modelling of Turbulent Scalar Fluxes in the Broken Reaction Zones Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hong G.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Kasten, Christian; Arias, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The LES filtered species transport equation in turbulent reacting flow simulations contains the unclosed turbulent scalar flux that needs to be modelled. It is well known that the statistical behavior of this term and its alignment characteristics with resolved scalar gradient depend on the relative importance of heat release and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Counter-gradient transport has been reported in several earlier studies where the flames under investigation were located either in the corrugated flamelets or thin reaction zones regime of premixed turbulent combustion. Therefore it is useful to understand the statistical behavior of turbulent scalar fluxes if the flame represents the broken reaction zones regime (BRZR). The present analysis aims to provide improved understanding on this subject through an a-priori analysis of a detailed chemistry database consisting of three freely-propagating statistically planar turbulent H2-air premixed flames representing three different regimes of combustion. Results indicate that heat release effects weaken with increasing Karlovitz number, but that counter-gradient transport can still occur for large LES filter size in the BRZR. Furthermore the behaviour of the flux and in particular its sign are different for reactant and product species. KAUST, EPSRC, KAUST Supercomputing Lab, N8, Archer.

  7. Numerical simulation of friction stir welding (FSW): Prediction of the heat affect zone using a softening model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, R. M. F.; Carlone, P.; Valente, R. A. F.; Teixeira-Dias, F.; Palazzo, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    In this work a numerical model is proposed to simulate Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process in AA2024-T3 plates. This model included a softening model that account for the temperature history and the hardness distribution on a welded plate can thus be predicted. The validation of the model was performed using experimental measurements of the hardness in the plate cross-section. There is an acceptable prediction of the material softening in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) using the adopted model.

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Sequence Database: an expanded data model integrating natural language text and sequence analysis programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, R; Machekano, R; Gonzales, M J; Dupnik, K; Schapiro, J M; Shafer, R W

    2001-01-01

    The HIV Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Sequence Database is an on-line relational database that catalogs evolutionary and drug-related sequence variation in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease enzymes, the molecular targets of anti-HIV therapy (http://hivdb.stanford.edu). The database contains a compilation of nearly all published HIV RT and protease sequences, including submissions from International Collaboration databases and sequences published in journal articles. Sequences are linked to data about the source of the sequence sample and the antiretroviral drug treatment history of the individual from whom the isolate was obtained. During the past year 3500 sequences have been added and the data model has been expanded to include drug susceptibility data on sequenced isolates. Database content has also been integrated with didactic text and the output of two sequence analysis programs.

  9. Modeling Soft Institutional Change and the Improvement of Freshwater Governance in the Coastal Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Mongruel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of soft institutional change to improve freshwater governance in the coastal zone will be examined. Freshwater management seeks to reduce losses due to overexploitation of the common-pool resources provided by river catchments and their associated ecosystems. Due to the complexity of the governance system, improving the performance of one coastal social-ecological system means searching for the appropriate "soft" institutional change. In the Pertuis Charentais region, increasing scarcity of freshwater in summer threatens the health of the coastal ecosystem and the sustainability of human activities, which depend on the use of natural resources. The allocation of freshwater among competing uses or concerns is a core issue for integrated coastal zone management. To address this issue, we have constructed an analytical framework that combines the ecosystem services approach with the institutional analysis of common-pool resources, and have developed an integrated simulation tool based on the system dynamic modeling approach. Freshwater scarcity generates three kinds of user conflict: (1 conflict between two extractive uses of freshwater (irrigation and drinking water, (2 conflicts between extractive uses (provisioning services and other services (support, regulatory, and cultural provided by freshwater, and (3 competition within a given activity sector (agriculture or shellfish farming. Participation by local managers led to the identification of realistic soft institutional changes that might mitigate conflicts and improve the governance system. These possible institutional changes were then integrated as fixed exogenous parameters in the simulation model. The simulated scenarios suggest that innovative collective arrangements involving farmers could be an alternative to other more restrictive top-down measures. This participatory experiment also illustrates the potential of social-ecological modeling for exploring acceptable new

  10. Groundwater and solute transport modeling at Hyporheic zone of upper part Citarum River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Irwan; Farazi, Hendy; Fadhilah, Rahmat; Purnandi, Cipto; Notosiswoyo, Sudarto

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater and surface water interaction is an interesting topic to be studied related to the water resources and environmental studies. The study of interaction between groundwater and river water at the Upper Part Citarum River aims to know the contribution of groundwater to the river or reversely and also solute transport of dissolved ions between them. Analysis of drill logs, vertical electrical sounding at the selected sections, measurement of dissolved ions, and groundwater modeling were applied to determine the flow and solute transport phenomena at the hyporheic zone. It showed the hyporheic zone dominated by silt and clay with hydraulic conductivity range from 10-4∼10-8 m/s. The groundwater flowing into the river with very low gradient and it shows that the Citarum River is a gaining stream. The groundwater modeling shows direct seepage of groundwater into the Citarum River is only 186 l/s, very small compared to the total discharge of the river. Total dissolved ions of the groundwater ranged from 200 to 480 ppm while the river water range from 200 to 2,000 ppm. Based on solute transport modeling it indicates dissolved ions dispersion of the Citarum River into groundwater may occur in some areas such as Bojongsoang-Dayeuh Kolot and Nanjung. This situation would increase the dissolved ions in groundwater in the region due to the contribution of the Citarum River. The results of the research can be a reference for further studies related to the mechanism of transport of the pollutants in the groundwater around the Citarum River.

  11. Early Earth melt production in a subduction zone, a petrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, V.; Bouilhol, P.; Van Hunen, J.; Moyen, J.

    2013-12-01

    A large part of the Archean continental crust is made of a composite rock assemblage dominated by granitoids belonging to the TTG series (tonalite-trondhejmeite-granodiorite). The modus operandi of this sodic granitoids still disputed. If the modern processes leading to continental crust formation at convergent margins are well constrained, the extrapolation to early Earth conditions is hazardous, because the composition of Earth's early crust can be achieved through several processes. However, an 'arc' signature seems to be present in TTGs, suggesting a formation of continental crust in subduction zone settings. Moreover, they show strong similarities with modern adakites, which are thought to be formed by melting of the oceanic subducting crust. We present the results of a study where numerical models of subduction are integrated with a thermodynamic database. Our goal is to investigate under which conditions slab melting can be achieved if at all. We particularly focus our attention on the fate of water, since it is a component that is essential to the formation of TTG series, independently of the petrogenetical scenario preferred. The amount and composition of water bearing fluids in a subduction zone is controlled by slab devolatilization, and influence both the melting regime and the melt composition. Our reference model of an early Earth regime, with a high mantle potential temperature, show that the slab dehydrates early, ending up being composed of a dry eclogites. Importantly, our models show that dehydration melting is not achieved in the slab crust; yet, water-present melting of the 'dry' eclogites can be achieved if a dehydration reaction occurs in the deeper portion of the slab, fuelling the melting reaction with water. Moreover, the dehydration reactions that occurred within the slab are able to metasomatize the overlying mantle wedge, forming hydrated peridotites, that becomes a melt source when dragged down by corner-flow. Our results show the

  12. Modeling Surface Subsidence from Hydrocarbon Production and Induced Fault Slip in the Louisiana Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, E. P.; Zoback, M. D.

    2005-12-01

    Coastal wetland loss in southern Louisiana poses a great threat to the ecological and economic stability of the region. In the region of interest, wetland loss is a combination of land subsidence along with eustatic sea level rise, sediment accumulation, erosion, filling and drainage. More than half of the land loss in coastal Louisiana between 1932 and 1990 was related to subsidence due to the complicated interaction of multiple natural and anthropogenic processes, including compaction of Holocene sediments in the Mississippi River delta, lithospheric flexure as a response to sediment loading, and natural episodic movement along regional growth faults. In addition to these mechanisms, it has recently been suggested that subsurface oil and gas production may be a large contributing factor to surface subsidence in the Louisiana Coastal Zone. We model the effect of fluid withdrawal from oil and gas fields in the Barataria Bay region of the Louisiana Coastal Zone on surface subsidence and its potential role in inducing fault slip on the region's growth faults. Along the western edge of Barataria Basin is a first-order leveling line to constrain our model of land subsidence. The rates for this leveling line show numerous locations of increased subsidence rate over the surrounding area, which tend to be located over the large oil and gas fields in the region. However, also located in the regions of high subsidence rate and oil and gas fields are the regional normal faults. Slip on these growth faults is important in two contexts: Regional subsidence would be expected along these faults as a natural consequence of naturally-occurring slip over time. In addition, slip along the faults can be exacerbated by production such that surface subsidence would be localized near the oil and gas fields. Using pressure data from wells in the Valentine, Golden Meadow, and Leeville oil and gas fields we estimate the amount of compaction of the various reservoirs, the resulting surface

  13. CO2 migration in the vadose zone: experimental and numerical modelling of controlled gas injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    gasparini, andrea; credoz, anthony; grandia, fidel; garcia, david angel; bruno, jordi

    2014-05-01

    The mobility of CO2 in the vadose zone and its subsequent transfer to the atmosphere is a matter of concern in the risk assessment of the geological storage of CO2. In this study the experimental and modelling results of controlled CO2 injection are reported to better understanding of the physical processes affecting CO2 and transport in the vadose zone. CO2 was injected through 16 micro-injectors during 49 days of experiments in a 35 m3 experimental unit filled with sandy material, in the PISCO2 facilities at the ES.CO2 centre in Ponferrada (North Spain). Surface CO2 flux were monitored and mapped periodically to assess the evolution of CO2 migration through the soil and to the atmosphere. Numerical simulations were run to reproduce the experimental results, using TOUGH2 code with EOS7CA research module considering two phases (gas and liquid) and three components (H2O, CO2, air). Five numerical models were developed following step by step the injection procedure done at PISCO2. The reference case (Model A) simulates the injection into a homogeneous soil(homogeneous distribution of permeability and porosity in the near-surface area, 0.8 to 0.3 m deep from the atmosphere). In another model (Model B), four additional soil layers with four specific permeabilities and porosities were included to predict the effect of differential compaction on soil. To account for the effect of higher soil temperature, an isothermal simulation called Model C was also performed. Finally, the assessment of the rainfall effects (soil water saturation) on CO2 emission on surface was performed in models called Model D and E. The combined experimental and modelling approach shows that CO2 leakage in the vadose zone quickly comes out through preferential migration pathways and spots with the ranges of fluxes in the ground/surface interface from 2.5 to 600 g·m-2·day-1. This gas channelling is mainly related to soil compaction and climatic perturbation. This has significant implications to

  14. A consistency assessment of coupled cohesive zone models for mixed-mode debonding problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dimitri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to their simplicity, cohesive zone models (CZMs are very attractive to describe mixed-mode failure and debonding processes of materials and interfaces. Although a large number of coupled CZMs have been proposed, and despite the extensive related literature, little attention has been devoted to ensuring the consistency of these models for mixed-mode conditions, primarily in a thermodynamical sense. A lack of consistency may affect the local or global response of a mechanical system. This contribution deals with the consistency check for some widely used exponential and bilinear mixed-mode CZMs. The coupling effect on stresses and energy dissipation is first investigated and the path-dependance of the mixed-mode debonding work of separation is analitically evaluated. Analytical predictions are also compared with results from numerical implementations, where the interface is described with zero-thickness contact elements. A node-to-segment strategy is here adopted, which incorporates decohesion and contact within a unified framework. A new thermodynamically consistent mixed-mode CZ model based on a reformulation of the Xu-Needleman model as modified by van den Bosch et al. is finally proposed and derived by applying the Coleman and Noll procedure in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The model holds monolithically for loading and unloading processes, as well as for decohesion and contact, and its performance is demonstrated through suitable examples.

  15. Body-Fitted Detonation Shock Dynamics and the Pseudo-Reaction-Zone Energy Release Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chad; Quirk, James; Short, Mark; Chqiuete, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Programmed-burn methods are a class of models used to propagate a detonation wave, without the high resolution cost associated with a direct numerical simulation. They separate the detonation evolution calculation into two components: timing and energy release. The timing component is usually calculated with a Detonation Shock Dynamics model, a surface evolution representation that relates the normal velocity of the surface (Dn) to its local curvature. The energy release component must appropriately capture the degree of energy change associated with chemical reaction while simultaneously remaining synchronized with the timing component. The Pseudo-Reaction-Zone (PRZ) model is a reactive burn like energy release model, converting reactants into products, but with a conversion rate that is a function of the DSD surface Dn field. As such, it requires the DSD calculation produce smooth Dn fields, a challenge in complex geometries. We describe a new body-fitted approach to the Detonation Shock Dynamics calculation which produces the required smooth Dn fields, and a method for calibrating the PRZ model such that the rate of energy release remains as synced as possible with the timing component. We show results for slab, rate-stick and arc geometries.

  16. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  17. Seismic Responses of Texture-sequence Models and Their Applications in Hydrocarbon Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuChuanhu

    2005-01-01

    The texture-sequence analysis was established on the basis of texture-sequence models and time-frequency analysis as well as the quantitative analysis of seismic sections to determine the correspondence between sequence bodies and time-frequency features and that between reservoir properties and time-frequency energy. The targets would be studied in terms of sequence analysis,cycling analysis, reservoir prediction and quantitative description of targets by integrating geological,logging and drilling data. The fundamentals for texture-sequence analysis were to construct effectivetex ture-sequence models and obtain the corresponding seismic responses. The texturesequence analy-sis was applied to sandstones/conglomerates on steep slopes, to deltas on gentle slopes, to fans at low ends as well as to other subtle reservoirs in the continental rift-subsidence basins, which had brought out good results.

