WorldWideScience

Sample records for model xenon ion

  1. Effect of sharp maximum in ion diffusivity for liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, A. V.; Orekhov, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Ion diffusion in a liquid usually could be treated as a movement of an ion cluster in a viscous media. For small ions this leads to a special feature: diffusion coefficient is either independent of the ion size or increases with it. We find a different behavior for small ions in liquid xenon. Calculation of the dependence of an ion diffusion coefficient in liquid xenon on the ion size is carried out. Classical molecular dynamics method is applied. Calculated dependence of the ion diffusion coefficient on its radius has sharp maximums at the ion radiuses 1.75 and 2 Å. Every maximum is placed between two regions with different stable ion cluster configurations. This leads to the instability of these configurations in a small region between them. Consequently ion with radius near 1.75 or 2 Å could jump from one configuration to another. This increases the speed of the diffusion. A simple qualitative model for this effect is suggested. The decomposition of the ion movement into continuous and jump diffusion shows that continuous part of the diffusion is the same as for the ion cluster in the stable region.

  2. Damage of copper by low energy xenon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babad-Zakhryapin, A.A.; Popenko, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the copper crystal structure bombarded by xenon ions with 30-150 eV energy are studied. Foils of MOb copper mark, 10 mm in diameter and 100 μm thickness, are irradiated. The initial specimens are annealed in vacuum during 1 h at 900 K temperature. The specimens are bombarded by xenon ions in a water-cooled holder. A TE-O type accelerator serves as a xenon ion source. The ion energy varies within 30 to 150 eV range. The ion flux density is 8x10 16 ion/(cm 2 xs). It is shown that crystal structure variations at deep depths are observed not only at high (>1 keV), but at low ion energies down to several dozens of electronvolt as well. The crystal structure variation on copper irradiation by xenon ions with 30-150 eV energy is followed by formation of defects like dislocation loops, point defects in the irradiated target bulk

  3. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  4. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, A. M. F.; Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Neves, P. N. B.; Conde, C. A. N.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Santos, F. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities (K0) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH3)3N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E/N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH3)3N+ (59 u) and (CH3)2CH2N+ (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E/N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (~0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm2V-1s-1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  5. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trindade, A.M.F.; Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A.F.V.; Conde, C.A.N.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Santos, F.P.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities ( K 0 ) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH 3 ) 3 N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E / N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH 3 ) 3 N + (59 u) and (CH 3 ) 2 CH 2 N + (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E / N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm 2 V −1 s −1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (∼0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm 2 V −1 s −1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  6. Mobility and lifetime of sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Walters, A J

    2003-01-01

    Positively charged sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions are transported through liquid xenon using electric fields in the range of 4-10 kV cm sup - sup 1 and for drift distances up to 50 mm. From these measurements we deduce upper limits on the attenuation length for Tl ions in liquid xenon, resulting in a lifetime >5.5 s. In addition to these results, the field independent mobility of Tl bearing species in liquid xenon was measured to be 1.33+-0.04x10 sup - sup 4 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1. This result, when coupled with those for other species by previous workers, suggests that positive ion mobility in liquid xenon is proportional to the hard-core radius. Applications to Ba ion collection in a double beta decay experiment are also discussed.

  7. Post-Test Inspection of Nasa's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster Long Duration Test Hardware: Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.; Shastry, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    A Long Duration Test (LDT) was initiated in June 2005 as a part of NASAs Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) service life validation approach. Testing was voluntarily terminated in February 2014, with the thruster accumulating 51,184 hours of operation, processing 918 kg of xenon propellant, and delivering 35.5 MN-s of total impulse. This presentation will present the post-test inspection results to date for the thrusters ion optics.

  8. Surface damage on polycrystalline $\\beta$-SiC by xenon ion irradiation at high fluence

    OpenAIRE

    Baillet, J.; Gavarini, S.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Garnier, V.; Peaucelle, C.; Jaurand, X.; Duranti, A.; Bernard, C.; Rapegno, R.; Cardinal, S.; Escobar-Sawa, L; De Echave, T.; Lanfant, B.; Leconte, Y.

    2018-01-01

    International audience; Nano-grained $\\beta$-silicon carbide ($\\beta$-SiC) pellets were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). These were implanted at room temperature with 800 keV xenon at ion fluences of 5.10$^{15}$ and 1.10$^{17}$ cm$^{-2}$. Microstructural modifications were studied by electronic microscopy (TEM and SEM) and xenon profiles were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). A complete amorphization of the implanted area associated with a significant oxidat...

  9. Ionization efficiency studies for xenon ions with thesuperconducting ECR ion source VENUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd, DamonS.; Tarvainen,Olli

    2007-06-05

    Ionization efficiency studies for high charge state xenon ions using a calibrated gas leak are presented. A 75% enriched {sup 129}Xe gas leak with a gas flow equivalent to 5.11p{mu}A was used in all the measurements. The experiments were performed at the VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for Nuclear Science) ion source for 18 GHz, 28 GHz and double frequency operation. Overall, total ionization efficiencies close to 100% and ionization efficiencies into a single charge state up to 22% were measured. The influence of the biased disk on the ionization efficiency was studied and the results were somewhat surprising. When the biased disk was removed from the plasma chamber, the ionization efficiency was dramatically reduced for single frequency operation. However, using double frequency heating the ionization efficiencies achieved without the biased disk almost matched the ionization efficiencies achieved with the biased probe. In addition, we have studied the influence of the support gas on the charge state distribution of the xenon ions. Either pure oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and helium were used as support gases. The addition of a small amount of helium can increase the ionization efficiency into a single charge state by narrowing the charge state distribution. Furthermore by varying the helium flow the most efficient charge state can be shifted over a wide range without compromising the ionization efficiency. This is not possible using only oxygen as support gas. Results from these studies are presented and discussed.

  10. Linear and nonlinear effects at low energy ion bombardment of solid xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Elastic sputtering of crystalline xenon by 20-750 eV Xe ions has been studied with molecular dynamics. The nonlinear effects are dominant at 250 eV ion bombardment. They result in a partly amorphization of the impact volume as well as in a considerable reduction of the surface binding energy...

  11. Isotopic Enrichment of Boron in the Sputtering of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure the isotopic enrichment of boron. Xenon ions from 100 eV to 1.5 keV were used to sputter a boron nitride target. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 microA/sq cm. Xenon ions impinged on the target surface at 50 deg angle to the surface normal. Since boron nitride is an insulator, a flood electron gun was used in our experiments to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The sputtered secondary ions of boron were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The spectrometer entrance aperture was located perpendicular to the ion beam direction and 10 mm away from the target surface. The secondary ion flux was observed to be enriched in the heavy isotopes at lower ion energies. The proportion of heavy isotopes in the sputtered secondary ion flux was found to decrease with increasing primary ion energy from 100 to 350 eV. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially. The light isotope enrichment factor was observed to reach an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. This trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy range.

  12. Low-Energy Sputtering Studies of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtering of boron nitride with xenon ions was investigated using secondary ion (SIMS) and secondary neutral (SNMS) mass spectrometry. The ions generated from the ion gun were incident on the target at an angle of 50' with respect to the surface'normal. The energy of ions ranged from 100 eV to 3 keV. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge build-up on the target surface. The intensities of sputtered neutral and charged particles, including single atoms, molecules, and clusters, were measured as a function of ion energy. Positive SIMS spectra were dominated by the two boron isotopes whereas BN- and B- were the two major constituents of the negative SIMS spectra. Nitrogen could be detected only in the SNMS spectra. The intensity-energy curves of the sputtered particles were similar in shape. The knees in P-SIMS and SNMS intensity-energy curves appear at around I keV which is significantly higher that 100 to 200 eV energy range at which knees appear in the sputtering of medium and heavy elements by ions of argon and xenon. This difference in the position of the sputter yield knee between boron nitride and heavier targets is due to the reduced ion energy differences. The isotopic composition of secondary ions of boron were measured by bombarding boron nitride with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at lower incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing primary ion energy. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment increasing to an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. The trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy

  13. Xenon-Xenon collision events in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Mc Cauley, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    One of the first-ever xenon-xenon collision events recorded by CMS during the LHC’s one-day-only heavy-ion run with xenon nuclei. The large number of tracks emerging from the centre of the detector show the many simultaneous nucleon-nucleon interactions that take place when two xenon nuclei, each with 54 protons and 75 neutrons, collide inside CMS.

  14. Experimental studies of ion flow near the sheath edge in multiple ion species plasma including argon, xenon and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severn, Greg; Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-05-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion was studied with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. It was found in the first LIF studies of three ion species plasma (Yip et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 050703) in which krypton was added to a mixture of argon and xenon plasma confined in a multidipole, dc hot filament discharge, that the addition of krypton served to turn off instability enhanced collisional friction (IEF) found in two ion species plasma (Yip et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas). In this study, neon, a less massive atomic gas than argon was added. Argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) were measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate, and the Ne+ density was systematically increased. We found in both cases that once the added ion density significantly exceeded the density of the other two ions, IVDF measurements consistent with the absence of the instability were obtained, and the measured ion sheath edge speeds tended toward their individual Bohm velocities. For all other relative concentrations, the ions reached the sheath edge neither at their Bohm speeds nor the ion sound speed of the system, consistent, qualitatively, with the action of the IEF.

  15. Recycle Requirements for NASA's 30 cm Xenon Ion Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical breakdowns have been observed during ion thruster operation. These breakdowns, or arcs, can be caused by several conditions. In flight systems, the power processing unit must be designed to handle these faults autonomously. This has a strong impact on power processor requirements and must be understood fully for the power processing unit being designed for the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Application Readiness program. In this study, fault conditions were investigated using a NASA 30 cm ion thruster and a power console. Power processing unit output specifications were defined based on the breakdown phenomena identified and characterized.

  16. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  17. On limitations of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics for xenon ion velocity distribution function measurements in Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romadanov, I.; Raitses, Y.; Diallo, A.; Hara, K.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Smolyakov, A.

    2018-03-01

    Hall thruster operation is characterized by strong breathing oscillations of the discharge current, the plasma density, the temperature, and the electric field. Probe- and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics were used to measure temporal variations of plasma parameters and the xenon ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) in the near-field plasma plume in regimes with moderate (reducing the production of metastable ions. Because the residence time of ions in the channel is generally shorter than the time scale of breathing oscillations, the density of the excited ions outside the thruster is low and they cannot be detected. In the range of temperature of oscillations, the ionization cross-section of xenon atoms remains sufficiently large to sustain the discharge. This finding suggests that the commonly used LIF diagnostic of xenon IVDF can be subject to large uncertainties in the regimes with significant oscillations of the electron temperature, or other plasma parameters.

  18. Tuning of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of xenon ion implanted zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, B.; Ray, Sekhar C.; Pattanaik, Shreenu; Sarma, Sweety; Mishra, Dilip K.; Pontsho, Mbule; Pong, W. F.

    2018-03-01

    A correlation between the electronic structure and magnetic properties of ZnO single crystals (ZnO SCs) and 300 keV xenon ion (Xe3+) implanted ZnO SCs has been studied using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, valence band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device-type magnetometer. The XANES studies revealed that the number of unoccupied p-states in the implanted ZnO SCs is higher than in the pristine ZnO SCs. In the implanted ZnO SCs, the binding energy of the Zn 2p 3/2 core level peak shifted to higher energy which further confirmed the increase in the valence band maximum (VBM) energy level. The VBM of the xenon ion (Xe3+) implanted ZnO SCs increased from 3.17–3.49 eV, obtained from UPS (He-I) measurements. A VB-PES study revealed that the number of electrons in the valence band of the O 2p–Zn 4sp hybridized states of the implanted ZnO SCs is higher than in the pristine ZnO SCs. The magnetic M–H loops demonstrated enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in the Xe implanted ZnO SCs, attributable to the increasing number of surface defects and native defect sites in oxygen vacancies and zinc interstitials.

  19. Internal erosion rates of a 10-kW xenon ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1988-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter divergent magnetic field ion thruster, developed for mercury operation at 2.7 kW, was modified and operated with xenon propellant at a power level of 10 kW for 567 h to evaluate thruster performance and lifetime. The major differences between this thruster and its baseline configuration were elimination of the three mercury vaporizers, use of a main discharge cathode with a larger orifice, reduction in discharge baffle diameter, and use of an ion accelerating system with larger acceleration grid holes. Grid thickness measurement uncertainties, combined with estimates of the effects of reactive residual facility background gases gave a minimum screen grid lifetime of 7000 h. Discharge cathode orifice erosion rates were measured with three different cathodes with different initial orifice diameters. Three potential problems were identified during the wear test: the upstream side of the discharge baffle eroded at an unacceptable rate; two of the main cathode tubes experienced oxidation, deformation, and failure; and the accelerator grid impingement current was more than an order of magnitude higher than that of the baseline mercury thruster. The charge exchange ion eroison was not quantified in this test. There were no measurable changes in the accelerator grid thickness or the accelerator grid hole diameters.

  20. An overview of the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, Jay E.; Goebel, Don; Brophy, John R.; Beatty, John; Monheiser, J.; Giles, D.; Hobson, D.; Wilson, F.; Christensen, J.; De Pano, M.; hide

    2003-01-01

    NASA is investigating high power, high specific impulse propulsion technologies that could enable ambitious flights such as multi-body rendezvous missions, outer planet orbiters and interstellar precursor missions. The requirements for these missions are much more demanding than those for state-of-the-art solar-powered ion propulsion applications. The purpose of the NEXIS program is to develop advanced ion thruster technologies that satisfy the requirements for high power, high specific impulse operation, high efficiency and long thruster life. The nominal design point for the NEXIS thruster is 20 kWe at a specific impulse of 7500 s with an efficiency over 78% and a xenon throughput capability of greater than 2000 kg. These performance and throughput goals will be achieved by applying a combination of advanced technologies including a large discharge chamber, erosion resistant carbon-carbon grids, an advanced reservoir hollow cathode and techniques for increasing propellant efficiency such as grid masking and accelerator grid aperture diameter tailoring. This paper provides an overview of the challenges associated with these requirements and how they are being addressed in the NEXIS program.

  1. Electronic energy loss effects on chemical modification of polyimide induced by high energy xenon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Youmei; Zhu Zhiyong; Jin Yunfan; Wang Zhiguang; Hou Mingdong

    2004-01-01

    Stacked polyimide (PI) films of about 25 μm in thickness were irradiated with 1.755 GeV xenon ions under vacuum at room temperature. The chemical changes of modified PI films were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) absorption spectroscopy. The FTIR results show that the absorbance of the typical function groups decreases exponentially as a function of fluence. Under 8.8 keV/nm (minimum) and 11.5 keV/nm (maximum) electronic energy loss of 136 Xe irradiation, the mean degradation radius of all function groups in PI is 3.6 and 4.1 nm, respectively. The alkyne end group was found after irradiation and its formation radius was 5.6 nm and 5.9 nm corresponding to 8.8 keV/nm and 11.5 keV/nm, respectively. the UV/Vis analysis indicates the radiation induced absorbance change follows a linear relation with fluence, and the production efficiency of chromospheres depends strongly on the electronic energy loss (dE/dX) e . (authors)

  2. Comparison of Medium Power Hall Effect Thruster Ion Acceleration for Krypton and Xenon Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    thrusters. It is a lower cost replacement for xenon, may optimize to similar or potentially higher performance, and is enabling for very large solar ...lower cost replacement for xenon, may optimize to similar or potentially higher performance, and is enabling for very large solar electric transfer...ERC, Inc, Edwards AFB, CA, USA. fractional distillation of atmospheric gases for use pri- marily by the steel industry. Due to the low concentra- tion

  3. Modeling ARRM Xenon Tank Pressurization Using 1D Thermodynamic and Heat Transfer Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Patrick; Tomsik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    As a first step in understanding what ground support equipment (GSE) is required to provide external cooling during the loading of 5,000 kg of xenon into 4 aluminum lined composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), a modeling analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel. The goals of the analysis were to predict xenon temperature and pressure throughout loading at the launch facility, estimate the time required to load one tank, and to get an early estimate of what provisions for cooling xenon might be needed while the tanks are being filled. The model uses the governing thermodynamic and heat transfer equations to achieve these goals. Results indicate that a single tank can be loaded in about 15 hours with reasonable external coolant requirements. The model developed in this study was successfully validated against flight and test data. The first data set is from the Dawn mission which also utilizes solar electric propulsion with xenon propellant, and the second is test data from the rapid loading of a hydrogen cylindrical COPV. The main benefit of this type of model is that the governing physical equations using bulk fluid solid temperatures can provide a quick and accurate estimate of the state of the propellant throughout loading which is much cheaper in terms of computational time and licensing costs than a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis while capturing the majority of the thermodynamics and heat transfer.

  4. Modeling Xenon Tank Pressurization using One-Dimensional Thermodynamic and Heat Transfer Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Ryan P.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step in understanding what ground support equipment (GSE) is required to provide external cooling during the loading of 5,000 kg of xenon into 4 aluminum lined composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), a modeling analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel. The goals of the analysis were to predict xenon temperature and pressure throughout loading at the launch facility, estimate the time required to load one tank, and to get an early estimate of what provisions for cooling xenon might be needed while the tanks are being filled. The model uses the governing thermodynamic and heat transfer equations to achieve these goals. Results indicate that a single tank can be loaded in about 15 hours with reasonable external coolant requirements. The model developed in this study was successfully validated against flight and test data. The first data set is from the Dawn mission which also utilizes solar electric propulsion with xenon propellant, and the second is test data from the rapid loading of a hydrogen cylindrical COPV. The main benefit of this type of model is that the governing physical equations using bulk fluid solid temperatures can provide a quick and accurate estimate of the state of the propellant throughout loading which is much cheaper in terms of computational time and licensing costs than a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis while capturing the majority of the thermodynamics and heat transfer.

  5. Radio frequency source of a weakly expanding wedge-shaped xenon ion beam for contactless removal of large-sized space debris objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Victor; Cherkasova, Maria; Kruglov, Kirill; Kudriavtsev, Arseny; Masherov, Pavel; Mogulkin, Andrey; Obukhov, Vladimir; Riaby, Valentin; Svotina, Victoria

    2017-08-01

    A theoretical-experimental research has been carried out to determine the characteristics of a radio frequency (RF) ion source for the generation of a weakly expanding wedge-shaped xenon ion beam. Such ion beam geometry is of interest as a prototype of an on-board ion injector for contactless "ion shepherding" by service spacecraft to remove large space debris objects from geostationary orbits. The wedge shape of the ion beam increases its range. The device described herein comprises an inductive gas discharge chamber and a slit-type three-electrode ion extraction grid (IEG) unit. Calculations of accelerating cell geometries and ion trajectories determined the dependence of beam expansion half-angle on normalized perveance based on the measurements of the spatial distributions of the xenon plasma parameters at the IEG entrance for a xenon flow rate q ≈ 0.2 mg/s and an incident RF power Pin ≤ 250 W at a driving frequency f = 2 MHz. Experimental studies showed that the ion beam, circular at the IEG exit, accepted the elliptical form at the distance of 580 mm with half-angle of beam expansion across IEG slits about 2°-3° and close to 0° along them. Thus, the obtained result proved the possibility of creating a new-generation on-board ion injector that could be used in spacecrafts for removal of debris.

  6. Xenon focused ion beam in the shape memory alloys investigation – the case of NiTi and CoNiAl

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopeček, Jaromír; Jurek, Karel; Kopecký, Vít; Klimša, Ladislav; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Landa, Michal; Dluhoš, J.; Petrenec, M.; Hladík, L.; Doupal, A.; Heczko, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, Aug (2014), s. 335-336 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03044S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : scanning electron microscope * SEM * focused ion beam * FIB * xenon plasma focused ion beam * dual beam * shape memory alloy * SMA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  7. Acoustic signals generated in piezoelectric lead-zirconate-titanate elements by direct bombardment with xenon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyachi, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kuraza, G.; Fujii, M.; Nagashima, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kobayashi, M.N.; Kobayashi, S.; Miyajima, M.; Mori, K.; Okudaira, O.; Yamashita, N.; Shibata, H.; Murakami, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Okada, N.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic signals were observed with a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) element that was directly irradiated with a 368 MeV/n xenon beam. Using an array comprising PZT elements, the energy loss in the PZT was studied. These elements are sensitive to an energy deposit of 100 nJ. A series of values of output voltage vs. integrated thickness of PZT was represented along a line similar to the ionization loss calculated by the Bethe-Bloch formula. The induced voltage was attributed to several processes-ionization, thermal, elastic, and piezoelectric processes. This study describes the possible applications of the PZT element as an active medium for calorimeters and a monitor for hypervelocity impact of space dust

  8. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  9. Xenon gas field ion source from a single-atom tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Chiao; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Chang, Wei-Tse; Li, Po-Chang; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Chang, Chia-Seng; Tsong, T. T.; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2017-06-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems have become powerful diagnostic and modification tools for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gas field ion sources (GFISs) built from atomic-size emitters offer the highest brightness among all ion sources and thus can improve the spatial resolution of FIB systems. Here we show that the Ir/W(111) single-atom tip (SAT) can emit high-brightness Xe+ ion beams with a high current stability. The ion emission current versus extraction voltage was analyzed from 150 K up to 309 K. The optimal emitter temperature for maximum Xe+ ion emission was ˜150 K and the reduced brightness at the Xe gas pressure of 1 × 10-4 torr is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of a Ga liquid metal ion source, and four to five orders of magnitude higher than that of a Xe inductively coupled plasma ion source. Most surprisingly, the SAT emitter remained stable even when operated at 309 K. Even though the ion current decreased with increasing temperature, the current at room temperature (RT) could still reach over 1 pA when the gas pressure was higher than 1 × 10-3 torr, indicating the feasibility of RT-Xe-GFIS for application to FIB systems. The operation temperature of Xe-SAT-GFIS is considerably higher than the cryogenic temperature required for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which offers great technical advantages because only simple or no cooling schemes can be adopted. Thus, Xe-GFIS-FIB would be easy to implement and may become a powerful tool for nanoscale milling and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  10. High-energy xenon ion irradiation effects on the electrical properties of yttrium iron garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantini, J.M.; Flament, J.L.; Sinopoli, L.; Trochon, J.; Uzureau, J.L.; Groult, D.; Studer, F.; Toulemonde, M.

    1989-01-01

    Thin monocristalline samples of yttrium iron garnet Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 (YIG) were irradiated at room temperature with 27 MeV/A 132 Xe ions at varying fluences up to 3.5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 . Sample thickness (100 μm) was smaller than the mean projected range of ions (170 μm) so that we were able to study the effects of irradiation damage solely. At such a high ion energy the nuclear energy loss is negligible and damage is mainly due to electronic excitation energy loss. YIG d.c conductivity is found to rise by a factor 40 for the highest dose while the permittivity increases only slightly after irradiation (40% max.). The dielectric losses are also enhanced as the ion fluence increases especially at lower frequencies (by a factor 6 at 10 KHz). No dielectric relaxation peak is observed in the frequency range explored here (10 KHz - 10 MHz)

  11. Potential and Kinetic Electron Emissions from HOPG Surface Irradiated by Highly Charged Xenon and Neon Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Yu, Wang; Yong-Tao, Zhao; Jian-Rong, Sun; De-Hui, Li; Jin-Yu, Li; Ping-Zhi, Wang; Guo-Qing, Xiao; Abdul, Qayyum

    2011-01-01

    Highly charged 129 Xe q+ (q = 10−30) and 40 Ne q+ (q = 4−8) ion-induced secondary electron emissions on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are reported. The total secondary electron yield is measured as a function of the potential energy of incident ions. The experimental data are used to separate contributions of kinetic and potential electron yields. Our results show that about 4.5% and 13.2% of ion's potential energies are consumed in potential electron emission due to different Xe q+ -HOPG and Ne q+ -HOPG combinations. A simple formula is introduced to estimate the fraction of ion's potential energy for potential electron emission. (atomic and molecular physics)

  12. Preparation and Analysis of Atom Probe Tips by Xenon Focused Ion Beam Milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estivill, Robert; Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2016-06-01

    The damage and ion distribution induced in Si by an inductively coupled plasma Xe focused ion beam was investigated by atom probe tomography. By using predefined patterns it was possible to prepare the atom probe tips with a sub 50 nm end radius in the ion beam microscope. The atom probe reconstruction shows good agreement with simulated implantation profiles and interplanar distances extracted from spatial distribution maps. The elemental profiles of O and C indicate co-implantation during the milling process. The presence of small disc-shaped Xe clusters are also found in the three-dimensional reconstruction. These are attributed to the presence of Xe nanocrystals or bubbles that open during the evaporation process. The expected accumulated dose points to a loss of >95% of the Xe during analysis, which escapes undetected.

  13. ASTROPHYSICS. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-21

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our experiment, we exclude a variety of representative dark matter models that would induce electronic recoils. For axial-vector couplings to electrons, we exclude cross sections above 6 × 10(-35) cm(2) for particle masses of m(χ) = 2 GeV/c(2). Independent of the dark matter halo, we exclude leptophilic models as an explanation for the long-standing DAMA/LIBRA signal, such as couplings to electrons through axial-vector interactions at a 4.4σ confidence level, mirror dark matter at 3.6σ, and luminous dark matter at 4.6σ. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Interaction potentials lithium and potassium ions with argon, krypton and xenon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palyukh, B.M.; Rykalyuk, R.E.; Chigin', V.I.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of obtained experimental dependences of integral cross sections of elastic scattering of Li + and K + alkali metal ions with atoms of Ar, Kr and Xe inert gases on collision energy as well as quantum oscillations of glory detected for the first time for ion-atomic collisions determined were potentials of these particle interaction in a wide range of internucleus distances including repulsion potential minimum and remote-action polarization attraction. A method for obtaining five free parameters of the potential suggested in the form of piecewise continuous function permitting to form potential minimum by means of three values: put depth epsilon, equilibrium distance Rsub(m) and curvature Ksub(epsilon) independent of change of potential at remote and small distances [ru

  15. Bonding of xenon hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Peralta, N.; Juarez, R.; Cerpa, E.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Merino, G.

    2009-01-01

    We have computed the structure and stability of the xenon hydrides HXeY (with Y = F, Cl, Br, I, CCH, CN, NC) using relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at ZORA-BP86/TZ2P level. All model systems HXeY studied here are bound equilibrium structures, but they are also significantly destabilized

  16. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129 Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131 Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen

  17. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our

  18. Retinal endoilluminator toxicity of xenon and light-emitting diode (LED) light source: rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bahri; Dinç, Erdem; Yilmaz, S Necat; Altiparmak, U Emrah; Yülek, Fatma; Ertekin, Sevda; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yakın, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates retinal toxicity due to endoillumination with the light-emitting diode (LED) light source in comparison to endoillumination with xenon light source. Twenty-five eyes of 14 New Zealand pigmented rabbits were used in the study. The LED light (Omesis Medical Systems, Turkey) group was composed of 7 right eyes, while the other 7 right eyes constituted the xenon group (420 nm filter, 357mW/cm(2)) (Bright Star; DORC, Zuidland, Netherlands). Eleven untreated left eyes composed the control group. Twenty gauge pars plana incision 1.5 mm behind the limbus was performed in the right eyes. Twenty gauge bullet type fiberoptic endoilluminator was inserted into the eye from the incision without any pars plana vitrectomy. Fiberoptic endoilluminator was placed in such a way that it was directed toward visual streak of the rabbit retina with a 5 mm distance to retinal surface. Endoillumination was then applied for 20 min with a maximum light intensity for LED and xenon light. In left control eyes, no surgical procedure and no endoillumination were performed. One week after the endoillumination procedure, both eyes of the rabbits were enucleated following electroretinography. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate morphologic changes. Retina tissues were assessed by active caspase-3 staining. There was no difference in the shape of the waveforms recorded in the eyes endoilluminated with LED light and xenon light sources compared to control eyes both before and after endoillumination application (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation of the retinas with hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated that all study groups have normal histologic properties similar to control group. No apoptosis positive cells were found within all sections in all groups. When the LED light source is used with maximum power and limited duration for endoillumination in rabbit eyes it does not produce phototoxic effects that may be detectable by electrophysiology

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  20. Xenon and sevoflurane provide analgesia during labor and fetal brain protection in a perinatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yang

    Full Text Available It is not possible to identify all pregnancies at risk of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Many women use some form of analgesia during childbirth and some anesthetic agents have been shown to be neuroprotective when used as analgesics at subanesthetic concentrations. In this study we sought to understand the effects of two anesthetic agents with presumptive analgesic activity and known preconditioning-neuroprotective properties (sevoflurane or xenon, in reducing hypoxia-induced brain damage in a model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. The analgesic and neuroprotective effects at subanesthetic levels of sevoflurane (0.35% or xenon (35% were tested in a rat model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. Analgesic effects were measured by assessing maternal behavior and spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activation using c-Fos. In separate experiments, intrauterine fetal asphyxia was induced four hours after gas exposure; on post-insult day 3 apoptotic cell death was measured by caspase-3 immunostaining in hippocampal neurons and correlated with the number of viable neurons on postnatal day (PND 7. A separate cohort of pups was nurtured by a surrogate mother for 50 days when cognitive testing with Morris water maze was performed. Both anesthetic agents provided analgesia as reflected by a reduction in the number of stretching movements and decreased c-Fos expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Both agents also reduced the number of caspase-3 positive (apoptotic neurons and increased cell viability in the hippocampus at PND7. These acute histological changes were mirrored by improved cognitive function measured remotely after birth on PND 50 compared to control group. Subanesthetic doses of sevoflurane or xenon provided both analgesia and neuroprotection in this model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. These data suggest that anesthetic agents with neuroprotective properties may be effective in preventing HIE and should be

  1. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  2. Charge States of Krypton and Xenon in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsler, Peter; Fludra, Andrzej; Giunta, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    We calculate charge state distributions of Kr and Xe in a model for two different types of solar wind using the effective ionization and recombination rates provided from the OPEN_ADAS data base. The charge states of heavy elements in the solar wind are essential for estimating the efficiency of Coulomb drag in the inner corona. We find that xenon ions experience particularly low Coulomb drag from protons in the inner corona, comparable to the notoriously weak drag of protons on helium ions. It has been found long ago that helium in the solar wind can be strongly depleted near interplanetary current sheets, whereas coronal mass ejecta are sometimes strongly enriched in helium. We argue that if the extraordinary variability of the helium abundance in the solar wind is due to inefficient Coulomb drag, the xenon abundance must vary strongly. In fact, a secular decrease of the solar wind xenon abundance relative to the other heavier noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) has been postulated based on a comparison of noble gases in recently irradiated and ancient samples of ilmenite in the lunar regolith. We conclude that decreasing solar activity and decreasing frequency of coronal mass ejections over the solar lifetime might be responsible for a secularly decreasing abundance of xenon in the solar wind.

  3. Multicomponent ion exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D.; Byers, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    The optimization of ion-exchange column design becomes increasingly important in applications where high efficiency is required to remove trace components in wastewater to very low discharge requirements and for treating hazardous wastewaters where the disposal costs for secondary waste is extremely high. A predictive mathematical model is being developed for improved design of ion-exchange columns for treatment of wastewaters which are contaminated with trace quantities of Sr-90 and Cs-137. Equilibria isotherms and mass transfer mechanisms are being experimentally determined for isothermal multicomponent ion exchange of Ca, Mg, Na, Ca, and Sr with Ionsive IE-95 chabazite zeolite. These equations are being included in a mathematical model to determine the cation breakthrough curves for different column configurations and operating conditions

  4. Properties of excited xenon atoms in a plasma display panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Byoung H.; Oh, Phil Y.; Choi, Eun H.

    2009-01-01

    The luminance efficiency of a plasma display panel is directly related to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light that is emitted from excited xenon (Xe) atoms and molecules. It is therefore necessary to investigate the properties of excited xenon atoms. This study presents experimental data associated with the behavior of excited xenon atoms in a PDP discharge cell and compares the data with the theoretical results obtained using an analytical model. The properties of excited xenon atoms in the discharge cells of a plasma display panel are investigated by measuring the excited atom density through the use of laser absorption spectroscopy. The density of the excited xenon atoms increases from zero, reaches its peak, and decreases with time in the discharge cells. The profile of the excited xenon atoms is also studied in terms of the xenon mole fraction. The typical density of the excited xenon atoms in the metastable state is on the order of 10 13 atoms per cubic cm.

  5. On electron attachment effect on characteristics of the DBD in chlorine and its mixtures with xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtaeva, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The electron attachment effect on DBD characteristics in chlorine and its mixtures with xenon has been studied. Characteristics of the DBDs in pure chlorine and in xenon-chlorine mixtures with a chlorine fraction of 0.1-5% were modeled using the fluid model. It is shown that the electron attachment limits a magnitude of the DBD current, contributes to formation of multiple current spikes, appearance of a double layer near the dielectric surface and formation of XeCl* excimer molecules, and leads to a redistribution of the power deposited into the discharge: more power is deposited into ions and less power is deposited into electrons.

  6. Evidence for an ultrafast breakdown of the BeO band structure due to swift argon and xenon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwietz, G; Czerski, K; Roth, M; Grande, P L; Koteski, V; Staufenbiel, F

    2010-10-29

    Auger-electron spectra associated with Be atoms in the pure metal lattice and in the stoichiometric oxide have been investigated for different incident charged particles. For fast incident electrons, for Ar7+ and Ar15+ ions as well as Xe15+ and Xe31+ ions at velocities of 6% to 10% the speed of light, there are strong differences in the corresponding spectral distributions of Be-K Auger lines. These differences are related to changes in the local electronic band structure of BeO on a femtosecond time scale after the passage of highly charged heavy ions.

  7. Xenon. Now More than Ever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Xenon is one of the major goals of proposed missions to Venus. This talk explains why xenon is important to understanding the evolution of Venus's atmosphere. Implications for the historic climate of Venus add a new wrinkle in the story. Xenon's 9 stable isotopes can tell us much about the contrasting histories of Earth, Mars, and Venus. Earth's atmospheric Xe is highly mass fractionated compared to any known solar system source. Moreover, Earth's Xe/Kr ratio is low. It would seem that our heaviest gas has been escaping. What is even more remarkable, Xe escape took place for billions of years until the advent of an O2 atmosphere (Srinivasan EPSL 31:129 (1976); Pujol et al. EPSL 308:298 (2011); Avice et al. Nature Comm 8 (2017)). (ii) Earth's original xenon - what Pepin named U-Xe and claimed was the true solar Xe - had not been seen anywhere else until this year, when the secret parent of U-Xe was found hiding in Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by Rosetta (Marty et al. Science 356:1069 (2017)). Apparently 20% of Earth's xenon came from this kind of comet. This has obvious consequences for volatiles in general. Mars's Xe is also strongly mass fractionated, but its original Xe is indistinguishable from solar Xe, which means that Xe escape is a planetary process that operated in parallel on the two planets. (iii) 7% of Earth's 129Xe are radiogenic daughters of extinct 129I, half-life 15.7 Myrs. This is only 1% of the radiogenic 129Xe that Earth would have had had Earth retained its full cosmic birthright. The missing 129Xe can be interpreted as dating the Moon-forming impact to 100 Myrs after the solar system formed. Venus will be different. Xenon loss probably requires escape as an ion, and therefore it likely depends on hydrogen escape and an organized planetary magnetic field. Xenon escape during Earth's Archean implies that hydrogen was abundant and that the planetary magnetic field was strong. Venus will have seen a different history of escape, so that the mass

  8. The XENON project for dark matter direct detection at LNGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinario, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    The XENON project at INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy, aims at dark matter direct detection with liquid xenon dual-phase time projection chambers. Latest results of XENON100 detector exclude various models of leptophilic dark matter. A search for low mass weakly interacting massive particles was also performed, lowering the energy threshold for detection to 0.7 keV for nuclear recoils. The multi-ton XENON1T detector is fully installed and operating. It is expected to reach a sensitivity a factor 100 better than XENON100 with a 2 ton·year exposure.

  9. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  10. Computer modelling of a short-pulse excited dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp (lambda approx 172 nm)

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, R J

    2003-01-01

    A detailed rate-equation analysis has been used to simulate the plasma kinetics in a pulsed-excited dielectric barrier discharge in xenon, under operating conditions where the discharge structure is spatially homogeneous. The one-dimensional model, incorporating 14 species and 70 reaction processes, predicts results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the electrical characteristics, and optical (vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and visible) pulse shapes. The model reveals that electrical breakdown of the discharge gap occurs via a fast-moving ionization/excitation wavefront that starts close to the anode dielectric and propagates towards the cathode at approx 3x10 sup 5 m s sup - sup 1. The wavefront appears as a result of successive avalanches of electrons that propagate across the discharge gap after release from the cathode dielectric. During breakdown, the mean electron energy in the bulk plasma is close to optimum for preferential excitation of the Xe* 1s sub 4 sub , sub 5 states that fe...

  11. Collateral ventilation quantification using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT: Differences between canine and swine models of bronchial occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ah; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chng Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the difference in the degree of collateral ventilation between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction could be detected by using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Eight mongrel dogs and six pigs underwent dynamic dual-energy scanning of 64-slice dual-source CT at 12-second interval for 2-minute wash-in period (60% xenon) and at 24-second interval for 3-minute wash-out period with segmental bronchus occluded. Ventilation parameters of magnitude (A value), maximal slope, velocity (K value), and time-to-peak (TTP) enhancement were calculated from dynamic xenon maps using exponential function of Kety model. A larger difference in A value between parenchyma was observed in pigs than in dogs (absolute difference, -33.0 +/- 5.0 Hounsfield units [HU] vs. -2.8 +/- 7.1 HU, p = 0.001; normalized percentage difference, -79.8 +/- 1.8% vs. -5.4 +/- 16.4%, p = 0.0007). Mean maximal slopes in both periods in the occluded parenchyma only decreased in pigs (all p < 0.05). K values of both periods were not different (p = 0.892) in dogs. However, a significant (p = 0.027) difference was found in pigs in the wash-in period. TTP was delayed in the occluded parenchyma in pigs (p = 0.013) but not in dogs (p = 0.892). Xenon-ventilation CT allows the quantification of collateral ventilation and detection of differences between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction.

  12. Collateral ventilation quantification using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT: Differences between canine and swine models of bronchial occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ah; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chng Min

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the difference in the degree of collateral ventilation between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction could be detected by using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Eight mongrel dogs and six pigs underwent dynamic dual-energy scanning of 64-slice dual-source CT at 12-second interval for 2-minute wash-in period (60% xenon) and at 24-second interval for 3-minute wash-out period with segmental bronchus occluded. Ventilation parameters of magnitude (A value), maximal slope, velocity (K value), and time-to-peak (TTP) enhancement were calculated from dynamic xenon maps using exponential function of Kety model. A larger difference in A value between parenchyma was observed in pigs than in dogs (absolute difference, -33.0 +/- 5.0 Hounsfield units [HU] vs. -2.8 +/- 7.1 HU, p = 0.001; normalized percentage difference, -79.8 +/- 1.8% vs. -5.4 +/- 16.4%, p = 0.0007). Mean maximal slopes in both periods in the occluded parenchyma only decreased in pigs (all p < 0.05). K values of both periods were not different (p = 0.892) in dogs. However, a significant (p = 0.027) difference was found in pigs in the wash-in period. TTP was delayed in the occluded parenchyma in pigs (p = 0.013) but not in dogs (p = 0.892). Xenon-ventilation CT allows the quantification of collateral ventilation and detection of differences between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction.

  13. Molecular MRI based on hyper-polarized xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassali, Nawal

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has a high importance in medicine as it enables the observation of the organs inside the body without the use of radiative or invasive techniques. However it is known to suffer from poor sensitivity. To circumvent this limitation, a key solution resides in the use of hyper-polarized species. Among the entities with which we can drastically increase nuclear polarization, xenon has very specific properties through its interactions with its close environment that lead to a wide chemical shift bandwidth. The goal is thus to use it as a tracer. This PhD thesis focuses on the concept of 129 Xe MRI-based sensors for the detection of biological events. In this approach, hyper-polarized xenon is vectorized to biological targets via functionalized host systems, and then localized thanks to fast dedicated MRI sequences. The conception and set-up of a spin-exchange optical pumping device is first described. Then studies about the interaction of the hyper-polarized noble gas with new cryptophanes susceptible to constitute powerful host molecules are detailed. Also the implementation of recent MRI sequences optimized for the transient character of the hyper-polarization and taking profit of the xenon in-out exchange is described. Applications of this approach for the detection of metallic ions and cellular receptors are studied. Finally, our first in vivo results on a small animal model are presented. (author) [fr

  14. Stirring Up an Elastic Fluid: Critical Viscosity of Xenon-2 (CVX-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-12-01

    Whipped cream stays in place even when turned upside down. Yet it readily flows through the nozzle of a spray can to reach the dessert plate. This demonstrates the phenomenon of shear thinning that is important to many industrial and physical processes. Paints, film emulsions, and other complex solutions that are highly viscous under normal conditions but become thin and flow easily under shear forces. A simple fluid, such as water, does not exhibit shear thinning under normal conditions. Very close to the liquid-vapor critical point, where the distinction between liquid and vapor disappears, the fluid becomes more complex and is predicted to display shear thinning. At the critical point, xenon atoms interact over long distances in a classical model of cooperative phenomena. Physicists rely on this system to learn how long-range order arises. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of fluids. Viscosity originates from the interactions of individual molecules. It is so complicated that, except for the simplest gas, it cannot be calculated accurately from theory. Tests with critical fluids can provide key data, but are limited on Earth because critical fluids are highly compressed by gravity. CVX-2 employs a tiny metal screen vibrating between two electrodes in a bath of critical xenon. The vibrations and how they dampen are used to measure viscosity. CVX flew on STS-85 (1997), where it revealed that, close to the critical point, the xenon is partly elastic: it can 'stretch' as well as flow. For STS-107, the hardware has been enhanced to determine if critical xenon is a shear-thinning fluid.

  15. Xenon isotopes in 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko show that comets contributed to Earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Bekaert, D V; Berthelier, J-J; Bieler, A; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Hässig, M; Jäckel, A; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Mousis, O; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Wurz, P

    2017-06-09

    The origin of cometary matter and the potential contribution of comets to inner-planet atmospheres are long-standing problems. During a series of dedicated low-altitude orbits, the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) on the Rosetta spacecraft analyzed the isotopes of xenon in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The xenon isotopic composition shows deficits in heavy xenon isotopes and matches that of a primordial atmospheric component. The present-day Earth atmosphere contains 22 ± 5% cometary xenon, in addition to chondritic (or solar) xenon. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Xenon impairs reconsolidation of fear memories in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Edward G; Gillis, Timothy E; Manoukian, Jasmine; Kaufman, Marc J

    2014-01-01

    Xenon (Xe) is a noble gas that has been developed for use in people as an inhalational anesthestic and a diagnostic imaging agent. Xe inhibits glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors involved in learning and memory and can affect synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and hippocampus, two brain areas known to play a role in fear conditioning models of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Because glutamate receptors also have been shown to play a role in fear memory reconsolidation--a state in which recalled memories become susceptible to modification--we examined whether Xe administered after fear memory reactivation could affect subsequent expression of fear-like behavior (freezing) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained for contextual and cued fear conditioning and the effects of inhaled Xe (25%, 1 hr) on fear memory reconsolidation were tested using conditioned freezing measured days or weeks after reactivation/Xe administration. Xe administration immediately after fear memory reactivation significantly reduced conditioned freezing when tested 48 h, 96 h or 18 d after reactivation/Xe administration. Xe did not affect freezing when treatment was delayed until 2 h after reactivation or when administered in the absence of fear memory reactivation. These data suggest that Xe substantially and persistently inhibits memory reconsolidation in a reactivation and time-dependent manner, that it could be used as a new research tool to characterize reconsolidation and other memory processes, and that it could be developed to treat people with PTSD and other disorders related to emotional memory.

  17. Xenon impairs reconsolidation of fear memories in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward G Meloni

    Full Text Available Xenon (Xe is a noble gas that has been developed for use in people as an inhalational anesthestic and a diagnostic imaging agent. Xe inhibits glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors involved in learning and memory and can affect synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and hippocampus, two brain areas known to play a role in fear conditioning models of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Because glutamate receptors also have been shown to play a role in fear memory reconsolidation--a state in which recalled memories become susceptible to modification--we examined whether Xe administered after fear memory reactivation could affect subsequent expression of fear-like behavior (freezing in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained for contextual and cued fear conditioning and the effects of inhaled Xe (25%, 1 hr on fear memory reconsolidation were tested using conditioned freezing measured days or weeks after reactivation/Xe administration. Xe administration immediately after fear memory reactivation significantly reduced conditioned freezing when tested 48 h, 96 h or 18 d after reactivation/Xe administration. Xe did not affect freezing when treatment was delayed until 2 h after reactivation or when administered in the absence of fear memory reactivation. These data suggest that Xe substantially and persistently inhibits memory reconsolidation in a reactivation and time-dependent manner, that it could be used as a new research tool to characterize reconsolidation and other memory processes, and that it could be developed to treat people with PTSD and other disorders related to emotional memory.

  18. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  19. UTEX modeling of xenon signature sensitivity to geology and explosion cavity characteristics following an underground nuclear explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, J. D.; Haas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) produce anthropogenic isotopes that can potentially be used in the verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Several isotopes of radioactive xenon gas have been identified as radionuclides of interest within the International Monitoring System (IMS) and in an On-Site Inspection (OSI). Substantial research has been previously undertaken to characterize the geologic and atmospheric mechanisms that can drive the movement of radionuclide gas from a well-contained UNE, considering both sensitivities on gas arrival time and signature variability of xenon due to the nature of subsurface transport. This work further considers sensitivities of radioxenon gas arrival time and signatures to large variability in geologic stratification and generalized explosion cavity characteristics, as well as compares this influence to variability in the shallow surface.

  20. Scalability study of solid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Cease, H.; Jaskierny, W. F.; Markley, D.; Pahlka, R. B.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Filipenko, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employed a cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen combined with a xenon purification and chiller system. A modified {\\it Bridgeman's technique} reproduces a large scale optically transparent solid xenon.

  1. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ely, James H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Harper, Warren W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heimbigner, Tom R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, Charles W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Humble, Paul H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Madison, Jill C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Panisko, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ripplinger, Mike D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stewart, Timothy L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  2. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  3. Biophysical changes induced by xenon on phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Ryan D; Sum, Amadeu K

    2013-05-01

    Structural and dynamic changes in cell membrane properties induced by xenon, a volatile anesthetic molecule, may affect the function of membrane-mediated proteins, providing a hypothesis for the mechanism of general anesthetic action. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulation and differential scanning calorimetry to examine the biophysical and thermodynamic effects of xenon on model lipid membranes. Our results indicate that xenon atoms preferentially localize in the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer, inducing substantial increases in the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Xenon depresses the membrane gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, increasing membrane fluidity and lipid head group spacing, while inducing net local ordering effects in a small region of the lipid carbon tails and modulating the bilayer lateral pressure profile. Our results are consistent with a role for nonspecific, lipid bilayer-mediated mechanisms in producing xenon's general anesthetic action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Toward molecular mechanism of xenon anesthesia: a link to studies of xenon complexes with small aromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrijchenko, Natalya N; Ermilov, Alexander Yu; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2015-03-19

    The present study illustrates the steps toward understanding molecular mechanism of xenon anesthesia by focusing on a link to the structures and spectra of intermolecular complexes of xenon with small aromatic molecules. A primary cause of xenon anesthesia is attributed to inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by an unknown mechanism. Following the results of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations we report plausible xenon action sites in the ligand binding domain of the NMDA receptor, which are due to interaction of xenon atoms with aromatic amino-acid residues. We rely in these calculations on computational protocols adjusted in combined experimental and theoretical studies of intermolecular complexes of xenon with phenol. Successful reproduction of vibrational shifts in molecular species upon complexation with xenon measured in low-temperature matrices allowed us to select a proper functional form in density functional theory (DFT) approach for use in QM subsystems, as well as to calibrate force field parameters for MD simulations. The results of molecular modeling show that xenon atoms can compete with agonists for a place in the corresponding protein cavity, thus indicating their active role in anesthetic action.

  5. Measurement of cerebral blood flow by intravenous xenon-133 technique and a mobile system. Reproducibility using the Obrist model compared to total curve analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    was considerably more reproducible than CBF level. Using a single detector instead of five regional values averaged as the hemispheric flow increased standard deviation of CBF level by 10-20%, while the variation in asymmetry was doubled. In optimal measuring conditions the two models revealed no significant...... differences, but in low flow situations the artifact model yielded significantly more stable results. The present apparatus, equipped with 3-5 detectors covering each hemisphere, offers the opportunity of performing serial CBF measurements in situations not otherwise feasible.......The recent development of a mobile 10 detector unit, using i.v. Xenon-133 technique, has made it possible to perform repeated bedside measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Test-retest studies were carried out in 38 atherosclerotic subjects, in order to evaluate the reproducibility of CBF level...

  6. Distribution and Dynamic Properties of Xenon Dissolved in the Ionic Smectic Phase of [C16mim][NO3]: MD Simulation and Theoretical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezzato, Diego; Saielli, Giacomo

    2016-03-10

    We have investigated the structural and dynamic properties of Xe dissolved in the ionic liquid crystal (ILC) phase of 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Xe is found to be preferentially dissolved within the hydrophobic environment of the alkyl chains rather than in the ionic layers of the smectic phase. The structural parameters and the estimated local diffusion coefficients concerning the short-time motion of Xe are used to parametrize a theoretical model based on the Smoluchowski equation for the macroscopic dynamics across the smectic layers, a feature which cannot be directly obtained from the relatively short MD simulations. This protocol represents an efficient combination of computational and theoretical tools to obtain information on slow processes concerning the permeability and diffusivity of the xenon in smectic ILCs.

