WorldWideScience

Sample records for model water erosion

  1. Multifractal Model of Soil Water Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, Klaudia

    2017-04-01

    Breaking of solid surface symmetry during the interaction between the rainfall of high erosivity index and internally unstable volcanic soil/vegetation systems, results in roughness increasing as well as fertile horizon loosing. In these areas, the sustainability of management practices depends on the ability to select and implement the precise indicators of soil erodibility and vegetation capacity to protect the system against the extreme damaging precipitation events. Notwithstanding, the complex, non-linear and scaling nature of the phenomena involved in the interaction among the soil, vegetation and precipitation is still not taken into account by the numerous commonly used empirical, mathematical and computer simulation models: for instance, by the universal soil loss equation (USLE). The soil erodibility factor (K-factor) is still measuring by a set of empirical, dimensionless parameters and indexes, without taking into account the scaling (frequently multifractal) origin of a broad range of heterogeneous, anisotropic and dynamical phenomena involved in hydric erosion. Their mapping is not representative of this complex system spatial variability. In our research, we propose to use the toolbox of fractals and multifractals techniques in vista of its ability to measure the scale invariance and type/degree of soil, vegetation and precipitation symmetry breaking. The hydraulic units are chosen as the precise measure of soil/vegetation stability. These units are measured and modeled for soils with contrasting architecture, based on their porosity/permeability (Poroperm) as well as retention capacity relations. The simple Catalog of the most common Poroperm relations is proposed and the main power law relations among the elements of studied system are established and compared for some representative agricultural and natural Biogeosystems of Mexico. All resulted are related with the Mandelbrot' Baby Theorem in order to construct the universal Phase Diagram which

  2. Soil erosion by water - model concepts and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated surface runoff events, whose erosional effects are determined by numerous temporally and spatially varying variables. Thus the monitoring of soil loss by direct observation is extremely limited with respect to space and time. Usually observation plots cover an area of less than 100 m2 and the observation period is less than 10 years. In order to estimate soil losses by water erosion for others than empirically observable conditions, mathematical models are needed, which are able to describe the interaction of the different physical mechanisms involved either statistically or on the basis of physical algorithms. Such models are absolutely essential for risk prognoses on catchment and regional scale. Besides the aspect of soil conservation the delivery of sediments and sediment bound pollutants into surface water bodies are of increasing relevance in this context. Based on an exemplary selection of existing water erosion models this contribution aims to give an overview over different mathematical approaches used for the description of particle detachment, transport and deposition of soil particles. According to the chronology in the development of soil erosion models empirical algorithms will be presented first based on the USLE approach. However, since purely empirical models like USLE are limited to the estimation of annual soil loss further attempts in soil erosion modelling are focussed on event based estimations considering the fact that soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated runoff events. One of the first models of this type was CREAMS using physically based algorithms in combination with empirical ones in order to describe the basic erosion processes. Today there are diverse soil erosion models available following in principle the CREAMS concept but using different algorithms in detail. Concerning particle detachment, transport and deposition alternative

  3. Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: an application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, B.G.J.S.; Keyzer, M.A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison to evaluate the explanatory power of the mode

  4. Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: an application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, B.G.J.S.; Keyzer, M.A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison to evaluate the explanatory power of the mode

  5. Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: an application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, B.G.J.S.; Keyzer, M.A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison to evaluate the explanatory power of the

  6. Process-based soil erodibility estimation for empirical water erosion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of modeling technologies exist for water erosion prediction each with specific parameters. It is of interest to scrutinize parameters of a particular model from the point of their compatibility with dataset of other models. In this research, functional relationships between soil erodibilit...

  7. Revisiting classic water erosion models in drylands: The strong impact of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Bala, Chaudhary V.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil erosion and subsequent degradation has been a contributor to societal collapse in the past and is one of the major expressions of desertification in arid regions. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) models soil lost to water erosion as a function of climate erosivity (the degree to which rainfall can result in erosion), topography, soil erodibility, and land use/management. The soil erodibility factor (K) is primarily based upon inherent soil properties (those which change slowly or not at all) such as soil texture and organic matter content, while the cover/management factor (C) is based on several parameters including biological soil crust (BSC) cover. We examined the effect of two more precise indicators of BSC development, chlorophyll a and exopolysaccharides (EPS), upon soil stability, which is closely inversely related to soil loss in an erosion event. To examine the relative influence of these elements of the C factor to the K factor, we conducted our investigation across eight strongly differing soils in the 0.8 million ha Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. We found that within every soil group, chlorophyll a was a moderate to excellent predictor of soil stability (R2 = 0.21-0.75), and consistently better than EPS. Using a simple structural equation model, we explained over half of the variance in soil stability and determined that the direct effect of chlorophyll a was 3?? more important than soil group in determining soil stability. Our results suggest that, holding the intensity of erosive forces constant, the acceleration or reduction of soil erosion in arid landscapes will primarily be an outcome of management practices. This is because the factor which is most influential to soil erosion, BSC development, is also among the most manageable, implying that water erosion in drylands has a solution. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Using a dynamic model to assess trends in land degradation by water erosion in Spanish Rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Javier; Francisco Lavado-Contador, Joaquín; Schnabel, Susanne; Pulido-Fernández, Manuel; Martínez Valderrama, Jaime

    2014-05-01

    This work presents a model aimed at evaluating land degradation by water erosion in dehesas and montados of the Iberian Peninsula, that constitute valuable rangelands in the area. A multidisciplinary dynamic model was built including weather, biophysical and economic variables that reflect the main causes and processes affecting sheet erosion on hillsides of the study areas. The model has two main and two derived purposes: Purpose 1: Assessing the risk of degradation that a land-use system is running. Derived purpose 1: Early warning about land-use systems that are particularly threatened by degradation. Purpose 2: Assessing the degree to which different factors would hasten degradation if they changed from the typical values they show at present. Derived purpose 2: Evaluating the role of human activities on degradation. Model variables and parameters have been calibrated for a typical open woodland rangeland (dehesa or montado) defined along 22 working units selected from 10 representative farms and distributed throughout the Spanish region of Extremadura. The model is the basis for a straightforward assessment methodology which is summarized by the three following points: i) The risk of losing a given amount of soil before a given number of years was specifically estimated as the percentage of 1000 simulations where such a loss occurs, being the simulations run under randomly-generated scenarios of rainfall amount and intensity and meat and supplemental feed market prices; ii) Statistics about the length of time that a given amount of soil takes to be lost were calculated over 1000 stochastic simulations run until year 1000, thereby ensuring that such amount of soil has been lost in all of the simulations, i.e. the total risk is 100%; iii) Exogenous factors potentially affecting degradation, mainly climatic and economic, were ranked in order of importance by means of a sensitivity analysis. Particularly remarkable in terms of model performance is the major role

  9. Modelling spatial scales of water erosion in the West Usambare Mountains of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Vigiak, O.; Loon, van E.E.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of several models to locate areas affected by severe erosion and identified the factors controlling the distribution of erosion in a catchment characterized by a dynamic Hortonian hydrologic regime. The spatial patterns of severely eroded areas predicted by five

  10. Modelling spatial scales of water erosion in the West Usambara Mountains of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigiak, O.; van Loon, E.E.; Sterk, G.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of several models to locate areas affected by severe erosion and identified the factors controlling the distribution of erosion in a catchment characterized by a dynamic Hortonian hydrologic regime. The spatial patterns of severely eroded areas predicted by five

  11. Water quality modeling under hydrologic variability and parameter uncertainty using erosion-scaled export coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadam, Ibrahim M.; Kaluarachchi, Jagath J.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryWater quality modeling is important to assess the health of a watershed and to make necessary management decisions to control existing and future pollution of receiving water bodies. The existing export coefficient approach is attractive due to minimum data requirements; however, this method does not account for hydrologic variability. In this paper, an erosion-scaled export coefficient approach is proposed that can model and explain the hydrologic variability in predicting the annual phosphorus (P) loading to the receiving stream. Here sediment discharge was introduced into the export coefficient model as a surrogate for hydrologic variability. Application of this approach to model P in the Fishtrap Creek of Washington State showed the superiority of this approach compared to the traditional export coefficient approach, while maintaining its simplicity and low data requirement characteristics. In addition, a Bayesian framework is proposed to assess the parameter uncertainty of the export coefficient method instead of subjective assignment of uncertainty. This work also showed through a joint variability-uncertainty analysis the importance of separate consideration of hydrologic variability and parameter uncertainty, as these represent two independent and important characteristics of the overall model uncertainty. The paper also recommends the use of a longitudinal data collection scheme to reduce the uncertainty in export coefficients.

  12. Modeling sediment yield and phosphorus in the Lake Tahoe basin with the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, M.; Brooks, E. S.; Srivastava, A.; Lew, R.; Elliot, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, an alpine lake situated at the border between California and Nevada, has experienced a decrease in water quality during the last 50 years. Similar to lakes in other developed areas, this decrease in water quality is mainly associated with an increase in sediment and nutrient delivery from the surrounding tributaries. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model is a process-based hydrology and erosion model that can be used at both small scales (hillslopes, roads, small parcels, etc.) and large watershed scales to evaluate impacts of management practices and climate change on runoff and erosion. We developed and assessed new approaches in WEPP to simulate streamflow and sediment transport, and added a new routine to estimate phosphorus delivery from five geologically and climatically diverse watersheds in the Lake Tahoe basin. We used readily-available data to spatially distribute soil, climate, and management input files at a subwatershed level. Consistent with the current efforts in the basin to reduce phosphorus transport to the lake, our recent improvements to the model have also focused on enhancing the model with a phosphorus component that allows users to evaluate the effect of forest managements on phosphorus delivery to the lake. The model was run with minimal calibration to assess WEPP's ability as a physically-based model to predict streamflow, sediment, and phosphorus delivery. The performance of the model was examined against 25 years of observed snow water equivalent depth, streamflow, sediment, and phosphorus load data. Close agreement between simulated and observed snow water equivalent, streamflow, the distribution of fine (20 µm) sediments, and phosphorus load was achieved at each of the major watersheds located in the high-precipitation regions of the basin. Sediment load was adequately simulated in the drier watersheds; however, annual streamflow was overestimated. With the exception of the drier eastern region, the model

  13. Sustainable soil and water resources: modelling soil erosion and its impact on the environment

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    With the projected increase in world population to 9 billion by 2050, along with per capita income growth, the demand for land and water resources is going to increase significantly. Conversion of land to intensive agriculture has led to dramatic decreases in plant, animal and insect biodiversity, with approximately 40% of the world’s land surface now covered by croplands and pastures. Intensive agricultural practices cause erosion and lead to transport of soil particles and associated sorbed...

  14. Vortex erosion in a shallow water model of the polar vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Robin; Kwasniok, Frank; Thuburn, John

    2017-06-01

    The erosion of a model stratospheric polar vortex in response to bottom boundary forcing is investigated numerically. Stripping of filaments of air from the polar vortex has been implicated in the occurrence of stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) but it is not understood in detail what factors determine the rate and amount of stripping. Here a shallow water vortex forced by topography is used to investigate the factors initiating stripping and whether this leads the vortex to undergo an SSW. It is found that the amplitude of topographic forcing must exceed some threshold (of order 200-450 m) in order for significant stripping to occur. For larger forcing amplitudes significant stripping occurs, but not as an instantaneous response to the forcing; rather, the forcing appears to initiate a process that ultimately results in stripping several tens of days later. There appears to be no simple quantitative relationship between the amount of mass stripped and the topography amplitude. However, at least over the early stages of the experiments, there is a good correlation between the amount of mass stripped and the global integral of wave activity, which may be interpreted as a measure of the accumulated topographic forcing. Finally there does not appear to be a simple correspondence between amount of mass stripped and the occurrence of an SSW.

  15. Modeling the fluid/soil interface erosion in the Hole Erosion Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissi B.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon which yields at its final stage to insidious fluid leakages under the hydraulic infrastructures known as piping and which are the main cause of their rupture. The Hole Erosion Test is commonly used to quantify the rate of piping erosion. In this work, The Hole Erosion Test is modelled by using Fluent software package. The aim is to predict the erosion rate of soil during the hole erosion test. The renormalization group theory – based k–ε turbulence model equations are used. This modelling makes it possible describing the effect of the clay concentration in flowing water on erosion. Unlike the usual one dimensional models, the proposed modelling shows that erosion is not uniform erosion along the hole length. In particular, the concentration of clay is found to increase noticeably the erosion rate.

  16. A rill erosion-vegetation modeling approach for the evaluation of slope reclamation success in water-limited environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Diaz Sierra, Ruben; Nicolau, Jose M.; Zavala, Miguel A.

    2013-04-01

    Slope reclamation from surface mining and road construction usually shows important constraints in water-limited environments. Soil erosion is perceived as a critical process, especially when rill formation occurs, as rills can condition the spatial distribution and availability of soil moisture for plant growth, hence affecting vegetation development. On the other hand, encouraging early vegetation establishment is essential to reduce the risk of degradation in these man-made systems. This work describes a modeling approach focused on stability analysis of water-limited reclaimed slopes, where interactive relationships between rill erosion and vegetation regulate ecosystem stability. Our framework reproduces two main groups of trends along the temporal evolution of reclaimed slopes: successful trends, characterized by widespread vegetation development and the effective control of rill erosion processes; and gullying trends, characterized by the progressive loss of vegetation and a sharp logistic increase in erosion rates. Furthermore, this analytical approach allows the determination of threshold values for both vegetation cover and rill erosion that drive the system's stability, facilitating the identification of critical situations that require specific human intervention (e.g. revegetation or, in very problematic cases, revegetation combined with rill network destruction) to ensure the long-term sustainability of the restored ecosystem. We apply our threshold analysis framework in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed slopes derived form surface coal mining (the Teruel coalfield in central-east Spain), obtaining a good field-based performance. Therefore, we believe that this model is a valuable contribution for the management of water-limited reclaimed systems, as it can play an important role in decision-making during ecosystem restoration and provides a tool for the assessment of restoration success in severely disturbed landscapes.

  17. Modelling tillage and water erosion by using WATEM/SEDEM and 137Cs measurements at field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Laura; Beguería, Santiago; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    The estimation of soil redistribution rates is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of soil erosion including the loss of fertile topsoil which is one of the main soil degradation problems in agricultural landscapes. Modelling approach offers a potential tool for quantifying soil redistribution and to propose site-specific control measures to minimize soil degradation in agroecosystems. Studies at field scale using spatially distributed data of 137Cs derived soil redistribution rates to calibrate and evaluate the uncertainties of distributed models are required but are still scarcely implemented. This study applies the WATEM/SEDEM model to estimate soil redistribution rates after calibration with 137Cs measurements. Furthermore, soil redistribution rates by tillage were estimated using the Mass Balance Model 3 (MBM3). A representative Mediterranean cultivated field located in the central part of the Ebro basin (NE Spain) was selected to conduct the study. A digital elevation model (DEM) at high resolution (2.5 m) of the study field was generated to characterize the land surface. The elevation of a total of 617 points was measured on a 5 m grid using a total topographic station and 156 bulk soil samples were collected on a 10 m grid for soil analysis. According to field observations and topographical surveys four hydrological units were identified within the study field characterized by different hydrological behavior. The results indicated that soil erosion predominated over soil deposition. Mean values of 137Cs derived soil erosion and deposition rates were 19.7 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and 12.6 Mg ha-1 yr-1, respectively. The rates obtained with WATEM/SEDEM model were lower; mean erosion was 3.9 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and mean deposition rates that occurred in 35% of the grid cells was 5.8 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Water erosion was the major factor controlling soil redistribution whereas tillage erosion was almost negligible. These results are in line with the tillage rates obtained

  18. Modelling rainfall erosion resulting from climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnell, Peter

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that soil erosion leads to agricultural productivity decline and contributes to water quality decline. The current widely used models for determining soil erosion for management purposes in agriculture focus on long term (~20 years) average annual soil loss and are not well suited to determining variations that occur over short timespans and as a result of climate change. Soil loss resulting from rainfall erosion is directly dependent on the product of runoff and sediment concentration both of which are likely to be influenced by climate change. This presentation demonstrates the capacity of models like the USLE, USLE-M and WEPP to predict variations in runoff and erosion associated with rainfall events eroding bare fallow plots in the USA with a view to modelling rainfall erosion in areas subject to climate change.

  19. Modeling Soil Erosion with the Aid of GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ping-li

    2005-01-01

    Soil erosion caused by water is an increasing global problem. In order to relieve this problem, several erosion models have been developed to measure the rate of erosion for soil conservation planning. This study takes Lee County, South Carolina, USA as an example to map soil erosion within ArcGIS environment by using the RUSLE with erosion indexes retrieved from DEM. This study proves that the integration of soil erosion models with GIS is a very simple but efficient tool for soil conservation.

  20. Watershed-scale evaluation of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model in the Lake Tahoe basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Erin S.; Dobre, Mariana; Elliot, William J.; Wu, Joan Q.; Boll, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Forest managers need methods to evaluate the impacts of management at the watershed scale. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) has the ability to model disturbed forested hillslopes, but has difficulty addressing some of the critical processes that are important at a watershed scale, including baseflow and water yield. In order to apply WEPP to forested watersheds, we developed and assessed new approaches for simulating streamflow and sediment transport from large watersheds using WEPP. We created specific algorithms to spatially distribute soil, climate, and management input files for all the subwatersheds within the basin. The model enhancements were tested on five geologically and climatically diverse watersheds in the Lake Tahoe basin, USA. The model was run with minimal calibration to assess WEPP's ability as a physically-based model to predict streamflow and sediment delivery. The performance of the model was examined against 17 years of observed snow water equivalent depth, streamflow, and sediment load data. Only region-wide baseflow recession parameters related to the geology of the basin were calibrated with observed streamflow data. Close agreement between simulated and observed snow water equivalent, streamflow, and the distribution of fine (20 μm) sediments was achieved at each of the major watersheds located in the high-precipitation regions of the basin. Sediment load was adequately simulated in the drier watersheds; however, annual streamflow was overestimated. With the exception of the drier eastern region, the model demonstrated no loss in accuracy when applied without calibration to multiple watersheds across Lake Tahoe basin demonstrating the utility of the model as a management tool in gauged and ungauged basins.

  1. Water erosion as a cause for agricultural soil loss: modeling of dynamic processes using high-resolution ground based LiDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Imri; Filin, Sagi; Assouline, Shmuel; Shtain, Zachi; Furman, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion by rainfall and water flow is a frequent natural geomorphic process shaping the earth's surface at various scales. Conventional agrotechnical methods enhance soil erosion at the field scale and are at the origin of the reduction of the upper soil layer depth. This reduction is expressed in two aspects: decrease of soil depth, mainly due to erosion, and the diminution of soil quality, mainly due to the loss of fine material, nutrients and organic matter. Rain events, not even the most extremes, cause detachment and transport of fertile soil rich in organic matter and nutrients away from the fields, filling and plugging drainage channels, blocking infrastructure and contaminating water sources. Empirical, semi-empirical and mechanistic models are available to estimate soil erosion by water flow and sediment transport (e.g. WEPP, KINEROSS, EUROSEM). Calibration of these models requires data measured at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Development of high-resolution measurement tools (for both spatial and temporal aspects) should improve the calibration of functions related to particles detachment and transport from the soil surface. In addition, despite the great impact of different tillage systems on the soil erosion process, the vast majority of the models ignore this fundamental factor. The objective of this study is to apply high-resolution ground-based LiDAR measurements to different tillage schemes and scales to improve the ability of models to accurately describe the process of soil erosion induced by rainfall and overland flow. Ground-based laser scans provide high resolution accurate and subtle geomorphic changes, as well as larger-scale deformations. As such, it allows frequent monitoring, so that even the effect of a single storm can be measured, thus improving the calibration of the erosion models. Preliminary results for scans made in the field show the potential and limitations of ground-based LiDAR, and at this point qualitatively can

  2. A New European Slope Length and Steepness Factor (LS-Factor for Modeling Soil Erosion by Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos Panagos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE model is the most frequently used model for soil erosion risk estimation. Among the six input layers, the combined slope length and slope angle (LS-factor has the greatest influence on soil loss at the European scale. The S-factor measures the effect of slope steepness, and the L-factor defines the impact of slope length. The combined LS-factor describes the effect of topography on soil erosion. The European Soil Data Centre (ESDAC developed a new pan-European high-resolution soil erosion assessment to achieve a better understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of soil erosion in Europe. The LS-calculation was performed using the original equation proposed by Desmet and Govers (1996 and implemented using the System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses (SAGA, which incorporates a multiple flow algorithm and contributes to a precise estimation of flow accumulation. The LS-factor dataset was calculated using a high-resolution (25 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM for the whole European Union, resulting in an improved delineation of areas at risk of soil erosion as compared to lower-resolution datasets. This combined approach of using GIS software tools with high-resolution DEMs has been successfully applied in regional assessments in the past, and is now being applied for first time at the European scale.

  3. Potential for monitoring soil erosion features and soil erosion modeling components from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langran, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil erosion and its effects on soil productivity are essential in agricultural decision making and planning from the field scale to the national level. Erosion models have been primarily developed for designing erosion control systems, predicting sediment yield for reservoir design, predicting sediment transport, and simulating water quality. New models proposed are more comprehensive in that the necessary components (hydrology, erosion-sedimentation, nutrient cycling, tillage, etc.) are linked in a model appropriate for studying the erosion-productivity problem. Recent developments in remote sensing systems, such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), etc., can contribute significantly to the future development and operational use of these models.

  4. Commonalities in WEPP and WEPS and efforts towards a single erosion process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Flanagan, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been developing process-based erosion models to predict water erosion and wind erosion. During much of that time, the development efforts of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (

  5. Commonalities in WEPP and WEPS and efforts towards a single erosion process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Flanagan, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been developing process-based erosion models to predict water erosion and wind erosion. During much of that time, the development efforts of the Water Erosion Prediction Project

  6. Hillslope soil erosion and runoff model for natural rainfall events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanyu Zhang; Guohua Zhang; Changqing Zuo; Xiaoyu Pi

    2008-01-01

    By using the momentum theorem and water balance principle, basic equations of slope runoff were derived, soil erosion by raindrop splash and runoff were discussed and a model was established for decribing hillslope soil erosion processes. The numerical solution of the model was obtained by adopting the Preissmann format and considering the common solution-determining conditions, from which not only the runoff and soil erosion but also their processes can be described. The model was validated by ten groups of observation data of Soil Conservation Ecological Science and Technology Demonstration Park of Jiangxi Province. Comparisons show that the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental data is about 10.98% for total runoff and 15% for total erosion, 5.2% for runoff process and 6.1% for erosion process, indicating that the model is conceptually realistic and reliable and offers a feasible approach for further studies on the soil erosion process.

  7. Model for erosion-deposition patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Maionchi, D O; Filho, R N Costa; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2007-01-01

    We investigate through computational simulations with a pore network model the formation of patterns caused by erosion-deposition mechanisms. In this model, the geometry of the pore space changes dynamically as a consequence of the coupling between the fluid flow and the movement of particles due to local drag forces. Our results for this irreversible process show that the model is capable to reproduce typical natural patterns caused by well known erosion processes. Moreover, we observe that, within a certain range of porosity values, the grains form clusters that are tilted with respect to the horizontal with a characteristic angle. We compare our results to recent experiments for granular material in flowing water and show that they present a satisfactory agreement.

  8. Water erosion and climate change in a small alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteni, Francesca; Grossi, Giovanna

    2017-04-01

    WATER EROSION AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN A SMALL ALPINE CATCHMENT Francesca Berteni, Giovanna Grossi A change in the mean and variability of some variables of the climate system is expected to affect the sediment yield of mountainous areas in several ways: for example through soil temperature and precipitation peak intensity change, permafrost thawing, snow- and ice-melt time shifting. Water erosion, sediment transport and yield and the effects of climate change on these physical phenomena are the focus of this work. The study area is a small mountainous basin, the Guerna creek watershed, located in the Central Southern Alps. The sensitivity of sediment yield estimates to a change of condition of the climate system may be investigated through the application of different models, each characterized by its own features and limits. In this preliminary analysis two different empirical mathematical models are considered: RUSLE (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation; Renard et al., 1991) and EPM (Erosion Potential Method; Gavrilovic, 1988). These models are implemented in a Geographical Information System (GIS) supporting the management of the territorial database used to estimate relevant geomorphological parameters and to create different thematic maps. From one side the geographical and geomorphological information is required (land use, slope and hydrogeological instability, resistance to erosion, lithological characterization and granulometric composition). On the other side the knowledge of the weather-climate parameters (precipitation and temperature data) is fundamental as well to evaluate the intensity and variability of the erosive processes and estimate the sediment yield at the basin outlet. Therefore different climate change scenarios were considered in order to tentatively assess the impact on the water erosion and sediment yield at the small basin scale. Keywords: water erosion, sediment yield, climate change, empirical mathematical models, EPM, RUSLE, GIS

  9. Modeling soil erosion and transport on forest landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Steven G McNulty

    1998-01-01

    Century-long studies on the impacts of forest management in North America suggest sediment can cause major reduction on stream water quality. Soil erosion patterns in forest watersheds are patchy and heterogeneous. Therefore, patterns of soil erosion are difficult to model and predict. The objective of this study is to develop a user friendly management tool for land...

  10. Soil Erosion Risk Assessment and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Heckrath, Goswin

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is a phenomenon with relevance for many research topics in the geosciences. Consequently, PhD students with many different backgrounds are exposed to soil erosion related questions during their research. These students require a compact, but detailed introduction to erosion processes, the risks associated with erosion, but also tools to assess and study erosion related questions ranging from a simple risk assessment to effects of climate change on erosion-related effects on geochemistry on various scales. The PhD course on Soil Erosion Risk Assessment and Modelling offered by the University of Aarhus and conducted jointly with the University of Basel is aimed at graduate students with degrees in the geosciences and a PhD research topic with a link to soil erosion. The course offers a unique introduction to erosion processes, conventional risk assessment and field-truthing of results. This is achieved by combing lectures, mapping, erosion experiments, and GIS-based erosion modelling. A particular mark of the course design is the direct link between the results of each part of the course activities. This ensures the achievement of a holistic understanding of erosion in the environment as a key learning outcome.

  11. 10-daily soil erosion modelling over sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonakis, Elias; Drake, Nick

    2010-02-01

    Soil erosion is considered to be one of the greatest environmental problems of sub-Saharan Africa. This paper investigates the advantages and disadvantages of modelling soil erosion at the continental scale and suggests an operational methodology for mapping and quantifying 10-daily water runoff and soil erosion over this scale using remote sensing data in a geographical information system framework. An attempt is made to compare the estimates of this study with general data on the severity of soil erosion over Africa and with measured rates of soil loss at different locations over the continent. The results show that the measured and estimated rates of erosion are in some areas very similar and in general within the same order of magnitude. The importance and the potential of using the soil erosion estimates with simple models and easily accessible free data for various continental-scale environmental applications are also demonstrated.

  12. The importance of erosion for debris flow runout modelling from applications to the Swiss Alps

    OpenAIRE

    F. Frank; B. W. McArdell; Huggel, C; A. Vieli

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of channel-bed erosion of sediment by debris flows. An erosion model, developed using field data from debris flows at the Illgraben catchment, Switzerland, was incorporated into the existing RAMMS debris-flow model, which solves the 2-D shallow-water equations for granular flows. In the erosion model, the relationship between maximum shear stress and measured erosion is used to determine the maximum potential erosion depth. Additionally,...

  13. Ecological site-based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing accelerated soil erosion management in rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Duniway, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated soil erosion occurs when anthropogenic processes modify soil, vegetation or climatic conditions causing erosion rates at a location to exceed their natural variability. Identifying where and when accelerated erosion occurs is a critical first step toward its effective management. Here we explore how erosion assessments structured in the context of ecological sites (a land classification based on soils, landscape setting and ecological potential) and their vegetation states (plant assemblages that may change due to management) can inform systems for reducing accelerated soil erosion in rangelands. We evaluated aeolian horizontal sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Across the ecological sites, plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated vegetation states were consistently susceptible to aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion. Both processes were found to be highly variable for grassland and grass-succulent states across the ecological sites at the plot scale (0.25 Ha). We identify vegetation thresholds that define cover levels below which rapid (exponential) increases in aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion occur across the ecological sites and vegetation states. Aeolian sediment flux and fluvial erosion in the study area can be effectively controlled when bare ground cover is 100 cm in length is less than ~35%. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of areas to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the range of natural variability should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds identified here will enable identification of areas susceptible to accelerated soil erosion and the development of

  14. A Simplified Analytical Modeling of the Hole Erosion Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Bezzazi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Internal erosion occurs in soils containing fine particles under the action of high pressure gradients that could result from water discharge. This phenomenon can yield in its final stage to the formation of piping which constitutes a real threat for hydraulics infrastructures as it can precipitate their entire rupture in very short time. In order to mitigate this insidious hazard, it is important to characterize piping dynamics. In this context, the Hole Erosion Test was introduced to assess the erosive features of soils by means of two parameters, the erosion rate and the critical shear stress indicating the beginning of erosion. Modeling this test can enable to understand more comprehensibly the piping phenomenology. Approach: A simplified analytical modeling of the Hole Erosion Test was considered in this study. A closed form solution of erosion taking place during piping was derived without resorting to the habitual cumbersome developments that are needed to achieve complete solution of the rational equations describing this highly coupled problem. This was achieved by assuming formal analogy between the erosive shear stress and the friction shear that develops at a cylindrical piping wall under an axial viscous flow. The flow was assumed to be uniform along the tube. Results: A closed form analytical formula describing erosion dynamics associated to piping was derived. Theoretical predictions were compared with experimental results and the simplified model was found to predict accurately the increase of flow rate that results from piping erosion. Conclusion/Recommendations: The one-dimensional modeling that was proposed for the Hole Erosion Test under strong simplifying assumptions was found to yield the same features as those obtained in the literature by using other approaches. It gives furthermore the dynamics as function of the fluid regime existing inside the tube. In order to get further insight

  15. Erosivity, surface runoff, and soil erosion estimation using GIS-coupled runoff-erosion model in the Mamuaba catchment, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, Richarde; Guimarães Santos, Celso Augusto; Carneiro de Lima Silva, Valeriano; Pereira e Silva, Leonardo

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluates erosivity, surface runoff generation, and soil erosion rates for Mamuaba catchment, sub-catchment of Gramame River basin (Brazil) by using the ArcView Soil and Water Assessment Tool (AvSWAT) model. Calibration and validation of the model was performed on monthly basis, and it could simulate surface runoff and soil erosion to a good level of accuracy. Daily rainfall data between 1969 and 1989 from six rain gauges were used, and the monthly rainfall erosivity of each station was computed for all the studied years. In order to evaluate the calibration and validation of the model, monthly runoff data between January 1978 and April 1982 from one runoff gauge were used as well. The estimated soil loss rates were also realistic when compared to what can be observed in the field and to results from previous studies around of catchment. The long-term average soil loss was estimated at 9.4 t ha(-1) year(-1); most of the area of the catchment (60%) was predicted to suffer from a low- to moderate-erosion risk (catchment, the soil erosion was estimated to exceed > 12 t ha(-1) year(-1). Expectedly, estimated soil loss was significantly correlated with measured rainfall and simulated surface runoff. Based on the estimated soil loss rates, the catchment was divided into four priority categories (low, moderate, high and very high) for conservation intervention. The study demonstrates that the AvSWAT model provides a useful tool for soil erosion assessment from catchments and facilitates the planning for a sustainable land management in northeastern Brazil.

  16. Calibrating thermal erosion models along an Arctic coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, C. W.; Anderson, R. S.; Overeem, I.; Urban, F. E.; Clow, G. D.; Stanton, T. P.

    2009-12-01

    Coastal erosion rates of 20-30 meters per year have been documented along Alaska’s Beaufort Sea coastline, and a number of studies suggest that erosion rates have accelerated as a result of climate change. However, a lack of direct observational evidence has limited our progress in quantifying the role of climate change on coastal erosion rates in the Arctic. In particular, while longer ice-free periods are likely to lead to both warmer surface waters and longer fetch, the relative roles of thermal and mechanical (wave) erosion in driving coastal retreat have not been comprehensively quantified. We focus on the potential magnitude of thermal erosion along a permafrost coastline in the northern National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), where erosion rates have averaged 10-15 meters/year over two years of direct monitoring. We take advantage of these extraordinary rates of coastal erosion to directly observe erosion processes via time-lapse photography, while monitoring temperature, solar radiation and wind speed at the same time. These combined observations are used to calibrate models of thermal erosion. Our observations suggest that virtually all of the erosion in this setting can be explained as a purely thermal process. Coastal bluffs are first notched and then topple into the ocean, failing dominantly along ice wedges that serve as planes of weakness. Furthermore, the high ice content and the fine grain size of the coastal plain materials that comprise the bluffs appear to limit any strong negative feedback on erosion rates, since the sediments are readily dispersed on the shallow shelf. Although erosion driven purely by thermal processes may be unique to this particular coastal zone, these observations implicate a direct relationship between climatic warming and landscape change. Erosion of sandy coastlines in other parts of the NPR-A may also be ultimately controlled by thermal energy, once a thin veneer of clastic material is removed by wave action from

  17. The development of U. S. soil erosion prediction and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Laflen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion prediction technology began over 70 years ago when Austin Zingg published a relationship between soil erosion (by water and land slope and length, followed shortly by a relationship by Dwight Smith that expanded this equation to include conservation practices. But, it was nearly 20 years before this work's expansion resulted in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE, perhaps the foremost achievement in soil erosion prediction in the last century. The USLE has increased in application and complexity, and its usefulness and limitations have led to the development of additional technologies and new science in soil erosion research and prediction. Main among these new technologies is the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP model, which has helped to overcome many of the shortcomings of the USLE, and increased the scale over which erosion by water can be predicted. Areas of application of erosion prediction include almost all land types: urban, rural, cropland, forests, rangeland, and construction sites. Specialty applications of WEPP include prediction of radioactive material movement with soils at a superfund cleanup site, and near real-time daily estimation of soil erosion for the entire state of Iowa.

