WorldWideScience

Sample records for model wind tunnel

  1. Aeroelastic instability stoppers for wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A mechanism for constraining models or sections thereof, was wind tunnel tested, deployed at the onset of aeroelastic instability, to forestall destructive vibrations in the model is described. The mechanism includes a pair of arms pivoted to the tunnel wall and straddling the model. Rollers on the ends of the arms contact the model, and are pulled together against the model by a spring stretched between the arms. An actuator mechanism swings the arms into place and back as desired.

  2. Glide back booster wind tunnel model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricop, M. V.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Stoica, C. I.; Niculescu, M. L.; Neculaescu, A. M.; Persinaru, A. G.; Boscoianu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Affordable space access requires partial or ideally full launch vehicle reuse, which is in line with clean environment requirement. Although the idea is old, the practical use is difficult, requiring very large technology investment for qualification. Rocket gliders like Space Shuttle have been successfullyoperated but the price and correspondingly the energy footprint were found not sustainable. For medium launchers, finally there is a very promising platform as Falcon 9. For very small launchers the situation is more complex, because the performance index (payload to start mass) is already small, versus medium and heavy launchers. For partial reusable micro launchers this index is even smaller. However the challenge has to be taken because it is likely that in a multiyear effort, technology is going to enable the performance recovery to make such a system economically and environmentally feasible. The current paper is devoted to a small unitary glide back booster which is foreseen to be assembled in a number of possible configurations. Although the level of analysis is not deep, the solution is analyzed from the aerodynamic point of view. A wind tunnel model is designed, with an active canard, to enablea more efficient wind tunnel campaign, as a national level premiere.

  3. Wall Correction Model for Wind Tunnels with Open Test Section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2004-01-01

    In th paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, that is based on a onedimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. Generally......, the corrections from the model are in very good agreement with the CFD computaions, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections. Keywords: Wind tunnel correction, momentum theory...

  4. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  5. Wind Tunnel Management and Resource Optimization: A Systems Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Derya, A.; Aasen, Curtis A.

    2000-01-01

    Time, money, and, personnel are becoming increasingly scarce resources within government agencies due to a reduction in funding and the desire to demonstrate responsible economic efficiency. The ability of an organization to plan and schedule resources effectively can provide the necessary leverage to improve productivity, provide continuous support to all projects, and insure flexibility in a rapidly changing environment. Without adequate internal controls the organization is forced to rely on external support, waste precious resources, and risk an inefficient response to change. Management systems must be developed and applied that strive to maximize the utility of existing resources in order to achieve the goal of "faster, cheaper, better". An area of concern within NASA Langley Research Center was the scheduling, planning, and resource management of the Wind Tunnel Enterprise operations. Nine wind tunnels make up the Enterprise. Prior to this research, these wind tunnel groups did not employ a rigorous or standardized management planning system. In addition, each wind tunnel unit operated from a position of autonomy, with little coordination of clients, resources, or project control. For operating and planning purposes, each wind tunnel operating unit must balance inputs from a variety of sources. Although each unit is managed by individual Facility Operations groups, other stakeholders influence wind tunnel operations. These groups include, for example, the various researchers and clients who use the facility, the Facility System Engineering Division (FSED) tasked with wind tunnel repair and upgrade, the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Fabrication (FAB) group which fabricates repair parts and provides test model upkeep, the NASA and LARC Strategic Plans, and unscheduled use of the facilities by important clients. Expanding these influences horizontally through nine wind tunnel operations and vertically along the NASA management structure greatly increases the

  6. Wind Tunnel Experiments with Active Control of Bridge Section Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    the flutter wind velocity for future ultra-long span suspension bridges. The purpose of the wind tunnel experiments is to investigate the principle to use this active flap control system. The bridge section model used in the experiments is therefore not a model of a specific bridge but it is realistic......This paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section model where movable flaps are integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is the streamlined part of the edge of the girder. This active control flap system is patented by COWIconsult and may be used to increase...... compared with a real bridge. Five flap configurations are investigated during the wind tunnel experiments and depending on the actual flap configuration it is possible to decrease or increase the flutter wind velocity for the model....

  7. Wall correction model for wind tunnels with open test section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2006-01-01

    In the paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, which is based on a one-dimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. In the model...... the exchange of axial momentum between the tunnel and the ambient room is represented by a simple formula, derived from actuator disc computations. The correction model is validated against Navier-Stokes computations of the flow about a wind turbine rotor. Generally, the corrections from the model are in very...... good agreement with the CFD computations, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections....

  8. Airship Model Tests in the Variable Density Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Ira H

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests conducted to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airship models. Eight Goodyear-Zeppelin airship models were tested in the original closed-throat tunnel. After the tunnel was rebuilt with an open throat a new model was tested, and one of the Goodyear-Zeppelin models was retested. The results indicate that much may be done to determine the drag of airships from evaluations of the pressure and skin-frictional drags on models tested at large Reynolds number.

  9. Critical review of wind tunnel modeling of atmospheric heat dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-05-01

    There is increasing concern by scientists that future proposed energy or power parks may significantly affect the environment by releasing large quantities of heat and water vapor to the atmosphere. A critical review is presented of the potential application of physical modeling (wind tunnels) to assess possible atmospheric effects from heat dissipation systems such as cooling towers. A short inventory of low-speed wind tunnel facilities is included in the review. The useful roles of wind tunnels are assessed and the state-of-the-art of physical modeling is briefly reviewed. Similarity criteria are summarized and present limitations in satisfying these criteria are considered. Current physical models are defined and limitations are discussed. Three experimental problems are discussed in which physical modeling may be able to provide data. These are: defining the critical atmospheric heat load; topographic and local circulation effects on thermal plumes; and plume rise and downstream effects.

  10. Method for Standardizing Sonic-Boom Model Pressure Signatures Measured at Several Wind-Tunnel Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Low-boom model pressure signatures are often measured at two or more wind-tunnel facilities. Preliminary measurements are made at small separation distances in a wind tunnel close at hand, and a second set of pressure signatures is measured at larger separation distances in a wind-tunnel facility with a larger test section. In this report, a method for correcting and standardizing the wind-tunnel-measured pressure signatures obtained in different wind tunnel facilities is presented and discussed.

  11. Wind tunnel measurements of a large wind farm model approaching the infinite wind farm regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    A scaled wind farm, with 100 porous disk models of wind turbines, is used to study the effect of wind farm layout on the wind farm power output and its variability, in a wind tunnel study. The wind farm consists of 20 rows and 5 columns. The porous disk models have a diameter of 0 . 03 m and are instrumented with strain gages to measure the thrust force, as a surrogate for wind turbine power output. The frequency response of the measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the models and allows studying the spatio-temporal characteristics of the power output for different layouts. A variety of layouts are considered by shifting the individual rows in the spanwise direction. The reference layout has a regular streamwise spacing of Sx / D = 7 and a spanwise spacing of Sy / D = 5 . The parameter space is further expanded by considering layouts with an uneven streamwise spacing: Sx / D = 3 . 5 & 10 . 5 and Sx / D = 1 . 5 & 12 . 5 . We study how the mean row power changes as a function of wind farm layout and investigate the appearance of an asymptotic limiting behavior as previously described in the literature by application of the top-down model for the spatially averaged wind farm - boundary layer interaction. Work supported by ERC (Grant No. 306471, the ActiveWindFarms project) and by NSF (OISE-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  12. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  13. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  14. Overload prevention in model supports for wind tunnel model testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton IVANOVICI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Preventing overloads in wind tunnel model supports is crucial to the integrity of the tested system. Results can only be interpreted as valid if the model support, conventionally called a sting remains sufficiently rigid during testing. Modeling and preliminary calculation can only give an estimate of the sting’s behavior under known forces and moments but sometimes unpredictable, aerodynamically caused model behavior can cause large transient overloads that cannot be taken into account at the sting design phase. To ensure model integrity and data validity an analog fast protection circuit was designed and tested. A post-factum analysis was carried out to optimize the overload detection and a short discussion on aeroelastic phenomena is included to show why such a detector has to be very fast. The last refinement of the concept consists in a fast detector coupled with a slightly slower one to differentiate between transient overloads that decay in time and those that are the result of aeroelastic unwanted phenomena. The decision to stop or continue the test is therefore conservatively taken preserving data and model integrity while allowing normal startup loads and transients to manifest.

  15. Digital Control System For Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mcgraw, Sandra

    1995-01-01

    Multiple functions performed by multiple coordinated processors for real-time control. Multiple input, multiple-output, multiple-function digital control system developed for wind-tunnel model of advanced fighter airplane with actively controlled flexible wings. Digital control system provides flexibility in selection of control laws, sensors, and actuators, plus some redundancy to accommodate failures in some of its subsystems. Implements feedback control scheme providing simultaneously for suppression of flutter, control of roll angle, roll-rate tracking during maximized roll maneuvers, and alleviation of loads during roll maneuvers.

  16. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  17. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  18. Educational Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Bielskus

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes an educational wind tunnel produced by the Department of Building Energetics (DBE of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University. The equipment could be used for performing laboratory works and simple research. The article presents the projection of inflow and outlet velocity in the working chamber of DBE wind tunnel and carries out actual noise level measurement. The received data are compared with information on the level of noise generated by the fan considering instructions provided by the manufacturer. In order to assess the reliability of the computer program, simulation applying PHOENICS software has been conducted. The aim of modeling is to simulate a pilot model and to compare the obtained results with those of an analogous test presented in scientific articles.Article in Lithuanian

  19. An improved calibration technique for wind tunnel model attitude sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, John S.; Wong, Douglas T.; Finley, Tom D.; Tcheng, Ping

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic wind tunnel tests at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) require accurate measurement of model attitude. Inertial accelerometer packages have been the primary sensor used to measure model attitude to an accuracy of +/- 0.01 deg as required for aerodynamic research. The calibration parameters of the accelerometer package are currently obtained from a seven-point tumble test using a simplified empirical approximation. The inaccuracy due to the approximation exceeds the accuracy requirement as the misalignment angle between the package axis and the model body axis increases beyond 1.4 deg. This paper presents the exact solution derived from the coordinate transformation to eliminate inaccuracy caused by the approximation. In addition, a new calibration procedure is developed in which the data taken from the seven-point tumble test is fit to the exact solution by means of a least-squares estimation procedure. Validation tests indicate that the new calibration procedure provides +/- 0.005-deg accuracy over large package misalignments, which is not possible with the current procedure.

  20. Wind tunnel measurements of wake structure and wind farm power for actuator disk model wind turbines in yaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Kang, Justin; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Reducing wake losses in wind farms by deflecting the wakes through turbine yawing has been shown to be a feasible wind farm control approach. In this work, the deflection and morphology of wakes behind a wind turbine operating in yawed conditions are studied using wind tunnel experiments of a wind turbine modeled as a porous disk in a uniform inflow. First, by measuring velocity distributions at various downstream positions and comparing with prior studies, we confirm that the nonrotating wind turbine model in yaw generates realistic wake deflections. Second, we characterize the wake shape and make observations of what is termed a "curled wake," displaying significant spanwise asymmetry. Through the use of a 100 porous disk micro-wind farm, total wind farm power output is studied for a variety of yaw configurations. Strain gages on the tower of the porous disk models are used to measure the thrust force as a substitute for turbine power. The frequency response of these measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model and allows studying the spatiotemporal characteristics of the power output under the effects of yawing. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (Grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project). JB and JM are supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, Grant No. 306471).

  1. INCAS SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu STOICA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The INCAS Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a closed circuit, continuous, atmospheric pressure facility with a maximum speed of 110 m/s. The test section is octagonal ,of 2.5 m wide, 2.0 m high and 4 m long. The tunnel is powered by a 1200 kW, air cooled variable speed DC motor which drives a 12 blade, 3.5 m diameter fan and is equipped with a six component pyramidal type external mechanical balance with a 700 Kgf maximum lift capacity.The angle of attack range is between -45º and +45º while the yaw angle range is between -140º and +216º .The data acquisition system has been modified recently to allow the recording of all test data on a PC - type computer using LABVIEW and a PXI – type chassis containing specialized data acquisition modules.The tunnel is equipped with a variable frequency electrical supply system for powered models and a 10 bar compressed air supply for pneumatic flow control applications.In the recent years the subsonic wind tunnel has been intensively used for tests within several European projects (AVERT, CESAR and others.

  2. Numerical simulation of flows around deformed aircraft model in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenkov, A. V.; Bosnyakov, S. M.; Glazkov, S. A.; Gorbushin, A. R.; Kuzmina, S. I.; Kursakov, I. A.; Matyash, S. V.; Ishmuratov, F. Z.

    2016-10-01

    To obtain accurate data of calculation method error requires detailed simulation of the experiment in wind tunnel with keeping all features of the model, installation and gas flow. Two examples of such detailed data comparison are described in this paper. The experimental characteristics of NASA CRM model obtained in the ETW wind tunnel (Cologne, Germany), and CFD characteristics of this model obtained with the use of EWT-TsAGI application package are compared. Following comparison is carried out for an airplane model in the T-128 wind tunnel (TsAGI, Russia). It is seen that deformation influence on integral characteristics grows with increasing Re number and, accordingly, the dynamic pressure. CFD methods application for problems of experimental research in the wind tunnel allows to separate viscosity and elasticity effects.

  3. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  4. Simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer in the wind tunnel for modeling of wind loads on low-rise structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieleman, H. W.; Reinhold, T. A.; Marshall, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer (strong wind conditions) was simulated in low speed wind tunnel for the modeling of wind loads on low-rise structures. The turbulence characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer in the wind tunnel are compared with full scale measurements and with measurements made at NASA Wallops Flight Center. Wind pressures measured on roofs of a 1:70 scale model of a small single family dwelling were compared with results obtained from full scale measurements. The results indicate a favorable comparison between full scale and model pressure data as far as mean, r.m.s. and peak pressures are concerned. In addition, results also indicate that proper modeling of the turbulence is essential for proper simulation of the wind pressures.

  5. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  6. Wind tunnel measurements of the power output variability and unsteady loading in a micro wind farm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    To optimize wind farm layouts for a maximum power output and wind turbine lifetime, mean power output measurements in wind tunnel studies are not sufficient. Instead, detailed temporal information about the power output and unsteady loading from every single wind turbine in the wind farm is needed. A very small porous disc model with a realistic thrust coefficient of 0.75 - 0.85, was designed. The model is instrumented with a strain gage, allowing measurements of the thrust force, incoming velocity and power output with a frequency response up to the natural frequency of the model. This is shown by reproducing the -5/3 spectrum from the incoming flow. Thanks to its small size and compact instrumentation, the model allows wind tunnel studies of large wind turbine arrays with detailed temporal information from every wind turbine. Translating to field conditions with a length-scale ratio of 1:3,000 the frequencies studied from the data reach from 10-4 Hz up to about 6 .10-2 Hz. The model's capabilities are demonstrated with a large wind farm measurement consisting of close to 100 instrumented models. A high correlation is found between the power outputs of stream wise aligned wind turbines, which is in good agreement with results from prior LES simulations. Work supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471) and by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  7. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    This section presents the results obtained during the experimental campaign that was conducted in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov from August 16th to 26th, 2010. The goal of this study is to validate the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model through measurements of the boundary...... layer turbulence characteristics and the far-field noise generated by the acoustic scattering of the turbulent boundary layer vorticies as they convect past the trailing edge. This campaign was conducted with a NACA0015 airfoil section that was placed in the wind tunnel section. It is equipped with high...

  8. Evaluation of a micro-scale wind model's performance over realistic building clusters using wind tunnel experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Du, Yunsong; Miao, Shiguang; Fang, Xiaoyi

    2016-08-01

    The simulation performance over complex building clusters of a wind simulation model (Wind Information Field Fast Analysis model, WIFFA) in a micro-scale air pollutant dispersion model system (Urban Microscale Air Pollution dispersion Simulation model, UMAPS) is evaluated using various wind tunnel experimental data including the CEDVAL (Compilation of Experimental Data for Validation of Micro-Scale Dispersion Models) wind tunnel experiment data and the NJU-FZ experiment data (Nanjing University-Fang Zhuang neighborhood wind tunnel experiment data). The results show that the wind model can reproduce the vortexes triggered by urban buildings well, and the flow patterns in urban street canyons and building clusters can also be represented. Due to the complex shapes of buildings and their distributions, the simulation deviations/discrepancies from the measurements are usually caused by the simplification of the building shapes and the determination of the key zone sizes. The computational efficiencies of different cases are also discussed in this paper. The model has a high computational efficiency compared to traditional numerical models that solve the Navier-Stokes equations, and can produce very high-resolution (1-5 m) wind fields of a complex neighborhood scale urban building canopy (~ 1 km ×1 km) in less than 3 min when run on a personal computer.

  9. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Bridge Model with Active Vibration Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Mendes, P. A.

    The application of active control systems to reduce wind vibrations in bridges is a new area of research. This paper presents the results that were obtained on a set of wind tunnel tests of a bridge model equipped with active movable flaps. Based on the monitored position and motion of the deck......, the flaps are regulated by a control algorithm so that the wind forces exerted on them counteract the deck oscillations....

  10. A New Global Regression Analysis Method for the Prediction of Wind Tunnel Model Weight Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Bridge, Thomas M.; Amaya, Max A.

    2014-01-01

    A new global regression analysis method is discussed that predicts wind tunnel model weight corrections for strain-gage balance loads during a wind tunnel test. The method determines corrections by combining "wind-on" model attitude measurements with least squares estimates of the model weight and center of gravity coordinates that are obtained from "wind-off" data points. The method treats the least squares fit of the model weight separate from the fit of the center of gravity coordinates. Therefore, it performs two fits of "wind- off" data points and uses the least squares estimator of the model weight as an input for the fit of the center of gravity coordinates. Explicit equations for the least squares estimators of the weight and center of gravity coordinates are derived that simplify the implementation of the method in the data system software of a wind tunnel. In addition, recommendations for sets of "wind-off" data points are made that take typical model support system constraints into account. Explicit equations of the confidence intervals on the model weight and center of gravity coordinates and two different error analyses of the model weight prediction are also discussed in the appendices of the paper.

  11. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  12. Evaluation of Simultaneous Multisine Excitation of the Joined Wing SensorCraft Aeroelastic Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple mutually orthogonal signals comprise excitation data sets for aeroservoelastic system identification. A multisine signal is a sum of harmonic sinusoid components. A set of these signals is made orthogonal by distribution of the frequency content such that each signal contains unique frequencies. This research extends the range of application of an excitation method developed for stability and control flight testing to aeroservoelastic modeling from wind tunnel testing. Wind tunnel data for the Joined Wing SensorCraft model validates this method, demonstrating that these signals applied simultaneously reproduce the frequency response estimates achieved from one-at-a-time excitation.

  13. Application of two synthesis methods for active flutter suppression on an aeroelastic wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.; Dunn, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    Two flutter suppression control laws have been synthesized, implemented, and demonstrated on an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model of a transport-type wing. One control law was synthesized using an aerodynamic energy method and the other from using results of optimal control theory. At M = 0.95, the model was tested to a dynamic pressure 44 percent above the system-off flutter dynamic pressure. Both synthesis methods yielded control laws effective in suppressing flutter. The experimental results also indicate that wind-tunnel turbulence is an important factor in the experimental demonstration of system performance.

  14. Modeling the effects of wind tunnel wall absorption on the acoustic radiation characteristics of propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element theory is used to calculate the acoustic field of a propeller in a soft walled circular wind tunnel and to compare the radiation patterns to the same propeller in free space. Parametric solutions are present for a 'Gutin' propeller for a variety of flow Mach numbers, admittance values at the wall, microphone position locations, and propeller to duct radius ratios. Wind tunnel boundary layer is not included in this analysis. For wall admittance nearly equal to the characteristic value of free space, the free field and ducted propeller models agree in pressure level and directionality. In addition, the need for experimentally mapping the acoustic field is discussed.

  15. Experimental Aeroelastic Models Design and Wind Tunnel Testing for Correlation with New Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Several examples of experimental model designs, wind tunnel tests and correlation with new theory are presented in this paper. The goal is not only to evaluate a new theory, new computational method or new aeroelastic phonomenon, but also to provide new insights into nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, flutter, limit cycle oscillation (LCO and gust response.

  16. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  17. Aeroservoelastic Testing of a Sidewall Mounted Free Flying Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three j wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, exible vehicles. In the rst of these three tests, a semispan, aeroelastically scaled, wind-tunnel model of a ying wing SensorCraft vehi- cle was mounted to a force balance to demonstrate gust load alleviation. In the second and third tests, the same wing was mated to a new, multi-degree-of-freedom, sidewall mount. This mount allowed the half-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, allowing better simulation of the full span vehicle's rigid-body modes. Gust Load Alleviation (GLA) and Body Freedom Flutter (BFF) suppression were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees-of-freedom required that the model be own in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort.

  18. Force Measurement on Aircraft Model with and without Winglet using Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Muthusamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to conduct experiment by fabricating a standard aircraft model and retrofit winglets with cant angles 0 degree (vertical,30 degree and 60 degree. The experiments were conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel of size (feet 3x4x6.The experiment was conducted both for basic model and the model modified with winglets. The model with winglet has exhibited substantial reduction of coefficient of drag. The stall characteristics of the winglet were analyzed by plotting suitable graph. A calibrated three component balance was used for measuring the forces. Automated turntable mounted in the test section of the wind tunnel and therecording systems were used efficiently. The results were compared and discussed.

  19. Use of wind tunnel measurements for mathematical model comparison and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corti, A.; Zanobini, M. [Firenze Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Energy; Canepa, E. [Genova Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Physics

    2002-07-01

    In this paper hourly average concentrations obtained by means of several dispersion mathematical models (DIMULA, ISC3, SAFEAIR and ADMS2) considering their various options for the calculation of dispersion parameters are compared against measurements performed in the wind tunnel of C.R.I.A.C.I.V. (Centro di Ricerca Interuniversitario di Aerodinamica delle Costruzioni ed Ingegneria del Vento) at Prato, Italy. Measurements are referred to diffusion experiments in neutral conditions using a 1:270 small scale model above flat terrain. Different experimental conditions were considered in dependence of height and number of emitting stacks (coupled or single) and wind direction. Wind tunnel simulated emissions were referred to a buoyancy condition using a mixture based on the presence of ethylene (20% vol) and helium (80% vol) in order to have a suitable tracer. The experimental results include ground level concentration (GLC) maps and vertical profiles, covering a distance range of about 1,3 km from the stacks at full scale. A statistical validation procedure was applied using wind tunnel experimental results as data set in order to evaluate model performances. (orig.)

  20. Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 2: A Centerline Supported Fullspan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This is part 2 of a two part document. Part 1 is titled: "Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 1: A Sidewall Supported Semispan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation and Flutter Suppression." A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, flexible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind tunnel model of a joined wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind tunnel model was mated to a new, two degree of freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at10 percent static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be flown in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free flying wind tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  1. Experimental Study of Aerodynamic Behavior in Wind Tunnels with Ornithopter and Plane Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Francoise SCIBILIA; Jan WOJCIECHOWSKI

    2006-01-01

    There are similarities between planes and birds. In fact aerodynamics bases are the same. In order to make some comparisons, this paper presents two series of experiments: one in a wind tunnel with an ornithopter model for measurements of aerodynamic forces with flapping wings. The wing movement has two degrees of freedom flapping around the longitudinal axis of the model and feathering around the wing axis. Measurements of aerodynamic forces: lift and drag in static case averaging values during many cycles of movement and in dynamic case have been performed. The other part of the paper concerns velocity and turbulence measurements on a metal plane wall jet in a wind tunnel with and without a rough surface, with and without acoustic vibrations in order to simulate a plane wing. Aerodynamic characteristics have been obtained in all cases.

  2. Computational Design and Analysis of a Transonic Natural Laminar Flow Wing for a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynde, Michelle N.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    A natural laminar flow (NLF) wind tunnel model has been designed and analyzed for a wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The NLF design method is built into the CDISC design module and uses a Navier-Stokes flow solver, a boundary layer profile solver, and stability analysis and transition prediction software. The NLF design method alters the pressure distribution to support laminar flow on the upper surface of wings with high sweep and flight Reynolds numbers. The method addresses transition due to attachment line contamination/transition, Gortler vortices, and crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting modal instabilities. The design method is applied to the wing of the Common Research Model (CRM) at transonic flight conditions. Computational analysis predicts significant extents of laminar flow on the wing upper surface, which results in drag savings. A 5.2 percent scale semispan model of the CRM NLF wing will be built and tested in the NTF. This test will aim to validate the NLF design method, as well as characterize the laminar flow testing capabilities in the wind tunnel facility.

  3. Pressure-Sensitive Paint and Video Model Deformation Systems at the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, G. E.; Burner, A. W.; DeLoach, R.

    1999-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) and video model deformation (VMD) systems have been installed in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center to support the supersonic wind tunnel testing requirements of the High Speed Research (HSR) program. The PSP and VMD systems have been operational since early 1996 and provide the capabilities of measuring global surface static pressures and wing local twist angles and deflections (bending). These techniques have been successfully applied to several HSR wind tunnel models for wide ranges of the Mach number, Reynolds number, and angle of attack. A review of the UPWT PSP and VMD systems is provided, and representative results obtained on selected HSR models are shown. A promising technique to streamline the wind tunnel testing process, Modern Experimental Design, is also discussed in conjunction with recently-completed wing deformation measurements at UPWT.

  4. Simulating flow around scaled model of a hypersonic vehicle in wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, T. V.; Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitsky, D. V.; Gavrilov, A. D.; Son, E. E.; Prokhorov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    A prospective hypersonic HEXAFLY aircraft is considered in the given paper. In order to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of a new construction design of the aircraft, experiments with a scaled model have been carried out in a wind tunnel under different conditions. The runs have been performed at different angles of attack with and without hydrogen combustion in the scaled propulsion engine. However, the measured physical quantities do not provide all the information about the flowfield. Numerical simulation can complete the experimental data as well as to reduce the number of wind tunnel experiments. Besides that, reliable CFD software can be used for calculations of the aerodynamic characteristics for any possible design of the full-scale aircraft under different operation conditions. The reliability of the numerical predictions must be confirmed in verification study of the software. The given work is aimed at numerical investigation of the flowfield around and inside the scaled model of the HEXAFLY-CIAM module under wind tunnel conditions. A cold run (without combustion) was selected for this study. The calculations are performed in the FlowVision CFD software. The flow characteristics are compared against the available experimental data. The carried out verification study confirms the capability of the FlowVision CFD software to calculate the flows discussed.

  5. Noise model for serrated trailing edges compared to wind tunnel measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Bertagnolio, Franck; Shen, Wen Zhong; Madsen, Jesper

    2016-09-01

    A new CFD RANS based method to predict the far field sound pressure emitted from an aerofoil with serrated trailing edge has been developed. The model was validated by comparison to measurements conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel. The model predicted 3 dB lower sound pressure levels, but the tendencies for the different configurations were predicted correctly. Therefore the model can be used to optimise the serration geometry. A disadvantage of the new model is that the computational costs are significantly higher than for the Amiet model for a straight trailing edge. However, it is by decades faster than LES methods.

  6. Noise model for serrated trailing edges compared to wind tunnel measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas; Bertagnolio, Franck; Shen, Wen Zhong;

    2016-01-01

    A new CFD RANS based method to predict the far field sound pressure emitted from an aerofoil with serrated trailing edge has been developed. The model was validated by comparison to measurements conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel. The model predicted 3 dB lower sound pressure...... levels, but the tendencies for the different configurations were predicted correctly. Therefore the model can be used to optimise the serration geometry. A disadvantage of the new model is that the computational costs are significantly higher than for the Amiet model for a straight trailing edge. However...

  7. Computational Results for the KTH-NASA Wind-Tunnel Model Used for Acquisition of Transonic Nonlinear Aeroelastic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.; Eller, David; Ringertz, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    A status report is provided on the collaboration between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Sweden and the NASA Langley Research Center regarding the aeroelastic analyses of a full-span fighter configuration wind-tunnel model. This wind-tunnel model was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in the summer of 2016. Large amounts of data were acquired including steady/unsteady pressures, accelerations, strains, and measured dynamic deformations. The aeroelastic analyses presented include linear aeroelastic analyses, CFD steady analyses, and analyses using CFD-based reduced-order models (ROMs).

  8. Fluorescence Imaging and Streamline Visualization of Hypersonic Flow over Rapid Prototype Wind-Tunnel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Berger, Karen T.; Buck, Gregory M.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Reentry models for use in hypersonic wind tunnel tests were fabricated using a stereolithography apparatus. These models were produced in one day or less, which is a significant time savings compared to the manufacture of ceramic or metal models. The models were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel. Only a few of the models survived repeated tests in the tunnel, and several failure modes of the models were identified. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize the flowfields in the wakes of these models. Pure NO was either seeded through tubes plumbed into the model or via a tube attached to the strut holding the model, which provided localized addition of NO into the model s wake through a porous metal cylinder attached to the end of the tube. Models included several 2- inch diameter Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) models and 5-inch diameter Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) models. Various model configurations and NO seeding methods were used, including a new streamwise visualization method based on PLIF. Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) technology, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The use of calibration "dotcards" was investigated to correct for camera perspective and lens distortions in the PLIF images.

  9. Measurement of unsteady loading and power output variability in a micro wind farm model in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael F.; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Unsteady loading and spatiotemporal characteristics of power output are measured in a wind tunnel experiment of a microscale wind farm model with 100 porous disk models. The model wind farm is placed in a scaled turbulent boundary layer, and six different layouts, varied from aligned to staggered, are considered. The measurements are done by making use of a specially designed small-scale porous disk model, instrumented with strain gages. The frequency response of the measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model, which corresponds to a reduced frequency of 0.6 when normalized by the diameter and the mean hub height velocity. The equivalent range of timescales, scaled to field-scale values, is 15 s and longer. The accuracy and limitations of the acquisition technique are documented and verified with hot-wire measurements. The spatiotemporal measurement capabilities of the experimental setup are used to study the cross-correlation in the power output of various porous disk models of wind turbines. A significant correlation is confirmed between streamwise aligned models, while staggered models show an anti-correlation.

  10. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  11. Application of Pressure-Sensitive Paint to Ice-Accreted Wind Tunnel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been successfully used to measure global surface pressures on an ice-accreted model in an icing wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Until now, the PSP technique has been limited to use in normal wind tunnels and clear flight environments. This is the first known application of PSP directly to ice in subfreezing conditions. Several major objectives were achieved in these tests. The procedure for applying the coating in the subfreezing tunnel environment was verified. Inspection of the painted ice surface revealed that the paint did not alter the original ice shape and adhered well over the entire coated area. Several procedures were used to show that the paint responded to changes in air pressure and that a repeatable pressure-dependent calibration could be achieved on the PSP-coated surfaces. Differences in pressure measurements made simultaneously on the ice and the metal test model are not yet fully understood, and techniques to minimize or correct them are being investigated.

  12. Study of the average heat transfer coefficient at different distances between wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnyrya, A.; Korobkov, S.; Mokshin, D.; Koshin, A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents investigations of physical and climatic factors with regard to design and process variables having effect on heat transfer in the building model system at different distances between them in the airflow direction. The aim of this work is to improve energy efficiency of exterior walls of buildings. A method of physical simulation was used in experiments. Experimental results on the average values of the heat transfer coefficient in the building model system are presented herein. A series of experiments was carried out on a specific aerodynamic test bench including a subsonic wind tunnel, heat models and devices for giving thermal boundary conditions, transducers, and the record system equipment. The paper contains diagrams of the average heat transfer distribution at fixed Reynolds number and the airflow angle of attack; the average values of the heat transfer coefficient for each face and wind tunnel models as a whole at maximum, medium, and large distances between them. Intensification of the average heat transfer was observed on the downstream model faces depending on the distance between models.

  13. Modeling and control of temperature of heat-calibration wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yunhua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the temperature control of the heat air-flow wind tunnel for sensor temperature-calibration and heat strength experiment. Firstly, a mathematical model was established to describe the dynamic characteristics of the fuel supplying system based on a variable frequency driving pump. Then, based on the classical cascade control, an improved control law with the Smith predictive estimate and the fuzzy proportional-integral-derivative was proposed. The simulation result shows that the control effect of the proposed control strategy is better than the ordinary proportional-integral-derivative cascade control strategy.

  14. Thermal sensing of cryogenic wind tunnel model surfaces Evaluation of silicon diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Different sensors and installation techniques for surface temperature measurement of cryogenic wind tunnel models were investigated. Silicon diodes were selected for further consideration because of their good inherent accuracy. Their average absolute temperature deviation in comparison tests with standard platinum resistance thermometers was found to be 0.2 K in the range from 125 to 273 K. Subsurface temperature measurement was selected as the installation technique in order to minimize aerodynamic interference. Temperature distortion caused by an embedded silicon diode was studied numerically.

  15. Thermal sensing of cryogenic wind tunnel model surfaces - Evaluation of silicon diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Ash, Robert L.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1986-01-01

    Different sensors and installation techniques for surface temperature measurement of cryogenic wind tunnel models were investigated. Silicon diodes were selected for further consideration because of their good inherent accuracy. Their average absolute temperature deviation in comparison tests with standard platinum resistance thermometers was found to be 0.2 K in the range from 125 to 273 K. Subsurface temperature measurement was selected as the installation technique in order to minimize aerodynamic interference. Temperature distortion caused by an embedded silicon diode was studied numerically.

  16. Wind tunnel experiment of drag of isolated tree models in surface boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For very sparse tree land individual tree was the basic element of interaction between atmosphere and the surface. Drag of isolated tree was preliminary aerodynamic index for analyzing the atmospheric boundary layer of this kind of surface. A simple pendulum method was designed and carried out in wind tunnel to measure drag of isolated tree models according to balance law of moment of force. The method was easy to conduct and with small error. The results showed that the drag and drag coefficient of isolated tree increased with decreasing of its permeability or porosity. Relationship between drag coefficient and permeability of isolated tree empirically was expressed by quadric curve.

  17. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  18. Full Model Wind Tunnel Study on the Xia-Zhang Bridge Under Operation Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad T. Saeed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Long-span cable-stayed bridges under service and particular construction conditions are very susceptible to wind action due to their great flexibility, so the aerodynamic stability is becoming a major concern in the design and construction phrases. Cable-stayed bridges may exhibit wind-induced vibration phenomena such as flutter, buffeting and vortex oscillation under wind excitation. The study concentrated on the issues concerning the aerodynamic response of Xia-Zhang cable-stayed Bridge to make it safe and stable under wind action. Although there have been accumulating experience in the building of cable-stayed bridges and research on wind-resistant stability in Chinese Mainland, most of the research focuses on inland cable-stayed bridges or littoral ones of mid-length, but not on littoral ones whose main span is over 600 m. Therefore, wind-resistant performance research of north branch bridge of Xia-Zhang cross-sea Bridges is very necessary and important for its wind-resistant stability, safety and applicability in the operation condition. Approach: This study mainly presented the wind tunnel test program of the Xia-Zhang Bridge aeroelastic full model, including test method, test contents, test results and so on. Results: The test results contained Root Mean Square (RMS of accelerations and displacements as well as average values of displacements. Conclusion: The conclusions were as follows: (a In the uniform flow field, under the condition of entire bridge without rail may vibration divergence occur when α = 3°, V>122 m sec-1. (b No vortex-induced vibration with extreme amplitudes or static collapsing was detected in all the testing conditions. (c In the turbulent flow field, there were very obvious buffeting phenomena. Responses to turbulence are quite intense.

  19. Fluorescence Visualization of Hypersonic Flow over Rapid Prototype Wind-Tunnel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderfer, D. W.; Danehy, P. M.; Inma, J. A.; Berger, K. T.; Buck, G. M.; Schwartz, R J.

    2007-01-01

    Reentry models for use in hypersonic wind tunnel tests were fabricated using a stereolithography apparatus. These models were produced in one day or less, which is a significant time savings compared to the manufacture of ceramic or metal models. The models were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel. Most of the models did not survive repeated tests in the tunnel, and several failure modes of the models were identified. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize the flowfields in the wakes of these models. Pure NO was either seeded through tubes plumbed into the model or via a tube attached to the strut holding the model, which provided localized addition of NO into the model s wake through a porous metal cylinder attached to the end of the tube. Models included several 2-inch diameter Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) models and 5-inch diameter Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) models. Various configurations were studied including different sting placements relative to the models, different model orientations and attachment angles, and different NO seeding methods. The angle of attack of the models was also varied and the location of the laser sheet was scanned to provide three-dimensional flowfield information. Virtual Diagnostics Interface technology, developed at NASA Langley, was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The use of calibration "dotcards" was investigated to correct for camera perspective and lens distortions in the PLIF images. Lessons learned and recommendations for future experiments are discussed.

  20. The Role of Hierarchy in Response Surface Modeling of Wind Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper is intended as a tutorial introduction to certain aspects of response surface modeling, for the experimentalist who has started to explore these methods as a means of improving productivity and quality in wind tunnel testing and other aerospace applications. A brief review of the productivity advantages of response surface modeling in aerospace research is followed by a description of the advantages of a common coding scheme that scales and centers independent variables. The benefits of model term reduction are reviewed. A constraint on model term reduction with coded factors is described in some detail, which requires such models to be well-formulated, or hierarchical. Examples illustrate the consequences of ignoring this constraint. The implication for automated regression model reduction procedures is discussed, and some opinions formed from the author s experience are offered on coding, model reduction, and hierarchy.

  1. Metallurgical studies of NITRONIC 40 with reference to its use for cryogenic wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The characterstics of NITRONIC 40 were investigated in connection with its use in cryogenic wind tunnel models. In particular, the effects of carbide and sigma-phase precipitation resulting from heat treatment and the presence of delta ferrite were evaluated in relation to their effects on mechanical properties and the potential consequences of such degradation. Methods were examined for desensitizing the material and for possible removal of delta ferrite as a means of restoring the material to its advertised properties. It was found that heat treatment followed by cryogenic quenching is a technique capable of desensitizing NITRONIC 40. However, it was concluded that it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to remove the delta ferrite from the existing stock of material. Furthermore, heat treatments for removing delta ferrite have to take place at temperatures that cause very large grain growth. The implications of using the degraded NITRONIC 40 material for cryogenic model testing were reviewed, and recommendations were submitted with regard to the acceptability of the material. The experience gained from the study of NITRONIC 40 clearly identifies the need to implement a policy for purchasing top-quality materials for cryogenic wind tunnel model applications.

  2. Evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors for measuring model angle of attack in wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a laboratory evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors as potential candidates for measuring model attitude or angle of attack in wind tunnel tests are presented. The performance of eight electrolytic tilt sensors was compared with that of typical servo accelerometers used for angle-of-attack measurements. The areas evaluated included linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, temperature characteristics, roll-on-pitch interaction, sensitivity to lead-wire resistance, step response time, and rectification. Among the sensors being evaluated, the Spectron model RG-37 electrolytic tilt sensors have the highest overall accuracy in terms of linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, temperature sensitivity, and roll sensitivity. A comparison of the sensors with the servo accelerometers revealed that the accuracy of the RG-37 sensors was on the average about one order of magnitude worse. Even though a comparison indicates that the cost of each tilt sensor is about one-third the cost of each servo accelerometer, the sensors are considered unsuitable for angle-of-attack measurements. However, the potential exists for other applications such as wind tunnel wall-attitude measurements where the errors resulting from roll interaction, vibration, and response time are less and sensor temperature can be controlled.

  3. Snowdrift – visualisation on an architectural model in wind tunnel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiebig, Jennifer; Koss, Hans Holger Hundborg

    2016-01-01

    Wind-driven snow in cold regions is a significant problem for the built environment and the integration of snow deposition into the early design process is not sufficient implemented. Snowdrift simulation on a reduced scale in wind tunnel testing often investigates the similarity of particle tran...

  4. Simulation of Model Force-Loading with Changing Its Position in the Wind Tunnel Test Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Bui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When planning and implementing an aerodynamic experiment, model sizes and its position in the test section of the wind tunnel (WT play very important role. The paper focuses on the value variations of the aerodynamic characteristics of a model through changing its position in the WT test section and on the attenuation of the velocity field disturbance in front of the model. Flow around aerodynamic model profile in the open test section of the low-speed WT T-500 is simulated at BMSTU Department SM3. The problem is solved in a two-dimensional case using the ANSYS Fluent package. The mathematical model of flow is based on the Reynolds equations closed by the SST turbulence model. The paper also presents the results of the experiment. Experiments conducted in WT T-500 well correlate with the calculated data and show the optimal position in the middle of the test section when conducting the weighing and drainage experiments. Disturbance of tunnel dynamic pressure (velocity head and flow upwash around the model profile and circular cylinder in the WT test section is analyzed. It was found that flow upstream from the front stagnation point on the body weakly depends on the Reynolds number and obtained results can be used to assess the level of disturbances in the flow around a model by incompressible airflow.

  5. A parametric sensitivity and optimization study for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model flutter characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an effort is made to improve the analytical open-loop flutter predictions for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model using a sensitivity based optimization approach. The sensitivity derivatives of the flutter frequency and dynamic pressure of the model with respect to the lag terms appearing in the Roger's unsteady aerodynamics approximations are evaluated both analytical and by finite differences. Then, the Levenberg-Marquardt method is used to find the optimum values for these lag-terms. The results obtained here agree much better with the experimental (wind tunnel) results than those found in the previous studies.

  6. Computed and Experimental Flutter/LCO Onset for the Boeing Truss-Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Scott, Robert C.; Funk, Christie J.; Allen, Timothy J.; Sexton, Bradley W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents high fidelity Navier-Stokes simulations of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research truss-braced wing wind-tunnel model and compares the results to linear MSC. Nastran flutter analysis and preliminary data from a recent wind-tunnel test of that model at the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The simulated conditions under consideration are zero angle of attack, so that structural nonlinearity can be neglected. It is found that, for Mach number greater than 0.78, the linear flutter analysis predicts flutter onset dynamic pressure below the wind-tunnel test and that predicted by the Navier-Stokes analysis. Furthermore, the wind-tunnel test revealed that the majority of the high structural dynamics cases were wing limit cycle oscillation (LCO) rather than flutter. Most Navier-Stokes simulated cases were also LCO rather than hard flutter. There is dip in the wind-tunnel test flutter/LCO onset in the Mach 0.76-0.80 range. Conditions tested above that Mach number exhibited no aeroelastic instability at the dynamic pressures reached in the tunnel. The linear flutter analyses do not show a flutter/LCO dip. The Navier-Stokes simulations also do not reveal a dip; however, the flutter/LCO onset is at a significantly higher dynamic pressure at Mach 0.90 than at lower Mach numbers. The Navier-Stokes simulations indicate a mild LCO onset at Mach 0.82, then a more rapidly growing instability at Mach 0.86 and 0.90. Finally, the modeling issues and their solution related to the use of a beam and pod finite element model to generate the Navier-Stokes structure mode shapes are discussed.

  7. The design of a wind tunnel VSTOL fighter model incorporating turbine powered engine simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. O.; Maraz, M. R.; Hiley, P. E.

    1981-01-01

    A wind-tunnel model of a supersonic VSTOL fighter aircraft configuration has been developed for use in the evaluation of airframe-propulsion system aerodynamic interactions. The model may be employed with conventional test techniques, where configuration aerodynamics are measured in a flow-through mode and incremental nozzle-airframe interactions are measured in a jet-effects mode, and with the Compact Multimission Aircraft Propulsion Simulator which is capable of the simultaneous simulation of inlet and exhaust nozzle flow fields so as to allow the evaluation of the extent of inlet and nozzle flow field coupling. The basic configuration of the twin-engine model has a geometrically close-coupled canard and wing, and a moderately short nacelle with nonaxisymmetric vectorable exhaust nozzles near the wing trailing edge, and may be converted to a canardless configuration with an extremely short nacelle. Testing is planned to begin in the summer of 1982.

  8. Comparison of the NASA Common Research Model European Transonic Wind Tunnel Test Data to NASA Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Melissa; Quest, Juergen; Rudnik, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations of the NASA Common Research Model have been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility, the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel, and the European Transonic Wind Tunnel. In the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel, data have been obtained at only a chord Reynolds number of 5 million for a wing/body/tail = 0 degree incidence configuration. Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5, 19.8 and 30 million for the same configuration in the National Transonic Facility and in the European Transonic Facility. Force and moment, surface pressure, wing bending and twist, and surface flow visualization data were obtained in all three facilities but only the force and moment and surface pressure data are presented herein.

  9. Evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors for wind tunnel model angle-of-attack (AOA) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a laboratory evaluation of three types of electrolytic tilt sensors as potential candidates for model attitude or angle of attack (AOA) measurements in wind tunnel tests are presented. Their performance was also compared with that from typical servo accelerometers used for AOA measurements. Model RG-37 electrolytic tilt sensors were found to have the highest overall accuracy among the three types. Compared with the servo accelerometer, their accuracies are about one order of magnitude worse and each of them cost about two-thirds less. Therefore, the sensors are unsuitable for AOA measurements although they are less expensive. However, the potential for other applications exists where the errors resulting from roll interaction, vibration, and response time are less, and sensor temperature can be controlled.

  10. Evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors for wind tunnel model angle-of-attack (AOA) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a laboratory evaluation of three types of electrolytic tilt sensors as potential candidates for model attitude or angle of attack (AOA) measurements in wind tunnel tests are presented. Their performance was also compared with that from typical servo accelerometers used for AOA measurements. Model RG-37 electrolytic tilt sensors were found to have the highest overall accuracy among the three types. Compared with the servo accelerometer, their accuracies are about one order of magnitude worse and each of them cost about two-thirds less. Therefore, the sensors are unsuitable for AOA measurements although they are less expensive. However, the potential for other applications exists where the errors resulting from roll interaction, vibration, and response time are less, and sensor temperature can be controlled.

  11. Insights into Airframe Aerodynamics and Rotor-on-Wing Interactions from a 0.25-Scale Tiltrotor Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. A.; Lillie, D.; McCluer, M.; Yamauchi, G. K.; Derby, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation into tiltrotor aerodynamics and acoustics has resulted in the acquisition of a set of data related to tiltrotor airframe aerodynamics and rotor and wing interactional aerodynamics. This work was conducted in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex's (NFAC) 40-by-80 Foot Wind Tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, on the Full-Span Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The full-span TRAM wind tunnel test stand is nominally based on a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 aircraft. The data acquired will enable the refinement of analytical tools for the prediction of tiltrotor aeromechanics and aeroacoustics.

  12. High Lift Common Research Model for Wind Tunnel Testing: An Active Flow Control Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John C.; Melton, Latunia P.; Viken, Sally A.; Andino, Marlyn Y.; Koklu, Mehti; Hannon, Judith A.; Vatsa, Veer N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a research and development effort sponsored by the NASA Advanced Air Transport Technology Project to achieve the required high-lift performance using active flow control (AFC) on simple hinged flaps while reducing the cruise drag associated with the external mechanisms on slotted flaps of a generic modern transport aircraft. The removal of the external fairings for the Fowler flap mechanism could help to reduce drag by 3.3 counts. The main challenge is to develop an AFC system that can provide the necessary lift recovery on a simple hinged flap high-lift system while using the limited pneumatic power available on the aircraft. Innovative low-power AFC concepts will be investigated in the flap shoulder region. The AFC concepts being explored include steady blowing and unsteady blowing operating in the spatial and/or temporal domain. Both conventional and AFC-enabled high-lift configurations were designed for the current effort. The high-lift configurations share the cruise geometry that is based on the NASA Common Research Model, and therefore, are also open geometries. A 10%-scale High Lift Common Research Model (HL-CRM) is being designed for testing at the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel during fiscal year 2018. The overall project plan, status, HL-CRM configurations, and AFC objectives for the wind tunnel test are described.