  7. ATLAS Event Display: First Xenon-Xenon Run 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Event display from the xenon-xenon collision run of 12-13 October 2017. Curved cyan lines show the trajectories of charged particles in the tracking systems. The bottom right plot shows the distribution of energy deposited in the calorimeters, demonstrating the high particle multiplicity of the event. Two muon candidates are reconstructed at high pseudorapidity, as seen in the bottom left plot

  8. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  9. Xenon Feed System Progress (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barbaritis, Joseph K; King, Paul T

    2006-01-01

    ...), for the purpose of propellant isolation, pressure, and flow control. With pressure transducer feedback, the PFCV has successfully fed xenon to a 200 watt Hall Effect Thruster in a Technology Demonstration Program...

  10. Direct WIMP searches with XENON100 and XENON1T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Ferella Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON direct Dark Matter search program. It consists of an ultra-low background double phase (liquid-gas xenon filled time projection chamber with a total mass of 161 kg (62 in the target region and 99 in the active shield, installed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS. Here the results from the 224.6 live days of data taken between March 2011 and April 2012 are reported. The experiment set one of the most stringent limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section to date (2 × 10−45 cm2 for a 55 Gev/c2 WIMP mass at 90 % confidence level and the most stringent on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction (3.5 × 10−40 for a 45 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. With the same dataset, XENON100 excludes also solar axion coupling to electrons at gAe > 7.7 × 10−12 for a mass of mAxion 1 × 10−12 at a mass range of mAxion = 5−10 keV/c2 (both 90 % C.L.. Moreover an absolute spectral comparison between simulated and measured nuclear recoil distributions of light and charge signals from a 241AmBe source demonstrates a high level of detector and systematics understanding. Finally, the third generation of the XENON experiments, XENON1T, is the first tonne scale direct WIMP search experiment currently under construction. The commissioning phase of XENON1T is expected to start in early 2015 followed, a few months after, by the first science run. The experiment will reach sensitivities on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section down to 2 ×10−47 cm2 after two years of data taking.

  11. Ion channel model development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    2010-03-01

    The structure of the KcsA ion channel selectivity filter is used to develop three simple models of ion channel permeation. The quantitative predictions of the knock-on model are tested by comparison with experimental data from single-channel recordings of the KcsA channel. By comparison with experiment, students discover that the knock-on model can't explain saturation of ion channel current as the concentrations of the bathing solutions are increased. By inverting the energy diagram, students derive the association-dissociation model of ion channel permeation. This model predicts non-linear Michaelis-Menten saturating behavior that requires students to perform non-linear least-squares fits to the experimental data. This is done using Excel's solver feature. Students discover that this simple model does an excellent job of explaining the qualitative features of ion channel permeation but cannot account for changes in voltage sensitivity. The model is then extended to include an electrical dissociation distance. This rapid translocation model is then compared with experimental data from a wide variety of ion channels and students discover that this model also has its limitations. Support from NSF DUE 0836833 is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Empirical Model of Precipitating Ion Oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Jerry

    2017-10-01

    In this brief technical report published maps of ion integral flux are used to constrain an empirical model of the precipitating ion oval. The ion oval is modeled as a Gaussian function of ionospheric latitude that depends on local time and the Kp geomagnetic index. The three parameters defining this function are the centroid latitude, width, and amplitude. The local time dependences of these three parameters are approximated by Fourier series expansions whose coefficients are constrained by the published ion maps. The Kp dependence of each coefficient is modeled by a linear fit. Optimization of the number of terms in the expansion is achieved via minimization of the global standard deviation between the model and the published ion map at each Kp. The empirical model is valid near the peak flux of the auroral oval; inside its centroid region the model reproduces the published ion maps with standard deviations of less than 5% of the peak integral flux. On the subglobal scale, average local errors (measured as a fraction of the point-to-point integral flux) are below 30% in the centroid region. Outside its centroid region the model deviates significantly from the H89 integral flux maps. The model's performance is assessed by comparing it with both local and global data from a 17 April 2002 substorm event. The model can reproduce important features of the macroscale auroral region but none of its subglobal structure, and not immediately following a substorm.

  13. Data assimilation for xenon dynamics in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncot, A.

    2008-10-01

    Xenon-135 is a nuclear fission product which is known to be source of undesired roughly one day period density axial oscillations in pressurized water reactors. Xenon dynamics are non linearly coupled to another fission product the iodine-135. Such a coupling represents a challenge for the oscillation prediction. In order to improve xenon estimation, we investigate the feasibility of using variational data assimilation methods. The aim is to obtain a better estimation of initial 1D concentrations of xenon and iodine. Data assimilation techniques are widely used in meteorology and oceanography to improve initial states and forecasts. Such methods combine all kind of information about the system (model, a prior estimate of the true state and data). These information are weighted according to their accuracy expressed in error covariance matrices. The state resulting from the assimilation process is called analysis. 3DVAR and 4DVAR schemes for xenon dynamics are developed within the framework of twin experiments. This means that observations are obtained through numerical computation. Such a procedure allows an evaluation of produced analysis quality. The model developed for this purpose (CIREP1D) includes a mono-dimensional xenon dynamics linked to a mono-dimensional thermic and thermohydraulic model. Linear tangent and adjoint of this model are obtained through automatic differentiation. Observations are of three kinds: integrated powers over several nodes, power axial offset and boron concentration. This work figures out improvements on the estimation of iodine and xenon initial concentrations. Such encouraging results allow to set up tuning tool for an operator guiding system. (author)

  14. Ion-Exchanged SAPO-34 Membranes for Krypton-Xenon Separation: Control of Permeation Properties and Fabrication of Hollow Fiber Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yeon Hye; Min, Byunghyun; Yang, Shaowei; Koh, Dong-Yeun; Bhave, Ramesh R; Nair, Sankar

    2018-02-21

    Separation of radioisotope 85 Kr from 136 Xe is of importance in used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Membrane separation based on zeolite molecular sieves such as chabazite SAPO-34 is an attractive alternative to energy-intensive cryogenic distillation. We report the synthesis of SAPO-34 membranes with considerably enhanced performance via thickness reduction based upon control of a steam-assisted vapor-solid conversion technique followed by ion exchange with alkali metal cations. The reduction of membrane thickness leads to a large increase in Kr permeance from 7.5 to 26.3 gas permeation units (GPU) with ideal Kr/Xe selectivities >20 at 298 K. Cation-exchanged membranes show large (>50%) increases in selectivity at ambient or slight subambient conditions. The adsorption, diffusion, and permeation characteristics of ion-exchanged SAPO-34 materials and membranes are investigated in detail, with potassium-exchanged SAPO-34 membranes showing particularly attractive performance. We then demonstrate the fabrication of selective SAPO-34 membranes on α-alumina hollow fibers.

  15. Production and decay of K -shell hollow krypton in collisions with 52-197-MeV/u bare xenon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Caojie; Yu, Deyang; Cai, Xiaohong; Chen, Xi; Ma, Kun; Evslin, Jarah; Xue, Yingli; Wang, Wei; Kozhedub, Yury S.; Lu, Rongchun; Song, Zhangyong; Zhang, Mingwu; Liu, Junliang; Yang, Bian; Guo, Yipan; Zhang, Jianming; Ruan, Fangfang; Wu, Yehong; Zhang, Yuezhao; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng; Yang, Zhihu

    2017-07-01

    X-ray spectra of K -shell hollow krypton atoms produced in single collisions with 52-197-MeV/u X e54 + ions are measured in a heavy-ion storage ring equipped with an internal gas-jet target. Energy shifts of the K α1,2 s , K α1,2 h ,s , and K β1,3 s transitions are obtained. Thus the average number of the spectator L vacancies presented during the x-ray emission is deduced. From the relative intensities of the K α1,2 s and K α1,2 h ,s transitions, the ratio of K -shell hollow krypton to singly K -shell ionized atoms is determined to be 14 %-24 % . In the considered collisions, the K vacancies are mainly created by the direct ionization which cannot be calculated within the perturbation descriptions. The experimental results are compared with a relativistic coupled-channel calculation performed within the independent particle approximation.

  16. Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water-Xe system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I; Pulver, Alexander Yu; Peregudov, Alex; Artyuhov, Igor

    2014-07-21

    Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We follow the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a possible instability of clathrate at cryogenic temperatures and conversion to an amorphous phase comprised of "xenon + hydration shell" Xe·(H2O)21.5 clusters. Simulations of ice-xenon solution interface in equilibrium and during ice growth reveal the effects of xenon on the ice-liquid interface, where adsorbed xenon causes roughening of ice surface but does not preferentially form clathrate. These results provide evidence against the ice-blocker mechanism of xenon cryoprotection.

  17. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2015-10-20

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model\\'s predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  18. Fast Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M

    2016-12-12

    We show how to produce a fast quantum Rabi model with trapped ions. Its importance resides not only in the acceleration of the phenomena that may be achieved with these systems, from quantum gates to the generation of nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the ion, but also in reducing unwanted effects such as the decay of coherences that may appear in such systems.

  19. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  20. Hugoniot measurements of double-shocked precompressed dense xenon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Chen, Q F; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y

    2012-12-01

    The current partially ionized plasmas models for xenon show substantial differences since the description of pressure and thermal ionization region becomes a formidable task, prompting the need for an improved understanding of dense xenon plasmas behavior at above 100 GPa. We performed double-shock compression experiments on dense xenon to determine accurately the Hugoniot up to 172 GPa using a time-resolved optical radiation method. The planar strong shock wave was produced using a flyer plate impactor accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light-gas gun. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were acquired by using a multiwavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Shock velocity was measured and mass velocity was determined by the impedance-matching methods. The experimental equation of state of dense xenon plasmas are compared with the self-consistent fluid variational calculations of dense xenon in the region of partial ionization over a wide range of pressures and temperatures.

  1. Ionization and scintillation response of high-pressure xenon gas to alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Cervera, A; Díaz, J; Ferrario, P; Gil, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Borges, F I G; Conde, C A N; Fernandes, L M P; Freitas, E D C; Cebrián, S; Dafni, T; Gómez, H; Egorov, M; Gehman, V M; Goldschmidt, A; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Ferreira, A L

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure xenon gas is an attractive detection medium for a variety of applications in fundamental and applied physics. In this paper we study the ionization and scintillation detection properties of xenon gas at 10 bar pressure. For this purpose, we use a source of alpha particles in the NEXT-DEMO time projection chamber, the large scale prototype of the NEXT-100 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, in three different drift electric field configurations. We measure the ionization electron drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion, and compare our results to expectations based on available electron scattering cross sections on pure xenon. In addition, two types of measurements addressing the connection between the ionization and scintillation yields are performed. On the one hand we observe, for the first time in xenon gas, large event-by-event correlated fluctuations between the ionization and scintillation signals, similar to that already observed in liquid xenon. On the other hand, we study the field dependence of the average scintillation and ionization yields. Both types of measurements may shed light on the mechanism of electron-ion recombination in xenon gas for highly-ionizing particles. Finally, by comparing the response of alpha particles and electrons in NEXT-DEMO, we find no evidence for quenching of the primary scintillation light produced by alpha particles in the xenon gas.

  2. Markov State Model of Ion Assembling Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Roman

    2016-05-12

    We study the process of ion assembling in aqueous solution by means of molecular dynamics. In this article, we present a method to study many-particle assembly using the Markov state model formalism. We observed that at NaCl concentration higher than 1.49 mol/kg, the system tends to form a big ionic cluster composed of roughly 70-90% of the total number of ions. Using Markov state models, we estimated the average time needed for the system to make a transition from discorded state to a state with big ionic cluster. Our results suggest that the characteristic time to form an ionic cluster is a negative exponential function of the salt concentration. Moreover, we defined and analyzed three different kinetic states of a single ion particle. These states correspond to a different particle location during nucleation process.

  3. SPEEDUP{trademark} ion exchange column model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, T.

    2000-03-06

    A transient model to describe the process of loading a solute onto the granular fixed bed in an ion exchange (IX) column has been developed using the SpeedUp{trademark} software package. SpeedUp offers the advantage of smooth integration into other existing SpeedUp flowsheet models. The mathematical algorithm of a porous particle diffusion model was adopted to account for convection, axial dispersion, film mass transfer, and pore diffusion. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was employed to solve the governing transport equations. The model allows the use of a non-linear Langmuir isotherm based on an effective binary ionic exchange process. The SpeedUp column model was tested by comparing to the analytical solutions of three transport problems from the ion exchange literature. In addition, a sample calculation of a train of three crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IX columns in series was made using both the SpeedUp model and Purdue University's VERSE-LC code. All test cases showed excellent agreement between the SpeedUp model results and the test data. The model can be readily used for SuperLig{trademark} ion exchange resins, once the experimental data are complete.

  4. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedernales, J S; Lizuain, I; Felicetti, S; Romero, G; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-10-20

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions.

  5. Ion source mathematical modeling and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, N.V.; Vinogradova, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The system of beam formation and control in the ion gun is under investigation. The calculation of the ion gun must take into account the field ion cathode influence on the beam focusing and transport conditions and the other electrodes influence both on the field cathode emission ability and on the characteristics of the formation and control systems. It's considered a mathematical model of the gun as a axially symmetrical ion-optical system which consists of a cathode, i.e. axially symmetrical thin tip on a flat substrate and a system of round apertures as the focusing electrodes. The tip shape may be various. The number of the apertures may be various too. The potential of the tip is equal to the substrate potential and is assumed to be zero without the loss of general character of the problem. A method is proposed for the determination the potential distribution. lt is calculated the distribution of potentials for whole region of the ion-optical system. All geometrical dimensions of the system and the electrodes' potentials are the parameters of this method. The problem of the optimal geometrical parameters and electrodes potentials is solved to have the required emission current. (author)

  6. Transition from linear to nonlinear sputtering of solid xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Self-sputtering of solid xenon has been studied with molecular dynamics simulations as a model system for the transition from dominantly linear to strongly nonlinear effects. The simulation covered the projectile energy range from 20 to 750 eV. Within a relatively narrow range from 30 to 250 e...

  7. Ion thruster modeling: Particle simulations and experimental validations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Joseph; Polk, James; Brinza, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results from ion thruster modeling studies performed in support of NASA's Deep Space 1 mission and NSTAR project. Fully 3-dimensional computer particle simulation models are presented for ion optics plasma flow and ion thruster plume. Ion optics simulation results are compared with measurements obtained from ground tests of the NSTAR ion thruster. Plume simulation results are compared with in-flight measurements from the Deep Space 1 spacecraft. Both models show excellent agreement with experimental data

  8. Electrostatic ion thrusters - towards predictive modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalentev, O.; Matyash, K.; Duras, J.; Lueskow, K.F.; Schneider, R. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, D-17489 (Germany); Koch, N. [Technische Hochschule Nuernberg Georg Simon Ohm, Kesslerplatz 12, D-90489 Nuernberg (Germany); Schirra, M. [Thales Electronic Systems GmbH, Soeflinger Strasse 100, D-89077 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The development of electrostatic ion thrusters so far has mainly been based on empirical and qualitative know-how, and on evolutionary iteration steps. This resulted in considerable effort regarding prototype design, construction and testing and therefore in significant development and qualification costs and high time demands. For future developments it is anticipated to implement simulation tools which allow for quantitative prediction of ion thruster performance, long-term behavior and space craft interaction prior to hardware design and construction. Based on integrated numerical models combining self-consistent kinetic plasma models with plasma-wall interaction modules a new quality in the description of electrostatic thrusters can be reached. These open the perspective for predictive modeling in this field. This paper reviews the application of a set of predictive numerical modeling tools on an ion thruster model of the HEMP-T (High Efficiency Multi-stage Plasma Thruster) type patented by Thales Electron Devices GmbH. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Control aid for xenon vibration in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekawa, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    In the present invention, the control operation for suppressing xenon vibrations in a reactor is aided for saving forecasting analysis and operator's skills. That is, parameters to be controlled for the suppression of xenon vibrations are power distribution, iodine distribution and xenon distribution. But what can be observed by operaters by the conventional fast overtone method is only the output distribution. In the present invention, the output level of the reactor core is always observed. Then, mathematical processings are conducted for the iodine distribution, the xenon distribution and the power distribution in the reactor core based on the histeresis of the parameters obtained by the measurement using physical constants and reactor design data. The xenon vibration control is aided by displaying the change with time of the distortion in axial direction. Accordingly, operators can always recognize the axial distortion of the power distribution, the iodine distribution and the xenon distribution. (I.S.)

  10. Recent Development Activities and Future Mission Applications of NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Pencil, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    NASAs Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project is developing next generation ion propulsion technologies to enhance the performance and lower the costs of future NASA space science missions. This is being accomplished by producing Engineering Model (EM) and Prototype Model (PM) components, validating these via qualification-level and integrated system testing, and preparing the transition of NEXT technologies to flight system development. This presentation is a follow-up to the NEXT project overviews presented in 2009-2010. It reviews the status of the NEXT project, presents the current system performance characteristics, and describes planned activities in continuing the transition of NEXT technology to a first flight. In 2013 a voluntary decision was made to terminate the long duration test of the NEXT thruster, given the thruster design has exceeded all expectations by accumulating over 50,000 hours of operation to demonstrate around 900 kg of xenon throughput. Besides its promise for upcoming NASA science missions, NEXT has excellent potential for future commercial and international spacecraft applications.

  11. Searching for Double Beta Decay with the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, C.; /SLAC

    2007-03-16

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) Collaboration is building a series of experiments to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The first experiment, known as EXO-200, will utilize 200 kg of xenon enriched to 80% in the isotope of interest, making it the largest double beta decay experiment to date by one order of magnitude. This experiment is rapidly being constructed, and will begin data taking in 2007. The EXO collaboration is also developing a technique to identify on an event-by-event basis the daughter barium ion of the double beta decay. If successful, this method would eliminate all conventional radioactive backgrounds to the decay, resulting in an ideal experiment. We summarize here the current status of EXO-200 construction and the barium tag R&D program.

  12. Exploring the effect of xenon on biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimson, Lorna M; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko

    2005-01-01

    We report the initial findings of 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations of the role of cellular membranes in general anaesthesia. The effect of xenon on hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers is described. The xenon atoms were found to prefer the interfacial and central regions of the bilayer. The presence of xenon was observed to lead to a small increase in the surface area, membrane thickness, and order of the acyl chains.

  13. The XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Giboni, K.L.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Stern, M.; Tatananni, D.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Doets, M.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A.; Walet, R. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Othegraven, R.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Antunes, B.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Balata, M.; Bruno, G.; Corrieri, R.; Disdier, J.M.; Rosso, A.G.; Molinario, A.; Orlandi, D.; Parlati, S.; Tatananni, L.; Wang, Z. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; James, A.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Maier, R.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B.; Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Moraa, K.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Breskin, A.; Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Front, D.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.; Wack, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Sivers, M. von [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Chiarini, A.; Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, IMT Atlantique, Nantes (France); Fei, J.; Lombardi, F.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Huhmann, C.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Vargas, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Messina, M. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Pienaar, J. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Garcia, D.R. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Reichard, S. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lavina, L.S. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Wei, Y. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is the first WIMP dark matter detector operating with a liquid xenon target mass above the ton-scale. Out of its 3.2 t liquid xenon inventory, 2.0 t constitute the active target of the dual-phase time projection chamber. The scintillation and ionization signals from particle interactions are detected with low-background photomultipliers. This article describes the XENON1T instrument and its subsystems as well as strategies to achieve an unprecedented low background level. First results on the detector response and the performance of the subsystems are also presented. (orig.)

  14. The XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Antunes, B.; Arneodo, F.; Balata, M.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breskin, A.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Chiarini, A.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Corrieri, R.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Gangi, P. Di; Giovanni, A. Di; Diglio, S.; Disdier, J.-M.; Doets, M.; Duchovni, E.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Front, D.; Fulgione, W.; Rosso, A. Gallo; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Giboni, K.-L.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grandi, L.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Huhmann, C.; Itay, R.; James, A.; Kaminsky, B.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lombardi, F.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Maier, R.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Molinario, A.; Morå, K.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orlandi, D.; Othegraven, R.; Pakarha, P.; Parlati, S.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; García, D. Ramírez; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Santos, J. M. F. dos; Saldanha, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Shockley, E.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stern, M.; Stein, A.; Tatananni, D.; Tatananni, L.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Vargas, M.; Wack, O.; Walet, R.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The XENON1T experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is the first WIMP dark matter detector operating with a liquid xenon target mass above the ton-scale. Out of its 3.2 t liquid xenon inventory, 2.0 t constitute the active target of the dual-phase time projection chamber. The scintillation and ionization signals from particle interactions are detected with low-background photomultipliers. This article describes the XENON1T instrument and its subsystems as well as strategies to achieve an unprecedented low background level. First results on the detector response and the performance of the subsystems are also presented.

  15. Asymptotic analysis of an ion extraction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Abdallah, N.; Mas-Gallic, S.; Raviart, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    A simple model for ion extraction from a plasma is analyzed. The order of magnitude of the plasma parameters leads to a singular perturbation problem for a semilinear elliptic equation. We first prove existence of solutions for the perturbed problem and uniqueness under certain conditions. Then we prove the convergence of these solutions, when the parameters go to zero, towards the solution of a Child-Langmuir problem

  16. Ion Acceleration by Double Layers with Multi-Component Ion Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Timothy; Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; West Virginia University Team

    2017-10-01

    Current-free double layers (CFDL) models have been proposed to explain observations of magnetic field-aligned ion acceleration in plasmas expanding into divergent magnetic field regions. More recently, experimental studies of the Bohm sheath criterion in multiple ion species plasma reveal an equilibration of Bohm speeds at the sheath-presheath boundary for a grounded plate in a multipole-confined filament discharge. We aim to test this ion velocity effect for CFDL acceleration. We report high resolution ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) measurements using laser induced fluorescence downstream of a CFDL in a helicon plasma. Combinations of argon-helium, argon-krypton, and argon-xenon gases are ionized and measurements of argon or xenon IVDFs are investigated to determine whether ion acceleration is enhanced (or diminished) by the presence of lighter (or heavier) ions in the mix. We find that the predominant effect is a reduction of ion acceleration consistent with increased drag arising from increased gas pressure under all conditions, including constant total gas pressure, equal plasma densities of different ions, and very different plasma densities of different ions. These results suggest that the physics responsible for acceleration of multiple ion species in simple sheaths is not responsible for the ion acceleration observed in these expanding plasmas. Department of Physics, Gettysburg College.

  17. The methods of measuring radioactive xenon isotopes activity for CTBT noble xenon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Li Qi; Fan Yuanqing; Zhang Xinjun; Zhao Yungang; Wang Jun

    2011-01-01

    The radioactive xenon isotopes ( 131m Xe, 133 Xe, 133m Xe, 135 Xe) are some key important detecting objects for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring. Currently the most important difficulties are xenon sampling, purring and radioactive xenon isotopes measuring. It describes in detail the methods of HPGe γ spectrometer and β-γ coincidence method measuring radioactive xenon isotopes. The Lab simultaneously adopted two methods to measure the noble gas sample spiked 133 Xe, and the result difference of two methods is 8%. In the end, the method of improving radioactive xenon isotopes measuring accuracy is put forward. (authors)

  18. Evidence of nonspecific surface interactions between laser-polarized xenon and myoglobin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S M; Spence, M M; Goodson, B M; Wemmer, D E; Pines, A

    2000-08-15

    The high sensitivity of the magnetic resonance properties of xenon to its local chemical environment and the large (129)Xe NMR signals attainable through optical pumping have motivated the use of xenon as a probe of macromolecular structure and dynamics. In the present work, we report evidence for nonspecific interactions between xenon and the exterior of myoglobin in aqueous solution, in addition to a previously reported internal binding interaction. (129)Xe chemical shift measurements in denatured myoglobin solutions and under native conditions with varying xenon concentrations confirm the presence of nonspecific interactions. Titration data are modeled quantitatively with treatment of the nonspecific interactions as weak binding sites. Using laser-polarized xenon to measure (129)Xe spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)), we observed a shorter T(1) in the presence of 1 mM denatured apomyoglobin in 6 M deuterated urea (T(1) = 59 +/- 1 s) compared with that in 6 M deuterated urea alone (T(1) = 291 +/- 2 s), suggesting that nonspecific xenon-protein interactions can enhance (129)Xe relaxation. An even shorter T(1) was measured in 1 mM apomyoglobin in D(2)O (T(1) = 15 +/- 0.3 s), compared with that in D(2)O alone (T(1) = 506 +/- 5 s). This difference in relaxation efficiency likely results from couplings between laser-polarized xenon and protons in the binding cavity of apomyoglobin that may permit the transfer of polarization between these nuclei via the nuclear Overhauser effect.

  19. New constraints and prospects for sub-GeV dark matter scattering off electrons in xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Rouven; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-08-01

    We study in detail sub-GeV dark matter scattering off electrons in xenon, including the expected electron recoil spectra and annual modulation spectra. We derive improved constraints using low-energy XENON10 and XENON100 ionization-only data. For XENON10, in addition to including electron-recoil data corresponding to about 1-3 electrons, we include for the first time events corresponding to about 4-7 electrons. Assuming the scattering is momentum independent (FDM=1 ), this strengthens a previous cross-section bound by almost an order of magnitude for dark matter masses above 50 MeV. The available XENON100 data corresponds to events with about 4-50 electrons, and leads to a constraint that is comparable to the XENON10 bound above 50 MeV for FDM=1 . We demonstrate that a search for an annual modulation signal in upcoming xenon experiments (XENON1T, XENONnT, LZ) could substantially improve the above bounds even in the presence of large backgrounds. We also emphasize that in simple benchmark models of sub-GeV dark matter, the dark matter-electron scattering rate can be as high as one event every ten (two) seconds in the XENON1T (XENONnT or LZ) experiments, without being in conflict with any other known experimental bounds. While there are several sources of backgrounds that can produce single- or few-electron events, a large event rate can be consistent with a dark matter signal and should not be simply written off as purely a detector curiosity. This fact motivates a detailed analysis of the ionization-data ("S2") data, taking into account the expected annual modulation spectrum of the signal rate, as well as the DM-induced electron-recoil spectra, which are another powerful discriminant between signal and background.

  20. Respiratory depression by stable xenon in goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies with stable xenon have recently become practical. Xenon pharmacology is thus a more than academic interest. The authors studied the respiratory response of three trained goats to a mixture of 70% xenon, 30% oxygen. The relatively high xenon concentration was used because of the animals' resistance to anesthetic effects. Two other goats were treated with equivalent anesthetic concentration of nitrous oxide and halothane. The xenon-treated animals showed respiratory depression, in contrast to the stimulating effects observed with halothane and nitrous oxide. Elevation of PaCO/sub 2/ was significant and would substantially increase cRBF. Their findings emphasize the need to monitor ventilation and respond appropriately if necessary

  1. Xenon lighting adjusted to plant requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koefferlein, M.; Doehring, T.; Payer, H.D.; Seidlitz, H.K. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The high luminous flux and spectral properties of xenon lamps would provide an ideal luminary for plant lighting if not excess IR radiation poses several problems for an application: the required filter systems reduce the irradiance at spectral regions of particular importance for plant development. Most of the economical drawbacks of xenon lamps are related to the difficult handling of that excess IR energy. Furthermore, the temporal variation of the xenon output depending on the oscillations of the applied AC voltage has to be considered for the plant development. However, xenon lamps outperform other lighting systems with respect to spectral stability, immediate response, and maximum luminance. Therefore, despite considerable competition by other lighting techniques, xenon lamps provide a very useful tool for special purposes. In plant lighting however, they seem to play a less important role as other lamp and lighting developments can meet these particular requirements at lower costs.

  2. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H+), alkali metal cations (M+), calcium ions (Ca2+), and hydronium ions (H3O+) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C9H7NS2), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M+ + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M+ = H+, Li+, Na+, or K+. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from -0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  3. Theoretical studies of vibrational relaxation of iodine in low density liquid xenon

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J.K.; Russell, D.J.; Smith, D.E.; Harris, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results of generalized Langevin and isolated binary collision (IBC) calculations for vibrational relaxation of iodine in low density liquid xenon are presented. Simple generalized Langevin simulations, using equilibrium xenon as a model solvent, fail to reproduce molecular dynamics vibrational relaxation data. This is explained, at least in part, by noting that the iodine vibrational motion perturbs the local solvent, with this perturbation resulting in dissipation of energy. Simp...

  4. Search for double β-decays of 124Xe with XENON100 & XENON1T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieguth, Alexander; XENON Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The rare nuclear process of two-neutrino double electron capture, where two electrons are simultaneously captured from the atomic shell, has not yet been observed for 124Xe. A detection of this decay would provide a new reference for nuclear matrix element calculations. Moreover, if a neutrinoless mode were discovered, it would prove a Majorana nature of neutrinos and would shed light on the effective neutrino mass. The XENON dark matter project, with its dual-phase xenon time projection chambers XENON100 and XENON1T, is well suited for this rare event searches with signatures in the keV-region. The search with the XENON100 detector, containing 29 g of 124Xe, is explained as well as the outlook of its successor XENON1T, which contains 2 kg of the isotope in its active volume.

  5. Particle discrimination using a high-pressure xenon gas scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, David Alan

    This work presents results on the study of the scintillation of high-pressure Xenon gas irradiated by various sources. Noble gases such as Xenon give off characteristic scintillation light when irradiated. The goal of the study was to develop a characteristic based on the scintillation time response of Xenon gas that would reliably discriminate between events from different types of primary radiation (neutron or gamma). A reliable discrimination characteristic would enable the development of room temperature, gas phase detectors for use in the search for Galactic Dark Matter. The surprising result of the present work was that a reliable discrimination characteristic existed for distinguishing x-ray, gamma ray, and alpha particle events. Results for neutrons were negative. This was due to several factors: · Ionization tracks in xenon generally form two roughly cylindrical regions. A region near the center of the track, called the core, has very dense ionization. An outer region, called the penumbra, has sparse ionization. In Xenon, recombination of ions and the subsequent scintillation from the penumbra region happens slowly and can be easily distinguished from scintillation that happens in the core region. · Nuclear recoils resulting from neutron collisions that give recoil energies in the same range as that predicted for WIMP-nuclear collisions are of such low energy that they do not produce a significant penumbra region in Xenon gas. As such, the scintillation time response for these events is similar to that of high-energy gamma rays. Other results of the present work include: · The amount of energy deposited in the gas needed to produce a scintillation photon was measured for gamma rays and was found to be in agreement with results from other experiments. Low-energy gamma rays appeared to produce more scintillation photons for an equal amount of energy deposited than high-energy gamma rays. · The decay of the singlet and triplet molecular states of xenon

  6. Fully Kinetic Ion Models for Magnetized Plasma Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdevant, Benjamin J.

    This thesis focuses on the development of simulation models, based on fully resolving the gyro-motion of ions with the Lorentz force equations of motion, for studying low-frequency phenomena in well-magnetized plasma systems. Such models, known as fully kinetic ion models, offer formal simplicity over higher order gyrokinetic ion models and may provide an important validation tool or replacement for gyrokinetic ion models in applications where the gyrokinetic ordering assumptions are in question. Methods for dealing with the added difficulty of resolving the short time scales associated with the ion gyro-motion in fully kinetic ion models are explored with the use of graphics processing units (GPUs) and advanced time integration algorithms, including sub-cycling, orbit averaging and variational integrators. Theoretical work is performed to analyze the effects of the ion Bernstein modes, which are known to cause difficulties in simulations based on fully kinetic ion models. In addition, the first simulation results for the ion temperature gradient driven instability in toroidal geometry using a fully kinetic ion model are presented. Finally, during the course of this work, a method for analyzing the effects of a finite time step size and spatial grid in the delta-f approach to the particle-in-cell method was developed for the first time. This method was applied to an implicit time integration scheme and has revealed some unusual numerical properties related to the delta-f method.

  7. Ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses using xenon-enhanced dynamic single-energy CT and dual-energy CT: a feasibility study in a nasal cast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Sven F.; Helck, Andreas D.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C. [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Moeller, Winfried; Eickelberg, Oliver [Institute for Lung Biology and Disease (iLBD) and Comprehensive Pneumology Center (CPC), Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg, Munich (Germany); Becker, Sven [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Munich (Germany); Schuschnig, Uwe [Pari Pharma GmbH, Graefelfing (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    To show the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT) and dynamic CT for ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses in a nasal cast. In a first trial, xenon gas was administered to a nasal cast with a laminar flow of 7 L/min. Dynamic CT acquisitions of the nasal cavity and the sinuses were performed. This procedure was repeated with pulsating xenon flow. Local xenon concentrations in the different compartments of the model were determined on the basis of the enhancement levels. In a second trial, DECT measurements were performed both during laminar and pulsating xenon administration and the xenon concentrations were quantified directly. Neither with dynamic CT nor DECT could xenon-related enhancement be detected in the sinuses during laminar airflow. Using pulsating flow, dynamic imaging showed a xenon wash-in and wash-out in the sinuses that followed a mono-exponential function with time constants of a few seconds. Accordingly, DECT revealed xenon enhancement in the sinuses only after pulsating xenon administration. The feasibility of xenon-enhanced DECT for ventilation imaging was proven in a nasal cast. The superiority of pulsating gas flow for the administration of gas or aerosolised drugs to the paranasal sinuses was demonstrated. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of aircraft xenon strobe light characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    This report provides data on the characteristics of aircraft xenon strobe lights related to their potential for use as the cooperative element in Optical IR (Infrared) Airborne Proximity Warning Indicator (APWI) systems. It includes a description of ...

  9. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  10. Xenon as an adjunct in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.E.; Radue, E.W.; Zilkha, E.; Loh, L.

    1979-01-01

    Nonradioactive xenon was used for enhancement in computed tomography in a series of 18 patients requiring general anesthesia. The method and results are described. The properties of xenon are radically different from those of intravenous iodides, and the enhancement patterns demonstrate different aspects of both normal and abnormal tissues. In our limited experience, it has been of value in those isodense and low attenuation lesions that have not enhanced after intravenous Conray. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de

  11. Transportable Xenon Laboratory (TXL-1) Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Robert C.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Willett, Jesse A.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-03-07

    The Transportable Xenon Laboratory Operations Manual is a guide to set up and shut down TXL, a fully contained laboratory made up of instruments to identify and measure concentrations of the radioactive isotopes of xenon by taking air samples and analyzing them. The TXL is housed in a standard-sized shipping container. TXL can be shipped to and function in any country in the world.

  12. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Component Verification Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Pinero, Luis R.; Sovey, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Component testing is a critical facet of the comprehensive thruster life validation strategy devised by the NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) program. Component testing to-date has consisted of long-duration high voltage propellant isolator and high-cycle heater life validation testing. The high voltage propellant isolator, a heritage design, will be operated under different environmental condition in the NEXT ion thruster requiring verification testing. The life test of two NEXT isolators was initiated with comparable voltage and pressure conditions with a higher temperature than measured for the NEXT prototype-model thruster. To date the NEXT isolators have accumulated 18,300 h of operation. Measurements indicate a negligible increase in leakage current over the testing duration to date. NEXT 1/2 in. heaters, whose manufacturing and control processes have heritage, were selected for verification testing based upon the change in physical dimensions resulting in a higher operating voltage as well as potential differences in thermal environment. The heater fabrication processes, developed for the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor hollow cathode assembly, were utilized with modification of heater dimensions to accommodate a larger cathode. Cyclic testing of five 1/22 in. diameter heaters was initiated to validate these modified fabrication processes while retaining high reliability heaters. To date two of the heaters have been cycled to 10,000 cycles and suspended to preserve hardware. Three of the heaters have been cycled to failure giving a B10 life of 12,615 cycles, approximately 6,000 more cycles than the established qualification B10 life of the ISS plasma contactor heaters.

  13. Xenon recovery from molybdenum-99 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubin, R.T.; Paviet, P.D.; Bresee, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors research and development on the recycle of used commercial nuclear fuel as an option for future nuclear fuel cycles that offers increased use of uranium and thorium resources and a possible reduction in the overall cost of nuclear waste management. The two alternatives, direct disposal of used fuel and fuel recycle, are broadly referred to as open and closed fuel cycles. One requirement of a closed fuel cycle is the safe management of radioactive off-gases, which includes 14 C, radioiodine and the noble gases, including radio-xenon. The longest lived relevant radio-xenon isotope is 127 Xe; with a half-life of just 36.35 days it is feasible to trap and hold the radio-xenon to allow for decay to safe environmental levels. However, the very weak chemical bonds of noble gases, in this case xenon, make them difficult to trap, which led to an extensive DOE-NE study of noble gas adsorption on various molecular sieves as an alternative to costly cryogenics processes. Preliminary results indicate that xenon adsorption at near room temperature on molecular sieves, both synthetic and natural, may have both cost and efficiency advantages over cryogenic processes. These results appear to have direct application in helping achieve the United Nations Security Council goal of reducing xenon emissions from medical isotope producers

  14. A collisional model for plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahedi, V.; Lieberman, M.A.; Alves, M.V.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1990-01-01

    In plasma immersion ion implantation, a target is immersed in a plasma and a series of negative short pulses are applied to it to implant the ions. A new analytical model is being developed for the high pressure regimes in which the motion of the ions is highly collisional. The model provides values for ion flux, average ion velocity at the target, and sheath edge motion as a function of time. These values are being compared with those obtained from simulation and show good agreement. A review is also given (for comparison) of the earlier work done at low pressures, where the motion of ions in the sheath is collisionless, also showing good agreement between analysis and simulation. The simulation code is PDP1 which utilizes particle-in-cell techniques plus Monte-Carlo simulation of electron-neutral (elastic, excitation and ionization) and ion-neutral (scattering and charge-exchange) collisions

  15. Luminescence model with quantum impact parameter for low energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Galindo, H S; Martínez-Davalos, A; Belmont-Moreno, E; Galindo, S

    2002-01-01

    We have modified an analytical model of induced light production by energetic ions interacting in scintillating materials. The original model is based on the distribution of energy deposited by secondary electrons produced along the ion's track. The range of scattered electrons, and thus the energy distribution, depends on a classical impact parameter between the electron and the ion's track. The only adjustable parameter of the model is the quenching density rho sub q. The modification here presented, consists in proposing a quantum impact parameter that leads to a better fit of the model to the experimental data at low incident ion energies. The light output response of CsI(Tl) detectors to low energy ions (<3 MeV/A) is fitted with the modified model and comparison is made to the original model.

  16. Interaction of xenon clusters with intense sub-cycle laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Prachi; Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the interaction dynamics of the intense sub-cycle laser with the Xe2600 (Xenon) cluster by using a molecular dynamic code. The code is benchmarked against a couple of experimental works on Xe clusters. In the sub-cycle regime, the plane wave prescription of the laser pulse is not adequate, giving unrealistic field profiles, and hence in this study, we have relied on complex-source based sub-cycle pulsed beam model, which is an exact solution of Maxwell's equations. In order to see the effect of the sub-cycle pulses, the laser pulse duration is varied from 0.2 to 1 laser cycle while keeping the pulse energy conserved (by varying the peak amplitude with pulse duration). It has been observed that for the same laser energy the more energetic ions are obtained for sub-cycle pulses. Although the cluster explosion is symmetric, higher charge states are observed along the direction of laser polarization. The conversion efficiency of the energy absorbed per atom to average kinetic energy is found to be maximum for the shortest pulse duration of 0.2 laser cycle. The scaling law for maximum ion energy, total energy absorbed, and average kinetic energy of the ions with laser pulse duration is also deduced.

  17. Xenon-131 surface sensitive imaging of aerogels in liquid xenon near the critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaya, G; Blue, A K; Gibbs, S J; Haake, M; Cros, F; Malier, L; Meersmann, T

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, optically pumped xenon-129 has received a great deal of attention as a contrast agent in gas-phase imaging. This report is about the other NMR active xenon isotope (i.e., xenon-131, S = 32) which exhibits distinctive features for imaging applications in material sciences that are not obtainable from xenon-129 (S = (1/2)). The spin dynamics of xenon-131 in gas and liquid phases is largely determined by quadrupolar interactions which depend strongly on the surface of the surrounding materials. This leads to a surface dependent dispersion of relaxation rates, which can be substantial for this isotope. The dephasing of the coherence due to quadrupolar interactions may be used to yield surface specific contrast for imaging. Although optical pumping is not practical for this isotope because of its fast quadrupolar relaxation, a high spin density of liquid xenon close to the critical point (289 K) overcomes the sensitivity problems of xenon-131. We report the first xenon-131 magnetic resonance images and have tested this technique on various meso-porous aerogels as host structures. Aerogels of different densities and changing levels of hydration can clearly be distinguished from the images obtained. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Influence of Triply-Charged Ions and Ionization Cross-Sections in a Hybrid-PIC Model of a Hall Thruster Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon D.; Boyd, Iain D.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of xenon ionization rates to collision cross-sections is studied within the framework of a hybrid-PIC model of a Hall thruster discharge. A revised curve fit based on the Drawin form is proposed and is shown to better reproduce the measured crosssections at high electron energies, with differences in the integrated rate coefficients being on the order of 10% for electron temperatures between 20 eV and 30 eV. The revised fit is implemented into HPHall and the updated model is used to simulate NASA's HiVHAc EDU2 Hall thruster at discharge voltages of 300, 400, and 500 V. For all three operating points, the revised cross-sections result in an increase in the predicted thrust and anode efficiency, reducing the error relative to experimental performance measurements. Electron temperature and ionization reaction rates are shown to follow the trends expected based on the integrated rate coefficients. The effects of triply-charged xenon are also assessed. The predicted thruster performance is found to have little or no dependence on the presence of triply-charged ions. The fraction of ion current carried by triply-charged ions is found to be on the order of 1% and increases slightly with increasing discharge voltage. The reaction rates for the 0?III, I?III, and II?III ionization reactions are found to be of similar order of magnitude and are about one order of magnitude smaller than the rate of 0?II ionization in the discharge channel.

  19. Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, M J; Biegalski, S R; Haas, D A; Jiang, H; Daigle, H; Lowrey, J D

    2018-07-01

    The detection of radioactive noble gases is a primary technology for verifying compliance with the pending Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A fundamental challenge in applying this technology for detecting underground nuclear explosions is estimating the timing and magnitude of the radionuclide signatures. While the primary mechanism for transport is advective transport, either through barometric pumping or thermally driven advection, diffusive transport in the surrounding matrix also plays a secondary role. From the study of primordial noble gas signatures, it is known that xenon has a strong physical adsorption affinity in shale formations. Given the unselective nature of physical adsorption, isotherm measurements reported here show that non-trivial amounts of xenon adsorb on a variety of media, in addition to shale. A dual-porosity model is then discussed demonstrating that sorption amplifies the diffusive uptake of an adsorbing matrix from a fracture. This effect may reduce the radioxenon signature down to approximately one-tenth, similar to primordial xenon isotopic signatures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetospheric ion deposition on Titan's ionosphere in hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpaa, I.; Johnson, R. E.; Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Kallio, E. J.; Jarvinen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid modelling allows tracking ion particle in self-consist electromagnetic fields. Titan is a specific case where ion gyromotion plays a significant role in the interaction with the ambient plasma flow. We present hybrid simulation results from a medium-strength magnetospheric flow case. The water-group ions are shown to dominate the energy deposition by particles into Titan's ionosphere, while incident protons and pickup ions deposit about a total of a third of the water-group energy. Neutral collisions for the incident ions were taken into account via stopping cross sections. We show that Titan's neutral exosphere reduces the flux and energy deposit of especially lighter flow ions into Titan's atmosphere. Distribution of impacts and energy deposit by incident watergroup ions onto Titan's exobase.

  1. A double-layer based model of ion confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, D., E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Sorbello, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The paper proposes a new model of ion confinement in ECRIS, which can be easily generalized to any magnetic configuration characterized by closed magnetic surfaces. Traditionally, ion confinement in B-min configurations is ascribed to a negative potential dip due to superhot electrons, adiabatically confined by the magneto-static field. However, kinetic simulations including RF heating affected by cavity modes structures indicate that high energy electrons populate just a thin slab overlapping the ECR layer, while their density drops down of more than one order of magnitude outside. Ions, instead, diffuse across the electron layer due to their high collisionality. This is the proper physical condition to establish a double-layer (DL) configuration which self-consistently originates a potential barrier; this “barrier” confines the ions inside the plasma core surrounded by the ECR surface. The paper will describe a simplified ion confinement model based on plasma density non-homogeneity and DL formation.

  2. Ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions in lithium imidazolide electrolytes studied by Raman spectroscopy and DFT models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheers, Johan; Niedzicki, Leszek; Zukowska, Grażyna Z; Johansson, Patrik; Wieczorek, Władysław; Jacobsson, Per

    2011-06-21

    Molecular level interactions are of crucial importance for the transport properties and overall performance of ion conducting electrolytes. In this work we explore ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions in liquid and solid polymer electrolytes of lithium 4,5-dicyano-(2-trifluoromethyl)imidazolide (LiTDI)-a promising salt for lithium battery applications-using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. High concentrations of ion associates are found in LiTDI:acetonitrile electrolytes, the vibrational signatures of which are transferable to PEO-based LiTDI electrolytes. The origins of the spectroscopic changes are interpreted by comparing experimental spectra with simulated Raman spectra of model structures. Simple ion pair models in vacuum identify the imidazole nitrogen atom of the TDI anion to be the most important coordination site for Li(+), however, including implicit or explicit solvent effects lead to qualitative changes in the coordination geometry and improved correlation of experimental and simulated Raman spectra. To model larger aggregates, solvent effects are found to be crucial, and we finally suggest possible triplet and dimer ionic structures in the investigated electrolytes. In addition, the effects of introducing water into the electrolytes-via a hydrate form of LiTDI-are discussed.

  3. RELAX: An ultrasensitive, resonance ionization mass spectrometer for xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Lyon, I. C.; Johnston, W. A.; Turner, G.

    1994-03-01

    RELAX is a resonance ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometer to which a cryogenic sample concentrator has been added. This has resulted in an increase in sensitivity by a factor greater than 100. The sample concentrator consists of a localized cold spot in the ion source, onto which the sample condenses, and a heating laser to release the condensed sample into the ionization region. The lifetime against detection of a sample atom is close to 20 min, which corresponds to a count rate of 1 cps from a sample of 1000 atoms, while the mass resolution is 300 (10% peak height). Sensitivity depends on the return time of sample atoms to the cold spot (10 s) and the fraction of these atoms subsequently ionized (˜1%). The minimum sample size which can be measured is limited only by blank, which is currently 2×10-15 cc STP total xenon and isotopically atmospheric (this can be attributed to the large aliquots of xenon admitted to the instrument during development, and so may be expected to decrease with time). The precision of abundance measurements has been improved by the incorporation of pulse height discrimination and pulse counting detection for the less abundant isotopes. The design, construction, and operation of the spectrometer in its new configuration are described with particular attention to abundance extraction. The effects of the sample concentrator on ionization efficiency and discrimination are discussed in detail, as are interferences from nonresonantly ionized hydrocarbons and the means of accounting for them.

  4. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A ampersand 038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports

  5. Radon background in liquid xenon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, N.

    2018-02-01

    The radioactive daughters isotope of 222Rn are one of the highest risk contaminants in liquid xenon detectors aiming for a small signal rate. The noble gas is permanently emanated from the detector surfaces and mixed with the xenon target. Because of its long half-life 222Rn is homogeneously distributed in the target and its subsequent decays can mimic signal events. Since no shielding is possible this background source can be the dominant one in future large scale experiments. This article provides an overview of strategies used to mitigate this source of background by means of material selection and on-line radon removal techniques.

  6. The accuracy of heavy ion optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozik, T.

    1980-01-01

    There is investigated in detail the sources and magnitude of numerical errors in heavy ion optical model calculations. It is shown on example of 20 Ne + 24 Mg scattering at Esub(LAB)=100 MeV. (author)

  7. Some remarks on the statistical model of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, V.

    2003-01-01

    This contribution is an attempt to assess what can be learned from the remarkable success of this statistical model in describing ratios of particle abundances in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

  8. Potential model description of heavy ion elastic and inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations for a potential-model description of heavy-ion elastic and inelastic scattering attempt to follow the readjustments that the two ions must make as they begin to interact and imply modifications of the kinetic energy of relative motion as well as the potential energy. Phenomenology and the data, deep or shallow potentials, inelastic scattering, and folded potential models are treated with particular emphasis on the last

  9. UTA versus line emission for EUVL: studies on xenon emission at the NIST EBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahy, K; Dunne, P; McKinney, L; O'Sullivan, G; Sokell, E; White, J; Aguilar, A; Pomeroy, J M; Tan, J N; Blagojevic, B; LeBigot, E-O; Gillaspy, J D

    2004-01-01

    Spectra from xenon ions have been recorded at the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) and the emission into a 2% bandwidth at 13.5 nm arising from 4d → 5p transitions compared with those from 4d → 4f and 4p → 4d transitions in Xe XI and also with that obtained from the unresolved transition array (UTA) observed to peak just below 11 nm. It was found that an improvement of a factor of 5 could be gained in photon yield using the UTA rather than the 4d → 5p emission. The results are compared with atomic structure calculations and imply that a significant gain in efficiency should be obtained using tin, in which the emission at 13.5 nm comes from a similar UTA, rather than xenon, as an EUVL source material

  10. Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water$-$Xe system

    OpenAIRE

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I.; Pulver, Alexander Yu.; Peregudov, Alex; Artyuhov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We study the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a po...