  18. Modelling erosion and its interaction with soil organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyesiku-Blakemore, Joseph; Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Zhang, Ganlin; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Water driven soil erosion removes and relocates a significant quantity of soil organic carbon. In China the quantity of carbon removed from the soil through water erosion has been reported to be 180+/-80 Mt y-1 (Yue et al., 2011). Being able to effectively model the movement of such a large quantity of carbon is important for the assessment of soil quality and carbon storage in the region and further afield. A large selection of erosion models are available and much work has been done on evaluating the performance of these in developed countries (Merritt et al., 2006). Fewer studies have evaluated the application of these models on soils in developing countries. Here we evaluate and compare the performance of two of these models, WEPP (Laflen et al., 1997) and RUSLE (Renard et al., 1991), for simulations of soil erosion and deposition at the slope scale on a Chinese Red Soil under cultivation using measurements taken at the site. We also describe work to dynamically couple the movement of carbon presented in WEPP to a model of soil organic matter and nutrient turnover, ECOSSE (Smith et al., 2010). This aims to improve simulations of both erosion and carbon cycling by using the simulated rates of erosion to alter the distribution of soil carbon, the depth of soil and the clay content across the slopes, changing the simulated rate of carbon turnover. This, in turn, affects the soil carbon available to be eroded in the next timestep, so improving estimates of carbon erosion. We compare the simulations of this coupled modelling approach with those of the unaltered ECOSSE and WEPP models to determine the importance of coupling erosion and turnover models on the simulation of carbon losses at catchment scale.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF SOIL EROSION INDEX MODEL IN TAIWAN WATERSHEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Chin CHEN; Seasir CHIEN; Cheng-Daw HSIEH

    2001-01-01

    With steep terrain and excessive rainfall, Taiwan is affected by severe soil erosion caused by summer typhoons and storms that bring intensive rainfall and rapid fl . However, the actual erosion is much less than the value predicted by the USLE because the soil erosion types in Taiwan are different from those in America which has mild slope and dry weather. Developing a soil erosion index model applicable to Taiwan is the important goal of this research. Five factors, namely, soil texture, rainfall type,slope steepness, ground cover and land use, are included in this model. Soil index factor is measured by Km from the USLE model, and other index factors are calculated from local field data. The soil erosion index model (SEIM) is as follows:SE = 6 × 10-7 AI for AI≤ 50 SE = 0.233AI1.8 for AI > 50 where Al is the total index value, and SE is the soil erosion quantity (ton/ha/yr). After being properly calibrated and verified, SEIM proves to be useful in planning soil and water conservation, and assessing soil erosion impacts in Taiwan.

  20. Satellite remote sensing for water erosion assessment: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.

    2006-01-01

    Water erosion creates negative impacts on agricultural production, infrastructure, and water quality across the world. Regional-scale water erosion assessment is important, but limited by data availability and quality. Satellite remote sensing can contribute through providing spatial data to such as

  1. Satellite remote sensing for water erosion assessment: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.

    2006-01-01

    Water erosion creates negative impacts on agricultural production, infrastructure, and water quality across the world. Regional-scale water erosion assessment is important, but limited by data availability and quality. Satellite remote sensing can contribute through providing spatial data to such

  2. Erosion by shallow concentrated flow - experimental model deconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, M.; Wirtz, S.; Ali, M.

    2012-04-01

    The force of the flowing water is considered to be the main determinant factor for soil particle detachment and transport. The flow of water is described with flow velocity and discharge, and is often summarised in different composite parameters such as shear stress, stream power etc. The entrainment and transport of soil particles is then expressed as a threshold problem, where a soil specific critical value of shear stress, stream power etc. has to be trespassed. Thereafter, the increase of erosion is considered to be lineal. Despite considerable efforts, the process based model concepts have not been able to produce more reliable and accurate reproduction and forecast of soil erosion than "simple" empirical models such as the USLE and its derivates. Therefore, there still remain some unanswered fundamental questions about soil erosion modelling: 1. What are the main parameters of soils and flowing water influencing soil erosion? 2. What relationship do these parameters have with the intensity and different types of soil erosion? 3. Are the present concepts suitable to describe and quantify soil erosion accurately? For approaching these questions, laboratory flume and field experiments were set up. The aim of the laboratory experiments was to elucidate the influence of basic parameters as grain size, slope, flow and flow velocity on sediment transport by shallow flowing water. Therefore, variable flow was applied under different slopes on moveable beds of non-coherent sands of different grain sizes. The field experiments were designed to quantify the hydraulic and erosive functionality of small rills in the field. Here, small existing rills were flushed with defined flows, and flow velocity, flow depth, discharge at the end of the rill as well as transported sediments were quantified. The laboratory flume experiments clearly show a strong influence of flow velocity on sediment transport, depending this at the same time on the size of the transported grains, and

  3. Modelling catchment-scale erosion patterns in the East African Highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigiak, O.; Okoba, B.O.; Sterk, G.; Groenenberg, S.

    2005-01-01

    Prompt location of areas exposed to high erosion is of the utmost importance for soil and water conservation planning. Erosion models can be useful tools to locate sources of sediment and areas of deposition within a catchment, but the reliability of model predictions of spatial patterns of erosion

  4. Modelling of steady state erosion of CFC actively water-cooled mock-up for the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikova, O.V. [Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, Association Euratom-CEA, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance cedex (France)], E-mail: igra32@rambler.ru

    2008-04-15

    Calculations of the physical and chemical erosion of CFC (carbon fibre composite) monoblocks as outer vertical target of the ITER divertor during normal operation regimes have been done. Off-normal events and ELM's are not considered here. For a set of components under thermal and particles loads at glancing incident angle, variations in the material properties and/or assembly of defects could result in different erosion of actively-cooled components and, thus, in temperature instabilities. Operation regimes where the temperature instability takes place are investigated. It is shown that the temperature and erosion instabilities, probably, are not a critical point for the present design of ITER vertical target if a realistic variation of material properties is assumed, namely, the difference in the thermal conductivities of the neighbouring monoblocks is 20% and the maximum allowable size of a defect between CFC armour and cooling tube is +/-90{sup o} in circumferential direction from the apex.

  5. Modelling of steady state erosion of CFC actively water-cooled mock-up for the ITER divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.

    2008-04-01

    Calculations of the physical and chemical erosion of CFC (carbon fibre composite) monoblocks as outer vertical target of the ITER divertor during normal operation regimes have been done. Off-normal events and ELM's are not considered here. For a set of components under thermal and particles loads at glancing incident angle, variations in the material properties and/or assembly of defects could result in different erosion of actively-cooled components and, thus, in temperature instabilities. Operation regimes where the temperature instability takes place are investigated. It is shown that the temperature and erosion instabilities, probably, are not a critical point for the present design of ITER vertical target if a realistic variation of material properties is assumed, namely, the difference in the thermal conductivities of the neighbouring monoblocks is 20% and the maximum allowable size of a defect between CFC armour and cooling tube is +/-90° in circumferential direction from the apex.

  6. MODELING EPHEMERAL GULLY EROSION FOR CONSERVATION PLANNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the overland flow and concentrated flow systems that occur in most farm fields. Concentrated flow areas, which are distinct from overland flow areas, can be a major sediment source and are the main conduits that convey runoff and sediment from most farm fields. Ephemeral gully erosion, which occurs in concentrated flow areas, is similar to but differs from both rill and classical gully erosion. Concentrated flow areas occupy much of the flow path between the end of overland flow areas and defined stream channels. This paper describes the erosion and deposition processes that occur in concentrated flow areas and the effect of soil and cover management on these processes. Ephemeral gully erosion is not estimated with rill-interrill erosion prediction methods, which can result in major errors in estimates of sediment yield leaving farm fields. Much deposition can occur in concentrated flow areas resulting in sediment load leaving a farm field being much less than the sediment produced by rill-interrill and ephemeral gully erosion within the field. This paper describes model structure, topographic representation, and features of ephemeral gully erosion control practices needed in mathematical models used in conservation planning for farm fields.

  7. Water droplet erosion mechanisms of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkar Zahmatkesh, Niloofar

    Water impingement erosion of materials can be a life-limiting phenomenon for the components in many erosive environments. For example, aircraft body exposed to rain, steam turbine blade, and recently in gas turbine coupled with inlet fogging system. The last is the focus of this study. Inlet fogging system is the most common method used to augment gas turbine output during hot days; high ambient temperature causes strong deterioration of the engine performance. Micro-scaled droplets introduced into the inlet airflow allow the cooling of entering air as well as intercooling the compressor (overspray) and thus optimizes the output power. However, erosion damage of the compressor blades in overspray stage is one of the major concerns associated with the inlet fogging system. The main objective of this research work (CRIAQ MANU419 project) is to understand the erosion induced by water droplets on Titanium alloy to eventually optimize the erosion resistance of the Ti-based compressor blade. Therefore, characterization of the water droplet erosion damage on Ti-6Al-4V receives the major importance. The influence of base material microstructure and impact parameters were considered in erosion evaluation in present study. This work covers the characterization of the erosion damage on Ti-6Al-4V alloy in two parts: - The water droplet erosion damage through a novel experimental approach. The collected data were processed both qualitatively and quantitatively for multi-aspects damage study. - The influence of impact velocity on erosion in an attempt to represent the in-service conditions.

  8. SOIL EROSION PROCESS RESEARCH AND ITS POTENTIAL IMPACT ON EROSION PREDICTION MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-hua HUANG; Fenli ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    This paper highlights past efforts in developing erosion process concepts that lead to the development of the current process-based erosion prediction model, i.e., WEPP. Recent progress includes the development of a multiple-box system that can simulate hillslope hydrologic conditions. Laboratory procedures enable the quantification of near-surface hydrologic effects, i.e.,artesian seepage vs. drainage, on the soil erosion process and sediment regime, flow hydraulics, and sediment transport and deposition processes. These recent findings improve soil erosion science and provide new erosion control strategies that may have additional environmental benefits relative to the traditional erosion control practices. The paper also discusses the potential impacts of the erosion process on erosion model development and future research directions of soil erosion process research and model development.

  9. Impact of tillage erosion on water erosion in a hilly landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhang, J H; Zhang, Z H; Jia, L Z

    2016-05-01

    Little has been known of the interaction between tillage erosion and water erosion, while the two erosion processes was independently studied. Can tillage-induced soil redistribution lead to exaggerated (or retarded) runoff flow and sediment concentrations in steeply sloping fields? A series of simulated tillage and artificial rainfall events were applied to rectangular runoff plots (2m×8m) with a slope of 15° to examine the impacts of tillage erosion intensities on water erosion in the Yangtze Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China. Mean flow velocity, effective/critical shear stress, and soil erodibility factor K were calculated to analyze the differences in hydrodynamic characteristics induced by tillage. Our experimental results suggest that mean runoff rates were 2.26, 1.19, and 0.65Lmin(-1) and that mean soil detachment rates were 1.53, 1.01, and 0.61gm(-2)min(-1) during the 70-min simulated rainfall events for 52-, 31-, and 10-year tillage, respectively. A significant difference (Perosion increases soil erodibility and delivers the soil for water erosion in sloping fields, accelerating water erosion.

  10. Modelling erosion on a daily basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikha Shrestha, Dhruba; Jetten, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Effect of soil erosion causing negative impact on ecosystem services and food security is well known. To assess annual erosion rates various empirical models have been extensively used in all the climatic regions. While these models are simple to operate and do not require lot of input data, the effect of extreme rain is not taken into account in the annual estimations. For analysing the effects of extreme rain the event- based models become handy. These models can simulate detail erosional processes including particle detachment, transportation and deposition of sediments during a storm. But they are not applicable for estimating annual erosion rates. Moreover storm event data may not be available everywhere which prohibits their extensive use. In this paper we describe a method by adapting the revised MMF model to assess erosion on daily basis so that the effects of extreme rains are taken into account. We couple it to a simple surface soil moisture balance on a daily basis and include estimation of daily vegetation cover changes. Annual soil loss is calculated by adding daily erosion rates. We compare the obtained results with that obtained from applying the revised MMF model in a case study in the Mamora plateau in northwest Morocco which is affected by severe gully formation. The results show clearly the effects of exceptional rain in erosional processes which cannot be captured in an annual model.

  11. SOTER-Based Soil Water Erosion Simulation in Hainan Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YUGUO; ZHANG GANLIN; GONG ZITONG

    2003-01-01

    The actual and potential water erosion rates of soils with different land covers in Hainan Island, China,were estimated based on the universal soil loss equation (USLE) and a 1:200 000 Soils and Terrain Digital Database (SOTER) database, from which soil water erosion factors could be extracted. 92.8% of the whole island had a current erosion rate of lower than 500 t km-2 a-1. Soil erosion risk was considered to be high because of its abundant rainfall. Without vegetation cover, the potential soil erosion rate would be extremely high and 90.8% of the island would have a soil erosion rate higher than 2 500 t km-2 a-1. Relative erosion vulnerability of different soil zones, landform types, and lithological regions of the island was compared by introducing a relative erosion hazard parameter α. Cambosols developed from siltstone and mudstone in low hill regions were pinpointed as soils with the highest erosion risk in the island.

  12. Riparian erosion vulnerability model based on environmental features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero-Acosta, Alejandra; Chu, Maria L; Guzman, Jorge A; Starks, Patrick J; Moriasi, Daniel N

    2017-12-01

    Riparian erosion is one of the major causes of sediment and contaminant load to streams, degradation of riparian wildlife habitats, and land loss hazards. Land and soil management practices are implemented as conservation and restoration measures to mitigate the environmental problems brought about by riparian erosion. This, however, requires the identification of vulnerable areas to soil erosion. Because of the complex interactions between the different mechanisms that govern soil erosion and the inherent uncertainties involved in quantifying these processes, assessing erosion vulnerability at the watershed scale is challenging. The main objective of this study was to develop a methodology to identify areas along the riparian zone that are susceptible to erosion. The methodology was developed by integrating the physically-based watershed model MIKE-SHE, to simulate water movement, and a habitat suitability model, MaxEnt, to quantify the probability of presences of elevation changes (i.e., erosion) across the watershed. The presences of elevation changes were estimated based on two LiDAR-based elevation datasets taken in 2009 and 2012. The changes in elevation were grouped into four categories: low (0.5 - 0.7 m), medium (0.7 - 1.0 m), high (1.0 - 1.7 m) and very high (1.7 - 5.9 m), considering each category as a studied "species". The categories' locations were then used as "species location" map in MaxEnt. The environmental features used as constraints to the presence of erosion were land cover, soil, stream power index, overland flow, lateral inflow, and discharge. The modeling framework was evaluated in the Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental watershed in southcentral Oklahoma. Results showed that the most vulnerable areas for erosion were located at the upper riparian zones of the Cobb and Lake sub-watersheds. The main waterways of these sub-watersheds were also found to be prone to streambank erosion. Approximatively 80% of the riparian zone (streambank

  13. Remote sensing and spatially distributed erosion models as a tool to really understand biocrust effects on soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Chamizo, Sonia; Román, Raul; Roncero, Beatriz; Weber, Bettina; Jetten, Victor; Cantón, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Since publication of the first Ecological Stides volume on biological soil crusts (biocrusts) in 2003, numerous studies have been conducted trying to understand the role of biocrusts in runoff generation and water erosion. Most of them considered these communities as one of the most important stabilizing factors dryland regions. However, these studies were concentrated only on patch or hillslope scales, and there is a lack of information on biocrust interactions with other surface components at catchment scale. Even on fine textured soils, where biocrusts increase water infiltration, they act as runoff source when compared to vegetation. Run-on from biocrusted areas may be harvested by downslope vegetation, but sometimes it may promote downslope erosion. Thus, to really understand the effect of biocrusts on soil erosion, studies on larger scales, preferably on a catchment scale are needed. For this we developed a new approach, based on field measurements and remote sensing techniques, to include biocrust effects in physically-based runoff and erosion modeling. Doing this we were able to analyze how runoff generated in biocrust areas is redistributed within the landscape and its effect on catchment water erosion. The Limburg Soil Erosion Model (LISEM) was used to parameterize and simulate the effects of biocrusts on soil erosion in a small badlands catchment, where biocrusts represent one of the main surface components. Biocrust stability and cohesion were measured in the field, their hydrological properties were obtained from runoff plots, and their cover and spatial distribution was estimated from a hyperspectral image by linear mixture analysis. Then, the model was run under different rainfall intensities and final runoff and erosion rates were compared with field data measured at the catchment outlet. Moreover, these results were compared with the hypothetical scenario in which biocrusts were removed, simulating human disturbances or climatic change effects on

  14. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to

  15. Erosion-Corrosion Behavior of Power Plant Pipe Caused by Hot Feed Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Sungho; Lee, Jinwon; Kim, Taewon [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    In this study, we tried to define the erosion-corrosion behavior together with the resulting effects on a pipe that is a part of a feed water circulation system according to the pipe size and hot feed water environment. An erosion corrosion analysis was performed through the Hayduk and Minas model based on the chemical reaction between iron and oxygen, an essential corrosive factor. The erosion-corrosion rate against the pipe diameter and feed water temperature was then evaluated by means of finite element analysis using Abacus. As shown in the results, the feed water temperature was the main factor influencing the erosion-corrosion rate; in particular, it was expected that the thickness of 316 stainless steel would decrease by 2.59 {mu}m every year in a hot water environment at 290 .deg. C.

  16. Application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model to simulate streamflow in a PNW forest watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Srivastava; M. Dobre; E. Bruner; W. J. Elliot; I. S. Miller; J. Q. Wu

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of water yields from watersheds into streams and rivers is critical to managing water supply and supporting aquatic life. Surface runoff typically contributes the most to peak discharge of a hydrograph while subsurface flow dominates the falling limb of hydrograph and baseflow contributes to streamflow from shallow unconfined aquifers primarily during the...

  17. Behavior of farmers in regard to erosion by water as reflected by their farming practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerswald, Karl; Fischer, Franziska K; Kistler, Michael; Treisch, Melanie; Maier, Harald; Brandhuber, Robert

    2017-09-08

    The interplay between natural site conditions and farming raises erosion by water above geological background levels. We examined the hypothesis that farmers take erosion into account in their farming decisions and switch to farming practices with lower erosion risk the higher the site-specific hazard becomes. Erosion since the last tillage was observed from aerial orthorectified photographs for 8100 fields belonging to 1879 farmers distributed across Bavaria (South Germany) and it was modeled by the Universal Soil Loss Equation using highly detailed input data (e.g., digital terrain model with 5×5m(2) resolution, rain data with 1×1km(2) and 5min resolution, crop and cropping method from annual field-specific data from incentive schemes). Observed and predicted soil loss correlated closely, demonstrating the accuracy of this method. The close correlation also indicted that the farmers could easily observe the degree of recent erosion on their fields, even without modelling. Farmers clearly did not consider erosion in their decisions. When natural risk increased, e.g. due to steeper slopes, they neither grew crops with lower erosion potential, nor reduced field size, nor used contouring. In addition, they did not compensate for the cultivation of crops with higher erosion potential by using conservation techniques like mulch tillage or contouring, or by reducing field size. Only subsidized measures, like mulch tillage or organic farming, were applied but only at the absolute minimum that was necessary to obtain subsidies. However, this did not achieve the reduction in erosion that would be possible if these measures had been fully applied. We conclude that subsidies may be an appropriate method of reducing erosion but the present weak supervision, which assumes that farmers themselves will take erosion into account and that subsidies are only needed to compensate for any disadvantages caused by erosion-reducing measures, is clearly not justified. Copyright © 2017

  18. Water Impingement Erosion of Deep-Rolled Ti64

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Liquid Impingement Erosion (LIE performances of deep-rolling (DR treated and non-treated Ti64 were investigated. Various erosion stages, from the incubation to the terminal erosion stages, could be observed. A full factorial design of experiments was used to study the effect of DR process parameters (Feed Rate, Spindle Velocity, Number of Passes, Pressure on the residual stress distribution, microhardness and surface roughness of the treated Ti64 specimens. The DR-treated Ti64 specimens exhibited improved surface microhardness, surface roughness, and large magnitude of compressive residual stresses, which were attributed to the amount of cold work induced by the DR process. Although DR improved the mechanical properties of the Ti64, the results showed that the treatment has little or no effect on the LIE performance of Ti64 but different damage modes were observed in these two cases. Evolution of the erosion stages was described based on water-hammer pressure, stress waves, radial wall jetting, and hydraulic penetration modes. The initial erosion stages were mainly influenced by water-hammer pressure and stress waves, whereas the intermediate erosion stages were influenced by the combination of the four modes together. The final erosion stages contain the four modes, however the erosion was greatly driven by the radial jetting and hydraulic penetration modes, where more material was removed. The failure mechanism of the final stages of the LIE test of both DR-treated and non-treated Ti64 was characterized as fatigue fracture. However, a brittle fracture behavior was observed in the initial and intermediate erosion stages of the DR-treated Ti64, whereas a ductile fracture behavior was observed in the non-treated Ti64. This was concluded from the micrographs of the LIE damage through different erosion stages.

  19. Model isothermal internal erosion of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papin, A. A.; Sibin, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    The process of internal erosion in a three-phase saturated soil is studied. The problem is described by the equations of mass conservation, Darcy's law and the equation of capillary pressure. The original system of equations is reduced to a system of two equations for porosity and water saturation. In general, the equation of water saturation is degenerate. The degenerate problem in a one-dimensional domain and one special case of the problem in a two-dimensional domain are solved numerically using a finite-difference method. Existence and uniqueness of a classical solution of a nondegenerate problem is proved.

  20. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu; Moreno, Luis (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    from the compacted bentonite into and through the expanding gel towards the gel/ water interface and further out into the seeping water. Mass transfer resistance for ions as well as smectite particles in the seeping water is accounted for in the simulations. The sodium concentration profile in the gel influences the repulsive forces between the particles as well as the viscosity of the expanding gel. Under the most unfavourable circumstances, i.e. at high flowrates and large fracture apertures, considerable loss of smectite can be expected for a buffer that consists of only smectite. Other calculations have been done to assess under which conditions of flowrate, water compositions and initial bentonite chemical compositions the water composition at the gel/water interface could become larger than the CCC. At the same time the proportion of calcium and sodium as counter ions in the smectite at the gel/water interface was studied. This was done because should the calcium make up more than about 90% of the counterions, the smectite behaves very differently from than smectite with less calcium. In these calculations we have accounted for ion exchange in the expanding gel, for diffusion of ions in the gel, for transport to and from the seeping groundwater, and of the dissolution of soluble minerals that may supply the gel with ions. We conclude that with our present understanding of the processes it is not possible to affirmatively state that erosion of pure smectite gels cannot occur to a considerable extent. In experiments in downward facing slits it has been found that bentonite releases gel agglomerates much faster than our model predicts. These are released and sediment also under conditions where it is expected that the smectite particles should have separated into individual smectite sheets, which would not noticeably be influenced by gravity. The reasons for this behaviour are not understood. However, the commercial bentonites that have been extensively investigated

  1. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu; Moreno, Luis (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    from the compacted bentonite into and through the expanding gel towards the gel/ water interface and further out into the seeping water. Mass transfer resistance for ions as well as smectite particles in the seeping water is accounted for in the simulations. The sodium concentration profile in the gel influences the repulsive forces between the particles as well as the viscosity of the expanding gel. Under the most unfavourable circumstances, i.e. at high flowrates and large fracture apertures, considerable loss of smectite can be expected for a buffer that consists of only smectite. Other calculations have been done to assess under which conditions of flowrate, water compositions and initial bentonite chemical compositions the water composition at the gel/water interface could become larger than the CCC. At the same time the proportion of calcium and sodium as counter ions in the smectite at the gel/water interface was studied. This was done because should the calcium make up more than about 90% of the counterions, the smectite behaves very differently from than smectite with less calcium. In these calculations we have accounted for ion exchange in the expanding gel, for diffusion of ions in the gel, for transport to and from the seeping groundwater, and of the dissolution of soluble minerals that may supply the gel with ions. We conclude that with our present understanding of the processes it is not possible to affirmatively state that erosion of pure smectite gels cannot occur to a considerable extent. In experiments in downward facing slits it has been found that bentonite releases gel agglomerates much faster than our model predicts. These are released and sediment also under conditions where it is expected that the smectite particles should have separated into individual smectite sheets, which would not noticeably be influenced by gravity. The reasons for this behaviour are not understood. However, the commercial bentonites that have been extensively investigated

  2. Field Assessment Techniques for Bank Erosion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-22

    Field Assessment Techniques for Bank Erosion Modeling First Interim Report Prepared for US Army European Research Office US AR DS G-. EDISON HOUSE...SEDIMENTATION ANALYSIS SHEETS and GUIDELINES FOR THE USE OF SEDIMENTATION ANALYSIS SHEETS IN THE FIELD Prepared for US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment...Material Type 3 Material Type 4 Cobbles Toe[’ Toe Toefl Toefl Protection Status Cobbles/boulders Mid-Bnak .. Mid-na.k Mid-Bnask[ Mid-Boak

  3. A semi-empirical model to assess uncertainty of spatial patterns of erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Vigiak, O.; Romanowicz, R.J.; Beven, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Distributed erosion models are potentially good tools for locating soil sediment sources and guiding efficient Soil and Water Conservation (SWC) planning, but the uncertainty of model predictions may be high. In this study, the distribution of erosion within a catchment was predicted with a

  4. Water droplet erosion of stainless steel steam turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirols, H. S.; Kevorkov, D.; Uihlein, A.; Medraj, M.

    2017-08-01

    Steam turbine blades are highly subjected to water droplet erosion (WDE) caused by high energy impingement of liquid water droplets. However, most of the published research on this wear phenomenon is performed on laboratory test rigs, instead of addressing WDE of actual steam turbine blades. In this work, the progression of erosion on the surface of ex-service low pressure steam turbine blades was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The erosion appearance and mechanisms are compared with laboratory test rig results that are carried out using a rotating disk rig according to ASTM G73 standard. Initial and advanced erosion stages could be observed on the steam turbine blades. Similar to the WDE rig coupons, initial pits and cracks were preceded by blade surface roughening through the formation of asperities and depressions. In addition, it was also observed that the twist angle of the turbine blade around its diagonal, is an important parameter that influences its WDE. Twist angle has an effect on: impact angle, erosion appearance, impact speed, and the affected area. Furthermore, according to the current experimental results, multi-ray rig erosion test results are considered the closest simulation to the actual ex-service blade in terms of damage appearance.

  5. THE WATER FROM NATURE AND THE EROSION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. PANDI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The water from nature and the erosion process. Studying earth's surface erosion process is necessary for practical reasons. The theoretical approach requires knowledge of the alluvial system’s structure and operation as the cascade sequence of fluvial system’s mass and energy. Geosystem research methodology requires that the water energy and the role of adjacent surface must be expressed. The expression of water power can be grouped according to the shape of movement and action in the basin. A particular, important case is the energy variation in a basin-slope. An important role in energy expressions is considering the existence in nature of biphasic fluid - water as dispersion phase and solid particles as dispersed phase. The role of the adjacent surface is taken into account by using the erosion resistance indicator, which is calculated using the indicator of geological resistance and the indicator of plant protection. The evolution of natural systems, therefore of river basins too, leads to energy diminishing, thus affecting their dynamic balance. This can be expressed using the concept of entropy. Although erosion processes are usual natural phenomena for the evolution of river basins, they induce significant risks in certain circumstances. Depending on the circulated water energies, water basins can be ranked in terms of potential risks.

  6. [Assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on water environment based on the integration of soil erosion process and landscape pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Bing-Fang; Zeng, Yuan; Zhang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The integration of the effects of landscape pattern to the assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on eco-environmental is of practical significance in methodological prospect, being able to provide an approach for identifying water body's sediment source area, assessing the potential risks of sediment export of on-site soil erosion to the target water body, and evaluating the capacity of regional landscape pattern in preventing soil loss. In this paper, the RUSLE model was applied to simulate the on-site soil erosion rate. With the consideration of the soil retention potential of vegetation cover and topography, a quantitative assessment was conducted on the impacts of soil erosion in the water source region of the middle route for South-to-North Water Transfer Project on rivers and reservoirs by delineating landscape pattern at point (or cell) scale and sub-watershed level. At point (or grid cell) scale, the index of soil erosion impact intensity (I) was developed as an indicator of the potential risk of sediment export to the water bodies. At sub-watershed level, the landscape leakiness index (LI) was employed to indicate the sediment retention capacity of a given landscape pattern. The results revealed that integrating the information of landscape pattern and the indices of soil erosion process could spatially effectively reflect the impact intensity of in situ soil erosion on water bodies. The LI was significantly exponentially correlated to the mean sediment retention capacity of landscape and the mean vegetation coverage of watershed, and the sediment yield at sub-watershed scale was significantly correlated to the LI in an exponential regression. It could be concluded that the approach of delineating landscape pattern based on soil erosion process and the integration of the information of landscape pattern with its soil retention potential could provide a new approach for the risk evaluation of soil erosion.

  7. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in relation to water erosion and tillage erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the (137)Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of (137)Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. (137)Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion.

  8. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Relation to Water Erosion and Tillage Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the 137Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of 137Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. 137Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion. PMID:23717530

  9. Erosion rills offset the efficacy of vegetated buffer strips to mitigate pesticide exposure in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Sebastian; Dabrowski, James Michael; Bangert, Uli; Schulz, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory risk assessment considers vegetated buffer strips as effective risk mitigation measures for the reduction of runoff-related pesticide exposure of surface waters. However, apart from buffer strip widths, further characteristics such as vegetation density or the presence of erosion rills are generally neglected in the determination of buffer strip mitigation efficacies. This study conducted a field survey of fruit orchards (average slope 3.1-12.2%) of the Lourens River catchment, South Africa, which specifically focused on the characteristics and attributes of buffer strips separating orchard areas from tributary streams. In addition, in-stream and erosion rill water samples were collected during three runoff events and GIS-based modeling was employed to predict losses of pesticides associated with runoff. The results show that erosion rills are common in buffer strips (on average 13 to 24 m wide) of the tributaries (up to 6.5 erosion rills per km flow length) and that erosion rills represent concentrated entry pathways of pesticide runoff into the tributaries during rainfall events. Exposure modeling shows that measured pesticide surface water concentrations correlated significantly (R(2)=0.626; pmodeling approach in which buffer strip width was set to zero at sites with erosion rills; in contrast, no relationship between predicted runoff losses and in-stream pesticide concentrations were detected in the modeling approach that neglected erosion rills and thus assumed efficient buffer strips. Overall, the results of our study show that erosion rills may substantially reduce buffer strip pesticide retention efficacies during runoff events and suggest that the capability of buffer strips as a risk mitigation tool for runoff is largely overestimated in current regulatory risk assessment procedures conducted for pesticide authorization.

  10. Estimation model of soil freeze-thaw erosion in Silingco watershed wetland of Northern Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Yu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The freeze-thaw (FT) erosion is a type of soil erosion like water erosion and wind erosion. Limited by many factors, the grading evaluation of soil FT erosion quantities is not well studied. Based on the comprehensive analysis of the evaluation indices of soil FT erosion, we for the first time utilized the sensitivity of microwave remote sensing technology to soil moisture for identification of FT state. We established an estimation model suitable to evaluate the soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland of Northern Tibet using weighted summation method of six impact factors including the annual FT cycle days, average diurnal FT phase-changed water content, average annual precipitation, slope, aspect, and vegetation coverage. Finally, with the support of GIS, we classified soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland. The results showed that soil FT erosion are distributed in broad areas of Silingco watershed wetland. Different soil FT erosions with different intensities have evidently different spatial and geographical distributions.

  11. Optical Spectra of the High Voltage Erosive Water Discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Pirozerski, A L

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper kinetics of emission spectra of the high voltage erosive water discharge at near ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges has been investigated. Obtained results show a similarity of physical properties of this discharge (and of corresponding plasmoids) to that of some other types of erosional discharges which also result in the formation of dust-gas fireballs.

  12. Using Gypsum to Affect Soil Erosion Processes and Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    A driving force in soil erosion is the low electrolyte content of rain water. Various electrolyte sources have proven useful in serving as electrolyte sources such as phosphogypsum, lime and various salts, however, each has other potential problems. We performed a number of studies on low cost gypsu...

  13. Advances in Predicting Soil Erosion After Fire Using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Osama Z.; Pierson, Frederick B.; Nearing, Mark A.; Williams, C. Jason; Hernandez, Mariano; Boll, Jan; Nouwakpo, Sayjro; Weltz, Mark A.; Spaeth, Kenneth E.