  13. Models of Lift and Drag Coefficients of Stalled and Unstalled Airfoils in Wind Turbines and Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Equations are developed with which to calculate lift and drag coefficients along the spans of torsionally-stiff rotating airfoils of the type used in wind turbine rotors and wind tunnel fans, at angles of attack in both the unstalled and stalled aerodynamic regimes. Explicit adjustments are made for the effects of aspect ratio (length to chord width) and airfoil thickness ratio. Calculated lift and drag parameters are compared to measured parameters for 55 airfoil data sets including 585 test points. Mean deviation was found to be -0.4 percent and standard deviation was 4.8 percent. When the proposed equations were applied to the calculation of power from a stall-controlled wind turbine tested in a NASA wind tunnel, mean deviation from 54 data points was -1.3 percent and standard deviation was 4.0 percent. Pressure-rise calculations for a large wind tunnel fan deviated by 2.7 percent (mean) and 4.4 percent (standard). The assumption that a single set of lift and drag coefficient equations can represent the stalled aerodynamic behavior of a wide variety of airfoils was found to be satisfactory.

  14. A smart model of a long-span suspended bridge for wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquemani, S.; Diana, G.; Fossati, L.; Ripamonti, F.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional aeroelastic models rely only on good mechanical design and accurate crafting in order to match the required structural properties. This paper proposes an active regulation of their structural parameters in order to improve accuracy and reliability of wind tunnel tests. Following the design process steps typical of a smart structure, a damping tuning technique allowing to control a specific set of vibration modes is developed and applied on the aeroelastic model of a long-span suspended bridge. Depending on the testing conditions, the structural damping value can be adjusted in a fast, precise and repeatable way in order to highlight the effects of the aerodynamic phenomena of interest. In particular, vortex-induced vibration are taken into consideration, and the response of a bridge section to vortex shedding is assessed. The active parameter regulation allows to widen the pattern of operating conditions in which the model can be tested. The paper discusses the choice of both sensors and actuators to be embedded in the structure and their positioning, as the control algorithm to obtain the desired damping. Experimental results are shown and results are discussed to evaluate the performance of the smart structure in wind dunnel tests.

  15. Active aerodynamic load control on wind turbines: Aeroservoelastic modeling and wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barlas, A.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates particular concepts and technologies that can alleviate fatigue loads on wind turbines by using distributed active aerodynamic devices on the blades, a concept briefly referred to as `smart blades'. Firstly, published research work on smart control devices is reviewed, and

  16. Active aerodynamic load control on wind turbines: Aeroservoelastic modeling and wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barlas, A.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates particular concepts and technologies that can alleviate fatigue loads on wind turbines by using distributed active aerodynamic devices on the blades, a concept briefly referred to as `smart blades'. Firstly, published research work on smart control devices is reviewed, and t

  17. Wind-tunnel modelling of the tip-speed ratio influence on the wake evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Victor P.; Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    2016-09-01

    Wind-tunnel measurements on the near-wake evolution of a three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine model (HAWT) in the scale 1:O(350) operating in uniform flow conditions and within a turbulent boundary layer at different tip speed ratios are presented. Operational conditions are chosen to exclude Reynolds number effects regarding the turbulent boundary layer as well as the rotor performance. Triple-wire anemometry is used to measure all three velocity components in the mid-vertical and mid-horizontal plane, covering the range from the near- to the far-wake region. In order to analyse wake properties systematically, power and thrust coefficients of the turbine were measured additionally. It is confirmed that realistic modelling of the wake evolution is not possible in a low-turbulence uniform approach flow. Profiles of mean velocity and turbulence intensity exhibit large deviations between the low-turbulence uniform flow and the turbulent boundary layer, especially in the far-wake region. For nearly constant thrust coefficients differences in the evolution of the near-wake can be identified for tip speed ratios in the range from 6.5 to 10.5. It is shown that with increasing downstream distances mean velocity profiles become indistinguishable whereas for turbulence statistics a subtle dependency on the tip speed ratio is still noticeable in the far-wake region.

  18. Experimental Testing of a Generic Submarine Model in the DSTO Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Defence Science and Technology Organisation Technical Report DSTO-TR-1622, 2004. [3] Barlow, J. B., Rae , W. H. and Pope, A., Low-Speed Wind Tunnel...kW (900 hp) electric motor driving a 3.96 m diameter eight bladed fan, with a maximum rotational speed 750 RPM, manually controlled. Cooling 40 °C

  19. Evaluation of spray drift using low speed wind tunnel measurements and dispersion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the EPA’s proposed Test Plan for the validation testing of pesticide spray drift reduction technologies (DRTs) for row and field crops, focusing on the evaluation of ground application systems using the low-speed wind tunnel protocols and processing the dat...

  20. Jet-Boundary Corrections for Reflection-Plane Models in Rectangular Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-01-01

    Swanson, IkIbert S., and Sohuldenfrei, Marvin J.: Jet-Boundary Corrections to the Dmvnwa9h behind Powered Modelo in Rec- tangular Wtnd Tunnelswith Numerioal...410,1931. 4. Theodorsen,Theodore:Interferenceon an Airfoilof FiniteSpan in an OpenRectangularWind TunneL NACA Mp. No. 461, 1933. 5. Pearson ,Henry A

  1. A Wind Tunnel Captive Aircraft Testing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-01

    Flight/Wind Tunnel Correlation of Aircraft Longitudinal Motion ....................................... 14 10. Fright/Wind Tunnel Correlation of...I 2 3 4 5 6 T IME, s e c Figure 9. Flight/wind tunnel correla- tion of aircraft longitudinal motion. ’ D A n ~ v i i i | ~ 0 0 - 4 0

  2. Wind-tunnel blockage and actuation systems test of a two-dimensional scramjet inlet unstart model at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1994-01-01

    The present study examines the wind-tunnel blockage and actuation systems effectiveness in starting and forcibly unstarting a two-dimensional scramjet inlet in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The intent of the overall test program is to study (both experimentally and computationally) the dynamics of the inlet unstart; however, prior to the design and fabrication of an expensive, instrumented wind-tunnel model, it was deemed necessary first to examine potential wind-tunnel blockage issues related to model sizing and to examine the adequacy of the actuation systems in accomplishing the start and unstart. The model is equipped with both a moveable cowl and aft plug. Windows in the inlet sidewalls allow limited optical access to the internal shock structure; schlieren video was used to identify inlet start and unstart. A chronology of each actuation sequence is provided in tabular form along with still frames from the schlieren video. A pitot probe monitored the freestream conditions throughout the start/unstart process to determine if there was a blockage effect due to the model start or unstart. Because the purpose of this report is to make the phase I (blockage and actuation systems) data rapidly available to the community, the data is presented largely without analysis of the internal shock interactions or the unstart process. This series of tests indicated that the model was appropriately sized for this facility and identified operability limits required first to allow the inlet to start and second to force the unstart.

  3. Test technique development in interference free testing, flow visualization, and remote control model technology at Langley's Unitary Plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    A metric half-span model is considered as a means of mechanical support for a wind-tunnel model which allows measurement of aerodynamic forces and moments without support interference or model distortion. This technique can be applied to interference-free propulsion models. The vapor screen method of flow visualization at supersonic Mach numbers is discussed. The use of smoke instead of water vapor as a medium to produce the screen is outlined. Vapor screen data are being used in the development of analytical vortex tracking programs. Test results for a remote control model system are evaluated. Detailed control effectiveness and cross-coupling data were obtained with a single run. For the afterbody tail configuration, tested control boundaries at several roll orientations were established utilizing the facility's on-line capability to 'fly' the model in the wind tunnel.

  4. Aeronautical Wind Tunnels, Europe and Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    closed-circuit wind tunnel, 8-kW motor. Operates at sub-freezing temperatures. Built of wood and epoxy-fiberglass composite. Internally insulated with...airplane models. Also used to test wind loads on buildings, bridges, radar antennas, and television towers, and aerodynamic performance of windmills ...flow. This facility has a mahogany six- bladed fan powered by a 2000-hp, 750-V DC motor. At full speed this facility can run at 1.5 MVA. Data

  5. On the aero-elastic design of the DTU 10MW wind turbine blade for the LIFES50+ wind tunnel scale model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayati, I.; Belloli, M.; Bernini, L.

    2016-01-01

    and for different angles of attack. The aero-elastic design algorithm was set to define the optimal spanwise thickness over chord ratio (t/c), the chord length and the twist to match the first flapwise scaled natural frequency. An aluminium mould for the carbon fibre was CNC manufactured based on B-Splines CAD......This paper illustrates the aero-elastic optimal design, the realization and the verification of the wind tunnel scale model blades for the DTU 10 MW wind turbine model, within LIFES50+ project. The aerodynamic design was focused on the minimization of the difference, in terms of thrust coefficient......, with respect to the full scale reference. From the Selig low Reynolds database airfoils, the SD7032 was chosen for this purpose and a proper constant section wing was tested at DTU red wind tunnel, providing force and distributed pressure coefficients for the design, in the Reynolds range 30-250 E3...

  6. Rocket Plume Scaling for Orion Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Greathouse, James S.; White, Molly E.

    2011-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program was undertaken to assess the jet interaction effects caused by the various solid rocket motors used on the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). These interactions of the external flowfield and the various rocket plumes can cause localized aerodynamic disturbances yielding significant and highly non-linear control amplifications and attenuations. This paper discusses the scaling methodologies used to model the flight plumes in the wind tunnel using cold air as the simulant gas. Comparisons of predicted flight, predicted wind tunnel, and measured wind tunnel forces-and-moments and plume flowfields are made to assess the effectiveness of the selected scaling methodologies.

  7. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  8. Aeroelastic Uncertainty Quantification Studies Using the S4T Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbay, Melike; Heeg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This paper originates from the joint efforts of an aeroelastic study team in the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel from NATO Science and Technology Organization, with the Task Group number AVT-191, titled "Application of Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty Quantification to Military Vehicle Design." We present aeroelastic uncertainty quantification studies using the SemiSpan Supersonic Transport wind tunnel model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The aeroelastic study team decided treat both structural and aerodynamic input parameters as uncertain and represent them as samples drawn from statistical distributions, propagating them through aeroelastic analysis frameworks. Uncertainty quantification processes require many function evaluations to asses the impact of variations in numerous parameters on the vehicle characteristics, rapidly increasing the computational time requirement relative to that required to assess a system deterministically. The increased computational time is particularly prohibitive if high-fidelity analyses are employed. As a remedy, the Istanbul Technical University team employed an Euler solver in an aeroelastic analysis framework, and implemented reduced order modeling with Polynomial Chaos Expansion and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to perform the uncertainty propagation. The NASA team chose to reduce the prohibitive computational time by employing linear solution processes. The NASA team also focused on determining input sample distributions.

  9. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  10. Computer programs for calculation of sting pitch and roll angles required to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Two programs have been developed to calculate the pitch and roll angles of a wind-tunnel sting drive system that will position a model at the desired angle of attack and and angle of sideslip in the wind tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs from on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented in the report and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  11. GPC-Based Gust Response Alleviation for Aircraft Model Adapting to Various Flow Velocities in the Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Dai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A unified autoregressive (AR model is identified, based on the wind tunnel test data of open-loop gust response for an aircraft model. The identified AR model can be adapted to various flow velocities in the wind tunnel test. Due to the lack of discrete gust input measurement, a second-order polynomial function is used to approximate the gust input amplitude by flow velocity. Afterwards, with the identified online aeroelastic model, the modified generalized predictive control (GPC theory is applied to alleviate wing tip acceleration induced by sinusoidal gust. Finally, the alleviation effects of gust response at different flow velocities are estimated based on the comparison of simulated closed-loop acceleration with experimental open-loop one. The comparison indicates that, after gust response alleviation, the wing tip acceleration can be reduced up to 20% at the tested velocities ranging from 12 m/s to 24 m/s. Demonstratively, the unified control law can be adapted to varying wind tunnel velocities and gust frequencies. It does not need to be altered at different test conditions, which will save the idle time.

  12. On the aero-elastic design of the DTU 10MW wind turbine blade for the LIFES50+ wind tunnel scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, I.; Belloli, M.; Bernini, L.; Mikkelsen, R.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper illustrates the aero-elastic optimal design, the realization and the verification of the wind tunnel scale model blades for the DTU 10 MW wind turbine model, within LIFES50+ project. The aerodynamic design was focused on the minimization of the difference, in terms of thrust coefficient, with respect to the full scale reference. From the Selig low Reynolds database airfoils, the SD7032 was chosen for this purpose and a proper constant section wing was tested at DTU red wind tunnel, providing force and distributed pressure coefficients for the design, in the Reynolds range 30-250 E3 and for different angles of attack. The aero-elastic design algorithm was set to define the optimal spanwise thickness over chord ratio (t/c), the chord length and the twist to match the first flapwise scaled natural frequency. An aluminium mould for the carbon fibre was CNC manufactured based on B-Splines CAD definition of the external geometry. Then the wind tunnel tests at Politecnico di Milano confirmed successful design and manufacturing approaches.

  13. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 120th Scale Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Willink, Gina C.; Russell, Carl R.; Amy, Alexander R.; Pete, Ashley E.

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs: NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor and the Army's High Efficiency Tilt Rotor. The approximately 6%-scale airframe models (unpowered) were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe were taken using the wind tunnel scale system. In addition to force and moment measurements, flow visualization using tufts, infrared thermography and oil flow were used to identify flow trajectories, boundary layer transition and areas of flow separation. The purpose of this test was to collect data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics tools, for the development of flight dynamics simulation models, and to validate performance predictions made during conceptual design. This paper focuses on the results for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor model in an airplane mode configuration up to 200 knots of wind tunnel speed. Results are presented with the full airframe model with various wing tip and nacelle configurations, and for a wing-only case also with various wing tip and nacelle configurations. Key results show that the addition of a wing extension outboard of the nacelles produces a significant increase in the lift-to-drag ratio, and interestingly decreases the drag compared to the case where the wing extension is not present. The drag decrease is likely due to complex aerodynamic interactions between the nacelle and wing extension that results in a significant drag benefit.

  14. Comparisons between LES and Wind Tunnel Hot-Wire Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2012-01-01

    is constructed in a wind tunnel similar to the LM wind tunnel where the experiment for an NACA 0015 airfoil was carried out. The goal of this study is to validate the mixed scale SGS turbulence model against detailed measurements. Simulations are performed with the in-house EllipSys3D code on high performance...

  15. High Fidelity Computational and Wind Tunnel Models in Support of Certification Airworthiness of Control Surfaces with Freeplay and Other Nonlinear Features Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work will establish high fidelity computational methods and wind tunnel test model in support of new freeplay criteria for the design, construction and...

  16. A common geometric data-base approach for computer-aided manufacturing of wind-tunnel models and theoretical aerodynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, M. J.; Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    A more automated process to produce wind tunnel models using existing facilities is discussed. A process was sought to more rapidly determine the aerodynamic characteristics of advanced aircraft configurations. Such aerodynamic characteristics are determined from theoretical analyses and wind tunnel tests of the configurations. Computers are used to perform the theoretical analyses, and a computer aided manufacturing system is used to fabricate the wind tunnel models. In the past a separate set of input data describing the aircraft geometry had to be generated for each process. This process establishes a common data base by enabling the computer aided manufacturing system to use, via a software interface, the geometric input data generated for the theoretical analysis. Thus, only one set of geometric data needs to be generated. Tests reveal that the process can reduce by several weeks the time needed to produce a wind tunnel model component. In addition, this process increases the similarity of the wind tunnel model to the mathematical model used by the theoretical aerodynamic analysis programs. Specifically, the wind tunnel model can be machined to within 0.008 in. of the original mathematical model. However, the software interface is highly complex and cumbersome to operate, making it unsuitable for routine use. The procurement of an independent computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing system with the capability to support both the theoretical analysis and the manufacturing tasks was recommended.

  17. Evaluation of the Revised Lagrangian Particle Model GRAL Against Wind-Tunnel and Field Observations in the Presence of Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettl, Dietmar

    2015-05-01

    A revised microscale flow field model has been implemented in the Lagrangian particle model Graz Lagrangian Model (GRAL) for computing flows around obstacles. It is based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in three dimensions and the widely used standard turbulence model. Here we focus on evaluating the model regarding computed concentrations by use of a comprehensive wind-tunnel experiment with numerous combinations of building geometries, stack positions, and locations. In addition, two field experiments carried out in Denmark and in the U.S were used to evaluate the model. Further, two different formulations of the standard deviation of wind component fluctuations have also been investigated, but no clear picture could be drawn in this respect. Overall the model is able to capture several of the main features of pollutant dispersion around obstacles, but at least one future model improvement was identified for stack releases within the recirculation zone of buildings. Regulatory applications are the bread-and-butter of most GRAL users nowadays, requiring fast and robust modelling algorithms. Thus, a few simplifications have been introduced to decrease the computational time required. Although predicted concentrations for the two field experiments were found to be in good agreement with observations, shortcomings were identified regarding the extent of computed recirculation zones for the idealized wind-tunnel building geometries, with approaching flows perpendicular to building faces.

  18. Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 1: A Sidewall Supported Semispan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation and Flutter Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer.

    2013-01-01

    of a two part document. Part 2 is titled: "Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models, Part 2: A Centerline Supported Fullspan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation." A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, flexible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a semispan, aeroelastically scaled, wind tunnel model of a flying wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to demonstrate gust load alleviation. In the second and third tests, the same wing was mated to a new, multi-degree of freedom, sidewall mount. This mount allowed the half-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, allowing better simulation of the full span vehicle's rigid body modes. Gust load alleviation (GLA) and Body freedom flutter (BFF) suppression were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees-of-freedom required that the model be flown in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort.

  19. Pre-Test Assessment of the Upper Bound of the Drag Coefficient Repeatability of a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; L'Esperance, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new method is presented that computes a pre{test estimate of the upper bound of the drag coefficient repeatability of a wind tunnel model. This upper bound is a conservative estimate of the precision error of the drag coefficient. For clarity, precision error contributions associated with the measurement of the dynamic pressure are analyzed separately from those that are associated with the measurement of the aerodynamic loads. The upper bound is computed by using information about the model, the tunnel conditions, and the balance in combination with an estimate of the expected output variations as input. The model information consists of the reference area and an assumed angle of attack. The tunnel conditions are described by the Mach number and the total pressure or unit Reynolds number. The balance inputs are the partial derivatives of the axial and normal force with respect to all balance outputs. Finally, an empirical output variation of 1.0 microV/V is used to relate both random instrumentation and angle measurement errors to the precision error of the drag coefficient. Results of the analysis are reported by plotting the upper bound of the precision error versus the tunnel conditions. The analysis shows that the influence of the dynamic pressure measurement error on the precision error of the drag coefficient is often small when compared with the influence of errors that are associated with the load measurements. Consequently, the sensitivities of the axial and normal force gages of the balance have a significant influence on the overall magnitude of the drag coefficient's precision error. Therefore, results of the error analysis can be used for balance selection purposes as the drag prediction characteristics of balances of similar size and capacities can objectively be compared. Data from two wind tunnel models and three balances are used to illustrate the assessment of the precision error of the drag coefficient.

  20. Pressure distribution on the roof of a model low-rise building tested in a boundary layer wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goliber, Matthew Robert

    With three of the largest metropolitan areas in the United States along the Gulf coast (Houston, Tampa, and New Orleans), residential populations ever increasing due to the subtropical climate, and insured land value along the coast from Texas to the Florida panhandle greater than $500 billion, hurricane related knowledge is as important now as ever before. This thesis focuses on model low-rise building wind tunnel tests done in connection with full-scale low-rise building tests. Mainly, pressure data collection equipment and methods used in the wind tunnel are compared to pressure data collection equipment and methods used in the field. Although the focus of this report is on the testing of models in the wind tunnel, the low-rise building in the field is located in Pensacola, Florida. It has a wall length of 48 feet, a width of 32 feet, a height of 10 feet, and a gable roof with a pitch of 1:3 and 68 pressure ports strategically placed on the surface of the roof. Built by Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in 2002, the importance of the test structure has been realized as it has been subjected to numerous hurricanes. In fact, the validity of the field data is so important that the following thesis was necessary. The first model tested in the Bill James Wind Tunnel for this research was a rectangular box. It was through the testing of this box that much of the basic wind tunnel and pressure data collection knowledge was gathered. Knowledge gained from Model 1 tests was as basic as how to: mount pressure tubes on a model, use a pressure transducer, operate the wind tunnel, utilize the pitot tube and reference pressure, and measure wind velocity. Model 1 tests also showed the importance of precise construction to produce precise pressure coefficients. Model 2 was tested in the AABL Wind Tunnel at Iowa State University. This second model was a 22 inch cube which contained a total of 11 rows of pressure ports on its front and top faces. The purpose of Model 2 was to

  1. Wind tunnel testing of a closed-loop wake deflection controller for wind farm power maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnolo, Filippo; Petrović, Vlaho; Schreiber, Johannes; Nanos, Emmanouil M.; Croce, Alessandro; Bottasso, Carlo L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents results from wind tunnel tests aimed at evaluating a closed- loop wind farm controller for wind farm power maximization by wake deflection. Experiments are conducted in a large boundary layer wind tunnel, using three servo-actuated and sensorized wind turbine scaled models. First, we characterize the impact on steady-state power output of wake deflection, achieved by yawing the upstream wind turbines. Next, we illustrate the capability of the proposed wind farm controller to dynamically driving the upstream wind turbines to the optimal yaw misalignment setting.

  2. High-Lift OVERFLOW Analysis of the DLR-F11 Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.; Sclafani, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the 2nd AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop, the DLR-F11 wind tunnel model is analyzed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERFLOW. A series of overset grids for a bracket-off landing configuration is constructed and analyzed as part of a general grid refinement study. This high Reynolds number (15.1 million) analysis is done at multiple angles-of-attack to evaluate grid resolution effects at operational lift levels as well as near stall. A quadratic constitutive relation recently added to OVERFLOW for improved solution accuracy is utilized for side-of-body separation issues at low angles-of-attack and outboard wing separation at stall angles. The outboard wing separation occurs when the slat brackets are added to the landing configuration and is a source of discrepancy between the predictions and experimental data. A detailed flow field analysis is performed at low Reynolds number (1.35 million) after pressure tube bundles are added to the bracket-on medium grid system with the intent of better understanding bracket/bundle wake interaction with the wing's boundary layer. Localized grid refinement behind each slat bracket and pressure tube bundle coupled with a time accurate analysis are exercised in an attempt to improve stall prediction capability. The results are inconclusive and suggest the simulation is missing a key element such as boundary layer transition. The computed lift curve is under-predicted through the linear range and over-predicted near stall, and the solution from the most complete configuration analyzed shows outboard wing separation occurring behind slat bracket 6 where the experiment shows it behind bracket 5. These results are consistent with most other participants of this workshop.

  3. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  4. Aeroservoelastic Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Free-Flying, Joined-Wing SensorCraft Model for Gust Load Alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Castelluccio, Mark A.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, exible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind-tunnel model of a joined-wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind-tunnel model was mated to a new, two-degree-of-freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at -10% static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be own in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free ying wind-tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  5. Droplet evaporation from porous surfaces; model validation from field and wind tunnel experiments for sand and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R. F.; Roberts, I. D.

    The evaporation model of Roberts and Griffiths (1995 Atmospheric Environment 29, 1307-1317) has been subjected to an extensive validation exercise based on a major campaign of field experiments on evaporation from surfaces composed of sand and of concrete. This complements the previous validation which was limited to wind tunnel experiments on sand surfaces. Additionally, the validation using wind tunnel data has been extended to include concrete surfaces. The model describes the constant-rate and falling-rate periods that characterise evaporation from porous media. During the constant-rate period, the evaporation is solely determined by the vapour transport rate into the air. During the falling-rate period, the process in the porous medium is modelled as a receding evaporation front, the overall evaporation rate being determined by the combined effects of vapour transport through the pore network and subsequently into the air. The field trials programme was conducted at sites in the USA and the UK, and examined the evaporation of diethyl malonate droplets from sand and concrete surfaces. Vapour concentrations at several heights in the plume were measured at the centre of a 1 m radius annular source (of width 10 cm) contaminated by uniformly sized droplets (2.4 or 4.1 mm in diameter), key meteorological data being measured at the same time. The evaporation was quantified by coupling concentration and wind speed data. In all, 22 trials were performed on sand and concrete; a further 8 were performed on non-porous surfaces (aluminium foil and slate) as references. The model performance was evaluated against the experimental data in terms of two quantities, the initial evaporation rate of the embedded droplets, and the mass-fraction remaining in the substrate at intervals over the evaporation episode. Overall, the model performance was best in the case of the field experiments for concrete, and the wind tunnel experiments for sand; the performance for wind tunnel

  6. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis of a flexible wing wind tunnel model with a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) design for drag minimization tested at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The wind tunnel test was designed to explore the relative merit of the VCCTEF concept for improved cruise efficiency through the use of low-cost aeroelastic model test techniques. The flexible wing model is a 10%-scale model of a typical transport wing and is constructed of woven fabric composites and foam core. The wing structural stiffness in bending is tailored to be half of the stiffness of a Boeing 757-era transport wing while the torsional stiffness is about the same. This stiffness reduction results in a wing tip deflection of about 10% of the wing semi-span. The VCCTEF is a multi-segment flap design having three chordwise camber segments and five spanwise flap sections for a total of 15 individual flap elements. The three chordwise camber segments can be positioned appropriately to create a desired trailing edge camber. Elastomeric material is used to cover the gaps in between the spanwise flap sections, thereby creating a continuous trailing edge. Wind tunnel data analysis conducted previously shows that the VCCTEF can achieve a drag reduction of up to 6.31% and an improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio (L=D) of up to 4.85%. A method for estimating the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the flexible wingUWAL wind tunnel model from static load test data is presented. The resulting estimation indicates that the stiffness of the flexible wing is significantly stiffer in torsion than in bending by as much as 9 to 1. The lift prediction for the flexible wing is computed by a coupled aerodynamic-structural model. The coupled model is developed by coupling a conceptual aerodynamic tool Vorlax with a finite-element model of the flexible wing via an automated geometry deformation tool. Based on the comparison of the lift curve slope

  7. Computational Wind Tunnel: A Design Tool for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotorcraft engineers traditionally use the wind tunnel to evaluate and finalize designs. Insufficient correlation between wind tunnel results and flight tests, have...

  8. Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) Overview and 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test. [conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluer, Megan S.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most helicopter data trends cannot be extrapolated to tiltrotors because blade geometry and aerodynamic behavior, as well as rotor and fuselage interactions, are significantly different for tiltrotors. A tiltrotor model has been developed to investigate the aeromechanics of tiltrotors, to develop a comprehensive database for validating tiltrotor analyses, and to provide a research platform for supporting future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (FS TRAM) is a dual-rotor, powered aircraft model with extensive instrumentation for measurement of structural and aerodynamic loads. This paper will present the Full-Span TRAM test capabilities and the first set of data obtained during a 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test conducted in late 2000 at NASA Ames Research Center. The Full-Span TRAM is a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 Osprey aircraft, and a heavily instrumented NASA and U.S. Army wind tunnel test stand. Rotor structural loads are monitored and recorded for safety-of-flight and for information on blade loads and dynamics. Left and right rotor balance and fuselage balance loads are monitored for safety-of-flight and for measurement of vehicle and rotor aerodynamic performance. Static pressure taps on the left wing are used to determine rotor/wing interactional effects and rotor blade dynamic pressures measure blade airloads. All of these measurement capabilities make the FS TRAM test stand a unique and valuable asset for validation of computational codes and to aid in future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span TRAM was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel from October through December 2000. Rotor and vehicle performance measurements were acquired in addition to wing pressures, rotor acoustics, and Laser Light Sheet (LLS) flow visualization data. Hover, forward flight, and airframe (rotors off) aerodynamic runs were performed. Helicopter-mode data were acquired during angle of attack and thrust sweeps for

  9. A wind tunnel for the calibration of Mars wind sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. F.; Camilletti, A. L.; Calcutt, S. B.; Ligrani, P. M.

    2008-10-01

    A major limitation in the development of wind sensors for use on Mars is the lack of suitable testing and calibration facilities. A low-density wind tunnel has been developed at Oxford University for calibration of wind sensors for Mars landers, capable of providing stable or dynamically varying winds, of air or carbon dioxide, at Martian pressures (5-10 mbar) and speeds (0.5-30 m/s), and temperatures of 200-300 K. The flow field in the test section was calculated using analytical and computational modelling techniques, and validated experimentally using a pitot probe. This facility's stability and accuracy offer significant advantages with respect to previous calibration facilities.

  10. Use of 3D Printing for Custom Wind Tunnel Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagorik, Paul; Bates, Zachary; Issakhanian, Emin

    2016-11-01

    Small-scale wind tunnels for the most part are fairly simple to produce with standard building equipment. However, the intricate bell housing and inlet shape of an Eiffel type wind tunnel, as well as the transition from diffuser to fan in a rectangular tunnel can present design and construction obstacles. With the help of 3D printing, these shapes can be custom designed in CAD models and printed in the lab at very low cost. The undergraduate team at Loyola Marymount University has built a custom benchtop tunnel for gas turbine film cooling experiments. 3D printing is combined with conventional construction methods to build the tunnel. 3D printing is also used to build the custom tunnel floor and interchangeable experimental pieces for various experimental shapes. This simple and low-cost tunnel is a custom solution for specific engineering experiments for gas turbine technology research.

  11. Measurements of control stability characteristics of a wind-tunnel model using a transfer function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, I.; Ballard, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Recent state-of-the-art techniques in rotor systems include the use of active feedback to augment the dynamic control characteristics of an aircraft system. A recent test of a stoppable rotor with blade circulation blowing was conducted in the Ames Research Center's 40by 80-ft wind tunnel. A major part of the test schedule was dedicated to the acquisition of data to determine the stability of a closed-loop hub-moment feedback control system. Therefore, the open-loop control response was measured at several flight conditions to ascertain the stability of the system prior to the final closed-loop feedback control test. Measurements were made during both the stopped and rotating rotor modes, and open-loop Bode plots were obtained for the control loops associated with the moments about the longitudinal and lateral axis.

  12. Evaluation of the source area of rooftop scalar measurements in London, UK using wind tunnel and modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Aidan; Boon, Alex; Barlow, Janet; Hayden, Paul; Robins, Alan

    2014-05-01

    The source area of an instrument is an estimate of the area of ground over which the measurement is generated. Quantification of the source area of a measurement site provides crucial context for analysis and interpretation of the data. A range of computational models exists to calculate the source area of an instrument, but these are usually based on assumptions which do not hold for instruments positioned very close to the surface, particularly those surrounded by heterogeneous terrain i.e. urban areas. Although positioning instrumentation at higher elevation (i.e. on masts) is ideal in urban areas, this can be costly in terms of installation and maintenance costs and logistically difficult to position instruments in the ideal geographical location. Therefore, in many studies, experimentalists turn to rooftops to position instrumentation. Experimental validations of source area models for these situations are very limited. In this study, a controlled tracer gas experiment was conducted in a wind tunnel based on a 1:200 scale model of a measurement site used in previous experimental work in central London. The detector was set at the location of the rooftop site as the tracer was released at a range of locations within the surrounding streets and rooftops. Concentration measurements are presented for a range of wind angles, with the spread of concentration measurements indicative of the source area distribution. Clear evidence of wind channeling by streets is seen with the shape of the source area strongly influenced by buildings upwind of the measurement point. The results of the wind tunnel study are compared to scalar concentration source areas generated by modelling approaches based on meteorological data from the central London experimental site and used in the interpretation of continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration data. Initial conclusions will be drawn as to how to apply scalar concentration source area models to rooftop measurement sites and

  13. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  14. Vertical Wind Tunnel for Prediction of Rocket Flight Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoani Bryson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A customized vertical wind tunnel has been built by the University of Canterbury Rocketry group (UC Rocketry. This wind tunnel has been critical for the success of UC Rocketry as it allows the optimization of avionics and control systems before flight. This paper outlines the construction of the wind tunnel and includes an analysis of flow quality including swirl. A minimal modelling methodology for roll dynamics is developed that can extrapolate wind tunnel behavior at low wind speeds to much higher velocities encountered during flight. The models were shown to capture the roll flight dynamics in two rocket launches with mean roll angle errors varying from 0.26° to 1.5° across the flight data. The identified model parameters showed consistent and predictable variations over both wind tunnel tests and flight, including canard–fin interaction behavior. These results demonstrate that the vertical wind tunnel is an important tool for the modelling and control of sounding rockets.

  15. Aeroelastic Analyses of the SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) Wind Tunnel Model at Mach 0.95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    Detailed aeroelastic analyses of the SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) wind tunnel model at Mach 0.95 with a 1.75deg fixed angle of attack are presented. First, a numerical procedure using the Computational Fluids Laboratory 3-Dimensional (CFL3D) Version 6.4 flow solver is investigated. The mesh update method for structured multi-block grids was successfully applied to the Navier-Stokes simulations. Second, the steady aerodynamic analyses with a rigid structure of the S4T wind tunnel model are reviewed in transonic flow. Third, the static analyses were performed for both the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Both the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations predicted a significant increase of lift forces, compared to the results from the rigid structure of the S4T wind-tunnel model, over various dynamic pressures. Finally, dynamic aeroelastic analyses were performed to investigate the flutter condition of the S4T wind tunnel model at the transonic Mach number. The condition of flutter was observed at a dynamic pressure of approximately 75.0-psf for the Navier-Stokes simulations. However, it was observed that the flutter condition occurred a dynamic pressure of approximately 47.27-psf for the Euler simulations. Also, the computational efficiency of the aeroelastic analyses for the S4T wind tunnel model has been assessed.

  16. Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

    2008-04-01

    Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

  17. Wind Tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping for Static Aeroelastic Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Rivera, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Wind tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping (WAM) is a methodology for scaling and testing a static aeroelastic wind tunnel model. The WAM procedure employs scaling laws to define a wind tunnel model and wind tunnel test points such that the static aeroelastic flight test data and wind tunnel data will be correlated throughout the test envelopes. This methodology extends the notion that a single test condition - combination of Mach number and dynamic pressure - can be matched by wind tunnel data. The primary requirements for affecting this extension are matching flight Mach numbers, maintaining a constant dynamic pressure scale factor and setting the dynamic pressure scale factor in accordance with the stiffness scale factor. The scaling is enabled by capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) and by relaxation of scaling requirements present in the dynamic problem that are not critical to the static aeroelastic problem. The methodology is exercised in two example scaling problems: an arbitrarily scaled wing and a practical application to the scaling of the Active Aeroelastic Wing flight vehicle for testing in the TDT.

  18. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verelst, D.R.S.; Larsen, T.J.; Van Wingerden, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shel

  19. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off...

  20. Low Speed Wind Tunnel Facility (LSWTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: This facility consists of a large-scale, low-speed open-loop induction wind tunnel which has been modified to house a linear turbine cascade. A 125-hp...

  1. A century of wind tunnels since Eiffel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanetz, Bruno

    2017-08-01

    Fly higher, faster, preserve the life of test pilots and passengers, many challenges faced by man since the dawn of the twentieth century, with aviation pioneers. Contemporary of the first aerial exploits, wind tunnels, artificially recreating conditions encountered during the flight, have powerfully contributed to the progress of aeronautics. But the use of wind tunnels is not limited to aviation. The research for better performance, coupled with concern for energy saving, encourages manufacturers of ground vehicles to perform aerodynamic tests. Buildings and bridge structures are also concerned. This article deals principally with the wind tunnels built at ONERA during the last century. Somme wind tunnels outside ONERA, even outside France, are also evocated when their characteristics do not exist at ONERA.

  2. 7 x 10 Foot Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This wind tunnel is used for basic and applied research in aeromechanics on advanced and unique technology rotorcraft. It supports research on advanced concepts and...

  3. Visualizing Flutter Mechanism as Traveling Wave Through Animation of Simulation Results for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David M.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that frequency and phasing of structural modes in the presence of airflow play a fundamental role in the occurrence of flutter. Animation of simulation results for the long, slender Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model demonstrates that, for the case of mass-ballasted nacelles, the flutter mode can be described as a traveling wave propagating downstream. Such a characterization provides certain insights, such as (1) describing the means by which energy is transferred from the airflow to the structure, (2) identifying airspeed as an upper limit for speed of wave propagation, (3) providing an interpretation for a companion mode that coalesces in frequency with the flutter mode but becomes very well damped, (4) providing an explanation for bursts of response to uniform turbulence, and (5) providing an explanation for loss of low frequency (lead) phase margin with increases in dynamic pressure (at constant Mach number) for feedback systems that use sensors located upstream from active control surfaces. Results from simulation animation, simplified modeling, and wind-tunnel testing are presented for comparison. The simulation animation was generated using double time-integration in Simulink of vertical accelerometer signals distributed over wing and fuselage, along with time histories for actuated control surfaces. Crossing points for a zero-elevation reference plane were tracked along a network of lines connecting the accelerometer locations. Accelerometer signals were used in preference to modal displacement state variables in anticipation that the technique could be used to animate motion of the actual wind-tunnel model using data acquired during testing. Double integration of wind-tunnel accelerometer signals introduced severe drift even with removal of both position and rate biases such that the technique does not currently work. Using wind-tunnel data to drive a Kalman filter based upon fitting coefficients to

  4. 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel Improvements Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David

    2017-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) at NASA Glenn Research Center was built in 1969 in the return leg of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT). The 9x15 LSWT was designed for performance testing of VSTOL aircraft models, but with the addition of the current acoustic treatment in 1986 the tunnel been used principally for acoustic and performance testing of aircraft propulsion systems. The present document describes an anticipated acoustic upgrade to be completed in 2018.

  5. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel, part 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A summary of optical techniques for the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels are discussed. Six optical techniques were studied: Schlieren, light sheet and laser vapor screen, angle of attack, model deformation, infrared imagery, and digital image processing. The study includes surveys and reviews of wind tunnel optical techniques, some conceptual designs, and recommendations for use of optical methods in the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels. Particular emphasis was placed on searching for systems developed for wind tunnel use and on commercial systems which could be readily adapted for wind tunnels. This final report is to summarize the major results and recommendations.

  6. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements on the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA 11-ft Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime technique was used to make pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements on a 2.7% Common Research Model in the NASA Ames 11ft Transonic Wind Tunnel. PSP data were obtained on the upper and lower surfaces of the wing and horizontal tail, as well as one side of the fuselage. Data were taken for several model attitudes of interest at Mach numbers between 0.70 and 0.87. Image data were mapped onto a three-dimensional surface grid suitable both for comparison with CFD and for integration of pressures to determine loads. Luminescence lifetime measurements were made using strobed LED (light-emitting diode) lamps to illuminate the PSP and fast-framing interline transfer cameras to acquire the PSP emission.

  7. Evaporation suppression from reservoirs using floating covers: Lab scale wind-tunnel observations and mechanistic model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Dani; Lehmann, Peter; Aminzadeh, Milad; Sommer, Martina; Wey, Hannah; Krentscher, Christiane; Wunderli, Hans; Breitenstein, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The competition over dwindling fresh water resources is expected to intensify with projected increase in human population in arid regions, expansion of irrigated land and changes in climate and drought patterns. The volume of water stored in reservoirs would also increase to mitigate seasonal shortages due to rainfall variability and to meet irrigation water needs. By some estimates up to half of the stored water is lost to evaporation, thereby exacerbating the water scarcity problem. Recently, there is an upsurge in the use of self-assembling floating covers to suppress evaporation, yet the design and implementation remain largely empirical. We report a systematic experimental evaluation of different cover types and external drivers (radiation, wind, wind plus radiation) on evaporation suppression and energy balance of a 1.4 m2 basin placed in a wind-tunnel. Surprisingly, evaporation suppression by black and white floating covers (balls and plates) were similar despite significantly different energy balance regimes over the cover surfaces. Moreover, the evaporation suppression efficiency was a simple function of the uncovered area (square root of the uncovered fraction) with linear relations with the covered area in some cases. The thermally decoupled floating covers offer an efficient solution to the evaporation suppression with limited influence of the surface energy balance (water temperature for black and white covers was similar and remained nearly constant). The results will be linked with a predictive evaporation-energy balance model and issues of spatial scales and long exposure times will be studied.

  8. Loads and Performance Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Generic Model Helicopter Rotor Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to acquire data for use in assessing the ability of current and future comprehensive analyses to predict helicopter rotating-system and fixed-system vibratory loads. The investigation was conducted with a generic model helicopter rotor system using blades with rectangular planform, no built-in twist, uniform radial distribution of mass and stiffnesses, and a NACA 0012 airfoil section. Rotor performance data, as well as mean and vibratory components of blade bending and torsion moments, fixed-system forces and moments, and pitch link loads were obtained at advance ratios up to 0.35 for various combinations of rotor shaft angle-of-attack and collective pitch. The data are presented without analysis.

  9. Vibratory Loads Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Structurally Tailored Model Helicopter Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Idol, Robert F.; Mirick, Paul H.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to investigate the use of a Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) rotor structural tailoring concept, known as rotor nodalization, in conjunction with advanced blade aerodynamics as well as to evaluate rotor blade aerodynamic design methodologies. A 1/5-size, four-bladed bearingless hub, three sets of Mach-scaled model rotor blades were tested in forward flight from transition up to an advance ratio of 0.35. The data presented pertain only to the evaluation of the structural tailoring concept and consist of fixed-system and rotating system vibratory loads. These data will be useful for evaluating the effects of tailoring blade structural properties on fixed-system vibratory loads, as well as validating analyses used in the design of advanced rotor systems.

  10. Wind Tunnel Application of a Pressure-Sensitive Paint Technique to a Faceted Missile Model at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was applied in a wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to quantify the vortex-induced surface static pressures on a slender, faceted missile model at subsonic and transonic speeds. Satisfactory global calibrations of the PSP were obtained at =0.70, 0.90, and 1.20, angles of attack from 10 degrees to 20 degrees, and angles of sideslip of 0 and 2.5 degrees using an in-situ method featuring the simultaneous acquisition of electronically-scanned pressures (ESP) at 57 discrete locations on the model. Both techniques clearly revealed the significant influence on the surface pressure distributions of the vortices shed from the sharp, chine-like leading edges. The mean error in the PSP measurements relative to the ESP data was approximately 0.6 percent at M infinity =0.70 and 2.6 percent at M infinity =0.90 and 1.20. The vortex surface pressure signatures obtained from the PSP and ESP techniques were correlated with the off-surface vortex cross-flow structures obtained using a laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization technique. The on-surface and off-surface techniques were complementary, since each provided details of the vortex-dominated flow that were not clear or apparent in the other.

  11. Development of Aeroservoelastic Analytical Models and Gust Load Alleviation Control Laws of a SensorCraft Wind-Tunnel Model Using Measured Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vartio, Eric; Shimko, Anthony; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Eure, Kenneth W.; Scott,Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Aeroservoelastic (ASE) analytical models of a SensorCraft wind-tunnel model are generated using measured data. The data was acquired during the ASE wind-tunnel test of the HiLDA (High Lift-to-Drag Active) Wing model, tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in late 2004. Two time-domain system identification techniques are applied to the development of the ASE analytical models: impulse response (IR) method and the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) method. Using measured control surface inputs (frequency sweeps) and associated sensor responses, the IR method is used to extract corresponding input/output impulse response pairs. These impulse responses are then transformed into state-space models for use in ASE analyses. Similarly, the GPC method transforms measured random control surface inputs and associated sensor responses into an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) model. The ARX model is then used to develop the gust load alleviation (GLA) control law. For the IR method, comparison of measured with simulated responses are presented to investigate the accuracy of the ASE analytical models developed. For the GPC method, comparison of simulated open-loop and closed-loop (GLA) time histories are presented.

  12. Multi-Body Analysis of the 1/5 Scale Wind Tunnel Model of the V-22 Tiltrotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, G. L.; Masarati, P.; Mantegazza, P.; Nixon, M. W.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents a multi-body analysis of the 1/5 scale wind tunnel model of the V-22 tiltrotor, the Wing and Rotor Aeroelastic Testing System (WRATS), currently tested at NASA Langley Research Center. An original multi-body formulation has been developed at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale of the Politecnico di Milano, Italy. It is based on the direct writing of the equilibrium equations of independent rigid bodies, connected by kinematic constraints that result in the addition of algebraic constraint equations, and by dynamic constraints, that directly contribute to the equilibrium equations. The formulation has been extended to the simultaneous solution of interdisciplinary problems by modeling electric and hydraulic networks, for aeroservoelastic problems. The code has been tailored to the modeling of rotorcrafts while preserving a complete generality. A family of aerodynamic elements has been introduced to model high aspect aerodynamic surfaces, based on the strip theory, with quasi-steady aerodynamic coefficients, compressibility, post-stall interpolation of experimental data, dynamic stall modeling, and radial flow drag. Different models for the induced velocity of the rotor can be used, from uniform velocity to dynamic in flow. A complete dynamic and aeroelastic analysis of the model of the V-22 tiltrotor has been performed, to assess the validity of the formulation and to exploit the unique features of multi-body analysis with respect to conventional comprehensive rotorcraft codes; These are the ability to model the exact kinematics of mechanical systems, and the possibility to simulate unusual maneuvers and unusual flight conditions, that are particular to the tiltrotor, e.g. the conversion maneuver. A complete modal validation of the analytical model has been performed, to assess the ability to reproduce the correct dynamics of the system with a relatively coarse beam model of the semispan wing, pylon and rotor. Particular care has been used

  13. The Multipurpose New Wind Tunnel STU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubová Oľga

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BLWT STU tunnel, which is currently in test mode, will in its two measuring sections allow to prepare measurements with laminar and turbulent wind flow. The front section will fulfill technical parameters of steady flow for testing sectional models and dynamically similar models. In the rear operating section it is necessary to reproduce correctly the roughness of the earth surface covering different terrain categories and to prepare boundary layer suitable for experimental testing. Article deals with the brief description of the preparation and testing laminar flow and boundary layer for the urban terrain, which was simulated with rough elements and barriers of different heights. The attention is focused in getting get at least 1 meter height of boundary layer, which allows to optimize scale similarity of model.

  14. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, J.W.

    During February and April 2012 a series of wind tunnel tests were performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility (OJF) with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible...

  15. Development of procedures for the acquisition of metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) parts for use in the CSIR's wind tunnel models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnston, C

    2015-11-04

    Full Text Available The first Additive Manufacturing (AM) non-load-bearing, client furnished part was used in the CSIR’s wind tunnels in 2007. The advent of metal-grown materials, and the acquisition of machines to grow them in South Africa, has made it feasible...

  16. Wind tunnel measurements of windscreen performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniet, Edward R.

    2002-05-01

    Microphone windscreens are routinely used in outdoor acoustic measurements to reduce wind noise pickup. Characterization of windscreen performance outdoors with real wind has several drawbacks notably that the test conditions cannot be controlled. Test methodology has been developed that provides controlled, repeatable measurements of microphone windscreen performance in a laboratory setting. Wind noise measurements are performed using a high-speed/laminar-flow, low-noise wind tunnel that incorporates a large anechoic chamber. The wind tunnel is modified to produce a turbulent flow into which the microphone and windscreen under evaluation are placed. The turbulent velocity spectrum is measured using multi-axis hot-wire anemometers and compared to outdoor data to locate the best position in the turbulent flow to place the test article. Comparative performance measurements of several windscreen designs are presented.