  11. Estimation of ion velocity and temperature from asymmetric model incoherent scatter spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J.; Kohl, H.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * THE LEOPARD CODE MODEL * Thermal Spectrum Calculational Model * Non-thermal Spectrum Calculational Model * Depletion Calculational Model * THE PSU-LEOPARD CODE * Group Constants Polynomial Fitting * A Simulation of BPR and Control Rod Insertion * A Power-corrected Xenon Cross Section Calculation * MODIFICATIONS IN PSU-LEOPARD TO CALCULATE BORON BURNABLE ABSORBER CROSS SECTIONS * BPR Depletion * IFBA Depletion * PSU-LEOPARD INPUT AND OUTPUT DESCRIPTIONS * Input Description * Output Description * Standard output description * ADD file description * PSU-LEOPARD AS A PART OF PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * REFERENCES

  12. Nanoemulsion contrast agents with sub-picomolar sensitivity for xenon NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Todd K; Ramirez, R Matthew; Pines, Alexander

    2013-07-03

    A new type of contrast agent for Xe NMR based on surfactant-stabilized perfluorocarbon-in-water nanoemulsions has been produced. The contrast agent uses dissolved hyperpolarized xenon gas as a nonperturbing reporting medium, as xenon freely exchanges between aqueous solution and the perfluorocarbon interior of the droplets, which are spectroscopically distinguishable and allow for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) detection of the agent. Nanoemulsions with droplet diameters between 160 and 310 nm were produced and characterized using hyperpolarized (129)Xe combined with CEST detection. Saturation parameters were varied and data were modeled numerically to determine the xenon exchange dynamics of the system. Nanoemulsion droplets were detected at concentrations as low as 100 fM, corresponding to <1 μL of perfluorocarbon per liter of solution. The straightforward, inexpensive production of these agents will facilitate future development toward molecular imaging and chemical sensing applications.

  13. Studies of selenium and xenon in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bricker, Tonya [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-07-27

    Since its development, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been a widely used analytical technique. ICP-MS offers low detection limits, easy determination of isotope ratios, and simple mass spectra from analyte elements. ICP-MS has been successfully employed for many applications including geological, environmental, biological, metallurgical, food, medical, and industrial. One specific application important to many areas of study involves elemental speciation by using ICP-MS as an element specific detector interfaced to liquid chromatography. Elemental speciation information is important and cannot be obtained by atomic spectrometric methods alone which measure only the total concentration of the element present. Part 1 of this study describes the speciation of selenium in human serum by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and detection by ICP-MS. Although ICP-MS has been widely sued, room for improvement still exists. Difficulties in ICP-MS include noise in the background, matrix effects, clogging of the sampling orifice with deposited solids, and spectral interference caused by polyatomic ions. Previous work has shown that the addition of xenon into the central channel of the ICP decreases polyatomic ion levels. In Part 2 of this work, a fundamental study involving the measurement of the excitation temperature is carried out to further understand xenon`s role in the reduction of polyatomic ions. 155 refs.

  14. RBE and related modeling in carbon-ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Christian P.; Peschke, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a promising evolving modality in radiotherapy to treat tumors that are radioresistant against photon treatments. As carbon ions are more effective in normal and tumor tissue, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) has to be calculated by bio-mathematical models and has to be considered in the dose prescription. This review (i) introduces the concept of the RBE and its most important determinants, (ii) describes the physical and biological causes of the increased RBE for carbon ions, (iii) summarizes available RBE measurements in vitro and in vivo, and (iv) describes the concepts of the clinically applied RBE models (mixed beam model, local effect model, and microdosimetric-kinetic model), and (v) the way they are introduced into clinical application as well as (vi) their status of experimental and clinical validation, and finally (vii) summarizes the current status of the use of the RBE concept in carbon ion therapy and points out clinically relevant conclusions as well as open questions. The RBE concept has proven to be a valuable concept for dose prescription in carbon ion radiotherapy, however, different centers use different RBE models and therefore care has to be taken when transferring results from one center to another. Experimental studies significantly improve the understanding of the dependencies and limitations of RBE models in clinical application. For the future, further studies investigating quantitatively the differential effects between normal tissues and tumors are needed accompanied by clinical studies on effectiveness and toxicity.

  15. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

    2011-02-14

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  16. Thermal modeling of cylindrical lithium ion battery during discharge cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Baek, Seung Man

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. → This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. → A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. → The contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate. → The contribution of heat source due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. - Abstract: Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. The simplified model by adopting a cylindrical coordinate was employed. This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. The mathematical model solves conservation of energy considering heat generations due to both joule heating and entropy change. A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. The temperature profile from simulation had similar tendency with experiment. The temperature profile was decomposed with contributions of each heat sources and was presented at several discharge rates. It was found that the contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate, whereas that due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. Also the effect of cooling condition and the LiNiCoMnO 2 /C battery were analyzed for the purpose of temperature reduction.

  17. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  18. Identification of highly-ionized xenon spectra (Xe XXVI through Xe XXXI) excited in the plasma of the TFR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyart, J.F.; Bauche-Arnoult, C.; Luc-Koenig, E.

    1985-05-01

    The spectrum of xenon injected into the TFR tokamak plasma has been recorded in the range 10-90 A by means of a 2m grazing incidence spectrograph. Forty-four lines and unresolved transition arrays pertaining to multicharged xenon ions isoelectronic with Cu I, Ni I, Co I, Fe I, Mn I and Cr I have been identified by means of various theoretical methods. The 17 observed lines of the 3p 6 3d 8 - 3p 5 3d 9 transition array, have allowed the wavelengths of the magnetic dipole transitions occuring within the ground configuration 3d 8 of Xe XXXIX to be predicted

  19. Ion spectroscopy for improvement of the physical beam model for therapy planning in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arico, Giulia

    2016-11-23

    Helium and carbon ions enable a more conformal dose distribution, narrower penumbra and higher relative biological effectiveness than photon and proton radiotherapy. However, they may undergo nuclear fragmentation in the patient tissues and the arising secondary fragments affect the delivered biological dose distributions. Currently there is a lack of data regarding ion nuclear fragmentation. One reason is the large size (up to some meters) of the experimental setups required for the investigations. In this thesis a new method is presented, which makes use of versatile pixelated semiconductor detectors (Timepix). This method is based on tracking of single particles and pattern recognition of their signals in the detectors. Measurements were performed at the HIT facility. The mixed radiation field arising from 430 MeV/u carbon ion beams and 221 MeV/u helium ion beams in water and in PMMA targets was investigated. The amounts of primary (carbon or helium) ions detected behind targets with the same water equivalent thickness (WET) were found to be in agreement within the statistical uncertainties. However, more fragments (differences up to 20% in case of H) and narrower lateral particle distributions were measured behind the PMMA than the water targets. The spectra of ions behind tissue surrogates and corresponding water targets with the same WET were analysed. The results obtained with adipose and inner bone surrogates and with the equivalent water phantoms were found to be consistent within the uncertainties. Significant differences in the results were observed in the case of lung and cortical bone surrogates when compared to the water phantoms. The experimental results were compared to FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations. This comparison could contribute to enhance the ion interaction models currently implemented for {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He ion beams.

  20. Investigation of the lithium ion mobility in cyclic model compounds and their ion conduction properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielen, Joerg

    2011-07-27

    In view of both, energy density and energy drain, rechargeable lithium ion batteries outperform other present accumulator systems. However, despite great efforts over the last decades, the ideal electrolyte in terms of key characteristics such as capacity, cycle life, and most important reliable safety, has not yet been identified. Steps ahead in lithium ion battery technology require a fundamental understanding of lithium ion transport, salt association, and ion solvation within the electrolyte. Indeed, well defined model compounds allow for systematic studies of molecular ion transport. Thus, in the present work, based on the concept of immobilizing ion solvents, three main series with a cyclotriphosphazene (CTP), hexaphenylbenzene (HBP), and tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMS) scaffold were prepared. Lithium ion solvents, among others ethylene carbonate (EC), which has proven to fulfill together with propylene carbonate safety and market concerns in commercial lithium ion batteries, were attached to the different cores via alkyl spacers of variable length. All model compounds were fully characterized, pure and thermally stable up to at least 235 C, covering the requested broad range of glass transition temperatures from -78.1 C up to +6.2 C. While the CTP models tend to rearrange at elevated temperatures over time, which questions the general stability of alkoxide related (poly)phosphazenes, both, the HPB and CTP based models show no evidence of core stacking. In particular the CTP derivatives represent good solvents for various lithium salts, exhibiting no significant differences in the ionic conductivity {sigma}{sub dc} and thus indicating comparable salt dissociation and rather independent motion of cations and ions. In general, temperature-dependent bulk ionic conductivities investigated via impedance spectroscopy follow a William-Landel-Ferry (WLF) type behavior. Modifications of the alkyl spacer length were shown to influence ionic conductivities only in

  1. Mathematical Model of Ion Transport in Electrodialysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Rohman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of ion transport in electrodialysis process is reviewed and their basics concept is discussed. Three scales of ion transport reviewed are: 1 ion transport in the membrane, where two approaches are used, the irreversible thermodynamics and modeling of the membrane material; 2 ion transport in a three-layer system composed of a membrane with two adjoining diffusion layers; and 3 coupling with hydraulic flow system in an electrodialysis 2D and 3D cell, where the differential equation of convectivediffusion is used. Most of the work carried out in the past implemented NP equations since relatively easily coupled with other equations describing hydrodynamic conditions and ion transport in the surrounding solutions, chemical reactions in the solutions and the membrane, boundary and other conditions. However, it is limited to point ionic transport in homogenous and uniformly - grainy phases of structure. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 21 January 2008, Accepted: 10 March 2008][How to Cite: F.S. Rohman, N. Aziz (2008. Mathematical Model of Ion Transport in Electrodialysis Process. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3(1-3: 3-8. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7122.3-8][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7122.3-8 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7122 ] 

  2. Delayed xenon post-conditioning mitigates spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbits by regulating microglial activation and inflammatory factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Wei; Wang, Yun-Lu; Lu, Jia-Kai; Tian, Lei; Jin, Mu; Cheng, Wei-Ping

    2018-03-01

    The neuroprotective effect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats exerted by delayed xenon post-conditioning is stronger than that produced by immediate xenon post-conditioning. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. Activated microglia are the main inflammatory cell type in the nervous system. The release of pro-inflammatory factors following microglial activation can lead to spinal cord damage, and inhibition of microglial activation can relieve spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. To investigate how xenon regulates microglial activation and the release of inflammatory factors, a rabbit model of spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury was induced by balloon occlusion of the infrarenal aorta. After establishment of the model, two interventions were given: (1) immediate xenon post-conditioning-after reperfusion, inhalation of 50% xenon for 1 hour, 50% N 2 /50%O 2 for 2 hours; (2) delayed xenon post-conditioning-after reperfusion, inhalation of 50% N 2 /50%O 2 for 2 hours, 50% xenon for 1 hour. At 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 hours after reperfusion, hindlimb locomotor function was scored using the Jacobs locomotor scale. At 72 hours after reperfusion, interleukin 6 and interleukin 10 levels in the spinal cord of each group were measured using western blot assays. Iba1 levels were determined using immunohistochemistry and a western blot assay. The number of normal neurons at the injury site was quantified using hematoxylin-eosin staining. At 72 hours after reperfusion, delayed xenon post-conditioning remarkably enhanced hindlimb motor function, increased the number of normal neurons at the injury site, decreased Iba1 levels, and inhibited interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 levels in the spinal cord. Immediate xenon post-conditioning did not noticeably affect the above-mentioned indexes. These findings indicate that delayed xenon post-conditioning after spinal cord injury improves the recovery of neurological function by reducing

  3. Effects of temperature and irradiation on the mobility of Xenon in UO2: Profilometric and microstructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, B.

    2012-01-01

    In France, electricity is mainly produced (78%) through the operation of 58 PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors). During reactor operation, many fission products (FP) are generated in the fuel which is, in most cases, UO 2 enriched to about 4% in 235 U. Among FPs, gaseous fission products as Xenon and Krypton, are abundantly produced (around 15% stable fission products). Because of their chemical nature, those two gases have a very low solubility in the fuel and therefore tend to form bubbles (to minimize surface tension) and can cause pellets swelling. The formed gas can also be released out of the pellet, and lead to a substantial increase in the pressure within the fuel cladding, thereby limiting the energy production. However, migration mechanisms, traditionally studied indirectly by measuring the amount of gas released after irradiation, are not yet fully understood. It is frequently assumed that atomic diffusion is the only mechanism that can lead to a migration of xenon. The objective of this thesis is to provide direct evidence of the different mechanisms controlling the behavior of Xenon during thermal annealing and irradiation. Therefore, we used ion implantation to introduce Xenon in uranium dioxide samples. After implantation, the Xenon distribution follows a quasi-Gaussian concentration profile (variation of the concentration regard to the depth) located in the first 300 nanometers of the sample. We have performed post-implantation annealing at 1400 C and 1600 C in order to study the impact of the temperature, and irradiation with ions to simulate the impact of fission products in the fuel. Subsequently, concentration depth profiles were measured by ion microprobe (SIMS). Although the feasibility of Xenon measurement has been demonstrated in several articles, no concentration profile had so far been presented in the literature because a classical data processing of SIMS data is not suitable in uranium dioxide. Therefore a new data processing software has

  4. Re-solution of xenon clusters in plutonium dioxide under the collision cascade impact: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitov, D. D.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.; Gupta, S. K.; Akilbekov, A. T.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of xenon clusters with the collision cascades in the PuO2 crystals is investigated using the molecular dynamics simulation and the approximation of the pair interaction potentials. The potentials of interaction of Xe atoms with the surrounding particles in the crystal lattice are suggested, that are valid in the range of high collision energies. The cascades created by the recoil 235U ions formed as the plutonium α-decay product are considered, and the influence of such cascades on the structure of the xenon clusters is analyzed. It is shown, that the cascade-cluster interaction leads to release of the xenon atoms from the clusters and their subsequent re-solution in the crystal bulk.

  5. Bistable dynamics underlying excitability of ion homeostasis in neuron models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Hübel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When neurons fire action potentials, dissipation of free energy is usually not directly considered, because the change in free energy is often negligible compared to the immense reservoir stored in neural transmembrane ion gradients and the long-term energy requirements are met through chemical energy, i.e., metabolism. However, these gradients can temporarily nearly vanish in neurological diseases, such as migraine and stroke, and in traumatic brain injury from concussions to severe injuries. We study biophysical neuron models based on the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH formalism extended to include time-dependent ion concentrations inside and outside the cell and metabolic energy-driven pumps. We reveal the basic mechanism of a state of free energy-starvation (FES with bifurcation analyses showing that ion dynamics is for a large range of pump rates bistable without contact to an ion bath. This is interpreted as a threshold reduction of a new fundamental mechanism of ionic excitability that causes a long-lasting but transient FES as observed in pathological states. We can in particular conclude that a coupling of extracellular ion concentrations to a large glial-vascular bath can take a role as an inhibitory mechanism crucial in ion homeostasis, while the Na⁺/K⁺ pumps alone are insufficient to recover from FES. Our results provide the missing link between the HH formalism and activator-inhibitor models that have been successfully used for modeling migraine phenotypes, and therefore will allow us to validate the hypothesis that migraine symptoms are explained by disturbed function in ion channel subunits, Na⁺/K⁺ pumps, and other proteins that regulate ion homeostasis.

  6. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-29

    Apr 29, 2015 ... We review the transport models that are widely used to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We show that transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression ...

  7. Modeling ion channel dynamics through reflected stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangerfield, Ciara E; Kay, David; Burrage, Kevin

    2012-05-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that open and close at random and play a vital role in the electrical dynamics of excitable cells. The stochastic nature of the conformational changes these proteins undergo can be significant, however current stochastic modeling methodologies limit the ability to study such systems. Discrete-state Markov chain models are seen as the "gold standard," but are computationally intensive, restricting investigation of stochastic effects to the single-cell level. Continuous stochastic methods that use stochastic differential equations (SDEs) to model the system are more efficient but can lead to simulations that have no biological meaning. In this paper we show that modeling the behavior of ion channel dynamics by a reflected SDE ensures biologically realistic simulations, and we argue that this model follows from the continuous approximation of the discrete-state Markov chain model. Open channel and action potential statistics from simulations of ion channel dynamics using the reflected SDE are compared with those of a discrete-state Markov chain method. Results show that the reflected SDE simulations are in good agreement with the discrete-state approach. The reflected SDE model therefore provides a computationally efficient method to simulate ion channel dynamics while preserving the distributional properties of the discrete-state Markov chain model and also ensuring biologically realistic solutions. This framework could easily be extended to other biochemical reaction networks.

  8. Hydrodynamic modelling for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progress on hydrodynamic modelling, investigation on the flow data and the extraction of the QGP shear viscosity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. 2. Hydrodynamic modelling – a short introduction. 2.1 Viscous hydrodynamics. Relativistic hydrodynamics is a macroscopic tool to simulate the QGP fireball ...

  9. Modeling space charge in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new analytic model is presented which accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson's equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models

  10. Radial dose distribution around an energetic heavy ion and an ion track structure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Namba, Hideki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Ritsuko

    1997-03-01

    Ionization currents produced in a small wall-less ionization chamber located at varying distance from the 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion`path traversing Ar gas were measured and utilized to construct a track structure model. Using the LET value of 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} and G(Fe{sup 3+}) in Fricke solutions (= 15.4) for fast electrons, we estimate G(Fe{sup 3+}) for this ion to be 5.0. (author)

  11. Wave Model Development in Multi-Ion Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hee Song

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Near-earth space is composed of plasmas which embed a number of plasma waves. Space plasmas consist of electrons and multi-ion that determine local wave propagation characteristics. In multi-ion plasmas, it is di cult to find out analytic solution from the dispersion relation in general. In this work, we have developed a model with an arbitrary magnetic field and density as well as multi-ion plasmas. This model allows us to investigate how plasma waves behave when they propagate along realistic magnetic field lines, which are assumed by IGRF(International Geomagnetic Reference Field. The results are found to be useful for the analysis of the in situ observational data in space. For instance, if waves are assumed to propagate into the polar region, from the equatorial region, our model quantitatively shows how polarization is altered along earth travel path.

  12. Analytic model of Applied-B ion diode impedance behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.A.; Mendel, C.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An empirical analysis of impedance data from Applied-B ion diodes used in seven inertial confinement fusion research experiments was published recently. The diodes all operated with impedance values well below the Child's-law value. The analysis uncovered an unusual unifying relationship among data from the different experiments. The analysis suggested that closure of the anode-cathode gap by electrode plasma was not a dominant factor in the experiments, but was not able to elaborate the underlying physics. Here we present a new analytic model of Applied-B ion diodes coupled to accelerators. A critical feature of the diode model is based on magnetic insulation theory. The model successfully describes impedance behavior of these diodes and supports stimulating new viewpoints of the physics of Applied-B ion diode operation

  13. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M.

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided

  14. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  15. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerib, D.S.; Bai, X.; Bedikian, S.; Bernard, E.; Bernstein, A.; Bolozdynya, A.; Bradley, A.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S.B.; Camp, C.; Carmona-Benitez, M.C.; Carr, D.; Chapman, J.J.; Chiller, A.; Chiller, C.; Clark, K.; Classen, T.; Coffey, T.; Curioni, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) collaboration has designed and constructed a dual-phase xenon detector, in order to conduct a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. The goal of the LUX detector is to clearly detect (or exclude) WIMPS with a spin independent cross-section per nucleon of 2×10 −46 cm 2 , equivalent to ∼1event/100kg/month in the inner 100-kg fiducial volume (FV) of the 370-kg detector. The overall background goals are set to have <1 background events characterized as possible WIMPs in the FV in 300 days of running. This paper describes the design and construction of the LUX detector

  16. Optimization of Xenon Biosensors for Detection of ProteinInteractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowery, Thomas J.; Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Ruiz, E.Janette; Wu, Tom; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; King, David S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Pines, Alex; Wemmer, David E..

    2005-08-03

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR can detect the presence of specific low-concentration biomolecular analytes by means of the xenon biosensor, which consists of a water-soluble, targeted cryptophane-A cage that encapsulates xenon. In this work we use the prototypical biotinylated xenon biosensor to determine the relationship between the molecular composition of the xenon biosensor and the characteristics of protein-bound resonances. The effects of diastereomer overlap, dipole-dipole coupling, chemical shift anisotropy, xenon exchange, and biosensor conformational exchange on protein-bound biosensor signal were assessed. It was found that optimal protein-bound biosensor signal can be obtained by minimizing the number of biosensor diastereomers and using a flexible linker of appropriate length. Both the linewidth and sensitivity of chemical shift to protein binding of the xenon biosensor were found to be inversely proportional to linker length.

  17. Hopping models for ion conduction in noncrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Schrøder, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    semiconductors). These universalities are subject of much current interest, for instance interpreted in the context of simple hopping models. In the present paper we first discuss the temperature dependence of the dc conductivity in hopping models and the importance of the percolation phenomenon. Next......, the experimental (quasi)universality of the ac conductivity is discussed. It is shown that hopping models are able to reproduce the experimental finding that the response obeys time-temperature superposition, while at the same time a broad range of activation energies is involved in the conduction process. Again...

  18. HEMODYNAMIC EFFECTS OF XENON ANESTHESIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Bykov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at hemodynamic effects of xenon on operative interventions in children. Patients and methods: the study involved 30 5-17-year-old children – 10 (33.3% girls and 20 (66.7% boys with ASA score 1-3 admitted for surgical treatment. The children underwent endotracheal anesthesia with xenon-oxygen mixture (Xe:O2 = 60-65:30% and fentanyl (2.5‑3.5  mcg/kg per hour for the following operations: appendectomy – 10 (33.3% patients, herniotomy – 8 (26.7% patients, Ivanissevich procedure – 6 (20.0% patients, plastic surgery of posttraumatic defects of skin and soft tissues – 4 (13.3% patients, abdominal adhesiotomy – 2 (6.7% patients. Central hemodynamics was studied echocardiographically (Philips HD 11, the Netherlands using the Teichholz technique along the cephalocaudal axis (parasternal access. Results: the anesthesia was notable for hemodynamic stability during the operation: as a result, a statistically significant (p < 0.05 increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure by 10, 18 and 17%, respectively, was observed. Conclusion: the analysis demonstrated that xenon anesthesia improves lusitropic myocardial function statistically significantly increasing cardiac output by 12% by way of increasing stroke volume by 30%. 

  19. First Axion Results from the XENON100 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E.; Alfonsi, M.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Auger, M.; Balan, C.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Behrens, A.; Beltrame, P.; Bokeloh, K.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Colijn, A.P.; Contreras, H.; Cussonneau, J.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Duchovni, E.; Fattori, S.; Ferella, A.D.; Fulgione, W.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L.W.; Grignon, C.; Gross, E.; Hampel, W.; Itay, R.; Kaether, F.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R.F.; Calloch, M. Le; Lellouch, D.; Levy, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Lung, K.; Lyashenko, A.; Macmullin, S.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F.V.; Mayani Paras, D.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Pantic, E.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Simgen, H.; Teymourian, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Vitells, O.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2014-09-09

    We present the first results of searches for axions and axion-like-particles with the XENON100 experiment. The axion-electron coupling constant, $g_{Ae}$, has been tested by exploiting the axio-electric effect in liquid xenon. A profile likelihood analysis of 224.6 live days $\\times$ 34 kg exposure has shown no evidence for a signal. By rejecting $g_{Ae}$, larger than $7.7 \\times 10^{-12}$ (90% CL) in the solar axion search, we set the best limit to date on this coupling. In the frame of the DFSZ and KSVZ models, we exclude QCD axions heavier than 0.3 eV/c$^2$ and 80 eV/c$^2$, respectively. For axion-like-particles, under the assumption that they constitute the whole abundance of dark matter in our galaxy, we constrain $g_{Ae}$, to be lower than $1 \\times 10^{-12}$ (90% CL) for masses between 5 and 10 keV/c$^2$.

  20. Load-following induced xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.; Tiihonen, O.

    1977-01-01

    A new computer code is introduced for studying xenon oscillations during load following operation of a pressurized water reactor. In the code all major feedback effects occurring in PWRs are incorporated through nonlinear correlations. These effects include fuel and coolant temperatures, control rods, and soluble poison density. The code is capable of simulating xenon transients due to flux distribution changes, e.g., during load following procedures. As an example a single xenon transient run is included. (author)

  1. Modelling of ion implantation in SiC crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakarov, Ivan [SILVACO International, 4701 Patrick Henry Drive, Building 2, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)]. E-mail: ivan.chakarov@silvaco.com; Temkin, Misha [SILVACO International, 4701 Patrick Henry Drive, Building 2, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    An advanced electronic stopping model for ion implantation in SiC has been implemented within the binary collision approximation. The model has been thoroughly tested and validated for Al implantation into 4H-, 6H-SiC under different initial implant conditions. A very good agreement between calculated and experimental profiles has been achieved. The model has been integrated in an industrial technology CAD process simulator.

  2. Modelling of ion implantation in SiC crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarov, Ivan; Temkin, Misha

    2006-01-01

    An advanced electronic stopping model for ion implantation in SiC has been implemented within the binary collision approximation. The model has been thoroughly tested and validated for Al implantation into 4H-, 6H-SiC under different initial implant conditions. A very good agreement between calculated and experimental profiles has been achieved. The model has been integrated in an industrial technology CAD process simulator

  3. Multi module model for ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Magas, V K; Strottman, D D

    2001-01-01

    The Multi Module Model for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC and LHC energies is presented. It uses the Effective String Rope Model for the calculation of the initial stages of the reaction; the output of this model is used as the initial state for the subsequent one-fluid calculations. It is shown that such an initial state leads to the creation of the third flow component. The hydrodynamical evolution of the energy density distribution is also presented.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  5. A cost-effective and versatile xenon gas dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joseph C; Lenz, Warren N; Reed, Terry L; McGough, Christopher G

    2005-04-01

    To modify a commercial xenon gas dispenser so that two xenon unit-dose vials could be combined with a modified dispenser to deliver a recommended dose. To maintain the same operating mechanism, changes were made only to the vial shield and the needle port of the original gas dispenser. The modified gas dispenser consisted of two puncture needles and two vial holders shielded with the same thickness of lead as the commercial dispenser. Our evaluation showed that the modified gas dispenser operated the same way as the commercial unit, and the average 133Xe residual activity in either one or two xenon unit-dose vials of the modified gas dispenser was not significantly different from that in one vial of the commercial xenon gas dispenser. The modified xenon gas dispenser allows the stock of xenon gas vials to be managed cost-effectively. The modified unit can be used to dispense two low-activity xenon gas vials to deliver a standard dose to a patient. Also, the modified gas dispenser can be used to combine different amounts of xenon activity in two unit-dose vials in order to customize the dose delivered to patients with special needs (e.g., obese patients). Our modified device can also function as a single-dose dispenser by placing an empty vial alongside the unit-dose vial of radioactive xenon gas.

  6. Theoretical ab initio study of Xenon pentafluoride anion. Mechanism of Xenon pseudorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurat-Lessard, Paul; Durupthy, Olivier; Volatron, François

    2002-09-01

    Ab initio calculations have been performed on XeF 5- anion at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels with a large basis set. Four extrema have been optimized and characterized by frequencies analysis. We find the absolute minimum to be of D 5h symmetry in accordance with the experimental data; the theoretical vibrational spectrum of this minimum is in good agreement with the experimental one. Three other extrema are found to be higher in energy depending on the angular separation of the Xenon lone pairs as predicted by the VSEPR theory. Finally the characterized transition state has been found to belong to the Xenon pseudorotation pathway.

  7. Flexoelectric effects in model and native membranes containing ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A G; Miller, B A; Hristova, K; Usherwood, P N

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of flexoelectricity in model membranes containing ion pores and native membranes containing ion channels has been undertaken with the objective of determining the relationship, if any, between flexoelectricity and ion transport. Model membrane patches containing ion pores induced by a blue-green algal toxin, microcystin-LR, and locust muscle membrane patches containing potassium channels were studied using patch-clamp techniques. A correspondence was established between the presence of open channels and pores and the amplitude of the 1st harmonic of the total membrane current when the membranes or patches were subjected to pressure oscillations. The 2nd harmonic of the membrane current provided a measure of the amplitude of a membrane curvature induced by pressure, thus making it possible to determine the membrane flexoelectric coefficient. This study shows that flexoelectricity could be an effective driving force for ion transport through membrane pores and channels, thus further highlighting the possible biological significance of this mechano-electric phenomenon.

  8. Kinetic modeling of desorption of Cadmium (ii) ion from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic modeling of desorption of Cadmium (ii) ion from Mercaptoacetic acide modified and unmodified agricultural adsorbents. A A Abia, E D Asuquo. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Environmental Science Vol. 6 (2) 2007: pp. 89-98. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  9. Transferability of polarizable models for ion-water electrostatic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masia, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Studies of ion-water systems at condensed phase and at interfaces have pointed out that molecular and ionic polarization plays an important role for many phenomena ranging from hydrogen bond dynamics to water interfaces' structure. Classical and ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations reveal that induced dipole moments at interfaces (e.g. air-water and water-protein) are usually high, hinting that polarizable models to be implemented in classical force fields should be very accurate in reproducing the electrostatic properties of the system. In this paper the electrostatic properties of three classical polarizable models for ion-water interaction are compared with ab initio results both at gas and condensed phase. For Li + - water and Cl - -water dimers the reproducibility of total dipole moments obtained with high level quantum chemical calculations is studied; for the same ions in liquid water, Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to compute the time evolution of ionic and molecular dipole moments, which are compared with the classical models. The PD2-H2O model developed by the author and coworkers [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 7362] together with the gaussian intermolecular damping for ion-water interaction [Masia et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 164505] showed to be the fittest in reproducing the ab initio results from gas to condensed phase, allowing for force field transferability.

  10. Ion transport from plasma ion source at ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Steinsberger, Timo Pascal

    2017-01-01

    In this report, my work as CERN Summer Student at the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE is described. A new plasma ion source used as oine source for calibration and implemented before my arrival was commissioned and transportation settings for the produced ions to the ion traps were found. The cyclotron frequencies of 40Ar and the xenon isotopes 129-132Xe were measured using time-of-flight and phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance mass spectroscopy.

  11. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-09-01

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

  12. Jovian Proton and Heavy Ion Models for Spacecraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Evans, R. W.; Jun, I.; Kim, W.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will review the results of the latest modeling at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the high energy proton and ion environments at Jupiter. The existing models of the proton and ion environments at Jupiter have been revised and extended from the original 12 jovian radii out to 50 jovian radii using the latest Galileo data. In addition to the physical significance of these particle populations, the new models will be important in the evaluation and design of solar arrays at Jupiter as they can affect the radiation damage to the solar array cells and cover glass. The new models represent an important update to the tools currently being used to study the effects of the jovian environment on spacecraft. These models (part of the GIRE family of electron and proton models) are currently used worldwide to describe that jovian environment and are the main tools used by NASA to determine the effects of this environment on spacecraft systems and instruments. The update to be presented is the first significant revision (extending the proton and ion models from 12 Rj to 50 Rj) to the GIRE proton environment since 1983 and fills an important gap in our understanding.

  13. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  14. Study of pulsed neon-xenon VUV radiating low pressure plasmas for mercury free fluorescent sign optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, E.; Point, S.; Dozias, S.; Viladrosa, R.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    This work deals with the study and optimization of mercury free fluorescent discharge tubes for publicity lighting applications. The experimental set-up allows for time resolved spectroscopy from 110 up to 900 nm, photometric characterization in a large volume integrating sphere and the current and voltage measurement of microsecond duration signals delivered by lab-developed pulsed drivers. The glow and afterglow radiative process analysis indicates that the best performance measured with the pulsed excitation of rare gas plasma, in comparison with the conventional ac excitation, essentially originates from the efficient plasma relaxation during the afterglow at the benefit of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) resonance line radiated at 146.9 nm for xenon. The fit of the VUV time resolved experimental measurements, with the results issued from a simplified kinetic model of neon-xenon plasmas, evidences the crucial role of production of molecular ions during the glow phase and of their radiative recombination during the afterglow. The pulse duration and the gas mixture pressure appear as two experimental parameters whose influence, studied over an extended range, has been demonstrated to bring about a significant sign performance enhancement. There exists an optimum pulse duration range, which results in the appearance of limited stepwise excitation and ionization processes, favourable for an intense afterglow VUV production. The pressure dependence study shows that the best performance for pulsed excitation is obtained in Ne/Xe (100/1) mixtures around 50 mbar, at the difference of an ac driven Ne/Xe plasma for which the best conditions were reported to be of a few millibars. This pressure increase results both in the VUV and sign light output enhancement and the successful continuous operation of pulsed mercury free signs for time as long as 4000 h with neither electrode erosion, nor glass or phosphor degradation nor chromatic coordinate variation. For the green

  15. In Situ Measurement of Atmospheric Krypton and Xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratorys Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking missions krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

  16. Nuclear spin-spin coupling in a van der Waals-bonded system: xenon dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaara, Juha; Hanni, Matti; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2013-03-14

    Nuclear spin-spin coupling over van der Waals bond has recently been observed via the frequency shift of solute protons in a solution containing optically hyperpolarized (129)Xe nuclei. We carry out a first-principles computational study of the prototypic van der Waals-bonded xenon dimer, where the spin-spin coupling between two magnetically non-equivalent isotopes, J((129)Xe - (131)Xe), is observable. We use relativistic theory at the four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock and Dirac-density-functional theory levels using novel completeness-optimized Gaussian basis sets and choosing the functional based on a comparison with correlated ab initio methods at the nonrelativistic level. J-coupling curves are provided at different levels of theory as functions of the internuclear distance in the xenon dimer, demonstrating cross-coupling effects between relativity and electron correlation for this property. Calculations on small Xe clusters are used to estimate the importance of many-atom effects on J((129)Xe - (131)Xe). Possibilities of observing J((129)Xe - (131)Xe) in liquid xenon are critically examined, based on molecular dynamics simulation. A simplistic spherical model is set up for the xenon dimer confined in a cavity, such as in microporous materials. It is shown that the on the average shorter internuclear distance enforced by the confinement increases the magnitude of the coupling as compared to the bulk liquid case, rendering J((129)Xe - (131)Xe) in a cavity a feasible target for experimental investigation.

  17. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Ramírez-Sandoval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO32. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis.

  18. Analytical model describes ion conduction in fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Daniel; Tse, Steve; Witten, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Many fuel cell designs employ polyelectrolyte membranes, but little is known about how to tune the parameters (water level, morphology, etc.) to maximize ion conductivity. We came up with a simple model based on a random, discrete water distribution and ion confinement due to neighboring polymer. The results quantitatively agree with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and explain experimental observations. We find that when the ratio of water volume to polymer volume, Vw /Vp , is small, the predicted ion self-diffusion coefficient scales roughly as Dw T√{Vw /Vp } exp(- ⋯Vp /Vw) , where Dw T is the limiting value in pure water at temperature T . At high water levels the model also agrees with MD simulation, plateauing to Dw T . The model predicts a maximum conductivity at a water level higher than is typically used, and that it would be beneficial to increase water retention even at the expense of lower ion concentration. Also, membranes would conduct better if they phase-separated into water-rich and polymer-rich regions. US ARMY MURI #W911NF-10-1-0520.

  19. Particle modeling of transport of α-ray generated ion clusters in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Lizhu; Nanbu, Kenichi; Hirata, Yosuke; Izumi, Mikio; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    A particle model is developed using the test-particle Monte Carlo method to study the transport properties of α-ray generated ion clusters in a flow of air. An efficient ion-molecule collision model is proposed to simulate the collisions between ion and air molecule. The simulations are performed for a steady state of ion transport in a circular pipe. In the steady state, generation of ions is balanced with such losses of ions as absorption of the measuring sensor or pipe wall and disappearance by positive-negative ion recombination. The calculated ion current to the measuring sensor agrees well with the previous measured data. (author)

  20. Ion mass separation modeling inside a plasma separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Sidorov, V. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2018-01-01

    The results have been obtained in a continuation of the work for ion trajectories calculation in crossed electric and magnetic fields and also in a close alignment with the plasma separation study development. The main task was to calculate trajectories of ions of the substance imitating spent nuclear fuel in order to find a feasible plasma separator configuration. The three-dimensional modeling has been made with KARAT code in a single-particle approximation. The calculations have been performed under the following conditions. Magnetic field is produced by 2 coils of wire, the characteristic field strength in a uniform area is 1.4 kG. Electric field is produced by several electrodes (axial ones, anode shell and capacitor sheets) with electric potential up to 500 V. The characteristic linear size of the cylindrical separator area is ∼ 100 cm. The characteristic size of injection region is ∼ 1 cm. Spatial position of the injection region is inside the separator. The injection direction is along magnetic lines. Injected particles are single-charged ions with energies from 0 to 20 eV with atomic masses A = 150 and 240. Wide spreading angle range was investigated. As a result of simulation a feasible separator configuration was found. This configuration allows to achieve more than 10 cm spatial division distance for the separated ions and is fully compliant with and supplementary to the vacuum arc-based ion source research.

  1. Preliminary investigation of actinide and xenon reactivity effects in accelerator transmutation of waste high-flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.R.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of an unstable positive reactivity growth in an accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW)-type high-flux system is investigated. While it has always been clear that xenon is an important actor in the reactivity response of a system to flux changes, it has been suggested that in very high thermal flux transuranic burning systems, a positive, unstable reactivity growth could be caused by the actinides alone. Initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change caused by the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or startup. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response caused by the actinides. The capabilities and applications of both the current actinide model and the xenon model are discussed. Finally, the need for a complete dynamic model for the high-flux fluid-fueled ATW system is addressed

  2. An induction Linac driven heavy-ion fusion systems model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuckerman, D.S.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Waganer, L.M.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized systems model of a heavy-ion fusion (HIF) reactor power plant is presented. The model can be used to analyze the behavior and projected costs of a commercial power plant using an induction linear accelerator (Linac) as a driver. Each major component of the model (targets, reactor cavity, Linac, beam transport, power flow, balance of plant, and costing) is discussed. Various target, reactor cavity, Linac, and beam transport schemes are examined and compared. The preferred operating regime for such a power plant is also examined. The results show that HIF power plants can compete with other advanced energy concepts at the 1000-MW (electric) power level [cost of electricity (COE) -- 50 mill/kW . h] provided that the cost savings predicted for Linacs using higher charge-state ions (+3) can be realized

  3. Datasheet-based modeling of Li-Ion batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreras, Jorge Varela; Schaltz, Erik; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Researchers and developers use battery models in order to predict the performance of batteries depending on external and internal conditions, such as temperature, C-rate, Depth-of-Discharge (DoD) or State-of-Health (SoH). Most battery models proposed in the literature require specific laboratory...... test for parameterization, therefore a great majority do not represent an appropriate and feasible solution. In this paper three easy-to-follow equivalent circuit modeling methods based only on information contained in a commercial Li-Ion cell manufacturer’s datasheet are presented and validated...... at steady state, comparing simulation results and manufacturer’s curves. Laboratory results are included in order to demonstrate the accuracy of parameters estimation. Results of each method are presented, compared and discussed for a Kokam SLPB 120216216 53Ah Li-Ion cell....

  4. Appropriate xenon-inhalation speed in xenon-enhanced CT using the end-tidal gas-sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Sadao; Toya, Shigeo; Kawase, Takeshi; Koyama, Hideki; Shiga, Hayao

    1986-01-01

    This report describes some problems when end-tidal xenon gas is substituted for the arterial xenon concentration in xenon-enhanced CT. The authors used a newly developed xenon inhalator with a xenon-gas-concentration analyzer and performed xenon-enhanced CT by means of the ''arterio-venous shunt'' method and the ''end-tidal gas-sampling'' method simultaneously. By the former method, the arterial build-up rate (K) was obtained directly from the CT slices of a blood circuit passing through the phantom. By the latter method, it was calculated from the xenon concentration of end-tidal gas sampled from the mask. The speed of xenon supply was varied between 0.6 - 1.2 L/min. in 11 patients with or without a cerebral lesion. The results revealed that rapid xenon inhalation caused a discrepancy in the arterial K between the ''shunt'' method and the ''end-tidal'' method. This discrepancy may be responsible for the mixing of inhalated gas and expired gas in respiratory dead space, such as the nasal cavity or the mask. The cerebral blood flow was underestimated because of the higher arterial K in the latter method. Too much slow inhalation, however, was timewasting, and it increased the body motion in the subanesthetic state. Therefore, an inhalation speed of the arterial K of as much as 0.2 was ideal to represent the end-tidal xenon concentration for the arterial K in the ''end-tidal gas-sampling'' method. When attention is given to this point, this method may offer a reliable absolute value in xenon-enhanced CT. (author)

  5. Analysis of the XENON100 dark matter search data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 experiment, situated in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, aims at the direct detection of dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), based on their interactions with xenon nuclei in an ultra low background dual-phase time projection chamber. This

  6. Cerebral blood flow tomography with xenon-133

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured tomographically by inhalation of Xenon-133. The calculation is based on taking a sequence of tomograms during the wash-in and wash-out phase of the tracer. Due to the dynamic nature of the process, a highly sensitive and fast moving single photon emission...... of other tracers for CBF tomography using SPECT is summarized with emphasis on the 99mTc chelates that freely pass the intact blood-brain barrier. The highly sensitive brain-dedicated SPECT systems described are a prerequisite for achieving high resolution tomograms with such tracers....

  7. Lattice dynamics of solid xenon under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, J K; Ahuja, R; Li, S; Johansson, B

    2002-02-18

    We use density-functional perturbation theory to obtain the phonon spectrum of fcc xenon under pressure. Thermodynamic properties obtained within the quasiharmonic approximation are in fair to good agreement with experiment at zero pressure. The transition pressure from the fcc to hcp phase is predicted to occur at 5 GPa. The fcc structure is found to be dynamically stable up to a pressure of 100 GPa, beyond which the phonon modes at the X and L symmetry points soften. We attribute the observed sluggish kinetics of the fcc-hcp transition to the small energy difference between the phases as well as to the high dynamical stability of the fcc phase.

  8. A pulse generator for xenon lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Janata, E

    2002-01-01

    A pulse generator is described, which enhances the analyzing light emitted from a xenon lamp as used in kinetic photospectrometry experiments. The lamp current is increased to 600 A for a duration of 3 ms; the current is constant within +-0.2% during a time interval of 2 ms. Because of instabilities of the lamp arc during pulsing, the use of the enhanced light source is limited to measuring times up to 500 mu s. The enhancement in light intensity depends on the wavelength and amounts to more than 400-fold in the UV-region.

  9. Implantation of xenon in amorphous carbon and silicon for brachytherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, F.C.; Barbieri, P.F.; Viana, G.A.; Silva, D.S. da

    2013-01-01

    We report a procedure to implant high dose of xenon atoms (Xe) in amorphous carbon, a-C, and amorphous silicon, a-Si, for application in brachytherapy seeds. An ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) system was used for the deposition of the films, where one ion gun was used for sputtering a carbon (or silicon) target, while the other ion gun was used to simultaneously bombard the growing film with a beam of xenon ion Xe + in the 0–300 eV range. Xe atoms were implanted into the film with concentration up to 5.5 at.%, obtained with Xe bombardment energy in the 50–150 eV range. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the local arrangement of the implanted Xe atoms through the Xe L III absorption edge (4.75 keV). It was observed that Xe atoms tend to agglomerate in nanoclusters in a-C and are dispersed in a-Si.

  10. Modelling interaction cross sections for intermediate and low energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toburen, L.H.; Shinpaugh, J.L.; Justiniano, E.L.B.

    2002-01-01

    When charged particles slow in tissue they undergo electron capture and loss processes than can have profound effects on subsequent interaction cross sections. Although a large amount of data exists for the interaction of bare charged particles with atoms and molecules, few experiments have been reported for these 'dressed' particles. Projectile electrons contribute to an impact-parameter-dependent screening of the projectile charge that precludes straightforward scaling of energy loss cross sections from those of bare charged particles. The objective of this work is to develop an analytical model for the energy-loss-dependent effects of screening on differential ionisation cross sections that can be used in track structure calculations for high LET ions. As a first step a model of differential ionisation cross sections for bare ions has been combined with a simple screening model to explore cross sections for intermediate and low energy dressed ions in collisions with atomic and molecular gas targets. The model is described briefly and preliminary results compared to measured electron energy spectra. (author)

  11. Structures of small mixed krypton-xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Masanari; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Rühl, Eckart

    2012-06-21

    Structures of small mixed krypton-xenon clusters of different compositions with an average size of 30-37 atoms are investigated. The Kr 3d(5/2) and Xe 4d(5/2) surface core level shifts and photoelectron intensities originating from corner, edge, and face/bulk sites are analyzed by using soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Structural models are derived from these experiments, which are confirmed by theoretical simulation taking induced dipole interactions into account. It is found that one or two small Xe cores are partly embedded in the surface of the Kr clusters. These may grow and merge leading to a phase separation between the two rare gas moieties in mixed clusters with increasing the Xe content.

  12. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Ongari, Daniele [Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, Institut des Sciences et Ingeénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de l' Industrie 17 1951 Sion Valais Switzerland; Xu, Wenqian [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mohamed, Mona H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Haranczyk, Maciej [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2 28906 Getafe, Madrid Spain; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-07-24

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycle from anesthetic gas mixture can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low temperature distillation to recover Xe, which is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose much efficient and simpler system to recover and recycle Xe from simulant exhale anesthetic gas mixture at room temperature using metal organic frameworks. Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity, Xe/N2 and Xe/O2 selectivity at room temperature. The in-situ synchrotron measurements suggest the Xe is occupied in the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12.

  13. Physics reach of the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.; Brown, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Bauermeister, B. [Institut für Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F. D.; Balan, C. [Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Arazi, L.; Breskin, A.; Budnik, R. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Arneodo, F. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L. [Physik-Institut, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Berger, T.; Brown, E. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G., E-mail: cyril.grignon@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: marco.selvi@bo.infn.it [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster (Germany); and others

    2016-04-01

    The XENON1T experiment is currently in the commissioning phase at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. In this article we study the experiment's expected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section, based on Monte Carlo predictions of the electronic and nuclear recoil backgrounds. The total electronic recoil background in 1 tonne fiducial volume and (1, 12) keV electronic recoil equivalent energy region, before applying any selection to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils, is (1.80 ± 0.15) · 10{sup −4} (kg·day·keV){sup −1}, mainly due to the decay of {sup 222}Rn daughters inside the xenon target. The nuclear recoil background in the corresponding nuclear recoil equivalent energy region (4, 50) keV, is composed of (0.6 ± 0.1) (t·y){sup −1} from radiogenic neutrons, (1.8 ± 0.3) · 10{sup −2} (t·y){sup −1} from coherent scattering of neutrinos, and less than 0.01 (t·y){sup −1} from muon-induced neutrons. The sensitivity of XENON1T is calculated with the Profile Likelihood Ratio method, after converting the deposited energy of electronic and nuclear recoils into the scintillation and ionization signals seen in the detector. We take into account the systematic uncertainties on the photon and electron emission model, and on the estimation of the backgrounds, treated as nuisance parameters. The main contribution comes from the relative scintillation efficiency L{sub eff}, which affects both the signal from WIMPs and the nuclear recoil backgrounds. After a 2 y measurement in 1 t fiducial volume, the sensitivity reaches a minimum cross section of 1.6 · 10{sup −47} cm{sup 2} at m{sub χ} = 50 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Environmental Radio-xenon Levels in Europe: a Comprehensive Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saey, P.R.J.; Becker, A.; Cella, L.; Zahringer, M.; Schlosser, C.; Auer, M.; Sartorius, H.; Kalinowski, M.B.; Achim, P.; Blanchard, X.; Brachet, G.; Le Petit, G.; Taffary, T.; Axelsson, A.; De Geer, L.E.; Peterson, J.; Ringbom, A.; Popov, V.; Popov, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Activity concentration data from ambient radio-xenon measurements in ground level air, which were carried out in Europe in the framework of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) in support of the development and build-up of a radio-xenon monitoring network for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification regime are presented and discussed. Six measurement stations provided data from 5 years of measurements performed between 2003 and 2008: Longyearbyen (Spitsbergen, Norway), Stockholm (Sweden), Dubna (Russian Federation), Schauinsland Mountain (Germany), Bruyeres-le-Chatel and Marseille (both France). The noble gas systems used within the INGE are designed to continuously measure low concentrations of the four radio-xenon isotopes which are most relevant for detection of nuclear explosions: 131m Xe, 133m Xe, 133 Xe and 135 Xe with a time resolution less than or equal to 24 h and a minimum detectable concentration of 133 Xe less than 1 mBq/m 3. This European cluster of six stations is particularly interesting because it is highly influenced by a high density of nuclear power reactors and some radiopharmaceutical production facilities. The activity concentrations at the European INGE stations are studied to characterise the influence of civilian releases, to be able to distinguish them from possible nuclear explosions. It was found that the mean activity concentration of the most frequently detected isotope, 133 Xe, was 5-20 mBq/m 3 within Central Europe where most nuclear installations are situated (Bruyeres-le-Chatel and Schauinsland), 1.4-2.4 mBq/m 3 just outside that region (Stockholm, Dubna and Marseille) and 0.2 mBq/m 3 in the remote polar station of Spitsbergen. No seasonal trends could be observed from the data. Two interesting events have been examined and their source regions have been identified using atmospheric backtracking methods that deploy Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling and inversion techniques. The results are consistent

  15. Artificial neural network modelling in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-dahshan, E.; Radi, A.; El-Bakry, M.Y.; El Mashad, M.

    2008-01-01

    The neural network (NN) model and parton two fireball model (PTFM) have been used to study the pseudo-rapidity distribution of the shower particles for C 12, O 16, Si 28 and S 32 on nuclear emulsion. The trained NN shows a better fitting with experimental data than the PTFM calculations. The NN is then used to predict the distributions that are not present in the training set and matched them effectively. The NN simulation results prove a strong presence modeling in heavy ion collisions

  16. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-03-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse "slice" model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP_summary.html.

  17. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-01-01

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand

  18. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler; Wood, Eric; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Kim, Gi-heon; Shi, Ying; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-06-15

    It remains an open question how best to predict real-world battery lifetime based on accelerated calendar and cycle aging data from the laboratory. Multiple degradation mechanisms due to (electro)chemical, thermal, and mechanical coupled phenomena influence Li-ion battery lifetime, each with different dependence on time, cycling and thermal environment. The standardization of life predictive models would benefit the industry by reducing test time and streamlining development of system controls.