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of erosion from a hillslope is governed by the availability of sediment and connectivity of overland flow and erosion processes. For undisturbed conditions, sediment is mainly detached and transported by rainsplash and sheetflow (splash-sheet) processes in bare batches, but sediment generally only travels a short distance before deposition. On recently disturbed sites (e.g., after fire), bare ground is more extensive and runoff and erosion rates are higher relative to undisturbed conditions. Increased erosion following disturbance occurs largely due to a shift from splash-sheet to concentrated-flow-dominated processes. On long-disturbed sites (e.g., after woody plant encroachment), years of soil loss can limit sediment availability and soil erosion. In contrast, recently burned landscapes typically have ample sediment available and generate high erosion rates. This presentation highlights recent advancements in hillslope erosion prediction by the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) that accommodate recently burned conditions. The RHEM tool is a process-based model that was developed specifically for predicting hillslope runoff and erosion on rangeland ecosystems. The advancements presented here include development of empirical equations to predict erodibility parameters for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is limited (by runoff or sediment availability) and an erodibility parameter for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is the dominant erosion mechanism and sediment is amply available (burned conditions). The data used for developing and evaluating the erodibility parameter equations were obtained from rainfall simulation databases maintained by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service. The data span undisturbed, long-disturbed, and recently burned conditions. For undisturbed and long-disturbed conditions, a regression analysis was applied to derive the relationship between splash

  14. Modeling Overland Erosion on Disturbed Rangeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, O. Z.; Hernandez, M.; Pierson, F. B.; Nearing, M.; Stone, J. J.; Williams, C. J.; Boll, J.; Weltz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) is a new process-based model developed by the USDA-ARS primarily for undisturbed rangeland. Greater sediment detachment rates are usually generated by concentrated flow rather than by sheet flow. Disturbance on rangeland such as fire and tree encroachment can increase overland flow erosion rate by increasing the likelihood of concentrated flow formation on a more erodible surface. In this study, we made advancement to RHEM by developing a new version of the model to predict concentrated flow erosion rate from disturbed rangelands. The model was conceptualized based on observations and results of experimental studies on rangelands disturbed by fire and/or by tree encroachment. A logistic equation was used to partition overland flow into concentrated flow and sheet flow. The equation predicts the probability of overland flow to become concentrated based on slope angle, percentage bare soil, and flow discharge per unit width. Sediment detachment rate from concentrated flow was calculated using soil erodibility of the site and hydraulic parameters of the flow such as flow width and stream power. Soil detachment was assumed to start when concentrated flow starts (i.e. no threshold concept for initiating detachment was used). Width of concentrated flow was determined by flow discharge and slope using an equation which was developed specifically for rangeland. A dynamic erodibility concept was used where concentrated flow erodibility was set to be high at the beginning of the event and then decrease exponentially due to the reduction of availability of disturbance-source-sediment. Initial erodibility was estimated using an empirical parameterization equation as a function of readily available vegetation cover and surface soil texture data. Detachment rate from rain splash and sheet flow was determined by rainfall intensity and sheet flow discharge. A dynamic partial differential sediment continuity equation was used to

  15. Thermal erosion of a permafrost coastline: Improving process-based models using time-lapse photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, C.; Anderson, R.; Overeem, I.; Matell, N.; Clow, G.; Urban, F.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal erosion rates locally exceeding 30 m y-1 have been documented along Alaska's Beaufort Sea coastline, and a number of studies suggest that these erosion rates have accelerated as a result of climate change. However, a lack of direct observational evidence has limited our progress in quantifying the specific processes that connect climate change to coastal erosion rates in the Arctic. In particular, while longer ice-free periods are likely to lead to both warmer surface waters and longer fetch, the relative roles of thermal and mechanical (wave) erosion in driving coastal retreat have not been comprehensively quantified. We focus on a permafrost coastline in the northern National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), where coastal erosion rates have averaged 10-15 m y-1 over two years of direct monitoring. We take advantage of these extraordinary rates of coastal erosion to observe and quantify coastal erosion directly via time-lapse photography in combination with meteorological observations. Our observations indicate that the erosion of these bluffs is largely thermally driven, but that surface winds play a crucial role in exposing the frozen bluffs to the radiatively warmed seawater that drives melting of interstitial ice. To first order, erosion in this setting can be modeled using formulations developed to describe iceberg deterioration in the open ocean. These simple models provide a conceptual framework for evaluating how climate-induced changes in thermal and wave energy might influence future erosion rates in this setting.

  16. One-dimensional modeling of piping flow erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachouette, Damien; Golay, Frédéric; Bonelli, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    A process called "piping", which often occurs in water-retaining structures (earth-dams, dykes, levees), involving the formation and progression of a continuous tunnel between the upstream and downstream sides, is one of the main cause of structure failure. Starting with the diphasic flow volume equations and the jump equations including the erosion processes, a simplified one-dimensional model for two-phase piping flow erosion was developed. The numerical simulation based on constant input and output pressures showed that the particle concentration can be a significant factor at the very beginning of the process, resulting in the enlargement of the hole at the exit. However, it was concluded that this influence is a secondary factor: the dilute flow assumption, which considerably simplifies the description, is relevant here. To cite this article: D. Lachouette et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  17. Predicting Postfire Hillslope Erosion with a Web-based Probabilistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, P. R.; Elliot, W. J.; Pierson, F. B.; Hall, D. E.; Moffet, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    Modeling erosion after major disturbances, such as wildfire, has major challenges that need to be overcome. Fire-induced changes include increased erosion due to loss of the protective litter and duff, loss of soil water storage, and in some cases, creation of water repellent soil conditions. These conditions increase the potential for flooding, and sedimentation, which are of special concern to people who live and mange resources in the areas adjacent to burned areas. A web-based Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT), has been developed to predict surface erosion from postfire hillslopes and to evaluate the potential effectiveness of various erosion mitigation practices. The model uses a probabilistic approach that incorporates variability in weather, soil properties, and burn severity for forests, rangeland, and chaparral hillslopes. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is the erosion prediction engine used in a Monte Carlo simulation mode to provide event-based erosion rate probabilities. The one-page custom interface is targeted for hydrologists and soil scientists. The interface allows users to select climate, soil texture, burn severity, and hillslope topography. For a given hillslope, the model uses a single 100-year run to obtain weather variability and then twenty 5- to 10-year runs to incorporate soil property, cover, and spatial burn severity variability. The output, in both tabular and graphical form, relates the probability of soil erosion exceeding a given amount in each of the first five years following the fire. Event statistics are provided to show the magnitude and rainfall intensity of the storms used to predict erosion rates. ERMiT also allows users to compare the effects of various mitigation treatments (mulches, seeding, and barrier treatments such as contour-felled logs or straw wattles) on the erosion rate probability. Data from rainfall simulation and concentrated flow (rill) techniques were used to parameterize ERMiT for these varied

  18. Physical erosion modelling of complex morphodynamics in the upper Val d'Orcia: a combination of EROSION 3D, UAV, SFM and CANUPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Arno; Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Throughout the Mediterranean Basin soil erosion is both a widely spread and a landscape shaping process. In order to increase the understanding of morphodynamics inside large Italian badland areas, so called Calanchi, the process based erosion model EROSION 3D was parameterized by artificial rainfall simulations, soil sampling and an UAV based high resolution digital elevation model. Vegetation structures were removed with the CANUPO-classifier in CloudCompare. The rainfall experiments proved to be a convenient but costly tool for deriving the model input parameters. While building up the model, different composition of the inhomogeneous soil surface was considered. A diverse behavior against erosion by water was observed. The results showed that the deposition surfaces of rotational or translational slides, besides calanco depth contour, tend to degrade. Although these deposits present a comparatively low bulk density, they reduce the infiltration due to soil surface clogging and cause less erosion resistances. The differential consideration of erosion sub-processes turns out as particularly challenging. The simulation of a reference year showed an annual soil export from the catchment of 43 t/ha, which corresponds to an average surface lowering of 3 mm. Sheet erosion represents an amount of about 5% of the total erosion of badlands. Furthermore, infiltration depth, amount of runoff, sediment concentration, and grain size composition of the deposits were calculated. This study makes a contribution to the understanding of denudation processes in Calanchi badlands. The presented process-based modeling of badlands is contributing a new aspect to erosion research.

  19. Modeling target erosion during reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strijckmans, K., E-mail: Koen.Strijckmans@ugent.be; Depla, D.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The erosion of a target is simulated with the RSD2013 software during reactive magnetron sputtering. • The influence of redeposition on the target state and on the hysteresis is explained. • The racetrack formation along the hysteresis and as function of the redeposition is quantified. • Comparison of the racetrack and the sputter profile shows clear differences. - Abstract: The influence of the reactive sputter conditions on the racetrack and the sputter profile for an Al/O{sub 2} DC reactive sputter system is studied by modeling. The role of redeposition, i.e. the deposition of sputtered material back on the target, is therefore taken into account. The used model RSD2013 is capable of simulating the effect of redeposition on the target condition in a spatial resolved way. Comparison between including and excluding redeposition in the RSD2013 model shows that the in-depth oxidation profile of the target differs. Modeling shows that it is important to distinguish between the formed racetrack, i.e. the erosion depth profile, and the sputter profile. The latter defines the distribution of the sputtered atoms in the vacuum chamber. As the target condition defines the sputter yield, it does determine the racetrack and the sputter profile of the planar circular target. Both the shape of the racetrack and the sputter profile change as function of the redeposition fraction as well as function of the oxygen flow change. Clear asymmetries and narrowing are observed for the racetrack shape. Similar effects are noticed for the sputter profile but to a different extent. Based on this study, the often heard misconception that the racetrack shape defines the distribution of the sputtered atoms during reactive sputtering is proven to be wrong.

  20. Digital elevation model and satellite images an assessment of soil erosion potential in the Pcinja catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milevski Ivica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pcinja is large left tributary of Vardar River (135 km long, 2877,3 km2 catchment’s area, which drainages surface waters from northeastern Macedonia, and small part of southeastern Serbia. Because of suitable physical-geographic factors (geology, terrain morphology, climate, hydrology, vegetation coverage, soil composition, and high human impact, some parts of the catchment’s suffer significant erosion process. For this reason, it is necessary to research properly spatial distribution of erosion, then influence of physical and anthropogenic factors for the intensity of soil erosion, related erosion landforms (with morphology, genesis, evolution, soil erosion protection etc.. Earlier researches in the area have been performed generally with combination of cartographic and classic field analysis. But in last decades, there are new possibilities available like satellite images and digital elevation models. In this work has been presented the methodology of utilization of satellite images and DEM for erosion research, with analysis and comparisons of outcome data.

  1. Selecting and applying cesium-137 conversion models to estimate soil erosion rates in cultivated fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Lobb, David A; Tiessen, Kevin H D; McConkey, Brian G

    2010-01-01

    The fallout radionuclide cesium-137 ((137)Cs) has been successfully used in soil erosion studies worldwide. However, discrepancies often exist between the erosion rates estimated using various conversion models. As a result, there is often confusion in the use of the various models and in the interpretation of the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test the structural and parametrical uncertainties associated with four conversion models typically used in cultivated agricultural landscapes. For the structural uncertainties, the Soil Constituent Redistribution by Erosion Model (SCREM) was developed and used to simulate the redistribution of fallout (137)Cs due to tillage and water erosion along a simple two-dimensional (horizontal and vertical) transect. The SCREM-predicted (137)Cs inventories were then imported into the conversion models to estimate the erosion rates. The structural uncertainties of the conversion models were assessed based on the comparisons between the conversion-model-estimated erosion rates and the erosion rates determined or used in the SCREM. For the parametrical uncertainties, test runs were conducted by varying the values of the parameters used in the model, and the parametrical uncertainties were assessed based on the responsive changes of the estimated erosion rates. Our results suggest that: (i) the performance/accuracy of the conversion models was largely dependent on the relative contributions of water vs. tillage erosion; and (ii) the estimated erosion rates were highly sensitive to the input values of the reference (137)Cs level, particle size correction factors and tillage depth. Guidelines were proposed to aid researchers in selecting and applying the conversion models under various situations common to agricultural landscapes.

  2. 7 CFR 610.12 - Equations for predicting soil loss due to water erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... erosion. 610.12 Section 610.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... ASSISTANCE Soil Erosion Prediction Equations § 610.12 Equations for predicting soil loss due to water erosion. (a) The equation for predicting soil loss due to erosion for both the USLE and the RUSLE is A = R ×...

  3. Water erosion susceptibility mapping by applying Stochastic Gradient Treeboost to the Imera Meridionale River Basin (Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angileri, Silvia Eleonora; Conoscenti, Christian; Hochschild, Volker; Märker, Michael; Rotigliano, Edoardo; Agnesi, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water constitutes a serious problem affecting various countries. In the last few years, a number of studies have adopted statistical approaches for erosion susceptibility zonation. In this study, the Stochastic Gradient Treeboost (SGT) was tested as a multivariate statistical tool for exploring, analyzing and predicting the spatial occurrence of rill-interrill erosion and gully erosion. This technique implements the stochastic gradient boosting algorithm with a tree-based method. The study area is a 9.5 km2 river catchment located in central-northern Sicily (Italy), where water erosion processes are prevalent, and affect the agricultural productivity of local communities. In order to model soil erosion by water, the spatial distribution of landforms due to rill-interrill and gully erosion was mapped and 12 environmental variables were selected as predictors. Four calibration and four validation subsets were obtained by randomly extracting sets of negative cases, both for rill-interrill erosion and gully erosion models. The results of validation, based on receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curves, showed excellent to outstanding accuracies of the models, and thus a high prediction skill. Moreover, SGT allowed us to explore the relationships between erosion landforms and predictors. A different suite of predictor variables was found to be important for the two models. Elevation, aspect, landform classification and land-use are the main controlling factors for rill-interrill erosion, whilst the stream power index, plan curvature and the topographic wetness index were the most important independent variables for gullies. Finally, an ROC plot analysis made it possible to define a threshold value to classify cells according to the presence/absence of the two erosion processes. Hence, by heuristically combining the resulting rill-interrill erosion and gully erosion susceptibility maps, an integrated water erosion susceptibility map was created. The

  4. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki; Cordier, Stephane; Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás; Centeri, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  5. Tunnel backfill erosion by dilute water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olin, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2014-03-15

    The goal was to estimate smectite release from tunnel backfill due to dilute groundwater pulse during post glacial conditions. The plan was to apply VTT's two different implementations (BESW{sub D} and BESW{sub S}) of well-known model of Neretnieks et al. (2009). It appeared difficult to produce repeatable results using this model in COMSOL 4.2 environment, therefore a semi-analytical approximate approach was applied, which enabled to take into account both different geometry and smectite content in tunnel backfill as compared to buffer case. The results are quite similar to buffer results due to the decreasing effect of smaller smectite content and the increasing effect of larger radius. (orig.)

  6. Spatial distribution of water erosion risk in a watershed with eucalyptus and Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior Cesar Avanzi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The process of water erosion occurs in watersheds throughout the world and it is strongly affected by anthropogenic influences. Thus, the knowledge of these processes is extremely necessary for planning of conservation efforts. This study was performed in an experimental forested watershed in order to predict the average potential annual soil loss by water erosion using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE and a Geographic Information System (GIS, and then compared with soil loss tolerance. All the USLE factors were generated in a distributed approach employing a GIS tool. The layers were multiplied in the GIS framework in order to predict soil erosion rates. Results showed that the average soil loss was 6.2 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Relative to soil loss tolerance, 83% of the area had an erosion rate lesser than the tolerable value. According to soil loss classes, 49% of the watershed had erosion less than 2.5 Mg ha-1 yr-1. However, about 8.7% of the watershed had erosion rates greater than 15 Mg ha-1 yr-1, being mainly related to Plinthosol soil class and roads, thus requiring special attention for the improvement of sustainable management practices for such areas. Eucalyptus cultivation was found to have soil loss greater than Atlantic Forest. Thus, an effort should be made to bring the erosion rates closer to the native forest. Implementation of the USLE model in a GIS framework was found to be a simple and useful tool for predicting the spatial variation of soil erosion risk and identifying critical areas for conservation efforts.

  7. Water erosion tests on a tantalum sample: A short communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports results from an experiment exposing the hot isostatic pressed tantalum cladding of a tungsten spallation target sample to a 34 m/s water jet. The unpolished tantalum surface was placed under the jet for 4.5 months with a view to quantifying pitting and erosion. Micrographs and laser profilometry records of the sample surface taken before and after the experiment are reported here.

  8. Influence of water air content on cavitation erosion in distilled water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available air content on cavitation erosion in distilled water J. G. Auret,* O. F. R. A. Damm,* G. J. Wright* and F. P. A. Robinson t The influence of increased air content of the cavitating liquid (distilled water... erosion, air (gas) content, distilled water Introduction The existence of cavitation at positive liquid pressures depends on the presence of small gas pockets or nuclei ~. Thus gas (usually air) content is an extremely...

  9. Dune erosion near sea walls: Model-data comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geer, P.; De Vries, S.; Van Dongeren, A.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of the dune erosion model XBeach with laboratory measurement data of dune erosion in the presence of sea walls and revetments. Simulation results show that the essential dune set back processes are captured by the model and that the measurements at most locations

  10. Hanford Protective Barriers Program water-erosion studies, FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting the water-erosion control task of the Hanford Protective Barriers Program to assess barrier stability against soil erosion and slumping. The purpose of the barriers is to protect shallow-burial waste sites at the Hanford Site from water infiltration, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years. These aboveground, mounded structures will consist of layered, fine-grained sediment and rock designed to direct surface- and ground-water pathways away from the buried waste. The fine-grained sediment for the barrier will be obtained from the McGee Ranch on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the FY 1989 field work was to test two hypotheses concerning the behavior of McGee Ranch soil: runoff may occur on very dry, fine-grained sediment prior to complete saturation and rainsplash is an important erosional process for this type of sediment. This report describes plot construction, sediment sampling, and calibration testing of the rainfall simulator. Baseline stratigraphic and sedimentologic data include bulk density and textural properties of sediment in the test plots. Baseline precipitation data consist of predetermined raindrop sizes, rainfall intensities, plot coverage, and operational data for the simulator. 10 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. [Impact of wind-water alternate erosion on the characteristics of sediment particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Deng-Feng; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Ma, Xin-Xin; Zheng, Shi-Qing

    2014-02-01

    Wind and water are the two dominant erosion agents that caused soil and water losses in the wind-water alternate erosion region on the Loess Plateau. It is meaningful to study the impact of wind-water alternate erosion on the characteristics of soil particles for understanding the response of soil quality and environment to erosion. Through wind tunnel combined rainfall simulation, this paper studied the characteristics of the erosive sediment particles under the effect of wind-water alternate erosion. The results showed that the particles of 0-1 cm soil were coarsened by wind erosion at the wind speeds of 11 and 14 m x s(-1) compared with no wind erosion. Soil fine particles ( 0.05 mm) increased by 16.8%-20.8%. The physical property of surface soil was changed by the wind erosion, which, in turn, caused an increase in finer particles content in the sediment. Compared with no wind erosion, fine particles (wind alternate erosion increased by 2.7%-18.9% , and coarse particles (> 0.05 mm) decreased by 3.7%-9.3%. However, the changing trend of erosive sediment particles after the wind erosion at wind speeds of 11 and 14 m x s(-1) was different along with the rainfall intensity and duration. The erosive sediment particles at the rainfall intensities of 60, 80, 100 mm x h(-1) changed to greater extents than at the 150 mm x h(-1) rainfall intensity with longer than 15 min runoff flowing.

  12. Erosion of a model geophysical fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Li-Hua; Philippe, Pierre; Chambon, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    A specificity of natural flows such as debris flows, landslides or snow avalanches is that, mostly, the material forming the static bed has mechanical properties similar to those of the flowing material (mud/mud, snow/snow). To explore the bed erosion phenomenon induced by such geophysical flows, we consider the geomaterial as a continuum by performing experiments in laboratory on a model fluid that can behaves as a solid or as a liquid, depending on the conditions. Indeed, we propose an experimental study where a yield-stress fluid is implemented to model both the eroding flow and the eroded bed. Our approach is to capture the process of erosion in terms of solid-liquid transition. The studied hydrodynamics consists of a pipe-flow disturbed by the presence of an obstacle. We use a polymer micro-gel Carbopol that exhibits a Hershel-Bulkley (HB) rheology. By taking advantage of the fluid transparency, the flow is monitoring by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) internal visualization technique. Upstream of the obstacle, a solid-liquid-like interface between a flow zone and a dead zone appears in the fluid. In this study, we aim to investigate the dominant physical mechanism underlying the formation of the static domain, by combining the rheological characterization of the yield-stress fluid (using a rheometer), with the observation of the morphological evolution of the system substratum / flow and the local measurement of related hydrodynamic parameters. Our first result shows that the flow above the dead zone behaves as a classical plug flow, whose velocity profile can successfully be described by a Hagen-Poiseuille equation including a HB rheology, but except in a thin zone (compared to the whole flow zone) at the close vicinity of the solid-liquid interface. Thanks to a high PIV measurement resolution, we then properly examine the typical feature lying at the tail of the velocity profile. The numerical derivation of the profile shows that the shear rate in this

  13. A Quantitative Method for Long-Term Water Erosion Impacts on Productivity with a Lack of Field Experiments: A Case Study in Huaihe Watershed, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degen Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Water erosion causes reduced farmland productivity, and with a longer period of cultivation, agricultural productivity becomes increasingly vulnerable. The vulnerability of farmland productivity needs assessment due to long-term water erosion. The key to quantitative assessment is to propose a quantitative method with water loss scenarios to calculate productivity losses due to long-term water erosion. This study uses the agricultural policy environmental extender (APEX model and the global hydrological watershed unit and selects the Huaihe River watershed as a case study to describe the methodology. An erosion-variable control method considering soil and water conservation measure scenarios was used to study the relationship between long-term erosion and productivity losses and to fit with 3D surface (to come up with three elements, which are time, the cumulative amount of water erosion and productivity losses to measure long-term water erosion. Results showed that: (1 the 3D surfaces fit significantly well; fitting by the 3D surface can more accurately reflect the impact of long-term water erosion on productivity than fitting by the 2D curve (to come up with two elements, which are water erosion and productivity losses; (2 the cumulative loss surface can reflect differences in productivity loss caused by long-term water erosion.

  14. Contacts Erosion Modelling Using Ansys Computer Software And Experimental Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borkowski P.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of contacts’ erosion modelling by using computer simulation and analyzing heating, melting and evaporation processes, which cause contact erosion due to application of electric arc. Calculations have been conducted using professional ANSYS software which allows for thermal processes simulation and includes phase transitions for Ag, Cu, W metals and Ag-W50 composite.

  15. Modelling dune erosion, overwash and inundation of barrier islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, B.; Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Physical model experiments are performed at Deltares to investigate the morphological response of barrier islands on extreme storm events. The experiments included dune erosion, overwash and inundation regimes. Extensive measurement techniques made detailed comparison with numerical models possible.

  16. EQUIVALENT MODEL OF EXPANSION OF CEMENT MORTAR UNDER SULPHATE EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jue Zhu; Minqiang Jiaug; Jiankang Chen

    2008-01-01

    The expansion property of cement mortar under the attack of sulfate ions is studied by experimental and theoretical methods.First,cement mortars are fabricated with the ratio of water to cement of 0.4,0.6,and 0.8.Secondly,the expansion of specimen immerged in sulphate solution is measured at different times.Thirdly,a theoretical model of expansion of cement mortar under sulphate erosion is suggested by virtue of represent volume element method.In this model, the damage evolution due to the interaction between delayed ettringite and cement mortar is taken into account.Finally,the numerical calculation is performed.The numerical and experimental results indicate that the model perfectly describes the expansion of the cement mortar.

  17. Water erosion and soil water infiltration in different stages of corn development and tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. de Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study evaluated soil and water losses, soil water infiltration and infiltration rate models in soil tillage systems and corn (Zea mays, L. development stages under simulated rainfall. The treatments were: cultivation along contour lines, cultivation down the slope and exposed soil. Soil losses and infiltration in each treatment were quantified for rains applied using a portable simulator, at 0, 30, 60 and 75 days after planting. Infiltration rates were estimated using the models of Kostiakov-Lewis, Horton and Philip. Based on the obtained results, the combination of effects between soil tillage system and corn development stages reduces soil and water losses. The contour tillage system promoted improvements in soil physical properties, favoring the reduction of erosion in 59.7% (water loss and 86.6% (soil loss at 75 days after planting, and the increase in the stable infiltration rate in 223.3%, compared with the exposed soil. Associated to soil cover, contour cultivation reduces soil and water losses, and the former is more influenced by management. Horton model is the most adequate to represent soil water infiltration rate under the evaluated conditions.

  18. Modeling Edge Effects of Tillage Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillage erosion has been recognized as an important factor in redistribution of soil over time and in the development of morphological changes within agricultural fields. Field borders, fences, and vegetated strips that interrupt soil fluxes lead to the creation topographic discontinuities or lynche...

  19. Soil erosion and nitrogen leaching in northern Vietnam: expression and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trinh Van Mai,

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:   Soil degradation, remote sensing, watershed, soil erosion model, paddy fields, terraces, water balance model, nitrogen balance model, geostatistics, rice-based systems,

  20. Soil erosion and nitrogen leaching in northern Vietnam: expression and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trinh Van Mai,

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:   Soil degradation, remote sensing, watershed, soil erosion model, paddy fields, terraces, water balance model, nitrogen balance model, geostatistics, rice-based systems, spatia

  1. A proposition of erosion algorithm for terrain models with hardness layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korneliusz K. Warszawski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Processes of erosion occurring in natural environment depend on two major factors. The first is the strength of erosion force, e.g. wind, rainfall or water flow. The second is the terrain hardness or its tolerance to erosion forces. In this article we propose a method of modelling terrain erosion process where the force is uniformly distributed over the entire model with local distribution of varying terrain sensitivity. For the simulations we use two-layered terrain model. The first layer contains information about heights distribution (height-field and simulate topography of the terrain. The second layer stores data defining its hardness (hardness-field that represents different geological structures in the terrain.

  2. Methodology and models in erosion research: discussion and conclusions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shellis, R P; Ganss, C; Ren, Y; Zero, D T; Lussi, A

    2011-01-01

    .... The prospects for clinical trials are also discussed. All models in erosion research require a number of choices regarding experimental conditions, study design and measurement techniques, and these general aspects are discussed first...

  3. The water erosion processes in the retreat erosive of cliff on soft rocks in the province of Cadiz (Spain); Los procesos de erosion hidrica en el retroceso erosivo de acantilados sobre rocas blandas en la provincia de Cadiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendon Aragon, J. J.; Gracia Prieto, F. J.; Rio Rodriguez, L. del

    2009-07-01

    The littoral cliffs on soft materials of the Atlantic Cadiz coast show an important activity of the fresh water erosion processes, sometimes even more significant than the marine erosion processes. The connection of the lower cliffs with sandy beaches favours aeolian sand invasion, which fills previous rills and reduces the water erosion intensity by increasing infiltration. Cliff retreat and rill erosion measurement by using erosion sticks has shown very variables values, most of them higher than the estimated error of the employed methods. This indicates the existence of other factors influencing the distribution of water erosion processes along these cliffs, which have to be studied through different techniques. (Author) 5 refs.

  4. A review of soil erodibility in water and wind erosion research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGYang; LIULianyou; YANPing; CAOTong

    2005-01-01

    Soil erodibility is an important index to evaluate the soil sensitivity to erosion. The research on soil erodibility is a crucial tache in understanding the mechanism of soil erosion. Soil erodibility can be evaluated by measuring soil physiochemical properties, scouring experiment, simulated rainfall experiment, plot experiment and wind tunnel experiment. We can use soil erosion model and nomogram to calculate soil erodibility. Many soil erodibility indices and formulae have been put forward. Soil erodibility is a complex concept, it is influenced by many factors, such as soil properties and human activities. Several obstacles restrict the research of soil erodibility. Firstly, the research on soil erodibility is mainly focused on farmland; Secondly, soil erodibility in different areas cannot be compared sufficiently; and thirdly, the research on soil erodibility in water-wind erosion is very scarce.In the prospective research, we should improve method to measure and calculate soil erodibility.strengthen the research on the mechanism of soil erodibility, and conduct research on soil erodibility by both water and wind agents.

  5. Modelling spatial patterns of erosion in the West Usambara Mountains of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigiak, O.

    2005-01-01

    Prompt location of sources and sinks of sediment within a catchment would allow more effective Soil and Water Conservation (SWC) planning. Distributed erosion models are valuable tools for watershed planning, but the quality of spatially distributed model predictions is seriously hampered by the

  6. Is the BEHI Index (Part of the BANCS Model Good for Prediction of Streambank Erosion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Allmanová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation of waterways and reservoirs, decreasing quality of drinking water and costs necessary for maintenance of these objects directly related to streambank erosion. This study provides a tool for water management that can help with estimation parts of a streambank which are prone to erosion. The Bank erosion hazard index (BEHI part of the BANCS (Bank Assessment for Non‑point source Consequences of Sediment model is one of the several procedures for assessing streambank erosion condition and potential (Rosgen, 2001. On May 15th 2014 a high precipitation occurred in the watershed of Sestrč torrent, in the eastern part of Chočské vrchy (Sp = 27.64 km2. It reached 102.7 mm per 24 hours. The rainfall resulted in extreme streambank erosion. We started the research of annual stream bank erosion on Sestrč in the beginning of May 2014 and we established 19 experimental sections on the stream. Occurrence of heavy rainfall allowed us to erosion rates after flash flood. The aim of this paper was to verify, if BEHI index can really determine the most vulnerable parts of a banks to erosion. We measured erosion rates Eb (m3/m using a bank pins and toe pin (Sass, 2011 on each experimental section and evaluated each section by BEHI index (Rosgen, 2001, 2008. The results were statistically verified and confirmed a strong relationship between BEHI and real damage of banks Eb (m3/m (R: 0.88, R2: 0.78.

  7. Impact erosion model for gravity-dominated planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genda, Hidenori; Fujita, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Suetsugu, Ryo; Abe, Yutaka

    2017-09-01

    Disruptive collisions have been regarded as an important process for planet formation, while non-disruptive, small-scale collisions (hereafter called erosive collisions) have been underestimated or neglected by many studies. However, recent studies have suggested that erosive collisions are also important to the growth of planets, because they are much more frequent than disruptive collisions. Although the thresholds of the specific impact energy for disruptive collisions (QRD*) have been investigated well, there is no reliable model for erosive collisions. In this study, we systematically carried out impact simulations of gravity-dominated planetesimals for a wide range of specific impact energy (QR) from disruptive collisions (QR ∼ QRD*) to erosive ones (QR disruptive collisions (QR ∼ QRD*), the curvature of the target has a significant effect on Mej/Mtot. We also examined the angle-averaged value of Mej/Mtot and found that the numerically obtained relation between angle-averaged Mej/Mtot and QR/QRD* is very similar to the cases for θ = 45° impacts. We proposed a new erosion model based on our numerical simulations for future research on planet formation with collisional erosion.

  8. Beryllium-7 measurements of wind erosion on sloping fields in the wind-water erosion crisscross region on the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaqiong; Yang, Mingyi; Deng, Xinxin; Liu, Zhang; Zhang, Fengbao; Zhou, Weiying

    2017-09-29

    Soil erosion is complex in the wind-water erosion crisscross region of the Chinese Loess Plateau, as interleaving of wind and water erosion occurs on both temporal and spatial scales. It is difficult to distinguish wind erosion from the total erosion in previous studies due to the untraceable of aeolian particles and the limitation of feasible methods and techniques. This study used beryllium-7 measurements to study wind erosion in the wind-water erosion crisscross region on the Chinese Loess Plateau arms to delineate wind erosion distribution, to analyze its implication to erosive winds and surface microrelief, and to determine correlations between erosion rates and slope gradients. Results obtained using beryllium-7 measurements based on observation plots were verified with saltating particle collection method, and were also verified on a field scale. Results indicated that the effective resultant erosion wind was from northward, which was proved by the eight-directional distributed saltating particles. The microrelief of the ground surface contributed to the formation of high or low erosion centers. Wind erosion rates increased with a linear (R(2)≥0.95) or exponential (R(2)≥0.83) fitting increase in the slope gradients as reported in previous studies. Compared to wind erosion on field scale, both the plots and fields exhibited similar distribution patterns in wind erosion isolines. We also determined that the wind erosion rate for two fields estimated, based on equations developed from plot scale was acceptable. This study validates the feasibility of beryllium-7 measurements for soil-wind erosion field experiments and the potential to expand this approach to real field conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Multidirectional Wind Erosion Model for Western Saxony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simon; Meusburger, Katrin; de Figueiredo, Tomás; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion can trigger a non-visible loss of fine soil up to 40 t ha-1 per single event and is as such a major soil threat and environmental concern in areas susceptible to wind erosion. Western Saxony was assessed to be among the most susceptible landscapes not only within Germany but even within Europe (Borelli et al., 2015; Borelli et al., 2014). Moreover, wind erosion events in eastern Germany cause very severe off-site effects with impacts on road traffic. So far the wind erosion model that is normally applied in Germany is based on the norm DIN standard 19706. The DIN standard 19706 was revised by new controlling factors and fuzzy logic to consider the multi-directionality of wind and make it more realistic to wind erosion processes. The new factors are based on different datasets like (i) wind and temperature data (1hr resolution) for 9 gauging stations and interpolated long-term wind speed (1981-2000, 200m resolution) provided by the German Weather Service, (ii) soil erodibility extracted from the digital soil map 1:50,000, (iii) landscape components from different data sources (ATKIS, OpenStreetMap and others), and (iv) a DEM (20m resolution) for local orographic modeling. For a risky sub-region, local wind speeds and directions were modelled based on the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Programs (WAsP) orography-model to assess road bodies for priority actions. Major improvements of the proposed model are the consideration of changing wind directions and the implementation of factors on soil cover and field length. An estimation of the long-term spatiotemporal variability under changing climate is possible with the model conception. The revised model assesses 3.6% of western Saxonies agricultural fields under very high risk to wind erosion. Larger fields (greater than 116 ha) are connected to a higher frequency (51.7%) of very high risk. Only a small proportion (5.2%) of the high risk class was found in small fields (smaller than 21 ha). Fields under

  10. Quantifying and modeling soil erosion and sediment export from construction sites in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, A. K.; Beighley, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    Soil erosion is a power process that continuously alters the Earth's landscape. Human activities, such as construction and agricultural practices, and natural events, such as forest fires and landslides, disturb the landscape and intensify erosion processes leading to sudden increases in runoff sediment concentrations and degraded stream water quality. Understanding soil erosion and sediment transport processes is of great importance to researchers and practicing engineers, who routinely use models to predict soil erosion and sediment movement for varied land use and climate change scenarios. However, existing erosion models are limited in their applicability to constructions sites which have highly variable soil conditions (density, moisture, surface roughness, and best management practices) that change often in both space and time. The goal of this research is to improve the understanding, predictive capabilities and integration of treatment methodologies for controlling soil erosion and sediment export from construction sites. This research combines modeling with field monitoring and laboratory experiments to quantify: (a) spatial and temporal distribution of soil conditions on construction sites, (b) soil erosion due to event rainfall, and (c) potential offsite discharge of sediment with and without treatment practices. Field sites in southern California were selected to monitor the effects of common construction activities (ex., cut/fill, grading, foundations, roads) on soil conditions and sediment discharge. Laboratory experiments were performed in the Soil Erosion Research Laboratory (SERL), part of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at San Diego State University, to quantify the impact of individual factors leading to sediment export. SERL experiments utilize a 3-m by 10-m tilting soil bed with soil depths up to 1 m, slopes ranging from 0 to 50 percent, and rainfall rates up to 150 mm/hr (6 in/hr). Preliminary modeling, field and laboratory

  11. A mechanical erosion model for two-phase mass flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pudasaini, Shiva P

    2016-01-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, process-based, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transport. The model is based on the jump in the momentum flux including changes of material and flow properties along the flow-bed interface and enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012). A two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology is introduced and allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process including momentum and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. By rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions or losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent descript...