  17. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    The optimization of airfoil profiles specifically designed for wind turbine application was initiated in the late 80’s [67, 68, 30, 15]. The first attempts to reduce airfoil noise for wind turbines made use of airfoil trailing edge serration. Themodification of airfoil shapes targeted at noise...... reduction is more recent. An important effort was produced in this direction within the SIROCCO project. This latter work involved measurements on full size wind turbines and showed that trailing edge serration may proved a viable solution for mitigating wind turbine noise though it has not been implemented...... on commercial wind turbine yet. It should be mentioned here that the attenuation of turbulent inflow noise using wavy leading edge has recently been investigated [55], but this technique has still to be further validated for practical applications. In this paper, it is proposed to optimize an airfoil which...

  18. The Kevlar-walled anechoic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenport, William J.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Borgoltz, Aurelien; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Barone, Matthew F.; Brown, Kenneth A.; Morton, Michael A.

    2013-08-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of an anechoic wind tunnel test section with walls made from thin Kevlar cloth have been measured and analyzed. The Kevlar test section offers some advantages over a conventional free-jet arrangement. The cloth contains the bulk of the flow but permits the transmission of sound with little loss. The containment results in smaller far-field aerodynamic corrections meaning that larger models can be tested at higher Reynolds numbers. The containment also eliminates the need for a jet catcher and allows for a much longer test section. Model-generated noise is thus more easily separated from facility background using beamforming. Measurements and analysis of acoustic and aerodynamic corrections for a Kevlar-walled test section are presented and discussed, along with benchmark trailing edge noise measurements.

  19. Reducing Wind Tunnel Data Requirements Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James C.; Jorgenson, Charles C.; Norgaard, Magnus

    1997-01-01

    The use of neural networks to minimize the amount of data required to completely define the aerodynamic performance of a wind tunnel model is examined. The accuracy requirements for commercial wind tunnel test data are very severe and are difficult to reproduce using neural networks. For the current work, multiple input, single output networks were trained using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients. When applied to the aerodynamics of a 55% scale model of a U.S. Air Force/ NASA generic fighter configuration, this scheme provided accurate models of the lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients. Using only 50% of the data acquired during, the wind tunnel test, the trained neural network had a predictive accuracy equal to or better than the accuracy of the experimental measurements.

  20. Evaluation of an Experimental Model for Flat-Fan Nozzles Drift in Wind Tunnel by Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H Fattahi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Each year, millions of liters of toxic liquid, are used to combat with pests and plant diseases in farms. The wide spread use of chemical pesticides causes great environmental hazards. Particles drift is one of the main problems in spraying which results in the contamination of farm lands, humans and animals. Management of particle size is regarded as the main factor in drift control. In this study, the effect of some parameters on the size of deposited particles on non-target areas was studied using statistical method. The effects of nozzle type (orifice size, spraying pressure, spraying boom height and wind speed as effective factors on drift were examined. A horizontal wind tunnel with working section of 0.47 m wide, 0.75 m height and 5.5 m long was used for testing. Experiment was performed in the form of factorial split-plot based on randomized complete block design with two replications. Droplets were measured in the treatment combinations of the type of flat-fan nozzle with three orifice area (11003- 0.87 mm2, 11004-1.18 mm2 and 11006- 1.8 mm2, spraying pressure (150, 275 and 400 kpa, wind speed (1, 2 and 3 m s-1 and the boom height of (0.35, 0.55 and 0.75 m. Water-sensitive papers were used at intervals of 0.8, 1.6 and 2.4 m from the tip of nozzles for detecting droplets size. The factors of pressure, speed and height had positive effects on the droplet size at the desired distance, but the effect of nozzle size on droplet size was negative. In the regression model the coefficients of speed was higher than the others.

  1. Evaluation of an Experimental Model for Flat-Fan Nozzles Drift in Wind Tunnel by Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H Fattahi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Each year, millions of liters of toxic liquid, are used to combat with pests and plant diseases in farms. The wide spread use of chemical pesticides causes great environmental hazards. Particles drift is one of the main problems in spraying which results in the contamination of farm lands, humans and animals. Management of particle size is regarded as the main factor in drift control. In this study, the effect of some parameters on the size of deposited particles on non-target areas was studied using statistical method. The effects of nozzle type (orifice size, spraying pressure, spraying boom height and wind speed as effective factors on drift were examined. A horizontal wind tunnel with working section of 0.47 m wide, 0.75 m height and 5.5 m long was used for testing. Experiment was performed in the form of factorial split-plot based on randomized complete block design with two replications. Droplets were measured in the treatment combinations of the type of flat-fan nozzle with three orifice area (11003- 0.87 mm2, 11004-1.18 mm2 and 11006- 1.8 mm2, spraying pressure (150, 275 and 400 kpa, wind speed (1, 2 and 3 m s-1 and the boom height of (0.35, 0.55 and 0.75 m. Water-sensitive papers were used at intervals of 0.8, 1.6 and 2.4 m from the tip of nozzles for detecting droplets size. The factors of pressure, speed and height had positive effects on the droplet size at the desired distance, but the effect of nozzle size on droplet size was negative. In the regression model the coefficients of speed was higher than the others.

  2. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1969-01-01

    The normal magnetic field configuration of a Q device has been modified to obtain a 'magnetic Laval nozzle'. Continuous supersonic plasma 'winds' are obtained with Mach numbers ~3. The magnetic nozzle appears well suited for the study of the interaction of supersonic plasma 'winds' with either...

  3. Design of a wind tunnel scale model of an adaptive wind turbine blade for active aerodynamic load control experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulskamp, A.W.; Beukers, A.; Bersee, H.E.N.; Van Wingerden, J.W.; Barlas, T.

    2007-01-01

    Within wind energy research there is a drive towards the development of a “smart rotor”; a rotor of which the loading can be measured and controlled through the application of a sensor system, a control system and an aerodynamic device. Most promising solutions from an aerodynamic point of view are

  4. Design of a wind tunnel scale model of an adaptive wind turbine blade for active aerodynamic load control experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulskamp, A.W.; Beukers, A.; Bersee, H.E.N.; Van Wingerden, J.W.; Barlas, T.

    2007-01-01

    Within wind energy research there is a drive towards the development of a “smart rotor”; a rotor of which the loading can be measured and controlled through the application of a sensor system, a control system and an aerodynamic device. Most promising solutions from an aerodynamic point of view are

  5. Optimal control of a hyperbolic model of flow recirculation in a wind tunnel with dynamically constrained boundary controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    This thesis develops a new optimal control theory for a class of distributed-parameter systems governed by first-order quasilinear hyperbolic partial differential equations that arise in many physical applications such as fluid dynamics problems. These systems are controlled at their boundaries via boundary controls that are subject to dynamic constraints imposed by lumped-parameter systems governed by ordinary differential equations. A Mach number control problem for a closed-circuit wind tunnel is investigated. The flow is modeled using the Euler equations and is controlled by a compressor performance model defined as two-point boundary conditions. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by two first-order lumped-parameter systems that represent dynamics of a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system. Necessary conditions of optimality are developed by the minimum principle using the adjoint formulation of calculus of variations for a dual Hamiltonian system for the distributed and lumped-parameter systems. The theory is applied to analyze two problems of Mach number control in a wind tunnel: a nonlinear Mach number transition and a linear perturbation predictive feedforward optimal control in the presence of disturbance. Computational methods for general two-point boundary value problems involving coupled partial and ordinary differential equations are developed using a wave-splitting, finite difference upwind method with an explicit scheme for the state equations, and an implicit scheme and a quasi-steady state method for the adjoint equations. These computational methods are implemented to solve a two-point boundary value problem. Using a second-order gradient method, the optimal Mach number transition is computed. A linear-quadratic optimal control theory is developed for designing a Mach number control in the presence of a test model undergoing a continuous pitch motion. A feedback control is shown to not be able to

  6. Test techniques for cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the testing techniques developed for transonic cryogenic tunnels are presented. Techniques are emphasized which required special development or were unique because of the opportunities offered by cryogenic operation. Measuring the static aerodynamic coefficients normally used to determine component efficiency is discussed. The first topic is testing of two dimensional airfoils at transonic Mach numbers and flight values of Reynolds number. Three dimensional tests of complete configurations and sidewall mounted wings are also described. Since flight Reynolds numbers are of interest, free transition must be allowed. A discussion is given of wind tunnel and model construction effects on transition location. Time dependent phenomena, fluid mechanics, and measurement techniques are examined. The time dependent, or unsteady, aerodynamic test techniques described include testing for flutter, buffet, and oscillating airfoil characteristics. In describing non-intrusive laser techniques, discussions are given regarding optical access, seeding, forward scatter lasers, two-spot lasers, and laser holography. Methods of detecting transition and separation are reported and a new type of skin friction balance is described.

  7. A wind tunnel for the calibration of Mars wind sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, CF; Camilletti, AL; Calcutt, SB; Ligrani, PM

    2008-01-01

    A major limitation in the development of wind sensors for use on Mars is the lack of suitable testing and calibration facilities. A low-density wind tunnel has been developed at Oxford University for calibration of wind sensors for Mars landers, capable of providing stable or dynamically varying winds, of air or carbon dioxide, at Martian pressures (5-10 mbar) and speeds (0.5-30 m/s), and temperatures of 200-300 K. The flow field in the test section was calculated using analytical and computa...

  8. Wind Tunnel Assessment of Ship Manoeuvrability using a PMM Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agdrup, Kristian; Jensen, Andreas G.; Aage, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Tests have been performed at the Danish Maritime Institute (DMI) to investigate the applicability of a new wind tunnel Planar Motion Mechanism (PMM) for the determination of hydrodynamic coefficients of ships. The method has been tested on a tanker with known towing tank data. The wind tunnel model...... was a light foam hull equipped with fixed rudder but without propeller. Tests comprised the static drift, pure sway and pure yaw modes in the range corresponding to manoeuvring at forward speed. The resulting hydrodynamic coefficients and values of the stability criterion are compared with the towing tank...... data giving reasonable results. The dependency of amplitude and frequency is evaluated, and sources of inaccuracy are discussed. It is concluded that the wind tunnel method is a promising method to achieve a fast and cost-effective estimate of the hydrodynamic coefficients of a ship hull...

  9. Wind-tunnel investigation of the flow correction for a model-mounted angle of attack sensor at angles of attack from -10 deg to 110 deg. [Langley 12-foot low speed wind tunnel test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moul, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary wind tunnel investigation was undertaken to determine the flow correction for a vane angle of attack sensor over an angle of attack range from -10 deg to 110 deg. The sensor was mounted ahead of the wing on a 1/5 scale model of a general aviation airplane. It was shown that the flow correction was substantial, reaching about 15 deg at an angle of attack of 90 deg. The flow correction was found to increase as the sensor was moved closer to the wing or closer to the fuselage. The experimentally determined slope of the flow correction versus the measured angle of attack below the stall angle of attack agreed closely with the slope of flight data from a similar full scale airplane.

  10. Prismatic Blade Measuring on a Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stech J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The results from measurement on the straight blade cascade are presented in the paper. The cascade is placed at the outlet of wind tunnel in ŠKODA POWER experimental base. The results in the form of velocity and loss fields behind blade cascade as well as the distribution of the loss coefficient in selected cross-section are evaluated.

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Dynamic, 3-Degree-of-Freedom (DOF) Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    high tolerance of the printed parts. A selective laser sintered glass fiber- reinforced polymer was used for the gimbal assembly, CAS section, and nose...lower loading conditions as well as direct force and moment measurements. The transonic tunnel was operated at high subsonic velocities, which is...and robust metal housing. Maximum roll rate was not a driving factor due to the nonrolling airframe being considered; however, the AMT10× series

  12. Wind Tunnel Testing of Active Control System for Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper describes preparation of wind tunnel testing of the principle of using flaps to control the motion of suspension bridges. The experiment will take place at the Instituto Superior Technico Lisbon, Portugal. The bridge section model is constructed of foam with an aluminium frame. The flaps...

  13. Boundary Layer Simulation and Control in Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Vol. 1, No. 4, April 1963, pp. 931-933. AIAA 11. Maybe, Dennis G.: Some Remarks on Dynamic Aeroelastic Model Tests in Cryogenic Wind Tunnels...distribution). 42. Lindhout, J.P.F, Moek , C., Boer, E. de and Berg, B. van den: A Method for the Calculation of 3D Boundary Layers on Practical Wing

  14. The multiple-function multi-input/multi-output digital controller system for the AFW wind-tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mcgraw, Sandra M.

    1992-01-01

    A real time multiple-function digital controller system was developed for the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) Program. The digital controller system (DCS) allowed simultaneous execution of two control laws: flutter suppression and either roll trim or a rolling maneuver load control. The DCS operated within, but independently of, a slower host operating system environment, at regulated speeds up to 200 Hz. It also coordinated the acquisition, storage, and transfer of data for near real time controller performance evaluation and both open- and closed-loop plant estimation. It synchronized the operation of four different processing units, allowing flexibility in the number, form, functionality, and order of control laws, and variability in the selection of the sensors and actuators employed. Most importantly, the DCS allowed for the successful demonstration of active flutter suppression to conditions approximately 26 percent (in dynamic pressure) above the open-loop boundary in cases when the model was fixed in roll and up to 23 percent when it was free to roll. Aggressive roll maneuvers with load control were achieved above the flutter boundary. The purpose here is to present the development, validation, and wind tunnel testing of this multiple-function digital controller system.

  15. Pressure distributions on a 0.04-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forward fuselage in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. F.; Siemers, P. M., III; Flanagan, P. F.; Henry, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    Pressure distribution tests on a 0.04-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The UPWT has two different test sections operating in the continuous mode. Each test section has its own Mach number range. The model was tested at angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 30 deg and angles of sideslip from -5 deg to 5 deg in both test sections. The test Reynolds number was 6.6 x 10 to the 6th power per meter. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS pressure orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations currently existing on the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (OV-102). This DFI simulation has provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel data.

  16. A Numerical Comparison of Symmetric and Asymmetric Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kylen D.

    Supersonic wind tunnels are a vital aspect to the aerospace industry. Both the design and testing processes of different aerospace components often include and depend upon utilization of supersonic test facilities. Engine inlets, wing shapes, and body aerodynamics, to name a few, are aspects of aircraft that are frequently subjected to supersonic conditions in use, and thus often require supersonic wind tunnel testing. There is a need for reliable and repeatable supersonic test facilities in order to help create these vital components. The option of building and using asymmetric supersonic converging-diverging nozzles may be appealing due in part to lower construction costs. There is a need, however, to investigate the differences, if any, in the flow characteristics and performance of asymmetric type supersonic wind tunnels in comparison to symmetric due to the fact that asymmetric configurations of CD nozzle are not as common. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has been conducted on an existing University of Michigan (UM) asymmetric supersonic wind tunnel geometry in order to study the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Simulations were made on both the existing asymmetrical tunnel geometry and two axisymmetric reflections (of differing aspect ratio) of that original tunnel geometry. The Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved via NASAs OVERFLOW code to model flow through these configurations. In this way, information has been gleaned on the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Shock boundary layer interactions are paid particular attention since the test section integrity is greatly dependent upon these interactions. Boundary layer and overall flow characteristics are studied. The RANS study presented in this document shows that the UM asymmetric wind tunnel/nozzle configuration is not as well suited to producing uniform test section flow as that of a symmetric configuration, specifically one

  17. Survey Of Wind Tunnels At Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Report presented at AIAA 14th Aerodynamic Testing Conference on current capabilities and planned improvements at NASA Langley Research Center's major wind tunnels. Focuses on 14 major tunnels, 8 unique in world, 3 unique in country. Covers Langley Spin Tunnel. Includes new National Transonic Facility (NTF). Also surveys Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). Addresses resurgence of inexpensive simple-to-operate research tunnels. Predicts no shortage of tools for aerospace researcher and engineer in next decade or two.

  18. Survey Of Wind Tunnels At Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Report presented at AIAA 14th Aerodynamic Testing Conference on current capabilities and planned improvements at NASA Langley Research Center's major wind tunnels. Focuses on 14 major tunnels, 8 unique in world, 3 unique in country. Covers Langley Spin Tunnel. Includes new National Transonic Facility (NTF). Also surveys Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). Addresses resurgence of inexpensive simple-to-operate research tunnels. Predicts no shortage of tools for aerospace researcher and engineer in next decade or two.

  19. CFD and Wind Tunnel Analysis for Mounted-Wind Turbine in a Tall Building for Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany Perwita Sari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A mounted wind turbine on the top of a tall building may provide high wind power in regions of high wind speed and low turbulence. The objective of this study is to evaluate wind speed on roof top models to optimize the wind turbine performance for power generation. Comparative analyses from three different roof top models were conducted. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation and wind tunnel testing were performed to evaluate the performance of wind turbine. Wind speed on the building model with a geometric scale of 1:150 was measured in CFD simulation then it was validated in wind tunnel test. Results presented in this paper suggest that an increase of wind speed could be achieved with ¼ circular shapes around the rooftop which can provide additional wind speed of 55.24%, respectively.

  20. Preliminary wind tunnel tests on the pedal wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayagalingam, T.

    1980-06-01

    High solidity-low speed wind turbines are relatively simple to construct and can be used advantageously in many developing countries for such direct applications as water pumping. Established designs in this class, such as the Savonius and the American multiblade rotors, have the disadvantage that their moving surfaces require a rigid construction, thereby rendering large units uneconomical. In this respect, the pedal wind turbine recently reported by the author and which incorporates sail type rotors offers a number of advantages. This note reports preliminary results from a series of wind tunnel tests which were carried out to assess the aerodynamic torque and power characteristics of the turbine.

  1. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Digital Control Systems for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Christhilf, David; Perry, Boyd, III

    2012-01-01

    An important objective of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind tunnel model program was the demonstration of Flutter Suppression (FS), Gust Load Alleviation (GLA), and Ride Quality Enhancement (RQE). It was critical to evaluate the stability and robustness of these control laws analytically before testing them and experimentally while testing them to ensure safety of the model and the wind tunnel. MATLAB based software was applied to evaluate the performance of closed-loop systems in terms of stability and robustness. Existing software tools were extended to use analytical representations of the S4T and the control laws to analyze and evaluate the control laws prior to testing. Lessons were learned about the complex windtunnel model and experimental testing. The open-loop flutter boundary was determined from the closed-loop systems. A MATLAB/Simulink Simulation developed under the program is available for future work to improve the CPE process. This paper is one of a series of that comprise a special session, which summarizes the S4T wind-tunnel program.

  2. Pressure distributions obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forebody in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Henry, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure distribution test data obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The UPWT tests were conducted in two different test sections operating in the continuous mode, the 8 x 7 feet and 9 x 7 feet test sections. Each test section has its own Mach number range, 1.6 to 2.5 and 2.5 to 3.5 for the 9 x 7 feet and 8 x 7 feet test section, respectively. The test Reynolds number ranged from 1.6 to 2.5 x 10 to the 6th power ft and 0.6 to 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power ft, respectively. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations that existed on the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102) during the Orbiter Flight test program. This DFI simulation has provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel and computational data.

  3. Wind tunnel study on wind-induced vibration of middle pylon of Taizhou Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Rujin; Zhang Zhen; Chen Airong

    2012-01-01

    Full aero-elastic model tests are carried out to investigate wind-induced vibration of middle steel pylon of Taizhou Bridge. Model of the pylon under different construction periods is tested in both uniform and turbulent flow field. And the yaw angle of wind changes from transverse to longitudinal. Through full aero-elastic model testing, windinduced vibration is checked, which includes vortex resonance, buffeting and galloping. Vortex resonance is observed and further studies are carried out by changing damping ratio. Based on wind tunnel testing results, wind-resistance of middle pylon is evaluated and some suggestions are given for middle pylon' s construction.

  4. Testing of the QUIC-plume model with wind-tunnel measurements for a high-rise building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M. D. (Michael D.); Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Boswell, D. (David); Singh, B. (Balwinder); Pardyjak, E. M. (Eric M.)

    2004-01-01

    ), QUICPLUME, a model that describes dispersion near buildings (Williams et al., 2003), and a graphical user interface QUIC-GUI (Boswell et al., 2004). The QUIC dispersion code is currently being used for building scale to neighborhood scale transport and diffusion problems with domains on the order of several kilometers. Figure 1 illustrates the modeled dispersion for a release in downtown Salt Lake City. This paper describes the QUIC-PLUME randomwalk dispersion model formulation, the turbulence parameterization assumptions, and shows comparisons of model-computed concentration fields with measurements from a single-building wind-tunnel experiment. It is shown that the traditional three-term random walk model with a turbulence scheme based on gradients of the mean wind performs poorly for dispersion in the cavity of the single-building, and that model-experiment comparisons are improved significantly when additional drift terms are added and a non-local mixing scheme is implemented.

  5. Wind tunnel experiments of air flow patterns over nabkhas modeled after those from the Hotan River basin,Xinjiang,China(Ⅰ):non-vegetated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhong LI; Wanjuan LI; Shengli WU; Janis DALE; Lin GE; Mudan HE; Xiaofeng WANG; Jianhui JIN; Rong MA; Jinwei LIU

    2008-01-01

    A nabkha is a vegetated sand mound,which is ypical of the aeolian landforms found in the Hotan River pasin in Xinjiang,China.This paper compares the results of a series of wind tunnel experiments with an on-site field survey of nabkhas in the Hotan River basin of Xinjiang.Wind tunnel experiments were conducted on semi-sphercal and conical sand mounds without vegetation or shadow dunes.Field mounds were 40 times as large as the size of the wind tunnel models.In the wind tunnel experiments,five different velocities from 6 to 14 m/s were selected and used to model the wind flow pattern over mdividual sand mound using clean air without additional sand.Changes in the flow pattern at different wind speeds resulted in changes to the characteristic structure of the babkha surface.The results of the experiments for the semi-spherical sand mound at all wind velocities show the formation of a vortex at the bottom of the upwind side of the mound that resulted in scouring and deposition of a crescentic dune upwind of the main mound.The top part of the sand mound is strongly eroded.In the field,these dunes exhibited the same scouring and crescentic dune formation and the eroded upper surface was often topped by a layer of peat within the mound suggesting destroyed vegetation due to river channel migration or by possible anthropogenic forces such as fuel gathering,etc.Experiments for the conical mounds exhibit only a small increase in velocity on the upwind side of the mound and no formation of a vortex at the bottom of the upwind side.Instead,a vortex formed on the leeward side of the mound and overall,no change occurred in the shape of the conical mound.In the field,conical mounds have no crescentic dunes on the upwind side and no erosion at the top exposed below peat beds.Therefore,the field and laboratory experiments show that semi-spherical and conical sand mounds respond differently to similar wind conditions with different surface configuration and development of crescent

  6. Analysis and design of quiet hypersonic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, Hadassah

    The purpose of the present work is to integrate CFD into the design of quiet hypersonic wind tunnels and the analysis of their performance. Two specific problems are considered. The first problem is the automated design of the supersonic portion of a quiet hypersonic wind tunnel. Modern optimization software is combined with full Navier-Stokes simulations and PSE stability analysis to design a Mach 6 nozzle with maximum quiet test length. A response surface is constructed from a user-specified set of contour shapes and a genetic algorithm is used to find the "optimal contour", which is defined as the shortest nozzle with the maximum quiet test length. This is achieved by delaying transition along the nozzle wall. It is found that transition is triggered by Goertler waves, which can be suppressed by including a section of convex curvature along the contour. The optimal design has an unconventional shape described as compound curvature, which makes the contour appear slightly wavy. The second problem is the evaluation of a proposed modification of the test section in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel. The new design incorporates a section of increased diameter with the intention of enabling the tunnel to start in the presence of larger blunt models. Cone models with fixed base diameter (and hence fixed blockage ratio) are selected for this study. Cone half-angles from 15° to 75° are examined to ascertain the effect of ii the strength of the test model shock wave on the tunnel startup. The unsteady, laminar, compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved. The resulting flowfields are analyzed to see what affect the shocks and shear layers have on the quiet test section flow. This study indicates that cone angles ≤20° allow the tunnel to start. Keywords. automated optimization, response surface, parabolized stability equations, compound curvature, laminar, wind tunnel, unstart, test section.

  7. 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel Acoustic Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, David; Stephens, David

    2016-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) at NASA Glenn Research Center was built in 1969 in the return leg of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT). The 8x6 SWT was completed in 1949 and acoustically treated to mitigate community noise issues in 1950. This treatment included the addition of a large muffler downstream of the 8x6 SWT test section and diffuser. The 9x15 LSWT was designed for performance testing of VSTOL aircraft models, but with the addition of the current acoustic treatment in 1986 the tunnel has been used principally for acoustic and performance testing of aircraft propulsions systems. The present document describes an anticipated acoustic upgrade to be completed in 2017.

  8. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  9. Assessment of Scaled Rotors for Wind Tunnel Experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelley, Christopher Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chiu, Phillip [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Rotor design and analysis work has been performed to support the conceptualization of a wind tunnel test focused on studying wake dynamics. This wind tunnel test would serve as part of a larger model validation campaign that is part of the Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program’s Atmosphere to electrons (A2e) initiative. The first phase of this effort was directed towards designing a functionally scaled rotor based on the same design process and target full-scale turbine used for new rotors for the DOE/SNL SWiFT site. The second phase focused on assessing the capabilities of an already available rotor, the G1, designed and built by researchers at the Technical University of München.

  10. Water tunnel flow visualization and wind tunnel data analysis of the F/A-18. [leading edge extension vortex effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Six degree of freedom studies were utilized to extract a band of yawing and rolling moment coefficients from the F/A-18 aircraft flight records. These were compared with 0.06 scale model data obtained in a 16T wind tunnel facility. The results, indicate the flight test yawing moment data exhibit an improvement over the wind tunnel data to near neutral stability and a significant reduction in lateral stability (again to anear neutral level). These data are consistent with the flight test results since the motion was characterized by a relatively slo departure. Flight tests repeated the slow yaw departure at M 0.3. Only 0.16 scale model wind tunnel data showed levels of lateral stability similar to the flight test results. Accordingly, geometric modifications were investigated on the 0.16 scale model in the 30x60 foot wind tunnel to improve high angle of attack lateral stability.

  11. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verelst, D. R. S.; Larsen, T. J.; van Wingerden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is given as well as a brief summary of the design process. The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy's aeroelastic simulation program HAWC2.

  12. Wind Tunnel Tests for Wind Pressure Distribution on Gable Roof Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path. PMID:24082851

  13. Wind tunnel tests for wind pressure distribution on gable roof buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiao-kun; Li, Yuan-qi

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path.

  14. Wind flow and wind loads on the surface of a tower- shaped building: Numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow structure and wind pressure distribution caused by obtuse obstacles are usually the focuses in Computational Wind Engineer researches (CWE). By solving the non- hydrostatical dynamic equations, PUMA model (Peking University Model of Atmospheric Environment) was developed and applied to simulating the flow structure and wind pressure distribution around a tower-shaped building. Evaluation about the wind environment and wind loads around the building was obtained through the analysis of the numerical simulation results and wind tunnel data. Comparisons between the simulation and wind tunnel study indicate that numerical simulation results agree well in the flow field and wind pressure distribution around the tower-shaped building. On the other hand, the horizontal grid interval of 2 m and the vertical grid of 3 m were still too crude to simulate the flow structure and wind pressure distribution on the building surface more exactly in detail; and the absence of suitable pressure perturbation parameterization scheme between the solid and the adjacent space also limits the accuracy of the numerical simulation. The numerical simulation model can be used to evaluate the wind environment and wind load around high buildings.

  15. Improved design and data accuracy through modeling and simulation of wind tunnel facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. (AS&M) is proposing to develop and validate the procedures and modeling necessary to simulate, using computational...

  16. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 4: Model deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of systems capable of model deformation measurements was conducted. The survey included stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers. Moire, holographic, and heterodyne interferometry techniques were also looked at. Stereo-cameras with passive or active targets are currently being deployed for model deformation measurements at NASA Ames and LaRC, Boeing, and ONERA. Scanners and digitizers are widely used in robotics, motion analysis, medicine, etc., and some of the scanner and digitizers can meet the model deformation requirements. Commercial stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers are being improved in accuracy, reliability, and ease of operation. A number of new systems are coming onto the market.

  17. Phase I Experimental Testing of a Generic Submarine Model in the DSTO Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    force (N) M Moment about the z-axis (Nm) MRP Moment Reference Point N Moment about the y-axis (Nm) q Dynamic pressure       2 2 1 U (Pa... MRP ) is defined as the mid-length position on the centre-line of the model, and the strain gauge balance reference centre is located 77.64 mm...axially forward, and 28.0 mm vertically above the model MRP . 1350 m m 675 m m Stra in Gauge Balance 28.0m m M om ent Reference Point (M RP) 77.64m m

  18. Evaluation of Spray Drift Using Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Measurements and Dispersion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ricultural Engineers, St. Joseph, MI. 9 Teske , M. E., Thistle, H. W., and Ice, G. G., “Technical Advances in Modeling Aerially Applied Sprays...Int., Vol. 5, No. 1, 2008, paper ID JAI101493. 13 Teske , M., personal communication, 2009. 14 ISO 22369-1:2006E, 2006, “Crop Protection

  19. Development of a six-axis force/moment sensor for wind tunnel model test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun

    2013-11-01

    A novel structure for a six-axis force/moment sensor is proposed in this paper. Parallel plate structures are combined in the one-block structure of the sensor. A method for estimating the sensitivity and stiffness is developed by comparing the results of numeric estimations with those of finite element method (FEM) analyses. A detailed FEM model was used to analyse the surface strain in the area where the strain gauge was attached. Tests carried out on the characteristics revealed a sensitivity design error of less than 8.5%, a relative measurement error of less than 2.13%, and an interference error of less than 9.51%. A performance enhancement method is also proposed.

  20. Computational Wind Tunnel: A Design Tool for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During initial design studies, parametric variation of vehicle geometry is routine. In addition, rotorcraft engineers traditionally use the wind tunnel to evaluate...

  1. Ventilation of idealised urban area, LES and wind tunnel experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukačka L.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the ventilation of vehicle pollution within street canyons, a wind tunnel experiment and a large eddy simulation (LES was performed. A model of an idealised urban area with apartment houses arranged to courtyards was designed according to common Central European cities. In the wind tunnel, we assembled a set-up for simultaneous measurement of vertical velocity and tracer gas concentration. Due to the vehicle traffic emissions modelling, a new line source of tracer gas was designed and built into the model. As a computational model, the LES model solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations was used. In this paper, we focused on the street canyon with the line source situated perpendicular to an approach flow. Vertical and longitudinal velocity components of the flow with the pollutant concentration were obtained from two horizontal grids placed in different heights above the street canyon. Vertical advective and turbulent pollution fluxes were computed from the measured data as ventilation characteristics. Wind tunnel and LES data were qualitatively compared. A domination of advective pollution transport within the street canyon was determined. However, the turbulent transport with an opposite direction to the advective played a significant role within and above the street canyon.

  2. Aeroelastic Analysis of SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model Using FUN3D and a Nonlinear Structural Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Scott, Robert C.; Allen, Timothy J.; Sexton, Bradley W.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given in recent years to the design of highly flexible aircraft. The results of numerous studies demonstrate the significant performance benefits of strut-braced wing (SBW) and trussbraced wing (TBW) configurations. Critical aspects of the TBW configuration are its larger aspect ratio, wing span and thinner wings. These aspects increase the importance of considering fluid/structure and control system coupling. This paper presents high-fidelity Navier-Stokes simulations of the dynamic response of the flexible Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) truss-braced wing wind-tunnel model. The latest version of the SUGAR TBW finite element model (FEM), v.20, is used in the present simulations. Limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) of the TBW wing/strut/nacelle are simulated at angle-of-attack (AoA) values of -1, 0 and +1 degree. The modal data derived from nonlinear static aeroelastic MSC.Nastran solutions are used at AoAs of -1 and +1 degrees. The LCO amplitude is observed to be dependent on AoA. LCO amplitudes at -1 degree are larger than those at +1 degree. The LCO amplitude at zero degrees is larger than either -1 or +1 degrees. These results correlate well with both wind-tunnel data and the behavior observed in previous studies using linear aerodynamics. The LCO onset at zero degrees AoA has also been computed using unloaded v.20 FEM modes. While the v.20 model increases the dynamic pressure at which LCO onset is observed, it is found that the LCO onset at and above Mach 0.82 is much different than that produced by an earlier version of the FEM, v. 19.

  3. Tailoring wind properties by various passive roughness elements in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Kapil

    2012-08-01

    Boundary-layer wind tunnel provides a unique platform to reproduce urban, suburban and rural atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by using roughness devices such as vortex generators, floor roughness, barrier walls, and slots in the extended test-section floor in the contraction cone. Each passive device impacts wind properties in a certain way. In this study, influence of various passive devices on wind properties has been investigated. Experiments using eighteen different configurations of the passive devices have been carried out to simulate urban, sub-urban, and rural climate conditions in a boundary-layer wind tunnel. The effect of each configuration on the wind characteristics is presented. It was found that higher barrier height and more number of roughness elements on the floor, generated higher turbulence and therefore higher model scale factors were obtained. However, increased slot width in the extended test-section floor in the contraction cone of the wind tunnel seemed to have a little effect on wind characteristics.

  4. Simulation of the flow past a model in the closed test section of a low-speed wind tunnel and in the free stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, V. T.; Lapygin, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    The flow around a model in the closed test section of a low-speed wind tunnel has been analyzed in 2D approximation. As the contour of the nozzle, test section, and diffuser, the contour of the T-324 wind tunnel, of the Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ITAM SB RAS, Novosibirsk), in its symmetry plane was adopted. A comparison of experimental with calculated data on the distribution of velocities and dynamic pressures in the test section is given. The effect due to the sizes of a model installed in the test section on the values of the aerodynamic coefficients of the model is analyzed. As the aerodynamic model, the NASA0012 airfoil and the circular cylinder were considered. For the airfoil chord length b = 20 % of nozzle height, the values of the aerodynamic coefficients of the airfoil in the free stream and in the test section proved to be close to each other up to the angle of attack a = 7°, which configuration corresponds to blockage-factor value ξ ≈ 7 %. The obtained data are indicative of the expedience of taking into account, in choosing the model scale, not only the degree of flow passage area blockage by the model but, also, the length of the well-streamlined model. In the case of a strongly blunted body with a high drag-coefficient value, the admissible blockage factor ξ may reach a value of 10 %.

  5. Nano-ADEPT Aeroloads Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon; Yount, Bryan; Kruger, Carl; Brivkalns, Chad; Makino, Alberto; Cassell, Alan; Zarchi, Kerry; McDaniel, Ryan; Ross, James; Wercinski, Paul; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Swanson, Gregory; Gold, Nili

    2016-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) was conducted in April 2015 at the US Army's 7 by10 Foot Wind Tunnel located at NASA Ames Research Center. Key geometric features of the fabric test article were a 0.7 meter deployed base diameter, a 70 degree half-angle forebody cone angle, eight ribs, and a nose-to-base radius ratio of 0.7. The primary objective of this wind tunnel test was to obtain static deflected shape and pressure distributions while varying pretension at dynamic pressures and angles of attack relevant to entry conditions at Earth, Mars, and Venus. Other objectives included obtaining aerodynamic force and moment data and determining the presence and magnitude of any dynamic aeroelastic behavior (buzz/flutter) in the fabric trailing edge. All instrumentation systems worked as planned and a rich data set was obtained. This paper describes the test articles, instrumentation systems, data products, and test results. Four notable conclusions are drawn. First, test data support adopting a pre-tension lower bound of 10 foot pounds per inch for Nano-ADEPT mission applications in order to minimize the impact of static deflection. Second, test results indicate that the fabric conditioning process needs to be reevaluated. Third, no flutter/buzz of the fabric was observed for any test condition and should also not occur at hypersonic speeds. Fourth, translating one of the gores caused ADEPT to generate lift without the need for a center of gravity offset. At hypersonic speeds, the lift generated by actuating ADEPT gores could be used for vehicle control.

  6. Rain and deicing experiments in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasso, G.

    1983-01-01

    Comments on films of tests simulating rain and ice conditions in a wind tunnel are presented, with the aim of studying efficient methods of overcoming the adverse effects of rain and ice on aircraft. In the experiments, lifesize models and models of the Mirave 4 aircraft were used. The equipment used to simulate rain and ice is described. Different configurations of landing and takeoff under conditions of moderate or heavy rain at variable angles of incidence and of skipping and at velocities varying from 30 to 130 m/sec are reproduced in the wind tunnel. The risks of erosion of supersonic aircraft by the rain during the loitering and approach phases are discussed.

  7. Adaptive-Wall Wind-Tunnel Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    CALSPAN ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY CENTER A DA PTI VE. WA L L WIND- TUNNEL IN VES TIGA TIONS J.C. Erickson , Jr., C.E. Wittliff, C. Padova and G.F. Homicz...Cooper as technical monitor, and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, initially with Mr. Milton Rogers and later with Dr. James D. Wilson as...technical monitors. The late Mr. R. J. Vidal was principai investigator until May 1978 and was followed by Dr. J. C. Erickson , Jr. Dr. A. Ritter, Head

  8. Initial results of a model rotor higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel experiment on BVI impulsive noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Lehmann, G.; van der Wall, B.

    1989-09-01

    Initial acoustic results are presented from a higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel pilot experiment on helicopter rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise reduction, making use of the DFVLR 40-percent-scaled BO-105 research rotor in the DNW 6m by 8m closed test section. Considerable noise reduction (of several decibels) has been measured for particular HHC control settings, however, at the cost of increased vibration levels and vice versa. The apparently adverse results for noise and vibration reduction by HHC are explained. At optimum pitch control settings for BVI noise reduction, rotor simulation results demonstrate that blade loading at the outer tip region is decreased, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are increased, resulting altogether in reduced BVI noise generation. At optimum pitch control settings for vibration reduction adverse effects on blade loading, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are found.

  9. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  10. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  11. The use of wind tunnel facilities to estimate hydrodynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Kristoffer; Tophøj Rasmussen, Johannes; Hansen, Svend Ole; Reiso, Marit; Isaksen, Bjørn; Egeberg Aasland, Tale

    2016-03-01

    Experimental laboratory testing of vortex-induced structural oscillations in flowing water is an expensive and time-consuming procedure, and the testing of high Reynolds number flow regimes is complicated due to the requirement of either a large-scale or high-speed facility. In most cases, Reynolds number scaling effects are unavoidable, and these uncertainties have to be accounted for, usually by means of empirical rules-of-thumb. Instead of performing traditional hydrodynamic measurements, wind tunnel testing in an appropriately designed experimental setup may provide an alternative and much simpler and cheaper framework for estimating the structural behavior under water current and wave loading. Furthermore, the fluid velocities that can be obtained in a wind tunnel are substantially higher than in a water testing facility, thus decreasing the uncertainty from scaling effects. In a series of measurements, wind tunnel testing has been used to investigate the static response characteristics of a circular and a rectangular section model. Motivated by the wish to estimate the vortex-induced in-line vibration characteristics of a neutrally buoyant submerged marine structure, additional measurements on extremely lightweight, helium-filled circular section models were conducted in a dynamic setup. During the experiment campaign, the mass of the model was varied in order to investigate how the mass ratio influences the vibration amplitude. The results show good agreement with both aerodynamic and hydrodynamic experimental results documented in the literature.

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF WIND LOAD APPLIED TO THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES BY VIRTUE OF ITS SIMULATION IN THE WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors discuss wind loads applied to a set of two buildings. The wind load is simulated with the help of the wind tunnel. In the Russian Federation, special attention is driven to the aerodynamics of high-rise buildings and structures. According to the Russian norms, identification of aerodynamic coefficients for high-rise buildings, as well as the influence of adjacent buildings and structures, is performed on the basis of models of structures exposed to wind impacts simulated in the wind tunnel. This article deals with the results of the wind tunnel test of buildings. The simulation was carried out with the involvement of a model of two twenty-three storied buildings. The experiment was held in a wind tunnel of the closed type at in the Institute of Mechanics of Moscow State University. Data were compared at the zero speed before and after the experiment. LabView software was used to process the output data. Graphs and tables were developed in the Microsoft Excel package. GoogleSketchUp software was used as a visualization tool. The three-dimensional flow formed in the wind tunnel can't be adequately described by solving the two-dimensional problem. The aerodynamic experiment technique is used to analyze the results for eighteen angles of the wind attack.

  13. Wind tunnel experiments of air flow patterns over nabkhas modeled after those from the Hotan River basin,Xinjiang,China(Ⅱ):vegetated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhong LI; Rong MA; ShengLi WU; Janis DALE; Lin GE; Mudan HE; Xiaofeng WANG; Jianhui JIN; Jinwei LIU; Wanjuan LI

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the results of wind tunnel experiments on models of nabkha,based on those studied in the Hotan River basin.Semi-spherical and conical models of nabkhas were constructed at a ratio of 40:1 in light of the on-site observation.Artificial vegetation of simulated Tamarix spp.was put on top of each model.Parameters of the shape,including height,width,and diameter of vegetated semi-spherical and conical nabkha.were measured in the Hotan River basin.Wind tunnel experiments on the semi-spherical and conical nabkha used clean air devoid of additional sediments at five different wind speeds (6-14 m/s)to study the influence of vegetation on airflow patterns.Results of the experiments indicate that vegetation at the top of the nabkhas enhances the surface roughness of the sand mounds,retards airflow over the sand mounds,reduces airflow energy,eliminates erosional pits occurring on the top surface of non-vegetated sand mounds and enhances the range of influence of the vortex that forms on the leeward slope.Vegetation changes the airflow pattern upwind and downwind of the sand mound and reduces the transport of sand away from the nabkha.This entrapment of sediment by the vegetation plays an important role in sustaining the nabkha landscape of the study area.The existence of vegetation makes fine materials in wind-sand flow to possibly deposit,and promotes nabkha formation.The imitative flow patterns Of different morphological nabkhas have also been verified by on-site observation in the river basin.

  14. Wind Tunnel Tests Conducted to Develop an Icing Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    As part of NASA's Aviation Safety Program goals to reduce aviation accidents due to icing, NASA Glenn Research Center is leading a flight simulator development activity to improve pilot training for the adverse flying characteristics due to icing. Developing flight simulators that incorporate the aerodynamic effects of icing will provide a critical element in pilot training programs by giving pilots a pre-exposure of icing-related hazards, such as ice-contaminated roll upset or tailplane stall. Integrating these effects into training flight simulators will provide an accurate representation of scenarios to develop pilot skills in unusual attitudes and loss-of-control events that may result from airframe icing. In order to achieve a high level of fidelity in the flight simulation, a series of wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a 6.5-percent-scale Twin Otter aircraft model. These wind tunnel tests were conducted at the Wichita State University 7- by 10-ft wind tunnel and Bihrle Applied Research's Large Amplitude Multiple Purpose Facility in Neuburg, Germany. The Twin Otter model was tested without ice (baseline), and with two ice configurations: 1) Ice on the horizontal tail only; 2) Ice on the wing, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. These wind tunnel tests resulted in data bases of aerodynamic forces and moments as functions of angle of attack; sideslip; control surface deflections; forced oscillations in the pitch, roll, and yaw axes; and various rotational speeds. A limited amount of wing and tail surface pressure data were also measured for comparison with data taken at Wichita State and with flight data. The data bases from these tests will be the foundation for a PC-based Icing Flight Simulator to be delivered to Glenn in fiscal year 2001.

  15. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  16. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  17. Build an Inexpensive Wind Tunnel to Test CO2 Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    As part of the technology education curriculum, the author's eighth-grade students design, build, test, and race CO2 vehicles. To help them in refining their designs, they use a wind tunnel to test for aerodynamic drag. In this article, the author describes how to build a wind tunnel using inexpensive, readily available materials. (Contains 1…

  18. Advances in Projection Moire Interferometry Development for Large Wind Tunnel Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1999-01-01

    An instrument development program aimed at using Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) for acquiring model deformation measurements in large wind tunnels was begun at NASA Langley Research Center in 1996. Various improvements to the initial prototype PMI systems have been made throughout this development effort. This paper documents several of the most significant improvements to the optical hardware and image processing software, and addresses system implementation issues for large wind tunnel applications. The improvements have increased both measurement accuracy and instrument efficiency, promoting the routine use of PMI for model deformation measurements in production wind tunnel tests.

  19. Triple balance test of the PRR baseline space shuttle configuration on a .004 scale model of the MCR 0074 orbiter configuration in the MSFC 14 x 14 inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT 570) IA31F(B), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, P. E.; Davis, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel force and moment test of the space shuttle launch vehicle was conducted. The wind tunnel model utilized a triple balance such that component aerodynamics of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster was obtained. The test was conducted at an angle of attack range from -10 deg to 10 deg, and angle of sideslip range from -10 deg to 10 deg, and a Mach number range from 0.6 to 4.96. Simulation parameters to be used in future launch vehicle wind tunnel tests were investigated. The following were included: (1) effect of orbiter -ET attach hardware; (2) model attachment (spacer) effects; (3) effects of grit on model leading surfaces; and (4) model misalignment effects. The effects of external tank nose shape was studied by investigating five different nose configurations. Plotted and tabulated data is reported.

  20. Soil erosion rates caused by wind and saltating sand stresses in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1993-02-01

    Wind erosion tests were performed in a wind tunnel in support of the development of long-term protective barriers to cap stabilized waste sites at the Hanford Site. Controlled wind and saltating sand erosive stresses were applied to physical models of barrier surface layers to simulate worst-case eolian erosive stresses. The goal of these tests was to provide information useful to the design and evaluation of the surface layer composition of an arid-region waste site barrier concept that incorporates a deep fine-soil reservoir. A surface layer composition is needed that will form an armor resistant to eolian erosion during periods of extreme dry climatic conditions, especially when such conditions result in the elimination or reduction of vegetation by water deprivation or wildfire. Because of the life span required of Hanford waste barriers, it is important that additional work follow these wind tunnel studies. A modeling effort is planned to aid the interpretation of test results with respect to the suitability of pea gravel to protect the finite-soil reservoir during long periods of climatic stress. It is additionally recommended that wind tunnel tests be continued and field data be obtained at prototype or actual barrier sites. Results wig contribute to barrier design efforts and provide confidence in the design of long-term waste site caps for and regions.