  18. Mapping Seasonal Evapotranspiration and Root Zone Soil Moisture using a Hybrid Modeling Approach over Vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geli, H. M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa) at field scale over the growing season are required for improving agricultural water management, particularly in water limited and drought prone regions. Remote sensing data from multiple platforms such as airborne and Landsat-based sensors can be used to provide these estimates. Combining these data with surface energy balance models can provide ETa estimates at sub- field scale as well as information on vegetation stress and soil moisture conditions. However, the temporal resolution of airborne and Landsat data does not allow for a continuous ETa monitoring over the course of the growing season. This study presents the application of a hybrid ETa modeling approach developed for monitoring daily ETa and root zone available water at high spatial resolutions. The hybrid ETa modeling approach couples a thermal-based energy balance model with a water balance-based scheme using data assimilation. The two source energy balance (TSEB) model is used to estimate instantaneous ETa which can be extrapolated to daily ETa using a water balance model modified to use the reflectance-based basal crop coefficient for interpolating ETa in between airborne and/or Landsat overpass dates. Moreover, since it is a water balance model, the soil moisture profile is also estimated. The hybrid ETa approach is applied over vineyard fields in central California. High resolution airborne and Landsat imagery were used to drive the hybrid model. These images were collected during periods that represented different vine phonological stages in 2013 growing season. Estimates of daily ETa and surface energy balance fluxes will be compared with ground-based eddy covariance tower measurements. Estimates of soil moisture at multiple depths will be compared with measurements.

  19. Predictions of mixed mode interface crack growth using a cohesive zone model for ductile fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    Special interface elements that account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence are used to analyse crack growth. In these elements the stress component tangential to the interface is accounted for, as determined by the requirement of compatibility with the surrou......Special interface elements that account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence are used to analyse crack growth. In these elements the stress component tangential to the interface is accounted for, as determined by the requirement of compatibility...... with the surrounding material in the tangential direction. Thus, the present interface description incorporates the important effect of stress triaxiality on damage evolution, which is not part of the usual cohesive zone models. The interface elements have been used previously for mode I loading conditions...... Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Next-generation phylogeography: a targeted approach for multilocus sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Puritz

    Full Text Available The field of phylogeography has long since realized the need and utility of incorporating nuclear DNA (nDNA sequences into analyses. However, the use of nDNA sequence data, at the population level, has been hindered by technical laboratory difficulty, sequencing costs, and problematic analytical methods dealing with genotypic sequence data, especially in non-model organisms. Here, we present a method utilizing the 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing platform with the capacity to simultaneously sequence two species of sea star (Meridiastra calcar and Parvulastra exigua at five different nDNA loci across 16 different populations of 20 individuals each per species. We compare results from 3 populations with traditional Sanger sequencing based methods, and demonstrate that this next-generation sequencing platform is more time and cost effective and more sensitive to rare variants than Sanger based sequencing. A crucial advantage is that the high coverage of clonally amplified sequences simplifies haplotype determination, even in highly polymorphic species. This targeted next-generation approach can greatly increase the use of nDNA sequence loci in phylogeographic and population genetic studies by mitigating many of the time, cost, and analytical issues associated with highly polymorphic, diploid sequence markers.

  1. Next-Generation Phylogeography: A Targeted Approach for Multilocus Sequencing of Non-Model Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puritz, Jonathan B.; Addison, Jason A.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The field of phylogeography has long since realized the need and utility of incorporating nuclear DNA (nDNA) sequences into analyses. However, the use of nDNA sequence data, at the population level, has been hindered by technical laboratory difficulty, sequencing costs, and problematic analytical methods dealing with genotypic sequence data, especially in non-model organisms. Here, we present a method utilizing the 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing platform with the capacity to simultaneously sequence two species of sea star (Meridiastra calcar and Parvulastra exigua) at five different nDNA loci across 16 different populations of 20 individuals each per species. We compare results from 3 populations with traditional Sanger sequencing based methods, and demonstrate that this next-generation sequencing platform is more time and cost effective and more sensitive to rare variants than Sanger based sequencing. A crucial advantage is that the high coverage of clonally amplified sequences simplifies haplotype determination, even in highly polymorphic species. This targeted next-generation approach can greatly increase the use of nDNA sequence loci in phylogeographic and population genetic studies by mitigating many of the time, cost, and analytical issues associated with highly polymorphic, diploid sequence markers. PMID:22470543

  2. Global patterns of dissolved silica export to the coastal zone: Results from a spatially explicit global model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beusen, A.H.W.; Bouwman, A.F.; Dürr, H.H.; Dekkers, A.L.M.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a multiple linear regression model developed for describing global river export of dissolved SiO2 (DSi) to coastal zones. The model, with river basin spatial scale and an annual temporal scale, is based on four variables with a significant influence on DSi yields (soil bulk density, preci

  3. A CFD Model for Wave Transformation and Breaking in the Surf Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopakatla, S. C.; Lippmann, T. C.; Richardson, J. E.; Thornton, E. B.; Holman, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    Wind-generated surface gravity waves are the major driving force for nearshore circulation and sediment transport. As waves shoal in shallow coastal waters, spectra evolve strongly owing to refraction, nonlinear energy transfers, and dissipation caused by wave breaking and bottom friction. Although considerable progress has been made in modeling wave propagation over complex bottom topography, the dissipation mechanisms are still poorly understood. As a consequence, wave transformation models for the surf zone use crude descriptions of the wave breaking process based on simple saturation criteria or empirical probability distributions that do not always work well for the range of bathymetric and wave conditions commonly observed in nature. In this report, we will discuss the results of studies made with the commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software system known as FLOW-3D (Flow Science, Inc., Sante Fe, NM). FLOW-3D is designed to solve transient, free surface flow problems based on the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in three-dimensions. As part of FLOW-3D's formulation, the dissipation of energy is determined by use of coupled turbulence closure schemes (e.g., closure schemes based on the solution of turbulent kinetic energy transport equations). In this study, fine scale pressures and velocities are computed over a two-dimensional beach profile measured during the 1990 Delilah experiment. The model is driven by observed wave spectra obtained in 8 meter water depths, and results compared with a cross-shore array of pressure sensors and current meters spanning the width of the surf zone. In the calculations, wave breaking is a natural consequence of the fluid dynamics and does not require the use of empirical formulations, or breaking criteria. The spatial and temporal variability in the wave breaking locations will be compared with video observations obtained during the experiment. Good comparison between modeled and observed wave

  4. Developing a Paradigm to Measure and Model the Form and Function of the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) includes all chemical, physical, and biological processes in our environment. As humans change the CZ, it becomes more important for us to understand how the CZ will respond. The problem with understanding the CZ is that so many different processes are tightly coupled and exhibit threshold behaviors. We therefore have difficulty creating models that accurately describe CZ evolution. CZ science targets the development of models to understand these processes. To parameterize the models requires CZ characterization and observatories to measure fluxes of water, energy, solutes, and sediments (WESS). WESS fluxes can then, in turn, be compared to the time-integrated histories of those fluxes that are recorded in soil profiles, sediment deposits, and rocks. By using scenarios of human behavior along with models to cross timescales from minutes to millenia, we will learn to forecast the impacts of anthropogenic activity. In the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, a large team of researchers are developing a suite of models to simulate CZ processes over a range of timescales. At the same time, this team is moving from a paradigm of "measure everything everywhere" to "measure only what we need" as we scale up from the 0.1 km2 watershed at Shale Hills to the 165 km2 Shavers creek watershed. At Shale Hills, we made densely spaced measurements. In the Shavers creek watershed, we are targetting catenas in sub-catchments of the watershed as well as measurements of the main-branch streams. Sub-catchments were chosen to explore the different lithologies and land use characteristics. Instrumentation is already deployed in one first-order sub-catchment located on Tuscarora sandstone. The next sub-catchment to be instrumented, like Shale Hills, will be located on shale bedrock. Unlike Shale Hills, however, the sub-catchment will host agricultural activity. We are targetting our intensive chemical, physical, and biological measurements on catenas

  5. CONSTRUCTIVE MODELLING FOR ZONE OF RECOVERY ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF DC TRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Shynkarenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.The article is aimed to develop the means and methods of forming a plurality of real and potential structural diagrams for zones of energy recovery and different locations of trains for further training neuro-fuzzy networks on the basis of expert solutions and also for the formation of good control. Methodology. Methodology of mathematical and algorithmic constructivism for modeling the structural diagrams of the electric supply system and modes of traction power consumption and the train’s locations in zones of energy recovery was applied. This approach involves the development of constructive-synthesizing structures (CSS with transformation by specialization, interpretation, specification and implementation. Development CSS provides an extensible definition media, relations and the signature of operations and constructive axiomatic. The most complex and essential part of the axioms is the set formed by the substitution rules defining the process of withdrawal of the corresponding structures. Findings. A specialized and specified CSS, which allows considering all the possibilities and features, that supply power traction systems with modern equipment, stations and trains location was designed. Its feature: the semantic content of the terminal alphabet images of electrical traction network and power consumers with relevant attributes. A special case of the formation of the structural diagram shows the possibilities CSS in relation to this problem. Originality. A new approach to solving the problem of rational use of energy recovery, which consists in application of the methods and means of artificial neural networks, expert systems, fuzzy logic and mathematical and algorithmic constructivism. This paper presents the methods of constructive simulation of a production-distribution of energy recovery zone structure in the system of the DC traction. Practical value. The tasks decision of the rational use of energy recovery can

  6. An overview of the recent approaches to terroir functional modelling, footprinting and zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, E.; Costantini, E.; Jones, G. V.; Mocali, S.

    2015-03-01

    Notions of terroir and their conceptualization through agro-environmental sciences have become popular in many parts of world. Originally developed for wine, terroir now encompasses many other crops including fruits, vegetables, cheese, olive oil, coffee, cacao and other crops, linking the uniqueness and quality of both beverages and foods to the environment where they are produced, giving the consumer a sense of place. Climate, geology, geomorphology and soil are the main environmental factors which make up the terroir effect on different scales. Often considered immutable culturally, the natural components of terroir are actually a set of processes, which together create a delicate equilibrium and regulation of its effect on products in both space and time. Due to both a greater need to better understand regional-to-site variations in crop production and the growth in spatial analytic technologies, the study of terroir has shifted from a largely descriptive regional science to a more applied, technical research field. Furthermore, the explosion of spatial data availability and sensing technologies has made the within-field scale of study more valuable to the individual grower. The result has been greater adoption of these technologies but also issues associated with both the spatial and temporal scales required for practical applications, as well as the relevant approaches for data synthesis. Moreover, as soil microbial communities are known to be of vital importance for terrestrial processes by driving the major soil geochemical cycles and supporting healthy plant growth, an intensive investigation of the microbial organization and their function is also required. Our objective is to present an overview of existing data and modelling approaches for terroir functional modelling, footprinting and zoning on local and regional scales. This review will focus on two main areas of recent terroir research: (1) using new tools to unravel the biogeochemical cycles of both

  7. Mathematical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are the most densely-populated areas in the world. Consequently water demand is high, posing great pressure on fresh water resources. Climatic change and its direct impacts on meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation) and indirect impact on sea level rise, as well as anthropogenic pressures (e.g. groundwater abstraction), are strong drivers causing groundwater salinisation and subsequently affecting coastal wetlands salinity with adverse effects on the corresponding ecosystems. Coastal zones are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes and variable-density flow conditions. Simulation of sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades several computer codes have been developed to simulate coupled surface and groundwater flow. In these numerical models surface water flow is usually described by the 1-D Saint Venant equations (e.g. Swain and Wexler, 1996) or the 2D shallow water equations (e.g. Liang et al., 2007). Further simplified equations, such as the diffusion and kinematic wave approximations to the Saint Venant equations, are also employed for the description of 2D overland flow and 1D stream flow (e.g. Gunduz and Aral, 2005). However, for coastal bays, estuaries and wetlands it is often desirable to solve the 3D shallow water equations to simulate surface water flow. This is the case e.g. for wind-driven flows or density-stratified flows. Furthermore, most integrated models are based on the assumption of constant fluid density and therefore their applicability to coastal regions is questionable. Thus, most of the existing codes are not well-suited to represent surface water-groundwater interactions in coastal areas. To this end, the 3D integrated

  8. Passive Electroreception in Fish: AN Analog Model of the Spike Generation Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, James Robert

    Sensory transduction begins in receptor cells specialized to the sensory modality involved and proceeds to the more generalized stage of the first afferent fiber, converting the initial sensory information into neural spikes for transmittal to the central nervous system. We have developed a unique analog electronic model of the generalized step (also known as the spike generation zone (SGZ)) using a tunnel diode, an operational amplifier, resistors, and capacitors. With no externally applied simulated postsynaptic input current, our model represents a 10^{-3}cm^2 patch (100 times the typical in vivo area) of tonically active, nonadaptive, postsynaptic neural membrane that behaves as a pacemaker cell. Similar to the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations, our model is shown to be a simplification of the Hodgkin-Huxley parallel conductance model and can be analyzed by the methods of van der Pol. Measurements using the model yield results which compare favorably to physiological stimulus-response data gathered by Murray for elasmobranch electroreceptors. We then use the model to show that the main contribution to variance in the rate of neural spike output is provided by coincident inputs to the SGZ oscillator (i.e., by synaptic input noise) and not by inherent instability of the SGZ oscillator. Configured for maximum sensitivity, our model is capable of detecting stimulus changes as low as 50 fA in less than a second and this corresponds to a fractional frequency change of Delta f/f ~ 2 times 10^{-3}. Much data exists implying that in vivo detection of Delta f/f is limited to the range of one to ten percent (Weber-Fechner criterion). We propose the variance induced by the synaptic input noise provides a plausible physiological basis for the Weber-Fechner criterion.

  9. Logistic regression model for diagnosis of transition zone prostate cancer on multi-parametric MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikaios, Nikolaos; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Departments of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Alkalbani, Jokha; Sidhu, Harbir Singh; Fujiwara, Taiki [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Abd-Alazeez, Mohamed; Ahmed, Hashim; Emberton, Mark [University College London, Research Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom); Kirkham, Alex; Allen, Clare [University College London Hospital, Departments of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Freeman, Alex [University College London Hospital, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-17

    We aimed to develop logistic regression (LR) models for classifying prostate cancer within the transition zone on multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). One hundred and fifty-five patients (training cohort, 70 patients; temporal validation cohort, 85 patients) underwent mp-MRI and transperineal-template-prostate-mapping (TPM) biopsy. Positive cores were classified by cancer definitions: (1) any-cancer; (2) definition-1 [≥Gleason 4 + 3 or ≥ 6 mm cancer core length (CCL)] [high risk significant]; and (3) definition-2 (≥Gleason 3 + 4 or ≥ 4 mm CCL) cancer [intermediate-high risk significant]. For each, logistic-regression mp-MRI models were derived from the training cohort and validated internally and with the temporal cohort. Sensitivity/specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC-AUC) curve were calculated. LR model performance was compared to radiologists' performance. Twenty-eight of 70 patients from the training cohort, and 25/85 patients from the temporal validation cohort had significant cancer on TPM. The ROC-AUC of the LR model for classification of cancer was 0.73/0.67 at internal/temporal validation. The radiologist A/B ROC-AUC was 0.65/0.74 (temporal cohort). For patients scored by radiologists as Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (Pi-RADS) score 3, sensitivity/specificity of radiologist A 'best guess' and LR model was 0.14/0.54 and 0.71/0.61, respectively; and radiologist B 'best guess' and LR model was 0.40/0.34 and 0.50/0.76, respectively. LR models can improve classification of Pi-RADS score 3 lesions similar to experienced radiologists. (orig.)