  19. Comparison of models of high energy heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the main theoretical developments on heavy ion collisions at energies (0.1 to 2.0) GeV/nuc are reviewed. The fireball, firestreak, hydrodynamic (1-fluid, 2-fluids), ''row on row'', hard sphere and intranuclear cascades, and classical equations of motion models are discussed in detail. Results are compared to each other and to measured Ne + U → p + X reactions

  20. Electrodiffusive model for astrocytic and neuronal ion concentration dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Halnes

    Full Text Available The cable equation is a proper framework for modeling electrical neural signalling that takes place at a timescale at which the ionic concentrations vary little. However, in neural tissue there are also key dynamic processes that occur at longer timescales. For example, endured periods of intense neural signaling may cause the local extracellular K(+-concentration to increase by several millimolars. The clearance of this excess K(+ depends partly on diffusion in the extracellular space, partly on local uptake by astrocytes, and partly on intracellular transport (spatial buffering within astrocytes. These processes, that take place at the time scale of seconds, demand a mathematical description able to account for the spatiotemporal variations in ion concentrations as well as the subsequent effects of these variations on the membrane potential. Here, we present a general electrodiffusive formalism for modeling of ion concentration dynamics in a one-dimensional geometry, including both the intra- and extracellular domains. Based on the Nernst-Planck equations, this formalism ensures that the membrane potential and ion concentrations are in consistency, it ensures global particle/charge conservation and it accounts for diffusion and concentration dependent variations in resistivity. We apply the formalism to a model of astrocytes exchanging ions with the extracellular space. The simulations show that K(+-removal from high-concentration regions is driven by a local depolarization of the astrocyte membrane, which concertedly (i increases the local astrocytic uptake of K(+, (ii suppresses extracellular transport of K(+, (iii increases axial transport of K(+ within astrocytes, and (iv facilitates astrocytic relase of K(+ in regions where the extracellular concentration is low. Together, these mechanisms seem to provide a robust regulatory scheme for shielding the extracellular space from excess K(+.

  1. Adaptive thermal modeling of Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadman Rad, M.; Danilov, D.L.; Baghalha, M.; Kazemeini, M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple, accurate and adaptive thermal model is proposed for Li-ion batteries. • Equilibrium voltages, overpotentials and entropy changes are quantified from experimental results. • Entropy changes are highly dependent on the battery State-of-Charge. • Good agreement between simulated and measured heat development is obtained under all conditions. • Radiation contributes to about 50% of heat dissipation at elevated temperatures. -- Abstract: An accurate thermal model to predict the heat generation in rechargeable batteries is an essential tool for advanced thermal management in high power applications, such as electric vehicles. For such applications, the battery materials’ details and cell design are normally not provided. In this work a simple, though accurate, thermal model for batteries has been developed, considering the temperature- and current-dependent overpotential heat generation and State-of-Charge dependent entropy contributions. High power rechargeable Li-ion (7.5 Ah) batteries have been experimentally investigated and the results are used for model verification. It is shown that the State-of-Charge dependent entropy is a significant heat source and is therefore essential to correctly predict the thermal behavior of Li-ion batteries under a wide variety of operating conditions. An adaptive model is introduced to obtain these entropy values. A temperature-dependent equation for heat transfer to the environment is also taken into account. Good agreement between the simulations and measurements is obtained in all cases. The parameters for both the heat generation and heat transfer processes can be applied to the thermal design of advanced battery packs. The proposed methodology is generic and independent on the cell chemistry and battery design. The parameters for the adaptive model can be determined by performing simple cell potential/current and temperature measurements for a limited number of charge/discharge cycles

  2. Control Valve for Miniature Xenon Ion Thruster, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is continuing its development of electric propulsion engines for various applications. Efforts have been directed toward both large and small thrusters,...

  3. Control Valve for Miniature Xenon Ion Thruster, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is continuing its development of electric propulsion engines for various applications. Efforts have been directed toward both large and small thrusters,...

  4. Novel Parametric Circuit Modeling for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of their simplicity and dynamic response, current pulse series are often used to extract parameters for equivalent electrical circuit modeling of Li-ion batteries. These models are then applied for performance simulation, state estimation, and thermal analysis in electric vehicles. However, these methods have two problems: The assumption of linear dependence of the matrix columns and negative parameters estimated from discrete-time equations and least-squares methods. In this paper, continuous-time equations are exploited to construct a linearly independent data matrix and parameterize the circuit model by the combination of non-negative least squares and genetic algorithm, which constrains the model parameters to be positive. Trigonometric functions are then developed to fit the parameter curves. The developed model parameterization methodology was applied and assessed by a standard driving cycle.

  5. Optical properties of xenon implanted CuInSe2 by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satour, F.Z.; Zegadi, A.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical relation is derived for the normalized photoacoustic amplitude signal of a gas-coupled cell for the case of double-layer solid samples with particular application given to ion implanted semiconductors. Numerical estimates for a solar cell of the type CdS/CuInSe 2 based on experimental measured data of these compounds are given to illustrate the photoacoustic effect originating from double-layer samples. In application to ion implanted semiconductors, we show that the absorption coefficient of the implanted layer can be very easily extracted by photoacoustic spectroscopy if the absorption coefficient of the untreated substrate is known. We also present the optical properties results obtained from the analysis of the effect of xenon implantation into CuInSe 2 single crystals with the energy of 40 keV and a dose of 5×10 16 ions/cm 2 . - Highlights: ► A derived theoretical relation for photoacoustic study of implanted solids. ► Optical analysis of the effect of xenon implantation into CuInSe 2 . ► Impurity defect states analysis following the introduction of Xe into CuInSe 2 . ► Comparison between results obtained and existing literature.

  6. Studies of selenium and xenon in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricker, T.

    1994-01-01

    Since its development, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been a widely used analytical technique. ICP-MS offers low detection limits, easy determination of isotope ratios, and simple mass spectra from analyte elements. ICP-MS has been successfully employed for many applications including geological, environmental, biological, metallurgical, food, medical, and industrial. One specific application important to many areas of study involves elemental speciation by using ICP-MS as an element specific detector interfaced to liquid chromatography. Elemental speciation information is important and cannot be obtained by atomic spectrometric methods alone which measure only the total concentration of the element present. Part 1 of this study describes the speciation of selenium in human serum by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and detection by ICP-MS. Although ICP-MS has been widely sued, room for improvement still exists. Difficulties in ICP-MS include noise in the background, matrix effects, clogging of the sampling orifice with deposited solids, and spectral interference caused by polyatomic ions. Previous work has shown that the addition of xenon into the central channel of the ICP decreases polyatomic ion levels. In Part 2 of this work, a fundamental study involving the measurement of the excitation temperature is carried out to further understand xenon's role in the reduction of polyatomic ions. 155 refs

  7. Scaling properties in single collision model of light ion reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukanic, J.; Simovic, R.

    2004-01-01

    Light ion reflection from solids in the keV energy region has been studied within the single collision model. Particle and energy reflection coefficients as functions of the scaled transport cross section have been calculated numerically by utilizing the exact scattering function for the Kr-C potential and analytically with an effective power approximation for the same potential. The obtained analytical formulae approximate very accurately to the numerical results. Comparison of the calculated reflection coefficients with the experimental data and computer simulations for different light ion-heavy target combinations shows that the scaled transport cross section remains a convenient scaling parameter in the single collision domain, as adopted previously in multiple collision theory

  8. Radiation Environment Model of Protons and Heavier Ions at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Luz Maria Martinez; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    We performed an in depth study of the methods used to review the geometric factors (GF) and sensitivity to charge particles of the Energetic Particle Detector instrument on board the Galileo Spacecraft. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the interactions of electrons and ions (i. e., protons and alphas) with the sensitive regions of the instrument. The DC0 and B0 channels were studied with the intention of using them to update the jovian proton radiation model. The results proved that the B0 is a clean proton chanel without any concerns for contamination by heavier ions and electrons. In contrast, DC0 was found to be contaminated by electrons. Furthermore, we also found out that the B2 channel is a clean alpha particle channel (in other words, no contamination by electrons and/or protons).

  9. The potential for large scale uses for fission product xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrmann, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Of all fission products in spent, low enrichment, uranium, power reactor fuels xenon is produced in the highest yield - nearly one cubic meter, STP, per metric ton. In aged fuels which may be considered for processing in the U.S. radioactive xenon isotopes approach the lowest limits of detection. The separation from accompanying radioactive 85 Kr is the essential problem; however, this is state of the art technology which has been demonstrated on the pilot scale to yield xenon with pico-curie levels of 85 Kr contamination. If needed for special applications, such levels could be further reduced. Environmental considerations require the isolation of essentially all fission product krypton during fuel processing. Economic restraints assure that the bulk of this krypton will need to be separated from the much more voluminous xenon fraction of the total amount of fission gas. Xenon may thus be discarded or made available for uses at probably very low cost. In contrast with many other fission products which have unique radioactive characteristics which make them useful as sources of heat, gamma and x-rays and luminescence as well as for medicinal diagnostics and therapeutics fission product xenon differs from naturally occurring xenon only in its isotopic composition which gives it a slightly higher atomic weight, because of the much higher concentrations of the 134 X and 136 Xe isotopes. Therefore, fission product xenon can most likely find uses in applications which already exist but which can not be exploited most beneficially because of the high cost and scarcity of natural xenon. Unique uses would probably include applications in improved incandescent light illumination in place of krypton and in human anesthesia

  10. Modeling FAMA ion beam diagnostics based on the Ptolemy II model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balvanovic, R., E-mail: broman@vinca.rs [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Belicev, P. [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Radjenovic, B. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-10-21

    The previously developed model of ion beam transport control of the FAMA facility is further enhanced by equipping it with the model of ion beam diagnostics. The model of control, executing once, is adjusted so that it executes in iterative mode, where each iteration samples the input beam normally distributed over initial phase space and calculates a single trajectory through the facility beam lines. The model takes into account only the particles that manage to pass through all the beam line apertures, emulating in this way a Faraday cup and a beam profile meter. Generated are also beam phase space distributions and horizontal and vertical beam profiles at the end of the beam transport lines the FAMA facility consists of. By adding the model of ion beam diagnostics to the model of ion beam transport control, the process of determining optimal ion beam control parameters is eased and speeded up, and the understanding of influence of control parameters on the ion beam characteristics is improved.

  11. A neuro-fuzzy controller for xenon spatial oscillations in load-following operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Man Gyun [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Upadhyaya, Belle R. [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A neuro-fuzzy control algorithm is applied for xenon spatial oscillations in a pressurized water reactor. The consequent and antecedent parameters of the fuzzy rules are tuned by the gradient descent method. The reactor model used for computer simulations is a two-point xenon oscillation model. The reactor core is axially divided into two regions and each region has one input and one output and is coupled with the other region. The interaction between the regions of the reactor core is treated by a decoupling scheme. This proposed control method exhibits very responses to a step or a ramp change of target axial offest without any residual flux oscillations. 9 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  12. Infinite-dimensional observer theory for dynamic estimation of neutron flux and xenon distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Ho; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-07-01

    This paper describes a method for reconstructing the measurable and unmeasurable state variables in a nuclear reactor from output measurement data, which can be used to generate input of a feedback control system or to serve as a core observer (estimator) in reactor transient. The method is based on the Luenberger-type observer theory that is extended to infinite-dimensional distributed parameter systems. The method was applied to a simple reactor model in one spatial dimension and one energy group with xenon dynamics which exhibited spatial oscillations. The observer designed was tested by using model-based data for measurement output. The results showed that the spatial distributions of iodine, xenon and neutron flux were estimated by the observer very well using information from a finite number of sensors.

  13. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, J., E-mail: jrenner@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gehman, V.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Shuman, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Álvarez, V. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Borges, F.I.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Cárcel, S. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Castel, J.; Cebrián, S. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Calle Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cervera, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Conde, C.A.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); and others

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  14. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, M. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

  15. Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  16. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  17. Modeling of charge transport in ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Anton V; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus; Zozoulenko, Igor V

    2014-06-17

    Spatiotemporal control of the complex chemical microenvironment is of great importance to many fields within life science. One way to facilitate such control is to construct delivery circuits, comprising arrays of dispensing outlets, for ions and charged biomolecules based on ionic transistors. This allows for addressability of ionic signals, which opens up for spatiotemporally controlled delivery in a highly complex manner. One class of ionic transistors, the ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs), is especially attractive for these applications because these transistors are functional at physiological conditions and have been employed to modulate the delivery of neurotransmitters to regulate signaling in neuronal cells. Further, the first integrated complementary ionic circuits were recently developed on the basis of these ionic transistors. However, a detailed understanding of the device physics of these transistors is still lacking and hampers further development of components and circuits. Here, we report on the modeling of IBJTs using Poisson's and Nernst-Planck equations and the finite element method. A two-dimensional model of the device is employed that successfully reproduces the main characteristics of the measurement data. On the basis of the detailed concentration and potential profiles provided by the model, the different modes of operation of the transistor are analyzed as well as the transitions between the different modes. The model correctly predicts the measured threshold voltage, which is explained in terms of membrane potentials. All in all, the results provide the basis for a detailed understanding of IBJT operation. This new knowledge is employed to discuss potential improvements of ion bipolar junction transistors in terms of miniaturization and device parameters.

  18. Comprehensive modeling of ion-implant amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Benistant, F.

    2005-01-01

    A physically based model has been developed to simulate the ion-implant induced damage accumulation up to amorphization in silicon. Based on damage structures known as amorphous pockets (AP), which are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V) surrounded by crystalline silicon, the model is able to reproduce a wide range of experimental observations of damage accumulation and amorphization with interdependent implantation parameters. Instead of recrystallizing the I's and V's instantaneously, the recrystallization rate of an AP containing nI and mV is a function of its effective size, defined as min(n, m), irrespective of its internal spatial configuration. The parameters used in the model were calibrated using the experimental silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature as a function of dose rate for C, Si, and Ge. The model is able to show the superlinear damage build-up with dose, the extent of amorphous layer and the superadditivity effect of polyatomic ions

  19. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  20. Viscoelasticity of Xenon near the Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    Using a novel, overdamped, oscillator flown aboard the Space Shuttle, we measured the viscosity of xenon near the liquid-vapor critical point in the frequency range 2 Hz less than or equal to f less than or equal to 12 Hz. The measured viscosity divergence is characterized by the exponent z(sub eta) = 0.0690 +/- 0.0006, in agreement with the value z(sub eta) = 0.067 +/- 0.002 calculated from a two-loop perturbation expansion. Viscoelastic behavior was evident when t = (T - T(sub c))/T(sub c) less than 10(exp -5) and dominant when t less than 10(exp -6), further from T(sub c) than predicted. Viscoelastic behavior scales as Af(tau) where tau is the fluctuation decay time. The measured value of A is 2.0 +/- 0.3 times the result of a one-loop calculation. (Uncertainties stated are one standard uncertainty.)

  1. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  2. ions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MP2 B2). In order to draw the final conclusion about the content of the isomers of pentaatomic ions in saturated vapor over cesium chloride, we have taken into account the entropy factor. We considered the isomerization reactions which are given below: Cs3Cl2. + (V-shaped) = Cs3Cl2. + (cyclic or bipyramidal). (1). Cs2Cl3.

  3. Introduction to fluid model for RHIC heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraya, Shin

    2007-01-01

    An introductory review of the fluid model which has been looked upon as the promising phenomenological model for the heavy ion scattering experiments at RHIC is presented here. Subjects are especially focused on the fundamental assumptions of the model and the decision process of the phenomenological parameters considering newcomers to hadron physics. Introduction of thermodynamical quantities, 1+1 dimension model, time-space evolution of fluid, correspondence of fluid to particles, initial condition, boundary condition and comparison of the equation of state of fluid model and that of hadron model are described. Limitation of fluid picture and the validity of the model are discussed finally. It is summarized that the present fluid model does not predict much about results in advance but gives interpretation after the event, nevertheless it reproduces much of the experimental results in natural form. It is expected that the parameter of the fluid model is to be used as the intermediate theory to relate experimental results with theory. (S. Funahashi)

  4. The quantitative analysis of silicon carbide surface smoothing by Ar and Xe cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieshkin, A. E.; Kireev, D. S.; Ermakov, Yu. A.; Trifonov, A. S.; Presnov, D. E.; Garshev, A. V.; Anufriev, Yu. V.; Prokhorova, I. G.; Krupenin, V. A.; Chernysh, V. S.

    2018-04-01

    The gas cluster ion beam technique was used for the silicon carbide crystal surface smoothing. The effect of processing by two inert cluster ions, argon and xenon, was quantitatively compared. While argon is a standard element for GCIB, results for xenon clusters were not reported yet. Scanning probe microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques were used for the analysis of the surface roughness and surface crystal layer quality. The gas cluster ion beam processing results in surface relief smoothing down to average roughness about 1 nm for both elements. It was shown that xenon as the working gas is more effective: sputtering rate for xenon clusters is 2.5 times higher than for argon at the same beam energy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the surface defect layer gives values of 7 ± 2 nm and 8 ± 2 nm for treatment with argon and xenon clusters.

  5. An anisotropic three-fluid model for heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, I.; Zimanyi, J.; Csernai, L.P.; Greiner, W.

    1981-01-01

    The nucleons taking part in heavy ion reactions are considered as a three-fluid system. The first and second components correspond to the target and the projectile, while the thermalised nucleons produced in the course of the collision belong to the third component. Making use of the Boltzmann-equation, hydrodynamical equations are derived which yield also the anisotropy of the momentum distribution. The equation of state for anisotropic nuclear matter is derived from a field theoretical model in the mean field approximation. (Auth.)

  6. A simple model for low energy ion-solid interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajerzadeh, S.; Selvakumar, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A simple analytical model for ion-solid interactions, suitable for low energy beam depositions, is reported. An approximation for the nuclear stopping power is used to obtain the analytic solution for the deposited energy in the solid. The ratio of the deposited energy in the bulk to the energy deposited in the surface yields a ceiling for the beam energy above which more defects are generated in the bulk resulting in defective films. The numerical evaluations agree with the existing results in the literature. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Electrochemical model based charge optimization for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Sourav; Anwar, Sohel

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose the design of a novel optimal strategy for charging the lithium-ion battery based on electrochemical battery model that is aimed at improved performance. A performance index that aims at minimizing the charging effort along with a minimum deviation from the rated maximum thresholds for cell temperature and charging current has been defined. The method proposed in this paper aims at achieving a faster charging rate while maintaining safe limits for various battery parameters. Safe operation of the battery is achieved by including the battery bulk temperature as a control component in the performance index which is of critical importance for electric vehicles. Another important aspect of the performance objective proposed here is the efficiency of the algorithm that would allow higher charging rates without compromising the internal electrochemical kinetics of the battery which would prevent abusive conditions, thereby improving the long term durability. A more realistic model, based on battery electro-chemistry has been used for the design of the optimal algorithm as opposed to the conventional equivalent circuit models. To solve the optimization problem, Pontryagins principle has been used which is very effective for constrained optimization problems with both state and input constraints. Simulation results show that the proposed optimal charging algorithm is capable of shortening the charging time of a lithium ion cell while maintaining the temperature constraint when compared with the standard constant current charging. The designed method also maintains the internal states within limits that can avoid abusive operating conditions.

  8. A 1D Model of Radial Ion Motion Interrupted by Ion-Neutral Interactions in a Cometary Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigren, E.; Eriksson, A. I.

    2017-04-01

    Because ion-neutral reaction cross sections are energy dependent, the distance from a cometary nucleus within which ions remain collisionally coupled to the neutrals is dictated not only by the comet’s activity level but also by the electromagnetic fields in the coma. Here we present a 1D model simulating the outward radial motion of water group ions with radial acceleration by an ambipolar electric field interrupted primarily by charge transfer processes with H2O. We also discuss the impact of plasma waves. For a given electric field profile, the model calculates key parameters, including the total ion density, n I , the H3O+/H2O+ number density and flux ratios, R dens and R flux, and the mean ion drift speed, , as a function of cometocentric distance. We focus primarily on a coma roughly resembling that of the ESA Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko near its perihelion in 2015 August. In the presence of a weak ambipolar electric field in the radial direction the model results suggest that the neutral coma is not sufficiently dense to keep the mean ion flow speed close to that of the neutrals by the spacecraft location (˜200 km from the nucleus). In addition, for electric field profiles giving n I and within limits constrained by measurements, the R dens values are significantly higher than values typically observed. However, when including the ion motion in large-amplitude plasma waves in the model, results more compatible with observations are obtained. We suggest that the variable and often low H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios observed may reflect nonradial ion trajectories strongly influenced by electromagnetic forces and/or plasma instabilities, with energization of the ion population by plasma waves.

  9. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.

    1994-06-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion-ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this ''resonance.''

  10. RF Plasma modeling of the Linac4 H− ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Mattei, S; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J; Kawamura, Y; Yasumoto, M; Schmitzer, C

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the modelling of the ICP RF-plasma in the Linac4 H− ion source currently being constructed at CERN. A self-consistent model of the plasma dynamics with the RF electromagnetic field has been developed by a PIC-MCC method. In this paper, the model is applied to the analysis of a low density plasma discharge initiation, with particular interest on the effect of the external magnetic field on the plasma properties, such as wall loss, electron density and electron energy. The use of a multi-cusp magnetic field effectively limits the wall losses, particularly in the radial direction. Preliminary results however indicate that a reduced heating efficiency results in such a configuration. The effect is possibly due to trapping of electrons in the multi-cusp magnetic field, preventing their continuous acceleration in the azimuthal direction.

  11. A model for electron/ion recombination in ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailor, W.C.

    1988-05-01

    The recombination of free electrons and positive ions along charged particle tracks in gases has been modeled using electron tranport equations, which assume homogeneous distribution in the vicinity of the tracks. The equations include space charge terms, which have been negelected in previous models. A formula for the electron yield as a function of detector applied potential is obtained from a perturbation solution valid when the ratio of the Debye length to the charge column radius is larger then unity. When this ratio is very large, the formula reduces to that of previous models. Pulse height measurements in a 3 He ionization chamber indicate 2% to 30% losses to recombination which vary with applied field, particle type, and energy. Using reasonable values for the electron transport coefficients, the calculated loss of signal to recommendation is generally in agreement with experiment, but the variation with applied bias is stronger in the experiment

  12. The fusion of heavy ions in an interaction potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper contains the problems connected with fusion processes in heavy ions collision. Results of experimental fusion data for reactions: 9 Be + 12 C, 6 Li + 28 Si, 9 Be + 28 Si, 12 C + 28 Si, 12 C + 16 O and 16 O + 16 O are presented. Comparison of measured fusion cross sections with predictions of the fusion potential model have been made. The validity of this model for both light systems, like 9 Be + 12 C and heavy systems, like 35 Cl + 62 Ni, have been discussed. In conclusion, it should be stated that fusion cross sections could be correctly predicted by the potential model with a potential describing the elastic scattering data. (author)

  13. Liquid-drop model applied to heavy ions irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cicco, Hernan; Alurralde, Martin A.; Saint-Martin, Maria L. G.; Bernaola, Omar A.

    1999-01-01

    Liquid-drop model is used, previously applied in the study of radiation damage in metals, in an energy range not covered by molecular dynamics, in order to understand experimental data of particle tracks in an organic material (Makrofol E), which cannot be accurately described by the existing theoretical methods. The nuclear and electronic energy depositions are considered for each ion considered and the evolution of the thermal explosion is evaluated. The experimental observation of particle tracks in a region previously considered as 'prohibited' are justified. Although the model used has free parameters and some discrepancies with the experimental diametrical values exist, the agreement obtained is highly superior than that of other existing models. (author)

  14. XAS characterisation of xenon bubbles in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: martinp@drncad.cea.fr; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Valot, C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Nassif, V. [CEA Grenoble, DSM/DRFMC/SP2M/NRS, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Proux, O. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, UMR CNRS/Universite Joseph Fourier, 1381 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, 38400 Saint-Martin-D' Heres (France); Hazemann, J.-L. [Institut Neel, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-06-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were performed on a set of uranium dioxide samples implanted with 10{sup 17} xenon cm{sup -2} at 800 keV (8 at.% at 140 nm). EXAFS measurements performed at 12 K showed that during implantation the gas forms highly pressurised nanometre size inclusions. Bubble pressures were estimated at 2.8 {+-} 0.3 GPa at low temperature. Following the low energy xenon implantation, samples were annealed between 1073 and 1773 K for several hours. Stability of nanometre size highly pressurized xenon aggregates in UO{sub 2} is demonstrated up to 1073 K as for this temperature almost no modification of the xenon environment was observed. Above this temperature, bubbles will trap migrating vacancies and their inner pressure is seen to decrease substantially.

  15. Review of xenon-133 production and related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.; Ropero, M.

    1980-01-01

    A literature survey is given on the production methods of fission xenon-133 and related problems, such as purification, metrological and dosimetrical aspects, preparation of isotopic solutions, recycling, etc. (author)

  16. Xenon Spectral Gamma Penetrometer Probe Characterization and Calibration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballard, John

    2004-01-01

    .... A Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) spectral gamma penetrometer probe was designed using newly developed small-diameter high-pressure xenon gas gamma ray detector technology for the in situ speciation (identification...

  17. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Liu, J.; Martens, K.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D.; Yamashita, M.; Hosokawa, K.; Murata, A.; Otsuka, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kusaba, F.; Motoki, D.; Nishijima, K.; Tasaka, S.; Fujii, K.; Murayama, I.; Nakamura, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Nishitani, Y.; Takiya, H.; Uchida, H.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, J. S.; Xmass Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity vRn of radon and vXe of xenon in the trap with vRn/vXe=(0.96±0.10)×10-3 at -85 °C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  18. Review of xenon-133 production and related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, M.; Ropero, M.

    1980-01-01

    A literature survey is given on the production methods of fission xenon-133 and related problems, such as purification, metrological and dosimetric aspects, preparation of isotopic solutions, recycling, etc. 127 references are included. (Author) 127 refs

  19. The unbearable lightness of being: CDMS versus XENON

    CERN Document Server

    Frandsen, Mads T; McCabe, Christopher; Sarkar, Subir; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The CDMS-II collaboration has reported 3 events in a Si detector, which are consistent with being nuclear recoils due to scattering of Galactic dark matter particles with a mass of about 8.6 GeV and a cross-section on neutrons of about 2 x 10^-41 cm^2. While a previous result from the XENON10 experiment has supposedly ruled out such particles as dark matter, we find by reanalysing the XENON10 data that this is not the case. Some tension remains however with the upper limit placed by the XENON100 experiment, independently of astrophysical uncertainties concerning the Galactic dark matter distribution. We explore possible ways of ameliorating this tension by altering the properties of dark matter interactions. Nevertheless, even with standard couplings, light dark matter is consistent with both CDMS and XENON10/100.

  20. A new liquid xenon scintillation detector for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepel, V.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    A new positron-sensitive detector of annihilation photons filled with liquid xenon is proposed for positron emission tomography. Simultaneous detection of both liquid xenon scintillation and ionization current produces a time resolution of < 1 ns and a position resolution in the tangential direction of the tomograph ring is ∼ 1 mm and in the radial direction is ∼ 5 mm. The advantages of a tomograph with new detectors are discussed. New algorithms of Compton scattering can be used. (author)

  1. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at z = 3.32 Å. It was observed ...

  2. Xenon NMR with spectroscopic, spatial, and temporal resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Münnemann, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    129Xe NMR has found many applications in material sciences and medicine because of two useful properties of Xenon atoms for NMR: the sensitivity to their environment due to their highly polarizable electron cloud, which results in a wide range of chemical shifts, and the ability of being hyperpolarized, which overcomes the problem of the low signal-to-noise ratio of thermally polarized Xenon. In this work a variety of different experiments were performed that combine NMR measurements with spe...

  3. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at = 3.32 Å. It was observed that the ...

  4. Thermal stability and modeling of lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botte, Gerardine Gabriela

    2000-10-01

    First-principles mathematical models were developed to examine the effect of the lithium-lithium ion interactions inside the anode particles on the performance of a lithium foil cell. Two different models were developed: the chemical potential model (CPM) that includes the lithium-lithium ion interactions inside the anode particles and the diffusion model (DIM) that does not include the interactions. Significant differences in the thermal and electrochemical performance of the cell were observed between the two approaches. The temperature of the cell predicted by the DFM is higher than the one predicted by the CPM at a given capacity. The discharge time of the cell predicted by the DFM is shorter than the one predicted by the CPM. The results indicate that the cell needs to be modeled using the CPM approach especially at high discharge rates. An evaluation of the numerical techniques, control volume formulation (CVF) and finite difference method (FDM), used for the models was performed. It is shown that the truncation error is the same for both methods when the boundary conditions are of the Dirichlet type, the system of equations are linear and represented in Cartesian coordinates. A new technique to analyze the accuracy of the methods is presented. The only disadvantage of the FDM is that it failed to conserve mass for a small number of nodes when both boundary conditions include a derivative term whereas the CVF did conserve mass for these cases. However, for a large number of nodes the FDM provides mass conservation. It is important to note that the CVF has only (DeltaX) order of accuracy for a Neumann type boundary condition whereas the FDM has (DeltaX) 2 order. The second topic of this dissertation presents a study of the thermal stability of LiPF6 EC:EMC electrolyte for lithium ion batteries. A differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to perform the study of the electrolyte. For first time, the effect of different variables on its thermal stability

  5. Reactive quenching of two-photon excited xenon atoms by Cl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, M.R.; Layne, W.B.; Meyer, E.; Keto, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Total binary and tertiary quench rates have been measured for the reaction Xe (5p 5 6p) + Cl 2 at thermal temperatures. Xenon atoms are excited by state-selective, two-photon absorption with a uv laser. The time dependent fluorescence from the excited atom in the IR and from XeCl* (B) product near 308 nm have been measured with subnanosecond time resolution. The decay rates are measured as a function of Cl 2 pressure to 20 Torr and Xe pressure to 400 Torr. The measured reaction rates (k 2 ∼ 10 -9 cm 3 sec -1 ) are consistent with a harpoon model described in a separate paper. We also measure large termolecular reaction rates for collisions with xenon atoms (k 3 ∼ 10 -28 cm 6 sec -1 ). Total product fluorescence has been examined using a gated optical multichannel analyzer. We measure unit branching fractions for high vibrational levels of XeCl* (B) with very little C state fluorescence observed. The measured termolecular rates suggest similar processes will dominate at the high buffer-gas pressures used in XeCl lasers. The effect of these large reactive cross sections for neutral xenon atoms on models of the XeCl laser will be discussed

  6. Axial effects of xenon-samarium poisoning in the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auslander, D.J.; Smith, A.C.; McCracken, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    The paper details an analytical study of the time-dependent behavior in the spatial distributions of xenon and samarium fission product poisons in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) during operation and after shutdown. The results of this study provide insight into the behavior and significance of the changing spatial distributions of fission product poisons with respect to the prediction of shim positions at critical for reactor restart after a xenon shutdown. The study was performed with the PDQ neutron diffusion theory code and ENDF/B-V cross sections using a one-dimensional radial model of an ATR lobe and a two-dimensional radial-axial (RZ) model of an ATR lobe. The PDQ results were supported by a review of the basic differential equations, which describe the buildup and decay of the xenon and samarium fission product poisons and precursors. The ATR is a 250-MW, uranium-aluminum-fueled reactor used to study the effects of irradiation on reactor materials. Forty highly enriched uranium fuel elements are arranged in a serpentine configuration within the compact core resulting in a very high power density of (1.0 MW/ell of core)

  7. Comparison of string models for heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.

    1990-01-01

    An important method to explore new domains in physics is to compare new results with extrapolations from known areas. For heavy ion collision this can be done with string models, which extrapolate from light to heavy systems and which also may be used to extrapolate to higher energies. That does not mean that these string models are only background models, one may easily implement new ideas on top of the known aspects, providing much more reliable models than those formed from scratch. All the models to be considered in this paper have in common that they consist of three independent building blocks: (a) geometry, (b) string formation and (c) string fragmentation. The geometry aspect is treated quite similar in all models: nucleons are distributed inside each nucleus according to some standard parameterization of nuclear densities. The nuclei move through each other on a straight line trajectory, with all the nucleon positions being fixed. Whenever a projectile and a target nucleon come close, they interact. Such an interaction results in string formation. In the last step these strings decay into observable hadrons according to some string fragmentation procedure. The three building blocks are independent, so one can combine different methods in an arbitrary manner. Therefore rather than treating the models one after the other, the author discusses the procedures for string formation and string fragmentation as used by the models. He considers string models in a very general sense, so he includes models where the authors never use the word string, but which may be most naturally interpreted as string models and show strong similarities with real string models. Although very important he does not discuss - for time and space reasons - recent developments concerning secondary scattering

  8. Study of regional lung ventilation and perfusion by xenon 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    The present work consists of a regional lung exploration after injection of xenon 133, dissolved in physiological serum, followed a few minutes later by that of 99m Tc-labelled serumalbumin microspheres. The aim is three fold: first of all to study perfusion and ventilation by xenon 133, next to compare the results obtained after xenon 133 and 99 m Tc-labelled microsphere injection, lastly to establish the value of the technique and its routine application. This examination has not solved all problems of lung exploration by xenon 133. For example we deliberately kept to intraveinous injection of the gas dissolved in physiological serum, leaving aside the breathing test. Xenon 133 scintigraphy in our opinion will not tend to replace 99m Tc-labelled microsphere scintigraphy, which has irreplaceable morphological qualities, but will serve as an excellent complement. The basic advantage of xenon 133 is the regional ventilation estimate it provides allowing any anomaly of the lung parenchyma to be located immediately or conversely the functional value of the healthy lung to be established with a view to a surgical removal of a diseased zone [fr

  9. Shock Compression of Cryogenic Noble Gas Mixtures: Xenon - Krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Magyar, Rudolph; Lemke, Raymond; Mattsson, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    In past work, we have examined the multi-Mbar response of cryogenically cooled liquid xenon and liquid krypton measuring their Hugoniots to 8 Mbar. These results were utilized in the development of new EOS models for Xe and Kr to use in high energy density physics applications. The previous work demonstrated the usefulness of integrating high accuracy shock compression experiments with DFT to generate the basis for equation of state (EOS) models. In many physics applications, such as Z-pinch experiments, gas mixtures are used instead. However, we do not have reliable experimental data on these mixtures to provide informed decisions about the EOS models or mixture rules. To improve our understanding of mixtures at extreme conditions, we performed dynamic compression experiments using Sandia's Z - facility on a 70/30 molar ratio Kr/Xe cryogenically cooled liquid mixture. We measured the Hugoniot state and reshock state of the liquid mixture to several Mbar. The experimental data validated the DFT simulations for identical molar ratio mixtures. The combined experimental and DFT results are used to assess the EOS models and test the mixture rules. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Tumour control in ion beam radiotherapy with different ions in the presence of hypoxia: an oxygen enhancement ratio model based on the microdosimetric kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigari, L.; Torriani, F.; Manganaro, L.; Inaniwa, T.; Dalmasso, F.; Cirio, R.; Attili, A.

    2018-03-01

    Few attempts have been made to include the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) in treatment planning for ion beam therapy, and systematic studies to evaluate the impact of hypoxia in treatment with the beam of different ion species are sorely needed. The radiobiological models used to quantify the OER in such studies are mainly based on the dose-averaged LET estimates, and do not explicitly distinguish between the ion species and fractionation schemes. In this study, a new type of OER modelling, based on the microdosimetric kinetic model, taking into account the specificity of the different ions, LET spectra, tissues and fractionation schemes, has been developed. The model has been benchmarked with published in vitro data, HSG, V79 and CHO cells in aerobic and hypoxic conditions, for different ion irradiation. The model has been included in the simulation of treatments for a clinical case (brain tumour) using proton, lithium, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams. A study of the tumour control probability (TCP) as a function of oxygen partial pressure, dose per fraction and primary ion type has been performed. The modelled OER depends on both the LET and ion type, also showing a decrease for an increased dose per fraction with a slope that depends on the LET and ion type, in good agreement with the experimental data. In the investigated clinical case, a significant increase in TCP has been found upon increasing the ion charge. Higher OER variations as a function of dose per fraction have also been found for low-LET ions (up to 15% varying from 2 to 8 Gy(RBE) for protons). This model could be exploited in the identification of treatment condition optimality in the presence of hypoxia, including fractionation and primary particle selection.

  11. Review of xenon-133 production and related problems; Estudio bibliografico de la produccion de xenon-133 y problemas afines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina, M.; Ropero, M.

    1980-07-01

    A literature survey is given on the production methods of fission xenon-133 and related problems, such as purification, metrological and dosimetric aspects, preparation of isotopic solutions, recycling, etc. 127 references are included. (Author) 127 refs.

  12. Influence of configuration interaction on satellite lines of xenon and tin in the EUV region

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gaufridy de Dortan, F.

    2007-02-01

    Theoretical line strengths and positions of satellite lines of xenon and tin ions are computed in the EUV region (transitions from doubly excited configurations or between singly excited configurations). Calculations are conducted with HULLAC parametric multi-configuration relativistic code. Influence of configuration interaction is investigated for doubly excited configurations of ions from Pd- to Rb-like. The emission close to 13.5 nm, which is of interest to the EUV lithography, is detailed. A strong narrowing of 4d-4f/4d-4p group of satellite lines is observed, compared to the calculation without configuration interaction. The emissivity is strongly enhanced in the centre of this group of lines. This strongly increases the EUV emission at 13.5 nm for tin at moderate to high densities. The EUV emission of xenon at 13.5 nm is enhanced by 4d-5p satellite lines of Xe 9+ and 10+. Radiative transitions between singly excited configurations and between doubly excited configurations also enhance the emission at 13.5 nm, especially 6g-4f transitions of Xe 9+, 10+ and 5g-4f transitions of Xe 11+.

  13. AC impedance electrochemical modeling of lithium-ion positive electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dees, D.; Gunen, E.; Abraham, D.; Jansen, A.; Prakash, J.

    2004-01-01

    Under Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Development Program,various analytical diagnostic studies are being carried out to examine the lithium-ion battery technology for hybrid electric vehicle applications, and a series of electrochemical studies are being conducted to examine the performance of these batteries. An electrochemical model was developed to associate changes that were observed in the post-test analytical diagnostic studies with the electrochemical performance loss during testing of lithium ion batteries. While both electrodes in the lithium-ion cell have been studied using a similar electrochemical model, the discussion here is limited to modeling of the positive electrode. The positive electrode under study has a composite structure made of a layered nickel oxide (LiNi 0.8 Co 0.15 Al 0.05 O 2 ) active material, a carbon black and graphite additive for distributing current, and a PVDF binder all on an aluminum current collector. The electrolyte is 1.2M LiPF 6 dissolved in a mixture of EC and EMC and a Celgard micro-porous membrane is used as the separator. Planar test cells (positive/separator/negative) were constructed with a special fixture and two separator membranes that allowed the placement of a micro-reference electrode between the separator membranes (1). Electrochemical studies including AC impedance spectroscopy were then conducted on the individual electrodes to examine the performance and ageing effects in the cell. The model was developed by following the work of Professor Newman at Berkeley (2). The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) region, based on post-test analytical results, was assumed to be a film on the oxide and an oxide layer at the surface of the oxide. A double layer capacity was added in parallel with the Butler-Volmer kinetic expression. The pertinent reaction, thermodynamic, and transport equations were linearized for a small sinusoidal perturbation (3). The resulting system of differential equations was solved

  14. Modeling ion exchange in clinoptilolite using the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1992-06-01

    Assessing the suitability of Yucca Mtn., NV as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste requires the means to simulate ion-exchange behavior of zeolites. Vanselow and Gapon convention cation-exchange models have been added to geochemical modeling codes EQ3NR/EQ6, allowing exchange to be modeled for up to three exchangers or a single exchanger with three independent sites. Solid-solution models that are numerically equivalent to the ion-exchange models were derived and also implemented in the code. The Gapon model is inconsistent with experimental adsorption isotherms of trace components in clinoptilolite. A one-site Vanselow model can describe adsorption of Cs or Sr on clinoptilolite, but a two-site Vanselow exchange model is necessary to describe K contents of natural clinoptilolites

  15. Heavy ion collision evolution modeling with ECHO-QGP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, V.; Inghirami, G.; Beraudo, A.; Del Zanna, L.; Becattini, F.; Chandra, V.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical code modeling the evolution of the medium formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions, ECHO-QGP. The code solves relativistic hydrodynamics in (3 + 1)D, with dissipative terms included within the framework of Israel-Stewart theory; it can work both in Minkowskian and in Bjorken coordinates. Initial conditions are provided through an implementation of the Glauber model (both Optical and Monte Carlo), while freezeout and particle generation are based on the Cooper-Frye prescription. The code is validated against several test problems and shows remarkable stability and accuracy with the combination of a conservative (shock-capturing) approach and the high-order methods employed. In particular it beautifully agrees with the semi-analytic solution known as Gubser flow, both in the ideal and in the viscous Israel-Stewart case, up to very large times and without any ad hoc tuning of the algorithm.

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES POTENTIALLY STREAMING METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Halutin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models in the electrical parameters of physico-chemical processes in lithium-ion batteries are developed. The developed model parameters (discharge mode are identified out of family of discharging curve. By using of the parameters of this model we get the numerically model of lithium-ion battery.

  17. Ultraviolet Radiation of Repetitively Pulsed High-pressure Discharges in Xenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Filippov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed quartz-jacketed high-pressure xenon lamps, operating in the periodic pulse repetition modes, despite the appearing UV radiation sources of other types, remain a critical component of the processing equipment used in photochemistry, photo-medicine, nanoelectronics, biology, etc. Their main advantages, namely high power and radiation energy are slightly devalued by a relatively low efficiency of the shortwave radiation. Available literature data concerning the influence of various factors on the energy level of short-wave radiation in xenon need to be systematised and generalised because they have been obtained under conditions of uncontrolled quartz-jacketed transmission. The transmission of quartz can degrade after a while and, in addition, undergo great changes during the pulse. Besides, as a rule, in the literature, there is no detailed description of a complete kit of experimental setting. As a result, to analyse the factors affecting the efficiency of studying in the UV range is difficult, and there arises a relevant problem to optimise this type of discharge parameters to increase the efficiency in the range of 220-400 nm. A mathematical model of the radiation source, realistically describing the processes in the xenon plasma and in the stabilising envelope, can be a reliable ground for such a study. The paper shows an impact of the discharge channel diameter and length, the filling pressure of xenon, the pulse duration, the parameters of discharge circuit, and the current of pilot arc on the radiation yield. Based on the simulation-found relationship of internal plasma parameters (temperature distributions, fields of particle concentration and radiation, dynamics of electrical resistance of discharge channel, and plasma emission spectra with radiation characteristics of discharge, are determined conditions to ensure the greatest radiation yield in the UV region.  The experimental data prove the computational results. A material

  18. Direct Dark Matter Detection through the use of a Xenon Based TPC Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Akerib, Daniel; LZ group at SLAC

    2018-01-01

    The vast majority of matter in the universe is unaccounted for. Only 15% of the universe's mass density is visible matter, while the other 85% is Dark Matter (DM). The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is currently the frontrunner of the DM candidates. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) and next generation LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiments are designed to directly detect WIMPs. Both experiments are xenon-based Time Projection Chambers (TPC) used to observe possible WIMP interactions. These interactions produce photons and electrons with the photons being collected in a set of two photomultiplier tube (PMT) arrays and the electrons drifted upwards in the detector by a strong electric field to create a secondary production of photons in gaseous xenon. These two populations of photons are classified as S1 and S2 signals, respectively. Using these signals we reconstruct the energy and position of the interaction and in doing so we can eliminate background events that would otherwise “light up” the detector. My participation in the experiment, while at SLAC, was the creation of the grids that produce the large electric field, along with additional lab activities aimed at testing the grids. While at Stan State, I work on background modeling in order to distinguish a possible WIMP signal from ambient backgrounds.

  19. Improvements in or relating to trapping and reuse of radioactive xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolmsjoe, M.S.; Persson, B.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described suitable for recovering, from a mixture of gases contaning radioactive xenon, a mixture of gases containing an increased concentration of radioactive xenon, which method comprises the steps of passing xenon-containing gas through a bed of activated charcoal to adsorb the xenon therein, thereafter heating the charcoal bed to a temperature within the range of from 200 to 400 0 C, passing a moisture-free sweep gas through the bed when heated to said temperature to desorb xenon therefrom and then collecting the xenon-containing gas thus formed. (author)

  20. Modeling of interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, O.I.; Knyazheva, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    A model of the interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron during rapid thermal annealing of silicon layers previously amorphized by implantation of germanium has been proposed. It is supposed that the boron interstitials are created continuously during annealing due to generation, dissolution, or rearrangement of the clusters of impurity atoms which are formed in the ion-implanted layers with impurity concentration above the solubility limit. The local elastic stresses arising due to the difference of boron atomic radius and atomic radius of silicon also contribute to the generation of boron interstitials. A simulation of boron redistribution during thermal annealing for 60 s at a temperature of 850 C has been carried out. The calculated profile agrees well with the experimental data. A number of the parameters of interstitial diffusion have been derived. In particular, the average migration length of nonequilibrium boron interstitials is equal to 12 nm. It was also obtained that approximately 1.94% of boron atoms were converted to the interstitial sites, participated in the fast interstitial migration, and then became immobile again transferring into a substitutional position or forming the electrically inactive complexes with crystal lattice defects. (authors)

  1. Simulation study of a rectifying bipolar ion channel: Detailed model versus reduced model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ható

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a rectifying mutant of the OmpF porin ion channel using both all-atom and reduced models. The mutant was created by Miedema et al. [Nano Lett., 2007, 7, 2886] on the basis of the NP semiconductor diode, in which an NP junction is formed. The mutant contains a pore region with positive amino acids on the left-hand side and negative amino acids on the right-hand side. Experiments show that this mutant rectifies. Although we do not know the structure of this mutant, we can build an all-atom model for it on the basis of the structure of the wild type channel. Interestingly, molecular dynamics simulations for this all-atom model do not produce rectification. A reduced model that contains only the important degrees of freedom (the positive and negative amino acids and free ions in an implicit solvent, on the other hand, exhibits rectification. Our calculations for the reduced model (using the Nernst-Planck equation coupled to Local Equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations reveal a rectification mechanism that is different from that seen for semiconductor diodes. The basic reason is that the ions are different in nature from electrons and holes (they do not recombine. We provide explanations for the failure of the all-atom model including the effect of all the other atoms in the system as a noise that inhibits the response of ions (that would be necessary for rectification to the polarizing external field.

  2. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  3. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Lithium-ion battery models: a comparative study and a model-based powerline communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saidani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, various Lithium-ion (Li-ion battery models are evaluated according to their accuracy, complexity and physical interpretability. An initial classification into physical, empirical and abstract models is introduced. Also known as white, black and grey boxes, respectively, the nature and characteristics of these model types are compared. Since the Li-ion battery cell is a thermo-electro-chemical system, the models are either in the thermal or in the electrochemical state-space. Physical models attempt to capture key features of the physical process inside the cell. Empirical models describe the system with empirical parameters offering poor analytical, whereas abstract models provide an alternative representation. In addition, a model selection guideline is proposed based on applications and design requirements. A complex model with a detailed analytical insight is of use for battery designers but impractical for real-time applications and in situ diagnosis. In automotive applications, an abstract model reproducing the battery behavior in an equivalent but more practical form, mainly as an equivalent circuit diagram, is recommended for the purpose of battery management. As a general rule, a trade-off should be reached between the high fidelity and the computational feasibility. Especially if the model is embedded in a real-time monitoring unit such as a microprocessor or a FPGA, the calculation time and memory requirements rise dramatically with a higher number of parameters. Moreover, examples of equivalent circuit models of Lithium-ion batteries are covered. Equivalent circuit topologies are introduced and compared according to the previously introduced criteria. An experimental sequence to model a 20 Ah cell is presented and the results are used for the purposes of powerline communication.

  5. Compressible Convection Experiment using Xenon Gas in a Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaut, R.; Alboussiere, T.; Corre, Y.; Huguet, L.; Labrosse, S.; Deguen, R.; Moulin, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present here an experiment especially designed to study compressible convection in the lab. For significant compressible convection effects, the parameters of the experiment have to be optimized: we use xenon gaz in a cubic cell. This cell is placed in a centrifuge to artificially increase the apparent gravity and heated from below. With these choices, we are able to reach a dissipation number close to Earth's outer core value. We will present our results for different heating fluxes and rotation rates. We success to observe an adiabatic gradient of 3K/cm in the cell. Studies of pressure and temperature fluctuations lead us to think that the convection takes place under the form of a single roll in the cell for high heating flux. Moreover, these fluctuations show that the flow is geostrophic due to the high rotation speed. This important role of rotation, via Coriolis force effects, in our experimental setup leads us to develop a 2D quasigeostrophic compressible model in the anelastic liquid approximation. We test numerically this model with the finite element solver FreeFem++ and compare its results with our experimental data. In conclusion, we will present our project for the next experiment in which the cubic cell will be replace by a annulus cell. We will discuss the new expected effects due to this geometry as Rossby waves and zonal flows.

  6. Comparison between the double folding model and the energy density approach for calculating the ion-ion potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Osman, M.; Guirguis, J.W.; Ramadan, Kh.A.; Zahra, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work, we use the energy density formalism derived from both the conventional Skyrme force with parameter sets SI, SII and SIII together with the extended Skyrme force with parameters SKE1, SKE2, SKE3 and SKE4 to study the real part of the ion-ion potential between different pairs of nuclei. We have first modified the Skyrme energy density to include the energy dependence of the ion-ion potential. Then we have calculated the interaction potential between different pairs of nuclei at the strong absorption radius. We have compared our results with those deduced from experiment and with the predictions of the double folding model with M3Y force. We found that our results, obtained using a suitable approximation of the kinetic energy density, agree satisfactorily with experiment. The agreement is better than the agreement found in other papers. (author)

  7. Modelling early stages of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggieri M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we model early time dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions by an initial color-electric field which then decays to a plasma by the Schwinger mechanism. The dynamics of the many particles system produced by the decay is described by relativistic kinetic theory, taking into account the backreaction on the color field by solving self-consistently the kinetic and the field equations. Our main results concern isotropization and thermalization for a 1+1D expanding geometry. In case of small η/s (η/s ≲ 0.3 we find τisotropization ≈ 0.8 fm/c and τthermalization ≈ 1 fm/c in agreement with the common lore of hydrodynamics.