  1. Computational methods applied to wind tunnel optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, David

    This report describes computational methods developed for optimizing the nozzle of a three-dimensional subsonic wind tunnel. This requires determination of a shape that delivers flow to the test section, typically with a speed increase of 7 or more and a velocity uniformity of .25% or better, in a compact length without introducing boundary layer separation. The need for high precision, smooth solutions, and three-dimensional modeling required the development of special computational techniques. These include: (1) alternative formulations to Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, to deal with overspecified, ill-posed, or cyclic problems, and to reduce the discrepancy between numerical solutions and boundary conditions; (2) modification of the Finite Element Method to obtain solutions with numerically exact conservation properties; (3) a Matlab implementation of general degree Finite Element solvers for various element designs in two and three dimensions, exploiting vector indexing to obtain optimal efficiency; (4) derivation of optimal quadrature formulas for integration over simplexes in two and three dimensions, and development of a program for semi-automated generation of formulas for any degree and dimension; (5) a modification of a two-dimensional boundary layer formulation to provide accurate flow conservation in three dimensions, and modification of the algorithm to improve stability; (6) development of multi-dimensional spline functions to achieve smoother solutions in three dimensions by post-processing, new three-dimensional elements for C1 basis functions, and a program to assist in the design of elements with higher continuity; and (7) a development of ellipsoidal harmonics and Lame's equation, with generalization to any dimension and a demonstration that Cartesian, cylindrical, spherical, spheroidal, and sphero-conical harmonics are all limiting cases. The report includes a description of the Finite Difference, Finite Volume, and domain remapping

  2. Modelling Short-Term Maximum Individual Exposure from Airborne Hazardous Releases in Urban Environments. Part ΙI: Validation of a Deterministic Model with Wind Tunnel Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Efthimiou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The capability to predict short-term maximum individual exposure is very important for several applications including, for example, deliberate/accidental release of hazardous substances, odour fluctuations or material flammability level exceedance. Recently, authors have proposed a simple approach relating maximum individual exposure to parameters such as the fluctuation intensity and the concentration integral time scale. In the first part of this study (Part I, the methodology was validated against field measurements, which are governed by the natural variability of atmospheric boundary conditions. In Part II of this study, an in-depth validation of the approach is performed using reference data recorded under truly stationary and well documented flow conditions. For this reason, a boundary-layer wind-tunnel experiment was used. The experimental dataset includes 196 time-resolved concentration measurements which detect the dispersion from a continuous point source within an urban model of semi-idealized complexity. The data analysis allowed the improvement of an important model parameter. The model performed very well in predicting the maximum individual exposure, presenting a factor of two of observations equal to 95%. For large time intervals, an exponential correction term has been introduced in the model based on the experimental observations. The new model is capable of predicting all time intervals giving an overall factor of two of observations equal to 100%.

  3. The use of wind tunnel facilities to estimate hydrodynamic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    In a series of measurements, wind tunnel testing has been used to investigate the static response characteristics of a circular and a rectangular section model. Motivated by the wish to estimate the vortex-induced in-line vibration characteristics of a neutrally buoyant submerged marine structure, additional measurements on extremely lightweight, helium-filled circular section models were conducted in a dynamic setup. During the experiment campaign, the mass of the model was varied in order to investigate how the mass ratio influences the vibration amplitude. The results show good agreement with both aerodynamic and hydrodynamic experimental results documented in the literature.

  4. Generation of vertical gusts in a transonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, V.; Lepage, A.; Amosse, Y.; Soulevant, D.; Senecat, P.; Abart, J. C.; Paillart, P.

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the qualification of a gust generator device in a transonic wind tunnel. A vanning apparatus has been installed in the contraction of the S3Ch transonic wind tunnel at the ONERA Meudon center in order to generate up and down air movements in the test section. The apparatus has been tested in a range of Strouhal number based on frequency and vane chord up to 0.15 and in a range of Mach number between 0.3 and 0.73. The amplitude of the gusts has been characterized by a fast-response two-hole pressure probe and phase-averaged PIV. The system delivers vertical velocity amplitude of 0.5 % of the freestream velocity at transonic speeds. For a constant vane oscillation angle, the gust strength is found to increase with the Strouhal and the Mach numbers. The gust exhibit a satisfying uniformity and a quasi-sinusoidal waveform. A simple dynamic point vortex model of the oscillating vanes and of the downstream wake has been developed in order to (1) compare the experimental results and (2) enrich the description of the flow induced by the gusts. In particular, the model is used to analyze the detrimental effect of the upper and lower walls. This simple unsteady model gives a valuable prediction of the amplitude of the gust obtained in the tunnel and the workable frequency range permitted by the present apparatus.

  5. Demonstration of short-range wind lidar in a high-performance wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Montes, Belen Fernández; Pedersen, Jens Engholm;

    A short-range continuous-wave coherent laser radar (lidar) has been tested in a high-performance wind tunnel for possible use as a standard component in wind tunnels. The lidar was tested in a low as well as a high speed regime ranging from 5-35 m/s and 40-75 m/s, respectively. In both low and hi...... future for short range lidars as a complement to LDA and other standard equipment in wind tunnels....

  6. Demonstration of short-range wind lidar in a high-performance wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Montes, Belen Fernández; Pedersen, Jens Engholm;

    2012-01-01

    A short-range continuous-wave coherent laser radar (lidar) has been tested in a high-performance wind tunnel for possible use as a standard component in wind tunnels. The lidar was tested in a low as well as a high speed regime ranging from 5-35 m/s and 40-75 m/s, respectively. In both low and hi...... future for short range lidars as a complement to LDA and other standard equipment in wind tunnels....

  7. Wind tunnel studies of gas dispersion from ground level source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michálek Petr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of gas dispersion from ground source were performed in a boundary layer wind tunnel in VZLU Prague. The measurements include non-buoyant gas dispersion behind a ground level source on a flat plane, on a simple rectangular building model and behind a model hill and rectangular barrier. These measurements will serve for verification of a new gas dispersion software being developed in VZLU. The dispersion model is intended for use by firemen and ambulance services in the case of an accident for immediate estimation of the area with dangerous gas concentration. The dispersion model will use precalculated results for chosen areas in the Czech Republic with industrial plants and residential building in the neighborhood. The size of contaminated area will be estimated using actual meteorological situation, i.e. wind speed and direction etc. and precalculated data of flow and dispersion in the chosen location.

  8. Wind tunnel studies of gas dispersion from ground level source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michálek, Petr; Zacho, David

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of gas dispersion from ground source were performed in a boundary layer wind tunnel in VZLU Prague. The measurements include non-buoyant gas dispersion behind a ground level source on a flat plane, on a simple rectangular building model and behind a model hill and rectangular barrier. These measurements will serve for verification of a new gas dispersion software being developed in VZLU. The dispersion model is intended for use by firemen and ambulance services in the case of an accident for immediate estimation of the area with dangerous gas concentration. The dispersion model will use precalculated results for chosen areas in the Czech Republic with industrial plants and residential building in the neighborhood. The size of contaminated area will be estimated using actual meteorological situation, i.e. wind speed and direction etc. and precalculated data of flow and dispersion in the chosen location.

  9. Application of Doppler global velocimetry in cryogenic wind tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willert, C.; Stockhausen, G.; Beversdorff, M.; Klinner, J. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Propulsion Technology, Koeln (Germany); Lempereur, C.; Barricau, P. [DMAE, ONERA, Toulouse Cedex (France); Quest, J.; Jansen, U. [European Transonic Wind Tunnel (ETW), Koeln (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    A specially designed Doppler global velocimetry system (DGV, planar Doppler velocimetry) was developed and installed in a high-speed cryogenic wind tunnel facility for use at free stream Mach numbers between 0.2 and 0.88, and pressures between 1.2 bar and 3.3 bar. Particle seeding was achieved by injecting a mixture of gaseous nitrogen and water vapor into the dry and cold tunnel flow, which then immediately formed a large amount of small ice crystals. Given the limited physical and optical access for this facility, DGV is considered the best choice for non-intrusive flow field measurements. A multiple branch fiber imaging bundle attached to a common DGV image receiving system simultaneously viewed a common area in the flow field from three different directions through the wind tunnel side walls. The complete imaging system and fiber-fed light sheet generators were installed inside the normally inaccessible pressure plenum surrounding the wind tunnel's test section. The system control and frequency-stabilized laser system were placed outside of the pressure shell. With a field of view of 300 x 300 mm{sup 2}, the DGV system acquired flow maps at a spatial resolution of 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} in the wake of simple vortex generators as well as in the wake of different wing-tip devices on a half-span aircraft model. Although problems mainly relating to light reflections and icing on the observation windows significantly impaired part of the measurements, the remotely controlled hardware operated reliably over the course of three months. (orig.)

  10. Wind Tunnel Investigation of Ground Wind Loads for Ares Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Donald F.; Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    A three year program was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Aeroelasticity Branch (AB) and Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) with the primary objective to acquire scaled steady and dynamic ground-wind loads (GWL) wind-tunnel data for rollout, on-pad stay, and on-pad launch configurations for the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle (FTV). The experimental effort was conducted to obtain an understanding of the coupling of aerodynamic and structural characteristics that can result in large sustained wind-induced oscillations (WIO) on such a tall and slender launch vehicle and to generate a unique database for development and evaluation of analytical methods for predicting steady and dynamic GWL, especially those caused by vortex shedding, and resulting in significant WIO. This paper summarizes the wind-tunnel test program that employed two dynamically-aeroelastically scaled GWL models based on the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle. The first model tested, the GWL Checkout Model (CM), was a relatively simple model with a secondary objective of restoration and development of processes and methods for design, fabrication, testing, and data analysis of a representative ground wind loads model. In addition, parametric variations in surface roughness, Reynolds number, and protuberances (on/off) were investigated to determine effects on GWL characteristics. The second windtunnel model, the Ares I-X GWL Model, was significantly more complex and representative of the Ares I-X FTV and included the addition of simplified rigid geometrically-scaled models of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) and Launch Complex 39B primary structures. Steady and dynamic base bending moment as well as model response and steady and unsteady pressure data was acquired during the testing of both models. During wind-tunnel testing of each model, flow conditions (speed and azimuth) where significant WIO occurred, were identified and thoroughly investigated. Scaled data from

  11. Optical skin friction measurement technique in hypersonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Yao, Dapeng; Wen, Shuai; Pan, Junjie

    2016-10-01

    Shear-sensitive liquid-crystal coatings (SSLCCs) have an optical characteristic that they are sensitive to the applied shear stress. Based on this, a novel technique is developed to measure the applied shear stress of the model surface regarding both its magnitude and direction in hypersonic flow. The system of optical skin friction measurement are built in China Academy of Aerospace Aerodynamics (CAAA). A series of experiments of hypersonic vehicle is performed in wind tunnel of CAAA. Global skin friction distribution of the model which shows complicated flow structures is discussed, and a brief mechanism analysis and an evaluation on optical measurement technique have been made.

  12. Anechoic wind tunnel study of turbulence effects on wind turbine broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, B.; Harris, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent results obtained at MIT on the experimental and theoretical modelling of aerodynamic broadband noise generated by a downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine. The aerodynamic broadband noise generated by the wind turbine rotor is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The turbulence was generated in the MIT anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of biplanar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the aerodynamic broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of wind turbine performance parameters. Specifically, the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence, the size scale of turbulence, the number of turbine blades, and free stream velocity were varied. Simultaneous measurements of acoustic and turbulence signals were made. The sound pressure level was found to vary directly with the integral scale of the ingested turbulence but not with its intensity level. A theoretical model based on unsteady aerodynamics is proposed.

  13. Results of investigations on a 0.0405 scale model PRR version of the NR-SSV orbiter in the North American Aeronautical Laboratory low speed wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsland, R. B.; Vaughn, J. E.; Singellton, R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel on a scale model space shuttle vehicle (SSV) orbiter. The purpose of the test was to investigate the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of the space shuttle orbiter. Emphasis was placed on model component, wing-glove, and wing-body fairing effects, as well as elevon, aileron, and rudder control effectiveness. Angles of attack from - 5 deg to + 30 deg and angles of sideslip of - 5 deg, 0 deg, and + 5 deg were tested. Static pressures were recorded on base, fuselage, and wing surfaces. Tufts and talc-kerosene flow visualization techniques were also utilized. The aerodynamic force balance results are presented in plotted and tabular form.

  14. Calibration of the Flow in the Test Section of the Research Wind Tunnel at DST Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    recently upgraded the Low Speed Wind Tunnel electrical control and model support systems. UNCLASSIFIED DST-Group-TN-1468 UNCLASSIFIED...1073. Defence Science and Technology Organisation , Melbourne, Australia. Erm, L. P. 2003 Calibration of the flow in the extended test section...of the low-speed wind tunnel at DSTO. DSTO-TR-1384. Defence Science and Technology Organisation , Melbourne, Australia. Erm, L. P. 2015

  15. Wind tunnel tests for a flapping wing model with a changeable camber using macro-fiber composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Kwan; Han, Jae-Hung; Kwon, Ki-Jung

    2009-02-01

    In the present study, a biomimetic flexible flapping wing was developed on a real ornithopter scale by using macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuators. With the actuators, the maximum camber of the wing can be linearly changed from -2.6% to +4.4% of the maximum chord length. Aerodynamic tests were carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics, particularly the camber effect, the chordwise flexibility effect and the unsteady effect. Although the chordwise wing flexibility reduces the effective angle of attack, the maximum lift coefficient can be increased by the MFC actuators up to 24.4% in a static condition. Note also that the mean values of the perpendicular force coefficient rise to a value of considerably more than 3 in an unsteady aerodynamic flow region. Additionally, particle image velocimetry (PIV) tests were performed in static and dynamic test conditions to validate the flexibility and unsteady effects. The static PIV results confirm that the effective angle of attack is reduced by the coupling of the chordwise flexibility and the aerodynamic force, resulting in a delay in the stall phenomena. In contrast to the quasi-steady flow condition of a relatively high advance ratio, the unsteady aerodynamic effect due to a leading edge vortex can be found along the wing span in a low advance ratio region. The overall results show that the chordwise wing flexibility can produce a positive effect on flapping aerodynamic characteristics in quasi-steady and unsteady flow regions; thus, wing flexibility should be considered in the design of efficient flapping wings.

  16. Lower limit for the velocity fluctuation level in wind tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, U.; Froebel, E.

    1988-01-01

    The origins of the velocity fluctuations in the test section of a wind tunnel are discussed. Vorticity (turbulence convected from upstream) can be reduced by a careful design of the settling chamber to almost any desired level. The amplitudes of pressure waves propagating round the tunnel circuit can also be reduced considerably. The lowest level of the velocity fluctuations in wind tunnels are determined by those pressure fields that are created on the outer boundaries of the test section. These boundaries are the free shear layers in the case of free jet facilities and the turbulent boundary layers in the case of closed wall test sections. The lower limit for the rms velocity level is achieved in many open jet wind tunnels (typically 0.15%). The corresponding limit for low speed tunnels with closed test sections is smaller by a factor of at least twenty but not yet known.

  17. Enabling Advanced Wind-Tunnel Research Methods Using the NASA Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busan, Ronald C.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Croom, Mark A.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Grafton, Sue B.; O-Neal, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Design of Experiment (DOE) testing methods were used to gather wind tunnel data characterizing the aerodynamic and propulsion forces and moments acting on a complex vehicle configuration with 10 motor-driven propellers, 9 control surfaces, a tilt wing, and a tilt tail. This paper describes the potential benefits and practical implications of using DOE methods for wind tunnel testing - with an emphasis on describing how it can affect model hardware, facility hardware, and software for control and data acquisition. With up to 23 independent variables (19 model and 2 tunnel) for some vehicle configurations, this recent test also provides an excellent example of using DOE methods to assess critical coupling effects in a reasonable timeframe for complex vehicle configurations. Results for an exploratory test using conventional angle of attack sweeps to assess aerodynamic hysteresis is summarized, and DOE results are presented for an exploratory test used to set the data sampling time for the overall test. DOE results are also shown for one production test characterizing normal force in the Cruise mode for the vehicle.

  18. A scale model wind tunnel study of dispersion in the Cleveland area. Laboratory simulation of lake breeze effects on diffusion from ground level emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoydysh, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel simulation of the diffusion patterns in a sea breeze was attempted. The results indicate that the low level onshore flow was well simulated for neutral, stable, unstable, and elevated inversion conditions. Velocity, turbulence, shear stress, and temperature data were taken, and the spread of emissions from ground level sources was investigated. Comparison is made with theoretical predictions by E. Inoue and with the open, homogeneous plane field results of Pasquill. Agreement with the predictions by Inoue is good, and the comparison with Pasquill's results shows that the wind tunnel flows are shifted two categories towards more stable. The discrepancy may be explained as a matter of averaging time.

  19. EFFECT OF THE FLOW FIELD DEFORMATION IN THE WIND TUNNEL ON THE AERODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Maturkanič

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow field quality has a principal signification at wind tunnel measurement. The creation of the flow field of air by fan leads to the rotation of entire flow field which is, moreover, deformed at the bends of the wind tunnel with close circulation. Despite the wind tunnels are equipped with the devices which eliminate these non-uniformities, in the most of cases, the air flow field has not ideal parameters in the test section. For the evaluation of the measured results of the model in the wind tunnel, the character of flow field deformation is necessary. The following text describes the possible general forms of the flow field nonuniformity and their effect on the aerodynamic coefficients calculation.

  20. Design of Rail Instrumentation for Wind Tunnel Sonic Boom Measurements and Computational-Experimental Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Elmiligui, A.; Aftosmis, M.; Morgenstern, J.; Durston, D.; Thomas, S.

    2012-01-01

    An innovative pressure rail concept for wind tunnel sonic boom testing of modern aircraft configurations with very low overpressures was designed with an adjoint-based solution-adapted Cartesian grid method. The computational method requires accurate free-air calculations of a test article as well as solutions modeling the influence of rail and tunnel walls. Specialized grids for accurate Euler and Navier-Stokes sonic boom computations were used on several test articles including complete aircraft models with flow-through nacelles. The computed pressure signatures are compared with recent results from the NASA 9- x 7-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel using the advanced rail design.

  1. Blowdown wind tunnel control using an adaptive fuzzy PI controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Andrei NAE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an approach towards the control of a supersonic blowdown wind tunnel plant (as evidenced by experimental data collected from “INCAS Supersonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel” using a PI type controller. The key to maintain the imposed experimental conditions is the control of the air flow using the control valve of the plant. A proposed mathematical model based on the control valve will be analyzed using the PI controller. This control scheme will be validated using experimental data collected from real test cases. In order to improve the control performances an adaptive fuzzy PI controller will be implemented in SIMULINK in the present paper. The major objective is to reduce the transient regimes and the global reduction of the start-up loads on the models during this phase.

  2. Use Of Infrared Imagery In Continuous Flow Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, D. W.; Whetsel, R. G.

    1983-03-01

    Thermal mapping with infrared imagery is a very useful test technique in continuous flow wind tunnels. Convective-heating patterns over large areas of a model can be obtained through remote sensing of the surface temperature. A system has been developed at AEDC which uses a commercially available infrared scanning camera to produce these heat-transfer maps. In addition to the camera, the system includes video monitors, an analog tape recording, an analog-to-digital converter, a digitizer control, and two minicomputers. This paper will describe the individual components, data reduction techniques, and typical applications. *

  3. Assessing the vegetation canopy influences on wind flow using wind tunnel experiments with artificial plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youngjoo Hong; Dongyeob Kim; Sangjun Im

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion causes serious problems and considerable threat in most regions of the world. Vegetation on the ground has an important role in controlling wind erosion by covering soil surface and absorbingwind momentum. A set of wind tunnel experiments was performed to quantitatively examine the effect of canopy structure on wind movement. Artificial plastic vegetations with different porosity and canopyshape were introduced as the model canopy. Normalized roughness length $(Z0/H)$ and shear velocity ratio $(R)$ were analyzed as a function of roughness density ($\\lambda$). Experiments showed that $Z0/H$ increasesand R decreases as λ reaches a maximum value, $\\lambda_{max}$, while the values of $Z0/H$ and $R$ showed little change with $\\lambda$ value beyond as $\\lambda_{max}$.

  4. Offshore and onshore wind turbine wake meandering studied in an ABL wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Buckingham, Sophia; Glabeke, Gertjan;

    2015-01-01

    diameter downstream. The results show an earlier wake recovery for the onshore case. The effect of inflow conditions and the wind turbine’s working conditions on wake meandering was investigated. Wake meandering was detected by hot wire anemometry through a low frequency peak in the turbulent power......Scaled wind turbine models have been installed in the VKI L1-B atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel at offshore and onshore conditions. Time-resolved measurements were carried out with three component hot wire anemometry and stereo-PIV in the middle vertical plane of the wake up to eleven turbine...... spectrum, present in the entire wake mainly for offshore inflow condition. It was found that the Strouhal number, based on the rotor diameter and the wind velocity at hub height, was in the order of 0.25. Below the meandering frequency, turbulence power spectrum decreased, whereas above it increased. Wake...

  5. GVT-Based Ground Flutter Test without Wind Tunnel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc (ZONA) and Arizona State University (ASU) propose a R&D effort to develop a ground flutter testing system without wind tunnel, called the...

  6. 1 Ft. x 1 Ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel, Bldg. 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x), located in the Engine Research Building, is one of the most active test facilities at the Glenn Research Center. Used...

  7. Low-Hysteresis Flow-Through Wind-Tunnel Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, N.; Luna, P. M.; Roberts, A. C.; Smith, R. C.; Horne, W. L.; Smith, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    Improved flow-through wind-tunnel balance includes features minimizing both spurious force readings caused by internal pressurized flow and mechanical hysteresis. Symmetrical forces caused by internal flow cancelled.

  8. The future of wind tunnel technology in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, B.

    1978-01-01

    The practical value of a wind tunnel which is not dependent solely on size or achievable Reynolds number was examined. Measurement, interpretative and evaluative procedures developed in small facilities were also studied.

  9. Measurement and Assessment of Flow Quality in Wind Tunnels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New wind tunnel flow quality test and analysis procedures have been developed and will be used to establish standardized turbulent flow quality measurement...

  10. Drag force in wind tunnels: A new method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, P. V. S.; Girardi, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.

    2017-02-01

    A rigid object of general shape is fixed inside a wind tunnel. The drag force exerted on it by the wind is determined by a new method based on simple basic Physics concepts, provided one has a solver, any solver, for the corresponding dynamic Navier-Stokes equation which determines the wind velocity field around the object. The method is completely general, but here we apply it to the traditional problem of a long cylinder perpendicular to the wind.

  11. Turbine endwall two-cylinder program. [wind tunnel and water tunnel investigation of three dimensional separation of fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in an effort to study the three dimensional separation of fluid flow around two isolated cylinders mounted on an endwall. The design and performance of a hydrogen bubble generator for water tunnel tests to determine bulk flow properties and to measure main stream velocity and boundary layer thickness are described. Although the water tunnel tests are behind schedule because of inlet distortion problems, tests are far enough along to indicate cylinder spacing, wall effects and low Reynolds number behavior, all of which impacted wind tunnel model design. The construction, assembly, and operation of the wind tunnel and the check out of its characteristics are described. An off-body potential flow program was adapted to calculate normal streams streamwise pressure gradients at the saddle point locations.

  12. Computer programs for the calculation of dual sting pitch and roll angles required for an articulated sting to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind-tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two programs were developed to calculate the pitch and roll position of the conventional sting drive and the pitch of a high angle articulated sting to position a wind tunnel model at the desired angle of attack and sideslip and position the model as near as possible to the centerline of the tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles, and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs form on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  13. Testing compost as an anti wind erosion agent in a wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential of compost as an anti wind erosion agent was studied in a wind tunnel on a sandy soil susceptible to wind erosion. Soil treated with a compost-water mixture, which forms a crust on the soil surface after drying, was exposed to a series of increasing wind speeds. Two composts were

  14. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  15. Application of Doppler global velocimetry in cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willert, C.; Stockhausen, G.; Beversdorff, M.; Klinner, J.; Lempereur, C.; Barricau, P.; Quest, J.; Jansen, U.

    2005-08-01

    A specially designed Doppler global velocimetry system (DGV, planar Doppler velocimetry) was developed and installed in a high-speed cryogenic wind tunnel facility for use at free stream Mach numbers between 0.2 and 0.88, and pressures between 1.2 bar and 3.3 bar. Particle seeding was achieved by injecting a mixture of gaseous nitrogen and water vapor into the dry and cold tunnel flow, which then immediately formed a large amount of small ice crystals. Given the limited physical and optical access for this facility, DGV is considered the best choice for non-intrusive flow field measurements. A multiple branch fiber imaging bundle attached to a common DGV image receiving system simultaneously viewed a common area in the flow field from three different directions through the wind tunnel side walls. The complete imaging system and fiber-fed light sheet generators were installed inside the normally inaccessible pressure plenum surrounding the wind tunnel’s test section. The system control and frequency-stabilized laser system were placed outside of the pressure shell. With a field of view of 300×300 mm2, the DGV system acquired flow maps at a spatial resolution of 3×3 mm2 in the wake of simple vortex generators as well as in the wake of different wing-tip devices on a half-span aircraft model. Although problems mainly relating to light reflections and icing on the observation windows significantly impaired part of the measurements, the remotely controlled hardware operated reliably over the course of three months.

  16. Reliability of numerical wind tunnels for VAWT simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti Castelli, M.; Masi, M.; Battisti, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.; Dossena, V.; Persico, G.

    2016-09-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based on the Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations have long been widely used to study vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs). Following a comprehensive experimental survey on the wakes downwind of a troposkien-shaped rotor, a campaign of bi-dimensional simulations is presented here, with the aim of assessing its reliability in reproducing the main features of the flow, also identifying areas needing additional research. Starting from both a well consolidated turbulence model (k-ω SST) and an unstructured grid typology, the main simulation settings are here manipulated in a convenient form to tackle rotating grids reproducing a VAWT operating in an open jet wind tunnel. The dependence of the numerical predictions from the selected grid spacing is investigated, thus establishing the less refined grid size that is still capable of capturing some relevant flow features such as integral quantities (rotor torque) and local ones (wake velocities).

  17. An experimental investigation of end treatments for nonreturn wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.; Piazza, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a series of flow quality and performance tests on several inlet and exit configurations for nonreturn wind tunnels are presented. Test section flow angularities, local dynamic pressure variations, and total-pressure-loss variations are presented as functions of wind-to-test-section dynamic pressure ratio. The results show that a nonreturn wind tunnel should have end treatments with three characteristics: (1) a vertical exit system, (2) a horizontal inlet system, and (3) an area of protected enclosure at the inlet. Inlet and exhaust treatments were developed that produced good aerodynamic flow qualities with low power penalties.

  18. Wind Tunnel and Hover Performance Test Results for Multicopter UAS Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carl R.; Jung, Jaewoo; Willink, Gina; Glasner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a lack of published data for the performance of multicopter unmanned aircraft system (UAS) vehicles, such as quadcopters and octocopters, often referred to collectively as drones. With the rapidly increasing popularity of multicopter UAS, there is interest in better characterizing the performance of this type of aircraft. By studying the performance of currently available vehicles, it will be possible to develop models for vehicles at this scale that can accurately predict performance and model trajectories. This paper describes a wind tunnel test that was recently performed in the U.S. Army's 7- by 10-ft Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. During this wind tunnel entry, five multicopter UAS vehicles were tested to determine forces and moments as well as electrical power as a function of wind speed, rotor speed, and vehicle attitude. The test is described here in detail, and a selection of the key results from the test is presented.

  19. Airloads Correlation of the UH-60A Rotor inside the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chung Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented research validates the capability of a loosely coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD and comprehensive rotorcraft analysis (CRA code to calculate the flowfield around a rotor and test stand mounted inside a wind tunnel. The CFD/CRA predictions for the Full-Scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor inside the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center are compared with the latest measured airloads and performance data. The studied conditions include a speed sweep at constant lift up to an advance ratio of 0.4 and a thrust sweep at constant speed up to and including stall. For the speed sweep, wind tunnel modeling becomes important at advance ratios greater than 0.37 and test stand modeling becomes increasingly important as the advance ratio increases. For the thrust sweep, both the wind tunnel and test stand modeling become important as the rotor approaches stall. Despite the beneficial effects of modeling the wind tunnel and test stand, the new models do not completely resolve the current airload discrepancies between prediction and experiment.

  20. Jet-boundary and Plan-form Corrections for Partial-Span Models with Reflection-Plane, End-Plate, or No End-Plate in a Closed Circular Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivells, James C; Deters, Owen J

    1946-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the jet-boundary and plan-form corrections necessary for application to test data for a partial-span model with a reflection plane, an end plate, or no end plate in a closed circular wind tunnel. Examples are worked out for a partial-span model with each of the three end conditions in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel and the corrections are applied to measured values of lift, drag, pitching-moment, rolling-moment, and yawing-moment coefficients.

  1. Wind-Turbine Wakes in a Convective Boundary Layer: A Wind-Tunnel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    Thermal stability changes the properties of the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer, and in turn affects the behaviour of wind-turbine wakes. To better understand the effects of thermal stability on the wind-turbine wake structure, wind-tunnel experiments were carried out with a simulated convective boundary layer (CBL) and a neutral boundary layer. The CBL was generated by cooling the airflow to 12-15 °C and heating up the test section floor to 73-75 °C. The freestream wind speed was set at about 2.5 m s-1, resulting in a bulk Richardson number of -0.13. The wake of a horizontal-axis 3-blade wind-turbine model, whose height was within the lowest one third of the boundary layer, was studied using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) and triple-wire (x-wire/cold-wire) anemometry. Data acquired with the S-PIV were analyzed to characterize the highly three-dimensional turbulent flow in the near wake (0.2-3.2 rotor diameters) as well as to visualize the shedding of tip vortices. Profiles of the mean flow, turbulence intensity, and turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were measured with the triple-wire anemometer at downwind locations from 2-20 rotor diameters in the centre plane of the wake. In comparison with the wake of the same wind turbine in a neutral boundary layer, a smaller velocity deficit (about 15 % at the wake centre) is observed in the CBL, where an enhanced radial momentum transport leads to a more rapid momentum recovery, particularly in the lower part of the wake. The velocity deficit at the wake centre decays following a power law regardless of the thermal stability. While the peak turbulence intensity (and the maximum added turbulence) occurs at the top-tip height at a downwind distance of about three rotor diameters in both cases, the magnitude is about 20 % higher in the CBL than in the neutral boundary layer. Correspondingly, the turbulent heat flux is also enhanced by approximately 25 % in the lower part of the wake, compared to that

  2. Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Calibration Using the Modern Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Matthew N.; DeLoach, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A calibration of a hypersonic wind tunnel has been conducted using formal experiment design techniques and response surface modeling. Data from a compact, highly efficient experiment was used to create a regression model of the pitot pressure as a function of the facility operating conditions as well as the longitudinal location within the test section. The new calibration utilized far fewer design points than prior experiments, but covered a wider range of the facility s operating envelope while revealing interactions between factors not captured in previous calibrations. A series of points chosen randomly within the design space was used to verify the accuracy of the response model. The development of the experiment design is discussed along with tactics used in the execution of the experiment to defend against systematic variation in the results. Trends in the data are illustrated, and comparisons are made to earlier findings.

  3. Wind Tunnel Application of a Pressure-Sensitive Paint Technique to a Double Delta Wing Model at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Gonzalez, Hugo A.

    2006-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was applied in a wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to study the effect of wing fillets on the global vortex induced surface static pressure field about a sharp leading-edge 76 deg./40 deg. double delta wing, or strake-wing, model at subsonic and transonic speeds. Global calibrations of the PSP were obtained at M(sub infinity) = 0.50, 0.70, 0.85, 0.95, and 1.20, a Reynolds number per unit length of 2.0 million, and angles of attack from 10 degrees to 20 degrees using an insitu method featuring the simultaneous acquisition of electronically scanned pressures (ESP) at discrete locations on the model. The mean error in the PSP measurements relative to the ESP data was approximately 2 percent or less at M(sub infinity) = 0.50 to 0.85 but increased to several percent at M(sub infinity) =0.95 and 1.20. The PSP pressure distributions and pseudo-colored, planform-view pressure maps clearly revealed the vortex-induced pressure signatures at all Mach numbers and angles of attack. Small fillets having parabolic or diamond planforms situated at the strake-wing intersection were respectively designed to manipulate the vortical flows by removing the leading-edge discontinuity or introducing additional discontinuities. The fillets caused global changes in the vortex-dominated surface pressure field that were effectively captured in the PSP measurements. The vortex surface pressure signatures were compared to available off-surface vortex cross-flow structures obtained using a laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization technique. The fillet effects on the PSP pressure distributions and the observed leading-edge vortex flow characteristics were consistent with the trends in the measured lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients.

  4. 40 CFR Table F-2 to Subpart F of... - Particle Sizes and Wind Speeds for Full Wind Tunnel Test, Wind Tunnel Inlet Aspiration Test, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Particle Sizes and Wind Speeds for Full Wind Tunnel Test, Wind Tunnel Inlet Aspiration Test, and Static Chamber Test F Table F-2 to Subpart F... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-2 Table F-2 to Subpart F of...

  5. Wind tunnel and numerical study of a small vertical axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Robert; Qin, Ning; Edwards, Jonathan; Durrani, Naveed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents a combined experimental and computational study into the aerodynamics and performance of a small scale vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). Wind tunnel tests were carried out to ascertain overall performance of the turbine and two- and three-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were generated to help understand the aerodynamics of this performance. Wind tunnel performance results are presented for cases of different wind velocity, tip-speed ratio and solidity as well as rotor blade surface finish. It is shown experimentally that the surface roughness on the turbine rotor blades has a significant effect on performance. Below a critical wind speed (Reynolds number of 30,000) the performance of the turbine is degraded by a smooth rotor surface finish but above it, the turbine performance is enhanced by a smooth surface finish. Both two bladed and three bladed rotors were tested and a significant increase in performance coefficient is observed for the higher solidity rotors (three bladed rotors) over most of the operating range. Dynamic stalling behaviour and the resulting large and rapid changes in force coefficients and the rotor torque are shown to be the likely cause of changes to rotor pitch angle that occurred during early testing. This small change in pitch angle caused significant decreases in performance. The performance coefficient predicted by the two dimensional computational model is significantly higher than that of the experimental and the three-dimensional CFD model. The predictions show that the presence of the over tip vortices in the 3D simulations is responsible for producing the large difference in efficiency compared to the 2D predictions. The dynamic behaviour of the over tip vortex as a rotor blade rotates through each revolution is also explored in the paper. (author)

  6. The Application of Compulational Fluid Dynamics to Design of Vehicle Cooling Wind Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Xiao-ping; HUANG Xiao-hui

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation model for the airflow and heat transfer in an armored vehicle cooling wind tunnel is established. A practical method to determine computation region outside power train compartment, produce grid and ensure grid quality is put forward. A commercial software FLUENT can be used to obtain solutions numerically in 3-D space. Precision of CFD calculation results is verified. The CFD model is used in designing a vehicle cooling wind tunnel, and air flow resistance of fan blast baffle is calculated. The calculated results show feasibility of the CFD model and the method.

  7. Wind Pressure Characteristics at Windward Side of Long-Span Cantilevered Roof by Wind Tunnel Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAN Rong; LIAO Hai-li; LI Ming-shui

    2009-01-01

    A rigid mode of long-span cantilevered roof was tested in wind tunnel.By analyzing the relation between wind angle and wind pressure coefficient and the relation between wind angle and wind shape factor,we found that 90° is the most disadvantageous wind angle.Furthermore,the fluctuation of wind pressure at the windward edge was reflected by power spectrum density (PSD) and coherence function.The correlation coefficients of measuring points on outer and inner surfaces verifys that the largest lift force was produced at 90°.

  8. Accessing Wind Tunnels From NASA's Information Power Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jeff; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames wind tunnel customers are one of the first users of the Information Power Grid (IPG) storage system at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division. We wanted to be able to store their data on the IPG so that it could be accessed remotely in a secure but timely fashion. In addition, incorporation into the IPG allows future use of grid computational resources, e.g., for post-processing of data, or to do side-by-side CFD validation. In this paper, we describe the integration of grid data access mechanisms with the existing DARWIN web-based system that is used to access wind tunnel test data. We also show that the combined system has reasonable performance: wind tunnel data may be retrieved at 50Mbits/s over a 100 base T network connected to the IPG storage server.

  9. Wind flow and wind loads on the surface of a tower-shaped building:Numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow structure and wind pressure distribution caused by obtuse obstacles are usually the focuses in Computational Wind Engineer researches (CWE). By solving the non-hydrostatical dynamic equations, PUMA model (Peking University Model of Atmospheric Environment) was developed and applied to simulating the flow structure and wind pressure distribution around a tower-shaped building. Evaluation about the wind environment and wind loads around the building was obtained through the analysis of the numerical simulation results and wind tunnel data. Comparisons between the simulation and wind tunnel study indicate that numerical simulation results agree well in the flow field and wind pressure distribution around the tower-shaped building. On the other hand, the horizontal grid interval of 2 m and the vertical grid of 3 m were still too crude to simulate the flow structure and wind pressure distribution on the building surface more exactly in detail; and the absence of suitable pressure perturbation parameterization scheme between the solid and the adjacent space also limits the accuracy of the numerical simulation. The numerical simulation model can be used to evaluate the wind environment and wind load around high buildings.

  10. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far-field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow base line and suppressor nozzles. Summary report. [conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40by 80-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to study the near- and far-field jet noise characteristics of six baseline and suppressor nozzles. Static and wind-on noise source locations were determined. A technique for extrapolating near field jet noise measurements into the far field was established. It was determined if flight effects measured in the near field are the same as those in the far field. The flight effects on the jet noise levels of the baseline and suppressor nozzles were determined. Test models included a 15.24-cm round convergent nozzle, an annular nozzle with and without ejector, a 20-lobe nozzle with and without ejector, and a 57-tube nozzle with lined ejector. The static free-field test in the anechoic chamber covered nozzle pressure ratios from 1.44 to 2.25 and jet velocities from 412 to 594 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K. The wind tunnel flight effects test repeated these nozzle test conditions with ambient velocities of 0 to 92 m/s.

  11. Development of a Technique and Method of Testing Aircraft Models with Turboprop Engine Simulators in a Small-scale Wind Tunnel - Results of Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Petrov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the results of experimental investigations into the interaction between the propellers (Ps and the airframe of a twin-engine, twin-boom light transport aircraft with a Π-shaped tail. An analysis was performed of the forces and moments acting on the aircraft with rotating Ps. The main features of the methodology for windtunnel testing of an aircraft model with running Ps in TsAGI’s T-102 wind tunnel are outlined.The effect of 6-blade Ps slipstreams on the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics as well as the effectiveness of the control surfaces was studied on the aircraft model in cruise and takeoff/landing configurations. The tests were conducted at flow velocities of V∞ = 20 to 50 m/s in the ranges of angles of attack α =  -6 to 20 deg, sideslip angles of β = -16 to 16 deg and blade loading coefficient of B 0 to 2.8. For the aircraft of unusual layout studied, an increase in blowing intensity is shown to result in decreasing longitudinal static stability and significant asymmetry of the directional stability characteristics associated with the interaction between the Ps slipstreams of the same (left-hand rotation and the empennage.

  12. Rotary Balance Wind Tunnel Testing for the FASER Flight Research Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Casey; Owens, D. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Flight dynamics research was conducted to collect and analyze rotary balance wind tunnel test data in order to improve the aerodynamic simulation and modeling of a low-cost small unmanned aircraft called FASER (Free-flying Aircraft for Sub-scale Experimental Research). The impetus for using FASER was to provide risk and cost reduction for flight testing of more expensive aircraft and assist in the improvement of wind tunnel and flight test techniques, and control laws. The FASER research aircraft has the benefit of allowing wind tunnel and flight tests to be conducted on the same model, improving correlation between wind tunnel, flight, and simulation data. Prior wind tunnel tests include a static force and moment test, including power effects, and a roll and yaw damping forced oscillation test. Rotary balance testing allows for the calculation of aircraft rotary derivatives and the prediction of steady-state spins. The rotary balance wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST). Rotary balance testing includes runs for a set of given angular rotation rates at a range of angles of attack and sideslip angles in order to fully characterize the aircraft rotary dynamics. Tests were performed at angles of attack from 0 to 50 degrees, sideslip angles of -5 to 10 degrees, and non-dimensional spin rates from -0.5 to 0.5. The effects of pro-spin elevator and rudder deflection and pro- and anti-spin elevator, rudder, and aileron deflection were examined. The data are presented to illustrate the functional dependence of the forces and moments on angle of attack, sideslip angle, and angular rate for the rotary contributions to the forces and moments. Further investigation is necessary to fully characterize the control effectors. The data were also used with a steady state spin prediction tool that did not predict an equilibrium spin mode.

  13. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Wind tunnels as an aerodynamic testing tool in Formula 1

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Vallés, Carles

    2014-01-01

    This project aims to enable the reader to acquire the necessary knowledge to fully understand the main facts and working principles of modern wind tunnels and their application in F1. In addition one of the goals is to enable the reader to get an insight of the motorsport world, realizing how important aerodynamics are in relation to the global performance and handling of a race car. Throughout the entire project particular emphasis has been made to illustrate the importance of wind tunnels a...

  15. Development of air to air ejector for supersonic wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kracík Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the development of design of new conception of ejector with twelve primary annular nozzles arranged around the inlet part of the mixing chamber. The ejector is proposed to be used for propulsion of supersonic experimental wind tunnel with variable test section, which is now in development. The ejector is considered to be placed on outlet of this wind tunnel. The original design of the ejector has been modified to ensure its manufacturability. Software Ansys Fluent 14.0 was used for numerical verification of earlier work. The new design and dissimilarities of numerical results are presented in this work.

  16. Development of an intelligent hypertext system for wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Steinle, Frank W.; Wu, Y. C. L. Susan; Hoyt, W. Andes

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a system utilizing artificial intelligence technology to improve the productivity of project engineers who conduct wind tunnel tests. The objective was to create an intelligent hypertext system which integrates a hypertext manual and expert system that stores experts' knowledge and experience. The preliminary (Phase I) effort implemented a prototype IHS module encompassing a portion of the manuals and knowledge used for wind tunnel testing. The effort successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the intelligent hypertext system concept. A module for the internal strain gage balance, implemented on both IBM-PC and Macintosh computers, is presented. A description of the Phase II effort is included.

  17. Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel Components Structural Evaluation. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    specifications for the manifolds are listed below. a Component Material u Inlet Body -- 143,000 131,000 Exit Body -- 142,000 129,500 Studs ASTM A193 , GRB-7...unlimited I’V* I’.70 STPt ~ A TEEN T Wind Tunnel Components Fatigue [ugh Pressure Crack Propagation See following page. DO 1473 E---IOD o, E DA Is 01s...Vessels in the wind tunnel facility was performed using finite element techniques coupled with fatigue and fracture mechanics analyses of the critical

  18. Primary Research on the Standard System of Air Vehicle Calibration Models Used in Wind Tunnel Test%飞行器风洞试验标模体系研究初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    战培国; 罗月培

    2011-01-01

    风洞试验标模是一种评估风洞试验准度和验证CFD算法的通用校准模型.本文归纳分析了北大西洋公约组织AGARD系列、法国ONERAM系列为代表的国外风洞试验标模发展情况,阐述了我国DBM、GBM、HSCM风洞标模系列的发展现状,探讨了建立和完善风洞试验标模体系的一些问题,意在为国内风洞和试验技术发展提供参考.%The standard air vehicle calibration model is a common calibration model used for evaluating wind tunnel test results and validating CFD methods.This paper analyses the development of overseas wind tunnel calibration models,typically,NATO AGARD series and ONERA M series in France,introduces state of the art domestic calibration models,such as DBM,CBM and HSCM series,discusses some problems about setting up and consummating the system of calibration models.The purpose is to provide thoughts and references for the development of domestic wind tunnel techniques.

  19. An algorithm for minimum-cost set-point ordering in a cryogenic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for minimum cost ordering of set points in a cryogenic wind tunnel is developed. The procedure generates a matrix of dynamic state transition costs, which is evaluated by means of a single-volume lumped model of the cryogenic wind tunnel and the use of some idealized minimum-costs, which is evaluated by means of a single-volume lumped model of the cryogenic wind tunnel and the use of some idealized minimum-cost state-transition control strategies. A branch and bound algorithm is employed to determine the least costly sequence of state transitions from the transition-cost matrix. Some numerical results based on data for the National Transonic Facility are presented which show a strong preference for state transitions that consume to coolant. Results also show that the choice of the terminal set point in an open odering can produce a wide variation in total cost.

  20. Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

  1. Wind Tunnel Model and Test to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a Passive Gust Alleviation Device for a Flying Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Bisplinghoff, R. L., Ashley, H. and Halfman, R. L. (1955), Aeroelasticity, Addison - Wesley Publishing Co., Inc. [12] Banerjee, J. R. (1984...and Halfman, H. (1983), Aeroelasticity, Addison Wesley Publishing Co.Inc., Cambridge, Mass. [74] Samikkannu, R. and Upadhya, A. R. (2011), "Wind

  2. Incremental wind tunnel testing of high lift systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Pricop Mihai; Mircea, Boscoianu; Daniel-Eugeniu, Crunteanu

    2016-06-01

    Efficiency of trailing edge high lift systems is essential for long range future transport aircrafts evolving in the direction of laminar wings, because they have to compensate for the low performance of the leading edge devices. Modern high lift systems are subject of high performance requirements and constrained to simple actuation, combined with a reduced number of aerodynamic elements. Passive or active flow control is thus required for the performance enhancement. An experimental investigation of reduced kinematics flap combined with passive flow control took place in a low speed wind tunnel. The most important features of the experimental setup are the relatively large size, corresponding to a Reynolds number of about 2 Million, the sweep angle of 30 degrees corresponding to long range airliners with high sweep angle wings and the large number of flap settings and mechanical vortex generators. The model description, flap settings, methodology and results are presented.

  3. Low Speed PSP Testing in Production Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James; Mehta, Rabi; Schairer, Ed; Hand, Larry; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The brightness signal from a pressure-sensitive paint varies inversely with absolute pressure. Consequently high signal-to-noise ratios are required to resolve aerodynamic pressure fields at low speeds, where the pressure variation around an object might only be a few percent of the mean pressure. This requirement is unavoidable, and implies that care must be taken to minimize noise sources present in the measurement. This paper discusses and compares the main noise sources in low speed PSP testing using the "classical" intensity-based single-luminophore technique. These are: temperature variation, model deformation, and lamp drift/paint degradation. Minimization of these error sources from the point of view of operation in production wind tunnels is discussed, with some examples from recent tests in NASA Ames facilities.

  4. Optimization of transonic wind tunnel data acquisition and control systems for providing continuous mode tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronevich, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    The paper observes the issues related to the increase of efficiency and information content of experimental research in transonic wind tunnels (WT). In particular, questions of optimizing the WT Data Acquisition and Control Systems (DACS) to provide the continuous mode test method are discussed. The problem of Mach number (M number) stabilization in the test section of the large transonic compressor-type wind tunnels at subsonic flow conditions with continuous change of the aircraft model angle of attack is observed on the example of T-128 wind tunnel. To minimize the signals distortion in T-128 DACS measurement channels the optimal MGCplus filter settings of the data acquisition system used in T-128 wind tunnel to measure loads were experimentally determined. As a result of the tests performed a good agreement of the results of balance measurements for pitch/pause and continuous test modes was obtained. Carrying out balance tests for pitch/pause and continuous test methods was provided by the regular data acquisition and control system of T-128 wind tunnel with unified software package POTOK. The architecture and functional abilities of POTOK software package are observed.

  5. Power Effects on High Lift, Stability and Control Characteristics of the TCA Model Tested in the LaRC 14 x 22 Ft Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glessner, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The TCA-2 wind-tunnel test was the second in a series of planned tests utilizing the 5% Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) model. Each of the tests was planned to utilize the unique capabilities of the NASA Langley 14'x22' and the NASA Ames 12' test facilities, in order to assess specific aspects of the high lift and stability and control characteristics of the TCA configuration. However, shortly after the completion of the TCA-1 test, an early projection of the Technology Configuration (TC) identified the need for several significant changes to the baseline TCA configuration. These changes were necessary in order to meet more stringent noise certification levels, as well as, to provide a means to control dynamic structural modes. The projected changes included a change to the outboard wing (increased aspect ratio and lower sweep) and a reconfiguration of the longitudinal control surfaces to include a medium size canard and a reduced horizontal tail. The impact of these proposed changes did not affect the TCA-2 test, because it was specifically planned to address power effects on the empennage and a smaller horizontal tail was in the plan to be tested. However, the focus of future tests was reevaluated and the emphasis was shifted away from assessment of TCA specific configurations to a more general assessment of configurations that encompass the projected design space for the TC.