  10. Small-Scale Modeling of Waves and Floes in the Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Calantoni, J.; Bateman, S. P.; Veeramony, J.

    2014-12-01

    We are conducting a model-based investigation into the small-scale (O(m)) physics of wave-ice floe interaction in the marginal ice zone (MIZ), in order to test and improve parameterizations utilized by large-scale climate models. The presentation will describe the development and validation of a coupled system to track the wave-forced motion of floating objects (collections of bonded particles) and the concurrent effects of the moving objects on the surrounding fluid. NHWAVE, a fully dispersive wave model with a vertical sigma-coordinate, is extended to model moving objects by including vertical boundary fitted meshing and horizontal immersed boundary method. LIGGGHTS, a discrete element granular particle-tracking simulator, is configured to include realistic bonding forces between elements and incorporate velocity and pressure gradient effects from the fluid model. Following an overview of the coupled system, validation results will be presented for the standalone wave and ice models. For NHWAVE, model estimates of surface wave patterns generated by oscillating surface objects are compared to LIDAR measurements from corresponding laboratory experiments. For LIGGGHTS, the stress-strain response is measured for collections of bonded particles under tension and/or compression, then compared to available lab and field data. Results will also be presented from simplified MIZ simulations with the coupled system, in which waves pass through groups of rigid ice blocks and their refraction, diffraction, and reflection are measured. Finally, we will provide a preview of an upcoming series of targeted virtual experiments in which momentum/energy exchange between waves and ice floes is measured under varied conditions.

  11. Modelling nutrient retention in the coastal zone of an eutrophic sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almroth-Rosell, Elin; Edman, Moa; Eilola, Kari; Markus Meier, H. E.; Sahlberg, Jörgen

    2016-10-01

    The Swedish Coastal zone Model (SCM) was used at a test site, the Stockholm archipelago, located in the northern part of the central Baltic Sea, to study the retention capacity of the coastal filter on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loads from land and atmosphere. The efficiency of the coastal filter to permanently retain nutrients determines how much of the local nutrient loads actually reach the open sea. The SCM system is a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus-type model coupled to a horizontally integrated, physical model in particular suitable for estuaries. In this study the Stockholm Archipelago, consisting of 86 sub-basins, was divided into three sub-areas: the inner, the intermediate and the outer archipelago. An evaluation of model results showed that the modelled freshwater supply agrees well with observations. The nutrient, salinity and temperature dynamics simulated by the SCM are also found to be in good or acceptable agreement with observations. The analysis showed that the Stockholm Archipelago works as a filter for nutrients that enter the coastal zone from land, but the filter efficiency is not effective enough to retain all the supplied nutrients. However, at least 65 and 72 % of the P and N, respectively, are retained during the studied period (1990-2012). A major part of the retention is permanent, which for P means burial. For N, almost 92 % of the permanent retention is represented by benthic denitrification, less than 8 % by burial, while pelagic denitrification is below 1 %. Highest total amounts of P and N are retained in the outer archipelago, where the surface area is largest. The area-specific retention of P and N, however, is highest in the smaller inner archipelago and decreases towards the open sea. A reduction scenario of the land loads of N and P showed that the filter efficiencies of N and P increase and the export of N from the archipelago decreases. About 15 years after the reduction, the export of P changes into an

  12. The use of synthetic input sequences in time series modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dair Jose de [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31.270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Letellier, Christophe [CORIA/CNRS UMR 6614, Universite et INSA de Rouen, Av. de l' Universite, BP 12, F-76801 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray cedex (France); Gomes, Murilo E.D. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31.270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Aguirre, Luis A. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31.270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: aguirre@cpdee.ufmg.br

    2008-08-04

    In many situations time series models obtained from noise-like data settle to trivial solutions under iteration. This Letter proposes a way of producing a synthetic (dummy) input, that is included to prevent the model from settling down to a trivial solution, while maintaining features of the original signal. Simulated benchmark models and a real time series of RR intervals from an ECG are used to illustrate the procedure.

  13. The use of synthetic input sequences in time series modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Dair José; Letellier, Christophe; Gomes, Murilo E. D.; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2008-08-01

    In many situations time series models obtained from noise-like data settle to trivial solutions under iteration. This Letter proposes a way of producing a synthetic (dummy) input, that is included to prevent the model from settling down to a trivial solution, while maintaining features of the original signal. Simulated benchmark models and a real time series of RR intervals from an ECG are used to illustrate the procedure.

  14. Modeling sustainable groundwater management: packaging and sequencing of policy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Encarna; Dinar, Ariel

    2013-04-15

    Of the many studies estimating effectiveness of policy reforms most have been considering various types of policy reforms in isolation from each other. Such pattern has also been the case in water resource regulations. In the case of groundwater almost all policy interventions considered in the literature have been implemented individually, without taking into account the possible interactions and impacts among them. In this paper, we focus on two policy instruments: water quota and uniform water tax. The paper demonstrates how packaging and sequencing sets of policy interventions, with possible triggers to initiate their time of implementation, may be more effective in achieving a sustainable groundwater management than single policies when environmental externalities exist. The policy instruments are applied to the Western la Mancha aquifer in Southeast Spain, a major aquifer that is managed by a command and control approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Model-based quality assessment and base-calling for second-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Héctor Corrada; Irizarry, Rafael A

    2010-09-01

    Second-generation sequencing (sec-gen) technology can sequence millions of short fragments of DNA in parallel, making it capable of assembling complex genomes for a small fraction of the price and time of previous technologies. In fact, a recently formed international consortium, the 1000 Genomes Project, plans to fully sequence the genomes of approximately 1200 people. The prospect of comparative analysis at the sequence level of a large number of samples across multiple populations may be achieved within the next five years. These data present unprecedented challenges in statistical analysis. For instance, analysis operates on millions of short nucleotide sequences, or reads-strings of A,C,G, or T's, between 30 and 100 characters long-which are the result of complex processing of noisy continuous fluorescence intensity measurements known as base-calling. The complexity of the base-calling discretization process results in reads of widely varying quality within and across sequence samples. This variation in processing quality results in infrequent but systematic errors that we have found to mislead downstream analysis of the discretized sequence read data. For instance, a central goal of the 1000 Genomes Project is to quantify across-sample variation at the single nucleotide level. At this resolution, small error rates in sequencing prove significant, especially for rare variants. Sec-gen sequencing is a relatively new technology for which potential biases and sources of obscuring variation are not yet fully understood. Therefore, modeling and quantifying the uncertainty inherent in the generation of sequence reads is of utmost importance. In this article, we present a simple model to capture uncertainty arising in the base-calling procedure of the Illumina/Solexa GA platform. Model parameters have a straightforward interpretation in terms of the chemistry of base-calling allowing for informative and easily interpretable metrics that capture the variability in

  16. De novo Transcriptome Sequencing and Development of Abscission Zone-Specific Microarray as a New Molecular Tool for Analysis of Tomato Organ Abscission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Srivignesh; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Riov, Joseph; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Kuravadi, Nagesh A.; Kochanek, Bettina; Salim, Shoshana; Tucker, Mark L.; Meir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Abscission of flower pedicels and leaf petioles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can be induced by flower removal or leaf deblading, respectively, which leads to auxin depletion, resulting in increased sensitivity of the abscission zone (AZ) to ethylene. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive the acquisition of abscission competence and its modulation by auxin gradients are not yet known. We used RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) to obtain a comprehensive transcriptome of tomato flower AZ (FAZ) and leaf AZ (LAZ) during abscission. RNA-Seq was performed on a pool of total RNA extracted from tomato FAZ and LAZ, at different abscission stages, followed by de novo assembly. The assembled clusters contained transcripts that are already known in the Solanaceae (SOL) genomics and NCBI databases, and over 8823 identified novel tomato transcripts of varying sizes. An AZ-specific microarray, encompassing the novel transcripts identified in this study and all known transcripts from the SOL genomics and NCBI databases, was constructed to study the abscission process. Multiple probes for longer genes and key AZ-specific genes, including antisense probes for all transcripts, make this array a unique tool for studying abscission with a comprehensive set of transcripts, and for mining for naturally occurring antisense transcripts. We focused on comparing the global transcriptomes generated from the FAZ and the LAZ to establish the divergences and similarities in their transcriptional networks, and particularly to characterize the processes and transcriptional regulators enriched in gene clusters that are differentially regulated in these two AZs. This study is the first attempt to analyze the global gene expression in different AZs in tomato by combining the RNA-Seq technique with oligonucleotide microarrays. Our AZ-specific microarray chip provides a cost-effective approach for expression profiling and robust analysis of multiple samples in a rapid succession. PMID:26834766

  17. De novo transcriptome sequencing and development of abscission zone-specific microarray as a new molecular tool for analysis of tomato organ abscission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivignesh eSundaresan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abscission of flower pedicels and leaf petioles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum can be induced by flower removal or leaf deblading, respectively, leading to auxin depletion, which results in increased sensitivity of the abscission zone (AZ to ethylene. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive the acquisition of abscission competence and its modulation by auxin gradients are not yet known. We used RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq to obtain the comprehensive transcriptome of tomato flower AZ (FAZ and leaf AZ (LAZ during abscission. RNA-Seq was performed on a pool of total RNA extracted from different abscission stages of tomato FAZ and LAZ, followed by de novo assembly. The assembled clusters contained transcripts that are already known in Solanaceae (SOL genomics database and NCBI databases, and over 8,823 identified novel tomato transcripts of varying sizes. An AZ-specific microarray, encompassing these novel transcripts identified in this study and all known transcripts from the SOL genomics and NCBI databases, was constructed to study the abscission process. Multiple probes for longer genes and key AZ-specific genes, including antisense probes for all transcripts, make this array a unique tool for studying abscission with a comprehensive set of transcripts, and for mining for naturally occurring antisense transcripts. We focused on comparing the global transcriptomes generated from the FAZ and the LAZ to establish the divergences and similarities in their transcriptional networks, and particularly to characterize the processes and transcriptional regulators enriched in gene clusters that are differentially regulated in these two AZs. This study is the first attempt to analyze the global gene expression in different AZs in tomato by combining the RNA-Seq technique with oligonucleotide microarrays. Our AZ-specific microarray chip provides a cost-effective approach for expression profiling and robust analysis of multiple samples in a rapid succession.

  18. A Probabilistic Genome-Wide Gene Reading Frame Sequence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Mørk, Søren

    using the probabilistic logic programming language and machine learning system PRISM - a fast and efficient model prototyping environment, using bacterial gene finding performance as a benchmark of signal strength. The model is used to prune a set of gene predictions from an underlying gene finder...

  19. An introduction to hidden Markov models for biological sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    A non-matematical tutorial on hidden Markov models (HMMs) plus a description of one of the applications of HMMs: gene finding.......A non-matematical tutorial on hidden Markov models (HMMs) plus a description of one of the applications of HMMs: gene finding....

  20. Sequence analysis and homology modeling of laccase from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, Rohan J; Gavhane, Aj; Gaikar, Rb; Bansode, Ts; Maskar, Au; Gupta, Ak; Sohni, Sk; Patidar, Ma; Pandey, Tr; Jangle, Sn

    2010-09-20

    Industrial effluents of textile, paper, and leather industries contain various toxic dyes as one of the waste material. It imparts major impact on human health as well as environment. The white rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus Laccase is generally used to degrade these toxic dyes. In order to decipher the mechanism of process by which Laccase degrade dyes, it is essential to know its 3D structure. Homology modeling was performed in presented work, by satisfying Spatial restrains using Modeller Program, which is considered as standard in this field, to generate 3D structure of Laccase in unison, SWISSMODEL web server was also utilized to generate and verify the alternative models. We observed that models created using Modeller stands better on structure evaluation tests. This study can further be used in molecular docking techniques, to understand the interaction of enzyme with its mediators like 2, 2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) and Vanillin that are known to enhance the Laccase activity.

  1. Numerical modeling of fluid flow in a fault zone: a case of study from Majella Mountain (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Valentina; Battaglia, Maurizio; Bigi, Sabina; De'Haven Hyman, Jeffrey; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2017-04-01

    The study of fluid flow in fractured rocks plays a key role in reservoir management, including CO2 sequestration and waste isolation. We present a numerical model of fluid flow in a fault zone, based on field data acquired in Majella Mountain, in the Central Apennines (Italy). This fault zone is considered a good analogue for the massive presence of fluid migration in the form of tar. Faults are mechanical features and cause permeability heterogeneities in the upper crust, so they strongly influence fluid flow. The distribution of the main components (core, damage zone) can lead the fault zone to act as a conduit, a barrier, or a combined conduit-barrier system. We integrated existing information and our own structural surveys of the area to better identify the major fault features (e.g., type of fractures, statistical properties, geometrical and petro-physical characteristics). In our model the damage zones of the fault are described as discretely fractured medium, while the core of the fault as a porous one. Our model utilizes the dfnWorks code, a parallelized computational suite, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), that generates three dimensional Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) of the damage zones of the fault and characterizes its hydraulic parameters. The challenge of the study is the coupling between the discrete domain of the damage zones and the continuum one of the core. The field investigations and the basic computational workflow will be described, along with preliminary results of fluid flow simulation at the scale of the fault.