  12. Soil water erosion on Mediterranean vineyards. A review based on published data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdocimi, Massimo; Cerdà, Artemi; Tarolli, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    soil and water management techniques to the farmers and implement soil erosion mitigation policies at appropriate spatial scales. Acknowledgements The RECARE project is funded by the European Commission FP7 program, ENV.2013.6.2-4 "Sustainable land care in Europe". References Blavet, D., De Noni, G., Le Bissonnais, Y., Leonard, M., Maillo, L., Laurent, J.Y., Asseline, J., Leprun, J. C., Arshad, M. A., Roose, E.: Effect of land use and management on the early stages of soil water erosion in French Mediterranean vineyards, Soil & Tillage Research, 106, 124-136, 2009. Brenot, J., Quiquerez, A., Petit, C., Garcia, J.-P., Davy, P.: Soil erosion rates in Burgundian vineyards, Bolletino della Società Geologica Italiana, Volume Speciale 6, 169-174, 2006. Casalí, J., Giménez, R., De Santisteban, L., Alvarez-Mozos, J., Mena, J., Del Valle de Lersundi, J.: Determination of long-term erosion rates in vineyards of Navarre (Spain) using botanical benchmarks, Catena, 78, 12-19, doi:10.1016/ j.catena.2009.02.015, 2009. Cerdà, A., Doerr, S. H.: Soil wettability, runoff and erodibility of major dry-Mediterranean land use types on calcareous soils, Hydrological Processes, 21, 2325-2336, doi: 10.1016/j.catena.2008.03.010, 2007. Ferrero, A., Usowicz, B., Lipiec, J.: Effects of tractor traffic on spatial variability of soil strength and water content in grass covered and cultivated sloping vineyard, Soil & Tillage Research, 84, 127-138, 2005. Leh, M., Bajwa, S., Chaubey, I.: Impact of land use change on erosion risk: and integrated remote sensing geographic information system and modeling methodology, Land Degradation & Development, 24, 409- 421, doi 10.1002/ldr.1137, 2013. Leonard, J., Andrieux, P.: Infiltration characteristics of soils in Mediterranean vineyards in southern France, Catena, 32, 209-223, 1998. Martinez-Casasnovas, J. A., Ramos, M. C., Benites, G.: Soil and water assessment tool soil loss simulation at the sub-basin scale in the Alt Penedès-Anoia vineyard region (NE

  13. Quantification and multivariate analysis of water erosion in the Mediterranean region. A case study of the Isser basin. northern Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggane, Houari; Boutoutaou, Djamel

    2016-07-01

    In the Mediterranean region, the specifisity of erosion stems from a particularly contrasted climate, drought, and from summer and autumn severe thunderstorms. The process of erosion generates substantial loss of soil and affects any kind of crop. The adopted approach aims to establish regression models in order to highlight the relationship between solid and liquid flows at four measurement stations in the Isser catchement area, northern Ageria. The Power Model seems to explain this relationship. The quantification and temporal analysis of solid matter transport showed that the rates of erosion are high along the study area. The annual mean solid matter transport for the whole basin is about 2 200 t/km2.year, of which the main part is recorded in autumn during peak flows. The different factors involved in the process of water erosion are determined in advance in order to establish a model between the predictand variable, which is the specific erosion, and other predictors. Besides, a functional relationship has been highlighted between water erosion and the mean slope, the drainage density and the lithology index.

  14. Cavitation erosion of copper and aluminium in water at elevated-temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation erosion tests were carried out in tap water on aluminium and copper samples in a rotating disk cavitations test apparatus, to study the effect of water temperature on cavitation dynamics and cavitation erosion. A shift in the position...

  15. Modelling soil carbon fate under erosion process in vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Scalenghe, Riccardo; Minacapilli, Mario; Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Borgogno Mondino, Enrico; Gristina, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion processes in vineyards beyond water runoff and sediment transport have a strong effect on soil organic carbon loss (SOC) and redistribution along the slope. The variation of SOC across the landscape determines a difference in soil fertility and vine productivity. The aim of this research was to study erosion of a Mediterranean vineyard, develop an approach to estimate the SOC loss, correlate the vines vigor with sediment and carbon erosion. The study was carried out in a Sicilian (Italy) vineyard, planted in 2011. Along the slope, six pedons were studied by digging 6 pits up to 60cm depth. Soil was sampled in each pedon every 10cm and SOC was analyzed. Soil erosion, detachment and deposition areas were measured by pole height method. The vigor of vegetation was expressed in term of NDVI (Normalized difference Vegetation Index) derived from a satellite image (RapidEye) acquired at berry pre-veraison stage (July) and characterized by 5 spectral bands in the shortwave region, including a band in the red wavelength (R, 630-685 nm) and in the near infrared (NIR, 760-850 nm) . Results showed that soil erosion, sediments redistribution and SOC across the hill was strongly affected by topographic features, slope and curvature. The erosion rate was 46Mg ha-1 y-1 during the first 6 years since planting. The SOC redistribution was strongly correlated with the detachment or deposition area as highlighted by pole height measurements. The approach developed to estimate the SOC loss showed that during the whole study period the off-farm SOC amounts to 1.6Mg C ha-1. As highlighted by NDVI results, the plant vigor is strong correlated with SOC content and therefore, developing an accurate NDVI approach could be useful to detect the vineyard areas characterized by low fertility due to erosion process.

  16. Modeling fluvial erosion on regional to continental scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Alan D.; Dietrich, William E.; Seidl, Michele A.

    1994-01-01

    The fluvial system is a major concern in modeling landform evolution in response to tectonic deformation. Three stream bed types (bedrock, coarse-bed alluvial, and fine-bed alluvial) differ in factors controlling their occurrence and evolution and in appropriate modeling approaches. Spatial and temporal transitions among bed types occur in response to changes in sediment characteristics and tectonic deformation. Erosion in bedrock channels depends upon the ability to scour or pluck bed material; this detachment capacity is often a power function of drainage area and gradient. Exposure of bedrock in channel beds, due to rapid downcutting or resistant rock, slows the response of headwater catchments to downstream baselevel changes. Sediment routing through alluvial channels must account for supply from slope erosion, transport rates, abrasion, and sorting. In regional landform modeling, implicit rate laws must be developed for sediment production from erosion of sub-grid-scale slopes and small channels.

  17. RUSLE2015: Modelling soil erosion at continental scale using high resolution input layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Poesen, Jean; Ballabio, Cristiano; Lugato, Emanuele; Montanarella, Luca; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation in the Europe. On the occasion of the 2015 celebration of the International Year of Soils, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) published the RUSLE2015, a modified modelling approach for assessing soil erosion in Europe by using the best available input data layers. The objective of the recent assessment performed with RUSLE2015 was to improve our knowledge and understanding of soil erosion by water across the European Union and to accentuate the differences and similarities between different regions and countries beyond national borders and nationally adapted models. RUSLE2015 has maximized the use of available homogeneous, updated, pan-European datasets (LUCAS topsoil, LUCAS survey, GAEC, Eurostat crops, Eurostat Management Practices, REDES, DEM 25m, CORINE, European Soil Database) and have used the best suited approach at European scale for modelling soil erosion. The collaboration of JRC with many scientists around Europe and numerous prominent European universities and institutes resulted in an improved assessment of individual risk factors (rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, cover-management, topography and support practices) and a final harmonized European soil erosion map at high resolution. The mean soil loss rate in the European Union's erosion-prone lands (agricultural, forests and semi-natural areas) was found to be 2.46 t ha-1 yr-1, resulting in a total soil loss of 970 Mt annually; equal to an area the size of Berlin (assuming a removal of 1 meter). According to the RUSLE2015 model approximately 12.7% of arable lands in the European Union is estimated to suffer from moderate to high erosion(>5 t ha-1 yr-1). This equates to an area of 140,373 km2 which equals to the surface area of Greece (Environmental Science & Policy, 54, 438-447; 2015). Even the mean erosion rate outstrips the mean formation rate (<1.4 tonnes per ha annually). The recent RUSLE2015

  18. Erosion risk assessment in the southern Amazon - Data Preprocessing, data base application and process based modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Herrmann, Marie-Kristin; Herrmann, Anne-Katrin; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    The study region along the BR 16 highway belongs to the "Deforestation Arc" at the southern border of the Amazon rainforest. At the same time, it incorporates a land use gradient as colonization started in the 1975-1990 in Central Mato Grosso in 1990 in northern Mato Grosso and most recently in 2004-2005 in southern Pará. Based on present knowledge soil erosion is one of the key driver of soil degradation. Hence, there is a strong need to implement soil erosion control measures in eroding landscapes. Planning and dimensioning of such measures require reliable and detailed information on the temporal and spatial distribution of soil loss, sediment transport and deposition. Soil erosion models are increasingly used, in order to simulate the physical processes involved and to predict the effects of soil erosion control measures. The process based EROSION 3D simulation model is used for surveying soil erosion and deposition on regional catchments. Although EROSION 3D is a widespread, extensively validated model, the application of the model on regional scale remains challenging due to the enormous data requirements and complex data processing operations. In this context the study includes the compilation, validation and generalisation of existing land use and soil data in order to generate a consistent EROSION 3D input datasets. As a part of this process a GIS-linked data base application allows to transfer the original soil and land use data into model specific parameter files. This combined methodology provides different risk assessment maps for certain demands on regional scale. Besides soil loss and sediment transport, sediment pass over points into surface water bodies and particle enrichment can be simulated using the EROSION 3D model. Thus the estimation of particle bound nutrient and pollutant inputs into surface water bodies becomes possible. The study ended up in a user-friendly, timesaving and improved software package for the simulation of soil loss and

  19. Numerical modelling of erosion and sedimentation around offshore pipelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van F.A.; Wind, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a numerical model is presented for the description of the erosion and sedimentation near pipelines on the sea bottom. The model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations and the equation of motion and continuity of sediment. The results of the simulations have been compared with the res

  20. A Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model for Developing Ecological Site Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, M. A.; Hernandez, M.; Armendariz, G.; Barker, S.; Williams, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting soil erosion is common practice in natural resource management for assessing the effects of management practices and control techniques of soil productivity, sediment delivery and off site water quality. The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) was designed for this purpose. RHEM is an event-based model that estimates runoff, erosion, and sediment delivery rates and volumes at the spatial scale of the hillslope and the temporal scale of as single rainfall event. It represents erosion processes under normal and fire-impacted rangeland conditions. Moreover, it adopts a new splash erosion and thin sheet -flow transport equation developed from rangeland data, and it links the model hydrologic and erosion parameters with rangeland plant community by providing a new system of parameter estimation equations based on 204 plots at 49 rangeland sites distributed across 15 western U.S. states. Testing was done using long-term runoff and erosion data from small semi-aridland catchments. One of our goals with this project is to develop a framework for incorporating key ecohydrologic information/relationships in Ecological Site Descriptions and thereby enhanced utility of Ecological Site Descriptions s for guiding management. These key ecohydrologic relationships govern the ecologic resilience of the various states and community phases on many rangeland ecological sites and are strongly affected by management practices, land use, and disturbances. However, ecohydrologic data and relationships are often missing in Ecological Site Descriptions and resilience-based state-and-transition models. In this study we applied the RHEM model to data from multiple points in several ecological sites in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah to assess the utility of the model for informing these Ecological Site Descriptions.

  1. Integrating Phosphorus Movement with Soil and Water Loss in the Daily Erosion Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklenar, Tim; Perez-Bidegain, Mario; Cruse, Richard; Gelder, Brian; Herzmann, Daryl

    2016-04-01

    The Daily Erosion Project (DEP) is an ongoing modelling effort which is now in its second generation. DEP provides comprehensive and dynamic estimates of sediment delivery, soil erosion, and hill slope runoff for agricultural land areas across the Midwestern United States every day for Hydrologic Unit Code 12 (HUC 12) size watersheds. Results are posted every morning on the Internet at dailyerosion.org. Currently DEP covers all of Iowa and portions of Kansas and Minnesota, but expansion of coverage is ongoing. The integration of highly resolute spatial and temporal climate data, soil properties, crop rotation and residue management data affords the opportunity to test the effects of using multiple conservation practices on the transport and fate of water borne nutrients, especially phosphorus, on the Midwestern United States agricultural landscapes. Understanding the interaction of different environmental and land management practices on phosphorus movement will allow data from the DEP to guide conservation efforts as expansion continues into surrounding Midwestern states. The presentation will provide an overview of the DEP technology, including how input data are derived and used to make daily erosion estimates on over 200,000 flowpaths in the modelling area, as well as a discussion of the ongoing phosphorus transport modelling efforts and plans for future expansion (both land area and model functionality).

  2. Modeling of soil erosion and sediment transport in the East River Basin in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Chen, Ji

    2012-12-15

    Soil erosion is a major global environmental problem that has caused many issues involving land degradation, sedimentation of waterways, ecological degradation, and nonpoint source pollution. Therefore, it is significant to understand the processes of soil erosion and sediment transport along rivers, and this can help identify the erosion prone areas and find potential measures to alleviate the environmental effects. In this study, we investigated soil erosion and identified the most seriously eroded areas in the East River Basin in southern China using a physically-based model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We also introduced a classical sediment transport method (Zhang) into SWAT and compared it with the built-in Bagnold method in simulating sediment transport process along the river. The derived spatial soil erosion map and land use based erosion levels can explicitly illustrate the identification and prioritization of the critical soil erosion areas in this basin. Our results also indicate that erosion is quite sensitive to soil properties and slope. Comparison of Bagnold and Zhang methods shows that the latter can give an overall better performance especially in tracking the peak and low sediment concentrations along the river. We also found that the East River is mainly characterized by sediment deposition in most of the segments and at most times of a year. Overall, the results presented in this paper can provide decision support for watershed managers about where the best management practices (conservation measures) can be implemented effectively and at low cost. The methods we used in this study can also be of interest in sediment modeling for other basins worldwide.

  3. Modeling of soil erosion and sediment transport in the East River Basin in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yping; Chen, Ji

    2012-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major global environmental problem that has caused many issues involving land degradation, sedimentation of waterways, ecological degradation, and nonpoint source pollution. Therefore, it is significant to understand the processes of soil erosion and sediment transport along rivers, and this can help identify the erosion prone areas and find potential measures to alleviate the environmental effects. In this study, we investigated soil erosion and identified the most seriously eroded areas in the East River Basin in southern China using a physically-based model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We also introduced a classical sediment transport method (Zhang) into SWAT and compared it with the built-in Bagnold method in simulating sediment transport process along the river. The derived spatial soil erosion map and land use based erosion levels can explicitly illustrate the identification and prioritization of the critical soil erosion areas in this basin. Our results also indicate that erosion is quite sensitive to soil properties and slope. Comparison of Bagnold and Zhang methods shows that the latter can give an overall better performance especially in tracking the peak and low sediment concentrations along the river. We also found that the East River is mainly characterized by sediment deposition in most of the segments and at most times of a year. Overall, the results presented in this paper can provide decision support for watershed managers about where the best management practices (conservation measures) can be implemented effectively and at low cost. The methods we used in this study can also be of interest in sediment modeling for other basins worldwide.

  4. Control of water erosion and sediment in open cut coal mines in tropical areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, T.; Nugraha, C.; Matsui, K.; Shimada, H.; Ichinose, M.; Gottfried, J. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Earth Resources Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The purpose is to reduce the environmental impacts from open cut mining in tropical areas, such as Indonesia and Vietnam. Research conducted on methods for the control of water erosion and sediment from open cut coal mines is described. Data were collected on climate and weathering in tropical areas, mechanism of water erosion and sedimentation, characteristics of rocks in coal measures under wet conditions, water management at pits and haul roads and ramps, and construction of waste dumps and water management. The results will be applied to the optimum control and management of erosion and sediments in open cut mining. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Soil erosion and sediment connectivity modelling in Burgundy vineyards: case study of Mercurey, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fressard, Mathieu; Cossart, Étienne; Lejot, Jêrome; Michel, Kristell; Perret, Franck; Christol, Aurélien; Mathian, Hélène; Navratil, Oldrich

    2017-04-01

    This research aims at assessing the impact of agricultural landscape structure on soil erosion and sediment connectivity at the catchment scale. The investigations were conducted the vineyards of Mercurey (Burgundy, France), characterized by important issues related to soil loss, flash floods and associated management infrastructures maintenance. The methodology is based on two main steps that include (1) field investigations and (2) modelling. The field investigations consists in DEM acquisition by LiDAR imaging from a drone, soil mapping and human infrastructures impacting runoff classification and mapping (such as crop rows, storm water-basins, drainage network, roads, etc.). These data aims at supplying the models with field observations. The modelling strategy is based on two main steps: First, the modelling of soil sensitivity to erosion, using the spatial application of the RUSLE equation. Secondly, to assess the sediment connectivity in this area, a model based on graph theory developed by Cossart and Fressard (2017) is tested. The results allow defining the influence of different anthropogenic structures on the sediment connectivity and soil erosion at the basin scale. A set of sub-basins influenced by various anthropogenic infrastructures have been identified and show contrasted sensitivities to erosion. The modelling of sediment connectivity show that the runoff pattern is strongly influenced by the vine rows orientation and the drainage network. I has also permitted to identify non collected (by storm water-basins) areas that strongly contribute to the turbid floods sediment supply and to soil loss during high intensity precipitations events.

  6. Predicting coastal cliff erosion using a Bayesian probabilistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, C.; Plant, N.

    2010-01-01

    Regional coastal cliff retreat is difficult to model due to the episodic nature of failures and the along-shore variability of retreat events. There is a growing demand, however, for predictive models that can be used to forecast areas vulnerable to coastal erosion hazards. Increasingly, probabilistic models are being employed that require data sets of high temporal density to define the joint probability density function that relates forcing variables (e.g. wave conditions) and initial conditions (e.g. cliff geometry) to erosion events. In this study we use a multi-parameter Bayesian network to investigate correlations between key variables that control and influence variations in cliff retreat processes. The network uses Bayesian statistical methods to estimate event probabilities using existing observations. Within this framework, we forecast the spatial distribution of cliff retreat along two stretches of cliffed coast in Southern California. The input parameters are the height and slope of the cliff, a descriptor of material strength based on the dominant cliff-forming lithology, and the long-term cliff erosion rate that represents prior behavior. The model is forced using predicted wave impact hours. Results demonstrate that the Bayesian approach is well-suited to the forward modeling of coastal cliff retreat, with the correct outcomes forecast in 70-90% of the modeled transects. The model also performs well in identifying specific locations of high cliff erosion, thus providing a foundation for hazard mapping. This approach can be employed to predict cliff erosion at time-scales ranging from storm events to the impacts of sea-level rise at the century-scale. ?? 2010.

  7. Implications of sediment transport by subglacial water flow for interpreting contemporary glacial erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Venditti, Jeremy G.

    2017-04-01

    The role of glaciers in landscape evolution is central to the interactions between climate and tectonic forces at high latitudes and in mountainous regions. Sediment yields from glacierized basins are used to quantify contemporary erosion rates on seasonal to decadal timescales, often under the assumption that subglacial water flow is the main contributor to these yields. Two recent studies have furthermore used such sediment fluxes to calibrate a glacial erosion rule, where erosion rate scales with ice sliding speed raised to a power greater than one. Subglacial sediment transport by water flow has however seldom been studied, thus the controls on sediment yield from glacierized basins remain enigmatic. To bridge this gap, we develop a 1-D model of morphodynamics in semi-circular bedrock-floored subglacial channels. We adapt a sediment conservation law from the fluvial literature, developed for both mixed bedrock / alluvial and alluvial conditions, to subglacial channels. Channel evolution is a function of the traditional melt-opening due to viscous heat dissipation from the water flow, and creep closure of the overlying ice, to which we add the closure or enlargement due to sediment deposition or removal, respectively. Using a simple ice geometry representing a land-terminating glacier, we find that the shear stresses produced by the water flow on the bed decrease significantly near the terminus. As the ice thins, creep closure decreases and large hydraulic potential gradients cannot be sustained. The resulting gradients in sediment transport lead to a bottleneck, and sediment accumulates if the sediment supply is adequate. A similar bottleneck occurs if a channel is well established and water discharge drops. Whether such constriction happens in space of time, in the presence of a sufficiently large sediment supply sediment accumulates temporarily near the terminus, followed shortly thereafter by enhanced sediment transport. Reduction in the cross-sectional area

  8. Using albedo to reform wind erosion modelling, mapping and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are used to assess the impacts of dust on radiative forcing in the atmosphere, cloud formation, nutrient fertilisation and human health. The models are underpinned by a two-dimensional geometric property (lateral cover; L) used to characterise the three-dimensional aerodynamic roughness (sheltered area or wakes) of the Earth's surface and calibrate the momentum it extracts from the wind. We reveal a fundamental weakness in L and demonstrate that values are an order of magnitude too small and significant aerodynamic interactions between roughness elements and their sheltered areas have been omitted, particularly under sparse surface roughness. We describe a solution which develops published work to establish a relation between sheltered area and the proportion of shadow over a given area; the inverse of direct beam directional hemispherical reflectance (black sky albedo; BSA). We show direct relations between shadow and wind tunnel measurements and thereby provide direct calibrations of key aerodynamic properties. Estimation of the aerodynamic parameters from albedo enables wind erosion assessments over areas, across platforms from the field to airborne and readily available satellite data. Our new approach demonstrated redundancy in existing wind erosion models and thereby reduced model complexity and improved fidelity. We found that the use of albedo enabled an adequate description of aerodynamic sheltering to characterise fluid dynamics and predict sediment transport without the use of a drag partition scheme (Rt) or threshold friction velocity (u∗t). We applied the calibrations to produce global maps of aerodynamic properties which showed very similar spatial patterns to each other and confirmed the redundancy in the traditional parameters of wind erosion modelling. We evaluated temporal patterns of predicted horizontal mass flux at locations across Australia which revealed variation between land cover types that would not

  9. Biological water contamination in some cattle production fields of Argentina subjected to runoff and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celio I. Chagas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Grain production has displaced livestock to marginal lands in most of the productive regions in Argentina since 1990. In the fertile Rolling Pampa region, extensive cattle production has been concentrated in lowlands subjected to flooding, salt excess, erosion and sedimentation processes but also in some feedlots recently located in sloping arable lands prone to soil erosion. We studied the concentration of microbiological contamination indicators in runoff water and sediments accumulated in depressions along the tributary network from these lands devoted to cattle production. The aims of this work were: (i to gather a reliable set of data from different monitoring periods and scales, (ii to search for simple and sensible variables to be used as indicators for surface water quality advising purposes and (iii to corroborate previous biological contamination conceptual models for this region. Concentration of pollution indicators in these ponds was related to mean stocking rates from nearby fields and proved to depend significantly on the accumulated water and sediments. Viable mesophiles and total coliforms were found mainly attached to large sediments rather than in the runoff water phase. Seasonal sampling showed that the time period between the last significant runoff event and each sampling date regarding enterococci proved to be a sensible variable for predicting contamination. Enterococci concentration tended to increase gradually until the next extraordinary runoff event washed away contaminants. The mentioned relationship may be useful for designing early warning surface water contamination programs regarding enterococci dynamics and other related microbial pollutants as well.

  10. Bedrock river erosion measurements and modelling along a river of the Frontal Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lave, Jerome; Dubille, Matthieu

    2017-04-01

    River incision is a key process in mountains denudation and therefore in landscape evolution models. Despite its importance, most incision models for mountain rivers rely on simplified, or quite empirical relations, and generally only consider annual average values for water discharge and sediment flux. In contrast, very few studies consider mechanistic models at the timescale of a flood, and try to bridge the gap between experimental or theoretical approaches and long term river incision studies. In this contribution, we present observations made during 7 monsoon seasons on fluvial bedrock erosion along the Bakeya river across the Frontal Himalaya in Central Nepal. Along its lower gorge, this river incises alternation of indurated sandstone and less resistant claystone, at Holocene rates larger than 10mm/yr. More importantly, its upper drainage mostly drains through non-cohesive conglomerate which allows, in this specific setting, estimating the bedload characteristics and instantaneous fluxes, i.e. a pre-requisite to test mechanistic models of fluvial erosion. During the study period, we monitored and documented the channel bank erosion in order to understand the amplitude of the erosion processes, their occurrence in relation with hydrology, in order to test time-integrated models of erosion. Besides hydrologic monitoring, erosion measurements were threefold: (1) at the scale of the whole monsoon, plucking and block removal by repeated photo surveys of a 400m long channel reach, (2) detailed microtopographic surveys of channel bedrock elevation along a few sandstone bars to document their abrasion, (3) real time measurement of fluvial bedrock wear to document erosion timing using a new erosion sensor. Results indicate that: 1. Erosion is highly dependent on rock resistance, but on average block detachment and removal is a more efficient process than bedrock attrition, and operates at a rate that permit channel banks downcutting to keep pace with Holocene uplift

  11. Physical Model Study: Rill Erosion Morphology and Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, S.; Klik, A.; Nouwakpo, S. K.

    2012-04-01

    Using common catchment size erosion model software either lack of knowledge or lack in process ability of watershed characteristics leads to increasing simplifications in model assumptions. Referring to open channel hydraulics, erosion model equations are prevalently based on stepwise uniform flow condition requirements. Approaching balance of gravitational and frictional resistance forces, channel roughness is fundamental model input. The fusion of simplified model assumptions and the use of lumped roughness determination cause ambivalence in model calibration. By means of a physical model experiment at the National Soil Erosion Laboratory (NSERL), West Lafayette, USA, channel roughness was itemized into skin friction and channel shape friction due to rill morphology. Particularly the Manning-Strickler equation was analyzed concerning the applicability of constant and holistic factors describing boundary friction impacts. The insufficiency in using the Manning-Strickler equation for non-uniform flow conditions is widely advised, whereas lack in predictability in rill erosion development inhibits proper model adoptions. The aim of the present study is to determine the impact of channel morphology on roughness assessment in rill erosion scale. Therefore a 1.9 meter long, 0.6 meter wide and 0.3 meter deep flume with an inclination of 10 % was filled with a loamy soil representing a section of a hill slope. The soil was prepared and saturated by simulated rainfall before each model run. A single erosion channel was enforced to develop by means of steady state runoff. Two different erosion channel types were initiated and observed: I.) a Straight Constrained Rill (SCR) shape by concentration of the runoff into a prepared straight initial rill and II.) a Free Developing Rill (FDR) by back-cut erosion through the plain soil body. Discharge of the outflow was measured in 5 minute interval and outflow sediment concentration was measured every minute. A top view stereo

  12. Vulnerability of soils in the watershed of Wadi El Hammam to water erosion (Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gliz Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Located in the north west of Algeria, the watershed of Wadi El Hammam is threatened by water erosion that has resulted the silting of reservoirs at cascade: Ouizert, Bouhanifia and Fergoug. The objective of this study is to develop a methodology using remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS to map the zones presenting sensibility of water erosion in this watershed. It aims to produce a sensibility map that can be used as a reference document for planners. The methodology presented consists of three factors that control erosion: the slope, the friability material and the land use, which were integrated into a GIS. The derived erosion sensibility map shows three areas of vulnerability to water erosion: low, medium and high. The area of high vulnerability corresponds to sub-basin of Fergoug.

  13. Assessment of soil erosion risk in Komering watershed, South Sumatera, using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsabilla, A.; Kusratmoko, E.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in land use watershed led to environmental degradation. Estimated loss of soil erosion is often difficult due to some factors such as topography, land use, climate and human activities. This study aims to predict soil erosion hazard and sediment yield using the Soil and Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) hydrological model. The SWAT was chosen because it can simulate the model with limited data. The study area is Komering watershed (806,001 Ha) in South Sumatera Province. There are two factors land management intervention: 1) land with agriculture, and 2) land with cultivation. These factors selected in accordance with the regulations of spatial plan area. Application of the SWAT demonstrated that the model can predict surface runoff, soil erosion loss and sediment yield. The erosion risk for each watershed can be classified and predicted its changes based on the scenarios which arranged. In this paper, we also discussed the relationship between the distribution of erosion risk and watershed's characteristics in a spatial perspective.

  14. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  15. The Influence of Typical Forest Types on Soil Erosion Resistance in the Water Source Areas of Central Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangyi; ZHAO; Xu; DUAN; Shumiao; SHU

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify the influence of different forest types on soil erosion resistance in water source area of Central Yunnan,with the soils under three different kinds of typical forest in Yizhe watershed as the research object,this paper uses field simulation method and principal component analysis to analyze the soil erosion resistance of three kinds of soils. The results show that there is a significant difference in the shear strength of soil among three types of typical forest,and the size of soil shear strength is in the order of Pinus yunnanensis forest land >mixed broadleaf-conifer forest land > eucalyptus forest land. The difference in the soil erosion coefficient among different forests is not significant,and the soil erosion resistance is highest in mixed broadleaf-conifer forest land( 39. 0%),followed by eucalyptus woodland( 37. 0%)and Pinus yunnanensis forest land( 24. 0%). Under heavy rain intensity and long duration of rainfall,the ability of soil under eucalyptus ×Pinus yunnanensis mixed forests to resist disintegration is more obvious. Using principal component analysis to analyze soil erosion resistance of soils under three different forests,we get the comprehensive evaluation model for soil erosion resistance: Y = 0. 763Y1+ 0. 236Y2. The soil erosion resistance is in the order of mixed broadleaf-conifer forest land( 0. 150) > eucalyptus forest land( 0. 127) > Pinus yunnanensis forest land(-0. 079),indicating that the mixed forests have better water loss and soil erosion control effect than pure forests.

  16. Changes in forcing factors affecting coastal and shallow water erosion in the future Arctic climate change projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, Mikhail; Razumov, Sergey; Brovkin, Victor; Ilyina, Tatiana; Grigoriev, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Driving factors of seabed and coastal erosion in the Arctic can be classified as thermal and mechanical. Thermal factors such as air and ocean temperatures affect the seabed and coastal ground temperatures. Mechanical factors such as ocean currents and surface gravity waves contribute to the seabed and costal erosion due to shear stress. Due to polar amplification, the Arctic experiences strong increase in air and water temperature, sea-ice loss and changes in the ocean and atmospheric circulation, temperature and wind distribution. These climatic changes lead to changes in factors driving seabed and coastal erosion, which is expected to accelerate in the shallow Arctic regions such as the Laptev sea and East Siberian sea. In these regions, the coastal line to a large extent consists of frozen rocks, sediments and organic soils including ground ice. The increase of erosion rate of the coastal line will increase the release of organic and inorganic matter from thawed permafrost. Dynamics of thermal and mechanical drivers of seabed and coastal erosion in the present and future climate change (RCP8.5 scenario) simulated by the CMIP5 version of the MPI Earth system model and wave model WAM will be presented. Special attention will be given to changes in the air temperature, wind dynamics and development of new waves system in the ``ice-free'' Arctic and its role in the seabed and coastal erosion.

  17. Modelling sheet erosion on steep slopes in the loess region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Qingwei; Shen, Nan; Liu, June

    2017-10-01

    The relationship of sheet erosion rate (SE), slope gradient (S) and rainfall intensity (I), and hydraulic parameters, such as flow velocity (V), shear stress (τ), stream power (Ω) and unit stream power (P), was investigated to derive an accurate experimental model. The experiment was conducted at slopes of 12.23%, 17.63%, 26.8%, 36.4%, 40.4% and 46.63% under I of 48, 60, 90, 120, 138 and 150 mm h-1, respectively, using simulated rainfall. Results showed that sheet erosion rate increased as a power function with rainfall intensity and slope gradient with R2 = 0.95 and Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency (NSE) = 0.87. Sheet erosion rate was more sensitive to rainfall intensity than to slope gradient. It increased as a power function with flow velocity, which was satisfactory for predicting sheet erosion rate with R2 = 0.95 and NSE = 0.81. Shear stress and stream power could be used to predict sheet erosion rate accurately with a linear function equation. Stream power (R2 = 0.97, NSE = 0.97) was a better predictor of sheet erosion rather than shear stress (R2 = 0.90, NSE = 0.89). However, a prediction based on unit stream power was poor. The new equation (i.e. SE = 7.5 ×1012S1.43I3.04 and SE = 0.06 Ω - 0.0003 and SE = 0.011 τ - 0.01) would improve water erosion estimation on loess hillslopes of China.