  6. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Effects of Unsymmetrical Horizontal-Tail Arrangements on Power-on Static Longitudinal Stability of a Single-Engine Airplane Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Paul E.; Spear, Margaret F.

    1947-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been made to determine the effects of unsymmetrical horizontal-tail arrangements on the power-on static longitudinal stability of a single-engine single-rotation airplane model. Although the tests and analyses showed that extreme asymmetry in the horizontal tail indicated a reduction in power effects on longitudinal stability for single-engine single-rotation airplanes, the particular "practical" arrangement tested did not show marked improvement. Differences in average downwash between the normal tail arrangement and various other tail arrangements estimated from computed values of propeller-slipstream rotation agreed with values estimated from pitching-moment test data for the flaps-up condition (low thrust and torque) and disagreed for the flaps-down condition (high thrust and torque). This disagreement indicated the necessity for continued research to determine the characteristics of the slip-stream behind various propeller-fuselage-wing combinations. Out-of-trim lateral forces and moments of the unsymmetrical tail arrangements that were best from consideration of longitudinal stability were no greater than those of the normal tail arrangement.

  7. Design and calibration of the mixing layer and wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed account of the design, assembly and calibration of a wind tunnel specifically designed for free-shear layer research is contained. The construction of this new facility was motivated by a strong interest in the study of plane mixing layers with varying initial and operating conditions. The Mixing Layer Wind tunnel is located in the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center. The tunnel consists of two separate legs which are driven independently by centrifugal blowers connected to variable speed motors. The blower/motor combinations are sized such that one is smaller than the other, giving maximum flow speeds of about 20 and 40 m/s, respectively. The blower speeds can either be set manually or via the Microvax II computer. The two streams are allowed to merge in the test section at the sharp trailing edge of a slowly tapering splitter plate. The test section is 36 cm in the cross-stream direction, 91 cm in the spanwise direction and 366 cm in length. One test section side-wall is slotted for probe access and adjustable so that the streamwise pressure gradient may be controlled. The wind tunnel is also equipped with a computer controlled, three-dimensional traversing system which is used to investigate the flow fields with pressure and hot-wire instrumentation. The wind tunnel calibration results show that the mean flow in the test section is uniform to within plus or minus 0.25 pct and the flow angularity is less than 0.25 deg. The total streamwise free-stream turbulence intensity level is approximately 0.15 pct. Currently the wind tunnel is being used in experiments designed to study the three-dimensional structure of plane mixing layers and wakes.

  8. Pretest Report for the Full Span Propulsive Wing/Canard Model Test in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 Meter Low Speed Wind Tunnel Second Series Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1986-01-01

    A full span propulsive wing/canard model is to be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 4 x 7 meter low speed wind tunnel. These tests are a continuation of the tests conducted in Feb. 1984, NASA test No.290, and are being conducted under NASA Contract NAS1-17171. The purpose of these tests is to obtain extensive lateral-directional data with a revised fuselage concept. The wings, canards, and vertical tail of this second test series model are the same as tested in the previous test period. The fuselage and internal flow path have been modified to better reflect an external configuration suitable for a fighter airplane. Internal ducting and structure were changed as required to provide test efficiency and blowing control. The model fuselage tested during the 1984 tests was fabricated with flat sides to provide multiple wing and canard placement variations. The locations of the wing and canard are important variables in configuration development. With the establishment of the desired relative placement of the lifting surfaces, a typically shaped fuselage has been fabricated for these tests. This report provides the information necessary for the second series tests of the propulsive wing/canard model. The discussion in this report is limited to that affected by the model changes and to the second series test program. The pretest report information for test 290 which is valid for the second series test was published in Rockwell report NR 83H-79. This report is presented as Appendix 1 and the modified fuselage stress report is presented as Appendix 2 to this pretest report.

  9. Low-frequency rotational noise in closed-test-section wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Marianne

    The effects of closed-section wind-tunnel walls on the sound field radiated from a helicopter rotor are investigated by means of numerical simulations, summarizing the findings reported by Mosher (1986). The techniques used to model the rotor and the test section (including geometry, wall absorption, and measurement location) are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs. It is found that first-harmonic acoustic measurements obtained in a hard-walled wind tunnel twice as wide as the rotor diameter do not accurately represent the free-field rotational noise, that the relationship between the sound-pressure levels in the wind tunnel and in the free field is complex, that multiple near-field measurements are needed to characterize the direct acoustic field of the rotor, and that absorptive linings are of little value in enlarging the accurate-measurement zone.

  10. Comparison of Resource Requirements for a Wind Tunnel Test Designed with Conventional vs. Modern Design of Experiments Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Richard; Micol, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The factors that determine data volume requirements in a typical wind tunnel test are identified. It is suggested that productivity in wind tunnel testing can be enhanced by managing the inference error risk associated with evaluating residuals in a response surface modeling experiment. The relationship between minimum data volume requirements and the factors upon which they depend is described and certain simplifications to this relationship are realized when specific model adequacy criteria are adopted. The question of response model residual evaluation is treated and certain practical aspects of response surface modeling are considered, including inference subspace truncation. A wind tunnel test plan developed by using the Modern Design of Experiments illustrates the advantages of an early estimate of data volume requirements. Comparisons are made with a representative One Factor At a Time (OFAT) wind tunnel test matrix developed to evaluate a surface to air missile.

  11. On-Line Flutter Prediction Tool for Wind Tunnel Flutter Testing using Parameter Varying Estimation Methodology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes to develop an on-line flutter prediction tool for wind tunnel model using the parameter varying estimation (PVE) technique to...

  12. Investigation of nozzle contours in the CSIR supersonic wind tunnel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vallabh, Bhavya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available method developed to improve the flow quality in the test section region subject to the HSWT’s limitations. The wind tunnel geometry and constraints were employed in accordance with the Sivells’ nozzle design method and the method of characteristics...

  13. Studies on Pulse Jet Engine by Wind Tunnel Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro Nakano; Michael Zeutzius; Hideo Miyanishi; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kenji Kaneko

    2001-01-01

    Simple design and efficiency make pulse jet engines attractive for aeronautical short-term operation applications. An active control system extends the operating range and reduces the fuel consumption considerably so that this old technology might gain a new interest. The results on wind tunnel experiments have been reported together with the impact of combustion mode (pulse or steady) on system performance.

  14. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  15. Development of the 5-cm Agent Fate Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Generators Several approaches were evaluated to assure homogenous mixing of the agent vapor and air at the sampling port. One was a non- intrusive air mixer...9 pL) Multiple drops (30) in 2 lateral rows Vapour sampling of plume (no artificial mixing) 50 x 100 - cm Wind Tunnel On-line GC-MS Can test grass

  16. Transonic flutter study of a wind-tunnel model of a supercritical wing with/without winglet. [conducted in Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Rauch, F. J., Jr.; Waters, C.

    1982-01-01

    The model was a 1/6.5-size, semipan version of a wing proposed for an executive-jet-transport airplane. The model was tested with a normal wingtip, a wingtip with winglet, and a normal wingtip ballasted to simulate the winglet mass properties. Flutter and aerodynamic data were acquired at Mach numbers (M) from 0.6 to 0.95. The measured transonic flutter speed boundary for each wingtip configuration had roughly the same shape with a minimum flutter speed near M=0.82. The winglet addition and wingtip mass ballast decreased the wing flutter speed by about 7 and 5 percent, respectively; thus, the winglet effect on flutter was more a mass effect than an aerodynamic effect.

  17. Application of Wind Tunnel Free-Flight Technique for Wake Vortex Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Stuever, Robert A.; Buttrill, Catherine W.

    1997-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel to assess the free-flight test technique as a tool in research on wake vortex encounters. A typical 17.5-percent scale business-class jet airplane model was flown behind a stationary wing mounted in the forward portion of the wind tunnel test section. The span ratio (model span-generating wingspan) was 0.75. The wing angle of attack could be adjusted to produce a vortex of desired strength. The test airplane model was successfully flown in the vortex and through the vortex for a range of vortex strengths. Data obtained included the model airplane body axis accelerations, angular rates, attitudes, and control positions as a function of vortex strength and relative position. Pilot comments and video records were also recorded during the vortex encounters.

  18. Validation of a Compact Isokinetic Total Water Content Probe for Wind Tunnel Characterization at NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and at NRC Ice Crystal Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Craig R.; Landreville, Charles; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2017-01-01

    A new compact isokinetic probe to measure total water content in a wind tunnel environment has been developed. The probe has been previously tested under altitude conditions. This paper presents a comprehensive validation of the probe under a range of liquid water conditions at sea level in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and with ice crystals at sea level at the NRC wind tunnel. The compact isokinetic probe is compared to tunnel calibrations and other probes.

  19. A digital strategy for manometer dynamic enhancement. [for wind tunnel monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoughton, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Application of digital signal processing techniques to improve the non-linear dynamic characteristics of a sonar-type mercury manometer is described. The dynamic enhancement strategy quasi-linearizes the manometer characteristics and improves the effective bandwidth in the context of a wind-tunnel pressure regulation system. Model identification data and real-time hybrid simulation data demonstrate feasibility of approach.

  20. Computations on the volatilisation of the fungicide fenpropimorph from plants in a wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Wolters, A.

    2004-01-01

    Volatilisation of pesticides from plants is one of the main pathways for their emission to the environment. A simplified computation model was set up to simulate this volatilisation, including penetration into plants and photochemical transformation as competing processes. Previous wind tunnel exper

  1. Wind Tunnel Testing of Microtabs and Microjets for Active Load Control of Wind Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, Aubryn Murray

    Increases in wind turbine size have made controlling loads on the blades an important consideration for future turbine designs. One approach that could reduce extreme loads and minimize load variation is to incorporate active control devices into the blades that are able to change the aerodynamic forces acting on the turbine. A wind tunnel model has been constructed to allow testing of different active aerodynamic load control devices. Two such devices have been tested in the UC Davis Aeronautical Wind Tunnel: microtabs and microjets. Microtabs are small surfaces oriented perpendicular to an airfoil surface that can be deployed and retracted to alter the lift coefficient of the airfoil. Microjets produce similar effects using air blown perpendicular to the airfoil surface. Results are presented here for both static and dynamic performance of the two devices. Microtabs, located at 95% chord on the lower surface and 90% chord on the upper surface, with a height of 1% chord, produce a change in the lift coefficient of 0.18, increasing lift when deployed on the lower surface and decreasing lift when deployed on the upper surface. Microjets with a momentum coefficient of 0.006 at the same locations produce a change in the lift coefficient of 0.19. The activation time for both devices is less than 0.3 s, which is rapid compared to typical gust rise times. The potential of active device to mitigate changes in loads was tested using simulated gusts. The gusts were produced in the wind tunnel by accelerating the test section air speed at rates of up to 7 ft/s 2. Open-loop control of microtabs was tested in two modes: simultaneous and sequential tab deployment. Activating all tabs along the model span simultaneously was found to produce a change in the loads that occurred more rapidly than a gust. Sequential tab deployment more closely matched the rates of change due to gusts and tab deployment. A closed-loop control system was developed for the microtabs using a simple

  2. Advanced Recovery Systems Wind Tunnel Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    120’ leg is basically an open circuit tunnel with a closed throat test section (Figure 4.1-1). The 135,000 horse power fan drive system is enough to... AMpAcs (c.g.) = WPACSL sin(ap + ,) This methodology was applied to all the data and the induced moment, due to the offset in the PACS c.g., was removed...around wires and cables . Figure 5.3-3 depicts the nomenclature for the Cross Flow Principle. To determine CD the following equations are used: Co1 = 1.10

  3. A method for data base management and analysis for wind tunnel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biser, Aileen O.

    1987-01-01

    To respond to the need for improved data base management and analysis capabilities for wind-tunnel data at the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, research was conducted into current methods of managing wind-tunnel data and a method was developed as a solution to this need. This paper describes the development of the data base management and analysis method for wind-tunnel data. The design and implementation of the software system are discussed and examples of its use are shown.

  4. Investigation of Flow Field in a Typical Hypersonic Wind Tunnel over a Standard Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fata mohammadifard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to start designing a new hypersonic wind tunnel, it is important to have a pre-view about physical phenomena in a typical Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (HWT. In present research, it is tried to view phenomenologically the aerodynamics of flow in a typical HWT by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. The considered HWT consists of a curved nozzle in nominal Mach number 12, free-jet type test section, a test model and a convergent-divergent diffuser. Aerodynamics of flow in the nozzle exit and test section, conical shock wave system in the diffuser and flow over a standard model (HB-2 are investigated. A method is introduced for numerical simulation of capturing the free shear layer in free-jet test section based on the vorticity distribution of flow. The aerodynamics behavior of HB-2 model is investigated in various Mach numbers and flow domains. The results make a better view of some aerodynamic phenomena in a free-jet type test section of wind tunnel that are rarely considered. This research is conducted towards the project of designing and manufacturing the industrial hypersonic wind tunnel for Qadr Aerodynamic research Center.

  5. Survey of Uniformity of Pressure Profile in Wind Tunnel by Using Hot Wire Annometer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Yerrapragada. K.S.S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research work is to investigate experimentally and computationally the uniformity of velocity profile in wind tunnel. A wind tunnel is an instrument used to examine the stream lines and forces that are induced as the fluid flows past a fully submerged body. The uni-insta’s wind tunnel (300 mm*300 mm has been designed to give a large working section for the purpose of being able to layout substantial site models. The tunnel has a built in boundary layer simulation system that allows good simulation of the atmospheric velocity gradients. The tunnel is built around a sectionalized wooden frame work incorporating exterior grade plywood panels in the settling length and working section, clad in laminate on the side elevation for ease of maintenance. A bell mount entry incorporated is followed by a smooth settling length chamber comprising of well graded honey comb network fine mesh. The side panels of the working section are transparent acrylic cover, to gives a large viewing area .Additional matt back side panels gives photographic construct to smoke trails. The top panel of the working section is removable in order to fix the models.

  6. Survey of Uniformity of Velocity Profile in Wind Tunnel by Using Hot Wire Annometer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Ch. Dattu. V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research work is to investigate experimentally and computationally the uniformity of velocity profile in wind tunnel. A wind tunnel is an instrument used to examine the stream lines and forces that are induced as the fluid flows past a fully submerged body. The uni-insta’s wind tunnel (300 mm*300 mm has been designed to give a large working section for the purpose of being able to layout substantial site models. The tunnel has a built in boundary layer simulation system that allows good simulation of the atmospheric velocity gradients. The tunnel is built around a sectionalized wooden frame work incorporating exterior grade plywood panels in the settling length and working section, clad in laminate on the side elevation for ease of maintenance. A bell mount entry incorporated is followed by a smooth settling length chamber comprising of well graded honey comb network fine mesh. The side panels of the working section are transparent acrylic cover, to gives a large viewing area .Additional matt back side panels gives photographic construct to smoke trails. The top panel of the working section is removable in order to fix the models.

  7. Pre-Test Assessment of the Use Envelope of the Normal Force of a Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the aerodynamic lift force generated by a wind tunnel model, the model weight, and the measured normal force of a strain-gage balance is investigated to better understand the expected use envelope of the normal force during a wind tunnel test. First, the fundamental relationship between normal force, model weight, lift curve slope, model reference area, dynamic pressure, and angle of attack is derived. Then, based on this fundamental relationship, the use envelope of a balance is examined for four typical wind tunnel test cases. The first case looks at the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a light wind tunnel model at high subsonic Mach numbers. The second case examines the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a heavy wind tunnel model in an atmospheric low-speed facility. The third case reviews the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a floor-mounted semi-span model. The fourth case discusses the normal force characteristics during the test of a rotated full-span model. The wind tunnel model's lift-to-weight ratio is introduced as a new parameter that may be used for a quick pre-test assessment of the use envelope of the normal force of a balance. The parameter is derived as a function of the lift coefficient, the dimensionless dynamic pressure, and the dimensionless model weight. Lower and upper bounds of the use envelope of a balance are defined using the model's lift-to-weight ratio. Finally, data from a pressurized wind tunnel is used to illustrate both application and interpretation of the model's lift-to-weight ratio.

  8. Assessment of analytical and experimental techniques utilized in conducting plume technology tests 575 and 593. [exhaust flow simulation (wind tunnel tests) of scale model Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. R.; Sulyma, P. R.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    Since exhaust plumes affect vehicle base environment (pressure and heat loads) and the orbiter vehicle aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, an intensive program involving detailed analytical and experimental investigations of the exhaust plume/vehicle interaction was undertaken as a pertinent part of the overall space shuttle development program. The program, called the Plume Technology program, has as its objective the determination of the criteria for simulating rocket engine (in particular, space shuttle propulsion system) plume-induced aerodynamic effects in a wind tunnel environment. The comprehensive experimental program was conducted using test facilities at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center. A post-test examination of some of the experimental results obtained from NASA-MSFC's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel is presented. A description is given of the test facility, simulant gas supply system, nozzle hardware, test procedure and test matrix. Analysis of exhaust plume flow fields and comparison of analytical and experimental exhaust plume data are presented.

  9. Hot Wire Anemometer Turbulence Measurements in the wind Tunnel of LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    Flow measurements were carried out in the wind tunnel of LM Wind Power A/S with a Dantec Streamline CTA system to characterize the flow turbulence. Besides the free tunnel flow with empty test section we also investigated the tunnel flow when two grids with different mesh size were introduced...... downstream of the nozzle contraction. We used two different hot wire probes: a dual sensor miniature wire probe (Dantec 55P61) and a triple sensor fiber film probe (Dantec 55R91). The turbulence intensity measured with the dual sensor probe in the empty tunnel section was significantly lower than the one...... measured with the triple sensor probe. The turbulence intensity as well as the mean flow velocity downstream of the grids were not homogeneous in space. The grid with the finer mesh size created higher turbulence intensity. For both grids we found a functional form of the power spectral density...

  10. Wind Tunnel Interference Effects on Tilt Rotor Testing Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Witold J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental techniques to measure rotorcraft aerodynamic performance are widely used. However, most of them are either unable to capture interference effects from bodies, or require an extremely large computational budget. The objective of the present research is to develop an XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft rotor model for investigation of wind tunnel wall interference using a novel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver for rotorcraft, RotCFD. In RotCFD, a mid-fidelity Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver is used with an incompressible flow model and a realizable k-e turbulence model. The rotor is, however, not modeled using a computationally expensive, unsteady viscous body-fitted grid, but is instead modeled using a blade-element model (BEM) with a momentum source approach. Various flight modes of the XV-15 isolated rotor, including hover, tilt, and airplane mode, have been simulated and correlated to existing experimental and theoretical data. The rotor model is subsequently used for wind tunnel wall interference simulations in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) at Ames Research Center in California. The results from the validation of the isolated rotor performance showed good correlation with experimental and theoretical data. The results were on par with known theoretical analyses. In RotCFD the setup, grid generation, and running of cases is faster than many CFD codes, which makes it a useful engineering tool. Performance predictions need not be as accurate as high-fidelity CFD codes, as long as wall effects can be properly simulated. For both test sections of the NFAC wall, interference was examined by simulating the XV-15 rotor in the test section of the wind tunnel and with an identical grid but extended boundaries in free field. Both cases were also examined with an isolated rotor or with the rotor mounted on the modeled geometry of the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR). A "quasi linear trim" was used to trim the thrust

  11. An experimental system for release simulation of internal stores in a supersonic wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic parameters obtained from separation experiments of internal stores in a wind tunnel are significant in aircraft designs. Accurate wind tunnel tests can help to improve the release stability of the stores and in-flight safety of the aircrafts in supersonic environments. A simulative system for free drop experiments of internal stores based on a practical project is provided in this paper. The system contains a store release mechanism, a control system and an attitude measurement system. The release mechanism adopts a six-bar linkage driven by a cylinder, which ensures the release stability. The structure and initial aerodynamic parameters of the stores are also designed and adjusted. A high speed vision measurement system for high speed rolling targets is utilized to measure the pose parameters of the internal store models and an optimizing method for the coordinates of markers is presented based on a priori model. The experimental results show excellent repeatability of the system, and indicate that the position measurement precision is less than 0.13 mm, and the attitude measurement precision for pitch and yaw angles is less than 0.126°, satisfying the requirements of practical wind tunnel tests. A separation experiment for the internal stores is also conducted in the FL-3 wind tunnel of China Aerodynamics Research Institute.

  12. Preparation of polystyrene microspheres for laser velocimetry in wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Laser Velocimetry (L/V) had made great strides in replacing intrusive devices for wind tunnel flow measurements. The weakness of the L/V has not been the L/V itself, but proper size seeding particles having known drag characteristics. For many Langley Wind Tunnel applications commercial polystyrene latex microspheres suspended in ethanol, injected through a fluid nozzle provides excellent seeding but was not used due to the high cost. This paper provides the instructions, procedures, and formulations for producing polystyrene latex monodisperse microspheres of 0.6, 1.0, 1.7, 2.0, and 2.7 micron diameters. These are presently being used at Langley Research Center as L/V seeding particles.

  13. 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel Acoustic Improvements Expanded Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David

    2016-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) at NASA Glenn Research Center was built in 1969 in the return leg of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT). The 8x6 SWT was completed in 1949 and acoustically treated to mitigate community noise issues in 1950. This treatment included the addition of a large muffler downstream of the 8x6 SWT test section and diffuser. The 9x15 LSWT was designed for performance testing of V/STOL aircraft models, but with the addition of the current acoustic treatment in 1986 the tunnel been used principally for acoustic and performance testing of aircraft propulsion systems. The present document describes an anticipated acoustic upgrade to be completed in 2017.

  14. Transonic flutter study of a wind-tunnel model of a supercritical wing with/without winglet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Rauch, F. J., Jr.; Waters, C.

    1982-01-01

    The scaled flutter model was a 1/6.5-size, semispan version of a supercritical wing (SCW) proposed for an executive-jet-transport airplane. The model was tested cantilever-mounted with a normal wingtip, a wingtip with winglet, and a normal wingtip ballasted to simulate the winglet mass properties. Flutter and aerodynamic data were acquired at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.95. The measured transonic flutter speed boundary for each wingtip configuration had roughly the same shape with a minimum flutter speed near M = 0.82. The winglet addition and wingtip mass ballast decreased the wing flutter speed by about 7 and 5%, respectively; thus, the winglet effect on flutter was more a mass effect than an aerodynamic effect. Flutter characteristics calculated using a doublet-lattice analysis (which included interference effects) were in good agreement with the experimental results up to M = 0.82. Comparisons of measured static aerodynamic data with predicted data indicated that the model was aerodynamically representative of the airplane SCW.

  15. Studies on Pulse Jet Engine by Wind Tunnel Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Nakano

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple design and efficiency make pulse jet engines attractive for aeronautical short-term operation applications. An active control system extends the operating range and reduces the fuel consumption considerably so that this old technology might gain a new interest. The results on wind tunnel experiments have been reported together with the impact of combustion mode (pulse or steady on system performance.

  16. Wind Tunnel Tests on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Advanced Solid Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Irikado, Tomoko; Fukuzoe, Moriyasu; Shima, Eiji

    The Advanced Solid Rocket is being developed by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Since its configuration has been changed very recently, its aerodynamic characteristics are of great interest of the JAXA Advanced Solid Rocket Team. In this study, we carried out wind tunnel tests on the aerodynamic characteristics of the present configuration for Mach 1.5. Six test cases were conducted with different body configurations, attack angles, and roll angles. A six component balance, oilflow visualization, Schlieren images were used throughout the experiments. It was found that, at zero angle-of-attack, the flow around the body were perturbed and its drag (axial force) characteristics were significantly influenced by protruding body components such as flanges, cable ducts, and attitude control units of SMSJ (Solid Motor Side Jet), while the nozzle had a minor role. With angle-of-attack of five degree, normal force of CNα = 3.50±0.03 was measured along with complex flow features observed in the full-component model; whereas no crossflow separations were induced around the no-protuberance model with CNα = 2.58±0.10. These values were almost constant with respect to the angle-of-attack in both of the cases. Furthermore, presence of roll angle made the flow more complicated, involving interactions of separation vortices. These data provide us with fundamental and important aerodynamic insights of the Advanced Solid Rocket, and they will be utilized as reference data for the corresponding numerical analysis.

  17. A numerical optimization of high altitude testing facility for wind tunnel experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Ralphin Rose J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High altitude test facilities are required to test the high area ratio nozzles operating at the upper stages of rocket in the nozzle full flow conditions. It is typically achieved by creating the ambient pressure equal or less than the nozzle exit pressure. On average, air/GN2 is used as active gas for ejector system that is stored in the high pressure cylinders. The wind tunnel facilities are used for conducting aerodynamic simulation experiments at/under various flow velocities and operating conditions. However, constructing both of these facilities require more laboratory space and expensive instruments. Because of this demerit, a novel scheme is implemented for conducting wind tunnel experiments by using the existing infrastructure available in the high altitude testing (HAT facility. This article presents the details about the methods implemented for suitably modifying the sub-scale HAT facility to conduct wind tunnel experiments. Hence, the design of nozzle for required area ratio A/A∗, realization of test section and the optimized configuration are focused in the present analysis. Specific insights into various rocket models including high thrust cryogenic engines and their holding mechanisms to conduct wind tunnel experiments in the HAT facility are analyzed. A detailed CFD analysis is done to propose this conversion without affecting the existing functional requirements of the HAT facility.

  18. The multiple-function multi-input/multi-output digital controller system for the AFW wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mcgraw, Sandra M.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time multiple-function digital controller system was developed for the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) Program. The digital controller system (DCS) allowed simultaneous execution of two control laws: flutter suppression and either roll trim or a rolling maneuver load control. The DCS operated within, but independently of, a slower host operating system environment, at regulated speeds up to 200 Hz. It also coordinated the acquisition, storage, and transfer of data for near real-time controller performance evaluation and both open- and closed-loop plant estimation. It synchronized the operation of four different processing units, allowing flexibility in the number, form, functionality, and order of control laws, and variability in selection of sensors and actuators employed. Most importantly, the DCS allowed for the successful demonstration of active flutter suppression to conditions approximately 26 percent (in dynamic pressure) above the open-loop boundary in cases when the model was fixed in roll and up to 23 percent when it was free to roll. Aggressive roll maneuvers with load control were achieved above the flutter boundary.

  19. Blockage Testing in the NASA Glenn 225 Square Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Abigail; Davis, David O.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The starting characteristics for three different model geometries were tested in the Glenn Research Center 225 Square Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The test models were tested at Mach 2, 2.5 and 3 in a square test section and at Mach 2.5 again in an asymmetric test section. The results gathered in this study will help size the test models and inform other design features for the eventual implementation of a magnetic suspension system.

  20. Application of Rapid Prototyping Methods to High-Speed Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken in MSFC's 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel to determine if rapid prototyping methods could be used in the design and manufacturing of high speed wind tunnel models in direct testing applications, and if these methods would reduce model design/fabrication time and cost while providing models of high enough fidelity to provide adequate aerodynamic data, and of sufficient strength to survive the test environment. Rapid prototyping methods utilized to construct wind tunnel models in a wing-body-tail configuration were: fused deposition method using both ABS plastic and PEEK as building materials, stereolithography using the photopolymer SL-5170, selective laser sintering using glass reinforced nylon, and laminated object manufacturing using plastic reinforced with glass and 'paper'. This study revealed good agreement between the SLA model, the metal model with an FDM-ABS nose, an SLA nose, and the metal model for most operating conditions, while the FDM-ABS data diverged at higher loading conditions. Data from the initial SLS model showed poor agreement due to problems in post-processing, resulting in a different configuration. A second SLS model was tested and showed relatively good agreement. It can be concluded that rapid prototyping models show promise in preliminary aerodynamic development studies at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds.

  1. Blockage Corrections for Three-Dimensional-Flow Closed-Throat Wind Tunnels, with Consideration of the Effect of Compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot, J. G.

    1951-01-01

    Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional, unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wind tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject

  2. Analysis of the high Reynolds number 2D tests on a wind turbine airfoil performed at two different wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Madsen, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    2D wind tunnel tests at high Reynolds numbers have been done within the EU FP7 AVATAR project (Advanced Aerodynamic Tools of lArge Rotors) on the DU00-W-212 airfoil and at two different test facilities: the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG) and the LM Wind Power in-house wind tunnel. Two conditions of Reynolds numbers have been performed in both tests: 3 and 6 million. The Mach number and turbulence intensity values are similar in both wind tunnels at the 3 million Reynolds number test, while they are significantly different at 6 million Reynolds number. The paper presents a comparison of the data obtained from the two wind tunnels, showing good repeatability at 3 million Reynolds number and differences at 6 million Reynolds number that are consistent with the different Mach number and turbulence intensity values.

  3. Turbulence and selective decay in the SSX plasma wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tim; Brown, Michael; Dandurand, Dan; Fisher, Mike; Flanagan, Ken; Weinhold, Darren; Lukin, V.

    2011-10-01

    A helical, relaxed plasma state has been observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder has dimensions L = 1 m and R = 0 . 08 m. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v >= 50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. Typical plasma parameters are Ti = 25 eV, ne >=1015 cm-3, and B = 0 . 25 T. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data is favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibits broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement to the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇ × B --> = λ B --> . While the global structure roughly corresponds to the minimum energy eigenstate for the wind tunnel geometry, the plasma is high beta (β = 0 . 5) and does not have a flat λ profile. Merging with plasma plumes injected from both ends of the cylinder will be compared to the non-merging plasmas. Supported by US DOE and NSF.

  4. A wind tunnel test of newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Tolchinsky, Alexander D; Sigaev, Vladimir I; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2012-07-01

    In this study the performance of two newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers was evaluated. The two test samplers are cyclone-based personal samplers that incorporate a recirculating liquid film. The performance evaluations focused on the physical efficiencies that a personal bioaerosol sampler could provide, including aspiration, collection, and capture efficiencies. The evaluation tests were carried out in a wind tunnel, and the test personal samplers were mounted on the chest of a full-size manikin placed in the test chamber of the wind tunnel. Monodisperse fluorescent aerosols ranging from 0.5 to 20 microm were used to challenge the samplers. Two wind speeds of 0.5 and 2.0 m/sec were employed as the test wind speeds in this study. The test results indicated that the aspiration efficiency of the two test samplers closely agreed with the ACGIH inhalable convention within the size range of the test aerosols. The aspiration efficiency was found to be independent of the sampling orientation. The collection efficiency acquired from these two samplers showed that the 50% cutoff diameters were both around 0.6 microm. However the wall loss of these two test samplers increased as the aerosol size increased, and the wall loss of PAS-4 was considerably higher than that of PAS-5, especially in the aerosol size larger than 5 microm, which resulted in PAS-4 having a relatively lower capture efficiency than PAS-5. Overall, the PAS-5 is considered a better personal bioaerosol sampler than the PAS-4.

  5. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or better (e.g., hot-wire anemometry). The mean wind speed in the test section of the wind tunnel... section shall be determined during the tests using an appropriate technique (e.g., hot-wire anemometry... volumetric units. (g) Schematic drawings of the particle delivery system (wind tunnel and blower system) and...

  6. Operational modal analysis on a VAWT in a large wind tunnel using stereo vision technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Najafi, Nadia; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    This paper is about development and use of a research based stereo vision system for vibration and operational modal analysis on a parked, 1-kW, 3-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), tested in a wind tunnel at high wind. Vibrations were explored experimentally by tracking small deflections ...... in picking very closely spaced modes. Finally, the uncertainty of the 3D displacement measurement was evaluated by applying a generalized method based on the law of error propagation, for a linear camera model of the stereo vision system.......This paper is about development and use of a research based stereo vision system for vibration and operational modal analysis on a parked, 1-kW, 3-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), tested in a wind tunnel at high wind. Vibrations were explored experimentally by tracking small deflections...... of the markers on the structure with two cameras, and also numerically, to study structural vibrations in an overall objective to investigate challenges and to prove the capability of using stereo vision. Two high speed cameras provided displacement measurements at no wind speed interference. The displacement...

  7. Time Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at a Wind Tunnel Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, Bil; Streett, Craig L; Glass, Christopher E.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics code, an unsteady, time-accurate flow field about a Space Launch System configuration was simulated at a transonic wind tunnel condition (Mach = 0.9). Delayed detached eddy simulation combined with Reynolds Averaged Naiver-Stokes and a Spallart-Almaras turbulence model were employed for the simulation. Second order accurate time evolution scheme was used to simulate the flow field, with a minimum of 0.2 seconds of simulated time to as much as 1.4 seconds. Data was collected at 480 pressure taps at locations, 139 of which matched a 3% wind tunnel model, tested in the Transonic Dynamic Tunnel (TDT) facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed agreement within 5% in terms of location for peak RMS levels, and 20% for frequency and magnitude of power spectral densities. Grid resolution and time step sensitivity studies were performed to identify methods for improved accuracy comparisons to wind tunnel data. With limited computational resources, accurate trends for reduced vibratory loads on the vehicle were observed. Exploratory methods such as determining minimized computed errors based on CFL number and sub-iterations, as well as evaluating frequency content of the unsteady pressures and evaluation of oscillatory shock structures were used in this study to enhance computational efficiency and solution accuracy. These techniques enabled development of a set of best practices, for the evaluation of future flight vehicle designs in terms of vibratory loads.

  8. Transonic Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Static Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of Several Configurations of the Scout Vehicle and of a Number of Related Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas C.

    1961-01-01

    Results have been obtained i n t h e Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.40 t o 1.20 for several configurations of the Scout vehicle and f o r a number of related models. Tests extended over an angle-of-attack range from about -10 degrees to 10 degrees at a Reynolds number per foot of about 3.8 x 10 sup 6.

  9. Boundary Condition Study for the Juncture Flow Experiment in the NASA Langley 14x22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Carlson, J.-R.; Hannon, J. A.; Jenkins, L. N.; Bartram, S. M.; Pulliam, T. H.; Lee, H. C.

    2017-01-01

    Because future wind tunnel tests associated with the NASA Juncture Flow project are being designed for the purpose of CFD validation, considerable effort is going into the characterization of the wind tunnel boundary conditions, particularly at inflow. This is important not only because wind tunnel flowfield nonuniformities can play a role in integrated testing uncertainties, but also because the better the boundary conditions are known, the better CFD can accurately represent the experiment. This paper describes recent investigative wind tunnel tests involving two methods to measure and characterize the oncoming flow in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The features of each method, as well as some of their pros and cons, are highlighted. Boundary conditions and modeling tactics currently used by CFD for empty-tunnel simulations are also described, and some results using three different CFD codes are shown. Preliminary CFD parametric studies associated with the Juncture Flow model are summarized, to determine sensitivities of the flow near the wing-body juncture region of the model to a variety of modeling decisions.

  10. Practical application of RINO, a smartphone-based dynamic displacement sensing application for wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Knez, Kyle P.; Min, Jae-Hong; Jo, Hongki

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic displacement is one of the most important measurands in wind tunnel tests of structures. Laser sensors or optical sensors are usually used in wind tunnel tests to measure displacements. However, these commercial sensors have limitations in its use, cost and installation despite of their good performance in accuracy. RINO (Real-time Image- processing for Non-contact monitoring), an iOS software application for dynamic displacement monitoring, has been developed in the previous study. In this study, feasibility of RINO in practical use for wind tunnel tests is explored. Series of wind tunnel tests show that performances of RINO are comparable with those of conventional displacement sensors.

  11. Open access wind tunnel measurements of a downwind free yawing wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    A series of free yawing wind tunnel experiments was held in the Open Jet Facility (OJF) of the TU Delft. The ≈ 300 W turbine has three blades in a downwind configuration and is optionally free to yaw. Different 1.6m diameter rotor configurations are tested such as blade flexibility and sweep....... This paper gives a brief overview of the measurement setup and challenges, and continues with presenting some key results. This wind tunnel campaign has shown that a three bladed downwind wind turbine can operate in a stable fashion under a minimal yaw error. Finally, a description of how to obtain this open...... access dataset, including the post-processing scripts and procedures, is made available via a publicly accessible website....

  12. Description and calibration of the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. M., Jr.; Corlett, W. A.; Monta, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The two test sections of the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel were calibrated over the operating Mach number range from 1.47 to 4.63. The results of the calibration are presented along with a a description of the facility and its operational capability. The calibrations include Mach number and flow angularity distributions in both test sections at selected Mach numbers and tunnel stagnation pressures. Calibration data are also presented on turbulence, test-section boundary layer characteristics, moisture effects, blockage, and stagnation-temperature distributions. The facility is described in detail including dimensions and capacities where appropriate, and example of special test capabilities are presented. The operating parameters are fully defined and the power consumption characteristics are discussed.

  13. Hypersonic wind-tunnel free-flying experiments with onboard instrumentation

    KAUST Repository

    Mudford, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic wind-tunnel testing with "free-flight" models unconnected to a sting ensures that sting/wake flow interactions do not compromise aerodynamic coefficient measurements. The development of miniaturized electronics has allowed the demonstration of a variant of a new method for the acquisition of hypersonic model motion data using onboard accelerometers, gyroscopes, and a microcontroller. This method is demonstrated in a Mach 6 wind-tunnel flow, whose duration and pitot pressure are sufficient for the model to move a body length or more and turn through a significant angle. The results are compared with those obtained from video analysis of the model motion, the existing method favored for obtaining aerodynamic coefficients in similar hypersonic wind-tunnel facilities. The results from the two methods are in good agreement. The new method shows considerable promise for reliable measurement of aerodynamic coefficients, particularly because the data obtained are in more directly applicable forms of accelerations and rates of turn, rather than the model position and attitude obtained from the earlier visualization method. The ideal may be to have both methods operating together.

  14. Shuttle Continuous Open Wind Tunnel (SCOWT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, G. M.; Deluca, L.; Siemers, P. M.; Wood, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The aerodynamic and heat transfer coefficients are studied within the range of thermo-fluid-dynamic conditions experienced by a satellite during Tethered Satellite System (TSS) atmospheric flights. The gasdynamic processes occuring downstream of the bow wave standing in front of the satellite are also studied. The knowledge of the chemistry and physics of the upper atmosphere related to satellite aerothermodynamics is furthered. The existence of an overshooting of the air drag coefficient of the sphere in the transition regime is validated. A complete set of measurements is performed in order to provide the data base to develop and validate theoretical models of free molecule transition flow fields.

  15. Wind tunnel testing of the DeepWind demonstrator in design and tilted operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistia, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.

    2016-01-01

    ) configuration. The velocity field in the wake of the rotor was also fully characterized by means of an instrumented traversing system, to investigate the flow distribution downstream of the test section. Special care is taken in the description of the experimental set-up and of the measured data, so......The DeepWind Project aims at investigating the feasibility of a new floating vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) concept, whose purpose is to exploit wind resources at deep-water offshore sites. The results of an extensive experimental campaign on the DeepWind reduced scale demonstrator are here...... was installed on a high precision test bench, whose axis was suitable to be inclined up to 15° with respect to the design (i.e. upright) operating condition. The experiments were performed at the large scale, high speed wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano (Italy), using a “free jet” (open channel...

  16. Design and wind tunnel experimentation of a variable blade drag type vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Samuel; Bahr, Behnam

    2012-04-01

    The primary purpose of this research effort is to propose a novel efficiency boosting design feature in a drag type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), explore practicality through design and fabrication, and test the viability of the design through wind tunnel experiments. Using adaptive control surface design and an improved blade shape can be very useful in harnessing the wind's energy in low wind speed areas. The new design is based on a series of smaller blade elements to make any shape, which changes to reduce a negative resistance as it rotates and thus maximizing the useful torque. As such, these blades were designed into a modified Savonius wind turbine with the goal of improving upon the power coefficient produced by a more conventional design. The experiment yielded some positive observations with regard to starting characteristics. Torque and angular velocity data was recorded for both the conventional configuration and the newly built configuration and the torque and power coefficient results were compared.

  17. Wind power prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.; Mcginness, H.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were performed to predict the power available from the wind at the Goldstone, California, antenna site complex. The background for power prediction was derived from a statistical evaluation of available wind speed data records at this location and at nearby locations similarly situated within the Mojave desert. In addition to a model for power prediction over relatively long periods of time, an interim simulation model that produces sample wind speeds is described. The interim model furnishes uncorrelated sample speeds at hourly intervals that reproduce the statistical wind distribution at Goldstone. A stochastic simulation model to provide speed samples representative of both the statistical speed distributions and correlations is also discussed.

  18. Impact and Estimation of Balance Coordinate System Rotations and Translations in Wind-Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Kenneth G.; Parker, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between the model and balance coordinate systems lead to biases in the aerodynamic measurements during wind-tunnel testing. The reference coordinate system relative to the calibration coordinate system at which the forces and moments are resolved is crucial to the overall accuracy of force measurements. This paper discusses sources of discrepancies and estimates of coordinate system rotation and translation due to machining and assembly differences. A methodology for numerically estimating the coordinate system biases will be discussed and developed. Two case studies are presented using this methodology to estimate the model alignment. Examples span from angle measurement system shifts on the calibration system to discrepancies in actual wind-tunnel data. The results from these case-studies will help aerodynamic researchers and force balance engineers to better the understand and identify potential differences in calibration systems due to coordinate system rotation and translation.

  19. Aeroacoustic response of coaxial wall-mounted Helmholtz resonators in a low-speed wind tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaton, William V; Nishikawa, Asami

    2015-01-01

    The aeroacoustic response of coaxial wall-mounted Helmholtz resonators with different neck geometries in a low-speed wind tunnel has been investigated. Experimental test results of this system reveal a strong aeroacoustic response over a Strouhal number range of 0.25 to 0.1 for both increasing and decreasing the flow rate in the wind tunnel. Aeroacoustic response in the low-amplitude range O(10(-3)) < Vac/Vflow < O(10(-1)) has been successfully modeled by describing-function analysis. This analysis, coupled with a turbulent flow velocity distribution model, gives reasonable values for the location in the flow of the undulating stream velocity that drives vortex shedding at the resonator mouth. Having an estimate for the stream velocity that drives the flow-excited resonance is crucial when employing the describing-function analysis to predict aeroacoustic response of resonators.

  20. Preliminary Design of a LSA Aircraft Using Wind Tunnel Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert ANGI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents preliminary results concerning the design and aerodynamic calculations of a light sport aircraft (LSA. These were performed for a new lightweight, low cost, low fuel consumption and long-range aircraft. The design process was based on specific software tools as Advanced Aircraft Analysis (AAA, XFlr 5 aerodynamic and dynamic stability analysis, and Catia design, according to CS-LSA requirements. The calculations were accomplished by a series of tests performed in the wind tunnel in order to assess experimentally the aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane.

  1. Optimum design configuration of Savonius rotor through wind tunnel experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, U.K.; Thotla, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039 (India); Maity, D. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039 (India)

    2008-08-15

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to assess the aerodynamic performance of single-, two- and three-stage Savonius rotor systems. Both semicircular and twisted blades have been used in either case. A family of rotor systems has been manufactured with identical stage aspect ratio keeping the identical projected area of each rotor. Experiments were carried out to optimize the different parameters like number of stages, number of blades (two and three) and geometry of the blade (semicircular and twisted). A further attempt was made to investigate the performance of two-stage rotor system by inserting valves on the concave side of blade. (author)

  2. Wind Tunnel Tests of Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors: March 2001--August 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, N.; Peterka, J. A.; Gee, R. C.; Kearney, D.

    2008-05-01

    Conducted extensive wind-tunnel tests on parabolic trough solar collectors to determine practical wind loads applicable to structural design for stress and deformation, and local component design for concentrator reflectors.

  3. High-Speed Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Model of the Lockheed YP-80A Airplane Including Correlation with Flight Tests and Tests of Dive-Recovery Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Joseph W.; Gray, Lyle J.

    1947-01-01

    This report contains the results of tests of a 1/3-scale model of the Lockheed YP-90A "Shooting Star" airplane and a comparison of drag, maximum lift coefficient, and elevator angle required for level flight as measured in the wind tunnel and in flight. Included in the report are the general aerodynamic characteristics of the model and of two types of dive-recovery flaps, one at several positions along the chord on the lower surface of the wing and the other on the lower surface of the fuselage. The results show good agreement between the flight and wind-tunnel measurements at all Mach numbers. The results indicate that the YP-80A is controllable in pitch by the elevators to a Mach number of at least 0.85. The fuselage dive-recovery flaps are effective for producing a climbing moment and increasing the drag at Mach numbers up to at least 0.8. The wing dive-recovery flaps are most effective for producing a climbing moment at 0.75 Mach number. At 0.85 Mach number, their effectiveness is approximately 50 percent of the maximum. The optimum position for the wing dive-recovery flaps to produce a climbing moment is at approximately 35 percent of the chord.

  4. Aerodynamic study of different cyclist positions: CFD analysis and full-scale wind-tunnel tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-05-07

    Three different cyclist positions were evaluated with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and wind-tunnel experiments were used to provide reliable data to evaluate the accuracy of the CFD simulations. Specific features of this study are: (1) both steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and unsteady flow modelling, with more advanced turbulence modelling techniques (Large-Eddy Simulation - LES), were evaluated; (2) the boundary layer on the cyclist's surface was resolved entirely with low-Reynolds number modelling, instead of modelling it with wall functions; (3) apart from drag measurements, also surface pressure measurements on the cyclist's body were performed in the wind-tunnel experiment, which provided the basis for a more detailed evaluation of the predicted flow field by CFD. The results show that the simulated and measured drag areas differed about 11% (RANS) and 7% (LES), which is considered to be a close agreement in CFD studies. A fair agreement with wind-tunnel data was obtained for the predicted surface pressures, especially with LES. Despite the higher accuracy of LES, its much higher computational cost could make RANS more attractive for practical use in some situations. CFD is found to be a valuable tool to evaluate the drag of different cyclist positions and to investigate the influence of small adjustments in the cyclist's position. A strong advantage of CFD is that detailed flow field information is obtained, which cannot easily be obtained from wind-tunnel tests. This detailed information allows more insight in the causes of the drag force and provides better guidance for position improvements.

  5. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel. Part 5: Infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of infrared thermography for aerodynamics was made. Particular attention was paid to boundary layer transition detection. IR thermography flow visualization of 2-D and 3-D separation was surveyed. Heat transfer measurements and surface temperature measurements were also covered. Comparisons of several commercial IR cameras were made. The use of a recently purchased IR camera in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels was studied. Optical access for these facilities and the methods to scan typical models was investigated.

  6. Measuring Gas Concentration and Wind Intensity in a Turbulent Wind Tunnel with a Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the measurement of gas concentration and wind intensity performed with a mobile robot in a custom turbulent wind tunnel designed for experimentation with customizable wind and gas leak sources. This paper presents the representation in different information layers of the measurements obtained in the turbulent wind tunnel under different controlled environmental conditions in order to describe the plume of the gas and wind intensities inside the experimentation chamber. The information layers have been generated from the measurements gathered by individual onboard gas and wind sensors carried out by an autonomous mobile robot. On the one hand, the assumption was that the size and cost of these specialized sensors do not allow the creation of a net of sensors or other measurement alternatives based on the simultaneous use of several sensors, and on the other hand, the assumption is that the information layers created will have application on the development and test of automatic gas source location procedures based on reactive or nonreactive algorithms.

  7. Wind tunnel tests of sailwings for Darrieus rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, P. S.; Everitt, K. W.