  2. Using a Numerical Model to Quantitatively Assess Dynamic Recrystallization as a Mechanism for He Enrichment in Mantle Shear Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, K.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Warren, J. M.; Kurz, M. D.; Kumamoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies of ductile peridotite shear zones in the Josephine Peridotite in SW Oregon find higher helium concentrations in whole rock samples located where total strain is greatest and recrystallized grain sizes are smallest. Based upon these results, previous workers suggest that dynamic recrystallization may lead to increased storage of He on grain boundaries. To assess the feasibility of this mechanism for enhanced He storage, we utilize a combined set of new and previous data from Shear Zone A (SZA) and B (SZB) of the Fresno Bench of the Josephine Peridotite to constrain a 1D numerical model of a ductile shear zone; the combined data set includes both He concentrations as well as measured total strain across the shear zone. Existing data within the region of highest strain (0 to ~2.5 m from the center of each shear zone) are sparse and, thus, we strategically sampled locations within this zone to maximize data resolution across a range of total strain. In each sample, we measure helium concentrations in unserpentinized harzburgite bulk rock using mass spectrometry. Analysis of the orientation of pyroxene foliation planes compared to shear planes provides an estimation of shear strain during deformation. Numerically, our model is discretized using finite differences and incorporates a non-linear, temperature-dependent viscosity, shear heating, and dynamic recrystallization. Here, we present our newly compiled collection of helium concentrations relative to total strain within SZA and SZB and measured grain sizes, which are used to constrain the modeled equilibrium grain size and quantitatively test dynamic recrystallization as a mechanism for concentrating He within peridotite shear zones.

  3. Expanding the role of reactive transport models in critical zone processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Maher, Kate; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Druhan, Jennifer; Meile, Christof; Lawrence, Corey; Moore, Joel; Perdrial, Julia; Sullivan, Pamela; Thompson, Aaron; Jin, Lixin; Bolton, Edward W.; Brantley, Susan L.; Dietrich, William E.; Mayer, K. Ulrich; Steefel, Carl; Valocchi, Albert J.; Zachara, John M.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; McIntosh, Jennifer; Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Kumar, Mukesh; Sonnenthal, Eric; Bao, Chen; Beisman, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Models test our understanding of processes and can reach beyond the spatial and temporal scales of measurements. Multi-component Reactive Transport Models (RTMs), initially developed more than three decades ago, have been used extensively to explore the interactions of geothermal, hydrologic, geochemical, and geobiological processes in subsurface systems. Driven by extensive data sets now available from intensive measurement efforts, there is a pressing need to couple RTMs with other community models to explore non-linear interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and geosphere. Here we briefly review the history of RTM development, summarize the current state of RTM approaches, and identify new research directions, opportunities, and infrastructure needs to broaden the use of RTMs. In particular, we envision the expanded use of RTMs in advancing process understanding in the Critical Zone, the veneer of the Earth that extends from the top of vegetation to the bottom of groundwater. We argue that, although parsimonious models are essential at larger scales, process-based models offer tools to explore the highly nonlinear coupling that characterizes natural systems. We present seven testable hypotheses that emphasize the unique capabilities of process-based RTMs for (1) elucidating chemical weathering and its physical and biogeochemical drivers; (2) understanding the interactions among roots, micro-organisms, carbon, water, and minerals in the rhizosphere; (3) assessing the effects of heterogeneity across spatial and temporal scales; and (4) integrating the vast quantity of novel data, including “omics” data (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics), elemental concentration and speciation data, and isotope data into our understanding of complex earth surface systems. With strong support from data-driven sciences, we are now in an exciting era where integration of RTM framework into other community models will facilitate process

  4. A cohesive zone model to simulate the hydrogen embrittlement effect on a high-strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gobbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to model the fracture mechanical behavior of a high-strength low carbon steel, AISI 4130 operating in hydrogen contaminated environment. The study deals with the development of 2D finite element cohesive zone model (CZM reproducing a toughness test. Along the symmetry plane over the crack path of a C(T specimen a zero thickness layer of cohesive elements are implemented in order to simulate the crack propagation. The main feature of this kind of model is the definition of a traction-separation law (TSL that reproduces the constitutive response of the material inside to the cohesive elements. Starting from a TSL calibrated on hydrogen non-contaminated material, the embrittlement effect is simulated by reducing the cohesive energy according to the total hydrogen content including the lattice sites (NILS and the trapped amount. In this perspective, the proposed model consists of three steps of simulations. First step evaluates the hydrostatic pressure. It drives the initial hydrogen concentration assigned in the second step, a mass diffusion analysis, defining in this way the contribution of hydrogen moving across the interstitial lattice sites. The final stress analysis, allows getting the total hydrogen content, including the trapped amount, and evaluating the new crack initiation and propagation due to the hydrogen presence. The model is implemented in both plane strain and plane stress configurations; results are compared in the discussion. From the analyses, it resulted that hydrogen is located only into lattice sites and not in traps, and that the considered steel experiences a high hydrogen susceptibility. By the proposed procedure, the developed numerical model seems a reliable and quick tool able to estimate the mechanical behavior of steels in presence of hydrogen.

  5. A Model for Organizational Intelligence in Islamic Azad University (Zone 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Erfani Khanghahi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Today organizations are faced with the rapidly changeable events in economical, technological, social, cultural and political environment. Successful and dynamic reaction of organizations depends on their ability to provide relevant information and to find, at the same time, adequate solutions to the problems they are faced with. In that sense, the attention of organizational theoreticians is focused on designing of intellectual abilities of organization and new concept in organizational theory has developed organizational intelligence (OI. In two decades ago, theoretical models have been developed and little research has been conducted. Having a model for defining and assessing the organizational status of an organization can be very helpful but the key questions facing every manager are; how can the level of collective intelligence be promoted? And what factors influence OI? Therefore this research carried out in order to assess OI and its factors influencing I.A.U. and provide a structural equation model. The subject of the study was 311 faculty members of I.A.U (Zone 8. Faculty members completed OI questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha=0.98, learning climate (Cronbach's alpha=0.94, multifactor leadership questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha =0.92 and organizational learning audit (Cronbach's alpha =0.94. Findings of this research showed that mean of organizational intelligence, organizational learning and learning culture were less than mean and transformational leadership was more than mean of questionnaire. Lisrel project software was applied for confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and structural equation modeling (SEM. Based on the tested structural equation model, transformational leadership style had direct impact on learning culture $(eta=0.78$, learning culture had a direct impact on OI $(eta=0.46$, organizational learning had a direct impact on OI $(eta=0.34$ and learning culture had a direct impact on organizational learning $(eta=0.96$. The

  6. Contact models of repaired articular surfaces: influence of loading conditions and the superficial tangential zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2011-07-01

    The superficial tangential zone (STZ) plays a significant role in normal articular cartilage's ability to support loads and retain fluids. To date, tissue engineering efforts have not replicated normal STZ function in cartilage repairs. This finite element study examined the STZ's role in normal and repaired articular surfaces under different contact conditions. Contact area and pressure distributions were allowed to change with time, tension-compression nonlinearity modeled collagen behavior in the STZ, and nonlinear geometry was incorporated to accommodate finite deformation. Responses to loading via impermeable and permeable rigid surfaces were compared to loading via normal cartilage, a more physiologic condition, anticipating the two rigid loading surfaces would bracket that of normal. For models loaded by normal cartilage, an STZ placed over the inferior repair region reduced the short-term axial compression of the articular surface by 15%, when compared to a repair without an STZ. Covering the repair with a normal STZ shifted the flow patterns and strain levels back toward that of normal cartilage. Additionally, reductions in von Mises stress (21%) and an increase in fluid pressure (13%) occurred in repair tissue under the STZ. This continues to show that STZ properties of sufficient quality are likely critical for the survival of transplanted constructs in vivo. However, response to loading via normal cartilage did not always fall within ranges predicted by the rigid surfaces. Use of more physiologic contact models is recommended for more accurate investigations into properties critical to the success of repair tissues.

  7. Radiation and Polarization Signatures of 3D Multi-zone Time-dependent Hadronic Blazar Model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We present a newly developed time-dependent three-dimensional multi-zone hadronic blazar emission model. By coupling a Fokker-Planck based lepto-hadronic particle evolution code 3DHad with a polarization-dependent radiation transfer code, 3DPol, we are able to study the time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures of a hadronic blazar model for the first time. Our current code is limited to parameter regimes in which the hadronic $\\gamma$-ray output is dominated by proton synchrotron emission, neglecting pion production. Our results demonstrate that the time-dependent flux and polarization signatures are generally dominated by the relation between the synchrotron cooling and the light crossing time scale, which is largely independent of the exact model parameters. We find that unlike the low-energy polarization signatures, which can vary rapidly in time, the high-energy polarization signatures appear stable. As a result, future high-energy polarimeters may be able to distinguish such signatures from t...

  8. Simulations of a stretching bar using a plasticity model from the shear transformation zone theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Gibou, Frederic

    2010-06-05

    An Eulerian simulation is developed to study an elastoplastic model of amorphous materials that is based upon the shear transformation zone theory developed by Langer and coworkers. In this theory, plastic deformation is controlled by an effective temperature that measures the amount of configurational disorder in the material. The simulation is used to model ductile fracture in a stretching bar that initially contains a small notch, and the effects of many of the model parameters are examined. The simulation tracks the shape of the bar using the level set method. Within the bar, a finite difference discretization is employed that makes use of the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme. The system of equations is moderately stiff due to the presence of large elastic constants, and one of the key numerical challenges is to accurately track the level set and construct extrapolated field values for use in boundary conditions. A new approach to field extrapolation is discussed that is second order accurate and requires a constant amount of work per gridpoint.

  9. A two-dimensional model for gas mixing in the upper dilute zone of a circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, M.; Schoenfelder, H.; Werther, J. [Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    A two-dimensional two-phase flow model for gas/solid flow and gas mixing in the upper zone of a circulating fluidized bed is described. Continuous functions are used to describe variations of local flow parameters horizontally and vertically. Numerical values of dispersion parameters and interfacial mass transfer coefficients are derived from the results of tracer gas mixing experiments. There is good agreement between calculated and measured tracer gas profiles in the upper dilute zone of the circulating fluidized bed. The model is applicable to calculation of chemical reactions in CFB risers. 37 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Modeling Transient Root-zone Soil Moisture Dichotomies in Landscapes with Intermixed Land Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrignani, A.; Ochsner, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Although large-scale in situ soil moisture monitoring networks are becoming increasingly valuable research tools, deficiencies of many existing networks include the small spatial support of each station, the low spatial density of stations, and the almost exclusive deployment of stations in grassland vegetation. These grassland soil moisture observations may not adequately represent the real soil moisture patterns in landscapes with intermixed land cover types. The objectives of this study were i) to compare root-zone soil moisture dynamics of two dominant vegetation types across Oklahoma, grassland (observed) and winter wheat cropland (simulated); ii) to relate the soil moisture dynamics of grassland and cropland vegetation using an artificial neural network (ANN) as a transfer function; and iii) to use the resulting ANN to estimate the soil moisture spatial patterns for a landscape of intermixed grassland and wheat cropland. Root-zone soil moisture was represented by plant available water (PAW) in the top 0.8 m of the soil profile. PAW under grassland was calculated from 18 years of soil moisture observations at 78 stations of the Oklahoma Mesonet, whereas PAW under winter wheat was simulated for the same 78 locations using a soil water balance model. Then, we trained an ANN to reproduce the simulated PAW under winter wheat using only seven inputs: day of the year, latitude and longitude, measured PAW under grassland, and percent sand, silt, and clay. The resulting ANN was used, along with grassland soil moisture observations, to estimate the detailed soil moisture pattern for a 9x9 km2 Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) grid cell. The seasonal dynamics of root-zone PAW for grassland and winter wheat were strongly asynchronous, so grassland soil moisture observations rarely reflect cropland soil moisture conditions in the region. The simple ANN approach facilitated efficient and accurate prediction of the simulated PAW under winter wheat, RMSE = 24 mm, using

  11. Modeling nutrient retention in the coastal zone of an eutrophic sea - a model study in the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almroth-Rosell, Elin; Edman, Moa; Eilola, Kari; Meier, Markus; Sahlberg, Jörgen

    2016-04-01

    This study shows that the Stockholm archipelago works as a filter for nutrients that enters the coastal zone from land. The filter capacity is high, but not effective enough to take care of all the nutrients that the system receives. At least 65 % and 72 % of the phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), respectively, is retained. The multi-basin one dimensional Swedish Coastal zone Model (SCM) that was used is based on the Swedish Coastal and Ocean Biogeochemical model (SCOBI) coupled to the equation solver PROgram for Boundary layers in the Environment (PROBE). An evaluation of model results showed that the nutrient, salinity and temperature dynamics in the SCM model are of good quality. To analyse the results the Stockholm archipelago was divided into three sub-areas: the inner, the intermediate and the outer archipelago. The analysis showed that the highest total amounts of P and N are retained in the outer archipelago where the surface area is largest. The area weighted retention of P and N, however, is highest in the smaller inner archipelago and decreases towards the open sea. A major part of the retention is permanent. For P sediment burial is the only permanent retention mechanism, but for N almost 92 % of the permanent retention is caused by benthic denitrification, less than 8 % by burial, while pelagic denitrification is below 1%. A reduction of the land load of nutrients (P reduced with 13 % and N with 20%) resulted in increased retention capacity of N and P and lowered the transport of N out from the archipelago. About 15 years after the reduction P is imported into the archipelago instead of being exported.

  12. The effects of zoning methods on forecasting of the next earthquake occurrences, according to semi-Markov models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Sadeghian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are natural phenomena that can be viewed in three dimensions: time, space and magnitude. Earthquakes can be investigated not only physically, but also mathematically. In this study, semi-Markov models are applied, which can be considered as useful methods to analyze and forecast the occurrence of future earthquakes based on previous earthquake data. In the present study, the target region, Iran, is divided into zones, and each zone is examined as one of the semi-Markov model states. Several methods to determine the levels of forecasting error are then introduced and applied to the target area. The results of the application of these semi-Markov models to investigate and forecast the occurrence of future earthquakes are obtained and analyzed mathematically. A new zoning method is developed and compared with that of Karakaisis, through the proposed forecasting method. Moreover, the effects of the type of zoning and the number of zones on the forecasting error of the next earthquake occurrences are investigated using several algorithms.