  8. A three-scale model for ionic solute transport in swelling clays incorporating ion-ion correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien Dung; Moyne, Christian; Murad, Marcio A.

    2015-01-01

    A new three-scale model is proposed to describe the movement of ionic species of different valences in swelling clays characterized by three separate length scales (nano, micro, and macro) and two levels of porosity (nano- and micropores). At the finest (nano) scale the medium is treated as charged clay particles saturated by aqueous electrolyte solution containing monovalent and divalent ions forming the electrical double layer. A new constitutive law is constructed for the disjoining pressure based on the numerical resolution of non-local problem at the nanoscale which, in contrast to the Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point charge ions, is capable of capturing the short-range interactions between the ions due to their finite size. At the intermediate scale (microscale), the two-phase homogenized particle/electrolyte solution system is represented by swollen clay clusters (or aggregates) with the nanoscale disjoining pressure incorporated in a modified form of Terzaghi's effective principle. At the macroscale, the electro-chemical-mechanical couplings within clay clusters is homogenized with the ion transport in the bulk fluid lying in the micro pores. The resultant macroscopic picture is governed by a three-scale model wherein ion transport takes place in the bulk solution strongly coupled with the mechanics of the clay clusters which play the role of sources/sinks of mass to the bulk fluid associated with ion adsorption/desorption in the electrical double layer at the nanoscale. Within the context of the quasi-steady version of the multiscale model, wherein the electrolyte solution in the nanopores is assumed at instantaneous thermodynamic equilibrium with the bulk fluid in the micropores, we build-up numerically the ion-adsorption isotherms along with the constitutive law of the retardation coefficients of monovalent and divalent ions. In addition, the constitutive law for the macroscopic swelling pressure is reconstructed numerically showing patterns of

  9. Ion current prediction model considering columnar recombination in alpha radioactivity measurement using ionized air transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Susumu; Hirata, Yosuke; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Aoyama, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    We present a reinforced ion current prediction model in alpha radioactivity measurement using ionized air transportation. Although our previous model explained the qualitative trend of the measured ion current values, the absolute values of the theoretical curves were about two times as large as the measured values. In order to accurately predict the measured values, we reinforced our model by considering columnar recombination and turbulent diffusion, which affects columnar recombination. Our new model explained the considerable ion loss in the early stage of ion diffusion and narrowed the gap between the theoretical and measured values. The model also predicted suppression of ion loss due to columnar recombination by spraying a high-speed air flow near a contaminated surface. This suppression was experimentally investigated and confirmed. In conclusion, we quantitatively clarified the theoretical relation between alpha radioactivity and ion current in laminar flow and turbulent pipe flow. (author)

  10. Modeling an Iodine Hall Thruster Plume in the Iodine Satellite (ISAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An iodine-operated 200-W Hall thruster plume has been simulated using a hybrid-PIC model to predict the spacecraft surface-plume interaction for spacecraft integration purposes. For validation of the model, the plasma potential, electron temperature, ion current flux, and ion number density of xenon propellant were compared with available measurement data at the nominal operating condition. To simulate iodine plasma, various collision cross sections were found and used in the model. While time-varying atomic iodine species (i.e., I, I+, I2+) information is provided by HPHall simulation at the discharge channel exit, the molecular iodine species (i.e., I2, I2+) are introduced as Maxwellian particles at the channel exit. Simulation results show that xenon and iodine plasma plumes appear to be very similar under the assumptions of the model. Assuming a sticking coefficient of unity, iodine deposition rate is estimated.

  11. Converging xenon shock waves driven by megagauss magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.; Steinberg, D.J.

    1986-07-01

    We attempted to implode a conducting metal linear at high velocity, and our failure to do so led to switching, or rapidly transferring the field from pushing an aluminum conductor to snow-plowing a half-atmosphere of xenon gas. We successfully initiated convergent xenon gas shocks with the use of a magnetohydrodynamic switch and coaxial high-explosive, flux-compression generators. Principal diagnostics used to study the imploding xenon gas were 133 Xe radioactive tracers, continuous x-ray absorption, and neutron output. We compressed the xenon gas about five to sixfold at a velocity of 10 cm/μs at a radius of 4 cm. The snowplow efficiency was good; going from 13- to 4-cm radius, we lost only about 20% of the mass. The temperature of the imploded sheath was determined by mixing deuterium with the xenon and measuring the neutron output. Using reasonable assumptions about the amount, density, and uniformity of the compressed gas, we estimate that we reached temperatures as high as 155 eV. Energy-loss mechanisms that we encountered included wall ablation and Taylor instabilities of the back surface

  12. Xenon Anesthesia Improves Respiratory Gas Exchanges in Morbidly Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Abramo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Xenon-in-oxygen is a high density gas mixture and may improve PaO2/FiO2 ratio in morbidly obese patients uniforming distribution of ventilation during anesthesia. Methods. We compared xenon versus sevoflurane anesthesia in twenty adult morbidly obese patients (BMI>35 candidate for roux-en-Y laparoscopic gastric bypass and assessed PaO2/FiO2 ratio at baseline, at 15 min from induction of anaesthesia and every 60 min during surgery. Differences in intraoperative and postoperative data including heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, oxygen saturation, plateau pressure, eyes opening and extubation time, Aldrete score on arrival to the PACU were compared by the Mann-Whitney test and were considered as secondary aims. Moreover the occurrence of side effects and postoperative analgesic demand were assessed. Results. In xenon group PaO2-FiO2 ratio was significantly higher after 60 min and 120 min from induction of anesthesia; heart rate and overall remifentanil consumption were lower; the eyes opening time and the extubation time were shorter; morphine consumption at 72 hours was lower; postoperative nausea was more common. Conclusions. Xenon anesthesia improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio and maintained its distinctive rapid recovery times and cardiovascular stability. A reduction of opioid consumption during and after surgery and an increased incidence of PONV were also observed in xenon group.

  13. Xenon-related analgesia: a new target for pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Marilù; Abramo, Antonio; Giunta, Francesco; Forfori, Francesco

    2013-07-01

    The noble gas xenon has been known for >50 years in the field of anesthesia with an emerging series of favorable features; several clinical and preclinical studies performed over the last years reveal a renewed interest because they substantially agree on attributing relevant analgesic properties to xenon. The main mechanism of action is the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors of glutamate; it involves the blocking of painful stimuli transmissions from peripheral tissues to the brain and it also avoids the development of pain hypersensitivity. Therefore, this mechanism is responsible for the inhibition of pain transmission at spinal and supraspinal levels, as well as the cortical level. In all these levels of pain pathways, as the development of hyperalgesia is possible, xenon efficacy can also be based on the blocking of these processes. Several forms of pain share such mechanisms in their maintenance, and xenon can be successfully used at low dosages, which have no effects on vital parameters. The literature shows that analgesic features could also emerge outside the field of anesthesia; thus, this could permit xenon to have a larger usage according to local availability.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, William; Pratt, Scott

    2014-09-01

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition from the QGP stage to hadronization. Balance functions were constructed as the sum of these two charge production components, and four parameters were manipulated to match the model's output with experimental data taken from the STAR Collaboration at RHIC. Results show that the chemical composition of the super-hadronic matter are consistent with that of a thermally equilibrated QGP. High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition

  15. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Ongari, Daniele [Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, Institut des Sciences et Ingeénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de l' Industrie 17 1951 Sion Valais Switzerland; Xu, Wenqian [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mohamed, Mona H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Haranczyk, Maciej [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2 28906 Getafe, Madrid Spain; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-07-24

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycle from anesthetic gas mixture can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low temperature distillation to recover Xe, which is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose much efficient and simpler system to recover and recycle Xe from simulant exhale anesthetic gas mixture at room temperature using metal organic frameworks. Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity, Xe/O2, Xe/N2 and Xe/CO2 selectivity at room temperature. The in-situ synchrotron measurements suggest the Xe is occupied in the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12.

  16. Ion beam studies. Pt. 3(a): the modelling of electrostatic mirrors for the manipulation and focussing of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beanland, D.G.; Freeman, J.H.

    1976-06-01

    Electrostatic mirrors have been used to steer, focus and scan intense beams of heavy ions. In this paper, an account is given of the computer modelling of such mirrors. Consideration is given to aperture effects in the lens and it is shown that shaped fields can be used to control the focussing behaviour. The mirror structure incorporates an additional negatively-biased electrode to prevent the penetration of the electric field through the apertures and along the beam trajectories outside the mirror space. This factor and the compact design minimise the space-charge de-focussing effects which normally militate against the use of such electrostatic lenses with high intensity ion beams. The experimental verification of the modelling for a variety of ion-beam manipulation requirements will be described in a subsequent paper. (author)

  17. Detection of Internal Short Circuit in Lithium Ion Battery Using Model-Based Switching Model Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhwan Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of an internal short circuit (ISCr in a Li-ion battery can prevent it from undergoing thermal runaway, and thereby ensure battery safety. In this paper, a model-based switching model method (SMM is proposed to detect the ISCr in the Li-ion battery. The SMM updates the model of the Li-ion battery with ISCr to improve the accuracy of ISCr resistance R I S C f estimates. The open circuit voltage (OCV and the state of charge (SOC are estimated by applying the equivalent circuit model, and by using the recursive least squares algorithm and the relation between OCV and SOC. As a fault index, the R I S C f is estimated from the estimated OCVs and SOCs to detect the ISCr, and used to update the model; this process yields accurate estimates of OCV and R I S C f . Then the next R I S C f is estimated and used to update the model iteratively. Simulation data from a MATLAB/Simulink model and experimental data verify that this algorithm shows high accuracy of R I S C f estimates to detect the ISCr, thereby helping the battery management system to fulfill early detection of the ISCr.

  18. Study of carbon ion behavior by using collisional radiative model in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Kubota, Yuusuke; Saito, Masashi; Matama, Ken; Itakura, Akiyoshi; Cho, Teruji; Kato, Takako

    2006-01-01

    In a plasma experiment, collisional radiative model (CRM) is very useful model to evaluate impurity behaviors and plasma parameters with line emission from a plasma. CRMs for carbon and oxygen have been developed. However verification and application of the model for analysis of experimental results are not enough. Then we applied CRM calculation results to observed impurity spectra in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror to evaluate the impurity density profile and the particle balance of each charge state of carbon ion. We calculated the effective ionization rate for each charge state of carbon ion and obtained the density profile of each ion. Moreover, we calculated absolute emission intensities from all carbon ions. (author)

  19. From many body wee partons dynamics to perfect fluid: a standard model for heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, R.

    2010-07-22

    We discuss a standard model of heavy ion collisions that has emerged both from experimental results of the RHIC program and associated theoretical developments. We comment briefly on the impact of early results of the LHC program on this picture. We consider how this standard model of heavy ion collisions could be solidified or falsified in future experiments at RHIC, the LHC and a future Electro-Ion Collider.

  20. Multiscale modeling of lithium ion batteries: thermal aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulf Latz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The thermal behavior of lithium ion batteries has a huge impact on their lifetime and the initiation of degradation processes. The development of hot spots or large local overpotentials leading, e.g., to lithium metal deposition depends on material properties as well as on the nano- und microstructure of the electrodes. In recent years a theoretical structure emerges, which opens the possibility to establish a systematic modeling strategy from atomistic to continuum scale to capture and couple the relevant phenomena on each scale. We outline the building blocks for such a systematic approach and discuss in detail a rigorous approach for the continuum scale based on rational thermodynamics and homogenization theories. Our focus is on the development of a systematic thermodynamically consistent theory for thermal phenomena in batteries at the microstructure scale and at the cell scale. We discuss the importance of carefully defining the continuum fields for being able to compare seemingly different phenomenological theories and for obtaining rules to determine unknown parameters of the theory by experiments or lower-scale theories. The resulting continuum models for the microscopic and the cell scale are numerically solved in full 3D resolution. The complex very localized distributions of heat sources in a microstructure of a battery and the problems of mapping these localized sources on an averaged porous electrode model are discussed by comparing the detailed 3D microstructure-resolved simulations of the heat distribution with the result of the upscaled porous electrode model. It is shown, that not all heat sources that exist on the microstructure scale are represented in the averaged theory due to subtle cancellation effects of interface and bulk heat sources. Nevertheless, we find that in special cases the averaged thermal behavior can be captured very well by porous electrode theory.

  1. Occupational exposure to xenon-133 among hospital workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschamps, M.

    1984-11-01

    During procedures for pulmonary ventilation studies on patients in hospitals, xenon-133 may escape into ambient air. Measurements of air concentrations were required to permit an evaluation of the exposure to which hospital workers are subjected. Two complementary methods of in situ measurements of air concentrations were employed: a commercial air monitor and evacuated blood sampling tubes. Personal dosimeters (TLDs) were exposed simultaneously with the commercial air monitor, and the results were compared. This report presents the results of the measurements of air concentrations during studies on patients. Substantial leakage of xenon-133 was noted, but workers received less than the maximum permissible dose. Personal dosimeters do not permit accurate evaluation of the skin doses resulting from exposure to xenon-133; measurements of air concentrations are required for such evaluation. A number of procedures are recommended to minimize leakage and personnel exposure

  2. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivanen, V; Küchler, D

    2016-02-01

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  3. Dynamics of xenon binding inside the hydrophobic cavity of pseudo-wild-type bacteriophage T4 lysozyme explored through xenon-based NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvaux, Hervé; Dubois, Lionel; Huber, Gaspard; Quillin, Michael L; Berthault, Patrick; Matthews, Brian W

    2005-08-24

    Wild-type bacteriophage T4 lysozyme contains a hydrophobic cavity with binding properties that have been extensively studied by X-ray crystallography and NMR. In the present study, the monitoring of 1H chemical shift variations under xenon pressure enables the determination of the noble gas binding constant (K = 60.2 M(-1)). Although the interaction site is highly localized, dipolar cross-relaxation effects between laser-polarized xenon and nearby protons (SPINOE) are rather poor. This is explained by the high value of the xenon-proton dipolar correlation time (0.8 ns), much longer than the previously reported values for xenon in medium-size proteins. This indicates that xenon is highly localized within the protein cavity, as confirmed by the large chemical shift difference between free and bound xenon. The exploitation of the xenon line width variation vs xenon pressure and protein concentration allows the extraction of the exchange correlation time between free and bound xenon. Comparison to the exchange experienced by protein protons indicates that the exchange between the open and closed conformations of T4 lysozyme is not required for xenon binding.

  4. Influence of humidity on photochemical ozone generation with 172nm xenon excimer lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvermoser, M. J.; Kogelschatz, U.; Murnick, D. E.

    2009-08-01

    The reaction kinetics of photochemical ozone (O{3}) generation in humid air and oxygen (O{2}) using efficient, narrow band vacuum ultra violet (VUV) 172 nm xenon excimer lamps is discussed. Trace amounts of water (H{2}O) vapor in the process gas leads to hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO{2}) radical formation. These radicals drive a catalytic O{3} destruction cycle limiting O{3} saturation concentration. This catalytic O{3} destruction cycle was included into a quantitative kinetic model describing photochemical O{3} production. Experimental O{3} saturation concentrations obtained with coaxial VUV driven photochemical O{3} generators compare satisfactorily with the models predictions.

  5. Myocardial blood flow during general anesthesia with xenon in humans: a positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, W.; Meyer, P.T.; Rossaint, R.; Baumert, J.H.; Coburn, M.; Fries, M.; Rex, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Xenon has only minimal hemodynamic side effects and induces pharmacologic preconditioning. Thus, the use of xenon could be an interesting option in patients at risk for perioperative myocardial ischemia. However, little is known about the effects of xenon anesthesia on myocardial blood

  6. Molecular mechanisms transducing the anesthetic, analgesic, and organ-protective actions of xenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C.; Sanders, Robert D.; Maze, Mervyn; Schlack, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The anesthetic properties of xenon have been known for more than 50 yr, and the safety and efficacy of xenon inhalational anesthesia has been demonstrated in several recent clinical studies. In addition, xenon demonstrates many favorable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, which could be

  7. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are

  8. Two-dimensional Thermal Modeling of Lithium-ion Battery Cell Based on Electrothermal Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Daniel Loan; Knap, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    Thermal modeling of lithium-ion batteries is gaining its importance together with increasing power density and compact design of the modern battery systems in order to assure battery safety and long lifetime. Thermal models of lithium-ion batteries are usually either expensive to develop and accu...

  9. Generic NICA-Donnan model parameters for metal-ion binding by humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, C.J.; Kinniburgh, D.G.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Tipping, E.

    2003-01-01

    A total of 171 datasets of literature and experimental data for metal-ion binding by fulvic and humic acids have been digitized and re-analyzed using the NICA-Donnan model. Generic parameter values have been derived that can be used for modeling in the absence of specific metal-ion binding

  10. The high pressure xenon lamp as a source of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerdt, J.A. ter.

    1979-01-01

    An account is given of an investigation into the radiation properties of a commercially available high pressure xenon lamp (type XBO 900 W) in the spectral range 0.3 to 3 μm. The purpose of the study was to find out whether such a lamp can serve as a (secondary) standard of radiation in spectroscopic and radiometric measurements. The main advantades of the xenon lamp over other secondary standards such as the tungsten strip lamp and the anode of a carbon arc lamp are the high temperature of its discharge and the resulting strong radiation over a broad spectral range. (Auth.)

  11. Electric dipole moment searches using the isotope 129-xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchler, Florian

    2014-11-13

    Two new complementary experiments searching for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of 129-xenon are presented. Besides demonstration of a sensitivity improvement by employing established methods and a highly sensitive SQUID detection system the progress towards a novel measurement approach is discussed. The new method introduces time-varying electric fields and a liquid hyper-polarized xenon sample with a potential improvement in sensitivity of three orders of magnitude. The search for EDMs is motivated by their symmetry-breaking nature. A non-zero EDM provides a new source of CP violation to solve the mystery of the huge excess of matter over anti-matter in our Universe.

  12. Synthesis of the missing oxide of xenon, XeO2, and its implications for Earth's missing xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David S; Schrobilgen, Gary J

    2011-04-27

    The missing Xe(IV) oxide, XeO(2), has been synthesized at 0 °C by hydrolysis of XeF(4) in water and 2.00 M H(2)SO(4(aq)). Raman spectroscopy and (16/18)O isotopic enrichment studies indicate that XeO(2) possesses an extended structure in which Xe(IV) is oxygen bridged to four neighboring oxygen atoms to give a local square-planar XeO(4) geometry based on an AX(4)E(2) valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) arrangement. The vibrational spectra of Xe(16)O(2) and Xe(18)O(2) amend prior vibrational assignments of xenon doped SiO(2) and are in accordance with prior speculation that xenon depletion from the Earth's atmosphere may occur by xenon insertion at high temperatures and high pressures into SiO(2) in the Earth's crust.

  13. The Modeling of Pickup Ion or Energetic Particle Mediated Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Mostafavi, P.; Hunana, P.

    2016-05-01

    Suprathermal energetic particles, such as solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere and pickup ions (PUIs) in the outer heliosphere and the very local interstellar medium, often form a thermodynamically dominant component in their various environments. In the supersonic solar wind beyond > 10 AU, in the inner heliosheath (IHS), and in the very local interstellar medium (VLISM), PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma. Similarly, SEPs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the absence of equilibration between plasma components, a separate coupled plasma description for the energetic particles is necessary. Using a collisionless Chapman-Enskog expansion, we derive a closed system of multi-component equations for a plasma comprised of thermal protons and electrons, and suprathermal particles (SEPs, PUIs). The energetic particles contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to leading order, a collisionless heat flux at the next order, and a collisionless stress tensor at the second-order. The collisionless heat conduction and viscosity in the multi-fluid description results from a nonisotropic energetic particle distribution. A simpler single-fluid MHD-like system of equations with distinct equations of state for both the background plasma and the suprathermal particles is derived. We note briefly potential pitfalls that can emerge in the numerical modeling of collisionless plasma flows that contain a dynamically important energetic particle component.

  14. Controlling FAMA by the Ptolemy II model of ion beam transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balvanovic, R. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia)], E-mail: broman@vinca.rs; Radenovic, B. [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, Belgrade 11080 (Serbia); Belicev, P.; Neskovic, N. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia)

    2009-08-11

    FAMA is a facility for modification and analysis of materials with ion beams. Due to the wide range of ion beams and energies used in the facility and its future expansion, the need has arisen for faster tuning of ion beams transport control parameters. With this aim, a new approach to modeling ion-beam transport system was developed, based on the Ptolemy II modeling and design framework. A model in Ptolemy II is a hierarchical aggregation of components called actors, which communicate with other actors using tokens, or pieces of data. Each ion optical element is modeled by a composite actor implementing beam matrix transformation function, while tokens carry beam matrix data. A basic library of models of typical ion optical elements is developed, and a complex model of FAMA ion beam transport system is hierarchically integrated with bottom-up approach. The model is extended to include control functions. The developed model is modular, flexible and extensible. The results obtained by simulation on the model demonstrate easy and efficient tuning of beam line control parameters. Fine tuning of control parameters, due to uncertainties inherent to modeling, still has to be performed on-line.

  15. Chemical equilibrium relations used in the fireball model of relativistic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    The fireball model of relativistic heavy-ion collision uses chemical equilibrium relations to predict cross sections for particle and composite productions. These relations are examined in a canonical ensemble model where chemical equilibrium is not explicitly invoked

  16. Kinetic modeling of metal ion transport for desorption of Pb(II) ion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics of desorption of lead (II) ion from metal loaded adsorbent of mercaptoacetic acid modified and unmodified oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) fruit fiber was studied using different solutions, at different contact times. At the end of 25 minutes, 79.19%, 75.99%, 57.14%, 50.56% and 32.72% of Pb2+ were desorbed using ...

  17. Modeling and computer simulation of ion beam synthesis of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, M.

    1999-11-01

    The following topics were dealt with: ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters, kinetic three dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method, Ostwald ripening, redistribution of implanted impurities, buried layer formation, comparisation to experimental results.

  18. Kinetic modeling of auroral ion outflows observed by the VISIONS sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran, R. M.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The VISIONS (VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm) sounding rocket was launched on Feb. 7, 2013 at 8:21 UTC from Poker Flat, Alaska, into an auroral substorm with the objective of identifying the drivers and dynamics of the ion outflow below 1000km. Energetic ion data from the VISIONS polar cap boundary crossing show evidence of an ion "pressure cooker" effect whereby ions energized via transverse heating in the topside ionosphere travel upward and are impeded by a parallel potential structure at higher altitudes. VISIONS was also instrumented with an energetic neutral atom (ENA) detector which measured neutral particles ( 50-100 eV energy) presumably produced by charge-exchange with the energized outflowing ions. Hence, inferences about ion outflow may be made via remotely-sensing measurements of ENAs. This investigation focuses on modeling energetic outflowing ion distributions observed by VISIONS using a kinetic model. This kinetic model traces large numbers of individual particles, using a guiding-center approximation, in order to allow calculation of ion distribution functions and moments. For the present study we include mirror and parallel electric field forces, and a source of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) wave heating, thought to be central to the transverse energization of ions. The model is initiated with a steady-state ion density altitude profile and Maxwellian velocity distribution characterizing the initial phase-space conditions for multiple particle trajectories. This project serves to advance our understanding of the drivers and particle dynamics in the auroral ionosphere and to improve data analysis methods for future sounding rocket and satellite missions.

  19. Isotopic Composition of Xenon in Petroleum from the Shell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The xenon isotopic composition was found to be similar to the atmospheric value for one petroleum sample. While the results of the second sample suggest possible enrichment of the heavier isotopes, the errors associated with these excesses preclude a definitive statement to that effect. No monoisotopic enrichment in ...

  20. Commissioning of the XENON1T liquid level measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geis, Christopher [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Two-phase xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) have been operated very successfully in direct detection experiments for dark matter. This kind of detector uses liquid xenon as the sensitive target and is operated in two-phase (liquid/gas) mode, where the liquid level needs to be monitored and controlled with sub-millimeter precision. We present the installation, commissioning and first measurement data of two kinds of level meters operated in the XENON1T TPC: short level meters are three-plated capacitors measuring the level of the liquid-gas interface with a measurement range h∼5 mm and a resolution of ΔC/h∼1 pF/mm. The long level meters are cylindrical double-walled capacitors, measuring the overall filling level of the XENON1T TPC at a measurement range of h=1.4 m and a resolution of ΔC/h∼0.1 pF/mm. Further, we present the design and programming of the readout electronic based on the UTI chip by Smartec, which allows to read all six levelmeters simultaneously.

  1. Shear Thinning Near the Critical Point of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu

    2008-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of reduced shear rate: 10(exp -3) xenon at amplitudes 3 mu,m 430 mu, and frequencies 1 Hz dynamic critical scaling. At high frequencies, (omega tau)(exp 2) > gamma-dot tau, C(sub gamma) depends also on both x(sub 0) and omega. The data were compared with numerical calculations based on the Carreau-Yasuda relation for complex fluids: eta(gamma-dot)/eta(0)=[1+A(sub gamma)|gamma-dot tau|](exp - chi(sub eta)/3+chi(sub eta)), where chi(sub eta) =0.069 is the critical exponent for viscosity and mode-coupling theory predicts A(sub gamma) =0.121. For xenon we find A(sub gamma) =0.137 +/- 0.029, in agreement with the mode coupling value. Remarkably, the xenon data close to the critical temperature T(sub c) were independent of the cooling rate (both above and below T(sub c) and these data were symmetric about T(sub c) to within a temperature scale factor. The scale factors for the magnitude of the oscillator s response differed from those for the oscillator's phase; this suggests that the surface tension of the two-phase domains affected the drag on the screen below T(sub c).

  2. Xenon tissue/blood partition coefficient for pig urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Bülow, J; Nielsen, S L

    1990-01-01

    In four landrace pigs the tissue/blood partition coefficient (lambda) for xenon (Xe) for the urinary bladder was calculated after chemical analysis for lipid, water and protein content and determination of the haematocrit. The coefficients varied from bladder to bladder owing to small differences...

  3. Intrinsic backgrounds from Rn and Kr in the XENON100 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Di Gangi, P.; Di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lombardi, F.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Molinario, A.; Morå, K.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Piro, M.-C.; Pizzella, V.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Ramírez García, D.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rupp, N.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. Von; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Vargas, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Weber, M.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the XENON100 data analyses used to assess the target-intrinsic background sources radon (?), thoron (?) and krypton (?). We detail the event selections of high-energy alpha particles and decay-specific delayed coincidences. We derive distributions of the individual radionuclides inside the detector and quantify their abundances during the main three science runs of the experiment over a period of ˜ 4 years, from January 2010 to January 2014. We compare our results to external measurements of radon emanation and krypton concentrations where we find good agreement. We report an observed reduction in concentrations of radon daughters that we attribute to the plating-out of charged ions on the negatively biased cathode.

  4. Removing krypton from xenon by cryogenic distillation to the ppq level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Di Gangi, P.; Di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Duchovni, E.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grandi, L.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Huhmann, C.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Calloch, M. Le; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Piro, M.-C.; Pizzella, V.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Saldanha, R.; Santos, J. M. F. dos; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Shockley, E.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Wang, H.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Cristescu, I.

    2017-05-01

    The XENON1T experiment aims for the direct detection of dark matter in a detector filled with 3.3 tons of liquid xenon. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the background induced by radioactive decays inside the detector has to be sufficiently low. One major contributor is the β -emitter ^{85}Kr which is present in the xenon. For XENON1T a concentration of natural krypton in xenon ^{nat}Kr/Xe McCabe-Thiele approach is described. The system demonstrated a krypton reduction factor of 6.4\\cdot 10^5 with thermodynamic stability at process speeds above 3 kg/h. The resulting concentration of ^{nat}Kr/Xe<26 ppq is the lowest ever achieved, almost one order of magnitude below the requirements for XENON1T and even sufficient for future dark matter experiments using liquid xenon, such as XENONnT and DARWIN.

  5. Xenon spatial oscillation in nuclear power reactors:an analytical approach through non linear modal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2005-01-01

    It was proponed recently to apply an extension of Lyapunov's first method to the non-linear regime, known as non-linear modal analysis (NMA), to the study of space-time problems in nuclear reactor kinetics, nuclear power plant dynamics and nuclear power plant instrumentation and control(1). The present communication shows how to apply NMA to the study of Xenon spatial oscillations in large nuclear reactors. The set of non-linear modal equations derived by J. Lewins(2) for neutron flux, Xenon concentration and Iodine concentration are discussed, and a modified version of these equations is taken as a starting point. Using the methods of singular perturbation theory a slow manifold is constructed in the space of mode amplitudes. This allows the reduction of the original high dimensional dynamics to a low dimensional one. It is shown how the amplitudes of the first mode for neutron flux field, temperature field and concentrations of Xenon and Iodine fields can have a stable steady state value while the corresponding amplitudes of the second mode oscillates in a stable limit cycle. The extrapolated dimensions of the reactor's core are used as bifurcation parameters. Approximate analytical formulae are obtained for the critical values of this parameters( below which the onset of oscillations is produced), for the period and for the amplitudes of the above mentioned oscillations. These results are applied to the discussion of neutron flux and temperature excursions in critical locations of the reactor's core. The results of NMA can be validated from the results obtained applying suitable computer codes, using homogenization theory(3) to link the complex heterogeneous model of the codes with the simplified mathematical model used for NMA

  6. Enhanced Prognostic Model for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Particle Filter State Transition Model Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhi Arachchige

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on predicting the End of Life and End of Discharge of Lithium ion batteries using a battery capacity fade model and a battery discharge model. The proposed framework will be able to estimate the Remaining Useful Life (RUL and the Remaining charge through capacity fade and discharge models. A particle filter is implemented that estimates the battery’s State of Charge (SOC and State of Life (SOL by utilizing the battery’s physical data such as voltage, temperature, and current measurements. The accuracy of the prognostic framework has been improved by enhancing the particle filter state transition model to incorporate different environmental and loading conditions without retuning the model parameters. The effect of capacity fade in the reduction of the EOD (End of Discharge time with cycling has also been included, integrating both EOL (End of Life and EOD prediction models in order to get more accuracy in the estimations.

  7. Numerical investigation of the threshold intensity dependence on gas pressure in the breakdown of xenon by different laser wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abd El Hameid Mahmoud, Mohamed; Dawood, Nagia D. A.

    2014-07-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of the measurements that carried out to study the breakdown of xenon gas over a wide pressure range induced by laser source operating at different wavelengths. The study provided an investigation of the effect of laser wavelength as well as gas pressure on the physical processes associated with this phenomenon. To this aim a modified electron cascade model is applied. The model based on the numerical solution of the time dependent Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) simultaneously with a set of rate equations which describe the rate of change of the formed excited states population. Comparison between the calculated and measured threshold intensities for the experimentally tested laser wavelengths and gas pressure range is obtained. Furthermore computations of the EEDF and its parameters showed the actual correlation between the gain and loss processes which determine the threshold breakdown intensity of xenon and the two experimentally tested parameters; laser wavelength and gas pressure.

  8. Bonding of xenon to oxygen in magmas at depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Clémence; Sanloup, Chrystèle; Bureau, Hélène; Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Raepsaet, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    The field of noble gases chemistry has witnessed amazing advances in the last decade with over 100 compounds reported including Xe oxides and Xe-Fe alloys stable at the pressure-temperature conditions of planetary interiors. The chemistry of Xe with planetary materials is nonetheless still mostly ignored, while Xe isotopes are used to trace a variety of key planetary processes from atmosphere formation to underground nuclear tests. It is indeed difficult to incorporate the possibility of Xe reactivity at depth in isotopic geochemical models without a precise knowledge of its chemical environment. The structure of Xe doped hydrous silica-rich melts is investigated by in situ high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction using resistive heating diamond anvil cells. Obtained pair distribution functions reveal the oxidation of Xe between 0.2 GPa and 4 GPa at high T up to 1000 K. In addition to the usual interatomic distances, a contribution at 2.05 ± 0.05 Å is observed. This contribution is not observed in the undoped melt, and is interpreted as the Xe-O bond, with a coordination number of about 12 consistent with Xe insertion in rings of the melt structure. Xe solubility measurements by electron microprobe and particle induced X-rays emission analysis confirm that Xe and Ar have similar solubility values in wt% in silicate melts. These values are nonetheless an order of magnitude higher than those theoretically calculated for Xe. The formation of Xe-O bonds explains the enhanced solubility of Xe in deep continental crust magmas, revealing a mechanism that could store Xe and fractionate its isotopes. Xenon is indeed atypical among noble gases, the atmosphere being notably depleted in elemental Xe, and very strongly depleted in Xe light isotopes. These observations are known as the 'missing' Xe paradox, and could be solved by the present findings.

  9. Momentum Transfer in a Spinning Fuel Tank Filled with Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peugeot, John W.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Transient spin-up and spin-down flows inside of spacecraft fuel tanks need to be analyzed in order to properly design spacecraft control systems. Knowledge of the characteristics of angular momentum transfer to and from the fuel is used to size the de-spin mechanism that places the spacecraft in a controllable in-orbit state. In previous studies, several analytical models of the spin-up process were developed. However, none have accurately predicted all of the flow dynamics. Several studies have also been conducted using Navier-Stokes based methods. These approaches have been much more successful at simulating the dynamic processes in a cylindrical container, but have not addressed the issue of momentum transfer. In the current study, the spin-up and spin-down of a fuel tank filled with gaseous xenon has been investigated using a three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes code. Primary interests have been concentrated on the spin-up/spin-down time constants and the initial torque imparted on the system. Additional focus was given to the relationship between the dominant flow dynamics and the trends in momentum transfer. Through the simulation of both a cylindrical and a spherical tank, it was revealed that the transfer of angular momentum is nonlinear at early times and tends toward a linear pattern at later times. Further investigation suggests that the nonlinear spin up is controlled by the turbulent transport of momentum, while the linear phase is controlled by a Coriolis driven (Ekman) flow along the outer wall. These results indicate that the spinup and spin-down processes occur more quickly in tanks with curved surfaces than those with defined top, bottom, and side walls. The results also provide insights for the design of spacecraft de-spin mechanisms.

  10. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  11. Ion swarm data for electrical discharge modeling in air and flue gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.; Benhenni, M.; Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first step of this work is the determination of the elastic and inelastic ion-molecule collision cross sections for the main ions (N 2 + , O 2 + , CO 2 + , H 2 O + and O - ) usually present either in the air or flue gas discharges. The obtained cross section sets, given for ion kinetic energies not exceeding 100 eV, correspond to the interactions of each ion with its parent molecule (symmetric case) or nonparent molecule (asymmetric case). Then by using these different cross section sets, it is possible to obtain the ion swarm data for the different gas mixtures involving N 2 , CO 2 , H 2 O and O 2 molecules whatever their relative proportions. These ion swarm data are obtained from an optimized Monte Carlo method well adapted for the ion transport in gas mixtures. This also allows us to clearly show that the classical linear approximations usually applied for the ion swarm data in mixtures such as Blanc's law are far to be valid. Then, the ion swarm data are given in three cases of gas mixtures: a dry air (80% N 2 , 20% O 2 ), a ternary gas mixture (82% N 2 , 12% CO 2 , 6% O 2 ) and a typical flue gas (76% N 2 , 12% CO 2 , 6% O 2 , 6% H 2 O). From these reliable ion swarm data, electrical discharge modeling for a wire to plane electrode configuration has been carried out in these three mixtures at the atmospheric pressure for different applied voltages. Under the same discharge conditions, large discrepancies in the streamer formation and propagation have been observed in these three mixture cases. They are due to the deviations existing not only between the different effective electron-molecule ionization rates but also between the ion transport properties mainly because of the presence of a highly polar molecule such as H 2 O. This emphasizes the necessity to properly consider the ion transport in the discharge modeling

  12. Modeling of occurrence frequencies of ion conics as a function of altitude and conic angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Miyake

    Full Text Available The occurrence frequencies of dayside ion conics with various conic angles are obtained as a function of altitude from Exos-D (Akebono observations. We made a model calculation of ion conic evolution to match the observation results. The observed occurrence frequencies of ion conics with 80° to 90° conic angle are used as an input to the model and the occurrence frequencies of ion conics with smaller conic angles are numerically calculated at higher altitudes. The calculated occurrence frequencies are compared with the observed ones of ion conics with smaller conic angles. We take into account conic angle variation with altitude in both adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases, horizontal extension of ion conics due to E×B drift, and evolution to elevated conics and ion beams in the model. In the adiabatic case, the conic angle decreases with increasing altitude much faster than was observed. The occurrence frequency of small-angle conics is much larger than the observed value without E×B drift and evolution to the other UFIs. An agreement is obtained by assuming non-adiabatic variation of conic angles with altitude and an ion E×B drift to gyro velocity ratio of 0.08 to 0.6, depending on geomagnetic activities.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle acceleration · Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers.

  13. Ion heating and energy partition at the heliospheric termination shock: hybrid simulations and analytical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, S Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Pin [BOSTON UNIV.; Schwadron, N A [BOSTON UNIV.; Lee, M [UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos hybrid simulation code is used to examine heating and the partition of dissipation energy at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock in the presence of pickup ions. The simulations are one-dimensional in space but three-dimensional in field and velocity components, and are carried out for a range of values of pickup ion relative density. Results from the simulations show that because the solar wind ions are relatively cold upstream, the temperature of these ions is raised by a relatively larger factor than the temperature of the pickup ions. An analytic model for energy partition is developed on the basis of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and a polytropic energy equation. The polytropic index {gamma} used in the Rankine-Hugoniot relations is varied to improve agreement between the model and the simulations concerning the fraction of downstream heating in the pickup ions as well as the compression ratio at the shock. When the pickup ion density is less than 20%, the polytropic index is about 5/3, whereas for pickup ion densities greater than 20%, the polytropic index tends toward 2.2, suggesting a fundamental change in the character of the shock, as seen in the simulations, when the pickup ion density is large. The model and the simulations both indicate for the upstream parameters chosen for Voyager 2 conditions that the pickup ion density is about 25% and the pickup ions gain the larger share (approximately 90%) of the downstream thermal pressure, consistent with Voyager 2 observations near the shock.

  14. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  15. On intermediate energy heavy ion optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihan, T.H.; Awin, A.M.

    1992-08-01

    We derive in this paper an approximate analytical expression for the heavy ion optical potential by solving the inversion problem based on the McIntyre parametrization of the S-matrix. The quasi-classical limit of high energy approximation is modified in our approach so as to account for the Coulomb distortion of the trajectory. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs

  16. Modelling multi-ion plasma gun simulations of Tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    The effect of impurity ions in plasma gun ablation tests of various targets is considered. Inclusion of reasonable amounts of impurity (∼10%) is adequate to explain observed energy transmission and erosion measurements. The gun tests and the computer code calculations are relevant to the parameter range expected for major disruptions on large tokamaks

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Ni/H2 and Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, John W.; White, Ralph E.; Dougal, Roger A.

    2001-01-01

    The modelling effort outlined in this viewgraph presentation encompasses the following topics: 1) Electrochemical Deposition of Nickel Hydroxide; 2) Deposition rates of thin films; 3) Impregnation of porous electrodes; 4) Experimental Characterization of Nickel Hydroxide; 5) Diffusion coefficients of protons; 6) Self-discharge rates (i.e., oxygen-evolution kinetics); 7) Hysteresis between charge and discharge; 8) Capacity loss on cycling; 9) Experimental Verification of the Ni/H2 Battery Model; 10) Mathematical Modeling Li-Ion Batteries; 11) Experimental Verification of the Li-Ion Battery Model; 11) Integrated Power System Models for Satellites; and 12) Experimental Verification of Integrated-Systems Model.

  18. Effect of Xenon Anesthesia Compared to Sevoflurane and Total Intravenous Anesthesia for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery on Postoperative Cardiac Troponin Release: An International, Multicenter, Phase 3, Single-blinded, Randomized Noninferiority Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofland, Jan; Ouattara, Alexandre; Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Gruenewald, Matthias; Hazebroucq, Jean; Ecoffey, Claude; Joseph, Pierre; Heringlake, Matthias; Steib, Annick; Coburn, Mark; Amour, Julien; Rozec, Bertrand; Liefde, Inge de; Meybohm, Patrick; Preckel, Benedikt; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Tritapepe, Luigi; Tonner, Peter; Benhaoua, Hamina; Roesner, Jan Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Hanouz, Luc; Tenbrinck, Rob; Bogers, Ad J J C; Mik, Bert G; Coiffic, Alain; Renner, Jochen; Steinfath, Markus; Francksen, Helga; Broch, Ole; Haneya, Assad; Schaller, Manuella; Guinet, Patrick; Daviet, Lauren; Brianchon, Corinne; Rosier, Sebastien; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Paarmann, Hauke; Schön, Julika; Hanke, Thorsten; Ettel, Joachym; Olsson, Silke; Klotz, Stefan; Samet, Amir; Laurinenas, Giedrius; Thibaud, Adrien; Cristinar, Mircea; Collanges, Olivier; Levy, François; Rossaint, Rolf; Stevanovic, Ana; Schaelte, Gereon; Stoppe, Christian; Hamou, Nora Ait; Hariri, Sarah; Quessard, Astrid; Carillion, Aude; Morin, Hélène; Silleran, Jacqueline; Robert, David; Crouzet, Anne-Sophie; Zacharowski, Kai; Reyher, Christian; Iken, Sonja; Weber, Nina C; Hollmann, Marcus; Eberl, Susanne; Carriero, Giovanni; Collacchi, Daria; Di Persio, Alessandra; Fourcade, Olivier; Bergt, Stefan; Alms, Angela

    2017-12-01

    Ischemic myocardial damage accompanying coronary artery bypass graft surgery remains a clinical challenge. We investigated whether xenon anesthesia could limit myocardial damage in coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients, as has been reported for animal ischemia models. In 17 university hospitals in France, Germany, Italy, and The Netherlands, low-risk elective, on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients were randomized to receive xenon, sevoflurane, or propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia for anesthesia maintenance. The primary outcome was the cardiac troponin I concentration in the blood 24 h postsurgery. The noninferiority margin for the mean difference in cardiac troponin I release between the xenon and sevoflurane groups was less than 0.15 ng/ml. Secondary outcomes were the safety and feasibility of xenon anesthesia. The first patient included at each center received xenon anesthesia for practical reasons. For all other patients, anesthesia maintenance was randomized (intention-to-treat: n = 492; per-protocol/without major protocol deviation: n = 446). Median 24-h postoperative cardiac troponin I concentrations (ng/ml [interquartile range]) were 1.14 [0.76 to 2.10] with xenon, 1.30 [0.78 to 2.67] with sevoflurane, and 1.48 [0.94 to 2.78] with total intravenous anesthesia [per-protocol]). The mean difference in cardiac troponin I release between xenon and sevoflurane was -0.09 ng/ml (95% CI, -0.30 to 0.11; per-protocol: P = 0.02). Postoperative cardiac troponin I release was significantly less with xenon than with total intravenous anesthesia (intention-to-treat: P = 0.05; per-protocol: P = 0.02). Perioperative variables and postoperative outcomes were comparable across all groups, with no safety concerns. In postoperative cardiac troponin I release, xenon was noninferior to sevoflurane in low-risk, on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients. Only with xenon was cardiac troponin I release less than with total intravenous

  19. The acute toxicity of major ion salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia. III. Mathematical models for mixture toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Russell J; Mount, David R; Highland, Terry L; Hockett, J Russell; Hoff, Dale J; Jenson, Correne T; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Peterson, Kira N

    2018-01-01

    Based on previous research on the acute toxicity of major ions (Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Cl - , SO 4 2- , and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- ) to Ceriodaphnia dubia, a mathematical model was developed for predicting the median lethal concentration (LC50) for any ion mixture, excepting those dominated by K-specific toxicity. One component of the model describes a mechanism of general ion toxicity to which all ions contribute and predicts LC50s as a function of osmolarity and Ca activity. The other component describes Mg/Ca-specific toxicity to apply when such toxicity exceeds the general ion toxicity and predicts LC50s as a function of Mg and Ca activities. This model not only tracks well the observed LC50s from past research used for model development but also successfully predicts LC50s from new toxicity tests on synthetic mixtures of ions emulating chemistries of various ion-enriched effluents and receiving waters. It also performs better than a previously published model for major ion toxicity. Because of the complexities of estimating chemical activities and osmolarity, a simplified model based directly on ion concentrations was also developed and found to provide useful predictions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:247-259. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  20. RELAX-1, A Refrigerator Enhanced Laser Analyzer for Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, J. D.; Johnston, W. A.; Lyon, I. C.; Turner, G.

    1992-07-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a resonance ionization source [1,2] and a cryogenic sample concentrator [3,4] which increases the efficiency of the spectrometer by two orders of magnitude, has been constructed for the isotopic analysis of xenon. In the two-photon excitation, one-photon ionization scheme employed, a wavelength of 249.6 nm excites the 2P(sub)3/26p[1/2](sub)0 level of xenon. A pulsed laser operating at 10 Hz, with a pulse duration of 8 ns and energy of 1.5 mJ is used. The sample concentrator consists of a localised cold spot (5) and a characteristic temperature of 350 K. For sampled atoms of velocity v and characteristic temperature T, the theoretical instrumental discrimination [3] is 3/2m-1.66 x 10^27 v^2/2kT per mil per amu and is confirmed by experiment. Nonresonant ionization of hydrocarbons may occur at the high power densities necessary to saturate the two-photon transition of xenon (about 10^-9 Wcm^-2). Residual hydrocarbon effects in the spectrometer are monitored by detuning the wavelength of the ionizing laser away from resonance and are negligible. One side effect of the sample concentrator is that hydrocarbons tend to condense on parts of the cold spot the heating laser does not reach. Moreover most of the hydrocarbons that are evaporated leave the surface with velocities different from those of xenon and do not see the ionising laser beam. The spectrometer is currently being used to analyse xenon in meteorite residues and cosmogenic xenon in terrestrial barite. References 1. C H Chen, G S Hurst, M G Payne (1980) Chem. Phys. Lett. 75, 473-477. 2. J D Gilmour, S M Hewett, I C Lyon, M Stringer, G Turner (1991) Meas. Sci. Technol. 2, 589-595. 3. J D Gilmour, S M Hewett, I C Lyon, I Perera, G Turner, in prep. 4. G S Hurst, M G Payne, R C Phillips, J W T Dabbs, B E Lehmann (1984) J. Appl. Phys. 55, 1278-1284.

  1. The Acute Toxicity of Major Ion Salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia. III. Mathematical models for mixture toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset concerns the development of models for describing the acute toxicity of major ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia using data from single salt tests and binary...

  2. Generalized Selectivity Description for Polymeric Ion-Selective Electrodes Based on the Phase Boundary Potential Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Eric

    2010-02-15

    A generalized description of the response behavior of potentiometric polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes is presented on the basis of ion-exchange equilibrium considerations at the sample-membrane interface. This paper includes and extends on previously reported theoretical advances in a more compact yet more comprehensive form. Specifically, the phase boundary potential model is used to derive the origin of the Nernstian response behavior in a single expression, which is valid for a membrane containing any charge type and complex stoichiometry of ionophore and ion-exchanger. This forms the basis for a generalized expression of the selectivity coefficient, which may be used for the selectivity optimization of ion-selective membranes containing electrically charged and neutral ionophores of any desired stoichiometry. It is shown to reduce to expressions published previously for specialized cases, and may be effectively applied to problems relevant in modern potentiometry. The treatment is extended to mixed ion solutions, offering a comprehensive yet formally compact derivation of the response behavior of ion-selective electrodes to a mixture of ions of any desired charge. It is compared to predictions by the less accurate Nicolsky-Eisenman equation. The influence of ion fluxes or any form of electrochemical excitation is not considered here, but may be readily incorporated if an ion-exchange equilibrium at the interface may be assumed in these cases.

  3. Detectability of galactic supernova neutrinos coherently scattered on xenon nuclei in XMASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Hiraide, K.; Ichimura, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakagawa, K.; Nakahata, M.; Norita, T.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Yamashita, M.; Yang, B. S.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Tasaka, S.; Liu, J.; Martens, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Fujita, R.; Hosokawa, K.; Miuchi, K.; Oka, N.; Onishi, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Fukuda, Y.; Itow, Y.; Kegasa, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Masuda, K.; Takiya, H.; Uchida, H.; Nishijima, K.; Fujii, K.; Murayama, I.; Nakamura, S.; Xmass Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) plays a crucial role at the final evolution of stars. The detection of it would be of importance in astroparticle physics. Among all available neutrino sources, galactic supernovae give the highest neutrino flux in the MeV range. Among all liquid xenon dark matter experiments, XMASS has the largest sensitive volume and light yield. The possibility to detect galactic supernova via the CEvNS-process on xenon nuclei in the current XMASS detector was investigated. The total number of events integrated in about 18 s after the explosion of a supernova 10 kpc away from the Earth was expected to be from 3.5 to 21.1, depending on the supernova model used to predict the neutrino flux, while the number of background events in the same time window was measured to be negligible. All lead to very high possibility to detect CEvNS experimentally for the first time utilizing the combination of galactic supernovae and the XMASS detector. In case of a supernova explosion as close as Betelgeuse, the total observable events can be more than ∼ 104, making it possible to distinguish different supernova models by examining the evolution of neutrino event rate in XMASS.