    Wind tunnel tests have been made to investigate the aerodynamics of sailwings intended for use in vertical axis wind turbines. The tests were made over the full range of angles of incidence and used a number of different membranes and pre-tensions. The majority of tests used a rigid trailing edge but a limited number of tests was made using a wire or nylon cord in a circular-arc shaped trailing-edge. The tangential and radial force coefficients were measured as also was the chordwise component of membrane tension. It is concluded that such turbines should produce a high starting torque and that their performance will be influenced by the trailing edge elasticity and pre-tension at quite low tip speed ratios.

  8. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 2. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Plotted wing pressure data is tabulated.

  9. Analysis of some interference effects in a transonic wind tunnel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lombardi, G

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the walls of a test section on a model in transonic flow were investigated by using the AGARD Calibration Model B. Tests were carried out in a closed-circuit pressurized tunnel, with a confined square test section of 1.5 m width...

  10. Nacelle Chine Installation Based on Wind-Tunnel Test Using Efficient Global Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Masahiro; Yokokawa, Yuzuru; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Takeshi; Jeong, Shinkyu; Yamamoto, Kazuomi

    Design exploration of a nacelle chine installation was carried out. The nacelle chine improves stall performance when deploying multi-element high-lift devices. This study proposes an efficient design process using a Kriging surrogate model to determine the nacelle chine installation point in wind-tunnel tests. The design exploration was conducted in a wind-tunnel using the JAXA high-lift aircraft model at the JAXA Large-scale Low-speed Wind Tunnel. The objective was to maximize the maximum lift. The chine installation points were designed on the engine nacelle in the axial and chord-wise direction, while the geometry of the chine was fixed. In the design process, efficient global optimization (EGO) which includes Kriging model and genetic algorithm (GA) was employed. This method makes it possible both to improve the accuracy of the response surface and to explore the global optimum efficiently. Detailed observations of flowfields using the Particle Image Velocimetry method confirmed the chine effect and design results.

  11. Wind-tunnel free-flight investigation of a 0.15-scale model of the F-106B airplane with vortex flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Long P.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effects of vortex flaps on the flight dynamic characteristics of the F-106B in the area of low-speed, high-angle-of-attack flight was undertaken on a 0.15-scale model of the airplane in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel. Static force tests, dynamic forced-oscillation tests, as well as free-flight tests were conducted to obtain a data base on the flight characteristics of the F-106B airplane with vortex flaps. Vortex flap configurations tested included a full-span gothic flap, a full-span constant-chord flap, and a part-span gothic flap.

  12. Gust response analysis and wind tunnel test for a high-aspect ratio wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical nonlinear aeroelastic response analysis for a flexible high-aspect ratio wing excited by harmonic gust load is presented along with a companion wind tunnel test. A multidisciplinary coupled numerical calculation is developed to simulate the flexible model wing undergoing gust load in the time domain via discrete nonlinear finite element structural dynamic analysis and nonplanar unsteady vortex lattice aerodynamic computation. A dynamic perturbation analysis about a nonlinear static equilibrium is also used to determine the small perturbation flutter boundary. A novel noncontact 3-D camera measurement analysis system is firstly used in the wind tunnel test to obtain the spatial large deformation and responses. The responses of the flexible wing under different static equilibrium states and frequency gust loads are discussed. The fair to good quantitative agreements between the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented analysis method is an acceptable way to predict the geometrically nonlinear gust response for flexible wings.

  13. Experience with scale effects in non-airplane wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J. C.; Olson, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamics results of two tests performed in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center are discussed with particular emphasis on the effects of model scale. The tests are unusual for this facility in that they were performed on non-airplane configurations: a full-scale tractor/trailer and large ramair inflated wings. For the truck drag measurements, comparisons with 1/8th-scale drag data taken at the Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M indicate that small scale measurements can provide adequate accuracy if care is taken to test at high enough Reynolds numbers and if large regions of separated flow and reattachment are avoided. Some of the important aerodynamic and structural aspects of parafoil testing are also discussed. These include the effects of Reynolds number and aeroelastic effects such as fabric and support line stretch.

  14. Methodology for the Assessment of 3D Conduction Effects in an Aerothermal Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Anthony Brandon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for the assessment of three-dimensional conduction effects during test in a Aerothermal Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to duplicate and extend tests that were performed during the 1960's on thermal conduction on proturberance on a flat plate. Slides review the 1D versus 3D conduction data reduction error, the analysis process, CFD-based analysis, loose coupling method that simulates a wind tunnel test run, verification of the CFD solution, Grid convergence, Mach number trend, size trends, and a Sumary of the CFD conduction analysis. Other slides show comparisons to pretest CFD at Mach 1.5 and 2.16 and the geometries of the models and grids.

  15. Design and wind tunnel tests of winglets on a DC-10 wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a wind tunnel test utilizing a 4.7 percent scale semi-span model in the Langley Research Center 8-foot transonic pressure wind tunnel to establish the cruise drag improvement potential of winglets as applied to the DC-10 wide body transport aircraft. Winglets were investigated on both the DC-10 Series 10 (domestic) and 30/40 (intercontinental) configurations and compared with the Series 30/40 configuration. The results of the investigation confirm that for the DC-10 winglets provide approximately twice the cruise drag reduction of wing-tip extensions for about the same increase in bending moment at the wing fuselage juncture. Furthermore, the winglet configurations achieved drag improvements which were in close agreement to analytical estimates. It was observed that relatively small changes in wing-winglet tailoring effected large improvements in drag and visual flow characteristics. All final winglet configurations exhibited visual flow characteristics on the wing and winglets

  16. Computational design of low aspect ratio wing-winglets for transonic wind-tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Brown, Christopher K.

    1989-01-01

    A computational design has been performed for three different low aspect ratio wing planforms fitted with nonplanar winglets; one of the three planforms has been selected to be constructed as a wind tunnel model for testing in the NASA LaRC 7 x 10 High Speed Wind Tunnel. A design point of M = 0.8, CL approx = 0.3 was selected, for wings of aspect ratio equal to 2.2, and leading edge sweep angles of 45 and 50 deg. Winglet length is 15 percent of the wing semispan, with a cant angle of 15 deg, and a leading edge sweep of 50 deg. Winglet total area equals 2.25 percent of the wing reference area. This report summarizes the design process and the predicted transonic performance for each configuration.

  17. NACA0015 Measurements in LM Wind Tunnel and Turbulence Generated Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    A NACA0015 airfoil section was instrumented with an array of highfrequency microphones mounted on its surface and measured in the wind tunnel at LM Glasfiber at various inflow speeds, angles of attack, and with different turbulent inflow conditions. The aim of this work is to analyze these measur......A NACA0015 airfoil section was instrumented with an array of highfrequency microphones mounted on its surface and measured in the wind tunnel at LM Glasfiber at various inflow speeds, angles of attack, and with different turbulent inflow conditions. The aim of this work is to analyze...... these measurement data, including the turbulent inflow characteristics. The airfoil surface pressure data are considered in the perspective of turbulent inflow noise in order to identify the potential for using these data to validate and possibly improve associated noise models from the literature. In addition...

  18. Broadband measuring system for unsteady flow investigation in wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biriukov, V. I.; Garifullin, M. F.; Korneeva, D. B.; Slitinskaya, A. Ju.

    2016-10-01

    Due to increasingly tough requirements to the accuracy and informativity of the wind tunnel experiments, the urgency has grown of the unsteady flows research. A distinctive feature of such studies is synchronous multichannel measurements of rapidly changing in time process parameters (with a broadband spectrum and characteristic frequencies of 0 Hz to 1000 Hz and above) and also the need for fast processing and storage of large volumes of the data received. To solve these problems and to meet the requirements, TsAGI has developed a measuring system (MS) and the corresponding software. The basic purpose of MS is to conduct transonic buffeting research in T-128 wind tunnel. Besides, it can be used to study separated flow regimes, aeroelastic vibrations, including: classic flutter, stall flutter, limit cycle oscillations, etc. The MS can be used also to study a variety of transient regimes. It is possible to expand the system further on to enhance its performance without introducing any fundamental changes in its structure and software, and without breaking its operability for the period of modernization.

  19. Damping insert materials for settling chambers of supersonic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Radespiel, Rolf

    2017-03-01

    This study describes the application of a novel damping insert material for reducing the flow fluctuations in a tandem nozzle supersonic wind tunnel. This new damping material is composed of multi-layer stainless steel wired meshes. The influences of the multi-layer mesh, such as the quantity of the mesh layer and the installed location in the settling chamber, to the freestream quality have been investigated. A Pitot probe instrumented with a Kulite pressure sensor and a hot-wire probe are employed to monitor the flow fluctuation in the test section of the wind tunnel. Thereafter, a combined modal analysis is applied for the disturbance qualification. Additionally, the transient Mach number in the test section is measured. The disturbance qualification indicates that the multi-layer mesh performs well in providing reduction of vorticity reduction and acoustic fluctuations. Comparable flow quality of the freestream was also obtained using a combination of flexible damping materials. However, the life-span of the new damping materials is much longer. The time transient of the Mach number measured in the test section indicates that the mean flow is rather constant over run time. Furthermore, the time-averaged pressure along the settling chamber is recorded and it shows the distribution of pressure drop by settling chamber inserts.

  20. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, M. F.; Kühn, M.; PetroviĆ, V.; Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.; Mikkelsen, T.; Croce, A.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper combines the currently relevant research methodologies of scaled wind turbine model experiments in wind tunnels with remote-sensing short-range WindScanner Lidar measurement technology. The wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano was equipped with three wind turbine models and two short-range WindScanner Lidars to demonstrate the benefits of synchronised scanning Lidars in such experimental surroundings for the first time. The dual- Lidar system can provide fully synchronised trajectory scans with sampling time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. First, staring mode measurements were compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement of wake profiles on a line as well as wake area scans were executed to illustrate the applicability of Lidar scanning to measuring small scale wind flow effects. The downsides of Lidar with respect to the hot wire probes are the larger measurement probe volume and the loss of some measurements due to moving blades. In contrast, the benefits are the high flexibility in conducting both point measurements and area scanning, and the fact that remote sensing techniques do not disturb the flow while measuring. The research campaign revealed a high potential for using short-range WindScanner Lidar for accurately measuring small scale flow structures in a wind tunnel.

  1. Recent Advancements in the Infrared Flow Visualization System for the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbeff, Theodore J., II; Baerny, Jennifer K.

    2017-01-01

    The following details recent efforts undertaken at the NASA Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels to design and deploy an advanced, production-level infrared (IR) flow visualization data system. Highly sensitive IR cameras, coupled with in-line image processing, have enabled the visualization of wind tunnel model surface flow features as they develop in real-time. Boundary layer transition, shock impingement, junction flow, vortex dynamics, and buffet are routinely observed in both transonic and supersonic flow regimes all without the need of dedicated ramps in test section total temperature. Successful measurements have been performed on wing-body sting mounted test articles, semi-span floor mounted aircraft models, and sting mounted launch vehicle configurations. The unique requirements of imaging in production wind tunnel testing has led to advancements in the deployment of advanced IR cameras in a harsh test environment, robust data acquisition storage and workflow, real-time image processing algorithms, and evaluation of optimal surface treatments. The addition of a multi-camera IR flow visualization data system to the Ames UPWT has demonstrated itself to be a valuable analyses tool in the study of new and old aircraft/launch vehicle aerodynamics and has provided new insight for the evaluation of computational techniques.

  2. Development of a process control computer device for the adaptation of flexible wind tunnel walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, J.

    1982-01-01

    In wind tunnel tests, the problems arise of determining the wall pressure distribution, calculating the wall contour, and controlling adjustment of the walls. This report shows how these problems have been solved for the high speed wind tunnel of the Technical University of Berlin.

  3. Wind Tunnel Study of the Electro-Thermal De-Icing of Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, C.; Ilinca, A.; Fortin, G.; Perron, J. [Anti-icing Materials International Laboratory, Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, Quebec, Canada and Wind Energy Group, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Quebec (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Most of the wind turbines operating in cold climates are facing icing events but very few of them are equipped with blade de-icing systems. Few studies were performed and published on the characteristics of these de-icing systems. In order to optimize the design and power consumption of an electro-thermal de-icing system for wind turbine blades, an experimental set-up was built and used to test the system under icing conditions in a refrigerated wind tunnel. The parameters of the de-icing control system consider only the convective heat transfer at the blade surface during ice accretion. Meteorological data are those gathered from Murdochville's experimental site in Canada. The blade airfoil is a NACA 63 415 and the icing conditions are scaled to be simulated in the icing wind tunnel section. The results show the relation between the meteorological conditions, the ridge formed by liquid water runback, the heating power and the airfoil surface temperature. The study provides useful data for the design of electro-thermal deicing systems for wind turbine blade application.

  4. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wind Loads on a Post-Panamax Container Ship as a Function of the Container Configuration on Deck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of the wind forces acting on a 9,000+ TEU container ship has been carried out through a series of wind tunnel tests. It was investigated how the wind forces depend on the container configuration on the deck using a 1:450 scale model and a series of appropriate container...... are presented as nondimensional coefficients. It is concluded, that the measured forces and moment depend on the container configuration on deck, and the results may provide a general idea of how the magnitude of the wind forces is affected by a given container stacking configuration on a similar container ship....

  5. Turbulence measurements in high-speed wind tunnels using focusing laser differential interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, Matthew R.

    Characterization of freestream disturbances and their effect on laminar boundary layer transition is of great importance in high-speed wind tunnel testing, where significant differences between the behavior of scale-model and free-flight transition have long been noted. However, the methods traditionally used to perform this characterization in low-speed flows present significant difficulties when applied to supersonic and especially hypersonic wind tunnels. The design and theory of a focusing laser differential interferometer (FLDI) instrument, originally invented by Smeets at the Institut Saint-Louis in the 1970s and used recently by Parziale in the CalTech T5 shock tunnel, is presented. It is a relatively-simple, non-imaging common-path interferometer for measuring refractive signals from transition and turbulence, and it has a unique ability to look through facility windows, ignore sidewall boundary-layers and vibration, and concentrate only on the refractive signal near a pair of sharp beam foci in the core flow. The instrument's low cost and ease of implementation make it a promising alternative to traditional hot-wire anemometry and particle-based methods for turbulence characterization. Benchtop experiments using a turbulent supersonic air jet demonstrate its focusing ability, frequency response, unwanted signal rejection, and ease of use. The instrument is used to optically interrogate the flow in the Penn State University Supersonic Wind Tunnel and USAF AEDC Hypervelocity Tunnel 9 for measurement of the overall intensity and spectra of freestream disturbances. Precise characterization of the strength and spectral content of the disturbances provides insight into their nature and potential effect upon boundary layer transition. A special feature of the FLDI instrument used here is the replacement of traditional fixed Wollaston prisms with variable Sanderson prisms for laser-beam separation and recombination.

  6. Soil wind erosion in ecological olive trees in the Tabernas desert (southeastern Spain): a wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Carlos; Lozano, Francisco Javier; Gallardo, Pedro; Giménez, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Wind erosion is a key component of the soil degradation processes. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of material loss from wind on soil properties for different soil types and changes in soil properties in olive groves when they are tilled. The study area is located in the north of the Tabernas Desert, in the province of Almería, southeastern Spain. It is one of the driest areas in Europe, with a semiarid thermo-Mediterranean type of climate. We used a new wind tunnel model over three different soil types (olive-cropped Calcisol, Cambisol and Luvisol) and studied micro-plot losses and deposits detected by an integrated laser scanner. We also studied the image processing possibilities for examining the particles attached to collector plates located at the end of the tunnel to determine their characteristics and whether they were applicable to the setup. Samples collected in the traps at the end of the tunnel were analyzed. We paid special attention to the influence of organic carbon, carbonate and clay contents because of their special impact on soil crusting and the wind-erodible fraction. A principal components analysis (PCA) was carried out to find any relations on generated dust properties and the intensity and behavior of those relationships. Component 1 separated data with high N and OC contents from samples high in fine silt, CO3= and available K content. Component 2 separated data with high coarse silt and clay contents from data with high fine sand content. Component 3 was an indicator of available P2O5 content. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to analyze the effect of soil type and sampling height on different properties of trapped dust. Calculations based on tunnel data showed overestimation of erosion in soil types and calculation of the fraction of soil erodible by wind done by other authors for Spanish soils. As the highest loss was found in Cambisols, mainly due to the effect on soil crusting and the wind

  7. Time-Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at Wind Tunnel Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, William L.; Glass, Christopher E.; Streett, Craig L.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A transonic flow field about a Space Launch System (SLS) configuration was simulated with the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code at wind tunnel conditions. Unsteady, time-accurate computations were performed using second-order Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) for up to 1.5 physical seconds. The surface pressure time history was collected at 619 locations, 169 of which matched locations on a 2.5 percent wind tunnel model that was tested in the 11 ft. x 11 ft. test section of the NASA Ames Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed that the peak surface pressure RMS level occurs behind the forward attach hardware, and good agreement for frequency and power was obtained in this region. Computational domain, grid resolution, and time step sensitivity studies were performed. These included an investigation of pseudo-time sub-iteration convergence. Using these sensitivity studies and experimental data comparisons, a set of best practices to date have been established for FUN3D simulations for SLS launch vehicle analysis. To the author's knowledge, this is the first time DDES has been used in a systematic approach and establish simulation time needed, to analyze unsteady pressure loads on a space launch vehicle such as the NASA SLS.

  8. Binocular videogrammetric system for three-dimensional measurement in low-speed wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ye; Gu, Yonggang; Zhai, Chao

    2014-11-01

    In order to avoid the defects of contact measurement, such as limited range, complex constructing and disability of 3-D parameter acquisition, we built a binocular videogrammetric system for measuring 3-D geometry parameters of wind tunnel test models, for instance, displacement, rotation angle and vibration, in low-speed wind tunnel. The system is based on the principles of close-range digital photogrammetry. As a non-contact system, it acquires parameters without interference in the experiments, and it has adjustable range and simple structure. It is worth mentioning that this is a Realtime measurement system, so that it can greatly compress the experiment period, furthermore, it is also able to provide some specific experiments with parameters for online adjustment. In this system, images are acquired through two industrial digital cameras and a PCI-E image acquisition card, and they are processed in a PC. The two cameras are triggered by signals come from a function signal generator, so that images of different cameras will have good temporal synchronization to ensure the accuracy of 3-D reconstruction. A two-step stereo calibration technique using planar pattern developed by Zhengyou Zhang is used to calibrate these cameras. Results of wind tunnel test indicate that the system can provide displacement accuracy better than 0.1% and rotation angle accuracy better than 0.1 degree, besides, the vibration frequency accuracy is superior to 0.1Hz in the low-frequency range.

  9. High-precision pose measurement method in wind tunnels based on laser-aided vision technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of position and attitude parameters for the isolated target from a high-speed aircraft is a great challenge in the field of wind tunnel simulation technology. In this paper, firstly, an image acquisition method for small high-speed targets with multi-dimensional movement in wind tunnel environment is proposed based on laser-aided vision technology. Combining with the trajectory simulation of the isolated model, the reasonably distributed laser stripes and self-luminous markers are utilized to capture clear images of the object. Then, after image processing, feature extraction, stereo correspondence and reconstruction, three-dimensional information of laser stripes and self-luminous markers are calculated. Besides, a pose solution method based on projected laser stripes and self-luminous markers is proposed. Finally, simulation experiments on measuring the position and attitude of high-speed rolling targets are conducted, as well as accuracy verification experiments. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is feasible and efficient for measuring the pose parameters of rolling targets in wind tunnels.

  10. Roughness Effects on Wind-Turbine Wake Dynamics in a Boundary-Layer Wind Tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Buckingham, Sophia; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Increasing demand in wind energy has resulted in increasingly clustered wind farms, and raised the interest in wake research dramatically in the last couple of years. To this end, the present work employs an experimental approach with scaled three-bladed wind-turbine models in a large boundary-la...

  11. The 6-foot-4-inch Wind Tunnel at the Washington Navy Yard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, G L; Mccrary, J A

    1935-01-01

    The 6-foot-4-inch wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment has proven itself capable of continuous and reliable output of data. The real value of the tunnel will increase as experience is gained in checking the observed tunnel performance against full-scale performance. Such has been the case of the 8- by 8-foot tunnel, and for that reason the comparison in the calibration tests have been presented.

  12. Thermodynamic Effects on Particle Movement:Wind Tunnel Simulation Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Qinghe; QU Jianjun; ZHANG Kecun; LIU Xianwan

    2012-01-01

    Sand/dust storms are some of the main hazards in arid and semi-arid zones.These storms also influence global environmental changes.By field observations,empirical statistics,and numerical simulations,pioneer researchers on these natural events have concluded the existence of a positive relationship between thermodynamic effects and sand/dust storms.Thermodynamic effects induce an unsteady stratified atmosphere to influence the process of these storms.However,studies on the relationship of thermodynamic effects with particles (i.e.,sand and dust) are limited.In this article,wind tunnel with heating was used to simulate the quantitative relationship between thermodynamic effects and particle movement on different surfaces.Compared with the cold state,the threshold wind velocity of particles is found to be significantly decrease under the hot state.The largest decrease percentage exceedes 9% on fine and coarse sand surfaces.The wind velocity also has a three-power function in the sand transport rate under the hot state with increased sand transport.Thermodynamic effects are stronger on loose surfaces and fine particles,but weaker on compacted surfaces and coarse particles.

  13. A Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Shear Stress with A Blowing Sand Cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a blowing sand system,the wind provides the driving forces for the particle movement while the moving particles exert the opposite forces to the wind by extracting its momentum.The wind-sand interaction that can be characterized by shear stress and force exerted on the wind by moving particles results in the modification of wind profiles.Detailed wind pro-files re-adapted to blown sand movement are measured in a wind tunnel for different grain size populations and at differ-ent free-stream wind velocities.The shear stress with a blowing sand cloud and force exerted on the wind by moving par-ticles are calculated from the measured wind velocity profiles.The results suggest that the wind profiles with presence of blowing sand cloud assume convex-upward curves on the u(z)-ln(z) plot compared with the straight lines characterizing the velocity profiles of clean wind,and they can be better fitted by power function than log-linear function.The exponent of the power function ranging from 0.1 to 0.17 tends to increase with an increase in wind velocity but decrease with an increase in particle size.The force per unit volume exerted on the wind by blown sand drift that is calculated based on the empirical power functions for the wind velocity profiles is found to decrease with height.The particle-induced force makes the total shear stress with blowing sand cloud partitioned into air-borne stress that results from the wind velocity gradient and grain-borne stress that results from the upward or downward movement of particles.The air-borne stress in-creases with an increase in height,while the grain-borne stress decreases with an increase in height.The air-borne shear stress at the top of sand cloud layer increases with both wind velocity and grain size,implying that it increases with sand transport rate for a given grain size.The shear stress with a blowing sand cloud is also closely related to the sand transport rate.Both the total shear stress and grain-borne stress on

  14. Identification of Flutter Derivatives of Bridge Decks in Wind Tunnel Test by Stochastic Subspace Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Janesupasaeree

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Flutter derivatives are the essential parameters in the estimations of the flutter critical wind velocity and the responses of long-span cable supported bridges. These derivatives can be experimentally estimated from wind tunnel test results. Generally, wind tunnel test methods can be divided into free decay test and buffeting test. Compared with the free decay method, the buffeting test is simpler but its outputs appear random-like. This makes the flutter derivatives extraction from its outputs more difficult and then a more advanced system identification is required. Most of previous studies have used deterministic system identification techniques, in which buffeting forces and responses are considered as noises. These previous techniques were applicable only to the free decay method. They also confronted some difficulties in extracting flutter derivatives at high wind speeds and under turbulence flow cases where the buffeting responses dominate. Approach: In this study, the covariance-driven stochastic subspace identification technique (SSI-COV was presented to extract the flutter derivatives of bridge decks from the buffeting test results. An advantage of this method is that it considers the buffeting forces and responses as inputs rather than as noises. Numerical simulations and wind tunnel tests of a streamlined thin plate model conducted under smooth flow by the free decay and the buffeting tests were used to validate the applicability of the SSI-COV method. Then, wind tunnel tests of a two-edge girder blunt type of Industrial-Ring-Road Bridge deck (IRR were conducted under smooth and turbulence flow. Results: The identified flutter derivatives of the thin plate model by the SSI-COV technique agree well with those obtained theoretically. The results from the thin plate and the IRR Bridge deck validated the reliability and applicability of the SSI-COV technique to various experimental methods and conditions of wind flow

  15. Variation in wind speed and surface shear stress from open floor to porous parallel windbreaks: A wind tunnel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, De-Xin; Zhong, Ye; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Wu, Jia-Bing; Shi, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Ting-Yao

    2009-08-01

    As vegetative windbreaks become established on a large scale in agricultural ecosystems, understanding the influence of windbreak networks on the momentum budget of the atmospheric boundary layer becomes important. The authors conducted a wind tunnel experiment to study the variation of wind speed profile and surface shear stress of wind flow passing from an open surface to another with parallel windbreaks. Five spacing (L = 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 h, wherein h is the windbreak height) windbreak arrays with moderate porosity (aerodynamic porosity α = 0.501) were used in the experiments. Both near-floor and over-array wind speed measurements showed that airflow will approach equilibrium state behind a special windbreak of the array, varying from 4th to 9th windbreak when the spacing change from 30 to 5 h. Within the range of L/h values investigated, arrays with narrower spacing cause higher friction velocity and roughness length, which were up to 2.26 and nearly 100 times those observed over open floor, respectively. A semiempirical momentum budget model is developed on the arrayed surface to estimate windbreak drag and shear stress on the protected floor. Windbreak drag accounts for more than 80% of shear stress on the arrayed surface, and the shear stress on protected floor is less than 20% when L/h < 40 based on the model estimation. The sum of the two estimated components agrees well with the estimates obtained from over-array wind profiles.

  16. The new air conditioning wind tunnel at Vienna; Der neue Klima-Wind-Kanal in Wien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, G. [Oesterreichisches Forschungs- und Pruefzentrum Arsenal Ges.m.b.H., Wien (Austria)

    2003-07-01

    The world's only air conditioning wind tunnel for railway vehicles is located in Vienna (Wien Arsenal). For more than 40 years, air conditioning tests, functional tests and reliability tests have been carried out here on components, aggregates, and systems. Applications range from research and development to type testing and certification. In order to cope with future requirements, a new plant is currently being constructed (Pauker-Gruende), also in Vienna. The contribution describes current and future R + D goals in the field of air conditioning simulations for public transportation. On this basis, the specifications on the new air conditioning wind tunnel will be specified. The project and its functionalities are presented. [German] Im weltweit einzigen Klima-Wind-Kanal fuer Schienenfahrzeuge in Wien Arsenal werden seit mehr als 40 Jahren klimatechnische Untersuchungen, Funktions- und Zuverlaessigkeitstests an Komponenten, Aggregaten und am Gesamtsystem durchgefuehrt. Das Dienstleistungsspektrum reicht dabei von der Forschung ueber die Entwicklungsunterstuetzung bis hin zur Typenpruefung und Zertifizierung. Um den technischen Erfordernissen der Zukunft und der notwendigen Flexibilitaetsausweitung zu entsprechen, wird derzeit diese Anlage auf den Pauker-Gruenden in Wien neu errichtet. Der Beitrag beschreibt die derzeitigen und zukuenftigen Forschungs- und Entwicklungsschwerpunkte auf dem Gebiet der Klimasimulation oeffentlicher Verkehrsmittel. Daraus ergeben sich spezielle technische Anforderungen an einen neuen Klima-Wind-Kanal, die unter Einbeziehung der Erfahrungen mit der bestehenden Anlage naeher erlaeutert werden. Abschliessend werden das Ausfuehrungsprojekt selbst und deren erweiterte Moeglichkeiten dargestellt. (orig.)

  17. FUN3D Airload Predictions for the Full-Scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor in a Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids, FUN3D, is used to compute the rotor performance and airloads of the UH-60A Airloads Rotor in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel. The flow solver is loosely coupled to a rotorcraft comprehensive code, CAMRAD-II, to account for trim and aeroelastic deflections. Computations are made for the 1-g level flight speed-sweep test conditions with the airloads rotor installed on the NFAC Large Rotor Test Apparatus (LRTA) and in the 40- by 80-ft wind tunnel to determine the influence of the test stand and wind-tunnel walls on the rotor performance and airloads. Detailed comparisons are made between the results of the CFD/CSD simulations and the wind tunnel measurements. The computed trends in solidity-weighted propulsive force and power coefficient match the experimental trends over the range of advance ratios and are comparable to previously published results. Rotor performance and sectional airloads show little sensitivity to the modeling of the wind-tunnel walls, which indicates that the rotor shaft-angle correction adequately compensates for the wall influence up to an advance ratio of 0.37. Sensitivity of the rotor performance and sectional airloads to the modeling of the rotor with the LRTA body/hub increases with advance ratio. The inclusion of the LRTA in the simulation slightly improves the comparison of rotor propulsive force between the computation and wind tunnel data but does not resolve the difference in the rotor power predictions at mu = 0.37. Despite a more precise knowledge of the rotor trim loads and flight condition, the level of comparison between the computed and measured sectional airloads/pressures at an advance ratio of 0.37 is comparable to the results previously published for the high-speed flight test condition.

  18. Wind-tunnel tests of a 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic airplane. 1: Longitudinal stability and control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, C. J.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Polhamus, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic aircraft was tested in the Langley 300 mile-per-hour 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine its low speed longitudinal stability and control characteristics. Pertinent longitudinal flying qualities expected of the XS-1 research airplane were estimated from the results of these tests including the effects of compressibility likely to be encountered at speeds below the force break. It appears that the static longitudinal stability and elevator control power will be adequate, but that the elevator control force gradient in steady flight will be undesirably low for all configurations. It is suggested that a centering spring be incorporated in the elevator control system of the airplane in order to increase the control force gradient in steady flight and in maneuvers.

  19. Wind-tunnel investigation of the effect of power and flaps on the static lateral characteristics of a single-engine low-wing airplane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburello, Vito; Weil, Joseph

    1947-01-01

    Tests were made in the Langley 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the lateral-stability characteristics with and without power of a model of a typical low-wing single-engine airplane with flaps neutral, with a full-span single slotted flap, and with a full-span double slotted flap. Power decreased the dihedral effect regardless of flap condition, and the double-slotted flap configuration showed the most marked decrease. The usual effect of power in increasing the directional stability was also shown. Deflection of the single slotted flap produced negative dihedral effect, but increased the directional stability. The effects of deflecting the double slotted flap were erratic and marked changes in both effective dihedral and directional stability occurred. The addition of the tail surfaces always contributed directional stability and generally produced positive dihedral effect.

  20. Federated Database Services for Wind Tunnel Experiment Workflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paventhan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Enabling the full life cycle of scientific and engineering workflows requires robust middleware and services that support effective data management, near-realtime data movement and custom data processing. Many existing solutions exploit the database as a passive metadata catalog. In this paper, we present an approach that makes use of federation of databases to host data-centric wind tunnel application workflows. The user is able to compose customized application workflows based on database services. We provide a reference implementation that leverages typical business tools and technologies: Microsoft SQL Server for database services and Windows Workflow Foundation for workflow services. The application data and user's code are both hosted in federated databases. With the growing interest in XML Web Services in scientific Grids, and with databases beginning to support native XML types and XML Web services, we can expect the role of databases in scientific computation to grow in importance.

  1. Building 865 Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Power System Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Larry X. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report documents the characterization and analysis of a high current power supply for the building 865 Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at Sandia National Laboratories. The system described in this report became operational in 2013, replacing the original 1968 system which employed an induction voltage regulator. This analysis and testing was completed to help the parent organization understand why an updated and redesigned power system was not delivering adequate power to resistive heater elements in the HWT. This analysis led to an improved understanding of the design and operation of the revised 2013 power supply system and identifies several reasons the revised system failed to achieve the performance of the original power supply installation. Design modifications to improve the performance of this system are discussed.

  2. Monitoring dynamic loads on wind tunnel force balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Alice T.; White, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Two devices have been developed at NASA Langley to monitor the dynamic loads incurred during wind-tunnel testing. The Balance Dynamic Display Unit (BDDU), displays and monitors the combined static and dynamic forces and moments in the orthogonal axes. The Balance Critical Point Analyzer scales and sums each normalized signal from the BDDU to obtain combined dynamic and static signals that represent the dynamic loads at predefined high-stress points. The display of each instrument is a multiplex of six analog signals in a way that each channel is displayed sequentially as one-sixth of the horizontal axis on a single oscilloscope trace. Thus this display format permits the operator to quickly and easily monitor the combined static and dynamic level of up to six channels at the same time.

  3. Type IV Wind Turbine Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Margaris, Ioannis D.

    project to be incorporated in the wind power plant level. This document describes the Type 4 wind turbine simulation model, implemented in the EaseWind project. The implemented wind turbine model is one of the initial necessary steps toward integrating new control services in the wind power plant level....... In the project, this wind turbine model will be further incorporated in a wind power plant model together with the implementation in the wind power control level of the new control functionalities (inertial response, synchronising power and power system damping). For this purpose an aggregate wind power plant...... (WPP) will be considered. The aggregate WPP model, which will be based on the upscaling of the individual wind turbine model on the electrical part, will make use of an equivalent wind speed. The implemented model follows the basic structure of the generic standard Type 4 wind turbine model proposed...

  4. Case Studies for the Statistical Design of Experiments Applied to Powered Rotor Wind Tunnel Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Martin, Preston B.; Commo, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of statistical Design of Experiments (DOE) to helicopter wind tunnel testing was explored during two powered rotor wind tunnel entries during the summers of 2012 and 2013. These tests were performed jointly by the U.S. Army Aviation Development Directorate Joint Research Program Office and NASA Rotary Wing Project Office, currently the Revolutionary Vertical Lift Project, at NASA Langley Research Center located in Hampton, Virginia. Both entries were conducted in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with a small portion of the overall tests devoted to developing case studies of the DOE approach as it applies to powered rotor testing. A 16-47 times reduction in the number of data points required was estimated by comparing the DOE approach to conventional testing methods. The average error for the DOE surface response model for the OH-58F test was 0.95 percent and 4.06 percent for drag and download, respectively. The DOE surface response model of the Active Flow Control test captured the drag within 4.1 percent of measured data. The operational differences between the two testing approaches are identified, but did not prevent the safe operation of the powered rotor model throughout the DOE test matrices.

  5. Wind tunnel experimental study on the effect of PAM on soil wind erosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ji-Jun; Cai, Qiang-Guo; Tang, Ze-Jun

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, high-molecular-weight anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) have been widely tested on a variety of soils, primarily in water erosion control. However, little information is available regarding the effectiveness of PAM on preventing soil loss from wind erosion. The research adopted room wind tunnel experiment, two kinds of soils were used which were from the agro-pastoral area of Inner Mongolia, the northwest of China, the clay content of soils were 22.0 and 13.7%, respectively. For these tests, all the treatments were performed under the condition of wind velocity of 14 m s(-1) and a blown angle of 8.75%, according to the actual situation of experimented area. The study results indicated that using PAM on the soil surface could enhance the capability of avoiding the wind erosion, at the same time, the effect of controlling wind soil erosion with 4 g m(-2) PAM was better than 2 g m(-2) PAM's. Economically, the 2 g m(-2) PAM used in soil surface can control wind erosion effectively in this region. The prophase PAM accumulated in soil could not improve the capability of avoiding the wind erosion, owing to the degradation of PAM in the soil and the continual tillage year after year. The texture of soil is a main factor influencing the capability of soil avoiding wind erosion. Soil with higher clay content has the higher capability of preventing soil from wind erosion than one with the opposite one under the together action of PAM and water.

  6. Increased Mach Number Capability for the NASA Glenn 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, J. W.; Saunders, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations and wind tunnel testing were conducted to explore the operation of the Abe Silverstein Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center at test section Mach numbers above the current limit of Mach 3.5. An increased Mach number would enhance the capability for testing of supersonic and hypersonic propulsion systems. The focus of the explorations was on understanding the flow within the second throat of the tunnel, which is downstream of the test section and is where the supersonic flow decelerates to subsonic flow. Methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were applied to provide details of the shock boundary layer structure and to estimate losses in total pressure. The CFD simulations indicated that the tunnel could be operated up to Mach 4.0 if the minimum width of the second throat was made smaller than that used for previous operation of the tunnel. Wind tunnel testing was able to confirm such operation of the tunnel at Mach 3.6 and 3.7 before a hydraulic failure caused a stop to the testing. CFD simulations performed after the wind tunnel testing showed good agreement with test data consisting of static pressures along the ceiling of the second throat. The CFD analyses showed increased shockwave boundary layer interactions, which was also observed as increased unsteadiness of dynamic pressures collected in the wind tunnel testing.

  7. 铁路拱形防风明洞风荷载研究%Study of Wind Load on Arched Anti-wind Opencut Tunnel for Railway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳宝成

    2014-01-01

    The second double-tracked Lanzhou-Xinjiang Railway passes through the famous“100 km wind zone” and“30 km wind zone” where the wind hazards are very serious. Therefore, in order to minimize both speed limitaiton and wheel stopping, the anti-wind opencut tunnel was installed as a prevention measure at the core area of“100 km wind zone”. In this study, after the CFD numerical simulation as well as wind-tunnel model experiment and research, the distribution pattern of wind load acting on the anti-wind opencut tunnel surface was ascertained as follows: the wind load will increase with the increasing of wind speed;the wind load presentes positive pressure on the windward side, and presents negative pressure on the leeward side and on the arch crown.%兰新铁路第二双线穿过著名的百里风区、三十里风区,其风害极为严重。为了最大限度地减少限速和停轮,在百里风区的核心区采用设置防风明洞的防护措施。通过CFD数值模拟与风洞模型试验研究,得出了作用在防风明洞表面的风荷载随风速增大而增大,且迎风侧为正压、背风侧及拱顶为负压的分布规律。

  8. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. Small included angle for the exit cone; 2. Carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. Tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  9. Experimental Research on an Active Sting Damper in a Low Speed Acoustic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnels usually use long cantilever stings to support aerodynamic models in order to reduce support system flow interference on experimental data. However, such support systems are a potential source of vibration problems which limit the test envelope and affect data quality due to the inherently low structural damping of the systems. When exposed to tunnel flow, turbulence and model flow separation excite resonant Eigenmodes of a sting structure causing large vibrations due to low damping. This paper details the development and experimental evaluation of an active damping system using piezoelectric devices with balance signal feedback both in a lab and a low speed acoustic wind tunnel and presents the control algorithm verification tests with a simple cantilever beam. It is shown that the active damper, controlled separately by both PID and BP neural network, has effectively attenuated the vibration. For sting mode only, 95% reduction of displacement response under exciter stimulation and 98% energy elimination of sting mode frequency have been achieved.

  10. DARPA/AFRL/NASA Smart Wing Second Wind Tunnel Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, L. B.; Martin, C. A.; West, M.; Florance, J. P.; Wieseman, C. D.; Burner, A. W.; Fleming, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    To quantify the benefits of smart materials and structures adaptive wing technology, Northrop Grumman Corp. (NGC) built and tested two 16% scale wind tunnel models (a conventional and a "smart" model) of a fighter/attack aircraft under the DARPA/AFRL/NASA Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 1. Performance gains quantified included increased pitching moment (C(sub M)), increased rolling moment (C(subl)) and improved pressure distribution. The benefits were obtained for hingeless, contoured trailing edge control surfaces with embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wires and spanwise wing twist effected by SMA torque tube mechanisms, compared to conventional hinged control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the results from the second wind tunnel test performed at the NASA Langley Research Center s (LaRC) 16ft Transonic Dynamic Tunnel (TDT) in June 1998. Successful results obtained were: 1) 5 degrees of spanwise twist and 8-12% increase in rolling moment utilizing a single SMA torque tube, 2) 12 degrees of deflection, and 10% increase in rolling moment due to hingeless, contoured aileron, and 3) demonstration of optical techniques for measuring spanwise twist and deflected shape.

  11. A comparison of peak pressure interference factors interference factors for high-rise buildings determined in two ABL wind tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, A.J.; Uffelen, M. van; Geurts, C.P.W.; Aanen, L.; Bentum, C.A. van

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurements were performed on various configurations of two high-rise building models in two atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnels in the Netherlands. A comparison was made of the interference factors of the minimum and maximum peak pressures over all pressure taps at 0 degree angle of i

  12. Wind tunnel investigation of a high lift system with pneumatic flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Pricop Mihai; Mircea, Boscoianu; Daniel-Eugeniu, Crunteanu

    2016-06-01

    Next generation passenger aircrafts require more efficient high lift systems under size and mass constraints, to achieve more fuel efficiency. This can be obtained in various ways: to improve/maintain aerodynamic performance while simplifying the mechanical design of the high lift system going to a single slotted flap, to maintain complexity and improve the aerodynamics even more, etc. Laminar wings have less efficient leading edge high lift systems if any, requiring more performance from the trailing edge flap. Pulsed blowing active flow control (AFC) in the gap of single element flap is investigated for a relatively large model. A wind tunnel model, test campaign and results and conclusion are presented.

  13. Aerodynamic Data Accuracy and Quality: Requirements and Capabilities in Wind Tunnel Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    was made in the Boeing Vertol 20 Ft x 20 Ft low speed wind tunnel. Virtually the same model was tested as was used at AEDC for Test No. 4...balances supported on 53.34mm diameter flared single stings for virtually all full span model drag The need for absolute and incremental drag tests. These...d’eosai des torsos parasites 94- a-I’l propros A la soufflerie poor 6valuer les ricoltats qui soraient obtenus cur la alme coquette, danc UJ3 libro at

  14. Drag coefficients of lattice masts from full-scale wind-tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos; Støttrup-Andersen, Ulrik; Johnsen, Marie;

    2009-01-01

    :5 scale section model tests performed at the National Physics Laboratory and the National Maritime Institute in the UK in the 1970´s. ESDU provides velocity-dependent drag coefficients equivalent to those obtained from the same series of tests. In all cases, the mast legs and diagonals are comprised......In this paper, the drag coefficients obtained from a series of full-scale section model wind-tunnel tests of several lattice mast configurations are presented and compared to those provided in Eurocode 3 and ESDU. The drag coefficients provided in Eurocode are conservative interpretations of 1...

  15. Modal Analysis on the Wind Tunnel Test Bed based on Workbench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Zi-yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a wind tunnel test bed with parallelogram structure. The three-dimensional model was built by Solidworks after analyzing the movement principle. Then the model was imported to Workbench and carried out modal analysis according to the theory of finite element modal analysis. Finally the first six vibration mode and the natural frequency were got. This result provides theoretical support for the further research of the stability of the structure, and it also provides theoretical basis for the optimal design of the institution.

  16. Blockage Testing in the NASA Glenn 225 Square Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Abigail; Davis, David; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A feasibility study is in progress at NASA Glenn Research Center to implement a magnetic suspension and balance system in the 225 sq cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel for the purpose of testing the dynamic stability of blunt bodies. An important area of investigation in this study was determining the optimum size of the model and the iron spherical core inside of it. In order to minimize the required magnetic field and thus the size of the magnetic suspension system, it was determined that the test model should be as large as possible. Blockage tests were conducted to determine the largest possible model that would allow for tunnel start at Mach 2, 2.5, and 3. Three different forebody model geometries were tested at different Mach numbers, axial locations in the tunnel, and in both a square and axisymmetric test section. Experimental results showed that different model geometries produced more varied results at higher Mach Numbers. It was also shown that testing closer to the nozzle allowed larger models to start compared with testing near the end of the test section. Finally, allowable model blockage was larger in the axisymmetric test section compared with the square test section at the same Mach number. This testing answered key questions posed by the feasibility study and will be used in the future to dictate model size and performance required from the magnetic suspension system.

  17. Wind tunnel wall interference effects on a supercritical airfoil at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J. A., Jr.; Pounds, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 10% supercritical airfoil have been conducted in the Lockheed Compressible Flow Facility at transonic speeds to determine the effects of varying wind tunnel wall porosity on airfoil performance. Wall configurations ranging in porosity from 1.3% to 10% were investigated at Reynolds numbers of 7 to 30 million. Experimental data presented to show the effect of varying wall porosity include airfoil surface pressures, airfoil forces, and wind tunnel wall pressures. Utilizing the experimental results, an assessment of the applicability of current subcritical theoretical methods to predict wall interference corrections in subsonic and transonic flows is made.

  18. Check-Standard Testing Across Multiple Transonic Wind Tunnels with the Modern Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloach, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the result of an analysis of wind tunnel data acquired in support of the Facility Analysis Verification & Operational Reliability (FAVOR) project. The analysis uses methods referred to collectively at Langley Research Center as the Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE). These methods quantify the total variance in a sample of wind tunnel data and partition it into explained and unexplained components. The unexplained component is further partitioned in random and systematic components. This analysis was performed on data acquired in similar wind tunnel tests executed in four different U.S. transonic facilities. The measurement environment of each facility was quantified and compared.

  19. Understanding and Exploiting Wind Tunnels with Porous Flexible Walls for Aerodynamic Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kenneth Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic behavior of wind tunnels with porous, flexible walls formed from tensioned Kevlar has been characterized and new measurement techniques in such wind tunnels explored. The objective is to bring the aerodynamic capabilities of so-called Kevlar-wall test sections in-line with those of traditional solid-wall test sections. The primary facility used for this purpose is the 1.85-m by 1.85-m Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech, and supporting data is provided by the 2-m by 2-m L...

  20. Wind Farms: Modeling and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimanzadeh, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    provides the state space form of the dynamic wind farm model. The model provides an approximation of the behavior of the flow in wind farms, and obtains the wind speed in the vicinity of each wind turbine. The control algorithms in this work are mostly on the basis of the developed wind farm model......The primary purpose of this work is to develop control algorithms for wind farms to optimize the power production and augment the lifetime of wind turbines in wind farms. In this regard, a dynamical model for wind farms was required to be the basis of the controller design. In the first stage......, a dynamical model has been developed for the wind flow in wind farms. The model is based on the spatial discretization of the linearized Navier-Stokes equation combined with the vortex cylinder theory. The spatial discretization of the model is performed using the Finite Difference Method (FDM), which...

  1. Flutter Analysis of a Morphing Wing Technology Demonstrator: Numerical Simulation and Wind Tunnel Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea KOREANSCHI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As part of a morphing wing technology project, the flutter analysis of two finite element models and the experimental results of a morphing wing demonstrator equipped with aileron are presented. The finite element models are representing a wing section situated at the tip of the wing; the first model corresponds to a traditional aluminium upper surface skin of constant thickness and the second model corresponds to a composite optimized upper surface skin for morphing capabilities. The two models were analyzed for flutter occurrence and effects on the aeroelastic behaviour of the wing were studied by replacing the aluminium upper surface skin of the wing with a specially developed composite version. The morphing wing model with composite upper surface was manufactured and fitted with three accelerometers to record the amplitudes and frequencies during tests at the subsonic wind tunnel facility at the National Research Council. The results presented showed that no aeroelastic phenomenon occurred at the speeds, angles of attack and aileron deflections studied in the wind tunnel and confirmed the prediction of the flutter analysis on the frequencies and modal displacements.

  2. A computer-controlled, on-board data acquisition system for wind-tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, H. J.; Cambra, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    A computer-controlled data acquisition system has been developed for the 40x80-foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center. The system, consisting of several small onboard units installed in the model and a data-managing, data-displaying ground station, is capable of sampling up to 256 channels of raw data at a total sample rate of 128,000 samples/sec. Complete signal conditioning is contained within the on-board units. The sampling sequence and channel gain selection is completely random and under total control of the ground station. Outputs include a bar-graph display, digital-to-analog converters, and digital interface to the tunnel's central computer, an SEL 840MP. The system can be run stand-alone or under the control of the SEL 840MP.