  13. Impact of global warming on the geobotanic zones: an experiment with a statistical-dynamical climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franchito, Sergio H.; Brahmananda Rao, V. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Centro de Ciencia do Sistema Terrestre, CCST, Sau Paulo, SP (Brazil); Moraes, E.C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Sensoriamento Remoto, DSR, Sau Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    In this study, a zonally-averaged statistical climate model (SDM) is used to investigate the impact of global warming on the distribution of the geobotanic zones over the globe. The model includes a parameterization of the biogeophysical feedback mechanism that links the state of surface to the atmosphere (a bidirectional interaction between vegetation and climate). In the control experiment (simulation of the present-day climate) the geobotanic state is well simulated by the model, so that the distribution of the geobotanic zones over the globe shows a very good agreement with the observed ones. The impact of global warming on the distribution of the geobotanic zones is investigated considering the increase of CO{sub 2} concentration for the B1, A2 and A1FI scenarios. The results showed that the geobotanic zones over the entire earth can be modified in future due to global warming. Expansion of subtropical desert and semi-desert zones in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, retreat of glaciers and sea-ice, with the Arctic region being particularly affected and a reduction of the tropical rainforest and boreal forest can occur due to the increase of the greenhouse gases concentration. The effects were more pronounced in the A1FI and A2 scenarios compared with the B1 scenario. The SDM results confirm IPCC AR4 projections of future climate and are consistent with simulations of more complex GCMs, reinforcing the necessity of the mitigation of climate change associated to global warming. (orig.)

  14. Numerical modelling of the plasticity of Ringwoodite under transition zone conditions in the Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterbex, S.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Cordier, P.

    2013-12-01

    (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 ringwoodite spinel, a high-pressure polymorph of the main upper mantle constituent olivine, is considered to be the weakest phase in the lower half of the transition zone, generally a confined region between 410-660 km depth in the Earth's mantle which couples the upper and lower mantle. It is therefore believed to be an important phase in subducting slabs from 510-660 km depth. Knowledge of ductile deformation mechanisms of ringwoodite may therefore provide a framework for a better understanding of solid-state flow within the transition zone over which the viscosity is thought to increase rapidly. The glide of linear defects or dislocations in a crystal is one of the effective mechanisms responsible for creep of mantle minerals such as ringwoodite. A description of the core structures of the active dislocations is essentiel to obtain information about the dislocation mobility and hence the rate of deformation controlled by glide. Computer simulations at the atomic-scale are used to investigate the structure and properties of dislocation cores of Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite at a pressure of 20 GPa1. This approach is a good alternative to study intracrystalline plasticity since experimental study is more than challanging at the pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth's transition zone. The Peierls2-Nabarro3-Galerkin approach is used to understand and predict the plastic properties of Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite at 20 GPa4. In this semi-continuum model, the dislocation is described as a distribution of infinitesimal mismatches across the assumed glide planes. Ballancing the elastic forces within the crystal with the non-elastic interaction forces across the glide plane provide information about the localization of the planar core. The non-elastic forces across the glide plane can be deduced from atomic scale density functional theory based calculations of generalized stacking fault surfaces, which are energy landscapes due to the general stacking of one half of

  15. Shifts of climate zones in multi-model climate change experiments using the Koeppen climate classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanf, Franziska; Koerper, Janina; Spangehl, Thomas; Cubash, Ulrich [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie

    2012-04-15

    This study investigates the future changes in the climate zones' distribution of the Earth's land area due to increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations in three IPCC SRES emissions scenarios (A1B, A2 and B1). The Koeppen climate classification is applied to climate simulations of seven atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) and their multi-model mean. The evaluation of the skill of the individual climate models compared to an observation-reanalysis-based climate classification provides a first order estimate of relevant model uncertainties and serves as assessment for the confidence in the scenario projections. Uncertainties related to differences in simulation pathways of the future projections are estimated by both, the multi-model ensemble spread of the climate change signals for a given scenario and differences between different scenarios. For the recent climate the individual models fail to capture the exact Koeppen climate types in about 24-39 % of the global land area excluding Antarctica due to temperature and precipitation biases, while the multi-model ensemble mean simulates the present day observation-reanalysis-based distribution of the climate types more accurately. For the end of the 21{sup st} century compared to the present day climate the patterns of change are similar across the three scenarios, while the magnitude of change is largest for the highest emission scenario. Moreover, the temporal development of the climate shifts from the end of the 20st century and during the 21{sup st} century show that changes of the multi-model ensemble mean for the A2 and B1 scenario are generally within the ensemble spread of the individual models for the A1B scenario, illustrating that for the given range of scenarios the model uncertainty is even larger than the spread given by the different GHG concentration pathways. The multi-model ensemble mean's projections show climate shifts to dryer climates in the subtropics

  16. Revised sequence components power system models for unbalanced power system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Akher, M. [Tunku Abdul Rahman Univ., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nor, K.-M. [Univ. of Technology Malaysia, Johor (Malaysia); Rashid, A.H.A. [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2007-07-01

    The principle method of analysis using positive, negative, and zero-sequence networks has been used to examine the balanced power system under both balanced and unbalanced loading conditions. The significant advantage of the sequence networks is that the sequence networks become entirely uncoupled in the case of balanced three-phase power systems. The uncoupled sequence networks then can be solved in independent way such as in fault calculation programs. However, the hypothesis of balanced power systems cannot be considered in many cases due to untransposed transmission lines; multiphase line segments in a distribution power system; or transformer phase shifts which cannot be incorporated in the existing models. A revised sequence decoupled power system models for analyzing unbalanced power systems based on symmetrical networks was presented in this paper. These models included synchronous machines, transformers, transmission lines, and voltage regulators. The models were derived from their counterpart's models in phase coordinates frame of reference. In these models, the three sequence networks were fully decoupled with a three-phase coordinates features such as transformer phase shifts and transmission line coupling. The proposed models were used to develop an unbalanced power-flow program for analyzing both balanced and unbalanced networks. The power flow solution was identical to results obtained from a full phase coordinate three-phase power-flow program. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Numerical modeling of surf zone dynamics under weakly plunging breakers with SPH method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Christos V.; Memos, Constantine D.; Krestenitis, Yannis N.

    2016-02-01

    The wave breaking of weak plungers over a relatively mild slope is investigated in this paper. Numerical modeling aspects are studied, concerning the propagation and breaking of shore-normal, nonlinear and regular waves. The two-dimensional (2-D) kinematics and dynamics (fluctuating flow features and large 2-D eddies) of the wave-induced flow on a vertical cross-section over the entire surf zone are simulated with the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The academic 'open source' code SPHysics v.2 is employed and the viscosity treatment is based on a Sub-Particle Scale (SPS) approach, similarly to the Large Eddy Simulations (LES) concept. Thorough analysis of the turbulent flow scales determines the necessary refinement of the spatial resolution. The initial particle discretization reaches down to the demarcation point between integral turbulence length scales and Taylor micro-scales. A convolution-type integration method is implemented for the transformation of scattered Lagrangian particle data to Eulerian values at fixed gauges. A heuristic technique of ensemble-averaging is used for the discrimination of the fluctuating flow components from coherent structures and ordered wave motion. Comparisons between numerical and experimental data give encouraging results for several wave features. The wave-induced mean flows are simulated plausibly, and even the 'streaming' effect near the bed is reproduced. The recurring vorticity patterns are derived, and coherent 2-D structures inside the surf zone are identified. Fourier spectral analysis of velocities reveals isotropy of 2-D fluctuating dynamics up to rather high frequencies in shear intensified regions. The simulated Reynolds stresses follow patterns that define the characteristic mechanism of wave breaking for weak plungers. Persisting discrepancies at the incipient breaking region confirm the need for fine, massively 'parallel' 3-D SPS-SPH simulations.

  18. Uncertainties and time of emergence of multi-model precipitation projection over homogeneous rainfall zones of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Javed; Das, Lalu; Meher, Jitendra Kumar; Deb, Argha

    2017-08-01

    Present study has assessed different sources of uncertainties in multi-model precipitation projection using Global Climate Models (GCMs) from coupled model inter-comparison project phase five (CMIP5) experiment over seven homogeneous rainfall zones of India namely North Mountainous India (NMI), Northwest India (NWI), North Central India (NCI), Northeast India (NEI), West Peninsular India (WPI), East Peninsular India (EPI), and South Peninsular India (SPI). A relatively new method has been employed to separate out internal variability and climate change signal from precipitation time series before quantifying the uncertainties. In our method, signal has been defined as dynamic trend instead of considering a fixed trend line. Three different types of weighting namely equal weighting, independence based weighting and performance based weighting have been employed to assess the uncertainties of GCM projection over different zones. It has been found that ensemble with performance based weighting has produced smaller inter-model uncertainty but the patterns of temporal evolution of uncertainties have been quite irregular compared to other two ensembles. On the other hand, it has been noticed that bias correction using quantile mapping can effectively reduce the range of uncertainty in a systematic way. It has been observed that inter-model uncertainties over NEI has been relatively lower compared to other zones indicating more robust projection over this zone. A dynamic threshold on signal-to-internal variability ratio (S/I) has been used for estimating time of emergence (TOE) at 95% confidence level over each zone. TOE would be earlier in case of NEI and late in NMI. However no zone may experience TOE in first half of the present century.

  19. Microscopic Analysis and Modeling of Airport Surface Sequencing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Although a number of airportal surface models exist and have been successfully used for analysis of airportal operations, only recently has it become possible to...

  20. Exploiting Non-sequence Data in Dynamic Model Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    underlying dynamic model exhibits a periodic behavior (such as rotation on a plane ), the true first state may not be identifiable but A and σ2 still may be...Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 25, pages 2168–2176, 2012. 1 B. Balle, A. Quattoni, and X. Carreras . Local loss optimization in operator...Sciences, 99(12):7821, 2002. 7 A. Globerson, T. Koo, X. Carreras , and M. Collins. Structured prediction models via the matrix- tree theorem. In

  1. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F.; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-12-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus' fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses.

  2. Experimental Validation of Modeled Fe Opacities at Conditions Approaching the Base of the Solar Convection Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Taisuke

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of the Sun is a foundation for other stars. However, after the solar abundance revision in 2005, standard solar models disagree with helioseismic measurements particularly at the solar convection zone base (CZB, r ~ 0 . 7 ×RSun) [Basu, et al., Physics Reports 457, 217 (2008)]. One possible explanation is an underestimate in the Fe opacity at the CZB [Bailey et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 058101 (2009)]. Modeled opacities are important physics inputs for plasma simulations (e.g. standard solar models). However, modeled opacities are not experimentally validated at high temperatures because of three challenging criteria required for reliable opacity measurements: 1) smooth and strong backlighter, 2) plasma condition uniformity, and 3) simultaneous measurements of plasma condition and transmission. Fe opacity experiments are performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Z-machine aiming at conditions close to those at the CZB (i.e. Te = 190 eV, ne = 1 ×1023 cm-3). To verify the quality of the experiments, it is critical to investigate how well the three requirements are satisfied. The smooth and strong backlighter is provided by the SNL Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum. Fe plasma condition is measured by mixing Mg into the Fe sample and employing Mg K-shell line transmission spectroscopy. Also, an experiment is designed and performed to measure the level of non-uniformity in the Fe plasma by mixing Al and Mg dopants on the opposite side of the Fe sample and analyzing their spectra. We will present quantitative results on these investigations as well as the comparison of the measured opacity to modeled opacities. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. AN APPLICATION OF HYBRID CLUSTERING AND NEURAL BASED PREDICTION MODELLING FOR DELINEATION OF MANAGEMENT ZONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babankumar S. Bansod

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Starting from descriptive data on crop yield and various other properties, the aim of this study is to reveal the trends on soil behaviour, such as crop yield. This study has been carried out by developing web application that uses a well known technique- Cluster Analysis. The cluster analysis revealed linkages between soil classes for the same field as well as between different fields, which can be partly assigned to crops rotation and determination of variable soil input rates. A hybrid clustering algorithm has been developed taking into account the traits of two clustering technologies: i Hierarchical clustering, ii K-means clustering. This hybrid clustering algorithm is applied to sensor- gathered data about soil and analysed, resulting in the formation of well delineatedmanagement zones based on various properties of soil, such as, ECa , crop yield, etc. One of the purposes of the study was to identify the main factors affecting the crop yield and the results obtained were validated with existing techniques. To accomplish this purpose, geo-referenced soil information has been examined. Also, based on this data, statistical method has been used to classify and characterize the soil behaviour. This is done using a prediction model, developed to predict the unknown behaviour of clusters based on the known behaviour of other clusters. In predictive modeling, data has been collected for the relevant predictors, a statistical model has been formulated, predictions were made and the model can be validated (or revised as additional data becomes available. The model used in the web application has been formed taking into account neural network based minimum hamming distance criterion.

  4. Stochastic modeling and generation of synthetic sequences of hourly global solar irradiation at Quetta, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, Lalarukh [Balochistan Univ., Dept. of Mathematics, Quetta (Pakistan); Jafri, Yasmin Zahra [Balochistan Univ., Dept. of Statistics, Quetta (Pakistan)

    1999-07-01

    Using hourly global radiation data at Quetta, Pakistan for 10 yr, an Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) process is fitted. Markov Transition Matrices have also been developed. These models are used for generating synthetic sequences for hourly radiations in MJ/m{sup 2} and that the generated sequences are compared with the observed data. We found the MTM approach relatively better as a simulator compared to ARMA modeling. (Author)

  5. Experimental Investigation of Land Mobile Prediction Methods and Modeling of Radio Planning Tool Parameters along Indian Rail Road Rural Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. S. N. Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile communication networks in rural zones were not given enough importance and emphasis unlike their urban counter parts due to the unattractive revenues and economic considerations for the cellular operators. In order to identify the suitable prediction methods for Indian rail road rural zones, train-based measurements were conducted in the northern and western rural zones along rail roads. These were carried out by recording the carriers emitted by the trackside base stations inside the moving train. The observed signal levels converted into path losses were compared initially with various conventional prediction methods. The observed results were also compared with the predicted results of radio planning tool utilizing digital terrain data. The constants of the model incorporated in the radio planning tool were tuned separately for north Indian and west Indian base stations based on the observed results. The suitability of the models has been evaluated in terms of standard statistical parameters.