  18. Numerical simulation of sediment erosion by submerged jets using an Eulerian model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The erosion of loose beds by submerged circular impinging vertical turbulent jets is simulated using an Eulerian two-phase model which implements Euler-Euler coupled governing equations for fluid and solid phases, and a modified k-ε turbulence closure for the fluid phase. Both flow-particle and particle-particle interactions are considered in this model. The predictions of eroded bed profiles agree well with previous laboratory measurements and self-designed experiments. Analysis of the simulated results reveals that the velocity field of the jet water varies with various scouring intensities, that the scour depth and shape are mainly influenced by the driving force of the water when the density, diameter and porosity of the sand are the same, and that the porosity is an important contributor to sediment erosion. In this study, the scour depth, the height of dune and the velocity of the pore water increase with increasing porosity.

  19. Developing relations between soil erodibilty factors in two different soil erosion prediction models (USLE/RUSLE and wWEPP) and fludization bed technique for mechanical soil cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erosion models are valuable analysis tools that scientists and engineers use to examine observed data sets and predict the effects of possible future soil loss. In the area of water erosion, a variety of modeling technologies are available, ranging from solely qualitative models, to merely quan...

  20. Prevalence of dental erosion in adolescent competitive swimmers exposed to gas-chlorinated swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowska-Radlińska, J; Łagocka, R; Kaczmarek, W; Górski, M; Nowicka, A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of dental erosion among competitive swimmers of the local swimming club in Szczecin, Poland, who train in closely monitored gas-chlorinated swimming pool water. The population for this survey consisted of a group of junior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 7 years, a group of senior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 10 years, and a group of recreational swimmers. All subjects underwent a clinical dental examination and responded to a questionnaire regarding aspects of dental erosion. In pool water samples, the concentration of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, sodium, and potassium ions and pH were determined. The degree of hydroxyapatite saturation was also calculated. Dental erosion was found in more than 26 % of the competitive swimmers and 10 % of the recreational swimmers. The lesions in competitive swimmers were on both the labial and palatal surfaces of the anterior teeth, whereas erosions in recreational swimmers developed exclusively on the palatal surfaces. Although the pH of the pool water was neutral, it was undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. The factors that increase the risk of dental erosion include the duration of swimming and the amount of training. An increased risk of erosion may be related to undersaturation of pool water with hydroxyapatite components. To decrease the risk of erosion in competitive swimmers, the degree of dental hydroxyapatite saturation should be a controlled parameter in pool water.

  1. UPLAND EROSION MODELING WITH CASC2D-SED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre JULIEN; Rosalía ROJAS

    2002-01-01

    Developed at Colorado State University, CASC2D-SED is a physically-based model simulating the hydrologic response of a watershed to a distributed rainfall field. The time-dependent processes include:precipitation, interception, infiltration, surface runoff and channel routing, upland erosion, transport and sedimentation. CASC2D-SED is applied to Goodwin Creek, Mississippi. The watershed covers 21 km2and has been extensively monitored both at the outlet and at several internal locations by the ARS-NSL at Oxford, MS. The model has been calibrated and validated using rainfall data from 16 meteorological stations, 6 stream gauging stations and 6 sediment gauging stations. Sediment erosion/deposition rates by size fraction are predicted both in space and time. Geovisualization, a powerful data exploration technique based on GIS technology, is used to analyze and display the dynamic output time series generated by the CASC2D-SED model.

  2. Cytoprotective effects of hydrogen sulfide in novel rat models of non-erosive esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zayachkivska

    Full Text Available Non-erosive esophagitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus and is a form of gastroesophageal reflux disease. There are limited treatment options for non-erosive esophagitis, and it often progresses to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma. Hydrogen sulfide has been demonstrated to be a critical mediator of gastric and intestinal mucosal protection and repair. However, roles for H2S in esophageal mucosal defence, inflammation and responses to injury have not been reported. We therefore examined the effects of endogenous and exogenous H2S in rat models of non-erosive esophagitis. Mild- and moderate-severity non-erosive esophagitis was induced in rats through supplementation of drinking water with fructose, plus or minus exposure to water-immersion stress. The effects of inhibitors of H2S synthesis or of an H2S donor on severity of esophagitis was then examined, along with changes in serum levels of a pro- and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-17 and IL-10, respectively. Exposure to water-immersion stress after consumption of the fructose-supplemented water for 28 days resulted in submucosal esophageal edema and neutrophil infiltration and the development of lesions in the muscular lamina and basal cell hyperplasia. Inhibition of H2S synthesis resulted in significant exacerbation of inflammation and injury. Serum levels of IL-17 were significantly elevated, while serum IL-10 levels were reduced. Treatment with an H2S donor significantly reduced the severity of esophageal injury and inflammation and normalized the serum cytokine levels. The rat models used in this study provide novel tools for studying non-erosive esophagitis with a range of severity. H2S contributes significantly to mucosal defence in the esophagus, and H2S donors may have therapeutic value in treating esophageal inflammation and injury.

  3. Quantitative Model for Estimating Soil Erosion Rates Using 137Cs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGHAO; GHANGQING; 等

    1998-01-01

    A quantitative model was developed to relate the amount of 137Cs loss from the soil profile to the rate of soil erosion,According th mass balance model,the depth distribution pattern of 137Cs in the soil profile ,the radioactive decay of 137Cs,sampling year and the difference of 137Cs fallout amount among years were taken into consideration.By introducing typical depth distribution functions of 137Cs into the model ,detailed equations for the model were got for different soil,The model shows that the rate of soil erosion is mainly controlled by the depth distrbution pattern of 137Cs ,the year of sampling,and the percentage reduction in total 137Cs,The relationship between the rate of soil loss and 137Cs depletion i neither linear nor logarithmic,The depth distribution pattern of 137Cs is a major factor for estimating the rate of soil loss,Soil erosion rate is directly related with the fraction of 137Cs content near the soil surface. The influences of the radioactive decay of 137Cs,sampling year and 137Cs input fraction are not large compared with others.

  4. A laboratory study of water ice erosion by low-energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, Elena A; Field, Thomas A; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Fraser, Wesley C; Hunniford, Adam C; McCullough, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Water ice covers the surface of various objects in the outer Solar system. Within the heliopause, surface ice is constantly bombarded and sputtered by energetic particles from the solar wind and magnetospheres. We report a laboratory investigation of the sputtering yield of water ice when irradiated at 10 K by 4 keV singly (13C+, N+, O+, Ar+) and doubly charged ions (13C2+, N2+, O2+). The experimental values for the sputtering yields are in good agreement with the prediction of a theoretical model. There is no significant difference in the yield for singly and doubly charged ions. Using these yields, we estimate the rate of water ice erosion in the outer Solar system objects due to solar wind sputtering. Temperature-programmed desorption of the ice after irradiation with 13C+ and 13C2+ demonstrated the formation of 13CO and 13CO2, with 13CO being the dominant formed species.

  5. A laboratory study of water ice erosion by low-energy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Elena A.; Lacerda, Pedro; Field, Thomas A.; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Fraser, Wesley C.; Hunniford, Adam C.; McCullough, Robert W.

    2016-11-01

    Water ice covers the surface of various objects in the outer Solar system. Within the heliopause, surface ice is constantly bombarded and sputtered by energetic particles from the solar wind and magnetospheres. We report a laboratory investigation of the sputtering yield of water ice when irradiated at 10 K by 4 keV singly (13C+, N+, O+, Ar+) and doubly charged ions (13C2+, N2+, O2+). The experimental values for the sputtering yields are in good agreement with the prediction of a theoretical model. There is no significant difference in the yield for singly and doubly charged ions. Using these yields, we estimate the rate of water ice erosion in the outer Solar system objects due to solar wind sputtering. Temperature-programmed desorption of the ice after irradiation with 13C+ and 13C2+ demonstrated the formation of 13CO and 13CO2, with 13CO being the dominant formed species.

  6. Assessment of mercury erosion by surface water in Wanshan mercury mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, ZhiHui; Feng, Xinbin; Zhang, Chao; Shang, Lihai; Qiu, Guangle

    2013-08-01

    Soil erosion is a main cause of land degradation, and in its accelerated form is also one of the most serious ecological environmental problems. Moreover, there are few studies on migration of mercury (Hg) induced by soil erosion in seriously Hg-polluted districts. This paper selected Wanshan Hg mining area, SW China as the study area. Revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) and Geographic information system (GIS) methods were applied to calculate soil and Hg erosion and to classify soil erosion intensity. Our results show that the soil erosion rate can reach up to 600,884tkm(-2)yr(-1). Surfaces associated with very slight and extremely severe erosion include 76.6% of the entire land in Wanshan. Furthermore, the cumulative erosion rates in the area impacted by extremely severe erosion make up 90.5% of the total. On an annual basis, Hg surface erosion load was predicted to be 505kgyr(-1) and the corresponding mean migration flux of Hg was estimated to be 3.02kgkm(-2)yr(-1). The erosion loads of Hg resulting from farmland and meadow soil were 175 and 319kgyr(-1) respectively, which were enhanced compared to other landscape types due to the fact that they are generally located in the steep zones associated with significant reclamation. Contributing to establish a mass balance of Hg in Wanshan Hg mining area, this study supplies a dependable scientific basis for controlling soil and water erosion in the local ecosystems. Land use change is the most effective way for reducing Hg erosion load in Wanshan mining area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid Response Tools and Datasets for Post-fire Erosion Modeling: An Online Database to Support Post-fire Erosion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. E.; Russel, A. M.; Billmire, M.; Endsley, K.; Elliot, W. E.; Robichaud, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Renschler, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Once the danger posed by an active wildfire has passed, land managers must rapidly assess risks posed by post-fire runoff and erosion due to fire-induced changes in soil properties and the loss of surface cover. Post-fire assessments and proposals to mitigate risks to downstream areas due to flooding, erosion, and sedimentation are typically undertaken by interdisciplinary Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams. One of the first and most important priorities of a BAER team is the development of a burn severity map that reflects the fire-induced changes in both vegetative cover and soils. Currently these maps are known as BARC (Burned Area Reflectance Classification) maps and they are generated from multi-spectral remote sensing data. BAER teams also have access to many erosion modeling tools and datasets, but process-based, spatially explicit models are currently under-utilized relative to simpler, lumped models because they are more difficult to set up and they require the preparation of spatially-explicit data layers such as digital elevation models (DEM), soils, and land cover. We are working to make spatially-explicit modeling easier by preparing large-scale spatial data sets that can be rapidly combined with burn severity maps and then used to quickly run more accurate, process-based models for spatially explicit predictions of post-fire erosion and runoff. A prototype database consisting of 30-m DEM, soil, land cover, and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) maps for Colorado has been created for use in GeoWEPP (Geo-spatial interface for the Water Erosion Prediction Project) with Disturbed WEPP parameters developed for post-fire conditions. Additional soil data layers have been gathered to support a spatial empirical debris flow model that also utilizes BARC maps. Future plans include developing the dataset to support other models commonly used by BAER teams. The importance of preparing spatial data ahead of time can be illustrated with two

  8. SPATIAL IDENTIFICATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF SOIL EROSION PRONE ZONES USING REMOTE SENSING & GIS INTEGRATED ‘RUSLE’ MODEL AND ‘SATEEC GIS SYSTEM’

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion by water is pronounced critical problem in Himalayan regions due to anthropogenic pressure on its mountainous landscape. Its assessment and mapping of erosion prone areas are very essential for soil conservation and watershed management. The purpose of this study is to investigate the spatial distribution of average annual soil erosion in Ton Watershed (a sub-basin of Asan watershed) using Remote Sensing and GIS integrated ‘RUSLE’ Model and GIS based Hydrological Model of ‘SATEEE...

  9. Effects of land use systems on soil erosion in a sloping Mediterranean watershed in Cyprus: From qualitative assessments to quantitative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Bruggeman, Adriana; Camera, Corrado; Zoumides, Christos

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, water catchment sediment yield as a result of water erosion is difficult to model. Applicability of quantitative, process-based soil erosion models at a catchment scale is often problematic due to large data requirements and difficulty of describing all erosion and sediment transport processes. On the other hand, qualitative models require less data and include almost all evident erosion processes, which make them especially suited for watershed erosion assessments. The objective of this study is to compare water erosion estimates of the quantitative PESERA model with qualitative assessments obtained by WOCAT mapping methodology. The PESERA model simulates soil loss based on land cover, soil, climate and vegetation data, while the WOCAT methodology is based on expert observations per land use systems. This study is conducted in the Peristerona Watershed in Cyprus. The study area is 106.4 km2 and has a mean local slope higher than 40% for the mountainous upstream area and less than 8% for plain. Sixteen different land cover types with varying intensity of agriculture were distinguished during the WOCAT field assessment. WOCAT methodology ranked the land cover "complex cultivation" as the most degraded (degree: evident signs of water erosion, extent: 50% of the area, rate: moderately increasing in time),"agriculture, significant area natural vegetation" as less degraded (degree: evident signs of water erosion, extent: 30% of the area, rate: decreasing slowly in time) and "forests" the least degraded (some signs of water erosion, extent 5% of the area, rate: decreasing slowly in time). The classified WOCAT units will be compared with the erosion estimates obtained by the PESERA model. This study provides a linkage between qualitative soil erosion methods with quantitative models and helps to translate the outcomes of the former into latter.

  10. Present changes in water soil erosion hazard and the response to suspended sediment load in the Czech landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliment, Zdenek; Langhammer, Jakub; Kadlec, Jiří; Vyslouzilová, Barbora

    2014-05-01

    A noticeable change in water soil erosion hazard and an increase of extreme meteorological effects at the same time have marked the Czech landscape in the last twenty years. Formerly cultivated areas have been grassed or forested in mountain and sub mountain regions. Crop management has also been substantially changed. Longer and more frequently dry periods, more intensive local rainfalls and more gentle winter periods we can observe in the present climate development. The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate the importance and spatial relationship between changes in water soil erosion hazard by way of example of model river basins in different areas of the Czech Republic. The field research, remote sensing data, GIS and model approaches (MEFEM- multicriteria erosion factors evaluation model, USLE, RUSLE, WaTEM/SEDEM, AnnAGNPS and SWAT) were used for erosion hazard assessment. The findings were comparing with the balance, regime and trends of suspended load. Research in the model Blšanka River basin, based on our fifteen-year monitoring of suspended load, can be considered as basic (Kliment et al. 2008, Langhammer et al. 2013). KLIMENT, Z., KADLEC, J., LANGHAMMER, J., 2008. Evaluation of suspended load changes using AnnAGNPS and SWAT semi-empirical models. Catena, 73(3): 286-299. LANGHAMMER, J., MATOUŠKOVÁ, M., KLIMENT, Z., 2013. Assessment of spatial and temporal changes of ecological status of streams in Czechia: a geographical approach. Geografie, 118(4): 309-333

  11. Effects of cropping systems on water runoff, soil erosion and nutrient loss in the Moldavian Plateau, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ailincai, C.; Jitareanu, G.; Bucur, D.; Ailincai, D.; Raus, L.; Filipov, F.

    2009-07-01

    The experiments carried out at the Podu-lloaiei Agricultural Research Sation, during 1986-2008, had the following objectives: the study of water runoff and soil losses, by erosion, in different crops; the annual rate of erosion process under the influence of anti-erosion protection of different crops; the influence of water runoff and soil erosion on losses of organic matter and mineral elements from soil. (Author) 7 refs.

  12. Applying a process based erosion model to assess off-site effects of soil erosion from the regional scale to the measure level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Arevalo, Annika; Saathoff, Ulfert; Käpermann, Philipp; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Since soil erosion is one of the most important issues of global soil degradation, great effort was put into the application of erosion models for the assessment and prevention of on-site damages. Beside the primary impact of soil loss in decreasing soil fertility, erosion can cause significant impacts if transported sediments are entering downslope ecosystems, settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes. These off-site damages can be very costly, affect a lot of people and contaminate water-resources. The analysis of these problems is intensified by the requirements of new legislation, such as the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), providing new challenges for planning authorities in order to combat off-site damage. Hence there is strong public and scientific interest in understanding the processes of sediment as well as particle attached nutrient and pollutant transport. Predicting the frequency, magnitude and extent of off-site impacts of water erosion is a necessary precondition for adequate risk assessments and mitigation measures. Process based models are increasingly used for the simulation of soil erosion. Regarding the requirements of the WFD, these models need to deliver comparable estimates from the regional scale to the level of mitigation measures. This study aims on the application of the process based model EROSION 3D for off-site risk assessment on different scales for the German federal state of Saxony using available geo data, data base applications and GIS-routines. Following issues were investigated: - Where are the expected sediment deposition areas? - Which settlements, infrastructures and traffic routes are affected by sediment fluxes? - Which river sections are affected by sediment inputs? - Which river sections are affected by nutrient and heavy metal inputs? The model results identify the Saxon loess belt as highly endangered by off-site damages although hotspots can be found in the northern flatlands and the southern mountain range as

  13. Probabilistic soil erosion modeling using the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMIT) after wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; W. J. Elliot; J. W. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    The decision of whether or not to apply post-fire hillslope erosion mitigation treatments, and if so, where these treatments are most needed, is a multi-step process. Land managers must assess the risk of damaging runoff and sediment delivery events occurring on the unrecovered burned hillslope. We developed the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) to address this need...

  14. Assessing, measuring and modelling erosion in calanchi areas: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Almaru Caraballo-Arias

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Calanchi are erosion landforms characterised by a heavily dissected terrain with steep, unvegetated slopes and channels with a dendritic pattern, which rapidly incise and extend headwards. Recent literature focusing on badland systems highlights their similarity with other larger fluvial landforms, stating that these behave as a full size laboratory, due to their rapid development in space and time and to the diversity of geomorphic processes involved. In this paper, a brief review of the most important results on badland research is firstly presented. Then, the morphometric similarity between calanchi and other erosion landforms is discussed. Finally, models quantitatively relating the volume of sediments eroded from calanchi landforms and a set of geometric features of their tributary areas, by exploiting the dimensional analysis and the self-similarity theory, are presented.

  15. Estimating Sediment Yield on Disturbed Rangeland Using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) is an event-based model that estimates runoff, erosion, and sediment delivery rates and volumes at the spatial scale of the hillslope and the temporal scale of a single rainfall event. It represents erosion processes on normal rangeland, as well as, r...

  16. Main issues for preserving Mediterranean soil resources from water erosion under global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raclot, Damien; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Annabi, Mohamed; Sabir, Mohamed; Smetanova, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Soil resources are important for the socio-economic development of the Mediterranean area, and their durability is sometimes threatened because of intense erosion processes that result in severe degradation in the field (on-site effects) and downstream degradation (off-site effects). Based on the literature and results obtained during several research projects, this paper aims to present the main lessons and challenges dealing with Mediterranean soil resources under global change. After a review of the main drivers of Mediterranean soil erosion and the main impacts of water erosion processes, the paper highlights that the nature and intensity of active erosion processes are as diverse as the mosaic of the Mediterranean landscape. It then discusses the expected evolution of Mediterranean soil resources under global change and illustrates the prevalent influences of land use (partly depending on climatic constraints) on the evolution of erosion risk and soil vulnerability. Finally it details some main challenges for the future of Mediterranean soil resources dealing with a better knowledge of factors and processes involved in soil erosion; a better evaluation of soil vulnerability through a combined quantitative and qualitative soil erosion approach; and the need for a site-specific conservation strategy for Mediterranean soil resources. KEYWORDS : Mediterranean, soil resources, global change, erosion, preservation.

  17. Use of rare earth oxides and iron oxides as soil erosion tracers in water erosion experiments at hillslope scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, G.; Cañasveras, J. C.; Barrón, V.; Boulal, H.; Gómez, H.; Conde, E.; Fernández, M.; Gómez, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of the ideal soil erosion have been defined by several authors, for example by Zhang et al. (2001). Despite intensive research on erosion tracers in the last decades there is not a single tracer fulfilling all these characteristics. That is why research on different soil erosion tracers remains as an active field. Two desirable characteristics in erosion tracers are that they should be relatively inexpensive (to purchase and analyze) and that they should be determined with high accuracy in soil or sediment. The availability of multiple tracers is another of the key requirements. In this communication we present our preliminary results on the use of two different sets of erosion tracers. One set are iron oxides with different magnetic and optical properties (Fe3O4, α-Fe2O3 and FeOOH) analyzed by NIRS and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The other set consists of five rare earth oxides (La2O3, Pr6O11, Nd2O3, Sm2O3 and Gd2O3) analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two groups were studied under controlled and natural conditions, through several water erosion experiments, in field plots with different soil management, crops and scale. In one experiment these tracers were used to determine the source of sediment within sprinkle irrigated fields planted with cotton on shoulders. For this purpose, rainfall simulations were performed under controlled conditions at two scales, one with a portable rainfall simulator at small scale (0.81m2) and with the sprinkler irrigation system in the whole cotton field (2450 m2). Furrows were tagged with both groups of tracers, keeping shoulders untagged (where cotton was planted). Soil samples before and after the rainfall simulations were collected as well as sediment samples. In another experiment four olive orchard plots (330 m2) with different soil managements (cover crop and conventional tillage) were also tagged with the two groups of tracers. Soil samples were taken at

  18. Gully erosion in the Caatinga biome, Brazil: measurement and stochastic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Alencar, Pedro Henrique; de Araújo, José Carlos; Nonato Távora Costa, Raimundo

    2017-04-01

    In contrast with inter-rill erosion, which takes a long time to modify the terrain form, gully erosion can fast and severely change the landscape. In the Brazilian semiarid region, a one-million km2 area that coincides with the Caatinga biome, inter-rill erosion prevails due to the silty shallow soils. However, gully erosion does occur in the Caatinga, with temporal increasing severity. This source of sediment impacts the existing dense network of small dams, generating significant deleterious effects, such as water availability reduction in a drought-prone region. This study focuses on the Madalena basin (124 km2, state of Ceará, Brazil), a land-reform settlement with 20 inhabitants per km2, whose main economic activities are agriculture (especially Zea mays), livestock and fishing. In the catchment area, where there are 12 dams (with storage capacity ranging from 6.104 to 2.107 m3), gully erosion has become an issue due to its increasing occurrence. Eight gully-erosion sites have been identified in the basin, but most of them have not yet reached great dimensions (depth and/or width), nor interacted with groundwater, being therefore classified as ephemeral gullies. We selected the three most relevant sites and measured the topography of the eroded channels, as well as the neighboring terrain relief, using accurate total stations and unmanned aerial vehicle. The data was processed with the help of software, such as DataGeosis (Office 7.5) and Surfer (11.0), providing information on gully erosion in terms of (μ ± σ): projection area (317±165 m2), eroded mass (61±36 Mg) and volume (42±25 m3), length (38±6 m), maximum depth (0.58±0.13 m) and maximum width (6.00±2.35 m). The measured data are then compared with those provided by the Foster and Lane model (1986). The model generated results with considerable scatter. This is possibly due to uncertainties in the field parameters, which are neglected in the deterministic approach of most physically-based models

  19. Using connectivity to assess soil erosion in the landscape; applications of a new paradigm in soil erosion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borselli, Lorenzo; Vigiak, Olga; Ortiz Rodriguez, Azalea Judith

    2013-04-01

    Hydrologic and sedimentological connectivity concepts recently appeared as novel paradigms (Bracken and Croke , 2007) and tools to assess soil erosion at various scales. The landscape flow connectivity index IC (Borselli et al. 2007, 2008) is based on the ratio of hydrological distance to streams with the potential upstream runoff occurrence, hence allows mapping surface runoff connectivity and erosion across the landscape. After its first introduction, several studies applied the IC algorithm in very different geographic regions and territorial scale: 150 km2 watershed in Tuscany (Italy; Borselli et al. 2007, 2008); 20 small catchments (5 to 350 ha) in Murcia (Spain; Sougnez et al. 2011); 400 km2 watershed in Basilicata (South Italy; Borselli et al. 2011); 3300 km2 watershed in Victoria (Australia; Vigiak et al. 2012); 6 and 8 km2watersheds in the Italian Alps (Cavalli et al., in press); 74 ha catchment in Spanish Pre-Pyrenees (López-Vicente et al. 2013). Meanwhile, the IC index has been adapted for application to different erosion processes, i.e. hillslope erosion (Vigiak et al. 2012; López-Vicente et al. 2013), sediment remobilization by shallow landslides (Borselli et al. 2011), and debris flow (Cavalli et al. in press). Validation of IC index applications in spatially distributed erosion models has been conducted with field observations at hillslope scale, calibration against sediment yield estimates at several monitoring stations. These scientific results highlight the promising potential application of IC concept for erosion modelling. In this session, the IC model with all its proposed variants will be described. Future work perspectives, including potential developments of IC approach as an alternative method to classical soil erosion modelling, will be discussed. Acknowledgement: This study has been funded by CONACYT (Mexico); Proyecto CB-2012-01/184060

  20. Seepage weathering impacts on erosivity of arid stream banks: A new conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri

    2016-05-01

    Field observations have indicated the formation of horizontal, pipe shape cavities, along gully and dry stream channel banks in the semi-arid region of the northern Negev Desert, Israel. Piping is a well-known phenomenon in humid regions due to subsurface water flow and seepage weathering. However, in dry environments where rain events are scarce and subsurface water flow is rare, it is proposed here that capillary flow of saline water in the vadose zone leads to similar processes. It is suggested that where saline and shallow ground water persists, capillary flow may result in salt accumulation and precipitation at the top of the capillary fringe, consequently rendering this zone to be more susceptible to erosion. A conceptual model is presented and field observations, laboratory experiments, and a physically-based model are used to prove the feasibility of the proposed conceptual model and to explain why salts accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe, even though evaporation acts all along the vertical stream channel or gully banks. It is suggested that the low evaporative flux, in comparison to the liquid water flux, disables salt accumulation along the profile to the top of the capillary fringe where the liquid water flux is minimal. The presented findings strengthen the conceptual model, but thorough field studies are needed to estimate the impact of the proposed mechanism on erosion processes on a field scale.

  1. The fate of SOC during the processes of water erosion and subsequent deposition: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemelryck, H.; Govers, G.; van Oost, K.; Merckx, R.

    2009-04-01

    Globally soils are the largest terrestrial pool of carbon (C). A relatively small increase or decrease in soil carbon content due to changes in land use or management practices could therefore result in a significant net exchange of C between the soil C reservoir and the atmosphere. As such, the geomorphic processes of water and tillage erosion have been identified to significantly impact on this large pool of soil organic carbon (SOC). Soil erosion, transport and deposition not only result in redistribution of sediments and associated carbon within a landscape, but also affect the exchange of C between the pedosphere and the atmosphere. The direction and magnitude of an erosion-induced change in the global C balance is however a topic of much debate as opposing processes interact: i) At eroding sites a net uptake of C could be the result of reduced respiration rates and continued inputs of newly produced carbon. ii) Colluvial deposition of eroded sediment and SOC leads to the burial of the original topsoil and this may constrain the decomposition of its containing SOC. iii) Eroded sediment could be transported to distal depositional environments or fluvial systems where it will either be conserved or become rapidly mineralized. iv) Increased emission of CO2 due to erosion may result from the disruptive energy of erosive forces causing the breakdown of aggregates and exposing previously protected SOC to microbial decomposition. The above-mentioned processes show a large spatial and temporal variability and assessing their impact requires an integrated modeling approach. However uncertainties about the basic processes that accompany SOC displacement are still large. This study focuses on one of these large information gaps: the fate of eroded and subsequently deposited SOC. A preceding experimental study (Van Hemelryck et al., 2008) was used to identify controlling factors (erosional intensity, changes in soil structure,…). However this experimental research

  2. Modeling Coastal Erosion, Passive Inundation, and Dynamic Wave Inundation under Higher Sea Level in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Hawaii State legislators recently formed the Interagency Committee on Climate Adaptation to investigate community vulnerability to sea level rise. We developed modeling to provide the committee with assessments of exposure to coastal erosion, wave inundation, and passive flooding based on the IPCC RCP 8.5 model of sea level rise over the 21st Century. We model the exposure to coastal erosion using a hybrid equilibrium profile model (Anderson et al., 2015) that combines historical rates of shoreline change with a Bruun-type model of beach profile translation. Results are mapped in a GIS showing the 80th percentile probability of potential erosion at years 2030, 2050, 2075, and 2100. Wave inundation is modeled using XBeach. We use a 3 m significant wave height to represent a seasonal high swell event. A separate simulation was run for each heightened sea level (corresponding to the years previously mentioned); which accounts for changes in wave dynamics due to the change in water level over the reef platform. We use a bare earth topo/bathy LiDAR DEM derived from data collected during the 2013 JBLTX survey of the Hawaiian Islands. XBeach modeling is done along one-dimensional profiles spaced 20 m apart. From this, we develop a gridded product of water depth and velocity for use in a vulnerability analysis. Passive inundation due to sea level rise, the so-called "bath tub" method, provide estimates of storm drain flooding and groundwater inundation. Our analysis of these three impacts of sea level rise, combined - coastal erosion, wave inundation, and passive flooding - are used with other available data in the FEMA Hazus software to estimate exposure and loss of upland assets.

  3. Multi-temporal Soil Erosion Modelling over the Mt Kenya Region with Multi-Sensor Earth Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonakis, Elias; Higginbottom, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Accelerated soil erosion is the principal cause of soil degradation across the world. In Africa, it is seen as a serious problem creating negative impacts on agricultural production, infrastructure and water quality. Regarding the Mt Kenya region, specifically, soil erosion is a serious threat mainly due to unplanned and unsustainable practices linked to tourism, agriculture and rapid population growth. The soil types roughly correspond with different altitudinal zones and are generally very fertile due to their volcanic origin. Some of them have been created by eroding glaciers while others are due to millions of years of fluvial erosion. The soils on the mountain are easily eroded once exposed: when vegetation is removed, the soil quickly erodes down to bedrock by either animals or humans, as tourists erode paths and local people clear large swaths of forested land for agriculture, mostly illegally. It is imperative, therefore, that a soil erosion monitoring system for the Mt Kenya region is in place in order to understand the magnitude of, and be able to respond to, the increasing number of demands on this renewable resource. In this paper, we employ a simple regional-scale soil erosion modelling framework based on the Thornes model and suggest an operational methodology for quantifying and monitoring water runoff and soil erosion using multi-sensor and multi-temporal remote sensing data in a GIS framework. We compare the estimates of this study with general data on the severity of soil erosion over Kenya and with measured rates of soil loss at different locations over the area of study. The results show that the measured and estimated rates of erosion are generally similar and within the same order of magnitude. They also show that, over the last years, erosion rates are increasing in large parts of the region at an alarming rate, and that mitigation measures are needed to reverse the negative effects of uncontrolled socio-economic practices.

  4. A Comparison of Splash Erosion Behavior between Wettable and Water Repellent 'Soil' Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Hamlett, C. A.; Doerr, S.; Bryant, R.; Shirtcliffe, N.; McHale, G.; Newton, M.

    2011-12-01

    Wildfires remove vegetation and litter cover and expose soil surfaces to particle detachment by rain splash. This can serve as an agent of initial soil modification and erosion in the post-fire period. Splash behavior is mainly determined by the kinetic energy delivered by impacting water drops (erosivity), and the detachability (erodibility) of surface particles, affected by their size, aggregate stability and shear strength. Soil detachability may also be affected by water repellency (hydrophobicity). This soil characteristic is influenced by wildfire and may affect splash behavior by reducing capillary forces between particles. Previous work on splash behavior using cumulative drop impact reported larger ejection droplets and lower and shorter trajectories of ejections for water repellent soil compared with wettable soil (Terry and Shakesby 1993). A water film generated by delayed infiltration on water repellent soil was suggested to account for the difference. This study compares the trajectories of ejected wettable and hydrophobic model soil particles from single water drop impacts in order to isolate the effect of soil particle wettability on splash erosion behavior. Acid-washed (wettable) and hydrophobized (water repellent) glass beads used as model soil particles were held in an array within a squat cylinder of 1.5 cm diameter in the centre of a 20 cm diameter disk covered with a viscous adhesive film. A distilled water drop (20μL) was released 40 cm above the centre of the array and the resultant impact was recorded at 976 frames per second using a high speed video camera. The populations of, and distances travelled by, the particles were measured for three arrays of bead sizes within the range (180-400 μm). Three to five replications were made for each test. The trajectory of each ejected particle was traced on video frames and corrected for the actual distance and direction of travel measured from the adhesive film. The initial velocity and ejecting

  5. Regional validity of the parameters of a distributed runoff-erosion model in the semi-arid region of Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SRINIVASAN; Vajapeyam; Srirangachar; PAIVA; Fernanda; Maria; de; Lima

    2009-01-01

    The present paper examines the validity of the application of a distributed rainfall-runoff-erosion model on a regional basis in a semi-arid region of Brazil. The model tested is known as WESP (Water Erosion Simulation Program) developed by Lopes (1987). The model simulates the hydrograph and the sediment graph for individual events and thus, the model when properly calibrated can serve as a predictive tool for runoff and soil erosion on an individual or a continuous basis. The possibility of the existence of regionally applicable values for the parameters of the model WESP would be very interesting from the point of view of predictability of runoff and soil erosion from ungauged basins in the region. For this purpose, data collected in several experimental units in the experimental basin of Sumé as well as in the experimental basin of So Joo de Cariri have been used. The model was calibrated and validated in each of the experimental units (consisting of erosion plots and micro-basins) and the average value from all of the units for each of the parameters was considered to be the regional value. With these average values, all the events in all the experimental units were simulated. The results show that the runoff and erosion values simulated with this single parameter set were very good in all the units, being well within the acceptable deviations.