  4. Estimation of neutron flux and xenon distributions via observer-based control theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.H.; Cho, N.Z. (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box 150, Cheongryang, Seoul (KR))

    1992-05-01

    State feedback control provides many advantages, such as stabilization and improved transient response. However, when state feedback control is considered for spatial control of a nuclear reactor, it requires complete knowledge of the distributions of the system state variables. Also, if the reactor is in a transient, flux mapping systems that are based on steady-state conditions are not appropriate for an accurate representation of the operating state of the reactor. In this paper a method is described for reconstructing the measurable and unmeasurable state variables in a nuclear reactor from output measurement data, which can be used to generate input for a feedback control system or serve as a core observer (estimator) in a reactor transient. The method is based on a Luenberger-type observer theory that is extended to infinite-dimensional distributed parameter systems. The method was applied to a simple reactor model in one spatial dimension and one energy group with xenon dynamics that exhibited spatial oscillations. The resulting observer was tested by using model-based data for measurement output. The results show that the spatial distributions of iodine, xenon, and neutron flux are estimated very well be the observer using information from a finite number of sensors.

  5. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...... enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast...

  6. Stochastic differential equation models for ion channel noise in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Goldwyn, Joshua H.; Imennov, Nikita S.; Famulare, Michael; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The random transitions of ion channels between conducting and nonconducting states generate a source of internal fluctuations in a neuron, known as channel noise. The standard method for modeling the states of ion channels nonlinearly couples continuous-time Markov chains to a differential equation for voltage. Beginning with the work of R. F. Fox and Y.-N. Lu [Phys. Rev. E 49, 3421 (1994)], there have been attempts to generate simpler models that use stochastic differential equation (SDEs) t...

  7. Simple kinetic model of ion induced gas emission from polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 215, 1/2 (2004), s. 162-168 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/03/0514; GA AV ČR IAA5011301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : polymers * ion irradiation * degradation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.997, year: 2004

  8. Colour rope model for extreme relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, T.S.; Nielsen, H.B.; Knoll, J.

    1984-04-01

    Our goal is to investigate the possible cumulative effects of the colour fields of the observable meson multiplicity distribution in the central rapidity region in extreme relativistic heavy ion collisions. In the first Chapter we overview the space-time picture of the string formation in a central heavy ion collision. We take into account trivial geometrical factors in a straight line geometry. In the second Chapter we consider the colour chargation process of heavy ions as a random walk. We calculate the expectation value and the relative standard deviation of the total effective charge square. In the third Chapter we consider the stochastic decay of a K-fold string-rope to mesons by the Schwinger-mechanism. We calculate the expected lifetime of a K-fold string and the time for the first quark antiquark pair creation. In the fourth Chapter we deal with the meson production of a K-fold rope relative to that of a single string and hence we look for a scaling between A + A and p + p collisions. (orig./HSI)

  9. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores.

  10. Ionization yield from electron tracks in liquid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronova, T.Ya.; Kipsanov, M.A.; Kruglov, A.A.; Obodovskij, I.M.; Pokachalov, S.G.; Shilov, V.A.; Khristich, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for calculating coefficients K β , characterizing ionization yield from electron track in liquid xenon are considered. K β calculation is conducted on the base of experimental data on K parameter characterizing ionization yield from a certain combination of photo-, Compton-and Auger electron tracks. K parameter measurements are conducted in liquid xenon at 170 K temperature within 10-30 keV gamma- and X radiation energy ranges. Calculated dependence of K β and K coefficients on the energy in a wide (5-500 keV) range is presented. K β values obtained can be applied for calculating the energy resolution of a gamma-spectrometer and linearity of its calibration characteristics if the electric field intensity in the spectrometer does not exceed some kV/cm

  11. Inelastic scattering of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnyuk, I. A.; Berloff, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study inelastic interactions of particles with quantized vortices in superfluids by using a semiclassical matter wave theory that is analogous to the Landau two-fluid equations, but allows for the vortex dynamics. The research is motivated by recent experiments on xenon-doped helium nanodroplets that show clustering of the impurities along the vortex cores. We numerically simulate the dynamics of trapping and interactions of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluid helium and the obtained results can be extended to scattering of other impurities by quantized vortices. Different energies and impact parameters of incident particles are considered. We show that inelastic scattering is closely linked to the generation of Kelvin waves along a quantized vortex during the interaction even if there is no capture. The capture criterion of an impurity is formulated in terms of the binding energy.

  12. Depth distribution of martensite in xenon implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Steenstrup, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of stress-induced martensite and its distribution in depth in xenon implanted austenitic stainless steel poly- and single crystals have been measured by Rutherford backscattering and channeling analysis, depth selective conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. In low nickel 17/7, 304 and 316 commercial stainless steels and in 17:13 single crystals the martensitic transformation starts at the surface and develops towards greater depth with increasing xenon fluence. The implanted layer is nearly completely transformed, and the interface between martensite and austenite is rather sharp and well defined. In high nickel 310 commercial stainless steel and 15:19 and 20:19 single crystals, on the other hand, only insignificant amounts of martensite are observed. (orig.)

  13. Search for magnetic inelastic dark matter with XENON100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, 1098XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F.; Bruno, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Alfonsi, M. [Institut für Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D. [LIBPhys, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L. [Physik-Institut, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B.; Calvén, J. [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Stockholm SE-10691 (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Bruenner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Budnik, R. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001 (Israel); Bütikofer, L., E-mail: lukas.buetikofer@lhep.unibe.ch, E-mail: xenon@lngs.infn.it [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); and others

    2017-10-01

    We present the first search for dark matter-induced delayed coincidence signals in a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber, using the 224.6 live days of the XENON100 science run II. This very distinct signature is predicted in the framework of magnetic inelastic dark matter which has been proposed to reconcile the modulation signal reported by the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration with the null results from other direct detection experiments. No candidate event has been found in the region of interest and upper limits on the WIMP's magnetic dipole moment are derived. The scenarios proposed to explain the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal by magnetic inelastic dark matter interactions of WIMPs with masses of 58.0 GeV/c{sup 2} and 122.7 GeV/c{sup 2} are excluded at 3.3 σ and 9.3 σ, respectively.

  14. Search for magnetic inelastic dark matter with XENON100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Di Gangi, P.; Di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lombardi, F.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Vargas, M.; Wang, H.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-10-01

    We present the first search for dark matter-induced delayed coincidence signals in a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber, using the 224.6 live days of the XENON100 science run II. This very distinct signature is predicted in the framework of magnetic inelastic dark matter which has been proposed to reconcile the modulation signal reported by the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration with the null results from other direct detection experiments. No candidate event has been found in the region of interest and upper limits on the WIMP's magnetic dipole moment are derived. The scenarios proposed to explain the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal by magnetic inelastic dark matter interactions of WIMPs with masses of 58.0 GeV/c2 and 122.7 GeV/c2 are excluded at 3.3 σ and 9.3 σ, respectively.

  15. Rotational spectrum and molecular properties of pyridine...xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shouyuan; Evangelisti, Luca; Velino, Biagio; Caminati, Walther

    2008-10-14

    The rotational spectra of six isotopologues of pyridine-xenon, two isotopes of the nitrogen atom ((14)N and (15)N) in pyridine with three isotopes of the rare gas atom ((129)Xe, (131)Xe, and (132)Xe) have been measured by pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The complex has a structure with the xenon atom located in the plane of symmetry perpendicular to the aromatic ring plane. Its distance from the center of mass of pyridine is 3.81 A, and it is tilted--with respect to the c principal axis of pyridine--by 7 degrees toward the N atom. The (14)N and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined for the isotopologues containing these nuclei. Information on the dynamics of the Xe van der Waals motions was obtained from the centrifugal distortion and from the changes in the planar moments of inertia in going from pyridine to pyridine...Xe.

  16. Application of xenon difluoride for surface modification of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsamyan, G.B.; Belokonov, K.V.; Vargasova, N.A.; Sokolov, V.B.; Chaivanov, B.B.; Zubov, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical interaction between xenon difluoride (XeF 2 ) and polymeric materials was investigated. It was shown that the reaction occurs on the surface of solid polymer layer and brings to chemical modification of the surface properties of the polymer leaving the bulk properties unchanged. The results of various analysis of the fluorinated samples (IR, FTIR-ATR, ESCA, bulk analysis etc) are presented. The mechanism of reaction is proposed. 12 refs.; 13 figs

  17. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittone, E., E-mail: ettore.vittone@unito.it [Department of Physics, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Pastuovic, Z. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Breese, M.B.H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Garcia Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Sevilla University, J. Andalucia, CSIC, Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jaksic, M. [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruder Boškovic Institute (RBI), P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Raisanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Siegele, R. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Simon, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Vizkelethy, G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • We study the electronic degradation of semiconductors induced by ion irradiation. • The experimental protocol is based on MeV ion microbeam irradiation. • The radiation induced damage is measured by IBIC. • The general model fits the experimental data in the low level damage regime. • Key parameters relevant to the intrinsic radiation hardness are extracted. - Abstract: This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  18. Dust in the Ion Wind: A Model for Plasma Dust Particle Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RILEY, MERLE E.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed for the forces acting on a micrometer-size particle (dust) suspended within a plasma sheath. The significant forces acting on a single particle are gravity, neutral gas drag, electric field, and the ion wind due to ion flow to the electrode. It is shown that an instability in the small-amplitude dust oscillation might exist if the conditions are appropriate. In such a case the forcing term due to the ion wind exceeds the damping of the gas drag. The basic physical cause for the instability is that the ion wind force can be a decreasing function of the relative ion-particle velocity. However it seems very unlikely the appropriate conditions for instability are present in typical dusty plasmas

  19. A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, J.C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent with availa......In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent...... with available structural data by NMR and molecular dynamics simulation and dynamic data such glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid fragility (m). Alkali phosphate glasses are exemplary systems for developing constraint model since the modifying cation network plays an important role besides the primary...... of the modifying ion sub-network, as the alkali ions must share non-bonding oxygen to satisfy their coordination requirements at higher alkali oxide contents. We argue that the systematically decreasing the Tg values of alkali phosphate glasses from Li2O to Na2O to Cs2O could be caused by a weakening...

  20. Online Estimation of Model Parameters of Lithium-Ion Battery Using the Cubature Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Yan, Rusheng; Tian, Jindong; Zhou, Shijie; Hu, Chao

    2017-11-01

    Online estimation of state variables, including state-of-charge (SOC), state-of-energy (SOE) and state-of-health (SOH) is greatly crucial for the operation safety of lithium-ion battery. In order to improve estimation accuracy of these state variables, a precise battery model needs to be established. As the lithium-ion battery is a nonlinear time-varying system, the model parameters significantly vary with many factors, such as ambient temperature, discharge rate and depth of discharge, etc. This paper presents an online estimation method of model parameters for lithium-ion battery based on the cubature Kalman filter. The commonly used first-order resistor-capacitor equivalent circuit model is selected as the battery model, based on which the model parameters are estimated online. Experimental results show that the presented method can accurately track the parameters variation at different scenarios.

  1. Cellular ion channel-pump system modeling using switched stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    This paper identifies a multidimensional random switched process model of a neuron with embedded Ca++ ion channel and pump molecules adiabatically interacting based on local ion concentrations near the cell membrane. The model interprets known physiology of the channels as a coupled set of switched random processes and derives mechanical equations based on concentration flow among different states of the system. Rapid changes to channel barrier energies occurring during channel opening and closing transitions are modeled as another degree of freedom commutating the state of the overall system. An ion reservoir model is used as the primary tool to incorporate stochastic effects in channel operation. The complete model is analyzed numerically and then the equations are used to motivate a stochastic model for closed state dwell times. The result is compared against expected results of a leaky-integrator and known single-channel histograms.

  2. Model of charge-state distributions for electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Edgell

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer model for the ion charge-state distribution (CSD in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS plasma is presented that incorporates non-Maxwellian distribution functions, multiple atomic species, and ion confinement due to the ambipolar potential well that arises from confinement of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR heated electrons. Atomic processes incorporated into the model include multiple ionization and multiple charge exchange with rate coefficients calculated for non-Maxwellian electron distributions. The electron distribution function is calculated using a Fokker-Planck code with an ECR heating term. This eliminates the electron temperature as an arbitrary user input. The model produces results that are a good match to CSD data from the ANL-ECRII ECRIS. Extending the model to 1D axial will also allow the model to determine the plasma and electrostatic potential profiles, further eliminating arbitrary user input to the model.

  3. Lithium Ion Batteries—Development of Advanced Electrical Equivalent Circuit Models for Nickel Manganese Cobalt Lithium-Ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Nikolian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, advanced equivalent circuit models (ECMs were developed to model large format and high energy nickel manganese cobalt (NMC lithium-ion 20 Ah battery cells. Different temperatures conditions, cell characterization test (Normal and Advanced Tests, ECM topologies (1st and 2nd Order Thévenin model, state of charge (SoC estimation techniques (Coulomb counting and extended Kalman filtering and validation profiles (dynamic discharge pulse test (DDPT and world harmonized light vehicle profiles have been incorporated in the analysis. A concise state-of-the-art of different lithium-ion battery models existing in the academia and industry is presented providing information about model classification and information about electrical models. Moreover, an overview of the different steps and information needed to be able to create an ECM model is provided. A comparison between begin of life (BoL and aged (95%, 90% state of health ECM parameters (internal resistance (Ro, polarization resistance (Rp, activation resistance (Rp2 and time constants (τ is presented. By comparing the BoL to the aged parameters an overview of the behavior of the parameters is introduced and provides the appropriate platform for future research in electrical modeling of battery cells covering the ageing aspect. Based on the BoL parameters 1st and 2nd order models were developed for a range of temperatures (15 °C, 25 °C, 35 °C, 45 °C. The highest impact to the accuracy of the model (validation results is the temperature condition that the model was developed. The 1st and 2nd order Thévenin models and the change from normal to advanced characterization datasets, while they affect the accuracy of the model they mostly help in dealing with high and low SoC linearity problems. The 2nd order Thévenin model with advanced characterization parameters and extended Kalman filtering SoC estimation technique is the most efficient and dynamically correct ECM model developed.

  4. Study of neutronic problems related to the xenon instability in the pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathonniere, G.

    1988-03-01

    Xenon instabilities lead to increase initial errors. So it is extremely difficult to get an accurate calculation schema able to deal with these problems which are very important for electrical grid whose electronuclear output is large. The main task was to build a tridimensional calculation schema including nuclear, thermal hydraulic feedback. It was qualified by comparing its results with an actual experiment. Many technical problems were investigated through analytical studies or calculation results: time step, spatial mesh, finite element, convergence criterion, modelization for grids and fast control rod moves. Moreover, a 1D model, for less expensive, was studied. Its comparison with the 3D results allowed to check its accuracy and to validate the modelization of the radial laplacien and the modelization of the control rods [fr

  5. Radio-xenon monitoring technology for CTBT verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, J. S.; Yoon, W. K.; Shin, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, Y. G.; Na, W. W

    1998-03-01

    To help ensure compliance with a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty (CTBT), it is important that monitoring technologies for detecting covert nuclear testing be available. Monitoring methods are included seismic, hydroacoustic, infra-sound, and radionuclide technologies. Conducting a test underground, underwater, under such condition, gaseous radionuclides detection would be useful method for detecting of nuclear detonation. This report described on as to performance of detecting equipment and detecting principle of radioactive described on as to performance of detecting equipment and detecting principle of radioactive noble gas detection for CTBT. Although the quantity of xenon radionuclides entering the atmosphere from a nuclear detonation may be very large, the combination of dilution in the atmosphere plus radioactive decay requires very sensitive measurements to detect these radionuclides. Furthermore, xenon radionuclides can be enter the atmosphere from sources other than nuclear detonation, including operating nuclear reactors, producing and using medical isotopes and nuclear fuel reprocessing. Since measurement of the activity ratios of xenon radionuclides is important for determine of their origin. (author). 19 refs., 13 tabs., 18 figs

  6. Mirror dark matter will be confirmed or excluded by XENON1T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Clarke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mirror dark matter, where dark matter resides in a hidden sector exactly isomorphic to the standard model, can be probed via direct detection experiments by both nuclear and electron recoils if the kinetic mixing interaction exists. In fact, the kinetic mixing interaction appears to be a prerequisite for consistent small scale structure: Mirror dark matter halos around spiral galaxies are dissipative – losing energy via dark photon emission. This ongoing energy loss requires a substantial energy input, which can be sourced from ordinary supernovae via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova's core. Astrophysical considerations thereby give a lower limit on the kinetic mixing strength, and indeed lower limits on both nuclear and electron recoil rates in direct detection experiments can be estimated. We show here that potentially all of the viable parameter space will be probed in forthcoming XENON experiments including LUX and XENON1T. Thus, we anticipate that these experiments will provide a definitive test of the mirror dark matter hypothesis.

  7. When the dust settles: stable xenon isotope constraints on the formation of nuclear fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassata, W S; Prussin, S G; Knight, K B; Hutcheon, I D; Isselhardt, B H; Renne, P R

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear weapons represent one of the most immediate threats of mass destruction. In the event that a procured or developed nuclear weapon is detonated in a populated metropolitan area, timely and accurate nuclear forensic analysis and fallout modeling would be needed to support attribution efforts and hazard assessments. Here we demonstrate that fissiogenic xenon isotopes retained in radioactive fallout generated by a nuclear explosion provide unique constraints on (1) the timescale of fallout formation, (2) chemical fractionation that occurs when fission products and nuclear fuel are incorporated into fallout, and (3) the speciation of fission products in the fireball. Our data suggest that, in near surface nuclear tests, the presence of a significant quantity of metal in a device assembly, combined with a short time allowed for mixing with the ambient atmosphere (seconds), may prevent complete oxidation of fission products prior to their incorporation into fallout. Xenon isotopes thus provide a window into the chemical composition of the fireball in the seconds that follow a nuclear explosion, thereby improving our understanding of the physical and thermo-chemical conditions under which fallout forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of neutrino background prediction for next generation dark matter xenon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeddu, M.; Picciau, E.

    2018-01-01

    Next generation direct dark matter detectors will have the sensitivity to detect neutrinos from several sources, among which atmospheric and diffuse supernova neutrinos, through the Standard Model reaction of Coherent Elastic Neutrino Scattering on nucleus. This reaction represents an irreducible background that can be expressed as a limit in the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles parameters plane. This limit is known as the “neutrino floor” and it has been obtained by other authors considering standard hypotheses for the neutrino-nucleus form factor and for the coherence of the scattering process. Since the coherent scattering has never been observed experimentally, it is licit to relax some hypotheses in the differential cross section and to evaluate the effect of such modifications on the neutrino floor prediction. In this contribution, we show a more accurate neutrino-nucleus form factor and we discuss the coherence hypothesis of the process in two extreme cases, namely the total coherence and the total decoherence regime. We derive the neutrino background event rate under these new assumptions, considering xenon as a target. The differences between the number of neutrino events and the implication for the next generation dark matter detectors, such as XENON1T/XENONnT, LZ and DARWIN, are discussed.

  9. The iodine–plutonium–xenon age of the Moon–Earth system revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avice, G.; Marty, B

    2014-01-01

    Iodine–plutonium–xenon isotope systematics have been used to re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth–atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radionuclides (129I, T1/2=15.6 Ma and 244Pu, T1/2=80 Ma) have produced radiogenic 129Xe and fissiogenic 131−136Xe, respectively, within the Earth, the related isotope fingerprints of which are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archaean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archaean eon. Here, we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits the computation of new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The corrected Xe formation interval for the Earth–atmosphere system is  Ma after the beginning of Solar System formation. This time interval may represent a lower limit for the age of the Moon-forming impact. PMID:25114317

  10. The iodine-plutonium-xenon age of the Moon-Earth system revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avice, G; Marty, B

    2014-09-13

    Iodine-plutonium-xenon isotope systematics have been used to re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth-atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radionuclides ((129)I, T1/2=15.6 Ma and (244)Pu, T1/2=80 Ma) have produced radiogenic (129)Xe and fissiogenic (131-136)Xe, respectively, within the Earth, the related isotope fingerprints of which are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archaean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archaean eon. Here, we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits the computation of new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The corrected Xe formation interval for the Earth-atmosphere system is [Formula: see text] Ma after the beginning of Solar System formation. This time interval may represent a lower limit for the age of the Moon-forming impact. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source—Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

  12. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source--Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%).

  13. Effects of ion strength and ion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Solon, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to show the influence of ionic strength (as activity corrections) andion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion processes in wastewater treatment plants(WWTPs). Using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2) as a case study, this paper presents ...

  14. NMR investigations of surfaces and interfaces using spin-polarized xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaede, Holly Caroline [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-07-01

    129Xe NMR is potentially useful for the investigation of material surfaces, but has been limited to high surface area samples in which sufficient xenon can be loaded to achieve acceptable signal to noise ratios. In Chapter 2 conventional 129Xe NMR is used to study a high surface area polymer, a catalyst, and a confined liquid crystal to determine the topology of these systems. Further information about the spatial proximity of different sites of the catalyst and liquid crystal systems is determined through two dimensional exchange NMR in Chapter 3. Lower surface area systems may be investigated with spin-polarized xenon, which may be achieved through optical pumping and spin exchange. Optically polarized xenon can be up to 105times more sensitive than thermally polarized xenon. In Chapter 4 highly polarized xenon is used to examine the surface of poly(acrylonitrile) and the formation of xenon clathrate hydrates. An attractive use of polarized xenon is as a magnetization source in cross polarization experiments. Cross polarization from adsorbed polarized xenon may allow detection of surface nuclei with drastic enhancements. A non-selective low field thermal mixing technique is used to enhance the 13C signal of CO2 of xenon occluded in solid CO2 by a factor of 200. High-field cross polarization from xenon to proton on the surface of high surface area polymers has enabled signal enhancements of ~1,000. These studies, together with investigations of the efficiency of the cross polarization process from polarized xenon, are discussed in Chapter 5. Another use of polarized xenon is as an imaging contrast agent in systems that are not compatible with traditional contrast agents. The resolution attainable with this method is determined through images of structured phantoms in Chapter 6.

  15. Evidence of nonspecific surface interactions between laser-polarized xenon and myoglobin in solution

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Seth M.; Spence, Megan M.; Goodson, Boyd M.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The high sensitivity of the magnetic resonance properties of xenon to its local chemical environment and the large 129Xe NMR signals attainable through optical pumping have motivated the use of xenon as a probe of macromolecular structure and dynamics. In the present work, we report evidence for nonspecific interactions between xenon and the exterior of myoglobin in aqueous solution, in addition to a previously reported internal binding interaction. 129Xe chemical shift measurements in denatu...

  16. Mechanistic Insights into Xenon Inhibition of NMDA Receptors from MD Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lu Tian; Xu, Yan; Tang, Pei

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors has been viewed as a primary cause of xenon anesthesia, yet the mechanism is unclear. Here, we investigated interactions between xenon and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a NMDA receptor and examined xenon-induced structural and dynamical changes that are relevant to functional changes of the NMDA receptor. Several comparative molecular dynamics simulations were performed on two X-ray structures representing the open- and closed-cleft LBD...

  17. Myocardial blood flow during general anesthesia with xenon in humans: a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Wolfgang; Meyer, Philipp T; Rossaint, Rolf; Baumert, Jan H; Coburn, Mark; Fries, Michael; Rex, Steffen

    2011-06-01

    Xenon has only minimal hemodynamic side effects and induces pharmacologic preconditioning. Thus, the use of xenon could be an interesting option in patients at risk for perioperative myocardial ischemia. However, little is known about the effects of xenon anesthesia on myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary vascular resistance in humans. Myocardial blood flow was noninvasively quantified by H₂¹⁵O positron emission tomography in six healthy volunteers (age: 38 ± 8 yr). MBF was measured at baseline and during general anesthesia induced with propofol and maintained with xenon, 59 ± 0%. Absolute quantification of MBF was started after the calculated plasma concentration of propofol had decreased to less than 1.5 μg · ml⁻¹. Compared with baseline (MBFbaseline, 1.03 ± 0.09 ml · min⁻¹ · g⁻¹; mean ± SD), MBF was decreased insignificantly by xenon (MBFxenon, 0.80 ± 0.22 ml · min⁻¹ · g⁻¹; -21%, P = 0.11). Xenon decreased the rate-pressure product (RPP; heart rate × systolic arterial pressure), an indicator of cardiac work and myocardial oxygen consumption (-15%, P xenon anesthesia was reduced to -9% (MBFcorr-xenon, 1.42 ± 0.28 ml · g⁻¹ · mmHg⁻¹ vs. MBFcorr-baseline, 1.60 ± 0.28 ml · g⁻¹ · mmHg⁻¹, P = 0.32). Xenon did not affect the dependency of MBF on the RPP. Coronary vascular resistance did not significantly change (+15 ± 23%, P = 0.18) during xenon anesthesia. In healthy subjects, xenon has only minimal effects on coronary flow dynamics. These effects are probably of indirect nature, reflecting the decrease in myocardial oxygen consumption induced by the effects of xenon anesthesia on cardiac work.

  18. Predicting neutron damage using TEM with in situ ion irradiation and computer modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Marquis A.; Li, Meimei; Xu, Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.

    2018-01-01

    We have constructed a computer model of irradiation defect production closely coordinated with TEM and in situ ion irradiation of Molybdenum at 80 °C over a range of dose, dose rate and foil thickness. We have reexamined our previous ion irradiation data to assign appropriate error and uncertainty based on more recent work. The spatially dependent cascade cluster dynamics model is updated with recent Molecular Dynamics results for cascades in Mo. After a careful assignment of both ion and neutron irradiation dose values in dpa, TEM data are compared for both ion and neutron irradiated Mo from the same source material. Using the computer model of defect formation and evolution based on the in situ ion irradiation of thin foils, the defect microstructure, consisting of densities and sizes of dislocation loops, is predicted for neutron irradiation of bulk material at 80 °C and compared with experiment. Reasonable agreement between model prediction and experimental data demonstrates a promising direction in understanding and predicting neutron damage using a closely coordinated program of in situ ion irradiation experiment and computer simulation.

  19. Simulation of a model nanopore sensor: Ion competition underlies device behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mádai, Eszter; Valiskó, Mónika; Dallos, András; Boda, Dezső

    2017-12-01

    We study a model nanopore sensor with which a very low concentration of analyte molecules can be detected on the basis of the selective binding of the analyte molecules to the binding sites on the pore wall. The bound analyte ions partially replace the current-carrier cations in a thermodynamic competition. This competition depends both on the properties of the nanopore and the concentrations of the competing ions (through their chemical potentials). The output signal given by the device is the current reduction caused by the presence of the analyte ions. The concentration of the analyte ions can be determined through calibration curves. We model the binding site with the square-well potential and the electrolyte as charged hard spheres in an implicit background solvent. We study the system with a hybrid method in which we compute the ion flux with the Nernst-Planck (NP) equation coupled with the Local Equilibrium Monte Carlo (LEMC) simulation technique. The resulting NP+LEMC method is able to handle both strong ionic correlations inside the pore (including finite size of ions) and bulk concentrations as low as micromolar. We analyze the effect of bulk ion concentrations, pore parameters, binding site parameters, electrolyte properties, and voltage on the behavior of the device.

  20. Mechanistic insights into xenon inhibition of NMDA receptors from MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu Tian; Xu, Yan; Tang, Pei

    2010-07-15

    Inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors has been viewed as a primary cause of xenon anesthesia, yet the mechanism is unclear. Here, we investigated interactions between xenon and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a NMDA receptor and examined xenon-induced structural and dynamical changes that are relevant to functional changes of the NMDA receptor. Several comparative molecular dynamics simulations were performed on two X-ray structures representing the open- and closed-cleft LBD of the NMDA receptor. We identified plausible xenon action sites in the LBD, including those nearby agonist sites, in the hinge region, and at the interface between two subunits. The xenon-binding energy varies from -5.3 to -0.7 kcal/mol. Xenon's effect on the NMDA receptor is conformation-dependent and is produced through both competitive and noncompetitive mechanisms. Xenon can promote cleft opening in the absence of agonists and consequently stabilizes the closed channel. Xenon can also bind at the interface of two subunits, alter the intersubunit interaction, and lead to a reduction of the distance between two GT linkers. This reduction corresponds to a rearrangement of the channel toward a direction of pore size decreasing, implying a closed or desensitized channel. In addition to these noncompetitive actions, xenon was found to weaken the glutamate binding, which could lead to low agonist efficacy and appear as competitive inhibition.

  1. Model etch profiles for ion energy distribution functions in an inductively coupled plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.; Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Woodworth, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Rectangular trench profiles are modeled with analytic etch rates determined from measured ion distribution functions. The pattern transfer step for this plasma etch is for trilayer lithography. Argon and chlorine angular ion energy distribution functions measured by a spherical collector ring analyzer are fit to a sum of drifting Maxwellian velocity distribution functions with anisotropic temperatures. The fit of the model ion distribution functions by a simulated annealing optimization procedure converges adequately for only two drifting Maxwellians. The etch rates are proportional to analytic expressions for the ion energy flux. Numerical computation of the etch profiles by integration of the characteristic equations for profile points and connection of the profiles points is efficient. copyright 1999 American Vacuum Society

  2. Validation of recent Geant4 physics models for application in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lechner, A; Ivanchenko, V N

    2010-01-01

    Cancer treatment with energetic carbon ions has distinct advantages over proton or photon irradiation. In this paper we present a simulation model integrated into the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (version 9.3) which enables the use of ICRU 73 stopping powers for ion transport calculations. For a few materials, revised ICRU 73 stopping power tables recently published by ICRU (P. Sigmund, A. Schinner, H. Paul, Errata and Addenda: ICRU Report 73 (Stopping of Ions Heavier than Helium), International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, 2009) were incorporated into Geant4, also covering media like water which are of importance in radiotherapeutical applications. We examine, with particular attention paid to the recent developments, the accuracy of current Geant4 models for simulating Bragg peak profiles of C-12 ions incident on water and polyethylene targets. Simulated dose distributions are validated against experimental data available in the literature, where the focus is on beam energies relevant to io...

  3. Modelling the interaction of high energy ions with inert matter, living matter, and moving matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuve, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In this report for accreditation to supervise research (HDR), the author proposes a synthetic (and however relatively detailed) overview of his research works in the fields of physics and radiology. The first part addresses works in the field of interaction between ions and inert matter (Monte Carlo simulation of emission induced by ion-solid interaction, simulation by molecular dynamics of pulverization). The second part addresses the interaction between ions and living matter: research strategy, principle of the Local Effect Model (LEM) and influence of its main parameters, LEM experimental assessment, LEM theoretical analysis, role of the cell oxidizing and anti-oxidizing system. The next part addresses the interaction of ions with moving matter: research strategy, lung mechanics modelling and clinical assessments, chest wall mechanics, transformation of movements simulated in 4D scanner imagery

  4. Modeling of Low Frequency MHD Induced Beam Ion Transport In NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Medley, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    Beam ion transport in the presence of low frequency MHD activity in National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) plasma is modeled numerically and analyzed theoretically in order to understand basic underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed fast ion redistribution and losses. Numerical modeling of the beam ions flux into the NPA in NSTX shows that after the onset of low frequency MHD activity high energy part of beam ion distribution, E b > 40keV, is redistributed radially due to stochastic diffusion. Such diffusion is caused by high order harmonics of the transit frequency resonance overlap in the phase space. Large drift orbit radial width induces such high order resonances. Characteristic confinement time is deduced from the measured NPA energy spectrum and is typically ∼ 4msec. Considered MHD activity may induce losses on the order of 10% at the internal magnetic field perturbation (delta)B/B = Ο (10 -3 ), which is comparable to the prompt orbit losses

  5. Structural transitions in full-length human prion protein detected by xenon as probe and spin labeling of the N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackal; Nair, Divya Gopalakrishnan; Schaal, Daniel; Barbosa de Aguiar, Marisa; Wenzel, Sabine; Kremer, Werner; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-24

    Fatal neurodegenerative disorders termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are associated with the accumulation of fibrils of misfolded prion protein PrP. The noble gas xenon accommodates into four transiently enlarged hydrophobic cavities located in the well-folded core of human PrP(23-230) as detected by [(1)H, (15)N]-HSQC spectroscopy. In thermal equilibrium a fifth xenon binding site is formed transiently by amino acids A120 to L125 of the presumably disordered N-terminal domain and by amino acids K185 to T193 of the well-folded domain. Xenon bound PrP was modelled by restraint molecular dynamics. The individual microscopic and macroscopic dissociation constants could be derived by fitting the data to a model including a dynamic opening and closing of the cavities. As observed earlier by high pressure NMR spectroscopy xenon binding influences also other amino acids all over the N-terminal domain including residues of the AGAAAAGA motif indicating a structural coupling between the N-terminal domain and the core domain. This is in agreement with spin labelling experiments at positions 93 or 107 that show a transient interaction between the N-terminus and the start of helix 2 and the end of helix 3 of the core domain similar to that observed earlier by Zn(2+)-binding to the octarepeat motif.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melezhik Vladimir S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Vladimir S.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR) of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  8. Multi-Node Thermal System Model for Lithium-Ion Battery Packs: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Ying; Smith, Kandler; Wood, Eric; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-09-14

    Temperature is one of the main factors that controls the degradation in lithium ion batteries. Accurate knowledge and control of cell temperatures in a pack helps the battery management system (BMS) to maximize cell utilization and ensure pack safety and service life. In a pack with arrays of cells, a cells temperature is not only affected by its own thermal characteristics but also by its neighbors, the cooling system and pack configuration, which increase the noise level and the complexity of cell temperatures prediction. This work proposes to model lithium ion packs thermal behavior using a multi-node thermal network model, which predicts the cell temperatures by zones. The model was parametrized and validated using commercial lithium-ion battery packs. neighbors, the cooling system and pack configuration, which increase the noise level and the complexity of cell temperatures prediction. This work proposes to model lithium ion packs thermal behavior using a multi-node thermal network model, which predicts the cell temperatures by zones. The model was parametrized and validated using commercial lithium-ion battery packs.

  9. Comparative Research on RC Equivalent Circuit Models for Lithium-Ion Batteries of Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent circuit models are a hot research topic in the field of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles, and scholars have proposed a variety of equivalent circuit models, from simple to complex. On one hand, a simple model cannot simulate the dynamic characteristics of batteries; on the other hand, it is difficult to apply a complex model to a real-time system. At present, there are few systematic comparative studies on equivalent circuit models of lithium-ion batteries. The representative first-order resistor-capacitor (RC model and second-order RC model commonly used in the literature are studied comparatively in this paper. Firstly, the parameters of the two models are identified experimentally; secondly, the simulation model is built in Matlab/Simulink environment, and finally the output precision of these two models is verified by the actual data. The results show that in the constant current condition, the maximum error of the first-order RC model is 1.65% and the maximum error for the second-order RC model is 1.22%. In urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS condition, the maximum error of the first-order RC model is 1.88%, and for the second-order RC model the maximum error is 1.69%. This is of great instructional significance to the application in practical battery management systems for the equivalent circuit model of lithium-ion batteries of electric vehicles.

  10. Electromagnetic field modeling and ion optics calculations for a continuous-flow AMS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B. X.; von Reden, K. F.; Roberts, M. L.; Schneider, R. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Jenkins, W. J.

    2007-06-01

    A continuous-flow 14C AMS (CFAMS) system is under construction at the NOSAMS facility. This system is based on a NEC Model 1.5SDH-1 0.5 MV Pelletron accelerator and will utilize a combination of a microwave ion source (MIS) and a charge exchange canal (CXC) to produce negative carbon ions from a continuously flowing stream of CO2 gas. For high-efficiency transmission of the large emittance, large energy-spread beam from the ion source unit, a large-acceptance and energy-achromatic injector consisting of a 45° electrostatic spherical analyzer (ESA) and a 90° double-focusing magnet has been designed. The 45° ESA is rotatable to accommodate a 134-sample MC-SNICS as a second ion source. The high-energy achromat (90° double focusing magnet and 90° ESA) has also been customized for large acceptance. Electromagnetic field modeling and ion optics calculations of the beamline were done with Infolytica MagNet, ElecNet, and Trajectory Evaluator. PBGUNS and SIMION were used for the modeling of ion source unit.

  11. Development of Continuum-Atomistic Approach for Modeling Metal Irradiation by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batgerel, Balt; Dimova, Stefka; Puzynin, Igor; Puzynina, Taisia; Hristov, Ivan; Hristova, Radoslava; Tukhliev, Zafar; Sharipov, Zarif

    2018-02-01

    Over the last several decades active research in the field of materials irradiation by high-energy heavy ions has been worked out. The experiments in this area are labor-consuming and expensive. Therefore the improvement of the existing mathematical models and the development of new ones based on the experimental data of interaction of high-energy heavy ions with materials are of interest. Presently, two approaches are used for studying these processes: a thermal spike model and molecular dynamics methods. The combination of these two approaches - the continuous-atomistic model - will give the opportunity to investigate more thoroughly the processes of irradiation of materials by high-energy heavy ions. To solve the equations of the continuous-atomistic model, a software package was developed and the block of molecular dynamics software was tested on the heterogeneous cluster HybriLIT.

  12. Progress in Technology Validation of the Next Ion Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Scott W.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system has been in advanced technology development under the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology project. The highest fidelity hardware planned has now been completed by the government/industry team, including a flight prototype model (PM) thruster, an engineering model (EM) power processing unit, EM propellant management assemblies, a breadboard gimbal, and control unit simulators. Subsystem and system level technology validation testing is in progress. To achieve the objective Technology Readiness Level 6, environmental testing is being conducted to qualification levels in ground facilities simulating the space environment. Additional tests have been conducted to characterize the performance range and life capability of the NEXT thruster. This paper presents the status and results of technology validation testing accomplished to date, the validated subsystem and system capabilities, and the plans for completion of this phase of NEXT development.

  13. Development of Model for the Prediction of Ions Concentration in Soil Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. ADENIYI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a mathematical model for the prediction of different ion concentration in soil water used for irrigational purposes in Niger State of Nigeria. The various ions considered are sodium (Na+, potassium (K+, calcium (Ca2+, nitrogen in form of nitrate (NO3-, and phosphorus in form of phosphate (PO43-. The model was simulated for different concentration readings using different adsorption fractions. The results obtained compared favourably with that of the experimental, though with slight variations which were attributed to some of the basic assumptions used during the process of model development.

  14. Experimental and theoretical data on ion-molecule-reactions relevant for plasma modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansel, A.; Praxmarer, C.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the fact that the rate coefficients of hundreds of ion-molecule-reactions have been published in the literature, much more data are required for the purpose of plasma modelling. Many ion molecule reactions have rate coefficients, k, as large as the collisional limiting value, k c , i.e. the rate coefficients k c at which ion-neutral collision complexes are formed are close to the actual rate coefficients observed. In the case of the interaction of an ion with a non polar molecule, k c , is determined by the Langevin limiting value k L being typically 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . However, when ions react with polar molecules k c is predicted by the average dipole orientation (ADO) theory. These classical theories yield accurate rate coefficients at thermal and elevated temperatures for practically all proton transfer as well as for many charge transfer and hydrogen abstraction reactions. The agreement between experimental and calculated values is usually better than ±20% and in the case of proton transfer reactions the agreement seems to be even better as recent investigations have shown. Even the interaction of the permanent ion dipole with non polar and polar neutrals can be taken into account to predict reaction rate coefficients as has been shown very recently in reactions of the highly polar ion ArH 3 + with various neutrals

  15. GANIL Workshop on Ion Sources; Journees Sources d'Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Renan [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1999-07-01

    The proceedings of the GANIL Workshop on Ion Sources held at GANIL - Caen on 18-19 March 1999 contains 13 papers aiming at improving the old source operation and developing new types of sources for nuclear research and studies of ion physics. A number of reports are devoted to applications like surface treatment, ion implantation or fusion injection. The 1+{yields}n+ transformation, charged particle transport in ECR sources, addition of cesium and xenon in negative ion sources and other basic issues in ion sources are also addressed.

  16. Modeling of Jupiter's electron an ion radiation belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, Angelica

    2004-01-01

    In the Fifties, James Van Allen showed the existence of regions of the terrestrial magnetosphere consisted of energetic particles, trapped by the magnetic field: the radiation belts. The radiation belts of the Earth were the subject of many modeling works and are studied since several years at the Departement Environnement Spatial (DESP) of ONERA. In 1998, the DESP decided to adapt the radiation belts model of the Earth, Salammbo, to radiation environment of Jupiter. A first thesis was thus carried out on the subject and a first radiation belts model of electrons of Jupiter was developed [Santos-Costa, 2001]. The aim of this second thesis is to develop a radiation belts model for protons and heavy ions. In order to validate the developed model, the comparisons between Salammbo results and observations are essential. However, the validation is difficult in the case of protons and heavy ions because in-situ measurements of the probes are very few and most of the time contaminated by very energetic electrons. To solve this problem, a very good model of electrons radiation belts is essential to confirm or cancel the contamination of protons and heavy ions measurements. Thus, in parallel to the development of the protons and heavy ions radiation belts model, the electrons models, already existing, has been improved. Then Salammbo results have been compared to the different observations available (in-situ measurements, radio-astronomical observations). The different comparisons show a very good agreement between Salammbo results and observations. (author) [fr

  17. Human Enteroids as a Model of Upper Small Intestinal Ion Transport Physiology and Pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Foulke-Abel (Jennifer); J. In (Julie); Yin, J. (Jianyi); N.C. Zachos (Nicholas C.); O. Kovbasnjuk (Olga); M.K. Estes (Mary K.); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); M. Donowitz (Mark)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims Human intestinal crypt-derived enteroids are a model of intestinal ion transport that require validation by comparison with cell culture and animal models. We used human small intestinal enteroids to study neutral Na+ absorption and stimulated fluid and anion secretion

  18. Use of intraperitoneal xenon-133 for imaging of intestinal strangulation in small bowel obstruction. [Rats; Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulkley, G.B.; Gharagozloo, F.; Alderson, P.O.; Horn, S.D.; Zuidema, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Intraperitoneal xenon-133 dissolved in saline solution was evaluated for the detection of early strangulation in a reproducible model of segmental intestinal obstruction in rats and dogs. There was a highly significant delay inexternally detected isotope washout from animals with strangulated loops compared with normal, sham operated and simple (nonstrangulated) obstruction control groups. Corresponding anterior abdominal gamma camera images showed marked retention of isotope at 1 hour in the strangulation obstruction groups and the sites of this activity corresponsed to the location of the ischemic loops. Blinded readings of these images by nuclear radiologists showed this method to be highly accurate for the detection of strangulation in these animal models. This method should be directly applicable to patients with intestinal obstruction.

  19. Use of intraperitoneal xenon-133 for imaging of intestinal strangulation in small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulkley, G.B.; Gharagozloo, F.; Alderson, P.O.; Horn, S.D.; Zuidema, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Intraperitoneal xenon-133 dissolved in saline solution was evaluated for the detection of early strangulation in a reproducible model of segmental intestinal obstruction in rats and dogs. There was a highly significant delay inexternally detected isotope washout from animals with strangulated loops compared with normal, sham operated and simple (nonstrangulated) obstruction control groups. Corresponding anterior abdominal gamma camera images showed marked retention of isotope at 1 hour in the strangulation obstruction groups and the sites of this activity corresponsed to the location of the ischemic loops. Blinded readings of these images by nuclear radiologists showed this method to be highly accurate for the detection of strangulation in these animal models. This method should be directly applicable to patients with intestinal obstruction

  20. Stochastic differential equation models for ion channel noise in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwyn, Joshua H.; Imennov, Nikita S.; Famulare, Michael; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2011-04-01

    The random transitions of ion channels between conducting and nonconducting states generate a source of internal fluctuations in a neuron, known as channel noise. The standard method for modeling the states of ion channels nonlinearly couples continuous-time Markov chains to a differential equation for voltage. Beginning with the work of R. F. Fox and Y.-N. Lu [Phys. Rev. EMTHDE91539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.49.3421 49, 3421 (1994)], there have been attempts to generate simpler models that use stochastic differential equation (SDEs) to approximate the stochastic spiking activity produced by Markov chain models. Recent numerical investigations, however, have raised doubts that SDE models can capture the stochastic dynamics of Markov chain models.We analyze three SDE models that have been proposed as approximations to the Markov chain model: one that describes the states of the ion channels and two that describe the states of the ion channel subunits. We show that the former channel-based approach can capture the distribution of channel noise and its effects on spiking in a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model to a degree not previously demonstrated, but the latter two subunit-based approaches cannot. Our analysis provides intuitive and mathematical explanations for why this is the case. The temporal correlation in the channel noise is determined by the combinatorics of bundling subunits into channels, but the subunit-based approaches do not correctly account for this structure. Our study confirms and elucidates the findings of previous numerical investigations of subunit-based SDE models. Moreover, it presents evidence that Markov chain models of the nonlinear, stochastic dynamics of neural membranes can be accurately approximated by SDEs. This finding opens a door to future modeling work using SDE techniques to further illuminate the effects of ion channel fluctuations on electrically active cells.

  1. NREL Multiphysics Modeling Tools and ISC Device for Designing Safer Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad A.; Yang, Chuanbo

    2016-03-24

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed a portfolio of multiphysics modeling tools to aid battery designers better understand the response of lithium ion batteries to abusive conditions. We will discuss this portfolio, which includes coupled electrical, thermal, chemical, electrochemical, and mechanical modeling. These models can simulate the response of a cell to overheating, overcharge, mechanical deformation, nail penetration, and internal short circuit. Cell-to-cell thermal propagation modeling will be discussed.

  2. Xenon Reduces Neuronal Hippocampal Damage and Alters the Pattern of Microglial Activation after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Randomized Controlled Animal Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Veldeman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe neuroprotective properties of the noble gas xenon have already been demonstrated using a variety of injury models. Here, we examine for the first time xenon’s possible effect in attenuating early brain injury (EBI and its influence on posthemorrhagic microglial neuroinflammation in an in vivo rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH.MethodsSprague-Dawley rats (n = 22 were randomly assigned to receive either Sham surgery (n = 9; divided into two groups or SAH induction via endovascular perforation (n = 13, divided into two groups. Of those randomized for SAH, 7 animals were postoperatively ventilated with 50 vol% oxygen/50 vol% xenon for 1 h and 6 received 50 vol% oxygen/50 vol% nitrogen (control. The animals were sacrificed 24 h after SAH. Of each animal, a cerebral coronal section (−3.60 mm from bregma was selected for assessment of histological damage 24 h after SAH. A 5-point neurohistopathological severity score was applied to assess neuronal cell damage in H&E and NeuN stained sections in a total of four predefined anatomical regions of interest. Microglial activation was evaluated by a software-assisted cell count of Iba-1 stained slices in three cortical regions of interest.ResultsA diffuse cellular damage was apparent in all regions of the ipsilateral hippocampus 24 h after SAH. Xenon-treated animals presented with a milder damage after SAH. This effect was found to be particularly pronounced in the medial regions of the hippocampus, CA3 (p = 0.040, and dentate gyrus (DG p = 0.040. However, for the CA1 and CA2 regions, there were no statistical differences in neuronal damage according to our histological scoring. A cell count of activated microglia was lower in the cortex of xenon-treated animals. This difference was especially apparent in the left piriform cortex (p = 0.017.ConclusionIn animals treated with 50 vol% xenon (for 1 h after SAH, a less pronounced neuronal damage was

  3. The Flatworm Macrostomum lignano Is a Powerful Model Organism for Ion Channel and Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil Simanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrical signals generated by ion channels play crucial roles in many cellular processes in both excitable and nonexcitable cells. Some ion channels are directly implemented in chemical signaling pathways, the others are involved in regulation of cytoplasmic or vesicular ion concentrations, pH, cell volume, and membrane potentials. Together with ion transporters and gap junction complexes, ion channels form steady-state voltage gradients across the cell membranes in nonexcitable cells. These membrane potentials are involved in regulation of such processes as migration guidance, cell proliferation, and body axis patterning during development and regeneration. While the importance of membrane potential in stem cell maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation is evident, the mechanisms of this bioelectric control of stem cell activity are still not well understood, and the role of specific ion channels in these processes remains unclear. Here we introduce the flatworm Macrostomum lignano as a versatile model organism for addressing these topics. We discuss biological and experimental properties of M. lignano, provide an overview of the recently developed experimental tools for this animal model, and demonstrate how manipulation of membrane potential influences regeneration in M. lignano.

  4. The Flatworm Macrostomum lignano Is a Powerful Model Organism for Ion Channel and Stem Cell Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanov, Daniil; Mellaart-Straver, Imre; Sormacheva, Irina; Berezikov, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Bioelectrical signals generated by ion channels play crucial roles in many cellular processes in both excitable and nonexcitable cells. Some ion channels are directly implemented in chemical signaling pathways, the others are involved in regulation of cytoplasmic or vesicular ion concentrations, pH, cell volume, and membrane potentials. Together with ion transporters and gap junction complexes, ion channels form steady-state voltage gradients across the cell membranes in nonexcitable cells. These membrane potentials are involved in regulation of such processes as migration guidance, cell proliferation, and body axis patterning during development and regeneration. While the importance of membrane potential in stem cell maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation is evident, the mechanisms of this bioelectric control of stem cell activity are still not well understood, and the role of specific ion channels in these processes remains unclear. Here we introduce the flatworm Macrostomum lignano as a versatile model organism for addressing these topics. We discuss biological and experimental properties of M. lignano, provide an overview of the recently developed experimental tools for this animal model, and demonstrate how manipulation of membrane potential influences regeneration in M. lignano.