  6. Currency target-zone modeling: An interplay between physics and economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera, Sandro Claudio; Sornette, Didier

    2015-12-01

    We study the performance of the euro-Swiss franc exchange rate in the extraordinary period from September 6, 2011 to January 15, 2015 when the Swiss National Bank enforced a minimum exchange rate of 1.20 Swiss francs per euro. Within the general framework built on geometric Brownian motions and based on the analogy between Brownian motion in finance and physics, the first-order effect of such a steric constraint would enter a priori in the form of a repulsive entropic force associated with the paths crossing the barrier that are forbidden. Nonparametric empirical estimates of drift and volatility show that the predicted first-order analogy between economics and physics is incorrect. The clue is to realize that the random-walk nature of financial prices results from the continuous anticipation of traders about future opportunities, whose aggregate actions translate into an approximate efficient market with almost no arbitrage opportunities. With the Swiss National Bank's stated commitment to enforce the barrier, traders' anticipation of this action leads to a vanishing drift together with a volatility of the exchange rate that depends on the distance to the barrier. This effect is described by Krugman's model [P. R. Krugman, Target zones and exchange rate dynamics, Q. J. Econ. 106, 669 (1991), 10.2307/2937922]. We present direct quantitative empirical evidence that Krugman's theoretical model provides an accurate description of the euro-Swiss franc target zone. Motivated by the insights from the economic model, we revise the initial economics-physics analogy and show that, within the context of hindered diffusion, the two systems can be described with the same mathematics after all. Using a recently proposed extended analogy in terms of a colloidal Brownian particle embedded in a fluid of molecules associated with the underlying order book, we derive that, close to the restricting boundary, the dynamics of both systems is described by a stochastic differential

  7. Currency target-zone modeling: An interplay between physics and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera, Sandro Claudio; Sornette, Didier

    2015-12-01

    We study the performance of the euro-Swiss franc exchange rate in the extraordinary period from September 6, 2011 to January 15, 2015 when the Swiss National Bank enforced a minimum exchange rate of 1.20 Swiss francs per euro. Within the general framework built on geometric Brownian motions and based on the analogy between Brownian motion in finance and physics, the first-order effect of such a steric constraint would enter a priori in the form of a repulsive entropic force associated with the paths crossing the barrier that are forbidden. Nonparametric empirical estimates of drift and volatility show that the predicted first-order analogy between economics and physics is incorrect. The clue is to realize that the random-walk nature of financial prices results from the continuous anticipation of traders about future opportunities, whose aggregate actions translate into an approximate efficient market with almost no arbitrage opportunities. With the Swiss National Bank's stated commitment to enforce the barrier, traders' anticipation of this action leads to a vanishing drift together with a volatility of the exchange rate that depends on the distance to the barrier. This effect is described by Krugman's model [P. R. Krugman, Target zones and exchange rate dynamics, Q. J. Econ. 106, 669 (1991)]. We present direct quantitative empirical evidence that Krugman's theoretical model provides an accurate description of the euro-Swiss franc target zone. Motivated by the insights from the economic model, we revise the initial economics-physics analogy and show that, within the context of hindered diffusion, the two systems can be described with the same mathematics after all. Using a recently proposed extended analogy in terms of a colloidal Brownian particle embedded in a fluid of molecules associated with the underlying order book, we derive that, close to the restricting boundary, the dynamics of both systems is described by a stochastic differential equation with a very

  8. Thermomechanical cohesive zone models for analysis of composites failure under thermal gradients and transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattiangadi, Ashwin A.

    A numerical framework to study multi-physics problem involving coupled thermomechanical analyses for cracks is outlined. Using a thermomechanical cohesive zone model (TM-CZM), load transfer behavior is coupled to heat conduction across a crack. Non-linear effects due to coupling between the mechanical and thermal problem occur through the conductance-separation response between crack faces as well as through the temperature dependence of material constants of the CZM. The TM-CZM is implemented in a convenient framework within the finite element method and applied in the study of: (i) interface crack growth; (ii) crack bridging; and (iii) photo-thermal imaging. Interface fracture in a thermal protection system (TPS) under transient monotonic and cyclic thermal loading is studied using the new TM-CZM and an analytical model. TPS includes an oxidation protection coating (OPC) on a carbon-carbon (C-C) composite substrate. The description of the load transfer behavior uses a traction-separation law with an internal residual property variable that determines the extent of damage caused by mechanical separation. Temperature dependence is incorporated, such that the interfacial strength and therefore the tractions decrease with temperature. The description of thermal transport includes an accurate representation of breakdown of interface conductance with increase in separation. The current state of interface failure, the presence of gas entrapped in the crack as well as radiative heat transfer determines the crack conductance. Coupling between thermal-mechanical analyses affects the interface crack initiation and growth behavior. An analytical model is presented for the uncoupled thermal-mechanical problem to calculate temperature fields and energy release rates. The TM-CZM is also applied in the study of bridged delamination cracks in composite laminates loaded under a temperature gradient. A micromechanism based bridging law is used for load transfer coupled to heat

  9. Exploiting mid-range DNA patterns for sequence classification: binary abstraction Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Samuel S.; McSweeny, Andrew; Serpen, Gursel; Fedorov, Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNA sequences possess specific nucleotide patterns distinguishing them from non-coding genomic sequences. In this study, we explore the utilization of modified Markov models to analyze sequences up to 44 bp, far beyond the 8-bp limit of conventional Markov models, for exon/intron discrimination. In order to analyze nucleotide sequences of this length, their information content is first reduced by conversion into shorter binary patterns via the application of numerous abstraction schemes. After the conversion of genomic sequences to binary strings, homogenous Markov models trained on the binary sequences are used to discriminate between exons and introns. We term this approach the Binary Abstraction Markov Model (BAMM). High-quality abstraction schemes for exon/intron discrimination are selected using optimization algorithms on supercomputers. The best MM classifiers are then combined using support vector machines into a single classifier. With this approach, over 95% classification accuracy is achieved without taking reading frame into account. With further development, the BAMM approach can be applied to sequences lacking the genetic code such as ncRNAs and 5′-untranslated regions. PMID:22344692

  10. Mathematical Optimal Sequence Model Development to Process Planes and Other Interconnected Surfaces of Complex Body Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Kravchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience in application of multi-operational machines CNC (MOM CNC shows that they are efficient only in case of significantly increasing productivity and dramatically reducing time-to-market cycle of new products. Most full technological MOM capabilities are revealed when processing the complex body parts. The more complex is a part design and the more is its number of machined surfaces, the more tools are necessary for its processing and positioning, the more is an efficiency of their application. At the same time, the case history of using these machines in industry shows that MOM CNC are, virtually, used mostly for technological processes of universal equipment, which is absolutely unacceptable. One way to improve the processing performance on MOM CNC is to reduce nonproductive machine time through reducing the mutual idle movements of the working machine. This problem is solved using dynamic programming methods, one of which is the solution of the traveling salesman problem (Bellman's method. With a known plan for treatment of all elementary surfaces of the body part, i.e. the known number of performed transitions, each transition is represented as a vertex of some graph, while technological links between the vertices are its edges. A mathematical model is developed on the Bellman principle, which is adapted to technological tasks to minimize the idle time of mutual idle movements of the working machine to perform all transitions in the optimal sequence. The initial data to fill matrix of time expenditures are time consumed by the hardware after executing the i-th transition, and necessary to complete the j-transition. The programmer fills in matrix cells according to known routing body part taking into account the time for part and table positioning, tool exchange, spindle and table approach to the working zone, and the time of table rotation, etc. The mathematical model was tested when machining the body part with 36 transitions on the

  11. DINAMO: a coupled sequence alignment editor/molecular graphics tool for interactive homology modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M; Bentz, J; Baucom, A; Gregoret, L

    1998-01-01

    Gaining functional information about a novel protein is a universal problem in biomedical research. With the explosive growth of the protein sequence and structural databases, it is becoming increasingly common for researchers to attempt to build a three-dimensional model of their protein of interest in order to gain information about its structure and interactions with other molecules. The two most reliable methods for predicting the structure of a protein are homology modeling, in which the novel sequence is modeled on the known three-dimensional structure of a related protein, and fold recognition (threading), where the sequence is scored against a library of fold models, and the highest scoring model is selected. The sequence alignment to a known structure can be ambiguous, and human intervention is often required to optimize the model. We describe an interactive model building and assessment tool in which a sequence alignment editor is dynamically coupled to a molecular graphics display. By means of a set of assessment tools, the user may optimize his or her alignment to satisfy the known heuristics of protein structure. Adjustments to the sequence alignment made by the user are reflected in the displayed model by color and other visual cues. For instance, residues are colored by hydrophobicity in both the three-dimensional model and in the sequence alignment. This aids the user in identifying undesirable buried polar residues. Several different evaluation metrics may be selected including residue conservation, residue properties, and visualization of predicted secondary structure. These characteristics may be mapped to the model both singly and in combination. DINAMO is a Java-based tool that may be run either over the web or installed locally. Its modular architecture also allows Java-literate users to add plug-ins of their own design.

  12. Longitudinal dispersion in natural channels: 3. An aggregated dead zone model applied to the River Severn, U.K.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Davis

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ model is presented for longitudinal dispersion of tracer in river channels, in which the channel cross-section is divided into two parallel regions: the bulk flow and dead zone storage. Tracer particles in the bulk flow are assumed to obey plug-flow advection at the discharge velocity U without any mixing effects. The dispersive properties of the model are completely embodied in the residence time for tracer storage in the dead zone. The model provides an excellent description and prediction of empirical concentration-time distributions, for times t Its physical realism is demonstrated by using it to describe the evolution of a tracer cloud in the River Severn, U.K., and by comparing it with a more complex model which incorporates the additional effects of shear flow dispersion within the bulk flow. The ADZ model is a potentially useful tool for practical prediction of dispersion in natural channels. Keywords: Channels; dispersion; dead zones; tracers; River Severn

  13. An Active Area Model of Rapid Infiltration Response at Substantial Depth in the Unsaturated Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, L.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    In a porous medium subject to preferential flow, response to surface water infiltration can occur rapidly even at substantial depth in the unsaturated zone. In a ponding experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the profile of undisturbed natural soil, seasonally dry at the start, was observed to approach field saturation throughout a 2 meter depth within 6 hours (Nimmo and Perkins, 2007). Traditional use of Richards' equation would require an unrealistically large unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of 40 m/day to capture the observed non-classic wetting behavior. Here we present a model for rapid flow using an active area concept similar to the active fracture model (Liu and others, 1998, WRR 34:2633-2646). The active area concept is incorporated within the preferential flow domain (which allows rapid downward movement) of a dual-domain model that also contains a diffuse-flow domain in which flow can be described by Richards' equation. Development of the active area model is motivated by observation of rapid wetting at substantial depth, as well as a phenomenon in which deep flow is observed before shallow flow. In this model water movement in the preferential domain can be physically conceptualized as laminar flow in free-surface films of constant average thickness. For a given medium, the preferential domain is characterized by an effective areal density (area per unit bulk volume) that describes the free-surface film capacity of the domain as a function of depth. The active area is defined as a portion of the effective areal density that dictates the depth and temporal distribution of domain-exchange and new infiltration within the preferential domain. With the addition of the active area concept, the model is capable of simulating non-diffusive vertical transport patterns. Advantages of the model include simulating rapid response for a variety of infiltration types, including ponding and rain events, as well as modeling relatively rapid aquifer

  14. An Emerging Class of Gamma-Ray Flares from Blazars: Beyond One-Zone Models

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, Marco; Cavaliere, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic plasma jets with bulk Lorentz factors {\\Gamma} ~ 10, closely aligned along our line of sight. In a number of blazars of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar type such as 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 gamma-ray flares have recently been detected with very high luminosity and little or no counterparts in the optical and soft X-ray bands. They challenge the current one-zone leptonic models of emissions from within the broad line region. The latter envisage the optical/X-ray emissions to be produced as synchrotron radiation by the same population of highly relativistic electrons in the jet that would also yield the gamma rays by inverse Compton up-scattering of surrounding soft photons. To meet the challenge we present here a model based on primary synchrotron photons emitted in the broad line region by a plasmoid moving out with the jet and scattered back toward the incoming plasmoid by an outer plasma clump acting as a mirror. We consider both a scenario based on a static mirror located outsid...

  15. Developing hydrological model for water quality in Iraq marshes zone using Landsat-TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marghany, Maged; Hasab, Hashim Ali; Mansor, Shattri; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Bin Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    The Mesopotamia marshlands constitute the largest wetland ecosystem in the Middle East and Western Eurasia. These wetlands are located at the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in southern Iraq. However, there are series reductions in the wetland zones because of neighbor countries, i.e. Turkey, Syria built dams upstream of Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. In addition, the first Gulf war of the 1980s had damaged majority of the marches resources. In fact,the marshes had been reduced in size to less than 7% since 1973 and had deteriorated in water quality parameters. The study integrates Hydrological Model of RMA-2 with Geographic Information System, and remote sensing techniques to map the water quality in the marshlands south of Iraq. This study shows that RMA-2 shows the two dimensional water flow pattern and water quality quantities in the marshlands. It can be said that the integration between Hydrological Model of RMA-2, Geographic Information System, and remote sensing techniques can be used to monitor water quality in the marshlands south of Iraq.

  16. Gamma-ray binaries beyond one-zone models: an application to LS 5039

    CERN Document Server

    del Palacio, Santiago; Romero, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    Context. Several binary systems hosting massive stars present gamma-ray emission. In most of these systems, despite detailed observational information is available, the nature and the structure of the emitter are still poorly known. Aims. We investigate the validity of the so-called one-zone approximation for the high-energy emitter in binary systems hosting a massive star. In particular, the case of LS 5039 is considered. Methods. Assuming a point-like emitter at rest, the presence of a nearby massive star, and taking as a reference the observed MeV and GeV fluxes, a non-thermal leptonic model is systematically applied for di?erent locations, magnetic fields, and non-radiative losses. This allows the identification of both the emitter configurations most compatible with observations and inconsistencies between model predictions and the available data. Results. In the case of LS 5039, the best parameter combination is fast non-radiative cooling and a low magnetic field. However, discrepancies appear when comp...

  17. Physical modeling of shrink-swell cycles and cracking in a clayey vadose zone

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    Physical understanding of the crack origin and quantitative physical prediction of the crack volume variation far from the clay soil surface are necessary to protect the underlying aquifers from pollutants. The basis of this work is an available physical model for predicting the shrinkage and swelling curves in the maximum water content range (the primary curves) and crack volume variation. The objective of the work is to generalize this model to the conditions of the deep layer of a clayey vadose zone with the overburden pressure, multiple shrinkage-swelling, and variation of water content in a small range. We aim to show that the scanning shrinkage and swelling curves, and steady shrink-swell cycles existing in such conditions, inevitably lead to the occurrence of cracks and a hysteretic crack volume. The generalization is based on the transition to the increasingly complex soil medium from the contributive clay, through the intra-aggregate matrix and aggregated soil with no cracking, to the soil with crack...