  6. Regional validity of the parameters of a distributed runoff-erosion model in the semi-arid region of Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SRINIVASAN Vajapeyam Srirangachar; PAIVA Fernanda Maria de Lima

    2009-01-01

    The present paper examines the validity of the application of a distributed rainfall-runoff-erosion model on a regional basis in a semi-arid region of Brazil.The model tested is known as WESP (Water Erosion Simulation Program) developed by Lopes (1987).The model simulates the hydrograph and the sedi-ment graph for individual events and thus, the model when properly calibrated can serve as a predic-tive tool for runoff and soil erosion on an individual or a continuous basis.The possibility of the exis-tence of regionally applicable values for the parameters of the model WESP would be very interesting from the point of view of predictability of runoff and soil erosion from ungauged basins in the region.For this purpose, data collected in several experimental units in the experimental basin of Sume as well as in the experimental basin of Sao Joao de Cariri have been used.The model was calibrated and validated in each of the experimental units (consisting of erosion plots and micro-basins) and the av-erage value from all of the units for each of the parameters was considered to be the regional value.With these average values, all the events in all the experimental units were simulated.The results show that the runoff and erosion values simulated with this single parameter set were very good in all the units, being well within the acceptable deviations.

  7. Erosion Modeling of the Pyroclastic Flow Deposits From the 1991 Eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daag, A. S.; Daag, A. S.

    2001-12-01

    The June 15-16 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo had emplaced approximately 6km3 of sand-size pumiceous pyroclastic flow deposits that affected 8 major watersheds surrounding the volcano. These deposits attained thickness of about 200m on deep channels and remained unconsolidated, when it rains they are the main source of lahars for several years. This study focuses on the eastern watersheds namely, Sacobia-Pasig-Abacan, because it posed the greatest risk due to lahar flow hazards being the highly developed and the most populated. In order to study and monitor the erosions of the pyroclastic flow deposits, several methods were used. Yearly direct quantification of erosions were made using multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), aerial photos and satellite imageries. GIS and image processing software were used to compute erosion volumes and in determining geomorphic changes. To understand the different parameters affecting the erosiveness of in-situ deposits, a portable rainfall simulator was used. Regression modeling was utilized to determine the effect of the different parameters in the erosion such as, slope, rainfall intensity, grain size and shear strength of the deposits. Yearly rainfall events that yielded lahars were all analyzed to get the yearly deviations and relationships of the rainfall-lahar triggering thresholds. A physically based distributed simulation model was developed using PCRaster program that simulates the catchments' response on a certain rainfall and predicts the lahar hydrographs. This model utilizes DEM and other catchment's physical parameters. The flow predicts the volumetric ratio of sediments and water using Meunier mudflow equation.

  8. Mechanisms of Water Droplets Deposition on Turbine Blade Surfaces and Erosion Wear Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ilieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of turbine blades leads to various exploitation problems, efficiency decrease and economical losses, at all. A detailed research on aerodynamic features, in various exploitation conditions and regimes, and on reasons for failures, is a prerequisite to the obviated technical problems and increased reliability of turbine aggregates. Water droplets erosion is known as a very complex and crucial phenomena. It couples the effects of wet steam expansion, together with condensation (evaporation, presence of second phase with the impact of water droplets over blade surfaces, erosion effects and fatigue mechanisms. The present research deals with a logical sequence for numerical simulations and research on erosion mechanisms in a low pressure stage of К-1000-6 /1500 steam turbine, working at a Nuclear Power Plant. Attention is paid to the impact of droplets’ diameter on blade surfaces, their aerodynamic behavior and efficiency of energy conversion through turbine channels. Particular trajectories of water droplets, reasons for occurrence of erosion wear, over certain parts of the streamlined surfaces, are established and discussed. An approach to acquire incidence time to erosion appearance is implemented. Research methodology and obtained results are applicable to determine erosion effects on streamed complex surfaces, to replace expensive measurements campaigns, introduce approaches to decrease wetness in last stages of condensation turbines and prolong the reliability of blades operated in wet steam conditions

  9. Comparison of empirical models to estimate soil erosion and sediment yield in micro catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Eisazadeh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of sediment yield in soil conservation and watershed Project and implementation plan for water and soil resources management is so important. Regarding to somewhere that doesn’t have enough information and statistical data such as upper river branches, Empirical models should be used to estimate erosion and sediment yield. However the efficiency and usage of these models before calibration isn’t clear. In this research, the measurement of erosion and sediment yield of 10 basins upstream of reservoirshas been estimated by RUSLE and MPSIAC empirical models.In order to compare means between measured and estimated datat-test method was applied.Theresults indicated no significant differences between means of measured and estimated sediment yield in MPSAIC model in 5% level. In contrast, T-test showed contrary results in RUSLE model. Then the applicability and priority of two models were examined by statistical methodssuch as MAE and MBE methods. By regarding to accuracy and precision, MPSIAC model placed in first priorityto estimate soil erosion and sediment yield and has minimum value of MAE=0.79 and MBE = -0.59.

  10. Modeling of Erosion on Jelateng Watershed Using USLE Method, Associated with an Illegal Mining Activities (PETI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, I. N.; Aswari, F. V.; Narmaningrum, D. A.; Nugraha, A. S. A.; Asidiqi, M. A. A.; Setiawan, Y.

    2016-11-01

    The Indonesian archipelago has abundant mineral resources, and it causes many mining activities. Mineral resource is natural based resource which cannot be renewable. An abandon mining pit makes a hole in land surface and it increase the erosion severity level on the rainy season. This erosion would brought sediment to the sea, and it causes damage the ecosystem of the coastal. Erosion modeling in Jelateng watershed performed temporally using remote sensing image data, which consist of LANDSAT-5 (1995), and LANDsAt-8 (2015), and supported by field data as well. The parameters for modeling of erosion through rasterization process as input from erosion USLE models to IDRISI software. The results shown that in 1995, the majority of the area has a low level of erosion. The low erosion rate is less than 183.67 tons/hectare/year and high erosion rate is 408.34 up to 633 tons/hectare/year. Compare with in 2015, erosion models shown that erosion is most prevalent on the upstream area of Jelateng watershed, with low erosion rate is less than 432.2 tons/hectare/year and high erosion rate is 615.64 up to 1448.31 tons/hectare/year.

  11. Parameterization of a process-based soil erosion model by means of experimental field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzen, Verena; Seeger, Manuel; Scherer, Ulrike; Casper, Markus; Ries, Johannes B.

    2010-05-01

    The physically-based hydrological and soil erosion model CATFLOW-SED has been developed with data from a loess area in Germany (Maurer, 1997; Scherer, 2008) and covers the principal processes detachment, transport and deposition. The catchment is divided into slopes on the basis of topography as well as soil and land-use maps. The slopes are further divided into slope segments and the flow-routing is abstractly modeled as slope cross sections connected by a drainage network. In many process-based soil erosion models, soil erosion is calculated by an interaction of the forces of flowing water and rainfall. In CATFLOW-SED the detachment process is divided into the pulse current of precipitation and the sheer stress of flowing water. The most important parameter concerning detachment is the erosion resistance parameter fcrit. The described model is parameterized for a small catchment in the Central Spanish Pyrenees with experimental field data from this study area. The mean annual precipitation amount of 1120 mm is rather high but as it is typical of a Mediterranean climate the summer months show a deficit in water balance. Accordingly, a seasonal variation in dominating overland flow generation and soil erosion processes, can be observed particularly for wetland areas that regularly dry out in summer. The spatial and temporal pattern of overland-flow generation and erosion processes and their intensity in the study area is assessed by means of small plot-scale rainfall experiments in the field. The gained data are the amounts of overland flow and eroded material for intervals of five minutes duration. The gained results are used for the parameterization of the soil specific parameter fcrit in CATFLOW-SED. In order to cover the seasonal variation in dominating runoff processes, rainfall simulations that were carried out under dry soil moisture conditions in September as well as measurements that were done under moist conditions in March are used for parameterization

  12. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-05-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these highly productive soils are left bare under the prevailing land management and marly soils are vulnerable to soil water erosion when left bare. In this paper we study the impact of different agricultural land management strategies on soil properties (bulk density, soil organic matter, soil moisture), soil water erosion and runoff, by means of simulated rainfall experiments and soil analyses. Three representative land managements (tillage/herbicide/covered with vegetation) were selected, where 20 paired plots (60 plots) were established to determine soil losses and runoff. The simulated rainfall was carried out at 55mmh(-1) in the summer of 2013 (erosion were significantly higher in herbicide treated plots compared to the others. Runoff sediment concentration was significantly higher in tilled plots. The lowest values were identified in covered plots. Overall, tillage, but especially herbicide treatment, decreased vegetation cover, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and increased bulk density, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion. Soil erosion was extremely high in herbicide plots with 0.91Mgha(-1)h(-1) of soil lost; in the tilled fields erosion rates were lower with 0.51Mgha(-1)h(-1). Covered soil showed an erosion rate of 0.02Mgha(-1)h(-1). These results showed that agricultural management influenced water and sediment dynamics and that tillage and herbicide treatment should be avoided.

  13. Reduction Effect Analysis of Erosion Control Facilities Using Debris Flow Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Kyewon; Kim, Younghwan; Oh, Chaeyeon; Lee, Hojin; Kim, SoungDoug

    2017-04-01

    With the increase in frequency of typhoons and heavy rains following the climate change, the scale of damage from the calamities in the mountainous areas has been growing larger and larger, which is different from the past. For the case of Korea where 64% of land is consisted of the mountainous areas, establishment of the check dams has been drastically increased after 2000 in order to reduce the damages from the debris flow. However, due to the lack of data on scale, location and kind of check dams established for reducing the damages in debris flow, the measures to prevent damages based on experience and subjective basis have to be relied on. This study, the high-precision DEM data was structured by using the terrestrial LiDAR in the Jecheon area where the debris flow damage occurred in July 2009. And, from the numerical models of the debris flow, Kanako-2D that is available to reflect the erosion and deposition action was applied to install the erosion control facilities (water channel, check dam) and analyzed the effect of reducing the debris flow shown in the downstream. After installing the erosion control facilities, most of debris flow moves along the water channel to reduce the area to expand the debris flow, and after installing the check dam, the flow depth and flux of the debris flow were reduced along with the erosion. However, even after constructing the erosion control facilities, damages were still inflicted on private residences or agricultural sites located on the upper regions where the deposition was made. Acknowledgments This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education(NRF-2016R1D1A3B03933362)

  14. Data assimilation (4D-VAR) to forecast flood in shallow-waters with sediment erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Eric; Vincent, Alain

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the four-dimensional variational data assimilation technique (4D-VAR) is presented as a tool to forecast floods. Our study is limited to purely hydrological flows and supposes that the weather, here a big rain, has been already forecasted by meteorological services. The technique consists in minimizing, in the sense of Lagrange, the cost function: a measure of the difference between calculated data and available observations, here the water level. This is done under constraints that are the equations of the physical model. In our case, we modified the shallow-water equations to include a simplified sediment transport model. The steepest descent algorithm is then used to find the minimum. This is made possible because we can compute analytically the gradient of the cost function by using the adjoint equations of the model. As an application of the 4D-VAR technique, the overflowing of the Chicoutimi River at the Chute-Garneau dam, during the 1996 flood, is investigated. It is found that the 4D-VAR method reduces the error in the water height forecast even when the erosion model is not activated. In terms of Lyapunov exponents, we estimate the predictability horizon of such an event to be about half-an-hour after a big rain. However, this limit of predictability can be increased by using more observations or by using a finer computational grid.

  15. Use of the mass exchange theory for describing soil erosion by water and wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendugov, V. M.; Glazunov, G. P.; Larionov, G. A.; Nazarov, N. F.

    2012-02-01

    It was shown that the soil loss equation for different types of erosion should and can be theoretically derived in a general form. An analogy was drawn between the detachment of soil particles by water or air flows, on the one hand, and the heat and mass exchange in the boundary layer on a plate flowed around by a flow, on the other hand, which allowed finding the thermodynamic parameters of the circumfluent flow analogous to the mechanical parameters of a flow eroding the soil. On this basis, the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for equilibrium sublimation was transformed into an equation describing the removal of soil by both water and wind. The validity of the obtained equation for the description of the soil loss rate as a function of the eroding flow parameters was confirmed using the data on the physical simulation of wind erosion in wind tunnels and water erosion in hydraulic flumes. The confirmed adequacy of the derived equation to the phenomena of soil erosion by water and wind provides the theoretical substantiation of the equations previously derived for soil loss by washing [6] and blowing [3] and forms the basis for the further development of the theory of soil erosion.

  16. USLE-Based Assessment of Soil Erosion by Water in the Nyabarongo River Catchment, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamage, Fidele; Zhang, Chi; Kayiranga, Alphonse; Shao, Hua; Fang, Xia; Ndayisaba, Felix; Nahayo, Lamek; Mupenzi, Christophe; Tian, Guangjin

    2016-08-20

    Soil erosion has become a serious problem in recent decades due to unhalted trends of unsustainable land use practices. Assessment of soil erosion is a prominent tool in planning and conservation of soil and water resource ecosystems. The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was applied to Nyabarongo River Catchment that drains about 8413.75 km² (33%) of the total Rwanda coverage and a small part of the Southern Uganda (about 64.50 km²) using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing technologies. The estimated total annual actual soil loss was approximately estimated at 409 million tons with a mean erosion rate of 490 t·ha(-1)·y(-1) (i.e., 32.67 mm·y(-1)). The cropland that occupied 74.85% of the total catchment presented a mean erosion rate of 618 t·ha(-1)·y(-1) (i.e., 41.20 mm·y(-1)) and was responsible for 95.8% of total annual soil loss. Emergency soil erosion control is required with a priority accorded to cropland area of 173,244 ha, which is extremely exposed to actual soil erosion rate of 2222 t·ha(-1)·y(-1) (i.e., 148.13 mm·y(-1)) and contributed to 96.2% of the total extreme soil loss in the catchment. According to this study, terracing cultivation method could reduce the current erosion rate in cropland areas by about 78%. Therefore, the present study suggests the catchment management by constructing check dams, terracing, agroforestry and reforestation of highly exposed areas as suitable measures for erosion and water pollution control within the Nyabarongo River Catchment and in other regions facing the same problems.

  17. Simulation model of erosion and deposition on a barchan dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. D.; Morton, J. B.; Gal-El-hak, M.; Pierce, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Erosion and deposition over a barchan dune near the Salton Sea, California, are modeled by bookkeeping the quantity of sand in saltation following streamlines of transport. Field observations of near surface wind velocity and direction plus supplemental measurements of the velocity distribution over a scale model of the dune are combined as input to Bagnold type sand transport formulas corrected for slope effects. A unidirectional wind is assumed. The resulting patterns of erosion and deposition compare closely with those observed in the field and those predicted by the assumption of equilibrium (downwind translation of the dune without change in size or geometry). Discrepancies between the simulated results and the observed or predicted erosional patterns appear to be largely due to natural fluctuations in the wind direction. The shape of barchan dunes is a function of grain size, velocity, degree of saturation of the oncoming flow, and the variability in the direction of the oncoming wind. The size of the barchans may be controlled by natural atmospheric scales, by the age of the dunes, or by the upwind roughness. The upwind roughness can be controlled by fixed elements or by sand in the saltation. In the latter case, dune scale is determined by grain size and wind velocity.

  18. Modelling Soil Erosion in the Densu River Basin Using RUSLE and GIS Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiagbori, G; Forkuo, E K; Laari, P; Aabeyir, R

    2014-07-01

    Soil erosion involves detachment and transport of soil particles from top soil layers, degrading soil quality and reducing the productivity of affected lands. Soil eroded from the upland catchment causes depletion of fertile agricultural land and the resulting sediment deposited at the river networks creates river morphological change and reservoir sedimentation problems. However, land managers and policy makers are more interested in the spatial distribution of soil erosion risk than in absolute values of soil erosion loss. The aim of this paper is to model the spatial distribution of soil erosion in Densu River Basin of Ghana using RUSLE and GIS tools and to use the model to explore the relationship between erosion susceptibility, slope and land use/land cover (LULC) in the Basin. The rainfall map, digital elevation model, soil type map, and land cover map, were input data in the soil erosion model developed. This model was then categorized into four different erosion risk classes. The developed soil erosion map was then overlaid with the slope and LULC maps of the study area to explore their effects on erosion susceptibility of the soil in the Densu River Basin. The Model, predicted 88% of the basin as low erosion risk and 6% as moderate erosion risk, 3% as high erosion risk and 3% as severe risk. The high and severe erosion areas were distributed mainly within the areas of high slope gradient and also sections of the moderate forest LULC class. Also, the areas within the moderate forest LULC class found to have high erosion risk, had an intersecting high erodibility soil group.

  19. Soil Biogeochemical Properties and Erosion Source Prediction Model Summary for the Buffalo Bayou Watershed, Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, I.

    2015-12-01

    We draw conclusions on the research output and findings from a 4-year multidisciplinary USDA-CBG collaborative program in sustainable integrated monitoring of soil organic carbon (SOC) loss prediction via erosion. The underlying method uses the state-of-the-art stable isotope science of sediment tracing under uncertain hydrologic influences. The research finds are rooted in the (i) application of Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo statistical models to assess the relationship between rainfall-runoff and soil erosion in space and time, (ii) capture of the episodic nature of rainfall events and its role in the spatial distribution of SOC loss from water erosion, (iii) stable isotope composition guided fingerprinting (source and quantity) of eroded soil, and (iv) the creation of an integrated watershed scale statistical soil loss monitoring model driven by spatial and temporal correlation of flow and stable isotope composition. The research theme was successfully applied on the urbanized Buffalo Bayou Watershed in Houston, Texas. The application brought to light novel future research conceptual outlines which will also be discussed in this deliverable to the AGU meeting. These include but not limited to: regional rainfall cluster research, physics of muddy river-bank soil and suspended sediment interaction, and friction & mobility that together make up the plasticity of soil aggregates that control erosion processes and landscape changes in a riparian corridor. References: Ahmed, I., Karim, A., Boutton, T.W., and Strom, K.B. (2013a). "Monitoring Soil Organic Carbon Loss from Erosion Using Stable Isotopes." Proc., Soil Carbon Sequestration, International Conference, May 26-29, Reykjavik, Iceland. Ahmed, I, Bouttom, T.W., Strom, K. B., Karim, A., and Irvin-Smith, N. (2013b). "Soil carbon distribution and loss monitoring in the urbanized Buffalo Bayou watershed, Houston, Texas." Proc., 4th Annual All Investigators Meeting of the North American Carbon Program, February 4

  20. Long-term modeling of soil C erosion and sequestration at the small watershed scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Williams, Jimmy R.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Mcgill, William B.; Owens, Lloyd; Lal, Rattan

    2007-01-01

    The soil C balance is determined by the difference between inputs (e.g. litter, crop residues, decaying roots, organic amendments, depositional C) and outputs (e.g. soil respiration, dissolved organic C leaching and eroded C). Two competing hypotheses suggest erosion may either increase or decrease output. One hypothesis states that C from eroded fields becomes “sequestered” in depressional areas and thus is rendered unavailable for decomposition. An alternative hypothesis argues that due to aggregate breakdown during erosion events, physically-protected C becomes accessible, thereby increasing oxidation of C and emission of CO2. This study applied the EPIC (Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) model to evaluate the role of erosion-deposition processes on the C balance at the small watershed scale. The experimental records of three small watersheds (~1 ha) from the USDA North Appalachian Experimental Watershed facility north of Coshocton, OH were used in the study. Predominant silt loam soils in the area have developed from loess-like deposits over residual bedrock. Soil and crop management in the three watersheds has changed over time. Currently, watershed 118 (W118) is under a corn (Zea mays L.) - soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) no till rotation, W128 is under conventional till continuous corn, and W188 is under no till continuous corn. Predictions of sediment C yields were made through simulation of an entire range of ecosystem processes including plant growth, runoff, and water erosion. A simulated sediment C yield of 39 kg C ha-1 y-1 compared well against an observed value of 31 kg C ha-1 y-1 in W118. EPIC overpredicted the soil C stock in the top 30-cm soil depth in W188 by 21% of the measured value (36.8 Mg C ha-1). Predictions of soil C stocks in the other two watersheds (42.3 Mg C ha-1 in W128 and 50.4 Mg C ha-1 in W188) were off by <1 Mg C ha-1. Although these results do not directly answer any of the two prevailing hypotheses, they do provide

  1. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  2. A non-Markovian model of rill erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C.; Damron, M.

    2009-12-01

    Stochastic processes with reinforcement are inherently non-Markovian and therefore may model geophysical processes with memory, for instance patterns of rill erosion, more realistically than Markovian models. Reinforcement provides a bias to a system that is equivalent to infinite memory, making a system more likely to occupy a given state the more often the state is visited. Some well-studied examples in applied mathematics include variations on the urn of P'olya and reinforced random walks. Many natural phenomena exhibit similar behavior: for instance, an overall pattern of rills is relatively stable once it is established, although small details of the pattern may change frequently and catastrophes that permanently alter it may occasionally occur. To model the phenomenology of rill erosion, we propose a simple discrete time, infinite-memory random process defined on the nodes and edges of an oriented diagonal lattice. Lattice models have often been used to investigate the morphology of natural drainage networks, but our focus is as much on the dynamics of network formation as it is on morphology. The lattice in our model starts out smooth in the sense that it has no edges initially, but it sprouts edges everywhere the instant the process starts, much as rain can start soil erosion everywhere on a hillslope at once. Exactly one edge (rill segment) descends from each node, and it points either left or right. Sediment loads travel along networks of edges and are accumulated at nodes. At every node and at every time step, a simple two parameter reinforcing law randomly determines the direction of the node’s output and then is updated. The degree of reinforcement is set by comparing the node's current sediment load to the load history of the entire network above it and is governed by two system parameters representing respectively rainfall intensity and the soil’s resistance to change. The current pattern of connections among nodes represents the present state of

  3. A GIS-BASED DISTRIBUTED SOIL EROSION MODEL:A CASE STUDY OF TYPICAL WATERSHED, SICHUAN BASIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaijian YUAN; Qiangguo CAI; Yingmin CHU

    2007-01-01

    Based on the measuring data and Digital Elevation Data (DEM) in a typical watershed--Hemingguan Watershed, Nanbu County, Sichuan Province of China, a GIS-based distributed soil erosion model was developed particularly for the purple soil type. It takes 20 m × 20 m grid as calculating unit and operates at 10-minute time interval. The required input data to the model include DEM, soil, land use, and time-series of precipitation and evaporation loss. The model enables one to estimate runoff, erosion and sediment yield for each grid cell and route the flow along its flow path to the watershed outlet. Furthermore, the model is capable of calculating the total runoff; erosion and sediment yield for the entire watershed by recursion algorithm. The validation of the model demonstrated that it could quantitatively simulate the spatial distribution of hydrological variables in a watershed, such as runoff, vegetation entrapment, soil erosion, the degree of soil and water loss. Moreover, it can evaluate the effect of land use change on the runoff generation and soil erosion with an accuracy of 80% and 75% respectively. The application of this model to a neighboring watershed with similar conditions indicates that this distributed model could be extended to other similar regions in China.

  4. The influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffel, Bernd; Širok, Brane; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    A study of the influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness was performed. A cavitation tunnel with a single hydrofoil was used for the experiments. While the cavitation number andthe mean flow velocity remained constant throughout the tests, the gas content of the water was changed in steps from low (approximately 1%) to high (4 %). The gas content of the water was adjusted with a bubble generator. In addition tests at a constant cavitation...

  5. Control of erosion and water pollution during exploitation of the Meirama lignites. Control de la erosion y contaminacion de las aguas en la explotacion de lignitos de Meirama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimeno, E. (Lignitos de Meirama, S.A. (Spain))

    1989-01-01

    The required reclamation of land disturbed by surface coal mining often results in the creation of some slopes and soils that are prone to rapid erosion and sediment production. The are two general methods of preventing or controlling soil erosion from rainfall and water running. These two methods are the building of mechanical structures and covering the soil with live vegetation. This paper discusses the water control methods, the design of the drainage and acid water treatment plant of Lignitos de Meirama. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Experimental measurement of wind and water erosion in Aragón and Andalusia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Iserloh, Thomas; Marzen, Miriam; Ries, Johannes B.; Schmidt, Reinhard-G.

    2010-05-01

    For more than 50 years rainfall simulators and wind tunnels are important tools for soil erosion studies in the field. Laboratory investigations in wind tunnels with the ability of simultaneous rainfall production showed that wind significantly alters drop sizes, drop fall velocities and impact angles of falling raindrops. Leading to higher kinetic energies and increased soil detachment in comparison to falling drops with no wind influence. In most simulators this combined effect of wind and water is either not taken into account or deliberately excluded from the system, because of increasing complexity of processes involved. Within the project Ri 835/3-1, founded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, a portable combined wind an rainfall simulator for in-situ soil erosion studies was developed and used in Spain (Aragón, Andalusia), Morocco (Souss valley), and Germany (Eifel). The main objective of these field experiments was to quantify the susceptibility of different soil surface conditions and soil surface treatments to soil erosion by wind, water, and the combined effect of wind and water. Here, an overview of the results of the experimental measurements in Spain is given. The results show that wind erosion in Aragón is more or less negligible on undisturbed, crusted soil surfaces, but it can reach high amounts of up to 50 g m-² on rolled and grazed fields. Measurements in Andalusia show mean erosion rates of 24 g m-² on crusted soil surfaces. The expected increase of soil detachment, due to the combined force of wind and water in comparison to solely rainfall simulations, is apparent in most of the simulated runs. In total, the results proof that this combined wind and rainfall simulator is a valuable tool for soil erosion studies in the field and that it can be used to investigate various research questions.

  7. Modeling of state of vegetation and soil erosion over large areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A vegetation-erosion model was developed to assess the extent of soil erosion and development trend of vegetation in the context of existing and contemplated vegetation-based soil erosion controls under different climatic, topographical and soil conditions. The model recognizes four vegetation-mediated soil erosion states: (i) an expanding vegetation coverage coupled with reduced erosion (C), (ii) a deteriorating vegetation coverage coupled with increased erosion (A), (iii) two transitional states between A and C, one with increasing erosion and vegetation coverage (B) and the other with decreasing erosion and vegetation coverage (D). With the model, the vegetation-erosion state of any particular area can be quantitatively described, by way of a vegetation-erosion chart, for varying climate, soil and topographic conditions, as demonstrated for the Xishan region, the East River basin, the Wangjiagou and Anjiagou watersheds (Loess Plateau), and the Xiaojiang watersheds (hot and dry valleys in the upper Yangtze River basin) in China. This paper presents the principles and results of area-specific investigations that track the fractions of the areas covered by vegetation and experiencing soil erosion (with soil loss determined in t/km2yr). This is done within the context of local soil erosion control initiatives via re-vegetation efforts, or the lack thereof, over the course of 30 years. The effectiveness of reforestation and erosion-control measures vary under different climatic, topographical and soil conditions. The vegetation may be quickly restored in the hot and wet East River basin but is very difficult on the dry and cold Loess Plateau. In the hot and dry valleys the vegetation can be restored if erosion is controlled and intensive reforestations for small watersheds are performed.

  8. BIOLOGICAL WAYS OF STRUGGLE AGAINST WATER EROSION ON ARABLE SLOPES OF THE CENTRAL RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana ANISIMOVA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In article are proved a choice of ways of struggle against water erosion of arable slopes on the basis of harnessing the potential of bio-based agrocenosis. Efficiency of use long-term lupine in quality green manure and phyto-ameliorant on eroded soddy-podzolic sandy soils of the Vladimir area is shown.

  9. The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model: A dynamic approach for predicting soil loss on rangelands 2354

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we present the improved Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM V2.3), a process-based erosion prediction tool specific for rangeland application. The article provides the mathematical formulation of the model and parameter estimation equations. Model performance is assessed agains...

  10. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabio, C; Meusburger, K; Klik, A

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and...

  11. Numerical modeling of subglacial erosion and sediment transport beneath the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, A.; Bell, T.; Tarasov, L.

    2012-04-01

    Present-day sediment distribution offers a potentially strong constraint on past ice sheet evolution. However, glacial system models (GSMs) cannot address this while lacking physically-based representations of subglacial sediment generation and transport. Incorporation of these elements in GSMs is also required in order to understand the impact of changing sediment cover on glacial cycle dynamics. Towards this goal, we present a subglacial process model that incorporates mechanisms for sediment production, entrainment, transport, and deposition. An abrasion law based on Hallet's model and a quarrying law dependent on basal water pressure and bed roughness are used to calculate bedrock erosion. The incorporation of loose debris in the basal ice is modeled by regelation intrusion and basal freeze-on, depending on the thermal condition and the availability of water at the base. The entrained debris is subsequently transported along the ice sheet's internal velocity field and vertically mixed through a diffusion equation that accounts for folding and thrust faulting. The inclusion of vertical mixing lowers the basal debris concentration and allows more regelation entrainment. Soft bed deformation is included as an advective component within the subglacial sediment, the rheology of which is assumed to be weakly non-linear. Deposition occurs whenever the basal ice is debris-laden and the melting rate exceeds the entrainment rate. The model is coupled to the MUN 3D GSM, which includes a newly developed subglacial hydrology module. The GSM itself has been subject to Bayesian calibration for North American and Eurasian deglaciation and thus a probabilistic ensemble of deglacial chronologies is available. With this calibrated ensemble, we compare the range of calculated sediment thickness fields and cumulative erosion over the last glacial cycle against the present-day pattern of glacigenic sediment and the geological estimates of glacial erosion over North America

  12. Cavitation pitting and erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil and in ordinary tap water are presented. The maximum erosion rate (MDPR, or mean depth of penetration rate) in mineral oil was about four times that in water. The MDPR in mineral oil decreased continuously with time, but the MDPR in water remained approximately constant. The cavitation pits in mineral oil were of smaller diameter and depth than the pits in water. Treating the pits as spherical segments, we computed the radius r of the sphere. The logarithm of h/a, where h is the pit depth and 2a is the top width of the pit, was linear when plotted against the logarithm of 2r/h - 1.

  13. Effect of Cropping System and Contouring or Download Sowing on Soil Water Erosion under no Tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marioti, J.; Padilha, J.; Bertol, I.; Barbosa, F. T.; Ramos, J. C.; Werner, R. S.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Tanaka, M. S.

    2012-04-01

    Water erosion is the main responsible factor of soil and water losses, thus also causing soil degradation, especially on agricultural land, and it is also one factor of degradation outside the place of the origin of erosion. No tillage agriculture has been practiced in the last few decades for the purposes of water erosion control in various regions of Brazil. However, it has been shown that no tillage does not adequately control water erosion unless other complementary conservationist practices such as contour tillage or terracement. Although the erosion problem is widely recognized, there are still difficulties in estimating their magnitude, the environmental impact and the economic consequences, especially when it occurs in a conservation system like no tillage. The aim of this study was to quantify runoff and soil losses by water erosion under five different soil tillage treatments at Santa Catarina State, Southern Brazil. A field study was carried out using a rotating-boom rainfall simulator with 64 mmh-1 rainfall intensity for 90 minutes. Four rainfall tests were applied over the experimental period, one in each of the successive soybean and maize crop stages. Both soil cover by surface crop residue and soil cover by soybean and maize plant canopy were measured immediately before each rainfall test. Soil and water losses were smaller when sowing in contour than when sowing downslope. Contouring has promoted an average reduction of 42% in soil losses and 20% in water losses. Maize crop has promoted an average reduction of 19% in soil losses and 12% in water losses, in relation to the soybean crop. Therefore runoff rates and soil losses were higher in the downslope plots and in the soybean crop. Soil cover by previous crop residue was an important factor for reducing soil losses. Runoff rates were influenced by the soil water content before each rainfall test (R2= 0.78). The highest runoff occurred during the third simulated rainfall test, with the 83% of the

  14. Modeling the Erosion Process in Beaded Streams in a Semi-arid Bajada, Southern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, P.

    2003-12-01

    A channel network in Southern New Mexico falls in one of the three categories: splay, bead, and braid. A splay simply refers to diverging channels. A bead refers to channel reaches in which flow first diverges to form an area of multiple flow paths and then converges to form a single channel. A braid is intermediate between a splay and a bead. Recent studies have demonstrated that beads, which widely exist in the semi-arid environment of Southern New Mexico, serve as sinks to attract more water, nutrients, and sediment than other areas. Thus beads provide a physical base for ecological remediation means to reverse the desertification process. However, the mechanisms for the formation of a bead and geomorphologic factors controlling the properties of a bead are still poorly understood. Given the difficulties of physically tracking and quantitatively estimating the development of a bead in the field, a computer simulation is adopted to model the erosion process that leads to the beaded streams. The modeling is based on a FORTRAN algorithm in which the bajada surface is represented by a matrix of square cells. On each cell, both sediment transport and continuity equations, which are sufficient to describe the erosion process, are applied to determine whether the cell is degraded (erosion), aggraded (deposition), or graded (equilibrium). With a rule of determining the distribution of flow rate from a cell to its downstream neighbors, channels are automatically formed by the erosion processes. The simulation indicates (1) that a bead is formed with the combination of three factors: uneven distribution of flow rate, infiltration, and the degree of distribution, (2) that a bead, once formed, is stable, (3) that the size and shape of a bead are controlled by the discharge-infiltration ratio.

  15. Parameterization of erodibility in the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The magnitude of erosion from a hillslope is governed by the availability of sediment and connectivity of runoff and erosion processes. For undisturbed rangelands, sediment is primarily detached and transported by rainsplash and sheetflow (splash-sheet) processes in isolated bare batches, but sedime...

  16. Recent findings related to measuring and modeling forest road erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Elliot; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2009-01-01

    Sediment is the greatest pollutant of forest streams. In the absence of wildfire, forest road networks are usually the main source of sediment in forest watersheds. An understanding of forest road erosion processes is important to aid in predicting sediment delivery from roads to streams. The flowpath followed by runoff is the key to understanding road erosion...