  5. Microwave ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  6. Accurate modeling of benchmark x-ray spectra from highly charged ions of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Yuri; Tan, Joseph N.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Pomeroy, Joshua M.; Silver, Eric

    2006-01-01

    We present detailed collisional-radiative modeling for a benchmark x-ray spectrum of highly charged tungsten ions in the range between 3 and 10 A ring produced in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) with a beam energy of 4.08 keV. Remarkably good agreement between calculated and measured spectra was obtained without adjustable parameters, highlighting the well-controlled experimental conditions and the sophistication of the kinetic simulation of the non-Maxwellian tungsten plasma. This agreement permitted the identification of spectral lines from Cu-like W 45+ and Ni-like W 46+ ions, led to the reinterpretation of a previously known line in Ni-like ion as an overlap of electric-quadrupole and magnetic-octupole lines, and revealed subtle features in the x-ray spectrum arising from the dominance of forbidden transitions between excited states. The importance of level population mechanisms specific to the EBIT plasma is discussed as well

  7. Experimental discrimination of ion stopping models near the Bragg peak in highly ionized matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayzac, W; Frank, A; Ortner, A; Bagnoud, V; Basko, M M; Bedacht, S; Bläser, C; Blažević, A; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Ding, J; Ehret, M; Fiala, P; Frydrych, S; Gericke, D O; Hallo, L; Helfrich, J; Jahn, D; Kjartansson, E; Knetsch, A; Kraus, D; Malka, G; Neumann, N W; Pépitone, K; Pepler, D; Sander, S; Schaumann, G; Schlegel, T; Schroeter, N; Schumacher, D; Seibert, M; Tauschwitz, An; Vorberger, J; Wagner, F; Weih, S; Zobus, Y; Roth, M

    2017-06-01

    The energy deposition of ions in dense plasmas is a key process in inertial confinement fusion that determines the α-particle heating expected to trigger a burn wave in the hydrogen pellet and resulting in high thermonuclear gain. However, measurements of ion stopping in plasmas are scarce and mostly restricted to high ion velocities where theory agrees with the data. Here, we report experimental data at low projectile velocities near the Bragg peak, where the stopping force reaches its maximum. This parameter range features the largest theoretical uncertainties and conclusive data are missing until today. The precision of our measurements, combined with a reliable knowledge of the plasma parameters, allows to disprove several standard models for the stopping power for beam velocities typically encountered in inertial fusion. On the other hand, our data support theories that include a detailed treatment of strong ion-electron collisions.

  8. Study of negative hydrogen ion beam optics using the 3D3V PIC model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, K., E-mail: kmiyamot@naruto-u.ac.jp [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima, 772-8502 (Japan); Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1, Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, 223-8522 (Japan); Hanada, M.; Kojima, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1,Mukoyama, Naka, 319-0913 (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    The mechanism of negative ion extraction under real conditions with the complex magnetic field is studied by using the 3D PIC simulation code. The extraction region of the negative ion source for the negative ion based neutral beam injection system in fusion reactors is modelled. It is shown that the E x B drift of electrons is caused by the magnetic filter and the electron suppression magnetic field, and the resultant asymmetry of the plasma meniscus. Furthermore, it is indicated that that the asymmetry of the plasma meniscus results in the asymmetry of negative ion beam profile including the beam halo. It could be demonstrated theoretically that the E x B drift is not significantly weakened by the elastic collisions of the electrons with neutral particles.

  9. Infinite cloud model of electrification by the precipitation mechanism in the pressence of high rates of ion generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, J.D.; Rosenkilde, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    We have extended a simple, infinite-cloud, precipitation-mechanism model of thundercloud electrification to include effects due to the presence of radioactive aerosol particles. These effects involve ion generation, currents due to motions of ions and charged aerosol particles, and collection of ions and aerosol particles by hydrometeors and cloud droplets. Our conclusion is that an ion-pair generation rate G equal to or greater than 10 12 m -3 s -1 will prevent significant electric-field growth

  10. Evaluation of Model Based State of Charge Estimation Methods for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyue Zou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Four model-based State of Charge (SOC estimation methods for lithium-ion (Li-ion batteries are studied and evaluated in this paper. Different from existing literatures, this work evaluates different aspects of the SOC estimation, such as the estimation error distribution, the estimation rise time, the estimation time consumption, etc. The equivalent model of the battery is introduced and the state function of the model is deduced. The four model-based SOC estimation methods are analyzed first. Simulations and experiments are then established to evaluate the four methods. The urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS current profiles are applied to simulate the drive situations of an electrified vehicle, and a genetic algorithm is utilized to identify the model parameters to find the optimal parameters of the model of the Li-ion battery. The simulations with and without disturbance are carried out and the results are analyzed. A battery test workbench is established and a Li-ion battery is applied to test the hardware in a loop experiment. Experimental results are plotted and analyzed according to the four aspects to evaluate the four model-based SOC estimation methods.

  11. Modeling Adsorption Kinetics of Magnesium and Phosphate Ions on Goethite by Empirical Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Talebi Atouei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Natural environments, including soils and sediments, are open and complex systems in which physico-chemical reactions are in semi equilibrium state. In these systems, bioavailability of plant nutrients, like phosphate, is influenced by environmental conditions and concentrations of other ions such as calcium and magnesium. Magnesium is a dominant cation in irrigation water and in the soil solution of calcareous soils. Recent evidences show relative increase in the concentration of magnesium in irrigation water. Because of the importance of chemical kinetics in controlling concentrations of these ions in the soil solution and for understanding their effects of adsorption kinetics of magnesium and phosphate ions, in this research, adsorption kinetics of these two ions on goethite is investigated as function of time and pH in single ion and binary ion systems. The experimental data are described by using the adsorption kinetics equations. These data are of the great importance in better understanding adsorption interactions and ion adsorption mechanism.With respect to the importance of these interactions from both economical and environmental point of view, in this research, the kinetics and thermodynamics of phosphate and Mg2adsorption interactions were investigated as function of pH on soil model mineral goethite in both single and binary ion systems. Materials and Methods: Kinetics experiments were performed in the presence of 0.2 mM magnesium and 0.4 mM phosphate in 0.1 M NaCl background solution and 3 g L-1 goethite concentration as function of pH and time (1, 5, 14, 24, 48. 72 and 168 h in single ion and binary ion systems. After reaction time, the suspensions were centrifuged and a sample of supernatant was taken for measuring ions equilibrium concentrations.Phosphate concentration was measured calorimetrically with the ammonium molybdate blue method by spectrophotometer (Jenway-6505 UV/Vis. Magnesium concentration was

  12. Make-up of injector test stand (ITS-1) and preliminary results with Model-I ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, S.; Ito, T.; Kondo, U.; Ohara, Y.; Oga, T.; Shibata, T.; Shirakata, H.; Sugawara, T.; Tanaka, S.

    Constitution of the 1-st injector test stand (ITS-1) in the Thermonuclear Division, JAERI, and the performance of the Model-I ion source are described. Heating a plasma by neutral beam injection is one of the promising means in the thermonuclear fusion devices. Purpose of the test stand is to develop the ion sources used in such injection systems. The test stand was completed in February 1975, which is capable of testing the ion sources up to 12 amps at 30 kV. A hydrogen ion beam of 5.5 amps at 25 kV was obtained in the Model-I ion source

  13. Modelling radiation fields of ion beams in tissue-like materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burigo, Lucas Norberto

    2014-01-01

    Fast nuclei are ionizing radiation which can cause deleterious effects to irradiated cells. The modelling of the interactions of such ions with matter and the related effects are very important to physics, radiobiology, medicine and space science and technology. A powerful method to study the interactions of ionizing radiation with biological systems was developed in the field of microdosimetry. Microdosimetry spectra characterize the energy deposition to objects of cellular size, i.e., a few micrometers. In the present thesis the interaction of ions with tissue-like media was investigated using the Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) developed at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies. MCHIT is a Geant4-based application intended to benchmark the physical models of Geant4 and investigate the physical properties of therapeutic ion beams. We have implemented new features in MCHIT in order to calculate microdosimetric quantities characterizing the radiation fields of accelerated nucleons and nuclei. The results of our Monte Carlo simulations were compared with recent experimental microdosimetry data. In addition to microdosimetry calculations with MCHIT, we also investigated the biological properties of ion beams, e.g. their relative biological effectiveness (RBE), by means of the modified Microdosimetric-Kinetic model (MKM). The MKM uses microdosimetry spectra in describing cell response to radiation. MCHIT+MKM allowed us to study the physical and biological properties of ion beams. The main results of the thesis are as follows: MCHIT is able to describe the spatial distribution of the physical dose in tissue-like media and microdosimetry spectra for ions with energies relevant to space research and ion-beam cancer therapy; MCHIT+MKM predicts a reduction of the biological effectiveness of ions propagating in extended medium due to nuclear fragmentation reactions; We predicted favourable biological dose-depth profiles for monoenergetic helium and

  14. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression of hadron yields at high transverse momentum, provide exciting new information on the properties of the plasma formed. Keywords. Quark-gluon plasma; transport models; flow; jet quenching.

  15. Assessment of potential advantages of relevant ions for particle therapy: A model based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grün, Rebecca, E-mail: r.gruen@gsi.de [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Different ion types offer different physical and biological advantages for therapeutic applications. The purpose of this work is to assess the advantages of the most commonly used ions in particle therapy, i.e., carbon ({sup 12}C), helium ({sup 4}He), and protons ({sup 1}H) for different treatment scenarios. Methods: A treatment planning analysis based on idealized target geometries was performed using the treatment planning software TRiP98. For the prediction of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) that is required for biological optimization in treatment planning the local effect model (LEM IV) was used. To compare the three ion types, the peak-to-entrance ratio (PER) was determined for the physical dose (PER{sub PHY} {sub S}), the RBE (PER{sub RBE}), and the RBE-weighted dose (PER{sub BIO}) resulting for different dose-levels, field configurations, and tissue types. Further, the dose contribution to artificial organs at risk (OAR) was assessed and a comparison of the dose distribution for the different ion types was performed for a patient with chordoma of the skull base. Results: The study showed that the advantages of the ions depend on the physical and biological properties and the interplay of both. In the case of protons, the consideration of a variable RBE instead of the clinically applied generic RBE of 1.1 indicates an advantage in terms of an increased PER{sub RBE} for the analyzed configurations. Due to the fact that protons show a somewhat better PER{sub PHY} {sub S} compared to helium and carbon ions whereas helium shows a higher PER{sub RBE} compared to protons, both protons and helium ions show a similar RBE-weighted dose distribution. Carbon ions show the largest variation of the PER{sub RBE} with tissue type and a benefit for radioresistant tumor types due to their higher LET. Furthermore, in the case of a two-field irradiation, an additional gain in terms of PER{sub BIO} is observed when using an orthogonal field configuration

  16. Xenon-induced power oscillations in a generic small modular reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitcher, Evans Damenortey

    As world demand for energy continues to grow at unprecedented rates, the world energy portfolio of the future will inevitably include a nuclear energy contribution. It has been suggested that the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) could play a significant role in the spread of civilian nuclear technology to nations previously without nuclear energy. As part of the design process, the SMR design must be assessed for the threat to operations posed by xenon-induced power oscillations. In this research, a generic SMR design was analyzed with respect to just such a threat. In order to do so, a multi-physics coupling routine was developed with MCNP/MCNPX as the neutronics solver. Thermal hydraulic assessments were performed using a single channel analysis tool developed in Python. Fuel and coolant temperature profiles were implemented in the form of temperature dependent fuel cross sections generated using the SIGACE code and reactor core coolant densities. The Power Axial Offset (PAO) and Xenon Axial Offset (XAO) parameters were chosen to quantify any oscillatory behavior observed. The methodology was benchmarked against results from literature of startup tests performed at a four-loop PWR in Korea. The developed benchmark model replicated the pertinent features of the reactor within ten percent of the literature values. The results of the benchmark demonstrated that the developed methodology captured the desired phenomena accurately. Subsequently, a high fidelity SMR core model was developed and assessed. Results of the analysis revealed an inherently stable SMR design at beginning of core life and end of core life under full-power and half-power conditions. The effect of axial discretization, stochastic noise and convergence of the Monte Carlo tallies in the calculations of the PAO and XAO parameters was investigated. All were found to be quite small and the inherently stable nature of the core design with respect to xenon-induced power oscillations was confirmed. Finally, a

  17. Xenon Acquisition Strategies for High-Power Electric Propulsion NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Unfried, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of high-power solar electric propulsion (SEP) for both NASA's human and science exploration missions combined with the technology investment from the Space Technology Mission Directorate have enabled the development of a 50kW-class SEP mission. NASA mission concepts developed, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, and those proposed by contracted efforts for the 30kW-class demonstration have a range of xenon propellant loads from 100's of kg up to 10,000 kg. A xenon propellant load of 10 metric tons represents greater than 10% of the global annual production rate of xenon. A single procurement of this size with short-term delivery can disrupt the xenon market, driving up pricing, making the propellant costs for the mission prohibitive. This paper examines the status of the xenon industry worldwide, including historical xenon supply and pricing. The paper discusses approaches for acquiring on the order of 10 MT of xenon propellant considering realistic programmatic constraints to support potential near-term NASA missions. Finally, the paper will discuss acquisitions strategies for mission campaigns utilizing multiple high-power solar electric propulsion vehicles requiring 100's of metric tons of xenon over an extended period of time where a longer term acquisition approach could be implemented.

  18. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Lowering the radioactivity of the photomultiplier tubes for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    The low-background, VUV-sensitive 3-inch diameter photomultiplier tube R11410 has been developed by Hamamatsu for dark matter direct detection experiments using liquid xenon as the target material. We present the results from the joint effort between the XENON collaboration and the Hamamatsu company

  20. Xenon produces minimal haemodynamic effects in rabbits with chronically compromised left ventricular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preckel, B.; Schlack, W.; Heibel, T.; Rütten, H.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Xenon has only minimal haemodynamic side-effects on normal myocardium and might be a preferable anaesthetic agent for patients with heart failure. We studied the haemodynamic changes caused by 70% xenon in rabbits with chronically compromised left ventricular (LV) function. METHODS:

  1. Efficient calculation of local dose distributions for response modeling in proton and heavier ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Hahn, Ute; Kiderlen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We present an algorithm for fast and accurate computation of the local dose distribution in MeV beams of protons, carbon ions or other heavy charged particles. It uses compound Poisson modeling of track interaction and successive convolutions for fast computation. It can handle arbitrary complex...... mixed particle fields over a wide range of fluences. Since the local dose distribution is the essential part of several approaches to model detector efficiency and cellular response it has potential use in ion-beam dosimetry, radiotherapy, and radiobiology....

  2. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte...... Carlo simulations with SHIELD-HIT10A reasonably matched the most abundant PET isotopes 11C and 15O. We observed an ion-energy (i.e., depth) dependence of the agreement between SHIELD-HIT10A and measurement. Improved modeling requires more accurate measurements of cross-section values....

  3. Study of regional lung function with xenon 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, D.; Wagner, R.; Germain, M.; Chardon, G.

    1975-01-01

    Exploration of regional lung function includes study of the closed circuit perfusion and ventilation respectively by injection and inhalation of xenon 133. The radiation is measured across the chest using 4 fixed scintillation counters, placed opposite the subject's back, 2 per lung field. Theoretical regional values using 15 normal young subjects are determined. Three cases justified the practical interest of this method. The percentage of variation for the parameters studied was about 10%. The method proved very useful for the clinician to whom it provides a numerical assessment of regional ventilation and perfusion [fr

  4. Determination of BEACON Coupling Coefficients using data from Xenon transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, M.; Kurincic, B.

    2007-01-01

    NEK uses BEACO TM code (BEACO TM - Westinghouse Best Estimate Analyzer for Core Operating Nuclear) for core monitoring, analysis and core behaviour prediction. Coupling Coefficients determine relationship between core response and excore instrumentation. Measured power distribution using incore moveable detectors during Xenon transient with sufficient power axial offset change is the most important data for further analysis. Classic methodology and BEACO TM Conservative methodology using established Coupling Coefficients are compared on NPP Krsko case. BEACON TM Conservative methodology with predefined Coupling Coefficients is used as a surveillance tool for verification of relationship between core and excore instrumentation during power operation. (author)

  5. Regional study of ventilation with inhaled xenon 133 in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaultier, C.; Mensch, B.; Gerbeaux, J.

    1975-01-01

    A regional exploration of pulmonary ventilation in a population of 104 infants and children by a study of distribution and washout of xenon 133 inhaled with rebreathing is carried out. The results are expressed by photographs (gamma-camera) and time-activity curves. The indications for regional exploration were oriented by the existence on the straight X-ray film of a localised ventilation disorder (a hyperlucent area or an opacity). This study permitted physiopathological analysis and guided endobronchial examinations. The functional results obtained, complete and explain other methods of exploration of lung function by spirography, ventilatory mechanics, transthoracic electrical measurements and study of lung perfusion with technetium 99m [fr

  6. A phenomenological force model of Li-ion battery packs for enhanced performance and health management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ki-Yong; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2017-10-01

    A 1-D phenomenological force model of a Li-ion battery pack is proposed to enhance the control performance of Li-ion battery cells in pack conditions for efficient performance and health management. The force model accounts for multiple swelling sources under the operational environment of electric vehicles to predict swelling-induced forces in pack conditions, i.e. mechanically constrained. The proposed force model not only incorporates structural nonlinearities due to Li-ion intercalation swelling, but also separates the overall range of states of charge into three ranges to account for phase transitions. Moreover, an approach to study cell-to-cell variations in pack conditions is proposed with serial and parallel combinations of linear and nonlinear stiffness, which account for battery cells and other components in the battery pack. The model is shown not only to accurately estimate the reaction force caused by swelling as a function of the state of charge, battery temperature and environmental temperature, but also to account for cell-to-cell variations due to temperature variations, SOC differences, and local degradation in a wide range of operational conditions of electric vehicles. Considering that the force model of Li-ion battery packs can account for many possible situations in actual operation, the proposed approach and model offer potential utility for the enhancement of current battery management systems and power management strategies.

  7. Multi-scale modelling of ions in solution: from atomistic descriptions to chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ions in solution play a fundamental role in many physical, chemical, and biological processes. The PUREX process used in the nuclear industry to the treatment of spent nuclear fuels is considered as an example. For industrial applications these systems are usually described using simple analytical models which are fitted to reproduce the available experimental data. In this work, we propose a multi-scale coarse graining procedure to derive such models from atomistic descriptions. First, parameters for classical force-fields of ions in solution are extracted from ab-initio calculations. Effective (McMillan-Mayer) ion-ion potentials are then derived from radial distribution functions measured in classical molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to define an implicit solvent model of electrolytes. Finally, perturbation calculations are performed to define the best possible representation for these systems, in terms of charged hard-sphere models. Our final model is analytical and contains no free 'fitting' parameters. It shows good agreement with the exact results obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations for the thermodynamic and structural properties. Development of a similar model for the electrolyte viscosity, from information derived from atomistic descriptions, is also introduced. (author)

  8. A model system to give an insight into the behaviour of gold nanoparticles under ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramjauny, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Nano-composites fabricated with ion-based techniques have a number of attractive characteristics. However, the main and most crucial difficulty in obtaining commercial NPs-based devices is the inability to produce a suitable narrow size and spatial NP distributions. The objective of this thesis is twofold: i) to go further in the description of the behavior of the ion-driven NPs and ii) to overcome the limitations related to the ion-beam techniques providing a guideline methodology to rationalize the synthesis of NPs when ion-beams are used. Thus, a model system is fabricated. It consists of chemically synthesized metallic nanoparticles sandwiched between two silica layers. We show how the ion irradiation and the temperature can be used to tune the size distribution of the embedded NPs. Moreover, we show that when an initially large NPs size distribution is considered, the study of the growth kinetic of the NPs under irradiation can be problematic. Our model system is than used to investigate in detail the behavior of the NPs under irradiation. We show that the evolution of the precipitate phase under irradiation is successfully described by an Ostwald ripening mechanism in an open system limited by the diffusion. Moreover, the concentration threshold for nucleation as well as the surface tension and the gold diffusivity in silica under irradiation is estimated. Finally, direct and inverse Ostwald ripening processes under irradiation are systematically investigated and the existing theoretical models experimentally checked. (author)

  9. Modelling of advanced three-ion ICRF heating and fast ion generation scheme for tokamaks and stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustin, J. M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Lanthaler, S.; Villard, L.; Pfefferlé, D.; Geiger, J.; Kazakov, Ye O.; Van Eester, D.

    2017-08-01

    Absorption of ion-cyclotron range of frequencies waves at the fundamental resonance is an efficient source of plasma heating and fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. This heating method is planned to be exploited as a fast ion source in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator. The work presented here assesses the possibility of using the newly developed three-ion species scheme (Kazakov et al (2015) Nucl. Fusion 55 032001) in tokamak and stellarator plasmas, which could offer the capability of generating more energetic ions than the traditional minority heating scheme with moderate input power. Using the SCENIC code, it is found that fast ions in the MeV range of energy can be produced in JET-like plasmas. The RF-induced particle pinch is seen to strongly impact the fast ion pressure profile in particular. Our results show that in typical high-density W7-X plasmas, the three-ion species scheme generates more energetic ions than the more traditional minority heating scheme, which makes three-ion scenario promising for fast-ion confinement studies in W7-X.

  10. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)]. E-mail: jesus.hernandez.mangas@tel.uva.es; Arias, J. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Marques, L.A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Ruiz-Bueno, A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Bailon, L. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results.

  11. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Arias, J.; Marques, L.A.; Ruiz-Bueno, A.; Bailon, L.

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results

  12. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  13. A generalized Jaynes-Cummings model: The relativistic parametric amplifier and a single trapped ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-Guillén, D., E-mail: dojedag@ipn.mx [Escuela Superior de Cómputo, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Juan de Dios Bátiz esq. Av. Miguel Othón de Mendizábal, Col. Lindavista, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Mota, R. D. [Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Unidad Culhuacán, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Santa Ana No. 1000, Col. San Francisco Culhuacán, Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04430 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Granados, V. D. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ed. 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    We introduce a generalization of the Jaynes-Cummings model and study some of its properties. We obtain the energy spectrum and eigenfunctions of this model by using the tilting transformation and the squeezed number states of the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. As physical applications, we connect this new model to two important and novelty problems: the relativistic parametric amplifier and the quantum simulation of a single trapped ion.

  14. Model and observations of Schottky-noise suppression in a cold heavy-ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danared, H; Källberg, A; Rensfelt, K-G; Simonsson, A

    2002-04-29

    Some years ago it was found at GSI in Darmstadt that the momentum spread of electron-cooled beams of highly charged ions dropped abruptly to very low values when the particle number decreased to 10 000 or less. This has been interpreted as an ordering of the ions, such that they line up after one another in the ring. We report observations of similar transitions at CRYRING, including an accompanying drop in Schottky-noise power. We also introduce a model of the ordered beam from which the Schottky-noise power can be calculated numerically. The good agreement between the model calculation and the experimental data is seen as evidence for a spatial ordering of the ions.

  15. Models for the Immediate Environment of Ions in Aqueous Solutions of Neodymium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, P. R.; Grechin, O. V.

    2018-01-01

    Radial distribution functions of neodymium chloride aqueous solutions in a wide range of concentrations under ambient conditions are calculated from experimental data obtained earlier via X-ray diffraction analysis. Different models of the structural organization of the system are developed. The optimum versions are determined by calculating theoretical functions for each model and comparing their fit to the experimental functions. Such quantitative characteristics of the immediate environment of Nd3+ and Cl- ions as coordination numbers, interparticle distances, and varieties of ion pairs are determined. It is shown that the average number of water molecules in the first coordination sphere of the cation falls from 9 to 6.2 as the concentration rises. The structure of the systems over the whole range of concentrations is determined by ion associates of the noncontact type.

  16. Benchmarking nuclear models of FLUKA and GEANT4 for carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, TT; Quesada, J M; Bohlen, T T; Cerutti, F; Gudowska, I; Ferrari, A; Mairani, A

    2010-01-01

    As carbon ions, at therapeutic energies, penetrate tissue, they undergo inelastic nuclear reactions and give rise to significant yields of secondary fragment fluences. Therefore, an accurate prediction of these fluences resulting from the primary carbon interactions is necessary in the patient's body in order to precisely simulate the spatial dose distribution and the resulting biological effect. In this paper, the performance of nuclear fragmentation models of the Monte Carlo transport codes, FLUKA and GEANT4, in tissue-like media and for an energy regime relevant for therapeutic carbon ions is investigated. The ability of these Monte Carlo codes to reproduce experimental data of charge-changing cross sections and integral and differential yields of secondary charged fragments is evaluated. For the fragment yields, the main focus is on the consideration of experimental approximations and uncertainties such as the energy measurement by time-of-flight. For GEANT4, the hadronic models G4BinaryLightIonReaction a...

  17. Life Prediction Model for Grid-Connected Li-ion Battery Energy Storage System: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saxon, Aron R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lundstrom, Blake R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cao, Ziwei [SunPower Corporation; Roc, Albert [SunPower Corp.

    2017-08-25

    Life Prediction Model for Grid-Connected Li-ion Battery Energy Storage System: Preprint Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are being deployed on the electrical grid for a variety of purposes, such as to smooth fluctuations in solar renewable power generation. The lifetime of these batteries will vary depending on their thermal environment and how they are charged and discharged. To optimal utilization of a battery over its lifetime requires characterization of its performance degradation under different storage and cycling conditions. Aging tests were conducted on commercial graphite/nickel-manganese-cobalt (NMC) Li-ion cells. A general lifetime prognostic model framework is applied to model changes in capacity and resistance as the battery degrades. Across 9 aging test conditions from 0oC to 55oC, the model predicts capacity fade with 1.4 percent RMS error and resistance growth with 15 percent RMS error. The model, recast in state variable form with 8 states representing separate fade mechanisms, is used to extrapolate lifetime for example applications of the energy storage system integrated with renewable photovoltaic (PV) power generation.

  18. A Simplified Model to Estimate the Concentration of Inorganic Ions and Heavy Metals in Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemêncio Nhantumbo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model that uses only pH, alkalinity, and temperature to estimate the concentrations of major ions in rivers (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, HCO3−, SO42−, Cl−, and NO3− together with the equilibrium concentrations of minor ions and heavy metals (Fe3+, Mn2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Al3+, Pb2+, and Zn2+. Mining operations have been increasing, which has led to changes in the pollution loads to receiving water systems, meanwhile most developing countries cannot afford water quality monitoring. A possible solution is to implement less resource-demanding monitoring programs, supported by mathematical models that minimize the required sampling and analysis, while still being able to detect water quality changes, thereby allowing implementation of measures to protect the water resources. The present model was developed using existing theories for: (i carbonate equilibrium; (ii total alkalinity; (iii statistics of major ions; (iv solubility of minerals; and (v conductivity of salts in water. The model includes two options to estimate the concentrations of major ions: (1 a generalized method, which employs standard values from a world-wide data base; and (2 a customized method, which requires specific baseline data for the river of interest. The model was tested using data from four monitoring stations in Swedish rivers with satisfactory results.

  19. Building Atomic Models of the Ion Channels Based on Low Resolution Electron Microscopy Maps and Homology Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoseletsky, Valery; Malak, Olfat A; Loussouarn, Gildas; Sokolova, Olga S

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels play pivotal roles in excitable and non-excitable cells. For many decades, structural properties and molecular mechanisms of these channels were inferred from functional observations. At the turn of the twenty-first century, structural biology revealed major aspects in the structural basis of ion channel organization, permeation, and gating. Among the available tools, homology modeling associated with low resolution microscopy helps in delineating the different structural elements of voltage-gated channels. Here, we describe in detail the methodology of homology modeling, using the 3D structure of the Kv2.1ΔCTA ion channel as a reference.

  20. Modeling of negative ion extraction from a magnetized plasma source: Derivation of scaling laws and description of the origins of aberrations in the ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Garrigues, L.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2018-02-01

    We model the extraction of negative ions from a high brightness high power magnetized negative ion source. The model is a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm with Monte-Carlo Collisions. The negative ions are generated only on the plasma grid surface (which separates the plasma from the electrostatic accelerator downstream). The scope of this work is to derive scaling laws for the negative ion beam properties versus the extraction voltage (potential of the first grid of the accelerator) and plasma density and investigate the origins of aberrations on the ion beam. We show that a given value of the negative ion beam perveance correlates rather well with the beam profile on the extraction grid independent of the simulated plasma density. Furthermore, the extracted beam current may be scaled to any value of the plasma density. The scaling factor must be derived numerically but the overall gain of computational cost compared to performing a PIC simulation at the real plasma density is significant. Aberrations appear for a meniscus curvature radius of the order of the radius of the grid aperture. These aberrations cannot be cancelled out by switching to a chamfered grid aperture (as in the case of positive ions).

  1. A model of heavy ion detection in physical and biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Track structure theory (the Katz model) and its application to the detection of heavy ions in physical and biological systems are reviewed. Following the use of a new corrected formula describing the radial distribution of average dose around the path of a heavy ion, based on results of Monte Carlo calculations and on results of experimental measurements, better agreement is achieved between model calculations and experimentally measured relative effectiveness, for enzymatic and viral systems, for the Fricke dosemeter and for alanine and thermoluminescent (TDL-700) dosemeters irradiated with beams of heavy charged particles. From experimentally measured RBE dependences for survival and frequency of neoplastic transformations in a mammalian cell culture irradiated with beams of energetic heavy ions, values of model parameters for these biological endpoints have been extracted, and a model extrapolation to the low-dose region performed. Results of model calculations are then compared with evaluations of the lung cancer hazard in populations exposed to radon and its progeny. The model can be applied to practical phenomenological analysis of radiation damage in solid-state systems and to dosimetry of charged particle and fast neutron beams using a variety of detectors. The model can also serve as a guide in building more basic models of the action of ionizing radiation with physical and biological systems and guide of development of models of radiation risk more relevant than that used presently. 185 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  2. Characterization and modeling of the thermal mechanics of lithium-ion battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Ki-Yong; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal swelling shape is different than Li-ion intercalation swelling shape. • Nonuniform temperature and gap creation leads to a convex shape at free conditions. • Important parameters of thermal mechanics are estimated through experiments. • A coupled thermal-structural analysis accurately predicts thermal swelling shape. • Nonuniform temperature still plays a critical role at pack conditions. - Abstract: The thermal mechanics of Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is explored with a focus on thermal swelling. Experiments show for the first time that the swelling shape of prismatic battery cells due to temperature variations is significantly different from that due to Li-ion intercalation in unconstrained conditions. In contrast to uniform and orthotropic Li-ion intercalation swelling in a direction perpendicular to electrodes, the nonuniform temperature distribution in the jellyroll and the gaps/voids between electrodes result in distinguishable different swelling shapes. A unique coupled thermal-structural analysis with a simple, but efficient 3-D finite numerical model is proposed to investigate the impact of temperature variations on the thermal behaviors of battery cells. Anisotropic heat conduction and temperature dependency of the coefficient of thermal expansion are taken into account and found to have an impact on temperature distribution and thermal expansion. Experimental validation of the proposed model clearly demonstrates that the coupled thermal-structural analysis with the proposed model can predict accurately the thermal swelling at unconstrained conditions. The solution at pack (constrained) conditions shows that the nonuniform temperature distribution of the jellyroll still plays a critical role for the thermal swelling shape, although the gaps/voids do not occur because of the constraints from spacers in the pack, suggesting that the estimation of core temperature is important. Such an accurate model, able to estimate cell

  3. Giving pandas ROOT to chew on: experiences with the XENON1T Dark Matter experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenska, D.; Tunnell, C.; Aalbers, J.; Verhoeven, S.; Maassen, J.; Templon, J.

    2017-10-01

    In preparation for the XENON1T Dark Matter data acquisition, we have prototyped and implemented a new computing model. The XENON signal and data processing software is developed fully in Python 3, and makes extensive use of generic scientific data analysis libraries, such as the SciPy stack. A certain tension between modern “Big Data” solutions and existing HEP frameworks is typically experienced in smaller particle physics experiments. ROOT is still the “standard” data format in our field, defined by large experiments (ATLAS, CMS). To ease the transition, our computing model caters to both analysis paradigms, leaving the choice of using ROOT-specific C++ libraries, or alternatively, Python and its data analytics tools, as a front-end choice of developing physics algorithms. We present our path on harmonizing these two ecosystems, which allowed us to use off-the-shelf software libraries (e.g., NumPy, SciPy, scikit-learn, matplotlib) and lower the cost of development and maintenance. To analyse the data, our software allows researchers to easily create “mini-trees” small, tabular ROOT structures for Python analysis, which can be read directly into pandas DataFrame structures. One of our goals was making ROOT available as a cross-platform binary for an easy installation from the Anaconda Cloud (without going through the “dependency hell”). In addition to helping us discover dark matter interactions, lowering this barrier helps shift the particle physics toward non-domain-specific code.

  4. The complex formation-partition and partition-association models of solvent extraction of ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekierski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Two models of the extraction process have been proposed. In the first model it is assumed that the partitioning neutral species is at first formed in the aqueous phase and then transferred into the organic phase. The second model is based on the assumption that equivalent amounts of cations are at first transferred from the aqueous into the organic phase and then associated to form a neutral molecule. The role of the solubility parameter in extraction and the relation between the solubility of liquid organic substances in water and the partition of complexes have been discussed. The extraction of simple complexes and complexes with organic ligands has been discussed using the first model. Partition coefficients have been calculated theoretically and compared with experimental values in some very simple cases. The extraction of ion pairs has been discussed using the partition-association model and the concept of single-ion partition coefficients. (author)

  5. A Plasmaspheric Mass Density Model and Constraints on its Heavy Ion Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Green, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The first empirical model of the equatorial mass density of the plasmasphere is constructed using ground-based ULF wave diagnostics. Plasmaspheric mass density between L=l.7 and L=3.2 has been determined using over 5200 hours of data from pairs of stations in the MEASURE array of ground magnetometers. The least-squares fit to the data as a function of L shows that mass density falls logarithmically with L. Average ion mass as a function of L is also estimated by combining the mass density model with plasmaspheric electron density profiles determined from the IMAGE Radio Plasma Imager (RPI). Additionally, we use the RPI electron density database to examine how the average ion mass changes under different levels of geomagnetic activity. We find that average ion mass is greatest under the most disturbed conditions. This result indicates that heavy ion concentrations are enhanced during large geomagnetic disturbances, and therefore play an important role in storm-time plasmaspheric dynamics. The average ion mass is also used to constrain the concentrations of He(+) and O(+). Estimates of the He(+) concentration determined this way can be useful for interpreting IMAGE Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUV) images.

  6. Resonances and fusion in heavy ion reactions: new models and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cindro, N.

    1982-01-01

    Several aspects of the problem of the resonant behaviour of heavy-ion induced reactions are discussed. First, the problem is set in its relation to fundamental nuclear physics and our understanding of nuclear structure. It is suggested that, if the resonant behaviour of heavy-ion reactions is indeed due to the presence of particular configurations in the composite systems, these configurations must have a very specific nature which prevents their mixing with the adjacent states or else other conditons (e.g. low level density) should be met. Further on, the problem of resonant behaviour observed in back-angle elastic scattering and in forward-angle reaction data is discussed. Collisions between heavy ions leading to the composite systems 36 Ar and 40 Ca are used to discuss the apparent lack of correlation between these two sets of data. A way to understand it, based on the fragmentation of broad resonances, is suggested. In the third part the relation between structure in the fusion cross section excitation functions and that in reaction channel cross sections is discussed. Finally, in the fourth part, the orbiting-cluster model of heavy-ion resonances is briefly described and its predictions discussed. Based on this model a list is given of colliding heavy-ion systems where resonances are expected. (author)

  7. Xenon-enhanced CT CBF measurements in intracranial vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Kohichi; Tamura, Kiyotaka; Takayama, Hideichi; Kodaki, Kohei; Kawase, Takeshi; Shiga, Hayao; Toya, Shigeo

    1989-01-01

    In the management of intracranial vascular malformations, it is important to know the regional cerebral blood flow in its surrounding structure. However, CT scan with contrast medium and angiography have only a limited ability to estimate the rCBF. In this study, stable xenon-computerized tomography scanning by means of the end-tidal gas-sampling method was performed in eleven patients with intracranial vascular malformations. Seven of the patients had arteriovenous malformations, three had venous angiomas and one had aneurysm of the vein of Galen. In two patients with large arteriovenous malformations, in two with 'larger' venous angioma and in one with aneurysm of the vein of Galen, rCBF values were significantly reduced, particularly adjacent to the malformations. In contrast, there were no areas showing reduced rCBF in cases where the malformations were small. This indicates development of ischemia correlates with the size of malformations. From the xenon-enhanced CT scan and angiographic findings, the presence of steal phenomenon with venous congestion might be a cause of rCBF reduction in those cases where ischemia exists. (author)

  8. Stability of tetraphenyl butadiene thin films in liquid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguino, P.; Balau, F.; Botelho do Rego, A.M.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) is widely used in particle detectors as a wavelength shifter. In this work we studied the stability of TPB thin films when immersed in liquid xenon (LXe). The thin films were deposited on glass and quartz substrates by thermal evaporation. Morphological and chemical surface properties were monitored before and after immersion into LXe by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No appreciable changes have been detected with these two methods. Grain size and surface chemical composition were found to be identical before and after submersion into LXe. However, the film thickness, measured via optical transmission in the ultraviolet–visible wavelength regions, decreased by 1.6 μg/cm 2 (24%) after immersion in LXe during 20 h. These results suggest the necessity of using a protective thin film over the Tetraphenyl butadiene when used as a wavelength shifter in LXe particle detectors. - Highlights: • Stability of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) thin films immersed in liquid xenon (LXe). • Thermally evaporated TPB thin films were immersed in LXe for 20 h. • Film morphology and chemical surface properties remained unchanged. • Surface density of the films decreased by 1.6 μg/cm 2 (24%) after immersion in LXe. • For using in LXe particle detectors, TPB films should be protected with a coating.

  9. Theoretical investigation of the secondary ionization in krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffo, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the secondary ionization processes that responsible for the pre-breakdown ionization current growth in a uniform electric field was studied in krypton and xenon gases, especially at low values of E/P 0 which is corresponding to high values of pressure, since there are a number of possible secondary ionization processes. It is interesting to carry out a quantitative analysis for the generalized secondary ionization coefficient obtained previously by many workers in terms of the production of excited states and their diffusion to the cathode and their destruction rate in the gas body. From energy balance equation for the electrons in the discharge, the fractional percentage energy losses of ionization, excitation, and elastic collisions to the total energy gained by the electron from the field has been calculated for krypton and xenon, as a result of such calculations; the conclusion drawn is that at low values of E/P 0 the main energy loss of electrons are in excited collision. Therefore, we are adopting a theoretical calculation for W/α under the assumption that the photo-electron emission at the cathode is the predominated secondary ionization process. 14 tabs.; 12 figs.; 64 refs

  10. Ion Thruster Power Levels Extended by a Factor of 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    In response to two NASA Office of Space Science initiatives, the NASA Glenn Research Center is now developing a 7-kW-class xenon ion thruster system for near-term solar-powered spacecraft and a 25-kW ion engine for nuclear-electric spacecraft. The 7-kW ion thruster and power processor can be throttled down to 1 kW and are applicable to 25-kW flagship missions to the outer planets, asteroids, and comets. This propulsion system was scaled up from the 2.5-kW ion thruster and power processor that was developed successfully by Glenn, Boeing, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Spectrum Astro for the Deep Space 1 spacecraft. The 7-kW ion thruster system is being developed under NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project, which includes partners from JPL, Aerojet, Boeing, the University of Michigan, and Colorado State University.

  11. Cooling Simulation and Thermal Abuse Modeling of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using the Newman, Tiedemann, Gu, and Kim (NTGK) Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed Madani, Seyed; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives insight into the cooling simulation and thermal abuse modeling of lithium-ion batteries by ANSYS FLUENT. Cooling strategies are important issues in the thermal management of lithium-ion battery systems, and it is essential to investigate them attentively in order to maintain...... the functioning temperature of batteries within an optimum range. The high temperature is able not only to decrease the efficiency of batteries but also may lead to the thermal runaway. To comprehend further, the thermal abuse behavior of lithium-ion batteries based on The Newman, Tiedemann, Gu, and Kim (NTGK......) model has been implemented in ANSYS FLUENT software. The results show that to achieve an optimum energy consumption for battery cooling, a minimum value of average heat transfer coefficient can be selected in order to keep the functioning temperature of batteries within an optimum range....

  12. Affine-response model of molecular solvation of ions: Accurate predictions of asymmetric charging free energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bardhan, J. P.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Makowski, L.

    Roč. 137, č. 12 ( 2012 ), 124101/1-124101/6 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ion solvation * continuum models * linear response Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.164, year: 2012

  13. Application of retention modelling to the simulation of separation of organic anions in suppressed ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Philip; Dicinoski, Greg W; Ng, Boon Khing; Shellie, Robert A; Hanna-Brown, Melissa; Haddad, Paul R

    2009-09-18

    The ion-exchange separation of organic anions of varying molecular mass has been demonstrated using ion chromatography with isocratic, gradient and multi-step eluent profiles on commercially available columns with UV detection. A retention model derived previously for inorganic ions and based solely on electrostatic interactions between the analytes and the stationary phase was applied. This model was found to accurately describe the observed elution of all the anions under isocratic, gradient and multi-step eluent conditions. Hydrophobic interactions, although likely to be present to varying degrees, did not limit the applicability of the ion-exchange retention model. Various instrumental configurations were investigated to overcome problems associated with the use of organic modifiers in the eluent which caused compatibility issues with the electrolytically derived, and subsequently suppressed, eluent. The preferred configuration allowed the organic modifier stream to bypass the eluent generator, followed by subsequent mixing before entering the injection valve and column. Accurate elution prediction was achieved even when using 5-step eluent profiles with errors in retention time generally being less than 1% relative standard deviation (RSD) and all being less than 5% RSD. Peak widths for linear gradient separations were also modelled and showed good agreement with experimentally determined values.

  14. Analytical models for predicting the ion velocity distributions in JET in the presence of ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Lisak, M.

    1986-01-01

    The present report summarizes the work performed within the contract JT4/9008, the aim of which is to derive analytical models for ion velocity distributions resulting from ICRF heating on JET. The work has been performed over a two-year-period ending in August 1986 and has involved a total effort of 2.4 man years. (author)

  15. Nonequilibrium models of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecker, H; Bratkovskaya, E L; Bleicher, M; Soff, S; Zhu, X

    2005-01-01

    We review the results from the various hydrodynamical and transport models on the collective flow observables from AGS to RHIC energies. A critical discussion of the present status of the CERN experiments on hadron collective flow is given. We emphasize the importance of the flow excitation function from 1 to 50 A GeV: here the hydrodynamic model has predicted the collapse of the v 1 -flow and of the v 2 -flow at ∼10 A GeV; at 40 A GeV it has been recently observed by the NA49 collaboration. Since hadronic rescattering models predict much larger flow than observed at this energy we interpret this observation as evidence for a first-order phase transition at high baryon density ρ B . Moreover, the connection of the elliptic flow v 2 to jet suppression is examined. It is proven experimentally that the collective flow is not faked by minijet fragmentation. Additionally, detailed transport studies show that the away-side jet suppression can only partially ( 1 , v 2 closer to beam rapidity is related to the occurrence of a high density first order phase transition in the RHIC data at 62.5, 130 and 200 A GeV

  16. Ion temperature profiles in front of a negative planar electrode studied by a one-dimensional two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma-wall transition is studied by a one-dimensional steady state two-fluid model. Continuity and momentum exchange equations are used for the electrons, while the continuity, momentum exchange, and energy transport equation are used for the ions. Electrons are assumed to be isothermal. The closure of ion equations is made by the assumption that the heat flux is zero. The model equations are solved for potential, ion and electron density, and velocity and ion temperature as independent variables. The model includes coulomb collisions between ions and electrons and charge exchange collisions between ions and neutral atoms of the same species and same mass. The neutral atoms are assumed to be essentially at rest. The model is solved for finite ratio ɛ = /λ D L between the Debye length and λD and ionization length L in the pre-sheath and in the sheath at the same time. Charge exchange collisions heat the ions in the sheath and the pre-sheath. Even a small increase of the frequency of charge exchange collisions causes a substantial increase of ion temperature. Coulomb collisions have negligible effect on ion temperature in the pre-sheath, while in the sheath they cause a small cooling of ions. The increase of ɛ causes the increase of ion temperature. From the ion density and temperature profiles, the polytropic function κ is calculated according to its definition given by Kuhn et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 013503 (2006)]. The obtained profiles of κ indicate that the ion flow is isothermal only in a relatively narrow region in the pre-sheath, while close to the sheath edge and in the sheath it is closer to adiabatic. The ion sound velocity is space dependent and exhibits a maximum. This maximum indicates the location of the sheath edge only in the limit ɛ → 0 .

  17. An ion-neutral model to investigate chemical ionization mass spectrometry analysis of atmospheric molecules - application to a mixed reagent ion system for hydroperoxides and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikes, Brian G.; Treadaway, Victoria; McNeill, Ashley S.; Silwal, Indira K. C.; O'Sullivan, Daniel W.

    2018-04-01

    An ion-neutral chemical kinetic model is described and used to simulate the negative ion chemistry occurring within a mixed-reagent ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The model objective was the establishment of a theoretical basis to understand ambient pressure (variable sample flow and reagent ion carrier gas flow rates), water vapor, ozone and oxides of nitrogen effects on ion cluster sensitivities for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl peroxide (CH3OOH), formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc). The model development started with established atmospheric ion chemistry mechanisms, thermodynamic data and reaction rate coefficients. The chemical mechanism was augmented with additional reactions and their reaction rate coefficients specific to the analytes. Some existing reaction rate coefficients were modified to enable the model to match laboratory and field campaign determinations of ion cluster sensitivities as functions of CIMS sample flow rate and ambient humidity. Relative trends in predicted and observed sensitivities are compared as instrument specific factors preclude a direct calculation of instrument sensitivity as a function of sample pressure and humidity. Predicted sensitivity trends and experimental sensitivity trends suggested the model captured the reagent ion and cluster chemistry and reproduced trends in ion cluster sensitivity with sample flow and humidity observed with a CIMS instrument developed for atmospheric peroxide measurements (PCIMSs). The model was further used to investigate the potential for isobaric compounds as interferences in the measurement of the above species. For ambient O3 mixing ratios more than 50 times those of H2O2, O3-(H2O) was predicted to be a significant isobaric interference to the measurement of H2O2 using O2-(H2O2) at m/z 66. O3 and NO give rise to species and cluster ions, CO3-(H2O) and NO3-(H2O), respectively, which interfere in the measurement of CH3OOH using O2-(CH3OOH) at m/z 80. The CO3-(H2O

  18. Mechanical-electrochemical modeling of Li-ion battery designed for an electric scooter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khateeb, Siddique A.; Selman, J. Robert; Al-Hallaj, Said [Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Farid, Mohammed M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland (New Zealand)

    2006-07-14

    A macroscopic electrochemical-mechanical model was developed to predict the various power demands of an electric scooter and other outputs, such as the Li-ion battery pack current and voltage requirements for a randomly generated drive cycle using the Matlab-based Simulink software. The simulation results obtained were compared with the actual field test results of a commercial lead-acid battery pack used in a specific electric scooter. The simulation results appeared to give a realistic idea of the dynamic performance of a conceptual Li-ion battery pack in a typical drive pattern. These results, though, need to be validated in an actual field test. (author)

  19. Analysis and design of ion thruster for large space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Kami, S.

    1980-01-01

    Design analyses showed that an ion thruster of approximately 50 cm in diameter will be required to produce a thrust of 0.5 N using xenon or argon as propellants, and operating the thruster at a specific impulse of 3530 sec or 6076 sec respectively. A multipole magnetic confinement discharge chamber was specified.

  20. Relative clinical effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy. Theoretical modelling for H and N tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovic, Laura; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Dasu, Alexandru; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of the efficiency of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) administered with the same number of fractions might be of limited clinical interest, since a wide range of fractionation patterns are used clinically today. Due to advanced photon treatment techniques, hypofractionation is becoming increasingly accepted for prostate and lung tumours, whereas patients with head and neck tumours still benefit from hyperfractionated treatments. In general, the number of fractions is considerably lower in carbon ion RT. A clinically relevant comparison would be between fractionation schedules that are optimal within each treatment modality category. In this in silico study, the relative clinical effectiveness (RCE) of carbon ions was investigated for human salivary gland tumours, assuming various radiation sensitivities related to their oxygenation. The results indicate that, for hypoxic tumours in the absence of reoxygenation, the RCE (defined as the ratio of D 50 for photons to carbon ions) ranges from 3.5 to 5.7, corresponding to carbon ion treatments given in 36 and 3 fractions, respectively, and 30 fractions for photons. Assuming that interfraction local oxygenation changes take place, results for RCE are lower than that for an oxic tumour if only a few fractions of carbon ions are used. If the carbon ion treatment is given in more than 12 fractions, the RCE is larger for the hypoxic than for the well-oxygenated tumour. In conclusion, this study showed that in silico modelling enables the study of a wide range of factors in the clinical considerations and could be an important step towards individualisation of RT treatments. (author)

  1. Modelling of tokamak plasmas with internal transport barriers using ion temperature gradient based models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, J.E.; Waltz, R.E.; Staebler, G.M.; St.John, H.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic formation of an internal transport barrier resulting from an ExB driven bifurcation has been demonstrated in simulations of a DIII-D NCS discharge with an L-mode edge using the GLF23 model. Taking the sources, sinks, equilibrium, and the density profile from a power balance analysis, the thermal and toroidal momentum transport were simultaneously evolved while computing the effects of rotational shear stabilization. As the bifurcation point is approached, the mode growth rate and ExB shear become tangential and the profiles exhibit a dithering behavior. The input power, in particular the toroidal momentum, is sufficient to overcome the ITB threshold and a bifurcation in both the momentum and heat flux is observed. While the ion thermal and momentum transport show an significant improvement in confinement, the electron thermal transport remains anomalous due to the continued presence of the ETG mode. Comparing JET OS discharges to DIII-DNCS discharges, it is found that the ExB shear rate needs to be enhanced by a factor 2.65 in order to obtain profiles consistent with experimental data. Future work will focus on improving the robustness and efficiency of numerical techniques to allow wider application and increased predictive capability needed to conduct power threshold studies of internal transport barriers. (author)

  2. A travelling wave model of ripple formation on ion bombarded surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi, E-mail: s.numazawa@hzdr.de; Smith, Roger, E-mail: R.Smith@lboro.ac.uk

    2013-05-15

    We present a mathematical model describing surface modification resulting from atomic motion after ion bombardment. The model considers only the defect production and recovery process induced by the local atom rearrangement and is essentially independent of surface topography changes formed by both sputtering and surface diffusion. A stable analytic, travelling wave solution is presented for a specific incident angle, which agrees with experimental observation excellently.