  18. Suite of tools for statistical N-gram language modeling for pattern mining in whole genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K; Mitchell, Asia D; Thahir, Mohamed; Motwani, Kamiya; Ananthasubramanian, Seshan

    2012-12-01

    Genome sequences contain a number of patterns that have biomedical significance. Repetitive sequences of various kinds are a primary component of most of the genomic sequence patterns. We extended the suffix-array based Biological Language Modeling Toolkit to compute n-gram frequencies as well as n-gram language-model based perplexity in windows over the whole genome sequence to find biologically relevant patterns. We present the suite of tools and their application for analysis on whole human genome sequence.

  19. On Parsing Visual Sequences with the Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Harte

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidden Markov Models have been employed in many vision applications to model and identify events of interest. Their use is common in applications where HMMs are used to classify previously divided segments of video as one of a set of events being modelled. HMMs can also simultaneously segment and classify events within a continuous video, without the need for a separate first step to identify the start and end of the events. This is significantly less common. This paper is an exploration of the development of HMM frameworks for such complete event recognition. A review of how HMMs have been applied to both event classification and recognition is presented. The discussion evolves in parallel with an example of a real application in psychology for illustration. The complete videos depict sessions where candidates perform a number of different exercises under the instruction of a psychologist. The goal is to isolate portions of video containing just one of these exercises. The exercise involves rotating the head of a kneeling subject to the left, back to centre, to the right, to the centre, and repeating a number of times. By designing a HMM system to automatically isolate portions of video containing this exercise, issues such as the strategy of choice of event to be modelled, feature design and selection, as well as training and testing are reviewed. Thus this paper shows how HMMs can be more extensively applied in the domain of event recognition in video.

  20. Model comparison for aftershock sequences following the 2005 Kashmir disaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkyilmaz, K.; Lieshout, M.N.M. van; Stein, A.

    2011-01-01

    In an earlier study (Van Lieshout and Stein, in press) we postulated the existence of two major earthquakes in Kashmir instead of a single one, based upon the pattern of aftershocks. In this note we explore this pattern further by fitting several spatial point pattern models. In particular we di

  1. Stochastic modeling of salt accumulation in the root zone due to capillary flux from brackish groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.H.H.; Vervoort, R.W.; Suweis, S.; Guswa, A.J.; Rinaldo, A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater can be a source of both water and salts in semiarid areas, and therefore, capillary pressure–induced upward water flow may cause root zone salinization. To identify which conditions result in hazardous salt concentrations in the root zone, we combined the mass balance equations for salt

  2. Process-based and Surrogate Modelling of Fine Sediment Transport in the Dutch Coastal Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kai, C.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal zones which are known as the interface between continents and oceans are vital and important to human beings because a majority of the world's population live in such zones (Nelson, 2007). Coastal systems are among the most dynamic and energetic environments on earth and they are

  3. Modeling of plastic zones before the crack's peak of given structure constructional materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.І. Матченко

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  The basic kinds of deformation in plastic zones near top of a crack are determined.Zones are determined, in which the sliding in crystals ,between grains sliding and plastic deformation of a continuous body is typical.

  4. Process-based and Surrogate Modelling of Fine Sediment Transport in the Dutch Coastal Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kai, C.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal zones which are known as the interface between continents and oceans are vital and important to human beings because a majority of the world's population live in such zones (Nelson, 2007). Coastal systems are among the most dynamic and energetic environments on earth and they are continuousl

  5. Nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton development along an estuary–coastal zone continuum: A model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, S.; Lacroix, G.; Gypens, N.; Regnier, P.; Lancelot, C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a first attempt to quantify the biogeochemical transformations and fluxes of carbon and nutrients along the entire mixing zone of the shallow, tidally-dominated estuary–coastal zone continuum of the Scheldt (Belgium/The Netherlands). A fully transient, two-dimensional, nested-gri

  6. Process-based and Surrogate Modelling of Fine Sediment Transport in the Dutch Coastal Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kai, C.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal zones which are known as the interface between continents and oceans are vital and important to human beings because a majority of the world's population live in such zones (Nelson, 2007). Coastal systems are among the most dynamic and energetic environments on earth and they are continuousl

  7. An efficient binomial model-based measure for sequence comparison and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Qi; Li, Lihua; He, Zerong

    2011-04-01

    Sequence comparison is one of the major tasks in bioinformatics, which could serve as evidence of structural and functional conservation, as well as of evolutionary relations. There are several similarity/dissimilarity measures for sequence comparison, but challenges remains. This paper presented a binomial model-based measure to analyze biological sequences. With help of a random indicator, the occurrence of a word at any position of sequence can be regarded as a random Bernoulli variable, and the distribution of a sum of the word occurrence is well known to be a binomial one. By using a recursive formula, we computed the binomial probability of the word count and proposed a binomial model-based measure based on the relative entropy. The proposed measure was tested by extensive experiments including classification of HEV genotypes and phylogenetic analysis, and further compared with alignment-based and alignment-free measures. The results demonstrate that the proposed measure based on binomial model is more efficient.

  8. An overview of the recent approaches for terroir functional modelling, footprinting and zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, E.; Costantini, E.; Jones, G. V.; Mocali, S.

    2014-11-01

    Notions of terroir and their conceptualization through agri-environmental sciences have become popular in many parts of world. Originally developed for wine, terroir now encompasses many other crops including fruits, vegetables, cheese, olive oil, coffee, cacao and other crops, linking the uniqueness and quality of both beverages and foods to the environment where they are produced, giving the consumer a sense of place. Climate, geology, geomorphology, and soil are the main environmental factors which compose the terroir effect at different scales. Often considered immutable at the cultural scale, the natural components of terroir are actually a set of processes, which together create a delicate equilibrium and regulation of its effect on products in both space and time. Due to both a greater need to better understand regional to site variations in crop production and the growth in spatial analytic technologies, the study of terroir has shifted from a largely descriptive regional science to a more applied, technical research field. Furthermore, the explosion of spatial data availability and sensing technologies has made the within-field scale of study more valuable to the individual grower. The result has been greater adoption but also issues associated with both the spatial and temporal scales required for practical applications, as well as the relevant approaches for data synthesis. Moreover, as soil microbial communities are known to be of vital importance for terrestrial processes by driving the major soil geochemical cycles and supporting healthy plant growth, an intensive investigation of the microbial organization and their function is also required. Our objective is to present an overview of existing data and modelling approaches for terroir functional modelling, footprinting and zoning at local and regional scales. This review will focus on three main areas of recent terroir research: (1) quantifying the influences of terroir components on plant growth

  9. Modelling heterogeneous flow in the vadoze zone underneath a stormwater infiltration basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarski, T.; Lassabatere, L.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Goutaland, D.

    2011-12-01

    Infiltration basins are part of the best management practices. They are aimed at infiltrating stormwater to prevent additional collection and treatment through rainwater systems. In the suburbs of Lyon (France), many of these infiltration basins were built over fluvio-glacial deposit. These basins have been the subject of research programs on vadose zone flow and fate of pollutants. This study focuses on the impact of the heterogeneity of the fluvio-glacial deposit on both flow pattern and solute transfer. A proper geological and sedimentological description is first proposed to characterize the efficient water transfer properties of the fluvio-glacial deposit at the work scale (1 ha). The local geological and sedimentological architecture of the deposit and its lithofacies were investigated locally through trenches using both particle size analysis and sedimentological approach. This information was extended to the whole work by combining several geophysical techniques, i.e. GPR, electric resistivity and seismic refraction tomography. Then water infiltration experiments were performed on each lithofacies to derive the hydrodynamic properties through BEST algorithm (Beerkan estimation of Soil Transfer properties), leading to the corresponding hydrofacies. In addition, soil-column experiments were performed to estimate hydrodispersive parameters (tracer injection) and the geochemical properties of lithofacies (injection of model pollutants). All these data were implemented into Hydrus to model flow and solute transfer through a 2D soil profile with a precise description of the hydrofacies at the basin scale (flow domain 14x2 m2). The results are highly relevant because they emphasize different types of preferential flow due to either the presence of capillary barriers, drainage layers or pipe flow, which may be responsible for the enhancement of pollutant transfer. In particular, they show that sand lenses may play an important role whereas unconnected gravels may

  10. Protection zone in a diffusive predator-prey model with Beddington-DeAngelis functional response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao; Zheng, Sining

    2016-12-03

    In any reaction-diffusion system of predator-prey models, the population densities of species are determined by the interactions between them, together with the influences from the spatial environments surrounding them. Generally, the prey species would die out when their birth rate is too low, the habitat size is too small, the predator grows too fast, or the predation pressure is too high. To save the endangered prey species, some human interference is useful, such as creating a protection zone where the prey could cross the boundary freely but the predator is prohibited from entering. This paper studies the existence of positive steady states to a predator-prey model with reaction-diffusion terms, Beddington-DeAngelis type functional response and non-flux boundary conditions. It is shown that there is a threshold value [Formula: see text] which characterizes the refuge ability of prey such that the positivity of prey population can be ensured if either the prey's birth rate satisfies [Formula: see text] (no matter how large the predator's growth rate is) or the predator's growth rate satisfies [Formula: see text], while a protection zone [Formula: see text] is necessary for such positive solutions if [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text] properly large. The more interesting finding is that there is another threshold value [Formula: see text], such that the positive solutions do exist for all [Formula: see text]. Letting [Formula: see text], we get the third threshold value [Formula: see text] such that if [Formula: see text], prey species could survive no matter how large the predator's growth rate is. In addition, we get the fourth threshold value [Formula: see text] for negative [Formula: see text] such that the system admits positive steady states if and only if [Formula: see text]. All these results match well with the mechanistic derivation for the B-D type functional response recently given by Geritz and Gyllenberg (J Theoret Biol 314:106-108, 2012

  11. Dutch distribution zones of stable iodine tablets based on atmospheric dispersion modelling of accidental releases from nuclear power plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok-Palma, Y.S.; Leenders, M.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid administration of stable iodine is essential for the saturation and subsequent protection of the thyroid gland against the potential harm caused by radioiodines. This paper proposes the Dutch risk analysis that uses an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate the size of the zones around nucl

  12. Identification of plasticity model parameters of the heat-affected zone in resistance spot welded martensitic boron steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eller, Tom; Greve, L; Andres, M.T.; Medricky, M; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Duflou, J.; Leacock, A.; Micari, F.; Hagenah, H.

    2015-01-01

    A material model is developed that predicts the plastic behaviour of fully hardened 22MnB5 base material and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) material found around its corresponding resistance spot welds (RSWs). Main focus will be on an accurate representation of strain fields up to high strains, which

  13. Identification of plasticity model parameters of the heat-affected zone in resistance spot welded martensitic boron steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eller, Tom; Greve, L; Andres, M.T.; Medricky, M; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Merklein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A material model is developed that predicts the plastic behavior of fully hardened 22MnB5 base material and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) material found around its corresponding resistance spot welds (RSWs). Main focus will be on an accurate representation of strain fields up to high strains, which

  14. Physical models of spall zone ground motions and the determination of spatial decay rates. Los Alamos Source Region Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stump, B.W. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Weaver, T.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-01-24

    Spall, the tensile failure of near-surface layers, which is observed above contained explosions, has been identified as a possible secondary seismic source contributing to teleseismic and regional signals. The relative importance of this secondary source can be constrained if the motion field in the spall zone is characterized. Spall zone motions from nuclear explosions detonated above the water table at Pahute Mesa are analyzed to develop these models. Acceleration, velocity, displacement, and dwell time measurements are made from gauges placed directly above the explosion, most often at the free surface. Decay of peak motions are strongly affected by the free surface with little change in amplitude out to a free surface range of 100 m/kt{sup l/3} followed by rapid decay beyond. Free surface interactions are assessed with first-order elastic spherical wave calculations that match observed peak velocity decays. These results indicate that the spall zone motions may be strongly affected by the scaled depth of burial of the explosion. Spall zone velocities, displacements and dwell times are compared for consistency with a gravitational model. The data is in agreement with the functional form of theoretical models although observed displacements may be as much as a factor of two to four greater than the model predicts for observed velocities and dwell times. These differences may reflect the continuous nature of the spall process and/or the role of material strength in these phenomena.

  15. Empirical features of the second-generation target zone models : Mean-reverting fundamentals and endogenous devaluation risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knot, K.H.W.; Dijkstra, T.K.; de Haan, J.

    1999-01-01

    We show that within Bertola and Svensson's second-generation target zone model, mean-reverting interventions and endogenous devaluation risk are closely interrelated. Over the period 1983-93 we analyze the degree of mean reversion in the underlying fundamental process as well as the term structure o

  16. The refinement of hypocenter parameters on the basis of three-dimensional velocity models of focal zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavina, L. B.; Pivovarova, N. B.

    1982-11-01

    A complex approach to the processing of seismological data to determine hypocenter coordinates and to construct three-dimensional velocity fields of focal zones is considered. The iterative process includes the determination of focal coordinates under the assumption of a laterally homogeneous medium, the construction of a three-dimensional velocity model, and subsequent redefinition of the focal coordinates taking into account the inhomogeneous structure of the medium. The principal results of calculations of three-dimensional velocity fields and refined earthquake hypocenters are presented for focal zones in Vrancea (Carpathians), the Caucasus, and Kamchatka.