  17. Development of a statistical model for the determination of the probability of riverbank erosion in a Meditteranean river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Kourgialas, Nektarios; Karatzas, George; Giannakis, Georgios; Lilli, Maria; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    Riverbank erosion affects the river morphology and the local habitat and results in riparian land loss, damage to property and infrastructures, ultimately weakening flood defences. An important issue concerning riverbank erosion is the identification of the areas vulnerable to erosion, as it allows for predicting changes and assists with stream management and restoration. One way to predict the vulnerable to erosion areas is to determine the erosion probability by identifying the underlying relations between riverbank erosion and the geomorphological and/or hydrological variables that prevent or stimulate erosion. A statistical model for evaluating the probability of erosion based on a series of independent local variables and by using logistic regression is developed in this work. The main variables affecting erosion are vegetation index (stability), the presence or absence of meanders, bank material (classification), stream power, bank height, river bank slope, riverbed slope, cross section width and water velocities (Luppi et al. 2009). In statistics, logistic regression is a type of regression analysis used for predicting the outcome of a categorical dependent variable, e.g. binary response, based on one or more predictor variables (continuous or categorical). The probabilities of the possible outcomes are modelled as a function of independent variables using a logistic function. Logistic regression measures the relationship between a categorical dependent variable and, usually, one or several continuous independent variables by converting the dependent variable to probability scores. Then, a logistic regression is formed, which predicts success or failure of a given binary variable (e.g. 1 = "presence of erosion" and 0 = "no erosion") for any value of the independent variables. The regression coefficients are estimated by using maximum likelihood estimation. The erosion occurrence probability can be calculated in conjunction with the model deviance regarding

  18. Early Mars was wet but not warm: Erosion, fluvial features, liquid water habitats, and life below freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, C. P.; Davis, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that Mars had liquid water early in its history and possibly at recurrent interval. It has generally been assumed that this implied that the climate was warmer as a result of a thicker CO2 atmosphere than at the present. However, recent models suggest that Mars may have had a thick atmosphere but may not have experienced mean annual temperatures above freezing. In this paper we report on models of liquid water formation and maintenance under temperatures well below freezing. Our studies are based on work in the north and south polar regions of Earth. Our results suggest that early Mars did have a thick atmosphere but precipitation and hence erosion was rare. Transient liquid water, formed under temperature extremes and maintained under thick ice covers, could account for the observed fluvial features. The main difference between the present climate and the early climate was that the total surface pressure was well above the triple point of water.

  19. A new two-phase erosion-deposition model for mass flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Fischer, Jan-Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transports. The model enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) by introducing a two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology. The adaptive basal morphology allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. With rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions and losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent description of erosion-entrainment-deposition processes. Simulation indicates a sharp erosion-front and steady-state-rear erosion depth. The model appropriately captures the emergence and propagation of complex frontal surge dynamics associated with the frontal ambient-drag which is a new hypothesis associated with erosion. The novel enhanced real two-phase model also allows for simulating fluid-run-off during the deposition process. The model resembles laboratory experiments for particle-fluid mixture flows and reveals some major aspects of the mechanics associated with erosion, entrainment and deposition. Reference: Shiva P. Pudasaini (2012): A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res., 117, F03010, doi: 10.1029/2011JF002186.

  20. Developing a parameterization approach of soil erodibility for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a key factor for estimating soil erosion using physically based models. In this study, a new parameterization approach for estimating erodibility was developed for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). The approach uses empirical equations that were developed by apply...

  1. Developing soil erodibility prediction equations for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a key factor for estimating soil erosion using physically based models. In this study, a new parameterization approach for estimating erodibility was developed for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). The approach uses empirical equations that were developed by apply...

  2. Assessment of soil erosion by RUSLE model using remote sensing and GIS - A case study of Nethravathi Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.P. Ganasri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a serious problem arising from agricultural intensification, land degradation and other anthropogenic activities. Assessment of soil erosion is useful in planning and conservation works in a watershed or basin. Modelling can provide a quantitative and consistent approach to estimate soil erosion and sediment yield under a wide range of conditions. In the present study, the soil loss model, Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE integrated with GIS has been used to estimate soil loss in the Nethravathi Basin located in the southwestern part of India. The Nethravathi Basin is a tropical coastal humid area having a drainage area of 3128 km2 up to the gauging station. The parameters of RUSLE model were estimated using remote sensing data and the erosion probability zones were determined using GIS. The estimated rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, topographic and crop management factors range from 2948.16 to 4711.4 MJ/mm·ha−1hr−1/year, 0.10 to 0.44 t ha−1·MJ−1·mm−1, 0 to 92,774 and 0 to 0.63 respectively. The results indicate that the estimated total annual potential soil loss of about 473,339 t/yr is comparable with the measured sediment of 441,870 t/yr during the water year 2002–2003. The predicted soil erosion rate due to increase in agricultural area is about 14,673.5 t/yr. The probability zone map has been derived by the weighted overlay index method indicate that the major portion of the study area comes under low probability zone and only a small portion comes under high and very high probability zone. The results can certainly aid in implementation of soil management and conservation practices to reduce the soil erosion in the Nethravathi Basin.

  3. Assessment of soil erosion by RUSLE model using remote sensing and GIS-A case study of Nethravathi Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.P. Ganasri; H. Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is a serious problem arising from agricultural intensification, land degradation and other anthropogenic activities. Assessment of soil erosion is useful in planning and conservation works in a watershed or basin. Modelling can provide a quantitative and consistent approach to estimate soil erosion and sediment yield under a wide range of conditions. In the present study, the soil loss model, Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) integrated with GIS has been used to estimate soil loss in the Nethravathi Basin located in the southwestern part of India. The Nethravathi Basin is a tropical coastal humid area having a drainage area of 3128 km2 up to the gauging station. The parameters of RUSLE model were estimated using remote sensing data and the erosion probability zones were deter-mined using GIS. The estimated rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, topographic and crop management factors range from 2948.16 to 4711.4 MJ/mm$ha?1hr?1/year, 0.10 to 0.44 t ha?1$MJ?1$mm?1, 0 to 92,774 and 0 to 0.63 respectively. The results indicate that the estimated total annual potential soil loss of about 473,339 t/yr is comparable with the measured sediment of 441,870 t/yr during the water year 2002 e2003. The predicted soil erosion rate due to increase in agricultural area is about 14,673.5 t/yr. The probability zone map has been derived by the weighted overlay index method indicate that the major portion of the study area comes under low probability zone and only a small portion comes under high and very high probability zone. The results can certainly aid in implementation of soil management and conservation practices to reduce the soil erosion in the Nethravathi Basin.

  4. A Semi-Empirical Airborne Particle Erosion Model for Polyesteric Matrix Fiberglass Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the mathematical modeling of the airborne solid particle erosion rate of composite materials, in particular non-oriented fiberglass reinforced polyesteric matrices. Using the mathematical tool of non-linear regression, based on experimental data available in the state of the art, an algebraic equation has been determined to estimate the relative erosion rate of such composites. The formulation is tailored so that it relates to classical erosion models such as Finnie’s, Bitter’s or Tulsa angle dependent model which can be implemented into commercial computational fluid dynamics software. Although the implementation - per se - is not described herein, the model proposed can be useful in estimating the global effect of solid particle erosion on composite materials in this class. Further theoretical developments may add to the model the capacity to evaluate the erosion rate for a wider class of matrices as well as more types of weavings.

  5. The method of determining surface water erosion influence on agricultural valorization of soils with usage of geoprocessing techniques and spatial information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prus Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to propose methodical solutions concerning synthetic agricultural analysis of production space which consists in combined (synthetic – in spatial and statistical contexts – analysis and evaluation of quality and farming utility of soils in connection with soils erosive risk level. The paper is aimed at presentation of methodology useful in such type of analyses as well as demonstration to what extent the areas of farming production space being subject to restrictive protection are exposed to destructive effect of surface water erosion. Own factor (HDSP.E was suggested, which is a high degree synthesis of soil protection in connection with degrees of surface water erosion risk. The proposed methodology was used for detailed spatial analyses performed for Tomice – the Małopolska rural commune (case study. The area model elaborated for the proposed methodology’s purpose faced with soils mechanical composition allowed to make a model of surface water erosion in five-grade scale. Synthetic evaluation (product of spatial objects on numerous thematic layers of quality and farming utility of soils and also zones of surface water erosion risk allowed to assign spatial distribution of HDSP.E factor (abbreviation of high degree of soil protection combined with erosion. The analyses enabled to determine proportional contribution of the most valuable resources of farming production space that are subject to soil erosion negative phenomenon. Geoprocessing techniques used for the analyses of environmental elements of farming production space were applied in the paper. The analysis of spatial distribution of researched phenomena was elaborated in Quantum GIS programme.

  6. Climate-sensitive feedbacks between hillslope processes and fluvial erosion in sediment-driven incision models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, Daniel S.; Egholm, David L.

    2016-04-01

    the same time the channel bed in the lower parts become shielded from incision by a perpetual sediment cover and incision stalls. These differences cause transients of erosion to migrate through the drainage network. Beer, Alexander R., and J. M. Turowski. "Bedload transport controls bedrock erosion under sediment-starved conditions." Earth Surface Dynamics 3.3 (2015): 291-309. Herman, Frédéric, et al. "Worldwide acceleration of mountain erosion under a cooling climate." Nature 504.7480 (2013): 423-426. Lease, Richard O., and Todd A. Ehlers. "Incision into the Eastern Andean plateau during Pliocene cooling." Science 341.6147 (2013): 774-776. Molnar, Peter. "Late Cenozoic increase in accumulation rates of terrestrial sediment: how might climate change have affected erosion rates?." Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 32 (2004): 67-89. Reusser, Luke J., et al. "Rapid Late Pleistocene incision of Atlantic passive-margin river gorges." Science 305.5683 (2004): 499-502. Sklar, Leonard S., and William E. Dietrich. "Sediment and rock strength controls on river incision into bedrock." Geology 29.12 (2001): 1087-1090. Sklar, Leonard S., and William E. Dietrich. "A mechanistic model for river incision into bedrock by saltating bed load." Water Resources Research 40.6 (2004).

  7. Modeling sunspot and starspot decay by turbulent erosion

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Yuri E

    2015-01-01

    Disintegration of sunspots (and starspots) by fluxtube erosion, originally proposed by Simon and Leighton, is considered. A moving boundary problem is formulated for a nonlinear diffusion equation that describes the sunspot magnetic field profile. Explicit expressions for the sunspot decay rate and lifetime by turbulent erosion are derived analytically and verified numerically. A parabolic decay law for the sunspot area is obtained. For moderate sunspot magnetic field strengths, the predicted decay rate agrees with the results obtained by Petrovay and Moreno-Insertis. The new analytical and numerical solutions significantly improve the quantitative description of sunspot and starspot decay by turbulent erosion.

  8. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Towards modeling hydrology and erosion exclusively with remote sensing data in the central Pamirs, Tajikistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, E.; Gloaguen, R.; Andermann, C.

    2012-12-01

    Data scarcity, bad data quality, distribution and availability of measuring stations in remote mountain areas are a burden and hinder the application of models relying on meteorological input data. In this contribution, we present 1) a utilization of various remote sensing and modeled gridded data to run a distributed, conceptual hydrological model in the Tajik Pamirs, 2) derivation of qualitative and quantitative understanding of erosion in space and time, and 3) the linking of the hydrological discharge components to erosion dynamics and sediment transport. While some remote sensing products, such as digital elevation models, land cover classification, and increasingly precipitation products are widely used and accepted in hydrological modeling, holistic approaches are not the case yet. The key feature of the high elevation study area of the Gunt and Shakhdara catchments in the central Pamirs (average elevation of 4300 m a.s.l.) is the Westerlies-dominated precipitation input during winter and spring (two thirds of the annual precipitation of 320 mm/yr). During that time, temperatures are on average far below zero, and hence snowfall dominates the annual precipitation amount and temporarily offsets the river runoff generation. Thus, to model the snow accumulation and snowmelt, the amount of precipitation and its distribution pattern as well as the temperature, determining accumulation and snowmelt, are considered to be the most important parameters. For precipitation, we use two TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) products and one APHRODITE (Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources) product. As proxy for near ground air temperature we use two MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) LST (Land Surface Temperature) products that were calibrated with in-situ air temperature data. Mathematical optimization of the model delivers NSE (Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiencies) between 0.66 and 0

  10. The effects of mulching on soil erosion by water. A review based on published data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdocimi, Massimo; Jordán, Antonio; Tarolli, Paolo; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    Among the soil conservation practices that have been recently implemented, mulching has been successfully applied in different contexts (Jordán et al., 2011), such as agricultural lands (García-Orenes et al. 2009; Prosdocimi et al., 2016), fire-affected areas (Prats et al., 2014; Robichaud et al., 2013) and anthropic sites (Hayes et al., 2005), to reduce water and soil losses rates. In these contexts, soil erosion by water is a serious problem, especially in semi-arid and semi-humid areas of the world (Cerdà et al., 2009; Cerdan et al., 2010; Sadeghi et al., 2015). Although soil erosion by water consists of physical processes that vary significantly in severity and frequency according to when and where they occur, they are also strongly influenced by anthropic factors such as unsustainable farming practices and land-use changes on large scales (Cerdà, 1994; Montgomery, 2007). Although the beneficial effects of mulching are known, their quantification needs further research, especially in those areas where soil erosion by water represents a severe threat. In literature, there are still some uncertainties about how to maximize the effectiveness of mulching in the reduction of soil and water loss rates. First, the type of choice of the vegetative residues is fundamental and drives the application rate, cost, and consequently, its effectiveness. Second, it is important to assess application rates suitable for site-specific soil and environment conditions. The percentage of area covered by mulch is another important aspect to take into account, because it has proven to influence the reduction of soil loss. And third, the role played by mulching at catchment scale, where it plays a key role as barrier for breaking sediment and runoff connectivity. Given the seriousness of soil erosion by water and the uncertainties that still concern the correct use of mulching, this work aims to evaluate the effects of mulching on soil erosion rates and water losses in agricultural

  11. Modeling spatial and temporal change of soil erosion based on multi-temporal remotely sensed data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Liu; PeiJun Du; RuiMei Han; Chao Ma; YouFeng Zou

    2015-01-01

    In order to monitor the pattern, distribution, and trend of land use/cover change (LUCC) and its impacts on soil erosion, it is highly appropriate to adopt Remote Sensing (RS) data and Geographic Information System (GIS) to analyze, assess, simulate, and predict the spatial and temporal evolution dynamics. In this paper, multi-temporal Landsat TM/ETM+ re-motely sensed data are used to generate land cover maps by image classification, and the Cellular Automata Markov (CA_Markov) model is employed to simulate the evolution and trend of landscape pattern change. Furthermore, the Re-vised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) is used to evaluate the situation of soil erosion in the case study mining area. The trend of soil erosion is analyzed according to total/average amount of soil erosion, and the rainfall (R), cover man-agement (C), and support practice (P) factors in RUSLE relevant to soil erosion are determined. The change trends of soil erosion and the relationship between land cover types and soil erosion amount are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the CA_Markov model is suitable to simulate and predict LUCC trends with good efficiency and accuracy, and RUSLE can calculate the total soil erosion effectively. In the study area, there was minimal erosion grade and this is expected to con-tinue to decline in the next few years, according to our prediction results.

  12. 水蚀对风蚀影响的室内模拟试验%Effects of Water Erosion on Wind Erosion in Wind Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆印; 樊军; 张晓萍

    2012-01-01

    为了揭示黄土高原水蚀风蚀交错区风水复合侵蚀机制,利用室内风洞,在一定的风速(9.3m/s)、坡度(20°)下,人工模拟不同沟宽、沟深、沟密度对风蚀过程的影响。结果表明,在一定的水蚀沟宽度与密度范围内,风蚀量随着宽度与密度的增加而增加,并且两者与风蚀量都呈线性关系;侵蚀沟深度在4~8cm范围内,风蚀量随着沟深度增加而增加,当沟深大于8cm时,随着沟深度增加,风蚀量有所减少;水蚀沟发生风蚀的部位主要在沟壁和沟头,风沙流的磨蚀作用可能是主要作用力,水蚀沟形成会显著影响风蚀量。%Effect of water erosion on wind erosion was studied by wind tunnel under the different width,depth and density of rill under the condition of wind speed(9.3 m/s) and steep slope(20°) in order to reveal the mechanism of aeolian-fluvial interaction in the water-wind erosion crisscross region on the Loess Plateau.The results show that the sediment yields of wind erosion increased with the rill width and density during the certain range,and the sediment yields of wind erosion presented a positive relation with the rill width and density;in the 4~8 cm range,the sediment yields of wind erosion increased with the depth,while decreased when the depth was over 8 cm.Wall and foreside of rill were eroded easily by wind and the abrasive action of sand-driving wind may be the main force.The width,density and depth of rill were the key factors to influence the sediment yields of wind erosion,therefore,wind erosion was affected significantly by water erosion.

  13. Georeferenced measurement of soil EC as a tool to detect susceptible areas to water erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian Sallesses, Leonardo; Aparicio, Virginia Carolina; Costa, Jose Luis

    2017-04-01

    The Southeast region of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, is one of the main region for the cultivation of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in that country. The implementation of complementary irrigation for potato cultivation meant an increase in yield of up to 60%. Therefore, all potato production in the region is under irrigation. In this way, the area under central pivot irrigation has increased to 150% in the last two decades. The water used for irrigation in that region is underground with a high concentration of sodium bicarbonate. The combination of irrigation and rain increases the sodium absorption ratio of soil (SARs), consequently raising the clay dispersion and reducing infiltration. A reduction in infiltration means greater partitioning of precipitation into runoff. The degree of slope of the terrain, added to its length, increases the erosive potential of runoff water. The content of dissolved salts, in combination with the water content, affect the apparent Electrical Conductivity of the soil (EC), which is directly related to the concentration of Na + 2 in the soil solution. In August 2016, severe rill erosion was detected in a productive plot of 300 ha. The predecessor crop was a potato under irrigation campaign. However the history of the lot consists of various winter and summer crops, always made in dry land and no till. Cumulative rainfall from harvest to erosion detection (four months) was 250 mm. A georeferenced EC measurement was performed using the Verys 3100® contact sensor. With the data obtained, a geostatistical analysis was performed using Kriging spatial interpolation. The maps obtained were processed, dividing them into 4 EC ranges. The values and amplitude of the CEa ranges for each lot were determined according to the distribution observed in the generated histograms. It was observed a distribution of elevated EC ranges and consequently of a higher concentration of Na+ 2 coincident with the irrigation areas of the pivots. These

  14. Soil water erosion under different cultivation systems and different fertilization rates and forms over 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildegardis Bertol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The action of rain and surface runoff together are the active agents of water erosion, and further influences are the soil type, terrain, soil cover, soil management, and conservation practices. Soil water erosion is low in the no-tillage management system, being influenced by the amount and form of lime and fertilizer application to the soil, among other factors. The aim was to evaluate the effect of the form of liming, the quantity and management of fertilizer application on the soil and water losses by erosion under natural rainfall. The study was carried out between 2003 and 2013 on a Humic Dystrupept soil, with the following treatments: T1 - cultivation with liming and corrective fertilizer incorporated into the soil in the first year, and with 100 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T2 - surface liming and corrective fertilization distributed over five years, and with 75 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T3 - surface liming and corrective fertilization distributed over three years, and with 50 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T4 - surface liming and corrective fertilization distributed over two years, and with 25 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T5 - fallow soil, without liming or fertilization. In the rotation the crops black oat (Avena strigosa , soybean (Glycine max , common vetch (Vicia sativa , maize (Zea mays , fodder radish (Raphanus sativus , and black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris . The split application of lime and mineral fertilizer to the soil surface in a no-tillage system over three and five years, results in better control of soil losses than when split in two years. The increase in the amount of fertilizer applied to the soil surface under no-tillage cultivation increases phytomass production and reduces soil loss by water erosion. Water losses in treatments under no-tillage cultivation were low in all crop cycles, with a similar behavior as soil losses.

  15. Experimental Investigation and Analytical Modeling of Solid-Particle Erosion Behavior of Stellite Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsoesie, Sydney

    Stellite alloys are a range of cobalt-chromium alloys, also containing tungsten or molybdenum and a small amount (corrosion, wear and erosion environments. In this research a group of Stellite alloys that are commonly employed or potentially materials for erosion resistance application are studied under solid-particle erosion test. Two particle impact velocities (84 m/s and 98 m/s) and two impingement angles (30 degree and 90 degree) are used in the test. It is demonstrated that Stellite alloys are more resistant to erosion at 90 degree impingement angle than at 30 degree impingement angle and the erosion damage of Stellite alloys increases with the particle impact velocity. The erosion resistance of Stellite alloys is controlled mainly by their carbon content, but the tungsten and molybdenum contents also play an important role, because these elements determine the volume fractions of carbides and intermetallics in Stellite alloys. The eroded surfaces are analyzed using SEM to further understand the erosion test results. An erosion model, originally developed by Sheldon and Kanhere (1972), known as S-K model, has been modified for use on Stellite alloys, with the support of experimental data. The significant contribution of this modification is that the effect of particle impingement angle has been included. With this modified S-K model, for a Stellite alloy that has a similar chemical composition to one of the alloys studied in this research, the erosion rate for a set particle impact, velocity at an impingement angle between 30 degree and 90 degree can, be estimated. This modified S-K model can be used for erosion characterization of existing Stellite alloys and in the designing of new Stellite alloys for erosion resistance application.

  16. Modelling soil erosion at European scale: the importance of management practices and the future climate and land use scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Meusburger, Katrin; Poesen, Jean; Lugato, Emanuele; Montanarella, Luca; Alewell, Christine; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2017-04-01

    The implementation of RUSLE2015 for modelling soil loss by water erosion at European scale has introduced important aspects related to management practices. The policy measurements such as reduced tillage, crop residues, cover crops, grass margins, stone walls and contouring have been incorporated in the RUSLE2015 modelling platform. The recent policy interventions introduced in Good Agricultural Environmental Conditions of Common Agricultural Policy have reduced the rate of soil loss in the EU by an average of 9.5% overall, and by 20% for arable lands (NATURE, 526, 195). However, further economic and political action should rebrand the value of soil as part of ecosystem services, increase the income of rural land owners, involve young farmers and organize regional services for licensing land use changes (Land Degradation and Development, 27 (6): 1547-1551). RUSLE2015 is combining the future policy scenarios and land use changes introduced by predictions of LUISA Territorial Modelling Platform. Latest developments in RUSLE2015 allow also incorporating the climate change scenarios and the forthcoming intensification of rainfall in North and Central Europe contrary to mixed trends in Mediterranean basin. The rainfall erosivity predictions estimate a mean increase by 18% in European Union by 2050. Recently, a module of CENTURY model was coupled with the RUSLE2015 for estimating the effect of erosion in current carbon balance in European agricultural lands (Global Change Biology, 22(5), 1976-1984; 2016). Finally, the monthly erosivity datasets (Science of the Total Environment, 579: 1298-1315) introduce a dynamic component in RUSLE2015 and it is a step towards spatio-temporal soil erosion mapping at continental scale. The monthly mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should apply in different seasons of the year. In the future, the soil erosion-modelling platform will

  17. Distributed Modeling of soil erosion and deposition affected by buffer strips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    and dimension of buffer zones in the landscape can be optimized by means of spatially distributed erosion and deposition modeling. During the period from 1998 to 2000 field campaigns were done on a range of agricultural land in Denmark. On 21 slope units and adjacent buffer zones, rill erosion and deposition...

  18. Numerical modelling of the erosion and deposition of sand inside a filter layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; van Gent, Marcel R. A.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    prediction method to assure that the amount of erosion remains within acceptable limits. This work presents a numerical model that is capable of describing the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter of rock on top of sand. The hydraulic loading is that of incident irregular waves...... additional data sets on the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter. A few cases are defined to study the effect of the sinking of the filter into the erosion hole. The numerical model is also applied to several application cases. The response of the core material (sand) to changes......This paper treats the numerical modelling of the behaviour of a sand core covered by rocks and exposed to waves. The associated displacement of the rock is also studied. A design that allows for erosion and deposition of the sand core beneath a rock layer in a coastal structure requires an accurate...

  19. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Skidmore, Andrew K; Hao, Fanghua; Wang, Tiejun

    2010-02-15

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate assessment, from 1977 to 2006, of erosion in the upper watershed of the Yellow River. At same time, the impacts of land use and landscape service features on soil erosion load were assessed. A series of supervised land use classifications of Landsat images characterized variations in land use and landscape patterns over three decades. The SWAT database was constructed with soil properties, climate and elevation data. Using water flow and sand density data as parameters, regional soil erosion load was simulated. A numerical statistical model was used to relate soil erosion to land use and landscape. The results indicated that decadal decrease of grassland areas did not pose a significant threat to soil erosion, while the continual increase of bare land, water area and farmland increased soil erosion. Regional landscape variation also had a strong relationship with erosion. Patch level landscape analyses demonstrated that larger water area led to more soil erosion. The patch correlation indicated that contagious grassland patches reduced soil erosion yield. The increased grassland patches led to more patch edges, in turn increasing the sediment transportation from the patch edges. The findings increase understanding of the temporal variation in soil erosion processes, which is the basis for preventing local pollution.

  20. Knickpoint Generation and Persistence Following Base-Level Fall: An Examination of Erosional Thresholds in Sediment Flux Dependent Erosion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, B. T.; Whipple, K. X.; Gasparini, N. M.; Wobus, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    Non-lithologic knickpoints, or discrete convexities in longitudinal river profiles, are commonly considered to be the mobile, upstream extent of a transient incisional signal. Downstream of the knickpoint, the landscape is responding to a recent change in base level, uplift rate or climatic condition, while upstream of the knickpoint, the landscape retains its relict form, relatively ignorant the transient signal. Though this model of knickpoint mobility and their capacity to communicate incisional signals throughout basins works well with standard formulations of the stream power erosion model, the recent development of sediment flux dependent erosion models contain explicit thresholds that limit the upstream extent of knickpoint-mediated fluvial adjustment. Sediment flux dependent erosion models fail to communicate incisional signals at small drainage areas as sediment and water discharges are insufficient to effectively erode the bed. As well, if knickpoint slopes increase beyond a threshold value, sediment impacts against the bed become too infrequent and too oblique to continue knickpoint propagation by fluvial mechanisms. This threshold in fluvial erosion could lead to the stagnation of incisional signals and the generation of hanging valleys. This theoretical expectation aligns with our observation that in numerous actively incising landscapes around the world, relict low drainage area basins are often found elevated high above and disconnected from the mainstem by extremely over-steepened channel reaches often composed of one or more near-vertical steps. In order to better understand how river networks respond during transient pulses of incision, we employ a numerical landscape evolution model (CHILD) to test the sensitivity of three different sediment flux dependent erosion models to different base-level fall scenarios. This technique allows us to observe the propagation of the signal throughout a fluvial network composed of tributaries of variable

  1. Simwe model application on susceptibility analysis to linear erosion: a case study in Alto Douro wine region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Joana; Bateira, Carlos; Soares, Laura; Faria, Ana; Moura, Rui; Gonçalves, José

    2016-04-01

    The wine production in Alto Douro Wine Region - one of the world's oldest regulated and demarcated wine region - is based on a slope system organized in agricultural terraces once supported exclusively by dry stone walls. It has been undergoing the necessary changes for the introduction of technological innovations partially associated to the mechanization of vineyards work. In this sense, different forms of terrain framing have been implemented, namely the substitution of stone walls by earth embankments. This evolution raises a group of problems related to the hydric soil erosion and landscape preservation, since Alto Douro Wine Region is classified as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2001. The study area is mostly occupied by vineyards planted in the agriculture terraces without continuous vegetation, the flow proceeds superficially influenced by the weak infiltration capacity and hydraulic conductivity. So, because of this conditioning factor the erosive features present non-significant depth, and the length thereof is limited essentially by the slope of the land, where was registered 64 gullies and 78 rills This paper focuses on the evaluation of susceptibility to linear erosion, through the application of SIMWE (SIMulated Water Erosion), (Mitas and Mitasova, 1998), using a digital elevation model, with pixel of one square meter of spatial resolution, created through detail aerial photographs, (side pixel of 50 cm), submitted to automatic stereo-correlation procedures in Agisoft PhotoScan software. The results provided by the model are compared with hydrological characteristics of the soil, (infiltration capacity, and hydraulic conductivity), soil texture, and soil structure parameters (identified by electrical resistivity measurement) where obtained from field monitoring. This approach demonstrates an association between the spatial distribution of erosive features with high values of soil saturation, and reduced water discharge (10-110 cm3/s), that are

  2. Soil Erosion as Affected by Polyacrylamide Application Under Simulated Furrow Irrigation with Saline Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Chao-Yin; LI Fa-Hu; L. S.WU

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of soil and water losses under furrow.irrigation with saline water is important to environnental protection and agricultural production.The objective of this study was to determine the effect of polyacrylamide (pAM) application on soil infiltration and erosion under simulated furrow irrigation with saline water.Polyacrylamide was applied by dissolving it in irrigation water at the rates of 1.5,7.5,and 15.0 mg L-1 or spreading it as a powder on soil surface at the rates of 0.3,15,3.0,and 6.0 g m-2,respectively.The electrolyte concentration of tested irrigation water was 10 and 30 mmolc L-1 and its sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was 0.5,10.0,and 20.0 (mmol(c) L-1)0.5.Distilled water was used as a control for irrigation water quality.Results indicated that the electrolyte concentration and SAR generally did not significantly affect soil and water losses after PAM application.Infiltration rate and total infiltration volume decreased with the increase of PAM application rate.Polyacrylamide application in both methods significantly reduced soil erosion,but PAM application rate did not significantly affect it.The solution PAM application was more effective in controlling soil erosion than the powdered PAM application,but the former exerted a greater adverse influence on soil infiltration than the latter.Under the same total amounts,the powdered PAM application resulted in a 38.2%-139.6% granter infiltration volume but a soil mass loss of 1.3-3.4 times greater than the solution PAM apllication.

  3. Mineralogy, size, morphology and porosity of aggregates and their relationship with soil susceptibility to water erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, M. do A, E-mail: mucfig@hotmail.com; Augustin, C.H.R.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Geografia (Brazil)], E-mail: mucfig@hotmail.com; Fabris, J.D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas (Brazil)], E-mail: fabris@dedalus.lcc.ufmg.br

    1999-11-15

    Soil erosion has been considered as the main process related to losses of soil mass and decrease of productivity in cultivated lands as well as on e of the most important processes in landscape evolution. Attention has been paid to many pedological variables affecting intensity of erosion, but little to the influence of iron compounds on the type, size, shape and porosity of soil aggregates. In the present study, three lithopedodomains which were assumed to be closely related to the dominant lithology of the soil parent material, varying in the degree of water erosion intensity, were selected for further analysis which focused mainly on the influence of iron oxide mineralogy on the soil aggregation. Powder X-ray diffractometry, 80 K Moessbauer data and SEM images are used to correlate all these variables with observed erosion activity in the field. The present data indicate that the more the soil is rich in iron (hematite and/or goethite) or aluminium (gibbsite) (hydr)oxide, the smaller are its aggregates and is porous. Soils derived from metabasic rocks are much more susceptible to collapse under wetting than those from other lithologies. They have the highest iron and clay content. Schist-derived soil is richer in muscovite, has bigger aggregates and porous and are less prone to collapse, while the granite-derived soil presents relatively intermediate resistance, when humid.

  4. Network for measuring runoff and water erosion in small agricultural cathments in Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguas, E. V.; Gómez, J. A.; Boulal, H.; Gómez, H.; Vanwalleghem, T.; Pérez-Alcántara, R.; Peña, A.; Ayuso-Muñoz, J. L.; Giráldez, J. V.; Mateos, L.

    2010-05-01

    Water erosion is one of the major environmental threats to sustainability of agricultural production in Souther Spain. In Mediterranean climates, innapropriate soil management in steep or hilly landscapes causes intensive and extensive on-site and off-site damage. However, limited experimental information is available for fully understand the relationship between soil management practices and erosion at varying scales. This communication describes a network of five experimental catchments equipped with runoff and erosion monitoring devices established in the last five years in agricultural areas of Southern Spain. Three of the catchments are of small size (2 to 6.7 ha) and are covered by olive trees, a fourth one, of 20 ha, is cultivated with irrigated field crops, and the fifth catchment is located in an irrigation district where irrigated annual and tree crops coexist covering an area of 316 ha. Monitoring stations consist of a long-throated flume equipped with a untrasonic sensor to measure water depth, an ISCO water sampler, a rain gauge and a datalogger. This communication will present a preliminary comparison of runoff and sediment generated in the catchments during recent years, and it will discuss some of the main problems encountered in the establishment of the network and the future plans for upgrading the monitoring stations and analysing of results.