  3. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a Reflection Plane Wing Model Equipped with Partial-Span Jet-Augmented Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, James H., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation to determine the aerodynamic and flow-field characteristics of three 50-percent partial-span jet-augmented flap configurations located at three spanwise positions has been conducted in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel. The model was a semispan, rectangular unswept wing with a full-span aspect ratio of 8.3 and a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.167. The results of this investigation showed that an inboard partial-span jet-augmented flap is less effective than a full-span blowing flap. A further reduction in effectiveness is obtained as the blaring is shifted outboard along the span. At a given lift coefficient and angle of attack, the nose-down moment about the quarter chord increases as the blowing is moved outboard. This increase in nose-down moment is due primarily to the fact that the momentum coefficient must be increased in order to obtain the same lift condition. Flow surveys indicate that the tail contribution to static longitudinal stability would be greater for the outboard blowing locations.

  4. Wind tunnel data of the analysis of heat pipe and wind catcher technology for the built environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kaiser Calautit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article were the basis for the study reported in the research articles entitled ‘Climate responsive behaviour heat pipe technology for enhanced passive airside cooling’ by Chaudhry and Hughes [10] which presents the passive airside cooling capability of heat pipes in response to gradually varying external temperatures and related to the research article “CFD and wind tunnel study of the performance of a uni-directional wind catcher with heat transfer devices” by Calautit and Hughes [1] which compares the ventilation performance of a standard roof mounted wind catcher and wind catcher incorporating the heat pipe technology. Here, we detail the wind tunnel test set-up and inflow conditions and the methodologies for the transient heat pipe experiment and analysis of the integration of heat pipes within the control domain of a wind catcher design.

  5. Wind tunnel data of the analysis of heat pipe and wind catcher technology for the built environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calautit, John Kaiser; Chaudhry, Hassam Nasarullah; Hughes, Ben Richard

    2015-12-01

    The data presented in this article were the basis for the study reported in the research articles entitled 'Climate responsive behaviour heat pipe technology for enhanced passive airside cooling' by Chaudhry and Hughes [10] which presents the passive airside cooling capability of heat pipes in response to gradually varying external temperatures and related to the research article "CFD and wind tunnel study of the performance of a uni-directional wind catcher with heat transfer devices" by Calautit and Hughes [1] which compares the ventilation performance of a standard roof mounted wind catcher and wind catcher incorporating the heat pipe technology. Here, we detail the wind tunnel test set-up and inflow conditions and the methodologies for the transient heat pipe experiment and analysis of the integration of heat pipes within the control domain of a wind catcher design.

  6. The effect of wind erosion on toxic element content of soils based on wind tunnel trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatárvári, Károly; Négyesi, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion causes enormous problems in many parts of the world. It damages the fertile layer of soils, and eventually wind erosion can transport materials, pathogens and these may cause medical problems in the respiratory system. Numerous international and Hungarian surveys have proved, that wind erosion not only affects loose textured soils. During droughts wind erosion may cause great damage in bound soils of clay in case these are over-cultivated and dusty. As an effect of climate change the duration and frequency of drought periods shall grow. In our investigation samples were taken from the upper 10 cms of soils of 5 various types of mechanical compounds (according to physical characteristics sand, clay, clay loam, loam, sandy loam) in Györ-Moson-Sopron County Hungary. According to the map of Hungary of the areas potentially affected by wind erosion the sand physical soil type is strongly endangered by wind erosion, other areas are moderatly endangered. According to most recent international classification areas belonging to the sand physical soil type are categorized as "endangered by wind erosion", and others belong to the category "not endangered by wind erosion", but these data were not based on local trials. When selecting the sampling areas it was taken to account that opencast sand and gravel mines are in operation in the area. Because of these recently significant wind erosion related phenomena were observed. The area is the most windy in the country. The mechanical composition, CaCO3 content, pH value (H2O,Kcl), humus content of the samples were defined. The wind erosion experiments were conducted in the wind tunnel of the University of Debrecen. The threshold velocities of the soils were measured, and the quantity of the soil transported by the wind was analyzed at four wind velocity value ranges. The transported material intercepted at different wind velocities at the height of 0-10 cm and 10-35 cm. The As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn

  7. Wind tunnel unsteady pressure measurements using a differential optical fiber Fabry-Perot pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ricardo; Staines, Stephen E.; James, Stephen W.; Lawson, Nicholas; Garry, Kevin; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2014-05-01

    A differential extrinsic optical fiber Fabry-Perot based pressure sensor has been developed and benchmarked against a conventional piezoresistive Kulite pressure sensor. The sensors were placed on the fuselage of a 1:10/3 sub-scale model of a Scottish aviation Bulldog, which was placed in a wind-tunnel. Pressure tappings that surrounded the sensors aided the mapping of pressure distribution around this section of the fuselage. The results obtained from the fibre optic pressure sensor are in good agreement with those obtained from the Kulite and from the pressure tappings.

  8. Application of fuzzy logic to the control of wind tunnel settling chamber temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Humphreys, Gregory L.

    1994-01-01

    The application of Fuzzy Logic Controllers (FLC's) to the control of nonlinear processes, typically controlled by a human operator, is a topic of much study. Recent application of a microprocessor-based FLC to the control of temperature processes in several wind tunnels has proven to be very successful. The control of temperature processes in the wind tunnels requires the ability to monitor temperature feedback from several points and to accommodate varying operating conditions in the wind tunnels. The FLC has an intuitive and easily configurable structure which incorporates the flexibility required to have such an ability. The design and implementation of the FLC is presented along with process data from the wind tunnels under automatic control.

  9. A Novel Surface Thermometry Approach for use in Aerothermodynamic Wind Tunnel Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project is aimed at developing a novel thermometry technology with upconverting phosphors for temperature measurement in NASA's high-enthalpy wind tunnels....

  10. Phased array technique for low signal-to-noise ratio wind tunnels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Closed wind tunnel beamforming for aeroacoustics has become more and more prevalent in recent years. Still, there are major drawbacks as current microphone arrays...

  11. Role of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Wind Tunnels in Aeronautics R and D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Murjeeb R.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the status and future projections for the question of supplantation of wind tunnels by computation in design and to intuit the potential impact of computation approaches on wind-tunnel utilization all with an eye toward reducing the infrastructure cost at aeronautics R&D centers. Wind tunnels have been closing for myriad reasons, and such closings have reduced infrastructure costs. Further cost reductions are desired, and the work herein attempts to project which wind-tunnel capabilities can be replaced in the future and, if possible, the timing of such. If the possibility exists to project when a facility could be closed, then maintenance and other associated costs could be rescheduled accordingly (i.e., before the fact) to obtain an even greater infrastructure cost reduction.

  12. A computational fluid dynamics model for wind simulation:model implementation and experimental validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo-dong ZHANG; Ralf WIELAND; Matthias REICHE; Roger FUNK; Carsten HOFFMANN; Yong LI; Michael SOMMER

    2012-01-01

    To provide physically based wind modelling for wind erosion research at regional scale,a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) wind model was developed.The model was programmed in C language based on the Navier-Stokes equations,and it is freely available as open source.Integrated with the spatial analysis and modelling tool (SAMT),the wind model has convenient input preparation and powerful output visualization.To validate the wind model,a series of experiments was conducted in a wind tunnel.A blocking inflow experiment was designed to test the performance of the model on simulation of basic fluid processes.A round obstacle experiment was designed to check if the model could simulate the influences of the obstacle on wind field.Results show that measured and simulated wind fields have high correlations,and the wind model can simulate both the basic processes of the wind and the influences of the obstacle on the wind field.These results show the high reliability of the wind model.A digital elevation model (DEM) of an area (3800 m long and 1700 m wide) in the Xilingele grassland in Inner Mongolia (autonomous region,China) was applied to the model,and a 3D wind field has been successfully generated.The clear implementation of the model and the adequate validation by wind tunnel experiments laid a solid foundation for the prediction and assessment of wind erosion at regional scale.

  13. Engineering changes to the 0.1m cryogenic wind tunnel at Southampton University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The more important changes to the 0.1 m cryogenic wind tunnel since its completion in 1977 are outlined. These include detailed improvements in the fan drive to allow higher speeds, and the provision of a test section leg suitable for use with a magnetic suspension and balance system. The instrumentation, data logging, data reduction and tunnel controls were also improved and modernized. A tunnel performance summary is given.

  14. The laminar separation sensor - An advanced transition measurement method for use in wind tunnels and flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, G. S.; Carraway, D. L.; Croom, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel and flight tests have recently been conducted by the NASA Langley Research Center to explore the ability of laminar separation hot-film sensors to identify the presence of laminar separation as the principal mode of instability amplification leading to transition. This paper describes the different sensor configurations evaluated during the course of testing and presents results from the flight and wind tunnel evaluations. Plans for the next generation of sensors are briefly discussed.

  15. Experiment about Drag Reduction of Bionic Non-smooth Surface in Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Li-mei; Ren Lu-quan; Han Zhi-wu; Zhang Shi-cun

    2005-01-01

    The body surface of some organisms has non-smooth structure, which is related to drag reduction in moving fluid. To imitate these structures, models with a non-smooth surface were made. In order to find a relationship be tween drag reduction and the non-smooth surface, an orthogonal design test was employed in a low speed wind tunnel. Six factors likely to influence drag reduction were considered, and each factor tested at three levels. The six factors were the configuration, diameter/bottom width, height/depth, distribution, the arrangement of the rough structures on the experimental model and the wind speed. It was shown that the non-smooth surface causes drag reduction and the distribution of non-smooth structures on the model, and wind speed, are the predominant factors affecting drag reduction. Using analysis of variance, the optimal combination and levels were obtained, which were a wind speed of 44 m/s, distribution of the non-smooth structure on the tail of the experimental model, the configuration of riblets, diameter/bottom width of 1 mm, height/depth of 0.5 mm, arranged in a rhombic formation. At the optimal combination mentioned above, the 99% confidence interval for drag reduction was 11.13 % to 22.30%.

  16. Simulative technology for auxiliary fuel tank separation in a wind tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xin; Liu Wei; Chen Ling; Li Xiao; Jia Zhenyuan; Shang Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a simulative experimental system in wind tunnel conditions for the separation of auxiliary fuel tanks from an aircraft. The experimental system consists of a simulative release mechanism, a scaled model and a pose measuring system. A new release mechanism was designed to ensure stability of the separation. Scaled models of the auxiliary fuel tank were designed and their moment of inertia was adjusted by installing counterweights inside the model. Pose param-eters of the scaled model were measured and calculated by a binocular vision system. Additionally, in order to achieve high brightness and high signal-to-noise ratio of the images in the dark enclosed wind tunnel, a new high-speed image acquisition method based on miniature self-emitting units was pre-sented. Accuracy of the pose measurement system and repeatability of the separation mechanism were verified in the laboratory. Results show that the position precision of the pose measurement system can reach 0.1 mm, the precision of the pitch and yaw angles is less than 0.1? and that of the roll angle can be up to 0.3?. Besides, repeatability errors of models’ velocity and angular velocity controlled by the release mechanism remain small, satisfying the measurement requirements. Finally, experiments for the separation of auxiliary fuel tanks were conducted in the laboratory.

  17. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  18. Testing a model scramjet with fuel supplying in hypersonic pulsed wind tunnel%高超声速脉冲风洞中带燃料的超燃冲压发动机模型试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古科; 泽维金茨耶夫; 马祖尔; 克耐里托诺夫

    2006-01-01

    给出了在ITAM最近投入使用的高超声速脉冲绝热压缩风洞AT-303中进行超燃冲压发动机模型实验的结果.实验马赫数M∞≈8,运行时间τ=50~60 ms,雷诺数范围Re1∞=2.7×106~4.0×107,模型表面的边界层自然转捩.在实验中,模型中有燃料供给:把气态氢以超过化学量比率的空气燃料因子注入到燃烧室.提供了足以发生氢燃料自点燃的流动条件.测量了沿进气道楔型压缩面和整个发动机通道上的纵向压力和热流分布.所获数据与同一模型在热射流风洞IT-302M(实验马赫数M∞≈6,8,运行时间τ=100~120 ms,雷诺数范围Re1∞=(1.3~1.8)×106,进气道压缩面和侧压缩面进行了边界层转捩).结果表明:实验模型发动机在两座风洞中进行实验所获得的流态类型相同.发动机刚刚启动时,在进气道入口及其下游的发动机通道内形成超声速流.注入氢后,首先在燃烧室内形成平均流速是超声速的燃烧流动.之后,在燃烧室出口出现热拥塞现象、在进气道扩压段产生伪激波流态.在两座风洞中进行了进气道和发动机通道的流动特征试验,获得了令人满意的结果.%The paper presents results of a scramjet model test in a hypersonic pulsed adiabatic-compression wind tunnel AT-303 recently put into operation at ITAM. The model was tested at Mach number M ∞≈8,duration of runs was τ=50~60 ms, and a wide Reynolds number range of Re1 ∞=2.7×106~4.0×107 with boundary layer on the model surfaces developing naturally. Due to the model with fuel supply, the gaseous hydrogen was injected into the combustion chamber at air-to-fuel factors exceeding the stoichiometric ratio. The flow conditions sufficient for self-ignition of the hydrogen were provided. Lengthwise pressure and heat flux distribution along the inlet wedge ramp and along the whole engine duct were measured. The obtained results were compared to data of testing the same model in a hot

  19. Advanced Background Subtraction Applied to Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Horne, William C.

    2015-01-01

    An advanced form of background subtraction is presented and applied to aeroacoustic wind tunnel data. A variant of this method has seen use in other fields such as climatology and medical imaging. The technique, based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the background noise cross-spectral matrix, is robust against situations where isolated background auto-spectral levels are measured to be higher than levels of combined source and background signals. It also provides an alternate estimate of the cross-spectrum, which previously might have poor definition for low signal-to-noise ratio measurements. Simulated results indicate similar performance to conventional background subtraction when the subtracted spectra are weaker than the true contaminating background levels. Superior performance is observed when the subtracted spectra are stronger than the true contaminating background levels. Experimental results show limited success in recovering signal behavior for data where conventional background subtraction fails. They also demonstrate the new subtraction technique's ability to maintain a proper coherence relationship in the modified cross-spectral matrix. Beam-forming and de-convolution results indicate the method can successfully separate sources. Results also show a reduced need for the use of diagonal removal in phased array processing, at least for the limited data sets considered.

  20. Slow ions in plasma wind tunnels. [satellite-ionosphere interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, W. A.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1976-01-01

    One of the limitations of simulation experiments for the study of interaction between a satellite and its space environment is the background of slow ions in the plasma chamber. These ions appear to be created by charge exchange between the beam ions and residual neutral gas and may affect measurements of the current and potential in the wake. Results are presented for a plasma wind tunnel experiment to study the effect of slow ions on both the ion and electron current distribution and the electron temperature in the wake of a body in a streaming plasma. It is shown that the effect of slow ions for beam ion density not exceeding 3 is not significant for measurements of ion current variations in the wake zone. This is not the case when studies are aimed at the quantitative examination of electron current and temperature variations in the near wake zone. In these instances, the measurements of electron properties in the wake should be done at very low system pressures or over a range of system pressures in order to ascertain the influence of slow ions.

  1. The aerodynamics of a wind-tunnel fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Blake W

    1941-01-01

    The vortex blade-element theory modified to apply to an axial fan working in a duct is reviewed. Thrust and power coefficients for a fan are identified with the corresponding coefficients for airplane propellers. The relation of pressure produced by the fan to the blade-element coefficients is developed. The distribution of axial velocity of fluid through a fan is assumed to be controlled by the fan itself. The radial distribution of tangential velocity imported by the fan to fluid moving through the fan is shown to be independent of the axial-velocity distribution. A nondimensional coefficient, designated the rotation constant, is introduced. This constant is based solely upon design information. The use of the rotation constant in simplifying the design of a fan for a specific operating condition is demonstrated. Based on the use of the rotation constant, a graphical method is outlined by which the performance of a given fan in a given wind tunnel may be predicted and by which the distributions of axial velocity of the fluid through the fan under various operating conditions may be established.

  2. Wall interference correction improvements for the ONERA main wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucheret, X.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes improved methods of calculating wall interference corrections for the ONERA large windtunnels. The mathematical description of the model and its sting support have become more sophisticated. An increasing number of singularities is used until an agreement between theoretical and experimental signatures of the model and sting on the walls of the closed test section is obtained. The singularity decentering effects are calculated when the model reaches large angles of attack. The porosity factor cartography on the perforated walls deduced from the measured signatures now replaces the reference tests previously carried out in larger tunnels. The porosity factors obtained from the blockage terms (signatures at zero lift) and from the lift terms are in good agreement. In each case (model + sting + test section), wall corrections are now determined, before the tests, as a function of the fundamental parameters M, CS, CZ. During the windtunnel tests, the corrections are quickly computed from these functions.

  3. Wind tunnel study of the power output spectrum in a micro wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael F.; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Instrumented small-scale porous disk models are used to study the spectrum of a surrogate for the power output in a micro wind farm with 100 models of wind turbines. The power spectra of individual porous disk models in the first row of the wind farm show the expected -5/3 power law at higher frequencies. Downstream models measure an increased variance due to wake effects. Conversely, the power spectrum of the sum of the power over the entire wind farm shows a peak at the turbine-to-turbine travel frequency between the model turbines, and a near -5/3 power law region at a much wider range of lower frequencies, confirming previous LES results. Comparison with the spectrum that would result when assuming that the signals are uncorrelated, highlights the strong effects of correlations and anti-correlations in the fluctuations at various frequencies.

  4. Designing, Constructing, And Testing A Low – Speed Open – Jet Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Quoc Y

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-speed wind tunnel has been built and tested in the Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics at the Hochiminh City University of Technology for teaching and doing research. The wind tunnel is an open-jet type with the nozzle area of 1m x 1m and the maximum wind speed of 14 m/s. To evaluate quality of the wind flow created by the tunnel, velocity distribution and turbulence intensity of airflow were measured at the nozzle by a thermal-couple anemometer. The measurements indicated that the turbulence intensity was less than two percent while the uniformity of wind speed across the nozzle is more than ninety five percent.

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Complete Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayani, Sudheer N.; Sellers, William L., III; Tinetti, Ana F.; Brynildsen, Scott E.; Walker, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the complete circuit of the NASA Langley 14 x 22-ft low-speed wind tunnel is described. Inside the circuit, all turning vanes are modeled as well as the five flow control vanes downstream of the 1st corner. The fan drive system is modeled using an actuator disk for the fan blades coupled with the fan nacelle. All the surfaces are modeled as viscous walls except the turning vanes, which were modeled as inviscid surfaces. NASA Langley's TetrUSS unstructured grid software was used for grid generation and flow simulation. Two turbulence models were employed in the present study, namely, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model and the shear stress transport (SST) model of Menter. The paper shows the flow characteristics in the circuit and compares the results with experimental data where available.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Study of Wake Redirection Techniques in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Foley, S.; Nanos, E. M.; Yu, T.; Campagnolo, F.; Bottasso, C. L.; Zanotti, A.; Croce, A.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is to validate a wind farm LES framework in the context of two distinct wake redirection techniques: yaw misalignment and individual cyclic pitch control. A test campaign was conducted using scaled wind turbine models in a boundary layer wind tunnel, where both particle image velocimetry and hot-wire thermo anemometers were used to obtain high quality measurements of the downstream flow. A LiDAR system was also employed to determine the non-uniformity of the inflow velocity field. A high-fidelity large-eddy simulation lifting-line model was used to simulate the aerodynamic behavior of the system, including the geometry of the wind turbine nacelle and tower. A tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic approach was adopted to improve the sub-grid scale modeling. Comparisons with experimental measurements are used to systematically validate the simulations. The LES results are in good agreement with the PIV and hot-wire data in terms of time-averaged wake profiles, turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stresses. Discrepancies are also highlighted, to guide future improvements.

  7. Results of Experimental Investigations to Determine External Tank Protuberance Loads Using a 0.03-Scale Model of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration (Model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA19OA/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA19OA) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA19OB). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline; (2) GO2 pressure line; (3) LO2 antigeyser line; (4) GH2 pressure line; (5) LH2 tank cable tray; (6) LO2 tank cable tray; (7) Bipod; (8) ET/SRB cable tray; and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above; 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements; Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures; and Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  8. Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA190A/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA190A) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA190B). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline, (2) GO2 pressure line, (3) LO2 antigeyser line, (4) GH2 pressure line, (5) LH2 tank cable tray, (6) LO2 tank cable tray, (7) Bipod, (8) ET/SRB cable tray, and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: (1) Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above. (2) 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements. (3) Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures. (4) Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  9. Adjoint Method and Predictive Control for 1-D Flow in NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ardema, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling method and a new optimal control approach to investigate a Mach number control problem for the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The flow in the wind tunnel is modeled by the 1-D unsteady Euler equations whose boundary conditions prescribe a controlling action by a compressor. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system whose dynamics are modeled by ordinary differential equations. The resulting Euler equations are thus coupled to the ordinary differential equations via the boundary conditions. Optimality conditions are established by an adjoint method and are used to develop a model predictive linear-quadratic optimal control for regulating the Mach number due to a test model disturbance during a continuous pitch

  10. System Identification Applied to Dynamic CFD Simulation and Wind Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Frink, Neal T.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2011-01-01

    Demanding aerodynamic modeling requirements for military and civilian aircraft have provided impetus for researchers to improve computational and experimental techniques. Model validation is a key component for these research endeavors so this study is an initial effort to extend conventional time history comparisons by comparing model parameter estimates and their standard errors using system identification methods. An aerodynamic model of an aircraft performing one-degree-of-freedom roll oscillatory motion about its body axes is developed. The model includes linear aerodynamics and deficiency function parameters characterizing an unsteady effect. For estimation of unknown parameters two techniques, harmonic analysis and two-step linear regression, were applied to roll-oscillatory wind tunnel data and to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulated data. The model used for this study is a highly swept wing unmanned aerial combat vehicle. Differences in response prediction, parameters estimates, and standard errors are compared and discussed

  11. X-33 Metal Model Testing In Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The countrys next generation of space transportation, a reusable launch vehicle (RLV), continues to undergo wind tunnel testing at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. All four photos are a metal model of the X-33 reusable launch vehicle (about 15 inches long by 15 inches wide) being tested for Lockheed Martin Skunk Works in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) at NASA Langley Research Center. Tests are being conducted by members of the Aerothermodynamics Branch. According to Kelly Murphy of Langleys Aerothermodynamics Branch, the aluminum and stainless steel model of the X-33 underwent aerodynamic testing in the tunnel. *The subsonic tests were conducted at the speed of Mach 25,* she said. *Force and moment testing and measurement in this tunnel lasted about one week.* Future testing of the metal model is scheduled for Langleys 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, from the end of March to mid-April 1997, and the Unitary Wind Tunnel, from mid-April to the beginning of May. Other tunnel testing for X-33 models are scheduled from the present through June in the hypersonic tunnels, and the 14- by 22-Foot Tunnel from about mid-June to mid-July. Since 1991 Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. has been the lead center for coordinating the Agencys X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, an industry-led effort, which NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin has declared the agency's highest priority new program. The RLV Technology Program is a partnership among NASA, the United States Air Force and private industry to develop world leadership in low-cost space transportation. The goal of the program is to develop technologies and new operational concepts that can radically reduce the cost of access to space. The RLV program also hopes to speed the commercialization of space and improve U.S. economic competitiveness by making access to space as routine and reliable as today's airline industry, while reducing costs and enhancing safety and reliability. The RLV

  12. Characterization of pollutant dispersion near elongated buildings based on wind tunnel simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a wind tunnel study of the effects of elongated rectangular buildings on the dispersion of pollutants from nearby stacks. The study examines the influence of source location, building aspect ratio, and wind direction on pollutant dispersion with the goal of de...

  13. Spin Tests of a Low-lying Monoplane in Flight and in the Free-spinning Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Oscar; Mcavoy, William H

    1940-01-01

    Comparative full-scale and model spin tests were made with a low-lying monoplane in order to extend the available information as to the utility of the free-spinning wind tunnel as an aid in predicting full-scale spin characteristics. For a given control disposition the model indicated steeper spins than were actually obtained with the airplane, the difference being most pronounced for spins with elevators up. Recovery characteristics for the model, on the whole, agreed with those for the airplane, but a disagreement was noted for the case of recovery with elevators held full up. Free-spinning wind-tunnel tests are a useful aid in estimating spin characteristics of airplanes, but it must be appreciated that model results can give only general indications of full-scale behavior.

  14. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients for Wind Tunnel Data using a Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Aragon, Cecilia; Bardina, Jorge; Britten, Roy

    2002-01-01

    A fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network optimized by a genetic algorithm. Basic aerodynamic coefficients (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment) are modelled as functions of angle of attack and Mach number. The neural network is first trained on a relatively rich set of data from wind tunnel tests of numerical simulations to learn an overall model. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. A new set of data, which can be relatively sparse, is then supplied to the network to produce a new model consistent with the previous model and the new data. Because the new model interpolates realistically between the sparse test data points, it is suitable for use in piloted simulations. The genetic algorithm is used to choose a neural network architecture to give best results, avoiding over-and under-fitting of the test data.

  15. Design and Numerical Calculation of Variable Test Section for Small Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav DVOŘÁK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with numerical modelling of transition in a separated boundary layer. The model of laminar/turbulent transition is based on the combination of empirical terms determining position of the transition and averaged Navier – Stokes equations closed by the k – ω SST turbulence model. The model of transition is applied in computation of 2D flow past NACA63A421 airfoil. Computation is performed using the commercial code ANSYS Fluent 6.3.26, in which the transition method is implemented as a User-Defined-Function. Computed distributions of Cp along the airfoil are verified by comparison with experimental data, which were obtained by measurements in a closed circuit wind tunnel at the constant Reynolds number and several angles of attack. Comparisons prove applicability of the implemented transitional model.

  16. Unsteady aerodynamic modelling of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coton, F.N.; Galbraith, R.A. [Univ. og Glasgow, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The following current and future work is discussed: Collaborative wind tunnel based PIV project to study wind turbine wake structures in head-on and yawed flow. Prescribed wake model has been embedded in a source panel representation of the wind tunnel walls to allow comparison with experiment; Modelling of tower shadow using high resolution but efficient vortex model in tower shadow domain; Extension of model to yawing flow; Upgrading and tuning of unsteady aerodynamic model for low speed, thick airfoil flows. Glasgow has a considerable collection of low speed dynamic stall data. Currently, the Leishman - Beddoes model is not ideally suited to such flows. For example: Range of stall onset criteria used for dynamic stall prediction including Beddoes. Wide variation of stall onset prediction. Beddoes representation was developed primarily with reference to compressible flows. Analyses of low speed data from Glasgow indicate deficiencies in the current model; Predicted versus measured response during ramp down motion. Modification of the Beddoes representation is required to obtain a fit with the measured data. (EG)

  17. IIE`s wind tunnel calibration; Calibracion del tunel de viento del IIE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena Garcia, Raymundo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1985-12-31

    The calibration of a wind tunnel is performed in such a way as to warrant a very low turbulence grade. When there is recently built tunnel, as is the case of the IIE`s tunnel, the turbulence in its testing chambers is large; for this reason it is necessary to integrate in it aerodynamic devices and elements capable of reducing it. At the end of the calibration studies can be performed in models with controlled scale. From these and from the results obtained it will be decided if the designed prototypes are built or modified. [Espanol] La calibracion de un tunel de viento se realiza de tal forma que garantiza un grado de turbulencia muy bajo. Cuando se tiene un tunel recien construido, como es el caso del tunel de viento del IIE, la turbulencia en sus camaras de prueba es grande; por lo que es necesario integrarle dispositivos y elementos aerodinamicos que sean capaces de reducirla. Al terminar la calibracion pueden realizarse estudios en modelos con escala controlada. De estos y de los resultados que se obtengan se decidira si se construyen o se modifican los prototipos disenados.

  18. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Chan, David T.; Crosby, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a 0.009 scale model of the Space Launch System (SLS) was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to characterize the aerodynamics of the core and solid rocket boosters (SRBs) during booster separation. High-pressure air was used to simulate plumes from the booster separation motors (BSMs) located on the nose and aft skirt of the SRBs. Force and moment data were acquired on the core and SRBs. These data were used to corroborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations that were used in developing a booster separation database. The SRBs could be remotely positioned in the x-, y-, and z-direction relative to the core. Data were acquired continuously while the SRBs were moved in the axial direction. The primary parameters varied during the test were: core pitch angle; SRB pitch and yaw angles; SRB nose x-, y-, and z-position relative to the core; and BSM plenum pressure. The test was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.25 and a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot.

  19. WIND TUNNEL EVALUATION FOR CONTROL TRANSITION FROM ELEVATOR TO STABILATOR OF SMALL UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZULHILMY SAHWEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Faulty control surface actuator in a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (sUAV could be overcome with a few techniques. Redundant actuators, analytical redundancy or combination of both are normally used as fault accommodation techniques. In this paper, the accommodation technique of faulty elevator actuator is presented. This technique uses a standby control surface as temporary control reallocation. Wind tunnel measurement facility is set up for the experimental validation and it is compared with FoilSim software. Flat plate airfoil which was used as horizontal stabilizer, is simulated using numerical model and it is validated using the wind tunnel test. Then, a flat airfoil is designed to be used as stabilator for the recovery of faulty elevator actuator. Results show the different deflection angle is needed when transferring from one control surface to another. From the analysis, the proposed method could be implemented without affecting the pitch stability during control surface transition. The alternate control surface accommodation technique proves to be promising for higher reliability sUAV in the case of a faulty on-board actuator.

  20. Gust response analysis and wind tunnel test for a high-aspect ratio wing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yi; Xie Changchuan; Yang Chao; Cheng Jialin

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical nonlinear aeroelastic response analysis for a flexible high-aspect ratio wing excited by harmonic gust load is presented along with a companion wind tunnel test. A multidisci-plinary coupled numerical calculation is developed to simulate the flexible model wing undergoing gust load in the time domain via discrete nonlinear finite element structural dynamic analysis and nonplanar unsteady vortex lattice aerodynamic computation. A dynamic perturbation analysis about a nonlinear static equilibrium is also used to determine the small perturbation flutter bound-ary. A novel noncontact 3-D camera measurement analysis system is firstly used in the wind tunnel test to obtain the spatial large deformation and responses. The responses of the flexible wing under different static equilibrium states and frequency gust loads are discussed. The fair to good quanti-tative agreements between the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented analysis method is an acceptable way to predict the geometrically nonlinear gust response for flex-ible wings.

  1. Investigating Tiltrotor Formation Flight via 1/48-Scale Wind Tunnel Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romander, Ethan; Betzina, Mark; Silva, Mark; Wadcock, Alan; Yamauchi, Gloria

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes two small-scale wind tunnel tests conducted in the Army 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. These tests featured two 1/48-scale V-22 models that were operated in a variety of simulated flight conditions including climb, descent, and level flight at various flight speeds and spatial separations. Forces and moments experienced by the trail aircraft were used to deduce the influence of the lead aircraft on the trail aircraft. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data were collected to relate these forces and moments to features in the lead aircraft wake. In general, the roll moment on the trail aircraft is shown to be maximum when the aircraft are laterally offset by a full wingspan and the trail aircraft is vertically positioned so as to be in the wake of the lead aircraft. Furthermore, the roll moment is maximal when operating near 50 knots full-scale flight speed. Because the interaction persists far downstream and the vertical position of the wake is dependent on descent angle and flight speed, lateral separation has been determined to be the best means of avoiding adverse interactions between aircraft.

  2. A transport-rate model of wind-blown sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Sand transport by wind plays an important role in environmental problems.Formulating the sand-transport rate model has been of continuing significance,because the majority of the existing models relate sand-transport rate to the wind-shear velocity.However,the wind-shear velocity readapted to blown sand is difficult to determine from the measured wind profiles when sand movement occurs,especially at high wind velocity.Detailed wind tunnel tests were carried out to reformulate the sand-transport rate model,followed by attempts to relate sand-transport rate to parameters of wind velocity,threshold shear-velocity,and grain size.Finally,we validated the model based on the data from field observations.

  3. Simulation of flight-type engine fan noise in the NASA-Lewis 9 x 15 anechoic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, M. F.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    A major problem in the measurement of aircraft engine fan noise is the difficulty of simulating, in a ground-based facility, the noise that occurs during flight. Flight-type noise as contrasted to the usual ground-static test noise exhibits substantial reductions in both (1) the time unsteadiness of tone noise and (2) the mean level of tones calculated to be nonpropagating or cut-off. A model fan designed with cut-off of the fundamental tone was acoustically tested in the anechoic wind tunnel under both static and tunnel flow conditions. The properties that characterize flight-type noise were progressively simulated with increasing tunnel flow. The distinctly lobed directivity pattern of propagating rotor/stator interaction modes was also observed. The results imply that the excess noise attributed to the ingestion of the flow disturbances that prevail near most static test facilities was substantially reduced with tunnel flow. The anechoic wind tunnel appears to be a useful facility for applied research on aircraft engine fan noise under conditions of simulated flight.

  4. Flight and wind-tunnel calibrations of a flush airdata sensor at high angles of attack and sideslip and at supersonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A nonintrusive airdata-sensing system was calibrated in flight and wind-tunnel experiments to an angle of attack of 70 deg and to angles of sideslip of +/- 15 deg. Flight-calibration data have also been obtained to Mach 1.2. The sensor, known as the flush airdata sensor, was installed on the nosecap of an F-18 aircraft for flight tests and on a full-scale F-18 forebody for wind-tunnel tests. Flight tests occurred at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, using the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. Wind-tunnel tests were conducted in the 30- by 60-ft wind tunnel at the NASA LaRC, Hampton, Virginia. The sensor consisted of 23 flush-mounted pressure ports arranged in concentric circles and located within 1.75 in. of the tip of the nosecap. An overdetermined mathematical model was used to relate the pressure measurements to the local airdata quantities. The mathematical model was based on potential flow over a sphere and was empirically adjusted based on flight and wind-tunnel data. For quasi-steady maneuvering, the mathematical model worked well throughout the subsonic, transonic, and low supersonic flight regimes. The model also worked well throughout the angles-of-attack and -sideslip regions studied.

  5. CFD Mesh Model Optimization Based on Wind Tunnel Test%基于风洞试验的汽车气动阻力计算网格模型优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁侠义; 王娅; 王昊霆

    2013-01-01

    A local refined mesh parameter is analyzed, and three geometrical models in CFD 3D numerical simulation in model development process in presented based on this parameter. By contrasting different optimized geometrical model and combining wind tunnel test data, the optimal joint point is found for cost and accuracy calculation. Then the optimal CFD analysis model is constructed based on development node and optimization program to guide optimization of aerodynamic resistance in vehicle model development. The results of analysis indicate that the optimal mesh parameter and rational geometrical model can effectively save calculation cost and improve calculation accuracy.%分析了一种局部加密网格参数,并在此参数基础上提出车型开发过程中CFD三维数值模拟的3个几何模型。通过对比优化后不同的几何模型,并结合风洞试验数据,找到计算成本和计算精度的最佳交接点。进而可根据开发节点和优化方案来对应不同的最优CFD分析模型,以指导车型开发中气动阻力的优化工作。分析结果表明,最佳网格参数和合理的几何模型可有效节约计算成本和提高计算精度。

  6. Space Shuttle AFRSI OMS pod environment test using model 81-0 test fixture in the Ames Research Center 9x7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS-314A/B/C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 9x7-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to help resolve an anomaly that developed during the STS-6 orbiter flight wherein sections of the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) covering the OMS pods suffered some damage. A one-third scale two-dimensional shell structure model of an OMS pod cross-section was employed to support the test articles. These consisted of 15 AFRSI blanket panels form-fitted over the shell structures for exposure to simulated flight conditions. Of six baseline blankets, two were treated with special surface coatings. Two other panels were configured with AFRSI sections removed from the OV099 orbiter vehicle after the STS-6 flight. Seven additional specimens incorporated alternative designs and repairs. Following a series of surface pressure calibration runs, the specimens were exposed to simulated ascent and entry dynamic pressure profiles. Entry conditions included the use of a vortex generator to evaluate the effect of shed vortices on the AFRSI located in the area of concern.

  7. Test of a trail cryogenic balance in the ONERA T2 wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, A.; Seraudie, A.; Plazanet, M.; Payry, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The three component cryogenic balance designed and manufactured by the ONERA Large Means Directorate, was equipped with a light alloy schematic model and tested at the end of 1984 at the T2 wind tunnel in gusts at low temperatures up to 120 K. The tests pertained to the impact of the cryogenic conditions on the behavior of extensometric bridges while cooling the balance-model system mounted in the conditioning device and during gusts with models in the test section. A few tests with thermal disequilibrium between the flow and balance made it possible to confirm the proper operation in the range 120 to 300 K. This gust system showed that the balance, which was well compensated thermally, may be used in T2 with and without precooling. For any thermal gradient, the analysis was always performed with the same matrices and aerodynamic coefficients were obtained with the same precision.

  8. Compiling the space shuttle wind tunnel data base: An exercise in technical and managerial innovators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, N. D.

    1983-01-01

    Engineers evaluating Space Shuttle flight data and performance results are using a massive data base of wind tunnel test data. A wind tunnel test data base of the magnitude attained is a major accomplishment. The Apollo program spawned an automated wind tunnel data analysis system called SADSAC developed by the Chrysler Space Division. An improved version of this system renamed DATAMAN was used by Chrysler to document analyzed wind tunnel data and data bank the test data in standardized formats. These analysis documents, associated computer graphics and standard formatted data were disseminated nationwide to the Shuttle technical community. These outputs became the basis for substantiating and certifying the flight worthiness of the Space Shuttle and for improving future designs. As an aid to future programs this paper documents the lessons learned in compiling the massive wind tunnel test data base for developing the Space Shuttle. In particular, innovative managerial and technical concepts evolved in the course of conceiving and developing this successful DATAMAN system and the methods and organization for applying the system are presented.

  9. MHz-rate nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging in a Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Webster, Matthew; Lempert, Walter R; Miller, Joseph D; Meyer, Terrence R; Ivey, Christopher B; Danehy, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging at repetition rates as high as 1 MHz is demonstrated in the NASA Langley 31 in. Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel. Approximately 200 time-correlated image sequences of between 10 and 20 individual frames were obtained over eight days of wind tunnel testing spanning two entries in March and September of 2009. The image sequences presented were obtained from the boundary layer of a 20° flat plate model, in which transition was induced using a variety of different shaped protuberances, including a cylinder and a triangle. The high-speed image sequences captured a variety of laminar and transitional flow phenomena, ranging from mostly laminar flow, typically at a lower Reynolds number and/or in the near wall region of the model, to highly transitional flow in which the temporal evolution and progression of characteristic streak instabilities and/or corkscrew-shaped vortices could be clearly identified.

  10. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Zobeck, Ted M.; Kocurek, Gary; Yang, Zong-Liang; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2016-02-01

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely, clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  11. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad

    2016-01-22

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  12. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Andrew, E-mail: pandrew@ucla.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chui, Chi On [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  13. Analysis of Mexico wind tunnel measurements. Final report of IEA Task 29, Mexnext (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G.; Boorsma, K. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Cho, T. [Korea Aerospace Research Institute KARI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Gomez-Iradi, S. [National Renewable Energy Center of Spain CENER, Sarriguren (Spain); Schaffarczyk, P. [A. Jeromin University of Applied Sciences, CEWind EG, Kiel (Germany); Shen, W.Z. [The Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lutz, T. [K. Meister University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Stoevesandt, B. [ForWind, Zentrum fuer Windenergieforschung, Oldenburg (Germany); Schreck, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL, Golden, CO (United States); Micallef, D.; Pereira, R.; Sant, T. [Delft University of Technology TUD, Delft (Netherlands); Madsen, H.A.; Soerensen, N. [Risoe-DTU, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-02-15

    This report describes the work performed within the first phase of IEA Task 29 Mexnext. In this IEA Task 29 a total of 20 organisations from 11 different countries collaborated in analysing the measurements which have been performed in the EU project 'Mexico'. Within this Mexico project 9 European institutes carried out a wind tunnel experiment in the Large Low Speed Facility (LLF) of the German Dutch Wind Facilities DNW on a rotor with a diameter of 4.5 m. Pressure distributions were measured at five locations along the blade along with detailed flow field measurements around the rotor plane using stereo PIV. As a result of the international collaboration within this task a very thorough analysis of the data could be carried out and a large number of codes were validated not only in terms of loads but also in terms of underlying flow field. The detailed pressure measurements along the blade in combination with the detailed flow field measurements gave a unique opportunity to better understand the response of a wind turbine to the incoming flow field. Deficiencies in modelling have been established and directions for model improvement can be given.

  14. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Performance and Vibratory Loads Data From a Wind-Tunnel Test of a Model Helicopter Main-Rotor Blade With a Paddle-Type Tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Noonan, Kevin W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to obtain data to permit evaluation of paddle-type tip technology for possible use in future U.S. advanced rotor designs. Data was obtained for both a baseline main-rotor blade and a main-rotor blade with a paddle-type tip. The baseline and paddle-type tip blades were compared with regard to rotor performance, oscillatory pitch-link loads, and 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system loads. Data was obtained in hover and forward flight over a nominal range of advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.425. Results indicate that the paddle-type tip offers no performance improvements in either hover or forward flight. Pitch-link oscillatory loads for the paddle-type tip are higher than for the baseline blade, whereas 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system loads are generally lower.

  16. Quantitative risk assessment modeling for nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Qu, Xiaobo; Wang, Xinchang; Yuanita, Vivi; Wong, Siew Chee

    2011-03-01

    Urban road tunnels provide an increasingly cost-effective engineering solution, especially in compact cities like Singapore. For some urban road tunnels, tunnel characteristics such as tunnel configurations, geometries, provisions of tunnel electrical and mechanical systems, traffic volumes, etc. may vary from one section to another. These urban road tunnels that have characterized nonuniform parameters are referred to as nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels. In this study, a novel quantitative risk assessment (QRA) model is proposed for nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels because the existing QRA models for road tunnels are inapplicable to assess the risks in these road tunnels. This model uses a tunnel segmentation principle whereby a nonhomogeneous urban road tunnel is divided into various homogenous sections. Individual risk for road tunnel sections as well as the integrated risk indices for the entire road tunnel is defined. The article then proceeds to develop a new QRA model for each of the homogeneous sections. Compared to the existing QRA models for road tunnels, this section-based model incorporates one additional top event-toxic gases due to traffic congestion-and employs the Poisson regression method to estimate the vehicle accident frequencies of tunnel sections. This article further illustrates an aggregated QRA model for nonhomogeneous urban tunnels by integrating the section-based QRA models. Finally, a case study in Singapore is carried out.

  17. Experimental Data from the Benchmark SuperCritical Wing Wind Tunnel Test on an Oscillating Turntable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Piatak, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The Benchmark SuperCritical Wing (BSCW) wind tunnel model served as a semi-blind testcase for the 2012 AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW). The BSCW was chosen as a testcase due to its geometric simplicity and flow physics complexity. The data sets examined include unforced system information and forced pitching oscillations. The aerodynamic challenges presented by this AePW testcase include a strong shock that was observed to be unsteady for even the unforced system cases, shock-induced separation and trailing edge separation. The current paper quantifies these characteristics at the AePW test condition and at a suggested benchmarking test condition. General characteristics of the model's behavior are examined for the entire available data set.

  18. Analysis of Wind Tunnel Polar Replicates Using the Modern Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloach, Richard; Micol, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The role of variance in a Modern Design of Experiments analysis of wind tunnel data is reviewed, with distinctions made between explained and unexplained variance. The partitioning of unexplained variance into systematic and random components is illustrated, with examples of the elusive systematic component provided for various types of real-world tests. The importance of detecting and defending against systematic unexplained variance in wind tunnel testing is discussed, and the random and systematic components of unexplained variance are examined for a representative wind tunnel data set acquired in a test in which a missile is used as a test article. The adverse impact of correlated (non-independent) experimental errors is described, and recommendations are offered for replication strategies that facilitate the quantification of random and systematic unexplained variance.

  19. Generation of atmospheric boundary layer in the IIUM low speed wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Za'aba, Khalid Aldin Bin; Asrar, Waqar; Dheeb, Mohamad Al

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an attempt made to simulate the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at IIUM. This was performed through modifications of the inlet and surface conditions of the test section. Devices such as spires, fences and surface roughness were used. The ASCE 7-10 standard was used as a reference to validate the results between the wind tunnel data and the full-scale ABL flow characteristics. The velocity profile and turbulence intensity were measured using a one-dimensional hotwire (CTA) probe. The data obtained show good agreement with ASCE 7-10 velocity profiles for exposures B and C while using a scale of 1:488 to match the wind tunnel data. The turbulence intensity profiles do not show a good agreement.

  20. Wind-tunnel fan noise reduction including effects of turning vanes on noise propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, P. T.; Hoglund, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Fan silencers with low-pressure drop have been designed and installed in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel No. 1. The silencers are composed of an absorbent lining flush with the wind-tunnel walls upstream of the fan and an absorbent splitter in the duct downstream of the fan. An acoustical insertion loss of 4 to 12 dB was measured between 100 and 1000 Hz. High-frequency performance of the silencers was reduced by test-section noise and by corner vanes which turned the sound waves so they followed the duct axis. Sound below 1.2 kHz diffracted around the 305-mm-long vanes and impinged on acoustically absorbent corner walls. Wind-tunnel flow losses are discussed.

  1. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 3: Angle of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A review of optical sensors that are capable of accurate angle of attack measurements in wind tunnels was conducted. These include sensors being used or being developed at NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers, Boeing Airplane Company, McDonald Aircraft Company, Arnold Engineering Development Center, National Aerospace Laboratory of the Netherlands, National Research Council of Canada, and the Royal Aircraft Establishment of England. Some commercial sensors that may be applicable to accurate angle measurements were also reviewed. It was found that the optical sensor systems were based on interferometers, polarized light detector, linear or area photodiode cameras, position sensing photodetectors, and laser scanners. Several of the optical sensors can meet the requirements of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Two of these, the Boeing interferometer and the Complere lateral effect photodiode sensors are being developed for the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel.

  2. Aeroelastic Deformation: Adaptation of Wind Tunnel Measurement Concepts to Full-Scale Vehicle Flight Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2005-01-01

    The adaptation of a proven wind tunnel test technique, known as Videogrammetry, to flight testing of full-scale vehicles is presented. A description is presented of the technique used at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center for the measurement of the change in wing twist and deflection of an F/A-18 research aircraft as a function of both time and aerodynamic load. Requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the flight-testing technique and differences compared to wind tunnel testing are given. Measurement and operational comparisons to an older in-flight system known as the Flight Deflection Measurement System (FDMS) are presented.

  3. High speed wind tunnel tests of the PTA aircraft. [Propfan Test Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabri, A. S.; Little, B. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Propfans, advanced highly-loaded propellers, are proposed to power transport aircraft that cruise at high subsonic speeds, giving significant fuel savings over the equivalent turbofan-powered aircraft. NASA is currently sponsoring the Propfan Test Assessment Program (PTA) to provide basic data on the structural integrity and acoustic performance of the propfan. The program involves installation design, wind-tunnel tests, and flight tests of the Hamilton Standard SR-7 propfan in a wing-mount tractor installation on the Gulfstream II aircraft. This paper reports on the high-speed wind-tunnel tests and presents the computational aerodynamic methods that were employed in the analyses, design, and evaluation of the configuration. In spite of the complexity of the configuration, these methods provide aerodynamic predictions which are in excellent agreement with wind-tunnel data.