  17. Hydrological modelling over different scales on the edge of the permafrost zone: approaching model realism based on experimentalists' knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterova, Natalia; Makarieva, Olga; Lebedeva, Lyudmila

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative and qualitative experimentalists' data helps to advance both understanding of the runoff generation and modelling strategies. There is significant lack of such information for the dynamic and vulnerable cold regions. The aim of the study is to make use of historically collected experimental hydrological data for modelling poorly-gauged river basins on larger scales near the southern margin of the permafrost zone in Eastern Siberia. Experimental study site "Mogot" includes the Nelka river (30.8 km2) and its three tributaries with watersheds area from 2 to 5.8 km2. It is located in the upper elevated (500 - 1500 m a.s.l.) part of the Amur River basin. Mean annual temperature and precipitation are -7.5°C and 555 mm respectively. Top of the mountains with weak vegetation has well drained soil that prevents any water accumulation. Larch forest on the northern slopes has thick organic layer. It causes shallow active layer and relatively small subsurface water storage. Soil in the southern slopes has thinner organic layer and thaws up to 1.6 m depth. Flood plains are the wettest landscape with highest water storage capacity. Measured monthly evaporation varies from 9 to 100 mm through the year. Experimental data shows importance of air temperature and precipitation changes with the elevation. Their gradient was taken into account for hydrological simulations. Model parameterization was developed according to available quantitative and qualitative data in the Mogot station. The process-based hydrological Hydrograph model was used in the study. It explicitly describes hydrological processes in different permafrost environments. Flexibility of the Hydrograph model allows take advantage from the experimental data for model set-up. The model uses basic meteorological data as input. The level of model complexity is suitable for a remote, sparsely gauged region such as Southern Siberia as it allows for a priori assessment of the model parameters. Model simulation

  18. Physically-based modelling of the competition between surface uplift and erosion caused by earthquakes and earthquake sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovius, Niels; Marc, Odin; Meunier, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Large earthquakes deform Earth's surface and drive topographic growth in the frontal zones of mountain belts. They also induce widespread mass wasting, reducing relief. Preliminary studies have proposed that above a critical magnitude earthquake would induce more erosion than uplift. Other parameters such as fault geometry or earthquake depth were not considered yet. A new seismologically consistent model of earthquake induced landsliding allow us to explore the importance of parameters such as earthquake depth and landscape steepness. We have compared these eroded volume prediction with co-seismic surface uplift computed with Okada's deformation theory. We found that the earthquake depth and landscape steepness to be the most important parameters compared to the fault geometry (dip and rake). In contrast with previous studies we found that largest earthquakes will always be constructive and that only intermediate size earthquake (Mw ~7) may be destructive. Moreover, with landscapes insufficiently steep or earthquake sources sufficiently deep earthquakes are predicted to be always constructive, whatever their magnitude. We have explored the long term topographic contribution of earthquake sequences, with a Gutenberg Richter distribution or with a repeating, characteristic earthquake magnitude. In these models, the seismogenic layer thickness, that sets the depth range over which the series of earthquakes will distribute, replaces the individual earthquake source depth.We found that in the case of Gutenberg-Richter behavior, relevant for the Himalayan collision for example, the mass balance could remain negative up to Mw~8 for earthquakes with a sub-optimal uplift contribution (e.g., transpressive or gently-dipping earthquakes). Our results indicate that earthquakes have probably a more ambivalent role in topographic building than previously anticipated, and suggest that some fault systems may not induce average topographic growth over their locked zone during a

  19. Changes in neural stem cells in the subventricular zone in a rat model of communicating hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Dongxue; Wu, Chunming; Qu, Zhenyun; Zhao, Yongshun; Li, Weihua; Wang, Jian; Li, Zhongmin

    2014-08-22

    Communicating hydrocephalus is a common type of hydrocephalus. At present, the prevalent treatment is to perform a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, which, for reasons that are not clear, is sometimes ineffective. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles has been established as the primary site of adult neurogenesis. Following cerebral ischemia or brain injury, neural stem cells (NSCs) increase in the SVZ and can both differentiate into neurons and glial cells and respond to the injury. Neural stem cells, enabled by a complex repertoire of factors that precisely regulate the activation, proliferation, differentiation and integration of newborn cells, continuously generate new neurons. However, only a few systematic studies of the role of NSCs in hydrocephalus have been reported. In a rat model of communicating hydrocephalus, we recently showed that hydrocephalus caused the ventricular system to expand over time. We found that the number of NSCs in the SVZ peaked rapidly after hydrocephalus was established and decreased gradually over time until the cells disappeared. NSCs may be involved in the pathophysiology changes and repair process of hydrocephalus.

  20. European Regional Climate Zone Modeling of a Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Hot Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL; Keinath, Chris [Stone Mountain Technologies, Inc., Johnson City; Garrabrant, Michael A. [Stone Mountain Technologies, Inc., Johnson City; Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    High efficiency gas-burning hot water heating takes advantage of a condensing heat exchanger to deliver improved combustion efficiency over a standard non-condensing configuration. The water heating is always lower than the gas heating value. In contrast, Gas Absorption Heat Pump (GAHP) hot water heating combines the efficiency of gas burning with the performance increase from a heat pump to offer significant gas energy savings. An ammonia-water system also has the advantage of zero Ozone Depletion Potential and low Global Warming Potential. In comparison with air source electric heat pumps, the absorption system can maintain higher coefficients of performance in colder climates. In this work, a GAHP commercial water heating system was compared to a condensing gas storage system for a range of locations and climate zones across Europe. The thermodynamic performance map of a single effect ammonia-water absorption system was used in a building energy modeling software that could also incorporate the changing ambient air temperature and water mains temperature for a specific location, as well as a full-service restaurant water draw pattern.

  1. Modeling compositional dynamics based on GC and purine contents of protein-coding sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhang

    2010-11-08

    Background: Understanding the compositional dynamics of genomes and their coding sequences is of great significance in gaining clues into molecular evolution and a large number of publically-available genome sequences have allowed us to quantitatively predict deviations of empirical data from their theoretical counterparts. However, the quantification of theoretical compositional variations for a wide diversity of genomes remains a major challenge.Results: To model the compositional dynamics of protein-coding sequences, we propose two simple models that take into account both mutation and selection effects, which act differently at the three codon positions, and use both GC and purine contents as compositional parameters. The two models concern the theoretical composition of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids, with no prerequisite of homologous sequences or their alignments. We evaluated the two models by quantifying theoretical compositions of a large collection of protein-coding sequences (including 46 of Archaea, 686 of Bacteria, and 826 of Eukarya), yielding consistent theoretical compositions across all the collected sequences.Conclusions: We show that the compositions of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids are largely determined by both GC and purine contents and suggest that deviations of the observed from the expected compositions may reflect compositional signatures that arise from a complex interplay between mutation and selection via DNA replication and repair mechanisms.Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Zhaolei Zhang (nominated by Mark Gerstein), Guruprasad Ananda (nominated by Kateryna Makova), and Daniel Haft. 2010 Zhang and Yu; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  3. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-han Wang; Chun-mei Wang; Hua-xin Tang; Cheng-ji Zuo; Hong-ming Xu

    2009-01-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition tim-ing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its appli-cation, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NO while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recir-culation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NO is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  4. Developing an Agro-Ecological Zoning Model for Tumbleweed (Salsola kali), as Energy Crop in Drylands of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Silvia; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra; Ulberich, Ana

    2016-12-01

    Salsola kali is considered extremely valuable as an energy crop worldwide because it adapts easily to environments with strong abiotic stresses (hydric, saline and alkaline) and produces large amounts of biomass in drylands. This species is categorized as an important weed in Argentina. The aim of this work was to design an agro-ecological zoning model for tumbleweed in Argentina, employing a Geography Information System. Based on the bioclimatic requirements for the species and the climatic data for Argentina (1981-2010 period), an agro-climatic suitability map was drawn. This map was superimposed on the saline and alkaline soil maps delineated by the Food and Agriculture Organization for dry climates, generating the agro-ecological zoning on a scale of 1 : 500 000. This zoning revealed very suitable and suitable cultivation areas on halomorphic soils. The potential growing areas extend from N of the Salta province (approximately 22° S) to the Santa Cruz province (50° S). The use of tumbleweed on halomorphic soils under semi-arid to arid conditions, for the dual purpose of forage use and source of lignocellulosic material for bioenergy, could improve agricultural productivity in these lands. Furthermore, it could also contribute to their environmental sustainability, since the species can be used to reclaim saline soils over the years. Based on international bibliography, the authors outlined an agro-ecological zoning model. This model may be applied to any part of the world, using the agro-ecological limits presented here.

  5. Rossby wave instability at dead zone boundaries in 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamical global models of protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lyra, Wladimir

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parametrized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in 3D resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the Pencil Code to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the $\\alpha\\approx 10^{-2}$ level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also...

  6. Development of a three-dimensional site-scale model for the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittwer, C.S.; Bodvarsson, G.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Earth Sciences Div., Berkeley (United States); Chornack, M.P.; Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Lewis, B.D.; Spengler, R.W. [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver (United States); Rautmann, C.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Technical Integration Div., Albuquerque (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A three-dimensional model of moisture flow within the highly heterogeneous, porous and fractured tuffs of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being developed. This site-scale model covers an area of about 30 km{sup 2} and is bounded by major faults at the east and west. A detailed numerical grid has been developed based on the locations of boreholes, on the spatial distribution of different infiltration zones, hydrogeological units and water level data, and on the offset of the volcanic tuffs due to major faults. Hydrogeologic contour-and isopachs maps, are presented for the different infiltration zones, and for the base of the Tiva Canyon, the Paintbrush, and the Topopah Spring hydrogeological units. One- and two-dimensional simulations have been performed using the TOUGH2 computer code to test the geometry and the accuracy of the model-grid, which consists of about 5000 gridblocks distributed among 17 non-uniform vertical layers representing the four main hydrogeological units of the unsaturated zone. (author) 11 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  7. Regional Climate Zone Modeling of a Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Hot Water Heater Part 1: Southern and South Central Climate Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL; Keinath, Christopher M. [Stone Mountain Technologies, Inc., Johnson City; Garrabrant, Michael A. [Stone Mountain Technologies, Inc., Johnson City

    2016-01-01

    Commercial hot water heating accounts for approximately 0.78 Quads of primary energy use with 0.44 Quads of this amount from natural gas fired heaters. An ammonia-water based commercial absorption system, if fully deployed, could achieve a high level of savings, much higher than would be possible by conversion to the high efficiency nonheat-pump gas fired alternatives. In comparison with air source electric heat pumps, the absorption system is able to maintain higher coefficients of performance in colder climates. The ammonia-water system also has the advantage of zero Ozone Depletion Potential and low Global Warming Potential. A thermodynamic model of a single effect ammonia-water absorption system for commercial space and water heating was developed, and its performance was investigated for a range of ambient and return water temperatures. This allowed for the development of a performance map which was then used in a building energy modeling software. Modeling of two commercial water heating systems was performed; one using an absorption heat pump and another using a condensing gas storage system. The energy and financial savings were investigated for a range of locations and climate zones in the southern and south central United States. A follow up paper will analyze northern and north/central regions. Results showed that the system using an absorption heat pump offers significant savings.

  8. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  9. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment. PMID:28262684

  10. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment.

  11. Transgenerational inheritance: Models and mechanisms of non-DNA sequence-based inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miska, Eric A; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C

    2016-10-07

    Heritability has traditionally been thought to be a characteristic feature of the genetic material of an organism-notably, its DNA. However, it is now clear that inheritance not based on DNA sequence exists in multiple organisms, with examples found in microbes, plants, and invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In mammals, the molecular mechanisms have been challenging to elucidate, in part due to difficulties in designing robust models and approaches. Here we review some of the evidence, concepts, and potential mechanisms of non-DNA sequence-based transgenerational inheritance. We highlight model systems and discuss whether phenotypes are replicated or reconstructed over successive generations, as well as whether mechanisms operate at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we explore the short- and long-term implications of non-DNA sequence-based inheritance. Understanding the effects of non-DNA sequence-based mechanisms is key to a full appreciation of heritability in health and disease.

  12. Polypeptoids: A model system for exploring sequence and shape effects on block copolymer self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalman, Rachel

    2015-03-01

    While our ability to understand the detailed relationship between block copolymer chemistry and mesoscopic self-assembly has made remarkable progress over the last many years, yet we are still limited to a relatively small number of blocks in terms of structure-property understanding. Thus, there is a need to explore self-assembly phase space with sequence using a model system. Polypeptoids are non-natural, sequence specific polymers that offer the opportunity to probe the effect of sequence on self-assembly with much simpler molecular interactions and more scalable synthesis than traditional polypeptides. In this talk, I will discuss the use of this model system to understand the role of sequence on chain collapse and globule formation in solution, polymer crystallization, and block copolymer self-assembly. I will then discuss potential application as surface active agents for anti-fouling.

  13. A New Multivariate Markov Chain Model for Adding a New Categorical Data Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new multivariate Markov chain model for adding a new categorical data sequence. The number of the parameters in the new multivariate Markov chain model is only (3s) less than ((s+1)2) the number of the parameters in the former multivariate Markov chain model. Numerical experiments demonstrate the benefits of the new multivariate Markov chain model on saving computational resources.

  14. Multi-Zone Modeling of the Pulsar Win Nebula HESS J1825-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Etten, Adam; Romani, Roger W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-08

    The pulsar wind nebula associated with PSR J1826-1334, HESS J1825-137, is a bright very high energy source with an angular extent of {approx} 1{sup o} and spatially-resolved spectroscopic TeV measurements. The gamma-ray spectral index is observed to soften with increasing distance from the pulsar, likely the result of cooling losses as electrons traverse the nebula. We describe analysis of X-ray data of the extended nebula, as well as 3-D time-dependent spectral energy distribution modeling, with emphasis on the spatial variations within HESS J1825-137. The multi-wavelength data places significant constraints on electron injection, transport, and cooling within the nebula. The large size and high nebular energy budget imply a relatively rapid initial pulsar spin period of 13 {+-} 7 ms and an age of 40 {+-} 9 kyr. The relative fluxes of each VHE zone can be explained by advective particle transport with a radially decreasing velocity profile with v(r) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.5}. The evolution of the cooling break requires an evolving magnetic field which also decreases radially from the pulsar, B(r, t) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.7} E(t){sup 1/2}. Detection of 10 TeV flux {approx} 80 pc from the pulsar requires rapid diffusion of high energy particles with {tau}{sub esc} {approx} 90 (R/10 pc){sup 2}(E{sub e}/100TeV){sup -1} year, contrary to the common assumption of toroidal magnetic fields with strong magnetic confinement. The model predicts a rather uniform Fermi LAT surface brightness out to {approx} 1{sup o} from the pulsar, in good agreement with the recently discovered LAT source centered 0.5{sup o} southwest of PSR J1826-1334 with extension 0.6 {+-} 0.1{sup o}.

  15. 3D geostatistical modelling for identifying sinkhole disaster potential zones around the Verkhnekamskoye potash deposit (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, J. J.; Litaudon, J.; Filippov, L. O.; Lyubimova, T.; Maximovich, N.