  3. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1999-06-01

    Heating with electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is a well-established method for auxiliary heating of present-day tokamak plasmas and is envisaged as one of the main heating techniques for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactor plasmas. In order to predict the performance of ICRF heating in future machines, it is important to benchmark present theoretical modelling with experimental results on present tokamaks. This thesis reports on development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ICRF heating at the Joint European Torus (JET). Several ICRF physics effects and scenarios have been studied. Direct importance to the ITER is the theoretical analysis of ICRF heating experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas. These experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of ICRF heating for auxiliary heating of reactor plasmas. In particular, scenarios with potential for good bulk ion heating and enhanced D-T fusion reactivity have been identified. Good bulk ion heating is essential for reactor plasmas in order to obtain a high ion temperature and a high fusion reactivity. In JET good bulk ion heating with ICRF waves has been achieved in high-performance discharges by adding ICRF heating to neutral beam injection. In these experiments, as in other JET discharges where damping at higher harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency takes place, so-called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects play an important role. Due to FLR effects, the resonating ion velocity distribution function can have a strong influence on the power deposition. Evidence for this effect has been obtained from the third harmonic deuterium heating experiments. Because of FLR effects, the wave-particle interaction can also become weak at certain ion energies, which prevents resonating ions from reaching higher energies. When interacting with the wave, an ion receives not only a change in energy but also a change in

  4. Ion and solvent Transport in Polypyrrole: Experimental Test of Osmotic Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Skaarup, Steen

    2005-01-01

    Ion and solvent transport in the conjugated polymer actuator material, polypyrrole, doped with the immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulphonate, has been investigated by simultaneous cyclic voltammetry and Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance measurements. The purpose was to elucidate the pre...... from almost pure cation transport to ca. equal amount of anion transport; exchanging Br- for Cl- ions has only negligible effect at lower concentrations at equal osmotic pressures. Ca. 4 H2O molecules are tightly bound to each Na+ ion at concentrations ... the precise nature of the mobile species during redox cycling, and to seek confirmation for the osmotic mechanism of actuation. Three testable aspects of the model were confirmed: The number of inserted H2O molecules decreases with electrolyte concentration; at the same time the mechanism gradually changes...

  5. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Power Processing Unit (PPU) Capacitor Failure Root Cause Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, James F.; Pinero, Luis; Schneidegger, Robert; Dunning, John; Birchenough, Art

    2012-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project is developing an advanced ion propulsion system for future NASA missions for solar system exploration. A critical element of the propulsion system is the Power Processing Unit (PPU) which supplies regulated power to the key components of the thruster. The PPU contains six different power supplies including the beam, discharge, discharge heater, neutralizer, neutralizer heater, and accelerator supplies. The beam supply is the largest and processes up to 93+% of the power. The NEXT PPU had been operated for approximately 200+ hours and has experienced a series of three capacitor failures in the beam supply. The capacitors are in the same, nominally non-critical location the input filter capacitor to a full wave switching inverter. The three failures occurred after about 20, 30, and 135 hours of operation. This paper provides background on the NEXT PPU and the capacitor failures. It discusses the failure investigation approach, the beam supply power switching topology and its operating modes, capacitor characteristics and circuit testing. Finally, it identifies root cause of the failures to be the unusual confluence of circuit switching frequency, the physical layout of the power circuits, and the characteristics of the capacitor.

  6. Electric field dependence of the total excimer luminescence of xenon excited below the atomic ionization limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    In the spectral region of interest (i.e., 11.1 eV ≤ h nu ≤ 11.9 eV), the photoionization yield of electrons from excited-state dimers of xenon, increases monotonically to relatively high values (e.g., Y(11.7 eV) = 0.43 electrons/absorbed photon). It is also known however, that the luminescence intensity excited by photons in this region is quite high, even at low pressures. These two observations can be reconciled only by assuming that one of the processes leading to excimer luminescence involves dimer-ion + electron recombination. If this assumption is correct, application of an electric field, with concomitant collection of the free charges generated by the incident photons, should lead to a decrease in luminescence intensity; moreover, this decrease should follow the energy dependence of the photoionization yield function. The present report demonstrates experimentally that this is indeed the case. Such experiments combining luminescence and electric fields were made, until now, only by high-energy excitation. In this case the deconvolution of the various decay channels is hardly possible

  7. Ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for evaluating krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Ito, C.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer that can be applied to evaluate krypton (Kr) contamination in xenon (Xe) dark matter detectors has been developed for measuring Kr at the parts-per-trillion (ppt) or sub-ppt level in Xe. The gas sample is introduced without any condensation into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer through a pulsed supersonic valve. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 212.6 nm, 84 Kr atoms in the sample are resonantly ionized along with other Kr isotopes. 84 Kr ions are then mass separated and detected by the mass spectrometer in order to measure the Kr impurity concentration. With our current setup, approximately 0.4 ppt of Kr impurities contained in pure argon (Ar) gas are detectable with a measurement time of 1000 s. Although Kr detection sensitivity in Xe is expected to be approximately half of that in Ar, our spectrometer can evaluate Kr contamination in Xe to the sub-ppt level

  8. Diffusive nature of xenon anesthetic changes properties of a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2012-08-02

    Effects of general anesthesia can be controllable by the ambient pressure. We perform molecular dynamics simulations for a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine lipid bilayer with or without xenon molecules by changing the pressure to elucidate the mechanism of the pressure reversal of general anesthesia. According to the diffusive nature of xenon molecules in the lipid bilayer, a decrease in the orientational order of the lipid tails, an increase in the area and volume per lipid molecule, and an increase in the diffusivity of lipid molecules are observed. We show that the properties of the lipid bilayer with xenon molecules at high pressure come close to those without xenon molecules at 0.1 MPa. Furthermore, we find that xenon molecules are concentrated in the middle of the lipid bilayer at high pressures by the pushing effect and that the diffusivity of xenon molecules is suppressed. These results suggest that the pressure reversal originates from a jamming and suppression of the diffusivity of xenon molecules in lipid bilayers.

  9. The breakthrough curve combination for xenon sampling dynamics in a carbon molecular sieve column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu-jiang, Liu; Zhan-ying, Chen; Yin-zhong, Chang; Shi-lian, Wang; Qi, Li; Yuan-qing, Fan; Huai-mao, Jia; Xin-jun, Zhang; Yun-gang, Zhao

    2015-01-21

    In the research of xenon sampling and xenon measurements, the xenon breakthrough curve plays a significant role in the xenon concentrating dynamics. In order to improve the theoretical comprehension of the xenon concentrating procedure from the atmosphere, the method of the breakthrough curve combination for sampling techniques should be developed and investigated under pulse injection conditions. In this paper, we describe a xenon breakthrough curve in a carbon molecular sieve column, the combination curve method for five conditions is shown and debated in detail; the fitting curves and the prediction equations are derived in theory and verified by the designed experiments. As a consequence, the curves of the derived equations are in good agreement with the fitting curves by tested. The retention times of the xenon in the column are 61.2, 42.2 and 23.5 at the flow rate of 1200, 1600 and 2000 mL min(-1), respectively, but the breakthrough times are 51.4, 38.6 and 35.1 min.

  10. Removing krypton from xenon by cryogenic distillation to the ppq level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [Physik-Institut, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. v. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Huhmann, C.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lin, Q. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Meng, Y.; Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Lavina, L.S. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Cristescu, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-05-15

    The XENON1T experiment aims for the direct detection of dark matter in a detector filled with 3.3 tons of liquid xenon. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the background induced by radioactive decays inside the detector has to be sufficiently low. One major contributor is the β-emitter {sup 85}Kr which is present in the xenon. For XENON1T a concentration of natural krypton in xenon {sup nat}Kr/Xe < 200 ppq (parts per quadrillion, 1 ppq = 10{sup -15} mol/mol) is required. In this work, the design, construction and test of a novel cryogenic distillation column using the common McCabe-Thiele approach is described. The system demonstrated a krypton reduction factor of 6.4 . 10{sup 5} with thermodynamic stability at process speeds above 3 kg/h. The resulting concentration of {sup nat}Kr/Xe < 26 ppq is the lowest ever achieved, almost one order of magnitude below the requirements for XENON1T and even sufficient for future dark matter experiments using liquid xenon, such as XENONnT and DARWIN. (orig.)

  11. An Online SOC and SOH Estimation Model for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Chin Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring and prognosis of cell degradation in lithium-ion (Li-ion batteries are essential for assuring the reliability and safety of electric and hybrid vehicles. This paper aims to develop a reliable and accurate model for online, simultaneous state-of-charge (SOC and state-of-health (SOH estimations of Li-ion batteries. Through the analysis of battery cycle-life test data, the instantaneous discharging voltage (V and its unit time voltage drop, V′, are proposed as the model parameters for the SOC equation. The SOH equation is found to have a linear relationship with 1/V′ times the modification factor, which is a function of SOC. Four batteries are tested in the laboratory, and the data are regressed for the model coefficients. The results show that the model built upon the data from one single cell is able to estimate the SOC and SOH of the three other cells within a 5% error bound. The derived model is also proven to be robust. A random sampling test to simulate the online real-time SOC and SOH estimation proves that this model is accurate and can be potentially used in an electric vehicle battery management system (BMS.

  12. Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules: Ion Distributions from a Poisson-Boltzmann Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiyun; Denton, Alan R.; Rozairo, Damith; Croll, Andrew B.

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments have shown that polystyrene-polyacrylic-acid-polystyrene (PS-PAA-PS) triblock copolymers in a solvent mixture of water and toluene can self-assemble into spherical microcapsules. Suspended in water, the microcapsules have a toluene core surrounded by an elastomer triblock shell. The longer, hydrophilic PAA blocks remain near the outer surface of the shell, becoming charged through dissociation of OH functional groups in water, while the shorter, hydrophobic PS blocks form a networked (glass or gel) structure. Within a mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory, we model these polyelectrolyte microcapsules as spherical charged shells, assuming different dielectric constants inside and outside the capsule. By numerically solving the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we calculate the radial distribution of anions and cations and the osmotic pressure within the shell as a function of salt concentration. Our predictions, which can be tested by comparison with experiments, may guide the design of microcapsules for practical applications, such as drug delivery. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  13. Modelling and simulation of surface morphology driven by ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yewande, E.O.

    2006-05-02

    Non-equilibrium surfaces, at nanometer length scales, externally driven via bombardment with energetic particles are known to exhibit well ordered patterns with a variety of applications in nano-technology. These patterns emerge at time scales on the order of minutes. Continuum theory has been quite successful in giving a general picture of the processes that interplay to give the observed patterns, as well as how such competition might determine the properties of the nanostructures. However, continuum theoretical descriptions are ideal only in the asymptotic limit. The only other theoretical alternative, which happens to be more suitable for the characteristic length-and time-scales of pattern formation, is Monte Carlo simulation. In this thesis, surface morphology is studied using discrete solid-on-solid Monte Carlo models of sputtering and surface diffusion. The simulations are performed in the context of the continuum theories and experiments. In agreement with the experiments, the ripples coarsen with time and the ripple velocity exhibits a power-law behaviour with the ripple wavelength, in addition, the exponent was found to depend on the simulation temperature, which suggests future experimental studies of flux dependence. Moreover, a detailed exploration of possible topographies, for different sputtering conditions, corresponding to different materials, was performed. And different surface topographies e.g. holes, ripples, and dots, were found at oblique incidence, without sample rotation. With sample rotation no new topography was found, its only role being to destroy any inherent anisotropy in the system. (orig.)

  14. Modelling and simulation of surface morphology driven by ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yewande, E.O.

    2006-01-01

    Non-equilibrium surfaces, at nanometer length scales, externally driven via bombardment with energetic particles are known to exhibit well ordered patterns with a variety of applications in nano-technology. These patterns emerge at time scales on the order of minutes. Continuum theory has been quite successful in giving a general picture of the processes that interplay to give the observed patterns, as well as how such competition might determine the properties of the nanostructures. However, continuum theoretical descriptions are ideal only in the asymptotic limit. The only other theoretical alternative, which happens to be more suitable for the characteristic length-and time-scales of pattern formation, is Monte Carlo simulation. In this thesis, surface morphology is studied using discrete solid-on-solid Monte Carlo models of sputtering and surface diffusion. The simulations are performed in the context of the continuum theories and experiments. In agreement with the experiments, the ripples coarsen with time and the ripple velocity exhibits a power-law behaviour with the ripple wavelength, in addition, the exponent was found to depend on the simulation temperature, which suggests future experimental studies of flux dependence. Moreover, a detailed exploration of possible topographies, for different sputtering conditions, corresponding to different materials, was performed. And different surface topographies e.g. holes, ripples, and dots, were found at oblique incidence, without sample rotation. With sample rotation no new topography was found, its only role being to destroy any inherent anisotropy in the system. (orig.)

  15. Laboratory Modeling of Space experiments on Expulsion of CO2 ions. Application to Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A. Y.

    2007-05-01

    An approach to expel minority species which can contribute to global warming from the upper atmosphere in the Arctic region by the use of HF electromagnetic waves has been proposed [1]. Laboratory plasma experiments have been designed to model various aspects of this concept - from the acquisiton of negative charges by green house gases such as CO2 to their ascent to the upper atmosphere and their acceleration and expulsion along the open magnetic field lines. Laboratory results are presented which confirmed the efficient gyro-resonance acceleration of minority ion species made possible through the space charge cancellation by majority species. The outflow of CO2 ions from the divergent magnetic field of a laboratory plasma device is measured at various background neutral pressures and for different amount of currents along the axial magnetic field. The central idea is to impart perpendicular energy to a selective ion species gyrating around the geomagnetic field at its cyclotron resonance. The wave field is produced by either modulating the auroral electrojet or from the nonlinear interaction between two electron plasma resonances. In the presence of the divergent polar geomagnetic field the accelerated perpendicular ion velocity is converted into an upward motion along open magnetic field lines. The ions thus removed will unlikely find their way back to the lower atmosphere. Negatively charged particles move upward by the fair-weather electric field and by atmospheric convection. When these ions reach above 120 km altitude where the ion gyro frequency is comparable to or greater than the ion- neutral collision frequency, they can be accelerated by EM fields through the gyro resonance interaction. The propagation of these low frequency waves to the upper atmosphere along the earth's magnetic field is permitted by the plasma dispersion relation. Laboratory experiments play an important role in confirming the theoretical prediction that ion cyclotron waves can grow

  16. A 3D thermal runaway propagation model for a large format lithium ion battery module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xuning; Lu, Languang; Ouyang, Minggao; Li, Jiangqiu; He, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D thermal runaway (TR) propagation model is built for a large format lithium ion battery module. The 3D TR propagation model is built based on the energy balance equation. Empirical equations are utilized to simplify the calculation of the chemical kinetics for TR, whereas equivalent thermal resistant layer is employed to simplify the heat transfer through the thin thermal layer. The 3D TR propagation model is validated by experiment and can provide beneficial discussions on the mechanisms of TR propagation. According to the modeling analysis of the 3D model, the TR propagation can be delayed or prevented through: 1) increasing the TR triggering temperature; 2) reducing the total electric energy released during TR; 3) enhancing the heat dissipation level; 4) adding extra thermal resistant layer between adjacent batteries. The TR propagation is successfully prevented in the model and validated by experiment. The model with 3D temperature distribution provides a beneficial tool for researchers to study the TR propagation mechanisms and for engineers to design a safer battery pack. - Highlights: • A 3D thermal runaway (TR) propagation model for Li-ion battery pack is built. • The 3D TR propagation model can fit experimental results well. • Temperature distributions during TR propagation are presented using the 3D model. • Modeling analysis provides solutions for the prevention of TR propagation. • Quantified solutions to prevent TR propagation in battery pack are discussed.

  17. Xenon Acquisition Strategies for High-Power Electric Propulsion NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Unfried, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) has been used for station-keeping of geostationary communications satellites since the 1980s. Solar electric propulsion has also benefitted from success on NASA Science Missions such as Deep Space One and Dawn. The xenon propellant loads for these applications have been in the 100s of kilograms range. Recent studies performed for NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) have demonstrated that SEP is critically enabling for both near-term and future exploration architectures. The high payoff for both human and science exploration missions and technology investment from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) are providing the necessary convergence and impetus for a 30-kilowatt-class SEP mission. Multiple 30-50- kilowatt Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM) concepts have been developed based on the maturing electric propulsion and solar array technologies by STMD with recent efforts focusing on an Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM). Xenon is the optimal propellant for the existing state-of-the-art electric propulsion systems considering efficiency, storability, and contamination potential. NASA mission concepts developed and those proposed by contracted efforts for the 30-kilowatt-class demonstration have a range of xenon propellant loads from 100s of kilograms up to 10,000 kilograms. This paper examines the status of the xenon industry worldwide, including historical xenon supply and pricing. The paper will provide updated information on the xenon market relative to previous papers that discussed xenon production relative to NASA mission needs. The paper will discuss the various approaches for acquiring on the order of 10 metric tons of xenon propellant to support potential near-term NASA missions. Finally, the paper will discuss acquisitions strategies for larger NASA missions requiring 100s of metric tons of xenon will be discussed.

  18. Modeling Stationary Lithium-Ion Batteries for Optimization and Predictive Control: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raszmann, Emma; Baker, Kyri; Shi, Ying; Christensen, Dane

    2017-02-22

    Accurately modeling stationary battery storage behavior is crucial to understand and predict its limitations in demand-side management scenarios. In this paper, a lithium-ion battery model was derived to estimate lifetime and state-of-charge for building-integrated use cases. The proposed battery model aims to balance speed and accuracy when modeling battery behavior for real-time predictive control and optimization. In order to achieve these goals, a mixed modeling approach was taken, which incorporates regression fits to experimental data and an equivalent circuit to model battery behavior. A comparison of the proposed battery model output to actual data from the manufacturer validates the modeling approach taken in the paper. Additionally, a dynamic test case demonstrates the effects of using regression models to represent internal resistance and capacity fading.

  19. Developing models for simulation of pinched-beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Mark, J.W.K.; Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrodynamic models have been derived by Mark and Yu and by others to describe energetic pinched-beams, such as those used in ion-beam fusion. The closure of the Mark-Yu model is obtained with adiabatic assumptions mathematically analogous to those of Chew, Goldberger, and Low for MHD. The other models treated here use an ideal gas closure and a closure by Newcomb based on an expansion in V/sub th//V/sub z/. Features of these hydrodynamic beam models are compared with a kinetic treatment

  20. Track etching model for normal incident heavy ion recording in isotropic dielectric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrey, F.; Chambaudet, A.; Fromm, M.; Saouli, R.

    1990-01-01

    Heavy ion recording in dielectric isotropic detectors has a wide range of applications in such areas as uranium cartography, neutron activation and fission track dating using the external detector method (EDM). It is important to have a good understanding of etch pit evolution during chemical etching. The conical model, which is very often used, is based on a constant track etching velocity (VT). Numerous experiments have shown, however, that VT varies along the damage trail. In this paper, we propose a computer-generated model which simulates the etching process for normal incident ions. The analytical form of VT must be chosen in order to describe as precisely as possible the relationship between etching time (residual range) and the VT value. The conical model only provides a primary approximation which is generally insufficient, especially when performing cartography. (author)

  1. Interaction of the model alkyltrimethylammonium ions with alkali halide salts: an explicit water molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an explicit water molecular dynamics simulation of dilute solutions of model alkyltrimethylammonium surfactant ions (number of methylene groups in the tail is 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12 in mixture with NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI salts, respectively. The SPC/E model is used to describe water molecules. Results of the simulation at 298 K are presented in form of the radial distribution functions between nitrogen and carbon atoms of CH2 groups on the alkyltrimethylammonium ion, and the counterion species in the solution. The running coordination numbers between carbon atoms of surfactants and counterions are also calculated. We show that I- counterion exhibits the highest, and F- the lowest affinity to "bind" to the model surfactants. The results are discussed in view of the available experimental and simulation data for this and similar solutions.

  2. Evaluation of activated charcoal for dynamic adsorption of krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Ramarathinam, K.; Kishore, A.G.

    1975-01-01

    From the standpoint of radiation safety, the release of radioactive krypton and xenon from power reactors should be kept as low as practicable. The decay of shortlived isotopes of krypton and xenon by adsorptive delay on activated charcoal has shown promising results for this purpose. The delay provided by activated charcoal is proportional to the dynamic adsorption coefficients of these gases which are characteristic of the adsorbent. These coefficients were determined for krypton and xenon on indigenous gas-adsorbing activated charcoal at different moisture contents of carrier air stream and activated charcoal, concentrations of krypton around ambient temperatures, to find its suitability for designing adsorber columns. (author)

  3. Online {sup 222}Rn removal by cryogenic distillation in the XENON100 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. v. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Meng, Y.; Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Lavina, L.S. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Cristescu, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-06-15

    We describe the purification of xenon from traces of the radioactive noble gas radon using a cryogenic distillation column. The distillation column was integrated into the gas purification loop of the XENON100 detector for online radon removal. This enabled us to significantly reduce the constant {sup 222}Rn background originating from radon emanation. After inserting an auxiliary {sup 222}Rn emanation source in the gas loop, we determined a radon reduction factor of R > 27 (95% C.L.) for the distillation column by monitoring the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration inside the XENON100 detector. (orig.)

  4. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed

  5. Comparison of measurements and modeling of beam ion loss during TAE avalanches in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Douglass; Crocker, N.; Fredrickson, E.; Gorelenkov, N.; Podesta, M.; Shi, L.; White, R.

    2011-10-01

    Brief `avalanches' of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas having several different n numbers simultaneously present. All are accompanied by a drop in the neutron rate, indicating likely loss of beam ions. However, the scintillator fast ion loss detector at the wall on NSTX registers losses only for some avalanches and not others. When losses are seen, they cover a wide range of pitch angles, suggesting that the modes cause stochasticity in the beam ion phase space. A 16 channel array of microwave reflectometers provides a radial profile of the structure of each n TAE, which can then be used to produce an absolute amplitude for a TAE mode structure computed by the NOVA code for the plasma at the time of interest. Using the equilibrium plus the TAE modes structures in the guiding center code ORBIT then allows modeling of the effect of the avalanches on beam ion orbits. The modeling does reveal stochastic behavior and loss of some classes of orbits that are populated by the neutral beams on NSTX, with an amplitude threshold for loss that is close to that observed in the experiments. This work supported by US DoE contract DE-ACO2-09CH11466 and the China Scholarship Council.

  6. Multi-scale modeling of the behaviour of water and ions clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotenberg, B.

    2007-10-01

    Predicting the fate of radioactive waste stored in a clay formation requires a good understanding of the transport properties of water and ions in clays. Their diffusion in this charged porous medium is described by empirical parameters such as their partitioning coefficient Kd which accounts for the interactions with the mineral surfaces. The present work deals with the relevance of this concept and its definition based on microscopic grounds. We have first modeled the ionic contribution to the dielectric properties of clays and suggested an experimental determination of Kd from dielectric spectroscopy measurements. Using microscopic simulations (Monte-Carlo and Molecular Dynamics), we then have computed the Gibbs free energy and enthalpy for ionic exchange in the case of alkaline cations. They control the value of Kd and its evolution with the temperature. The results for cesium are in good agreement with both microcalorimetric measurements and the determination of Kd at different temperatures. We have participated in the development of a new lattice simulation method (Lattice Fokker-Planck), which we have then used to link explicitly the microscopic dynamics of ions to the diffusion-reaction model underlying the definition of Kd. Finally, we have used Molecular Dynamics to investigate the kinetics of exchange of water and ions between clay particles (interlayer) and the extra-particle porosity. The results confirm the generally admitted idea that water and ions can explore the whole porosity, whereas anions are excluded from the interlayers. (author)

  7. A model of energetic ion effects on pressure driven tearing modes in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfmoon, M. R.; Brennan, D. P.

    2017-06-01

    The effects that energetic trapped ions have on linear resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities are studied in a reduced model that captures the essential physics driving or damping the modes through variations in the magnetic shear. The drift-kinetic orbital interaction of a slowing down distribution of trapped energetic ions with a resistive MHD instability is integrated to a scalar contribution to the perturbed pressure, and entered into an asymptotic matching formalism for the resistive MHD dispersion relation. Toroidal magnetic field line curvature is included to model trapping in the particle distribution, in an otherwise cylindrical model. The focus is on a configuration that is driven unstable to the m/n = 2/1 mode by increasing pressure, where m is the poloidal mode number and n is the toroidal. The particles and pressure can affect the mode both in the core region where there can be low and reversed shear and outside the resonant surface in significant positive shear. The results show that the energetic ions damp and stabilize the mode when orbiting in significant positive shear, increasing the marginal stability boundary. However, the inner core region contribution with low and reversed shear can drive the mode unstable. This effect of shear on the energetic ion pressure contribution is found to be consistent with the literature. These results explain the observation that the 2/1 mode was found to be damped and stabilized by energetic ions in δf-MHD simulations of tokamak experiments with positive shear throughout, while the 2/1 mode was found to be driven unstable in simulations of experiments with weakly reversed shear in the core. This is also found to be consistent with related experimental observations of the stability of the 2/1 mode changing significantly with core shear.

  8. Nuclear spin relaxation of methane in solid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Takeru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Yamakawa, Koichiro

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear spin relaxation of methane in solid xenon has been studied by infrared spectroscopy. From the analysis of the temporal changes of the rovibrational peaks, the rates of the nuclear spin relaxation of I = 2 ← 1 correlated to the rotational relaxation of J = 0 ← 1 were obtained at temperatures of 5.1-11.5 K. On the basis of the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate, the activation energy of the indirect two-phonon process was determined to be 50 ± 6 K, which is in good agreement with the rotational transition energies of J = 2 ← 1 and J = 3 ← 1. Taking into account this result and the spin degeneracy, we argue that the lowest J = 3 level in which the I = 1 and I = 2 states are degenerate acts as the intermediate point of the indirect process.

  9. Reflectance dependence of polytetrafluoroethylene on thickness for xenon scintillation light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, J.; Neff, A.; Arthurs, M.; Batista, E.; Morton, D.; Okunawo, M.; Pushkin, K.; Sander, A.; Stephenson, S.; Wang, Y.; Lorenzon, W.

    2017-06-01

    Many rare event searches including dark matter direct detection and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments take advantage of the high VUV reflective surfaces made from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) reflector materials to achieve high light collection efficiency in their detectors. As the detectors have grown in size over the past decade, there has also been an increased need for ever thinner detector walls without significant loss in reflectance to reduce dead volumes around active noble liquids, outgassing, and potential backgrounds. We report on the experimental results to measure the dependence of the reflectance on thickness of two PTFE samples at wavelengths near 178 nm. No change in reflectance was observed as the wall thickness of a cylindrically shaped PTFE vessel immersed in liquid xenon was varied between 1 mm to 9.5 mm.

  10. Support method for solving an optimal xenon shutdown problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    Since the discovering of the maximum principle by Pontriagin in 1956, methods for solving optimal control problems have been developed fast. There are the efforts to solve an optimal problem of transient process in a nuclear reactor using its ideas. However, the classical maximum principle does not show how to construct an optimal control or suboptimal control with a given exactness. We exploit mainly in the present work the ideas of the support method proposed by Gabasov and Kirillova for linear systems, in order to solve an optimal control problem for non-linear systems. The constructive maximum principle for non-linear dynamic systems with controllable structure received by us in this paper is new result. The ε - maximum principle is used for receiving an 7-phase ε - optimal control of optimal xenon shutdown problem. (author)

  11. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R.; Markey, J.K.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166 degrees C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen

  12. Computing characterizations of drugs for ion channels and receptors using Markov models

    CERN Document Server

    Tveito, Aslak

    2016-01-01

    Flow of ions through voltage gated channels can be represented theoretically using stochastic differential equations where the gating mechanism is represented by a Markov model. The flow through a channel can be manipulated using various drugs, and the effect of a given drug can be reflected by changing the Markov model. These lecture notes provide an accessible introduction to the mathematical methods needed to deal with these models. They emphasize the use of numerical methods and provide sufficient details for the reader to implement the models and thereby study the effect of various drugs. Examples in the text include stochastic calcium release from internal storage systems in cells, as well as stochastic models of the transmembrane potential. Well known Markov models are studied and a systematic approach to including the effect of mutations is presented. Lastly, the book shows how to derive the optimal properties of a theoretical model of a drug for a given mutation defined in terms of a Markov model.

  13. Model-based analysis of digital radio frequency control systems for a heavy-ion synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the behavior of different radio frequency control systems in a heavy-ion synchrotron, which act on the electrical fields used to accelerate charged particles, along with the longitudinal dynamics of the particles in the beam. Due to the large physical dimensions of the system, the required precision can only be achieved by a distributed control system. Since the plant is highly nonlinear and the overall system is very complex, a purely analytical treatment is not possible without introducing unacceptable simplifications. Instead, we use numerical simulation to investigate the system behavior. This thesis arises from a cooperation between the Institute of Microelectronic Systems at Technische Universitaet Darmstadt and the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy-Ion Research. A new heavy-ion synchrotron, the SIS100, is currently being built at GSI; its completion is scheduled for 2016. The starting point for the present thesis was the question whether a control concept previously devised at GSI is feasible - not only in the ideal case, but in the presence of parameter deviations, noise, and other disturbances - and how it can be optimized. In this thesis, we present a system model of a heavy-ion synchrotron. This model comprises the beam dynamics, the relevant components of the accelerator, and the relevant controllers as well as the communication between those controllers. We discuss the simulation techniques as well as several simplifications we applied in order to be able to simulate the model in an acceptable amount of time and show that these simplifications are justified. Using the model, we conducted several case studies in order to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the control concept, analyze the system's sensitivity towards disturbances and explore opportunities for future extensions. We derive specific suggestions for improvements from our results. Finally, we demonstrate that the model represents the physical reality

  14. Model planetary nebulae: the effect of shadowed filaments on low ionization potential ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, A.

    1977-01-01

    Previous homogeneous model planetary nebulae calculations No. 4 have yielded emission strengths for low ionization potential No. 4 ions which are considerably lower than those observed. Several attempts were to correct this problem by the inclusion of optically thin condensations, the use of energy flux distributions from stellar model calculations instead of blackbody spectrum stars, and the inclusion of dust in the nebulae. The effect that shadowed filaments have on the ionization and thermal structure of model nebulae and the resultant line strengths are considered. These radial filaments are shielded from the direct stellar ionizing radiation by optically thick condensations in the nebula. Theoretical observational evidence exists for the presence of condensations and filaments. Since the only source of ionizing photons in the shadowed filaments is due to diffuse photons produced by recombination, ions of lower ionization potential are expected to exist there in greater numbers than those found in the rest of the nebula. This leads to increased line strengths from these ions and increases their values to match the observational values. It is shown that these line strengths in the filaments increase by over one to two orders of magnitude relative to values found in homogeneous models. This results in an increase of approximately one order of magnitude for these lines when contributions from both components of the nebula are considered. The parameters that determine the exact value of the increase are the radial location of the filaments in the nebula and the fraction of the nebular volume occupied by the filaments

  15. Local structure refinement of disordered material models: ion pairing and structure in YCl3 aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowron, D T; Diaz-Moreno, S

    2007-10-04

    Hydrogen/deuterium isotopic neutron diffraction techniques have been used to investigate the structure of a 1 m aqueous solution of YCl3 at room temperature. Empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR) has been used to build a three-dimensional model of the solution structure that is consistent with the bulk solvent correlations strongly probed by the neutron scattering technique. Optimization of the local structural environment of the Y3+ ion sites within the model has been performed through calculations of the yttrium K-edge, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum of the solution, and detailed information has been extracted on the structure of the ion hydration shell and the extent of inner-sphere ion pairing within the solution. The results demonstrate the significant potential of this hybrid data analysis approach to circumvent the limitations of the individual experimental methods, to refine atomic potential models, and to produce accurate, quantitative structural models of the local environment of dilute atomic species within tightly constrained bulk network structures.

  16. Life Prediction Model for Grid-Connected Li-ion Battery Energy Storage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saxon, Aron R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lundstrom, Blake R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cao, Ziwei [SunPower Corporation; Roc, Albert [SunPower Corporation

    2017-09-06

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are being deployed on the electrical grid for a variety of purposes, such as to smooth fluctuations in solar renewable power generation. The lifetime of these batteries will vary depending on their thermal environment and how they are charged and discharged. To optimal utilization of a battery over its lifetime requires characterization of its performance degradation under different storage and cycling conditions. Aging tests were conducted on commercial graphite/nickel-manganese-cobalt (NMC) Li-ion cells. A general lifetime prognostic model framework is applied to model changes in capacity and resistance as the battery degrades. Across 9 aging test conditions from 0oC to 55oC, the model predicts capacity fade with 1.4% RMS error and resistance growth with 15% RMS error. The model, recast in state variable form with 8 states representing separate fade mechanisms, is used to extrapolate lifetime for example applications of the energy storage system integrated with renewable photovoltaic (PV) power generation.

  17. Modeling charge polarization voltage for large lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Polarization voltage of the lithium-ion battery is an important parameter that has direct influence on battery performance. The paper aims to analyze the impedance characteristics of the lithium-ion battery based on EIS data. Design/methodology/approach: The effects of currents, initial SOC of the battery on charge polarization voltage are investigated, which is approximately linear function of charge current. The change of charge polarization voltage is also analyzed with the gradient analytical method in the SOC domain. The charge polarization model with two RC networks is presented, and parts of model parameters like Ohmic resistance and charge transfer impedance are estimated by both EIS method and battery constant current testing method. Findings: This paper reveals that the Ohmic resistance accounts for much contribution to battery total polarization compared to charge transfer impedance. Practical implications: Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the model with the proposed identification method, which provides the foundation for battery charging optimization. Originality/value: The paper analyzed the impedance characteristics of the lithium-ion battery based on EIS data, presented a charge polarization model with two RC networks, and estimated parameters like Ohmic resistance and charge transfer impedance.

  18. Predicting the Types of Ion Channel-Targeted Conotoxins Based on AVC-SVM Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianfang, Wang; Junmei, Wang; Xiaolei, Wang; Yue, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    The conotoxin proteins are disulfide-rich small peptides. Predicting the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins has great value in the treatment of chronic diseases, epilepsy, and cardiovascular diseases. To solve the problem of information redundancy existing when using current methods, a new model is presented to predict the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins based on AVC (Analysis of Variance and Correlation) and SVM (Support Vector Machine). First, the F value is used to measure the significance level of the feature for the result, and the attribute with smaller F value is filtered by rough selection. Secondly, redundancy degree is calculated by Pearson Correlation Coefficient. And the threshold is set to filter attributes with weak independence to get the result of the refinement. Finally, SVM is used to predict the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins. The experimental results show the proposed AVC-SVM model reaches an overall accuracy of 91.98%, an average accuracy of 92.17%, and the total number of parameters of 68. The proposed model provides highly useful information for further experimental research. The prediction model will be accessed free of charge at our web server.

  19. 3-D CFD modeling and experimental testing of thermal behavior of a Li-Ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gümüşsu, Emre; Ekici, Özgür; Köksal, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermally fully predictive 3-D CFD model is developed for Li-Ion batteries. • Complete flow field around the battery and conduction inside the battery are solved. • Macro-scale thermophysical properties and the entropic term are investigated. • Discharge rate and usage history of the battery are systematically investigated. • Reliability of the model was tested through experimental measurements. - Abstract: In this study, a 3-D computational fluid dynamics model was developed for investigating the thermal behavior of lithium ion batteries under natural convection. The model solves the complete flow field around the battery as well as conduction inside the battery using the well-known heat generation model of Bernardi et al. (1985). The model is thermally fully predictive so it requires only electrical performance parameters of the battery to calculate its temperature during discharging. Using the model, detailed investigation of the effects of the variation of the macro-scale thermophysical properties and the entropic term of the heat generation model was carried out. Results show that specific heat is a critical property that has a significant impact on the simulation results whereas thermal conductivity has relatively minor importance. Moreover, the experimental data can be successfully predicted without taking the entropic term into account in the calculation of the heat generation. The difference between the experimental and predicted battery surface temperature was less than 3 °C for all discharge rates and regardless of the usage history of the battery. The developed model has the potential to be used for the investigation of the thermal behavior of Li-Ion batteries in different packaging configurations under natural and forced convection.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation for statistical mechanics model of ion-channel cooperativity in cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Riza; Aydiner, Ekrem

    2009-03-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are key molecules for the generation and propagation of electrical signals in excitable cell membranes. The voltage-dependent switching of these channels between conducting and nonconducting states is a major factor in controlling the transmembrane voltage. In this study, a statistical mechanics model of these molecules has been discussed on the basis of a two-dimensional spin model. A new Hamiltonian and a new Monte Carlo simulation algorithm are introduced to simulate such a model. It was shown that the results well match the experimental data obtained from batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in the squid giant axon using the cut-open axon technique.

  1. An Empirical Rate Constant Based Model to Study Capacity Fading in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivatsan Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model based on solvent diffusion and kinetics to study the formation of the SEI (solid electrolyte interphase layer and its impact on the capacity of a lithium ion battery is developed. The model uses the earlier work on silicon oxidation but studies the kinetic limitations of the SEI growth process. The rate constant of the SEI formation reaction at the anode is seen to play a major role in film formation. The kinetics of the reactions for capacity fading for various battery systems are studied and the rate constants are evaluated. The model is used to fit the capacity fade in different battery systems.

  2. Material radioassay and selection for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Sivers, M. von [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Scotto Lavina, L. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T dark matter experiment aims to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through low-energy interactions with xenon atoms. To detect such a rare event necessitates the use of radiopure materials to minimize the number of background events within the expected WIMP signal region. In this paper we report the results of an extensive material radioassay campaign for the XENON1T experiment. Using gamma-ray spectroscopy and mass spectrometry techniques, systematic measurements of trace radioactive impurities in over one hundred samples within a wide range of materials were performed. The measured activities allowed for stringent selection and placement of materials during the detector construction phase and provided the input for XENON1T detection sensitivity estimates through Monte Carlo simulations. (orig.)

  3. Experimental studies of a zeeman-tuned xenon laser differential absorption apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, G J

    1973-06-01

    A Zeeman-tuned cw xenon laser differential absorption device is described. The xenon laser was tuned by axial magnetic fields up to 5500 G generated by an unusually large water-cooled dc solenoid. Xenon laser lines at 3.37 micro, 3.51 micro, and 3.99 micro were tuned over ranges of 6 A, 6 A, and 11 A, respectively. To date, this apparatus has been used principally to study the details of formaldehyde absorption lines lying near the 3 .508-micro xenon laser transition. These experiments revealed that the observed absorption spectrum of formaldehyde exhibits a sufficiently unique spectral structure that the present technique may readily be used to measure relative concentrations of formaldehyde in samples of polluted air.

  4. Microscopic simulation of xenon-based optical TPCs in the presence of molecular additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, C. D. R.; González-Díaz, D.; Biagi, S. F.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Escada, J.; Monrabal, F.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Álvarez, V.; Benlloch-Rodríguez, J. M.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Botas, A.; Cárcel, S.; Carrión, J. V.; Cebrián, S.; Conde, C. A. N.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Esteve, R.; Felkai, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernandez, A. I.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; Herrero, V.; Jones, B. J. P.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Losada, M.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; McDonald, A. D.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Vidal, J. Muñoz; Musti, M.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Nygren, D.; Palmeiro, B.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Rogers, L.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Stiegler, T.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a simulation framework for the transport of high and low energy electrons in xenon-based optical time projection chambers (OTPCs). The simulation relies on elementary cross sections (electron-atom and electron-molecule) and incorporates, in order to compute the gas scintillation, the reaction/quenching rates (atom-atom and atom-molecule) of the first 41 excited states of xenon and the relevant associated excimers, together with their radiative cascade. The results compare positively with observations made in pure xenon and its mixtures with CO2 and CF4 in a range of pressures from 0.1 to 10 bar. This work sheds some light on the elementary processes responsible for the primary and secondary xenon-scintillation mechanisms in the presence of additives, that are of interest to the OTPC technology.

  5. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  6. Distribution of xenon between gaseous and liquid CO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackley, R.D.; Notz, K.J.

    1976-10-01

    The distribution of xenon at low concentrations between gaseous and liquid CO/sub 2/ was measured over essentially the entire liquid range of CO/sub 2/. These measurements involved using a collimated radiation-detection cell to determine the relative quantities of /sup 133/Xe-traced xenon in the separate phases contained in a vertical cylinder under isothermal conditions. The results are expressed in terms of a distribution ratio (mole fraction of xenon in the gaseous phase divided by mole fraction of xenon in the liquid phase) which decreased from 7.53 at -54.8/sup 0/C to 1.10 at 30.5/sup 0/C. These data were used to calculate various other solubility-related quantities.

  7. Electron Impact Excitation Cross Sections of Xenon for Optical Plasma Diagnostic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srivastava, Rajesh

    2007-01-01

    In this project the researcher had taken up the calculation of xenon apparent emission-excitation cross sections for emission lines that have diagnostic value in the analysis of Xe-propelled electric thruster plasmas...

  8. A semi-analytical model of biological effectiveness for treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 6 (2007), s. 2654-2654 ISSN 0094-2405. [AAPM Annual Meeting. Minneapolis, 22.07.2007-26.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : treatment planning * light-ion therapy * radiobiological models Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2007

  9. Coupled electrochemical thermal modelling of a novel Li-ion battery pack thermal management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Suman; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Song, Taewon; Sohn, Dong Kee; Yeo, Taejung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional electrochemical thermal model of Li-ion battery pack using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). • Novel pack design for compact liquid cooling based thermal management system. • Simple temperature estimation algorithm for the cells in the pack using the results from the model. • Sensitivity of the thermal performance to contact resistance has been investigated. - Abstract: Thermal management system is of critical importance for a Li-ion battery pack, as high performance and long battery pack life can be simultaneously achieved when operated within a narrow range of temperature around the room temperature. An efficient thermal management system is required to keep the battery temperature in this range, despite widely varying operating conditions. A novel liquid coolant based thermal management system, for 18,650 battery pack has been introduced herein. This system is designed to be compact and economical without compromising safety. A coupled three-dimensional (3D) electrochemical thermal model is constructed for the proposed Li-ion battery pack. The model is used to evaluate the effects of different operating conditions like coolant flow-rate and discharge current on the pack temperature. Contact resistance is found to have the strongest impact on the thermal performance of the pack. From the numerical solution, a simple and novel temperature correlation of predicting the temperatures of all the individual cells given the temperature measurement of one cell is devised and validated with experimental results. Such coefficients have great potential of reducing the sensor requirement and complexity in a large Li-ion battery pack, typical of an electric vehicle.

  10. Modelling radiation fields of ion beams in tissue-like materials

    OpenAIRE

    Burigo, Lucas Norberto (Dr.)

    2014-01-01

    Fast nuclei are ionizing radiation which can cause deleterious effects to irradiated cells. The modelling of the interactions of such ions with matter and the related effects are very important to physics, radiobiology, medicine and space science and technology. A powerful method to study the interactions of ionizing radiation with biological systems was developed in the field of microdosimetry. Microdosimetry spectra characterize the energy deposition to objects of cellular size, i.e., a few...

  11. An empirical topside electron density model for calculation of absolute ion densities in IRI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Třísková, Ludmila; Truhlík, Vladimír; Šmilauer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 5 (2006), s. 928-934 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/02/P037; GA AV ČR IAA3042201; GA MŠk ME 651 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) 0245457 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Plasma density * Topside ionosphere * Ion composition * Empirical models Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.706, year: 2005

  12. Towards better description of solar activity variation in the International Reference Ionosphere topside ion composition model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Truhlík, Vladimír; Bilitza, D.; Třísková, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 8 (2015), s. 2099-2105 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11123 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : ion composition * topside ionosphere * solar activity * empirical model * International Reference Ionosphere Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.409, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027311771400489X

  13. Numerical modeling of a small recirculating induction accelerator for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Newton, M.A.; Fessenden, T.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    A series of small-scale experiments has been proposed to study critical physics issues of a circular induction accelerator for heavy-ion fusion. Because the beam dynamics will be dominated by space charge, the experiments require careful design of the lattice and acceleration schedule. A hierarchy of codes has been developed for modeling the experiments at different levels of detail. The codes are discussed briefly, and examples of the output are presented

  14. Lithium-Ion Battery Power Degradation Modelling by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel-Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Ana-Irina

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique as an alternative to the DC pulses technique for estimating the power capability decrease of Lithium-ion batteries during calendar ageing. Based on results obtained from calendar ageing tests performed...... at different conditions during one to two years, a generalized model that estimates the battery power capability decrease as function of the resistance Rs increase (obtained from EIS) was proposed and successfully verified....

  15. DNA damage on nano- and micrometer scales impacts dicentric induction: computer modelling of ion microbeam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Schmitt, Elke

    2016-07-01

    Detailed understanding of the enhanced relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ions, in particular at high linear energy transfer (LET) values, is needed to fully explore the radiation risk of manned space missions. It is generally accepted that the enhanced RBE of high-LET particles results from the DNA lesion patterns, in particular DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), due to the spatial clustering of energy deposits around their trajectories. In conventional experiments on biological effects of radiation types of diverse quality, however, clustering of energy deposition events on nanometer scale that is relevant for the induction and local complexity of DSB is inherently interlinked with regional (sub-)micrometer-scale DSB clustering along the particle tracks. Due to this limitation, the role of both (nano- and micrometer) scales on the induction of diverse biological endpoints cannot be frankly separated. To address this issue in a unique way, experiments at the ion microbeam SNAKE [1] and corresponding track-structure based model calculations of DSB induction and subsequent repair with the biophysical code PARTRAC [2] have been performed. In the experiments, hybrid human-hamster A_{L} cells were irradiated with 20 MeV (2.6 keV/μm) protons, 45 MeV (60 keV/μm) lithium ions or 55 MeV (310 keV/μm) carbon ions. The ions were either quasi-homogeneously distributed or focused to 0.5 x 1 μm^{2} spots on regular matrix patterns of 5.4 μm, 7.6 μm and 10.6 μm grid size, with pre-defined particle numbers per spot so as to deposit a mean dose of 1.7 Gy for all irradiation patterns. As expected, the induction of dicentrics by homogeneous irradiation increased with LET: lithium and carbon ions induced about two- and four-fold higher yields of dicentrics than protons. The induction of dicentrics is, however, affected by µm-scale, too: focusing 20 lithium ions or 451 protons per spot on a 10.6 μm grid induced two or three times more dicentrics, respectively, than a

  16. Modelling of Ion Transport in Solids with a General Bond Valence Based Force-Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Adams

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Empirical bond length - bond valence relations provide insight into the link between structure of and ion transport in solid electrolytes. Building on our earlier systematic adjustment of bond valence (BV parameters to the bond softness, here we discuss how the squared BV mismatch can be linked to the absolute energy scale and used as a general Morse-type interaction potential for analyzing low-energy pathways in ion conducting solid or mixed conductors either by an energy landscape approach or by molecular dynamics (MD simulations. For a wide range of Lithium oxides we could thus model ion transport revealing significant differences to an earlier geometric approach. Our novel BV-based force-field has also been applied to investigate a range of mixed conductors, focusing on cathode materials for lithium ion battery (LIB applications to promote a systematic design of LIB cathodes that combine high energy density with high power density. To demonstrate the versatility of the new BV-based force-field it is applied in exploring various strategies to enhance the power performance of safe low cost LIB materials (LiFePO4, LiVPO4F, LiFeSO4F, etc..

  17. Energy loss of slow, highly charged ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenkel, T.; Hamza, A.V.; Barnes, A.V.; Schneider, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The loss of kinetic energy of highly charged, heavy ions (Ar 18+ , Xe 44+ , and Au 69+ ) in thin carbon foils has been measured as a function projectile velocity in the range from 6x10 5 to 11x10 5 m/s. Evidence for strong pre-equilibrium energy-loss enhancements is observed for highly charged xenon and gold ions. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Radiation hardening of metals irradiated by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, A.Yu.; Skuratov, V.A.; Mikhajlova, N.Yu.; Regel', V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The damage dose dependence in the 10 -4 -10 -2 dpa region of radiation hardening of Al, V, Ni, Cu irradiated by xenon ions with 124 MeV energy is investigated using the microhardness technique and transmission electron microscope. It is shown that the pure metals radiation hardening is stimulated for defects clusters with the typical size less than 5 nm, as in the case of neutron and the light charge ion irradiation

  19. Thick electrodes for Li-ion batteries: A model based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Timo; Singh, Madhav; Hein, Simon; Kaiser, Jörg; Hahn, Horst; Latz, Arnulf

    2016-12-01

    Li-ion batteries are commonly used in portable electronic devices due to their outstanding energy and power density. A remaining issue which hinders the breakthrough e.g. in the automotive sector is the high production cost. For low power applications, such as stationary storage, batteries with electrodes thicker than 300 μm were suggested. High energy densities can be attained with only a few electrode layers which reduces production time and cost. However, mass and charge transport limitations can be severe at already small C-rates due to long transport pathways. In this article we use a detailed 3D micro-structure resolved model to investigate limiting factors for battery performance. The model is parametrized with data from the literature and dedicated experiments and shows good qualitative agreement with experimental discharge curves of thick NMC-graphite Li-ion batteries. The model is used to assess the effect of inhomogeneities in carbon black distribution and gives answers to the possible occurrence of lithium plating during battery charge. Based on our simulations we can predict optimal operation strategies and improved design concepts for future Li-ion batteries employing thick electrodes.

  20. Noncontact measurement of electrostatic fields: Verification of modeled potentials within ion mobility spectrometer drift tube designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for independently validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: (1) A traditional alternating set of electrodes and insulators and (2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the alternating electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of resistive ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated by a noncontact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe (results for alternative measurement methods provided in supplementary material). The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked ion mobility spectrometer drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube approach perfect linearity