  4. Analytical aeroelastic stability considerations and conversion loads for an XV-15 tilt-rotor in a wind tunnel simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Meza, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A rotorcraft analysis is conducted to assess tilt-rotor stability and conversion loads for the XV-15 rotor with metal blades within its specified test envelope. A 38-DOF flutter analysis based on the code by Johnson (1988) is developed to simulate a wind-tunnel test in which the rotor torque is constant and thereby study stability. The same analytical model provides the simulated loads including hub loads, blade loads, and oscillatory pitch-link loads with attention given to the nonuniform inflow through the proprotor in the presence of the wing. Tilt-rotor stability during the cruise mode is found to be sensitive to coupling effects in the control system stiffness, and a stability problem is identified in the XV-15 Advanced Technology Blades. The present analysis demonstrates that the tilt-rotor is stable within the specified test envelope of the NASA 40 x 80-ft wind tunnel.

  5. Wind tunnel test and calibration techniques for the measurement of damping and dynamic cross derivatives due to pitching and yawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanff, E. S.; Orlik-Rueckemann, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper shows how the oscillatory apparatus described previously by Orlik-Rueckemann et al. (1974) for determining cross and cross-coupling moment derivatives due to pitching and yawing oscillation is strengthened, extensively modified, and adapted to permit operation in a large continuous-flow wind tunnel. Particular attention is given to an electromagnetic three-degrees-of-freedom calibrating system developed to verify the validity of the experimental method and the various aspects of data reduction procedure. Typical results from calibration tests and from a series of wind tunnel experiments are presented. The only significant limitation is that the apparatus can only be used for models that are relatively small and have a conically-shaped longitudinal cavity.

  6. Numerical simulation and transonic wind-tunnel test for elastic thin-shell structure considering fluid-structure interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Yunju; Xi Zhuyou; Zhang Shanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic force can lead to the strong structural vibration of flying aircraft at a high speed. This harmful vibration can bring damage or failure to the electronic equipment fixed in air-craft. It is necessary to predict the structural dynamic response in the design course. This paper pre-sents a new numerical algorithm and scheme to solve the structural dynamics responses when considering fluid–structure interaction (FSI). Numerical simulation for a free-flying structural model in transonic speed is completed. Results show that the small elastic deformation of the struc-ture can greatly affect the FSI. The FSI vibration tests are carried out in a transonic speed wind-tunnel for checking numerical theory and algorithms, and the wind-tunnel test results well accord with that of the numerical simulation. This indicates that the presented numerical method can be applied to predicting the structural dynamics responses when containing the FSI.

  7. Comparison of Force and Moment Coefficients for the Same Test Article in Multiple Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares the results of force and moment measurements made on the same test article and with the same balance in three transonic wind tunnels. Comparisons are made for the same combination of Reynolds number, Mach number, sideslip angle, control surface configuration, and angle of attack range. Between-tunnel force and moment differences are quantified. An analysis of variance was performed at four unique sites in the design space to assess the statistical significance of between-tunnel variation and any interaction with angle of attack. Tunnel to tunnel differences too large to attribute to random error were detected were observed for all forces and moments. In some cases these differences were independent of angle of attack and in other cases they changed with angle of attack.

  8. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2014-01-01

    been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade......Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has...... for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel...

  9. Design and Execution of the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Large-Article Wind Tunnel Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    The testing of 3- and 6-meter diameter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) test articles was completed in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40 ft x 80 ft Wind Tunnel test section. Both models were stacked tori, constructed as 60 degree half-angle sphere cones. The 3-meter HIAD was tested in two configurations. The first 3-meter configuration utilized an instrumented flexible aerodynamic skin covering the inflatable aeroshell surface, while the second configuration employed a flight-like flexible thermal protection system. The 6-meter HIAD was tested in two structural configurations (with and without an aft-mounted stiffening torus near the shoulder), both utilizing an instrumented aerodynamic skin.

  10. Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test of a Flare-type Membrane Aeroshell for Atmospheric Entry Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Koyama, Masashi; Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Abe, Takashi; Koichi Hayashi, A.

    A flexible aeroshell for atmospheric entry vehicles has attracted attention as an innovative space transportation system. In this study, hypersonic wind tunnel tests were carried out to investigate the behavior, aerodynamic characteristics and aerodynamic heating environment in hypersonic flow for a previously developed capsule-type vehicle with a flare-type membrane aeroshell made of ZYLON textile sustained by a rigid torus frame. Two different models with different flare angles (45º and 60º) were tested to experimentally clarify the effect of flare angle. Results indicate that flare angle of aeroshell has significant and complicate effect on flow field and aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flow at Mach 9.45 and the flare angle is very important parameter for vehicle design with the flare-type membrane aeroshell.

  11. Wind-tunnel Tests of the Fowler Variable-area Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Fred E; Platt, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    The lift, drag, and center of pressure characteristics of a model of the Fowler variable-area wing were measured in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. The Fowler wing consists of a combination of a main wing and an extension surface, also of airfoil section. The extension surface can be entirely retracted within the lower rear portion of the main wing or it can be moved to the rear and downward. The tests were made with the nose of the extension airfoil in various positions near the trailing edge of the main wing and with the surface at various angular deflections. The highest lift coefficient obtained was C(sub L) = 3.17 as compared with 1.27 for the main wing alone.

  12. Drag reduction by reconfiguration of a full tree in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Langre, Emmanuel; Tadrist, Loic; Leclercq, Tristan; Hemon, Pascal; Amandolese, Xavier; Saudreau, Marc; Marquier, Andre; Knapp, Graham; Flamand, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    The results of drag measurements performed on a full 3 m-tall cherry tree in an atmospheric wind tunnel are presented. The drag on the trunk alone is shown to increase quadratically with the velocity of the flow, as expected, but the drag on the whole tree with branches and leaves follows a smaller power law with velocity, after the reconfiguration of most leaves. The transition from the quadratic law to a linear increase of the drag of the leaves with the magnitude of the flow is observed. Data is also obtained on moment loading on the base of the tree showing also an effect of the reconfiguration. Finally, these results are compared with current models of drag reduction by reconfiguration.

  13. Vortex wakes generated by robins Erithacus rubecula during free flight in a wind tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, A; Rosén, M; Spedding, G R

    2006-04-22

    The wakes of two individual robins were measured in digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experiments conducted in the Lund wind tunnel. Wake measurements were compared with each other, and with previous studies in the same facility. There was no significant individual variation in any of the measured quantities. Qualitatively, the wake structure and its gradual variation with flight speed were exactly as previously measured for the thrush nightingale. A procedure that accounts for the disparate sources of circulation spread over the complex wake structure nevertheless can account for the vertical momentum flux required to support the weight, and an example calculation is given for estimating drag from the components of horizontal momentum flux (whose net value is zero). The measured circulations of the largest structures in the wake can be predicted quite well by simple models, and expressions are given to predict these and other measurable quantities in future bird flight experiments.

  14. Vapor-screen technique for flow visualization in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, O. A.; Corlett, W. A.; Wassum, D. L.; Babb, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor-screen technique for flow visualization, as developed for the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, is described with evaluations of light sources and photographic equipment. Test parameters including dew point, pressure, and temperature were varied to determine optimum conditions for obtaining high-quality vapor-screen photographs. The investigation was conducted in the supersonic speed range for Mach numbers from 1.47 to 4.63 at model angles of attack up to 35 deg. Vapor-screen photographs illustrating various flow patterns are presented for several missile and aircraft configurations. Examples of vapor-screen results that have contributed to the understanding of complex flow fields and provided a basis for the development of theoretical codes are presented with reference to other research.

  15. An Assessment of Ares I-X Aeroacoustic Measurements with Comparisons to Pre-Flight Wind Tunnel Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Donald K.; Reed, Darren K.

    2011-01-01

    During the recent successful launch of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle, aeroacoustic data was gathered at fifty-seven locations along the vehicle as part of the Developmental Flight Instrumentation. Several of the Ares I-X aeroacoustic measurements were placed to duplicate measurement locations prescribed in pre-flight, sub-scale wind tunnel tests. For these duplicated measurement locations, comparisons have been made between aeroacoustic data gathered during the ascent phase of the Ares I-X flight test and wind tunnel test data. These comparisons have been made at closely matching flight conditions (Mach number and vehicle attitude) in order to preserve a one-to-one relationship between the flight and wind tunnel data. These comparisons and the current wind tunnel to flight scaling methodology are presented and discussed. The implications of using wind tunnel test data scaled under the current methodology to predict conceptual launch vehicle aeroacoustic environments are also discussed.

  16. Quantifying Density, Water Adsorption and Equilibration Properties of Wind Tunnel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinting; Horst, Sarah; He, Chao; Bridges, Nathan; Burr, Devon M.; Sebree, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    Aeolian processes are found on various planetary bodies including Earth, Venus, Mars, Titan, Triton, Pluto, and Comet 67P. Wind tunnels can simulate aeolian processes under different planetary parameters, with the robustness of results relying on experimental conditions and understanding of experimental materials. Threshold wind speed, the minimum wind speed to initiate saltation, is one parameter that can be investigated in wind tunnels. Liquid water adsorbed on wind tunnel materials could greatly enhance the threshold wind speed by increasing the interparticle force, density, and effective size of particles. Previous studies have shown that this effect could increase the threshold by 100% by putting 0.3-0.6% of water into typical dry quartz sand (Fecan et al. 1998). In order to simulate the weight of particles on other planetary bodies where gravity is significantly lower than on Earth, low-density materials are used in planetary wind tunnels, including walnut shells, activated charcoal, iced tea, and instant coffee.We first quantified the densities for all wind tunnel materials using a pycnometer and updated the density for low-density materials (e.g., walnut shells have density of 1.4 g/cm3 instead of 1.1 g/cm3 in the literature (Greeley et al. 1980)). Then we present a set of measurements that quantify water adsorption for both low and high-density materials (sand, basalt, and chromite). We first measured the water content and equilibration timescales for the materials through gravimetric measurements. We found low-density materials tend to have much more water (>5%) compared to high-density materials ( 6 hrs) compared to high-density materials (10-50 minutes). Since only water adsorbed on the particle surface would change the interparticle force, we then separate the surface and internal water using thermo-gravimetric analysis, and found that >80% of the water is still on the surface. Thus we assume water adsorption for low-density materials could greatly

  17. Immersion and contact freezing experiments in the Mainz wind tunnel laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppers, Oliver; Mayer, Amelie; Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir; Borrmann, Stephan; Szakáll, Miklós

    2016-04-01

    Immersion and contact freezing are of outmost important ice nucleation processes in mixed phase clouds. Experimental studies are carried out in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel laboratory in order to characterize these nucleation processes for different ice nucleating particles (INP), such as for mineral dust or biological particles. Immersion freezing is investigated in our laboratory with two different experimental techniques, both attaining contact-free levitation of liquid droplets and cooling of the surrounding air down to about -25 °C. In an acoustic levitator placed in the cold room of our laboratory, drops with diameters of 2 mm are investigated. In the vertical air stream of the wind tunnel droplets with diameter of 700 micron are freely floated at their terminal velocities, simulating the flow conditions of the free atmosphere. Furthermore, the wind tunnel offers a unique platform for contact freezing experiments. Supercooled water droplets are floated in the vertical air stream at their terminal velocities and INP are injected into the tunnel air stream upstream of them. As soon as INP collides with the supercooled droplet the contact freezing is initiated. The first results of immersion and contact freezing experiments with cellulose particles both in the acoustic levitator and in the wind tunnel will be presented. Cellulose is considered as typical INP of biological origin and a macrotracer for plant debris. Nucleating properties of cellulose will be provided, mainly focusing on the temperature, INP concentration, and specific surface area dependences of the freezing processes. Direct comparison between the different experimental techniques (acoustic levitator and wind tunnel), as well as between nucleation modes (immersion and contact freezing) will be presented. The work is carried out within the framework of the German research unit INUIT.

  18. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved.

  19. Numerical modeling of tunneling-induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Urpi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Removal of rock mass in mining environment has been associated since long-time with seismic event of magnitude 3 and above, with the potential to cause damage to the infrastructures or even loss of human life. Although with similarities with mining, relatively unknown up to now are seismic events induced by tunneling. However with modern mechanized tunneling techniques, making possible to digging deeper and longer underground infrastructure, the risk is not negligible. As an example, the excavation of the 57km long Gotthard Base Tunnel has been associated more than hundred seismic events, with the largest one having magnitude of ML 2.4, damaging the tunnel infrastructures. For future scenario of deep geological storage of nuclear waste, tunneling will constitute the primary activity during site construction. Hence, it will be crucial to understand the risk associated with the underground construction operation that can reactivate seismogenic features nearby the future location of emplacement tunnels. Here we present numerical simulation aimed at understanding the potential for inducing seismicity during tunnel construction. The stress changes and their evolution during the excavation are evaluated with a finite element solver (FLAC3d). A strain-softening friction model is then used to simulate the occurrence of a sudden slip on a fault zone (if critical conditions for reactivation are reached). We also present a sensitivity analysis of the potential for inducing different seismic events by different tunnel sizes at varying distance from a nearby failure plane, with the final purpose of evaluating safety of a potential nuclear repository site on the short- and long-term.

  20. Pulsar Wind Nebulae Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Bucciantini, N

    2013-01-01

    Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) are ideal astrophysical laboratories where high energy relativistic phenomena can be investigated. They are close, well resolved in our observations, and the knowledge derived in their study has a strong impact in many other fields, from AGNs to GRBs. Yet there are still unresolved issues, that prevent us from a full clear understanding of these objects. The lucky combination of high resolution X-ray imaging and numerical codes to handle the outflow and dynamical properties of relativistic MHD, has opened a new avenue of investigation that has lead to interesting progresses in the last years. Despite all of this, we do not understand yet how particles are accelerated, and the functioning of the pulsar wind and pulsar magnetosphere, that power PWNe. I will review what is now commonly known as the MHD paradigm, and in particular I will focus on various approaches that have been and are currently used to model these systems. For each I will highlight its advantages, limitations, and de...

  1. Critical wind velocity for arresting upwind gas and smoke dispersion induced by near-wall fire in a road tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L H; Peng, W; Huo, R

    2008-01-15

    In case of a tunnel fire, toxic gas and smoke particles released are the most fatal contaminations. It is important to supply fresh air from the upwind side to provide a clean and safe environment upstream from the fire source for people evacuation. Thus, the critical longitudinal wind velocity for arresting fire induced upwind gas and smoke dispersion is a key criteria for tunnel safety design. Former studies and thus, the models built for estimating the critical wind velocity are all arbitrarily assuming that the fire takes place at the centre of the tunnel. However, in many real cases in road tunnels, the fire originates near the sidewall. The critical velocity of a near-wall fire should be different with that of a free-standing central fire due to their different plume entrainment process. Theoretical analysis and CFD simulation were performed in this paper to estimate the critical velocity for the fire near the sidewall. Results showed that when fire originates near the sidewall, it needs larger critical velocity to arrest the upwind gas and smoke dispersion than when fire at the centre. The ratio of critical velocity of a near-wall fire to that of a central fire was ideally estimated to be 1.26 by theoretical analysis. Results by CFD modelling showed that the ratio decreased with the increase of the fire size till near to unity. The ratio by CFD modelling was about 1.18 for a 500kW small fire, being near to and a bit lower than the theoretically estimated value of 1.26. However, the former models, including those of Thomas (1958, 1968), Dangizer and Kenndey (1982), Oka and Atkinson (1995), Wu and Barker (2000) and Kunsch (1999, 2002), underestimated the critical velocity needed for a fire near the tunnel sidewall.

  2. Analysis of a Split-Plot Experimental Design Applied to a Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A procedure to analyze a split-plot experimental design featuring two input factors, two levels of randomization, and two error structures in a low-speed wind tunnel investigation of a small-scale model of a fighter airplane configuration is described in this report. Standard commercially-available statistical software was used to analyze the test results obtained in a randomization-restricted environment often encountered in wind tunnel testing. The input factors were differential horizontal stabilizer incidence and the angle of attack. The response variables were the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment. Using split-plot terminology, the whole plot, or difficult-to-change, factor was the differential horizontal stabilizer incidence, and the subplot, or easy-to-change, factor was the angle of attack. The whole plot and subplot factors were both tested at three levels. Degrees of freedom for the whole plot error were provided by replication in the form of three blocks, or replicates, which were intended to simulate three consecutive days of wind tunnel facility operation. The analysis was conducted in three stages, which yielded the estimated mean squares, multiple regression function coefficients, and corresponding tests of significance for all individual terms at the whole plot and subplot levels for the three aerodynamic response variables. The estimated regression functions included main effects and two-factor interaction for the lift coefficient, main effects, two-factor interaction, and quadratic effects for the drag coefficient, and only main effects for the pitching moment coefficient.

  3. Experimental evaluation of pumpjet propulsor for an axisymmetric body in wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Suryanarayana

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Design of a Pump Jet Propulsor (PJP was undertaken for an underwater body with axisymmetric configuration using axial flow compressor design techniques supported by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD analysis for performance prediction. Experimental evaluation of the PJP was carried out through experiments in a Wind Tunnel Facility (WTF using momentum defect principle for propulsive performance prior to proceeding with extensive experimental evaluation in towing tank and cavitation tunnel. Experiments were particularly conducted with respect to Self Propulsion Point (SPP, residual torque and thrust characteristics over a range of vehicle advance ratio in order to ascertain whether sufficient thrust is developed at the design condition with least possible imbalance torque left out due to residual swirl in the slip stream. Pumpjet and body models were developed for the propulsion tests using Aluminum alloy forged material. Tests were conducted from 0 m/s to 30 m/s at four rotational speeds of the PJP. SPP was determined confirming the thrust development capability of PJP. Estimation of residual torque was carried out at SPP corresponding to speeds of 15, 20 and 25 m/s to examine the effectiveness of the stator. Estimation of thrust and residual torque was also carried out at wind speeds 0 and 6 m/s for PJP RPMs corresponding to self propulsion tests to study the propulsion characteristics during the launch of the vehicle in water where advance ratios are close to Zero. These results are essential to assess the thrust performance at very low advance ratios to accelerate the body and to control the body during initial stages. This technique has turned out to be very useful and economical method for quick assessment of overall performance of the propulsor and generation of exhaustive fluid dynamic data to validate CFD techniques employed.

  4. Collisions of cloud droplets with a rain drop investigated in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górska, Anna; Fugal, Jacob; Mitra, Subir; Malinowski, Szymon; Szakall, Miklos; von Blohn, Nadine; Jost, Alex; Borrmann, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Collisions of cloud droplets with rain drops and the ensuing collection of cloud droplets are important phenomena for precipitation formation. Representation of these processes in cloud and climate models, though adequate in some cases, is based on very few actual measurements to validate these parameterisations. Therefore we apply in-line holography to observe single collisions and near-collisions of cloud droplets with a rain drop in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel. So far we have measurements in a laminar flow seeded with small droplets of diameters between 20 and 70 μm. Into the stream, a single collector drop of diameter of ~700 μm was injected and floated in a sample volume by adjusting the vertical velocity of the wind tunnel to match the terminal velocity of the drop (~3 m/s). With a collimated laser beam and a high speed camera, we recorded holograms of the drop and droplets in the sample volume, which after reconstruction allows us to determine 3D positions of the droplets and the collecting drop, their diameters and droplet size distributions. With the time-resolved particle positions, we connect droplets from one hologram with droplets in the next hologram, which occurs in the predicted area calculated on the basis of known mean flow velocity. Analysis of successive images allows us to obtain trajectories of cloud droplets and especially their tracks close to the collector drop. With the obtained time resolution we have about 4-5 point droplet tracks through which we document collisions. A collision appears when we see a droplet approaching the collector drop and the droplet does not continue past the drop. We present the experimental method, data processing procedure and collisions characteristic founded in a data series length of about 50 s, yielding around 70-100 collisions.

  5. A wind tunnel study of flows over idealised urban surfaces with roughness sublayer corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yat-Kiu; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Dynamics in the roughness (RSLs) and inertial (ISLs) sublayers in the turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over idealised urban surfaces are investigated analytically and experimentally. In this paper, we derive an analytical solution to the mean velocity profile, which is a continuous function applicable to both RSL and ISL, over rough surfaces in isothermal conditions. Afterwards, a modified mixing-length model for RSL/ISL transport is developed that elucidates how surface roughness affects the turbulence motions. A series of wind tunnel experiments are conducted to measure the vertical profiles of mean and fluctuating velocities, together with momentum flux over various configurations of surface-mounted ribs in cross flows using hot-wire anemometry (HWA). The analytical solution agrees well with the wind tunnel result that improves the estimate to mean velocity profile over urban surfaces and TBL dynamics as well. The thicknesses of RSL and ISL are calculated by monitoring the convergence/divergence between the temporally averaged and spatio-temporally averaged profiles of momentum flux. It is found that the height of RSL/ISL interface is a function of surface roughness. Examining the direct, physical influence of roughness elements on near-surface RSL flows reveals that the TBL flows over rough surfaces exhibit turbulence motions of two different length scales which are functions of the RSL and ISL structure. Conclusively, given a TBL, the rougher the surface, the higher is the RSL intruding upward that would thinner the ISL up to 50 %. Therefore, the conventional ISL log-law approximation to TBL flows over urban surfaces should be applied with caution.

  6. Wind tunnel testing of a full scale helicopter blade section with an upstream active Gurney flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, R.; Freire Gomez, J.; Booker, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed on an aerofoil section comparable to that of a full scale helicopter blade section with an upstream active Gurney flap in the framework of the European project CleanSky ITD Green RotorCraft. A modified NACA0012 profile was used, with 23 Kulite pressure transducers em

  7. Nonlinear flutter wind tunnel test and numerical analysis of folding fins with freeplay nonlinearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ning

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The flutter characteristics of folding control fins with freeplay are investigated by numerical simulation and flutter wind tunnel tests. Based on the characteristics of the structures, fins with different freeplay angles are designed. For a 0° angle of attack, wind tunnel tests of these fins are conducted, and vibration is observed by accelerometers and a high-speed camera. By the expansion of the connected relationships, the governing equations of fit for the nonlinear aeroelastic analysis are established by the free-interface component mode synthesis method. Based on the results of the wind tunnel tests, the flutter characteristics of fins with different freeplay angles are analyzed. The results show that the vibration divergent speed is increased, and the divergent speed is higher than the flutter speed of the nominal linear system. The vibration divergent speed is increased along with an increase in the freeplay angle. The developed free-interface component mode synthesis method could be used to establish governing equations and to analyze the characteristics of nonlinear aeroelastic systems. The results of the numerical simulations and the wind tunnel tests indicate the same trends and critical velocities.

  8. Variation in energy intake and basal metabolic rate of a bird migrating in a wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindström, Å.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Kvist, A.

    1999-01-01

    1. We studied the changes in body mass, metabolizable energy intake rate (ME) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) of a Thrush Nightingale, Luscinia luscinia, following repeated 12-h migratory flights in a wind tunnel. In total the bird flew for 176 h corresponding to 6300 km. This is the first study wher

  9. Flight costs and fuel composition of a bird migrating in a wind-tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.R.J.; Kvist, A.; Lindström, A.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the energy and protein balance of a Thrush Nightingale Luscinia luscinia, a small long-distance migrant, during repeated 12-hr long Eights in a wind tunnel and during subsequent two-day fueling periods. From the energy budgets we estimated the power requirements for migratory flight in th

  10. Evaporation of HD Droplets From Nonporous, Inert Surfaces in TGA Microbalance Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaporation of HD Droplets from Nonporous, Inert Surfaces in TGA Microbalancc Wind Tunnels 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DAAD13...hr (lightly swirled on a rotating plateau). Then, the glass was rinsed with dematerialized water and dried (using appropriate fat-free non-felting

  11. Wind-tunnel investigations of pressure distribution over high-rise buildings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cwik, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available pressure distribution over the façade of 208 m high Warsaw Trade Tower building. Wind tunnel tests were a part of a wider research project which also includes full-scale measurements and numerical simulations (CFD, FEM), in order to examine the possibility...

  12. Metrology Measurements of the DSTO Transonic Wind Tunnel Store Support Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Metrology Measurements of the DSTO Transonic Wind Tunnel Store Support Arm Adam Blandford, John Clayton...provide quality assurance for test clients. This document details metrology measurements that were conducted during February and March 2013 on the store...Australia 2013 AR-015-818 December 2013 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Metrology Measurements of the DSTO

  13. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of Vegetative Buffer Effects on Air Flow near Swine Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing concerns about generation and transport of swine odor constituents have substantiated wind tunnel simulation studies on air flow dynamics near swine production facilities. A possible odor mitigation strategy is a forest vegetative buffer as a windbreak barrier near swine facilities becaus...

  14. Wind Tunnel Wall Corrections (la Correction des effets de paroi en soufflerie)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    dimensional Group 1 Flowfields already simulated in this way within flexible-walled test sections (Goodyer, [10]; Benvenuto and Pittaluga, [5] is...and Dress, D.A., 1986, "Optimum transonic wind tunnel", AIAA 86-0755. [5] Benvenuto , G. and Pittaluga, F., 1985, "Experimental investigation on the

  15. Nonlinear flutter wind tunnel test and numerical analysis of folding fins with freeplay nonlinearities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ning; Wang Nan; Zhang Xin; Liu Wei

    2016-01-01

    The flutter characteristics of folding control fins with freeplay are investigated by numer-ical simulation and flutter wind tunnel tests. Based on the characteristics of the structures, fins with different freeplay angles are designed. For a 0? angle of attack, wind tunnel tests of these fins are conducted, and vibration is observed by accelerometers and a high-speed camera. By the expansion of the connected relationships, the governing equations of fit for the nonlinear aeroelastic analysis are established by the free-interface component mode synthesis method. Based on the results of the wind tunnel tests, the flutter characteristics of fins with different freeplay angles are analyzed. The results show that the vibration divergent speed is increased, and the divergent speed is higher than the flutter speed of the nominal linear system. The vibration divergent speed is increased along with an increase in the freeplay angle. The developed free-interface component mode synthesis method could be used to establish governing equations and to analyze the characteristics of nonlinear aeroe-lastic systems. The results of the numerical simulations and the wind tunnel tests indicate the same trends and critical velocities.

  16. Standardization of flux chambers and wind tunnels for area source emission measurements at animal feeding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers and practitioners have used many varied designs of wind tunnels and flux chambers to measure the flux of volatile organic compounds, odor, and ammonia from area sources at animal feeding operations. The measured fluxes are used to estimate emission factors or compare treatments. We sho...

  17. Automation of Some Operations of a Wind Tunnel Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Buggele, Alvin E.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks were used successfully to sequence operations in a small, recently modernized, supersonic wind tunnel at NASA-Lewis Research Center. The neural nets generated correct estimates of shadowgraph patterns, pressure sensor readings and mach numbers for conditions occurring shortly after startup and extending to fully developed flow. Artificial neural networks were trained and tested for estimating: sensor readings from shadowgraph patterns, shadowgraph patterns from shadowgraph patterns and sensor readings from sensor readings. The 3.81 by 10 in. (0.0968 by 0.254 m) tunnel was operated with its mach 2.0 nozzle, and shadowgraph was recorded near the nozzle exit. These results support the thesis that artificial neural networks can be combined with current workstation technology to automate wind tunnel operations.

  18. Determination of aerodynamic damping and force coefficients of filleted twin cables in dry conditions through passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattiello, E.; Eriksen, M. B.; Georgakis, Christos T.

    Moderate amplitude vibrations continue to be reported on the Øresund Bridge cables, although fitted with fillets and dampers. To further investigate the aerodynamics of the bridge’s twin-cable arrangement, 1:2.3 scale passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests of the cables were performed at the DTU....../FORCE Technology Climatic Wind Tunnel facility. The measured aerodynamic damping of the twin-cable arrangement in dry conditions was compared to the values obtained from full-scale monitoring and from an analytical model using static force coefficients. The comparison revealed broad agreement in the investigated...

  19. Determination of aerodynamic damping and force coefficients of filleted twin cables in dry conditions through passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattiello, E.; Eriksen, M. B.; Georgakis, Christos T.

    /FORCE Technology Climatic Wind Tunnel facility. The measured aerodynamic damping of the twin-cable arrangement in dry conditions was compared to the values obtained from full-scale monitoring and from an analytical model using static force coefficients. The comparison revealed broad agreement in the investigated......Moderate amplitude vibrations continue to be reported on the Øresund Bridge cables, although fitted with fillets and dampers. To further investigate the aerodynamics of the bridge’s twin-cable arrangement, 1:2.3 scale passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests of the cables were performed at the DTU...

  20. Characteristics of wind power on Savonius rotor using a guide-box tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irabu, Kunio; Roy, Jitendro Nath [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Senbaru-1, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    This study investigates to improve and adjust the output power of Savonius rotor under various wind power and suggests the method of prevention the rotor from strong wind disaster. In this study, as the appropriate device to achieve the purpose of it, a guide-box tunnel is employed. The guide-box tunnel is like a rectangular box as wind passage in which a test rotor is included. The area ratio between the inlet and exit of it is variable to adjust the inlet mass flow rate or input power. At first, the experiment was conducted to find the adequate configuration which would provide the best relative performance. The present experiment, however, does not include the test to retain the guide-box tunnel from the strong wind. The experiments include the static torque test of the fixed rotor at any phase angle and the dynamic torque test at rotation of them. Consequently, it was found that the maximum rotor rotational speed was achieved in the range of the guide-box area ratio between 0.3 and 0.7 and the value of the output power coefficient of the rotor with guide-box tunnel of the area ratio 0.43 increases about 1.5 times with three blades and 1.23 times with two blades greater than that without guide-box tunnel, respectively. It seemed that the performance of Savonius rotor within the guide-box tunnel is comparable enough with other methods for augmentation and control of the output. (author)

  1. Modelling Wind for Wind Farm Layout Optimization Using Joint Distribution of Wind Speed and Wind Direction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable wind modelling is of crucial importance for wind farm development. The common practice of using sector-wise Weibull distributions has been found inappropriate for wind farm layout optimization. In this study, we propose a simple and easily implementable method to construct joint distribu......Reliable wind modelling is of crucial importance for wind farm development. The common practice of using sector-wise Weibull distributions has been found inappropriate for wind farm layout optimization. In this study, we propose a simple and easily implementable method to construct joint...... quite well in terms of the coefficient of determination R-2. Then, the best of these joint distributions is used in the layout optimization of the Horns Rev 1 wind farm and the choice of bin sizes for wind speed and wind direction is also investigated. It is found that the choice of bin size for wind...... direction is especially critical for layout optimization and the recommended choice of bin sizes for wind speed and wind direction is finally presented....

  2. GVT-Based Ground Flutter Test without Wind Tunnel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc (ZONA) and Arizona State University (ASU) propose a R&D effort to further develop the ground flutter testing system in place of a wind...

  3. Wind erosion in semiarid landscapes: Predictive models and remote sensing methods for the influence of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, H. Brad

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: to develop and test predictive relations for the quantitative influence of vegetation canopy structure on wind erosion of semiarid rangeland soils, and to develop remote sensing methods for measuring the canopy structural parameters that determine sheltering against wind erosion. The influence of canopy structure on wind erosion will be investigated by means of wind-tunnel and field experiments using structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments using model roughness elements to simulate plant canopies. The canopy structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments as important in determining vegetative sheltering against wind erosion will then be measured at a number of naturally vegetated field sites and compared with estimates of these variables derived from analysis of remotely sensed data.

  4. Wind Tunnel Measured Effects on a Twin-Engine Short-Haul Transport Caused by Simulated Ice Accretions: Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reehorst, Andrew; Potapczuk, Mark; Ratvasky, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to release the data from the NASA Langley/Lewis 14 by 22 foot wind tunnel test that examined icing effects on a 1/8 scale twin-engine short-haul jet transport model. Presented in this document are summary data from the major configurations tested. The entire test database in addition to ice shape and model measurements is available as a data supplement in CD-ROM form. Data measured and presented are: wing pressure distributions, model force and moment, and wing surface flow visualization.

  5. An Optimization Model of Tunnel Support Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Lijuan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An optimization model was developed to obtain the ideal values of the primary support parameters of tunnels, which are wide-ranging in high-speed railway design codes when the surrounding rocks are at the III, IV, and V levels. First, several sets of experiments were designed and simulated using the FLAC3D software under an orthogonal experimental design. Six factors, namely, level of surrounding rock, buried depth of tunnel, lateral pressure coefficient, anchor spacing, anchor length, and shotcrete thickness, were considered. Second, a regression equation was generated by conducting a multiple linear regression analysis following the analysis of the simulation results. Finally, the optimization model of support parameters was obtained by solving the regression equation using the least squares method. In practical projects, the optimized values of support parameters could be obtained by integrating known parameters into the proposed model. In this work, the proposed model was verified on the basis of the Liuyang River Tunnel Project. Results show that the optimization model significantly reduces related costs. The proposed model can also be used as a reliable reference for other high-speed railway tunnels.

  6. Reliability Modeling of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostandyan, Erik

    Cost reductions for offshore wind turbines are a substantial requirement in order to make offshore wind energy more competitive compared to other energy supply methods. During the 20 – 25 years of wind turbines useful life, Operation & Maintenance costs are typically estimated to be a quarter...... the actions should be made and the type of actions requires knowledge on the accumulated damage or degradation state of the wind turbine components. For offshore wind turbines, the action times could be extended due to weather restrictions and result in damage or degradation increase of the remaining...... for Operation & Maintenance planning. Concentrating efforts on development of such models, this research is focused on reliability modeling of Wind Turbine critical subsystems (especially the power converter system). For reliability assessment of these components, structural reliability methods are applied...

  7. PM10 Emission, Sandblasting Efficiency and Vertical Entrainment During Successive Wind-Erosion Events: A Wind-Tunnel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, J. E.; Mendez, M. J.; Buschiazzo, D. E.

    2016-11-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment was carried out to measure saltation and PM10 (particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) emission during three successive wind-erosion events on three different surfaces: an unpaved road and two different textured agricultural soils: a sandy loam and a loamy sand. The total horizontal mass transport ( Q) and the PM10 emissions ( E), were measured at two friction velocities: 0.2 and 0.3 m s^{-1}. Results indicated that Q decreased rapidly in time over all surfaces, as the Q values were only 13-17 % of the amount registered during the first event. Similar trends were detected at both wind speeds. However, E values showed a lower relative decrease in the second wind-erosion event at the lower wind speed (25-51 % of the initial amounts) than at the higher wind speed (19-28 % of the initial amounts) over all surfaces. After the second wind-erosion event, both Q and E values remained constant except for the unpaved road, where both values decreased by 50 % in relation to the second event. Emission from the agricultural soils was sustained over successive wind-erosion events even when saltation was low. The sandblasting efficiency for PM10 emission was found to be higher for agricultural soils than for the unpaved road, and increased over wind-erosion events particularly in agricultural soils, and this was also reflected in the PM10 vertical entrainment. Results suggest that sandblasting efficiency and PM10 vertical distribution can change among wind-erosion events even for the same surface. The saltation fraction to PM10 content ratio can be a simple indicator of the general behaviour of an emitting surface during successive wind-erosion events.

  8. PM10 Emission, Sandblasting Efficiency and Vertical Entrainment During Successive Wind-Erosion Events: A Wind-Tunnel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, J. E.; Mendez, M. J.; Buschiazzo, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment was carried out to measure saltation and PM10 (particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μ m) emission during three successive wind-erosion events on three different surfaces: an unpaved road and two different textured agricultural soils: a sandy loam and a loamy sand. The total horizontal mass transport (Q) and the PM10 emissions (E), were measured at two friction velocities: 0.2 and 0.3 m {s}^{-1} . Results indicated that Q decreased rapidly in time over all surfaces, as the Q values were only 13-17 % of the amount registered during the first event. Similar trends were detected at both wind speeds. However, E values showed a lower relative decrease in the second wind-erosion event at the lower wind speed (25-51 % of the initial amounts) than at the higher wind speed (19-28 % of the initial amounts) over all surfaces. After the second wind-erosion event, both Q and E values remained constant except for the unpaved road, where both values decreased by 50 % in relation to the second event. Emission from the agricultural soils was sustained over successive wind-erosion events even when saltation was low. The sandblasting efficiency for PM10 emission was found to be higher for agricultural soils than for the unpaved road, and increased over wind-erosion events particularly in agricultural soils, and this was also reflected in the PM10 vertical entrainment. Results suggest that sandblasting efficiency and PM10 vertical distribution can change among wind-erosion events even for the same surface. The saltation fraction to PM10 content ratio can be a simple indicator of the general behaviour of an emitting surface during successive wind-erosion events.

  9. 基于PMAC运动控制卡的风洞风速控制系统%Wind Tunnel Wind Speed Control System Based on PMAC Controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘子娟; 董挺挺; 付庄; 赵言正; 闫维新

    2013-01-01

    介绍了一种基于PMAC多轴运动控制卡的风洞风速控制系统.采用PC作为上位机,PMAC运动控制卡为控制核心,风速传感器为反馈,控制两套交流旋转伺服系统驱动风扇运转.建立了伺服系统的控制模型并在Simulink仿真环境下进行了仿真;利用Visual C#语言开发设计了风洞风速控制软件.在所搭建风速控制平台上进行风速控制实验,结果表明该风洞控制系统能够快速、准确实现风速的调控.%A wind tunnel wind speed control system is discussed based on PMAC multi-axis motion control card and servo motor where PC is used as host computer, PMAC controller as center of the control system and wind speed sensor as a feedback. The two sets of AC rotation servo system drive the fans to generate wind. The control model of the servo system is established and conducted in Simulink simulation environment. A wind tunnel wind speed control software is developed by Visual C# language and speed control experiments are conducted on the speed control platform, the results show that the control system can realize the speed regulation quickly and accurately.

  10. Modelling Wind for Wind Farm Layout Optimization Using Joint Distribution of Wind Speed and Wind Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Feng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable wind modelling is of crucial importance for wind farm development. The common practice of using sector-wise Weibull distributions has been found inappropriate for wind farm layout optimization. In this study, we propose a simple and easily implementable method to construct joint distributions of wind speed and wind direction, which is based on the parameters of sector-wise Weibull distributions and interpolations between direction sectors. It is applied to the wind measurement data at Horns Rev and three different joint distributions are obtained, which all fit the measurement data quite well in terms of the coefficient of determination . Then, the best of these joint distributions is used in the layout optimization of the Horns Rev 1 wind farm and the choice of bin sizes for wind speed and wind direction is also investigated. It is found that the choice of bin size for wind direction is especially critical for layout optimization and the recommended choice of bin sizes for wind speed and wind direction is finally presented.

  11. Dynamic experiment, modeling and compensation of bar-shaped strain gauge balance for wind tunnel%杆式风洞应变天平动态实验、建模与补偿

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐科军; 杨双龙; 张进; 赵长辉; 张平

    2009-01-01

    Bar-shaped strain gauge balance is a kind of six-dimension force/moment sensor used to measure force and moment applied to an aircraft model in wind tunnel. But the overshoot of its dynamic response is large and the adjusting time is long, i.e. its dynamic performance is so poor that it cannot meet dynamic test requirements. Therefore a dynamic calibration setup is designed for the bar-shaped strain gauge balance, and dynamic calibration experiments are conducted in this paper. The dynamic mathematic models are built up according to the experimental data, and the dynamic performance indexes are presented. In order to speed up the dynamic response of the strain gauge balance, a real-time dynamic correction system is developed with DSP to achieve dynamic compensation for the six output signals of the strain gauge balance. The effectiveness of the models built and the compensation system developed in this paper are verified by experimental results.%杆式应变天平是一种6维力传感器,在风洞实验中测量飞行器模型所受的各个方向的力和力矩.但是,其动态响应的超调量大,调节时间长,即动态性能差,无法满足动态测试的要求.为此,设计了应变天平动态标定装置,进行动态标定实验;基于实验数据建立应变天平的动态数学模型,给出性能指标;研制基于DSP的动态校正系统,实现对应变天平6路输出信号的动态补偿,以加快应变天平的动态响应.所建的模型和所研制的系统得到实验结果的验证.

  12. Enhanced Tunnelling Models for Child Universe Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ansoldi, S; Shilon, I

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a recently proposed model that allows for an enhanced rate of child universe production under generic conditions, we elaborate on refinements that may allow for non-singular initial configurations. A possibility to treat both, the initial state and the tunnelling beyond the semiclassical level will also be introduced.

  13. Laser transit anemometer measurements on a slender cone in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Covell, Peter F.; Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer (LTA) system was used to probe the boundary layer on a slender (5 degree half angle) cone model in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel. The anemometer system utilized a pair of laser beams with a diameter of 40 micrometers spaced 1230 micrometers apart to measure the transit times of ensembles of seeding particles using a cross-correlation technique. From these measurements, boundary layer profiles around the model were constructed and compared with CFD calculations. The measured boundary layer profiles representing the boundary layer velocity normalized to the edge velocity as a function of height above the model surface were collected with the model at zero angle of attack for four different flow conditions, and were collected in a vertical plane that bisected the model's longitudinal center line at a location 635 mm from the tip of the forebody cone. The results indicate an excellent ability of the LTA system to make velocity measurements deep into the boundary layer. However, because of disturbances in the flow field caused by onboard seeding, premature transition occurred implying that upstream seeding is mandatory if model flow field integrity is to be maintained. A description and results of the flow field surveys are presented.

  14. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of the longitudinal stability characteristics of a model equipped with a variable-speed wing, 23 May 1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, C. J.; Sleeman, W. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The longitudinal stability characteristics of a complete model equipped with a variable sweep wings at angles of sweepback of 45 deg, 30 deg, 15 deg, and 0 deg investigated. Various wing modifications and an extern 1 flap arrangement designed to minimize the shift in neutral point accompanying the change in sweep angle were studied. The results indicate that stability at the stall was obtained at a sweep angle of 15 deg without recourse to stall control devices. The basic neutral point movement accompanying the change in sweep angle from 45 deg to 15 deg amounted to 56 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord (at zero sweep angle) and the most effective modification investigated only reduced this change to 47 percent of the chord. It appears, therefore, that for designs in which the fuselage is the major load carrying element some relative movement between the wing and center of gravity will be required to assure satisfactory stability at all sweep angles.

  15. Experimental validation of heavy rain attenuation in E-band based on climate wind tunnel measurements at 77 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewark, Ulrich J.; Mahler, Tobias; Antes, Jochen; Boes, Florian; Tessmann, Axel; Henneberger, Ralf; Kallfass, Ingmar; Zwick, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Attenuation measurements through extreme rain in a climate wind tunnel are carried out to benchmark the possibility of wireless data transmission at 77 GHz during adverse weather conditions. Based on a network analyzer and external E-band mixers, the propagation loss at 77 GHz is obtained over a distance of 180 m using a corner reflector at the end of a 90-m tunnel. Comparing the results to prediction models like the ITU-R P.838, a large deviation of several tens of dB/km was found for high rain rates when the drop size distribution is neglected. In the paper, the authors use known attenuation models based on rain drop distribution functions to explain the high measured attenuation during the testing, demonstrating a large variation of specific attenuation under heavy rain at high microwave frequencies.

  16. Evaluation of four subcritical response methods for on-line prediction of flutter onset in wind-tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Watson, J. J.; Ricketts, R. H.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Four subcritical response methods were evaluated for on-line use in transonic wind-tunnel tests where the flutter model is excited solely by airstream turbulence. The methods were: randomdec, power-spectral-density, peak-hold, and cross-spectrum. Subcritical response data were obtained during tests in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel of a cantilevered flutter model wing. The test procedure was to maintain a constant Mach number and increase the dynamic pressure (q) in incremental steps. The four methods provided damping trends by which the flutter mode could be tracked and extrapolated to a flutter-onset q. A hard flutter point was obtained at M = 0.82. The peak-mold and cross-spectrum methods gave reliable results and could be most readily used for on-line testing.

  17. Model Used for Dynamic Stability Studies in 5 Foot Free-Flight Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1938-01-01

    Model mounted in the 5-Foot Free-Flight Tunnel. This wind tunnel was used to study the dynamic stability and control characteristics of aircraft in flight. The test section of the tunnel could be tilted to permit the model to fly without restraint when sufficient lift was produced by its wings. During free-flight tests, the tunnel test technique required two engineers. One engineer stood at the side of the test section and controlled the tunnel airspeed and tilt angle while attempting to maintain the airstream relative to the model. The second engineer controlled the airplane model remotely via small wires attached to control surface actuators. The pilot stood behind the tunnel propeller and viewed the rear of the model in flight and assessed its stability and control characteristics for various test conditions. His control box can be seen at the bottom of the picture. The tunnel was authorized in 1936 and was operational in April 1937. Construction cost was $120,000. This exploratory facility was superseded by a larger 12-ft free-flight tunnel in 1939.

  18. Propfan test assessment testbed aircraft stability and control/performance 1/9-scale wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, B. H., Jr.; Tomlin, K. H.; Aljabri, A. S.; Mason, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    One-ninth scale wind tunnel model tests of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) aircraft were performed in three different NASA facilities. Wing and propfan nacelle static pressures, model forces and moments, and flow field at the propfan plane were measured in these tests. Tests started in June 1985 and were completed in January 1987. These data were needed to assure PTA safety of flight, predict PTA performance, and validate analytical codes that will be used to predict flow fields in which the propfan will operate.

  19. A new low-turbulence wind tunnel for animal and small vehicle flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Daniel B.; Watts, Anthony; Nagle, Tony; Lentink, David

    2017-03-01

    Our understanding of animal flight benefits greatly from specialized wind tunnels designed for flying animals. Existing facilities can simulate laminar flow during straight, ascending and descending flight, as well as at different altitudes. However, the atmosphere in which animals fly is even more complex. Flow can be laminar and quiet at high altitudes but highly turbulent near the ground, and gusts can rapidly change wind speed. To study flight in both laminar and turbulent environments, a multi-purpose wind tunnel for studying animal and small vehicle flight was built at Stanford University. The tunnel is closed-circuit and can produce airspeeds up to 50 m s-1 in a rectangular test section that is 1.0 m wide, 0.82 m tall and 1.73 m long. Seamless honeycomb and screens in the airline together with a carefully designed contraction reduce centreline turbulence intensities to less than or equal to 0.030% at all operating speeds. A large diameter fan and specialized acoustic treatment allow the tunnel to operate at low noise levels of 76.4 dB at 20 m s-1. To simulate high turbulence, an active turbulence grid can increase turbulence intensities up to 45%. Finally, an open jet configuration enables stereo high-speed fluoroscopy for studying musculoskeletal control in turbulent flow.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Wind Driven Natural Ventilation in a Building Scale Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; True, Jan Per Jensen; Sandberg, Mats;

    2004-01-01

    Airflow through openings in a cross ventilated building scale model was investigated in a wind tunnel and by numerical predictions. Predictions for a wind direction perpendicular to the building showed an airflow pattern consisting of streamlines entering the room, that originated from approximat......Airflow through openings in a cross ventilated building scale model was investigated in a wind tunnel and by numerical predictions. Predictions for a wind direction perpendicular to the building showed an airflow pattern consisting of streamlines entering the room, that originated from...