  5. Erosion Effects of Liquid Water and Volatiles in a Former Lacustrine Environment - From Gale Crater to Death Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, R. H.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Iacob, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    During its first two years of exploration, Curiosity rover provided strong evidence of water activity at Gale Crater on Mars. While liquid water is not commonly present on the surface of Mars, large depressions such as Gale Crater hold evidence that water was collected in impact craters on Mars in the distant past. Specific features such as alluvial fans, inverted riverbeds, moat areas, and sedimentary formations, demonstrate strong water activity on low elevation regions of Mars. While surface water (gradually) disappeared as the climate and atmosphere of Mars changed, important water deposits formed underground, either as sub-surface ice shelves, or in the form of hydrated minerals, as demonstrated by MER and MSL. Although the presence of water ice under the ancient lake bed at the foothills of Mount Sharp is still to be determined, the area explored so far by Curiosity exhibits erosion features that can help describe the history of water activity along billions of years, e.g., river streams, lacustrine sedimentation, and later cycles of evaporation, frosting and sublimation. This presentation features a comparative study of water erosion processes at Gale Crater on Mars and Death Valley (DV) on Earth, from ancient water flows and lacustrine environments, through evaporation, dryness, and cyclic frosting and sublimation. Groundwater deposits in Death Valley offer best opportunities to study the process of minerals hydration, as well as landforms related to underground water percolation and evaporation, similar to those discovered by Curiosity at Yellowknife Bay. Furthermore, sedimentary processes in lacustrine proximal settings similar to those argued for Mount Sharp, or seen at Gale Crater's floor, have been studied in several locations of DV. These include, but are not limited to, younger dry lake beds of former lakes Manly and Panamint, carved badland formations of Furnace Creek Lake (Zabriskie Point) and older Tertiary lacustrine and fanglomeratic deposits

  6. Characteristics of water erosion and conservation practice in arid regions of Central Asia: Xinjiang Province, China as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentai Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Located in the inland arid area of Central Asia and northwest China, Xinjiang has recently received heightened concerns over soil water erosion, which is highly related with the sustainable utilization of barren soil and limited water resources. Data from the national soil erosion survey of China (1985–2011 and Xinjiang statistical yearbook (2000–2010 was used to analyze the trend, intensity, and serious soil water erosion regions. Results showed that the water erosion area in Xinjiang was 87.6×103 km2 in 2011, mainly distributed in the Ili river valley and the northern and southern Tian Mountain. Soil erosion gradient was generally slight and the average erosion modulus was 2184 t/(km2 a. During the last 26 years, the water erosion area in Xinjiang decreased by 23.2%, whereas the intensity was still increasing. The driving factors from large to small impact included: population boom and human activities>vegetation degradation>rainfall and climate change>topography and soil erodibility>tectonics movement. Soil water erosion resulted in eco-environmental and socioeconomic losses, such as destroying farmland and grassland, triggering floods, sedimentation of reservoirs, damaging transportation and irrigation facilities, and aggravating poverty. A landscape ecological design approach is suggested for integrated control of soil erosion. Currently, an average of 2.07×103 km2 of formerly eroded area is conserved each year. This study highlighted the importance and longevity of soil and water conservation efforts in Xinjiang, and offered some suggestions on ecological restoration and combating desertification in arid regions of Central Asia.

  7. Soil, water and nutrient losses by interrill erosion from green cane cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilka Rocha Vasconcelos da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Interrill erosion occurs by the particle breakdown caused by raindrop impact, by particle transport in surface runoff, by dragging and suspension of particles disaggregated from the soil surface, thus removing organic matter and nutrients that are essential for agricultural production. Crop residues on the soil surface modify the characteristics of the runoff generated by rainfall and the consequent particle breakdown and sediment transport resulting from erosion. The objective of this study was to determine the minimum amount of mulch that must be maintained on the soil surface of a sugarcane plantation to reduce the soil, water and nutrient losses by decreasing interrill erosion. The study was conducted in Pradópolis, São Paulo State, in 0.5 x 1.0 m plots of an Oxisol, testing five treatments in four replications. The application rates were based on the crop residue production of the area of 1.4 kg m-2 (T1- no cane trash; T2-25 % of the cane trash; T3- 50 % trash; T4-75 % trash; T5-100 % sugarcane residues on the surface, and simulated rainfall was applied at an intensity of 65 mm h-1 for 60 min. Runoff samples were collected in plastic containers and soon after taken to the laboratory to quantify the losses of soil, water and nutrients. To minimize soil loss by interrill erosion, 75 % of the cane mulch must be maintained on the soil, to control water loss 50 % must be maintained and 25 % trash controls organic matter and nutrient losses. This information can contribute to optimize the use of this resource for soil conservation on the one hand and the production of clean energy in sugar and alcohol industries on the other.

  8. Modelling streambank erosion potential using maximum entropy in a central Appalachian watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, J.; Strager, M.; Riley, A.; Lin, L.; Anderson, J.

    2015-03-01

    We used maximum entropy to model streambank erosion potential (SEP) in a central Appalachian watershed to help prioritize sites for management. Model development included measuring erosion rates, application of a quantitative approach to locate Target Eroding Areas (TEAs), and creation of maps of boundary conditions. We successfully constructed a probability distribution of TEAs using the program Maxent. All model evaluation procedures indicated that the model was an excellent predictor, and that the major environmental variables controlling these processes were streambank slope, soil characteristics, bank position, and underlying geology. A classification scheme with low, moderate, and high levels of SEP derived from logistic model output was able to differentiate sites with low erosion potential from sites with moderate and high erosion potential. A major application of this type of modelling framework is to address uncertainty in stream restoration planning, ultimately helping to bridge the gap between restoration science and practice.

  9. Modelling erosion development during wave overtopping of an asphalt road covered dike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomers Anouk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave overtopping initiates erosion of dikes, thereby compromising the safety against flooding. Structures integrated in a grass covered dike may decrease the resistance against erosion. In this study, CFD modelling is used to assess the effect of an asphalt road on top of the dike crest on the initiation of erosion due to wave overtopping. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved via a k-ε turbulence model. Two wave overtopping experiments are used for validating the hydrodynamics and the coupled hydrodynamic-erosion model. The amount of scour caused by overtopping waves is predicted by combining the shear stresses from the CFD model with an erosion model including grass erosion. Both the hydrodynamics and scour depths show good agreement with the measurements. Results show that a dike profile with a road on top of the crest is more vulnerable to erosion development than a bare grass covered dike profile. This is caused by a combination of the smoother asphalt section and the damaged berms at the transitions of the asphalt with the grass cover.

  10. Combining fire and erosion modeling to target forest management activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Mary Ellen Miller; Nic Enstice

    2015-01-01

    Forests deliver a number of important ecosystem services including clean water. When forests are disturbed by wildfire, the timing, quantity and quality of runoff are altered. A modeling study was carried out in a forested watershed in California to determine the risk of wildfire, and the potential post-fire sediment delivery from approximately 6-ha hillslope polygons...

  11. Improved similarity criterion for seepage erosion using mesoscopic coupled PFC-CFD model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪小东; 王媛; 陈珂; 赵帅龙

    2015-01-01

    Conventional model tests and centrifuge tests are frequently used to investigate seepage erosion. However, the centrifugal test method may not be efficient according to the results of hydraulic conductivity tests and piping erosion tests. The reason why seepage deformation in model tests may deviate from similarity was first discussed in this work. Then, the similarity criterion for seepage deformation in porous media was improved based on the extended Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer equation. Finally, the coupled particle flow code–computational fluid dynamics (PFC−CFD) model at the mesoscopic level was proposed to verify the derived similarity criterion. The proposed model maximizes its potential to simulate seepage erosion via the discrete element method and satisfy the similarity criterion by adjusting particle size. The numerical simulations achieved identical results with the prototype, thus indicating that the PFC−CFD model that satisfies the improved similarity criterion can accurately reproduce the processes of seepage erosion at the mesoscopic level.

  12. ESTIMATION OF THE WANDA GLACIER (SOUTH SHETLANDS SEDIMENT EROSION RATE USING NUMERICAL MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Kellem Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Glacial sediment yield results from glacial erosion and is influenced by several factors including glacial retreat rate, ice flow velocity and thermal regime. This paper estimates the contemporary subglacial erosion rate and sediment yield of Wanda Glacier (King George Island, South Shetlands. This work also examines basal sediment evacuation mechanisms by runoff and glacial erosion processes during the subglacial transport. This is small temperate glacier that has seen retreating for the last decades. In this work, we examine basal sediment evacuation mechanisms by runoff and analyze glacial erosion processes occurring during subglacial transport. The glacial erosion rate at Wanda Glacier, estimated using a numerical model that consider sediment evacuated to outlet streams, ice flow velocity, ice thickness and glacier area, is 1.1 ton m yr-1.

  13. Agricultural watershed modeling: a review for hydrology and soil erosion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rogério de Mello

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Models have been used by man for thousands of years to control his environment in a favorable way to better human living conditions. The use of hydrologic models has been a widely effective tool in order to support decision makers dealing with watersheds related to several economic and social activities, like public water supply, energy generation, and water availability for agriculture, among others. The purpose of this review is to briefly discuss some models on soil and water movement on landscapes (RUSLE, WEPP, GeoWEPP, LASH, DHSVM and AnnAGNPS to provide information about them to help and serve in a proper manner in order to discuss particular problems related to hydrology and soil erosion processes. Models have been changed and evaluated significantly in recent years, highlighting the use of remote sense, GIS and automatic calibration process, allowing them capable of simulating watersheds under a given land-use and climate change effects. However, hydrology models have almost the same physical structure, which is not enough for simulating problems related to the long-term effects of different land-uses. That has been our challenge for next future: to understand entirely the hydrology cycle, having as reference the critical zone, in which the hydrological processes act together from canopy to the bottom of aquifers.

  14. Assessment of erosion hazard after recurrence fires with the RUSLE 3D MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecín-Arias, Daniel; Palencia, Covadonga; Fernández Raga, María

    2016-04-01

    the use of inaccurate metadata, since in many cases the downloaded data include scale errors. It was noted that the factors vegetal ground cover and land use were the ones which introduce more error in the model. The low resolution of metadata produces sometimes that into a value zones very heterogeneous were included. Therefore, for this analysis, it has done a very specific and detailed manual labour, qualifying factors of vegetal ground cover and land uses. Also, the slope factor LS has been conducted in great detail. With all of these, the error has been minimized to look for pre- and post-fire differences. At the oral exposition, the process and difficulties of realization of both maps will be explained and how they were resolved and the results of the comparison of the effects of fire recurrence in the study área. Thanks to Gesfire Project Study of multiscale tools for post-fire management of forest ecosystems prone to fire. References IDEE. (2016). Infraestructura de Datos Espaciales de España .El portal de acceso de Información Geográfica de España. Available from Consejo Superior Geográfico http://idee.es Mitasova, H, Brown, WM, Johnston, D and Mitas, L, 1996. GIS Tools for Erosion/Deposition Modeling and Multidimensional Visualization. PART II: Unit Stream Power-Based Erosion/Deposition Modeling and Enahced Dynamic Visualization., In Report for USA CERL. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, vol 38. Renard, KG, R., FG, A., WG and Porter, JP. 1991. RUSLE Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation. J. Soil and Water Cons. 46, 30-33. Renard, KG, R., FG, A., WG, K., MD and C., YD, 1997. Predicting Soil Erosion by Water: A Guide To Conservation Planning With The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Services 703 USA Agricultural Handbook Šúri, M, Cebecauer, T, Hofierka, J and Fulajtár, E. 2002. Soil erosion assessment of Slovakia at a regional scale using GIS. Ekológia(Bratislava) 21, 404

  15. A One-Dimensional Global-Scaling Erosive Burning Model Informed by Blowing Wall Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    A derivation of turbulent flow parameters, combined with data from erosive burning test motors and blowing wall tests results in erosive burning model candidates useful in one-dimensional internal ballistics analysis capable of scaling across wide ranges of motor size. The real-time burn rate data comes from three test campaigns of subscale segmented solid rocket motors tested at two facilities. The flow theory admits the important effect of the blowing wall on the turbulent friction coefficient by using blowing wall data to determine the blowing wall friction coefficient. The erosive burning behavior of full-scale motors is now predicted more closely than with other recent models.

  16. The Future Role of Information Technology in Erosion Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural resources management and decision-making is a complex process requiring cooperation and communication among federal, state, and local stakeholders balancing biophysical and socio-economic concerns. Predicting soil erosion is common practice in natural resource management for assessing the e...

  17. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-14

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y(-1) of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y(-1), equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the "hotspots," largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  18. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt Cṡy-1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt Cṡy-1, equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g Cṡm-2ṡy-1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  19. A physically-based integrated numerical model for flow, upland erosion, and contaminant transport in surface-subsurface systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE ZhiGuo; WU WeiMing

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physically-based integrated hydrologic model that can simulate the rain-fall-induced 2D surface water flow, 3D variably saturated subsurface flow, upland soil erosion and transport, and contaminant transport in the surface-subsurface system of a watershed.The model couples surface and subsurface flows based on the assumption of continuity conditions of pressure head and exchange flux at the ground, considering infiltration and evapotranspiration.The upland rill/interrill soil erosion and transport are simulated using a non-equilibrium transport model.Con-taminant transport in the integrated surface and subsurface domains is simulated using advec-tion-diffusion equations with mass changes due to sediment sorption and desorption and exchanges between two domains due to infiltration, diffusion, and bed change.The model requires no special treatments at the interface of upland areas and streams and is suitable for wetland areas and agricul-tural watersheds with shallow streams.

  20. Simplified analytical modeling of the normal hole erosion test; Modelado analitico simplificado del ensayo normal de ersoion de tubo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamlichi, A.; Bezzazi, M.; El Bakkali, L.; Jabbouri, A.; Kissi, B.; Yakhlef, F.; Parron Vera, M. A.; Rubio Cintas, M. D.; Castillo Lopez, O.

    2009-07-01

    The role erosion test was developed in order to study erosion phenomenon which occurs in cracks appearing in hydraulic infrastructures such as dams. This test enables describing experimentally the erosive characteristics of soils by means of an index which is called erosion rate and a critical tension which indicates the threshold of surface erosion initiation. The objective of this work is to five modelling of this experiment by means of a simplified analytical approach. The erosion law is derived by taking into account the flow regime. This law shows that the erosion occurring in the tube is controlled by a first order dynamics where only two parameters are involved: the characteristic's time linked to the erosion rate and the stress shear threshold for which erosion begins to develop. (Author) 5 refs.

  1. Regional soil erosion assessment in Slovakia using modelling and farmer's participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenderessy, Pavol; Veihe, Anita

    There has been an increasing interest by decision makers to obtain regional assessments of soil erosion risk, whereas many existing models require substantial amounts of high quality input data with high spatial resolution and they are often only validated at the plot level. Operational models...... for regional assessments should be based on simple data requirements, must consider spatial and temporal variability in hydrological and soil erosion processes, and must be applicable to a variety of regions with a minimum of calibration. This study aims to assess the applicability of the Erosion3D model...... with cereals, sunflowers and corn and is characterised by poor cultivation practices and use of fertilizers leading to land degradation. As a first step, the initial raster-based modelling of soil loss and deposition has provided acceptable and realistic values. The predicted spatial patterns of erosion...

  2. Modeling overland flow-driven erosion across a watershed DEM using the Landlab modeling framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. M.; Gasparini, N. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Hutton, E. W. H.; Nudurupati, S. S.; Istanbulluoglu, E.

    2015-12-01

    Many traditional landscape evolution models assume steady-state hydrology when computing discharge, and generally route flow in a single direction, along the path of steepest descent. Previous work has demonstrated that, for larger watersheds or short-duration storms, hydrologic steady-state may not be achieved. In semiarid regions, often dominated by convective summertime storms, landscapes are likely heavily influenced by these short-duration but high-intensity periods of rainfall. To capture these geomorphically significant bursts of rain, a new overland flow method has been implemented in the Landlab modeling framework. This overland flow method routes a hydrograph across a landscape, and allows flow to travel in multiple directions out of a given grid node. This study compares traditional steady-state flow routing and incision methods to the new, hydrograph-driven overland flow and erosion model in Landlab. We propose that for short-duration, high-intensity precipitation events, steady-state, single-direction flow routing models will significantly overestimate discharge and erosion when compared with non-steady, multiple flow direction model solutions. To test this hypothesis, discharge and erosion are modeled using both steady-state and hydrograph methods. A stochastic storm generator is used to generate short-duration, high-intensity precipitation intervals, which drive modeled discharge and erosion across a watershed imported from a digital elevation model, highlighting Landlab's robust raster-gridding library and watershed modeling capabilities. For each storm event in this analysis, peak discharge at the outlet, incision rate at the outlet, as well as total discharge and erosion depth are compared between methods. Additionally, these results are organized by storm duration and intensity to understand how erosion rates scale with precipitation between both flow routing methods. Results show that in many cases traditional steady-state methods overestimate

  3. Dynamics of organic carbon losses by water erosion after biocrust removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantón Yolanda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semiarid ecosystems, plant interspaces are frequently covered by communities of cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and mosses, known as biocrusts. These crusts often act as runoff sources and are involved in soil stabilization and fertility, as they prevent erosion by water and wind, fix atmospheric C and N and contribute large amounts of C to soil. Their contribution to the C balance as photosynthetically active surfaces in arid and semiarid regions is receiving growing attention. However, very few studies have explicitly evaluated their contribution to organic carbon (OC lost from runoff and erosion, which is necessary to ascertain the role of biocrusts in the ecosystem C balance. Furthermore, biocrusts are not resilient to physical disturbances, which generally cause the loss of the biocrust and thus, an increase in runoff and erosion, dust emissions, and sediment and nutrient losses. The aim of this study was to find out the influence of biocrusts and their removal on dissolved and sediment organic carbon losses. One-hour extreme rainfall simulations (50 mm h-1 were performed on small plots set up on physical soil crusts and three types of biocrusts, representing a development gradient, and also on plots where these crusts were removed from. Runoff and erosion rates, dissolved organic carbon (DOC and organic carbon bonded to sediments (SdOC were measured during the simulated rain. Our results showed different SdOC and DOC for the different biocrusts and also that the presence of biocrusts substantially decreased total organic carbon (TOC (average 1.80±1.86 g m-2 compared to physical soil crusts (7.83±3.27 g m-2. Within biocrusts, TOC losses decreased as biocrusts developed, and erosion rates were lower. Thus, erosion drove TOC losses while no significant direct relationships were found between TOC losses and runoff. In both physical crusts and biocrusts, DOC and SdOC concentrations were higher during the first minutes after runoff

  4. River Channel Change Simulation of Khoshke Rud Farsan River and Bank Erosion Process Using a Numerical Depth Averaged Model, CCHE2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bank erosion in populated areas could cause fatalities and property damage if banks collapse abruptly, compromising the integrity of residential buildings and civil facilities. Bank erosion study is in general a very complex problem because of it involves multi-processes such as bank surface erosion, bank toe erosion and bank material mechanic failure, etc. Each of these processes is related to several parameters: sediment size distribution, bank material cohesion, slope, homogeneity, consolidation, soil moisture and ground water level, as well as bank height. The bank erosion rate is also related to the strength of the flow in the river indicated by the flow shear stress, water depth, and channel curvature, etc. In this study, the numerical model CCHE2D has been applied to study real-world bank erosion cases in a mountain river, Khoske Rud Farsan River, Iran, which is a braided river with high sediment loads and channel mobility; the bank erosion of this river is dominated by floods during rainy seasons.

  5. QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATION OF SOIL EROSION IN THE DRĂGAN RIVER WATERSHED WITH THE U.S.L.E. TYPE ROMSEM MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba HORVÁTH

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative estimation of soil erosion in the Drăgan river watershed with the U.S.L.E. type Romsem modelSediment delivered from water erosion causes substantial waterway damages and water quality degradation. A number of factors such as drainage area size, basin slope, climate, land use/land cover may affect sediment delivery processes. The goal of this study is to define a computationally effective suitable soil erosion model in the Drăgan river watershed, for future sedimentation studies. Geographic Information System (GIS is used to determine the Universal Soil Loss Equation Model (U.S.L.E. values of the studied water basin. The methods and approaches used in this study are expected to be applicable in future research and to watersheds in other regions.

  6. Adapting the RUSLE and GIS to model soil erosion risk in a mountains karst watershed, Guizhou Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue-Qing, Xu; Xiao-Mei, Shao; Xiang-Bin, Kong; Jian, Peng; Yun-Long, Cai

    2008-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem in Guizhou Province, which is located in the centre of the karst areas of southwestern China. Unfortunately, Guizhou Province suffers from a lack of financial resources to research, monitor and model soil erosion at large watershed. In order to assess the soil erosion risk, soil erosion modeling at the watershed scale are urgently needed to be undertaken. This study integrated the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a Geographic Information System (GIS) to estimate soil loss and identify the risk erosion areas in the Maotiao River watershed, which is a typical rural watershed in Guizhou Province. All factors used in the RUSLE were calculated for the watershed using local data. It was classified into five categories ranging from minimal risk to extreme erosion risk depending on the calculated soil erosion amount. The soil erosion map was linked to land use, elevation and slope maps to explore the relationship between soil erosion and environmental factors and identify the areas of soil erosion risk. The results can be used to advice the local government in prioritizing the areas of immediate erosion mitigation. The integrated approach allows for relatively easy, fast, and cost-effective estimation of spatially distributed soil erosion. It thus indicates that RUSLE-GIS model is a useful and efficient tool for evaluating and mapping soil erosion risk at a large watershed scale in Guizhou Province.

  7. Automatic calibration of an erosion and sediment yield distributed conceptual model: application to the Goodwin Creek experimental river basin (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussi, G.; Francés, F.

    2010-05-01

    correction factors have been included in the TETIS-SED model, calibrating respectively the hillslope sediment discharge generated by sheet and rill erosion, the gully erosion capacity and the channel erosion capacity. The calibration of sediment correction factors is also carried out by means of the SCE-UA algorithm, providing shorter computational times and more accurate results. Model sensitivity to the correction factors and to the initial conditions of available sediments has also been evaluated. In this work it is shown that the sediment initial conditions in the basin strongly affect the simulation results. Estimation of the initial available sediments has also been analysed, by using different estimation methods. This work demonstrates that TETIS-SED is a reliable model, and that its results are satisfactory when compared to other models previously used on the selected case study (the Goodwin Creek experimental river basin, located in the US). The TETIS-SED model was consistent in reproducing both the observed sedimentographs and the observed water discharge/ sediment load relations.

  8. The use of spatial empirical models to estimate soil erosion in arid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Meshal; Feagin, Rusty; Musawi, Layla

    2017-02-01

    The central objective of this project was to utilize geographical information systems and remote sensing to compare soil erosion models, including Modified Pacific South-west Inter Agency Committee (MPSIAC), Erosion Potential Method (EPM), and Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), and to determine their applicability for arid regions such as Kuwait. The northern portion of Umm Nigga, containing both coastal and desert ecosystems, falls within the boundaries of the de-militarized zone (DMZ) adjacent to Iraq and has been fenced off to restrict public access since 1994. Results showed that the MPSIAC and EPM models were similar in spatial distribution of erosion, though the MPSIAC had a more realistic spatial distribution of erosion and presented finer level details. The RUSLE presented unrealistic results. We then predicted the amount of soil loss between coastal and desert areas and fenced and unfenced sites for each model. In the MPSIAC and EPM models, soil loss was different between fenced and unfenced sites at the desert areas, which was higher at the unfenced due to the low vegetation cover. The overall results implied that vegetation cover played an important role in reducing soil erosion and that fencing is much more important in the desert ecosystems to protect against human activities such as overgrazing. We conclude that the MPSIAC model is best for predicting soil erosion for arid regions such as Kuwait. We also recommend the integration of field-based experiments with lab-based spatial analysis and modeling in future research.

  9. Comparing simple and complex approaches to simulate the impacts of soil water repellency on runoff and erosion in burnt Mediterranean forest slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Catarina Simões Vieira, Diana; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Fires impact soil hydrological properties, enhancing soil water repellency and therefore increasing the potential for surface runoff generation and soil erosion. In consequence, the successful application of hydrological models to post-fire conditions requires the appropriate simulation of the effects of soil water repellency on soil hydrology. This work compared three approaches to model soil water repellency impacts on soil hydrology in burnt eucalypt and pine forest slopes in central Portugal: 1) Daily approach, simulating repellency as a function of soil moisture, and influencing the maximum soil available water holding capacity. It is based on the Thornthwaite-Mather soil water modelling approach, and is parameterized with the soil's wilting point and field capacity, and a parameter relating soil water repellency with water holding capacity. It was tested with soil moisture data from burnt and unburnt hillslopes. This approach was able to simulate post-fire soil moisture patterns, which the model without repellency was unable to do. However, model parameters were different between the burnt and unburnt slopes, indicating that more research is needed to derive standardized parameters from commonly measured soil and vegetation properties. 2) Seasonal approach, pre-determining repellency at the seasonal scale (3 months) in four classes (from none to extreme). It is based on the Morgan-Morgan-Finney (MMF) runoff and erosion model, applied at the seasonal scale and is parameterized with a parameter relating repellency class with field capacity. It was tested with runoff and erosion data from several experimental plots, and led to important improvements on runoff prediction over an approach with constant field capacity for all seasons (calibrated for repellency effects), but only slight improvements in erosion predictions. In contrast with the daily approach, the parameters could be reproduced between different sites 3) Constant approach, specifying values for soil

  10. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  11. Modeling the erosion of tropical volcanic ocean islands : The Tahiti island case (French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, F.; Sichoix, L.; Barriot, J.; Dumas, P.

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we are interested in modeling the erosion of the Tahiti island, with two main objectives: risk assessment (erodibility of terrains with rainfall, catastrophic runoffs) and estimation of subsidence rate. The Tahiti island created around 1.4 Myears ago by an intraplate hotspot (aerial radiometric dating), is divided into two geological units: the main island Tahiti-Nui to northwest (end of volcanism 200,000 years ago) and the subsidiary Tahiti-Iti to the southeast (end of volcanism 380,000 years ago). It is now volcanically inactive and is deeply dissected by erosion. Tahiti Nui is around 30 km in diameter, and Tahiti Iti around 15 km. Both are linked through the isthmus of Taravao. The highest elevation is 2241 m. The two sub-islands are basaltic edifices, with an overwhelming presence of oxisols (down to tens of meters in some places). Slopes can be divided into three classes: 15° for the global slope of the shield volcanoes, 47° for the incision valleys and 2° for the seashore rim. Rainfalls range from 8,000 mm/year on the East side of Tahiti (trade winds) to 2,000 mm/year on the West side, the humid season of a year is summer. This study is conducted to validate the Unit Stream Power Erosion and Deposition (USPED) model, an enrichment to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to calculate average annual soil loss per unit land area resulting from rill and sheet erosion. The USPED model differs from other USLE models on how it handles the influence of topography on the erosion process, because USLE consider erosion only along the flow line without the influence of flow convergence/divergence. As the result, the USPED model predicts both erosion and deposition, while most other USLE-based models are limited to predictions of erosion only. The USLE, USPED equation can be written as A=R*K*LS*C*P where A is the soil loss, R the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor, K a soil erodibility factor, L a slope-length factor, S a slope steepness factor, C a

  12. Impacts of climate change and establishing a vegetation cover on water erosion of contaminated spoils for two contrasting United Kingdom regional climates: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Cécile S; Hutchings, Tony R; Moffat, Andy J

    2008-10-01

    This study examines how pollutant linkage of contaminants will be influenced by predicted changes in precipitation and subsequent rainfall erosion of soils and spoils in the United Kingdom during the 21st century. Two contrasting regional climates were used in conjunction with 2 extreme emissions scenarios (low and high greenhouse gas emissions) to run the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2 (RUSLE2) model for a case study that represents a high risk of pollutant linkage through water erosion. Results for the 2 scenarios and the 2 regions showed a significant and gradual increase in erosion rates with time as a consequence of climate change, by up to 32% for the southwest and 6.6% for the southeast regions by the 2080s. Revegetation of the site showed a dramatic reduction in predicted future amounts of sediment production and subsequent contaminant movement, well below existing levels. Limitations and future improvements of the methodology are discussed.

  13. A new solid particle erosion model for oriented fiber composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work describes a new model of erosion estimation equation which factors in both the impingement angle α and the fiber orientation angle β. Two examples of particular erosion equations are presented, for carbon fiber as well as for glass fiber in epoxidic matrix. Our methods are semi-empirical meaning that the general shape of the erosion equation is maintained while specific material coefficients must be determined for each of the matrix-fiber combination. As showed in the paper, the proposed model correlates well with the experimental data available in the literature. The work is significant since it provides a generalized method for estimating erosion rates for oriented fiber composites which can be further implemented in simulation software in a simple manner.

  14. HVOF and HVAF Coatings of Agglomerated Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Powders for Water Droplet Erosion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasi, F.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Dolatabadi, A.; Medraj, M.; Moreau, C.

    2016-12-01

    Water droplet erosion (WDE) is a phenomenon caused by impingement of water droplets of several hundred microns to a few millimeters diameter at velocities of hundreds of meters per second on the edges and surfaces of the parts used in such services. The solution to this problem is sought especially for the moving compressor blades in gas turbines and those operating at the low-pressure end of steam turbines. Thermal-sprayed tungsten carbide-based coatings have been the focus of many studies and are industrially accepted for a multitude of wear and erosion resistance applications. In the present work, the microstructure, phase analysis and mechanical properties (micro-hardness and fracture toughness) of WC-Co coatings are studied in relation with their influence on the WDE resistance of such coatings. The coatings are deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes. The agglomerated tungsten carbide-cobalt powders were in either sintered or non-sintered conditions. The WDE tests were performed using 0.4 mm water droplets at 300 m/s impact velocity. The study shows promising results for this cermet as WDE-resistant coating when the coating can reach its optimum quality using the right thermal spray process and parameters.

  15. 中国主要水蚀区土壤侵蚀过程与调控研究%Research into Soil Erosion Processes and Control in Major Water Erosion Regions of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锐

    2011-01-01

    The project,"Research into soil erosion processes and control in the major water erosion regions of China",aims to address the urgent needs of China′s national strategy and scientific developments of soil and water conservation.Taking the 4 water erosion regions of northeast black soil,northwest loess,South China red soil and southwest purple soil as the main study areas,the research has concentrated on soil erosion process,modeling and control mechanisms.After more than 4 years research,the following have been achieved: revealing soil erosion development processes and spatial patterns,factors and mechanisms of different types at different scales;developing a Chinese multi-scale soil erosion prediction modeling system;developing methods of evaluation for impacts of soil erosion/conservation on environment,and integrating soil erosion control models to fit into the natural ecology and social economy in different regions.All of these achievements have enriched and developed soil and water conservation science,and provide a theoretical basis for the national soil and water conservation strategy and planning in China.%国家重点基础研究发展计划(973)项目"中国主要水蚀区土壤侵蚀过程与调控研究"针对国家对土壤侵蚀防治对策基础理论的迫切需求和国际学科前沿重大问题,选择东北黑土漫岗丘陵区、西北黄土高原区、南方红壤丘陵区和西南紫色土山丘区等4个主要水力侵蚀区,从侵蚀过程、侵蚀模型和侵蚀调控3个层面进行了系统研究。揭示了不同方式和不同尺度下土壤侵蚀发生发展的过程及其空间格局、影响因子和作用机制;构建了中国多尺度水蚀预报模型;提出了水土流失与水土保持的环境效应评价指标体系与方法;综合集成了适应自然生态过程和人类活动的水土流失调控范式。该项研究成果丰富和发展了具有中国特色的水土保持科学,为国家制定水土保持

  16. A Multiphase First Order Model for Non-Equilibrium Sand Erosion, Transport and Sedimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Preziosi, Luigi; Bruno, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Three phenomena are involved in sand movement: erosion, wind transport, and sedimentation. This paper presents a comprehensive easy-to-use multiphase model that include all three aspects with a particular attention to situations in which erosion due to wind shear and sedimentation due to gravity are not in equilibrium. The interest is related to the fact that these are the situations leading to a change of profile of the sand bed.

  17. LandSoil model application for erosion management in sustainable agricultural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanova, Anna; Follain, Stéphane; Raclot, Damien; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion and land degradation can lead to irreversible changes and landscape degradation. In order to achieve the sustainability of agricultural landscapes, the land use scenarios might be developed and tested for their erosion mitigation effects. Despite the importance of the long-term scenarios (which are complicated by predictability of climate change in a small scale, its effect on change in soil properties and crops, and the societal behaviour of individual players), the management decision have to be applied already now. Therefore the short-term and medium term scenarios to achieve the most effective soil management and the least soil erosion footprint are necessary to develop. With increasing importance of individual large erosion events, the event-based models, considering soil properties and landscape structures appears to be suitable. The LandSoil model (Ciampalini et al., 2012) - a landscape evolution model operating at the field/small catchment scale, have been applied in order to analyse the effect of different soil erosion mitigation and connectivity management practices in two different Mediterranean catchments. In the soil erosion scenarios the proposed measures targeted soil erosion on field or on catchment scale, and the effect of different extreme events on soil redistribution was evaluated under different spatial designs. Anna Smetanová has received the support of the AgreenSkills fellowship (under grant agreement n°267196). R. Ciampalini, S. Follain, Y. Le Bissonnais, LandSoil: A model for analysing the impact of erosion on agricultural landscape evolution, Geomorphology, 175-176, 2012, 25-37.

  18. River Network Evolution Based on Fluid-Erosion Model

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A new landscape evolution model is proposed which is composed of the shallow water equations for the fluid above the sediment and the mass conservation equation of the sediment. Numerical simulations of the formation of landscape and river network are carried out based on these equations. It is shown that steady patterns of river network are formed for the initial inclinations of slopes within 0.00005 and 0.005. The fractal dimensions of the river network and the exponent of Hack's law are ob...

  19. Coastal Erosion Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal erosion is bad because the ecosystem there will be washed away and the animals could drown or be displaced and have to adapt to a new ecosystem that they are not prepared for. I'm interested in this problem because if there aren't beaches when I grow up I won't be able to do the things I would really like to do. I would like to be a marine biologist. Secondly, I don't want to see beach houses washed away. I would like to see people live in harmony with their environment. So, to study ways in which to preserve beaches I will make and use models that test different erosion controls. Two different ideas for erosion control I tested are using seaweed or a rock berm. I think the rock berm will work better than the model of seaweed because the seaweed is under water and the waves can carry the sand over the seaweed, and the rock berm will work better because the rocks will help break the waves up before they reach the shore and the waves can not carry the sand over the rocks that are above the water. To investigate this I got a container to use to model the Gulf of Mexico coastline. I performed several test runs using sand and water in the container to mimic the beach and waves from the Gulf of Mexico hitting the shoreline. I did three trials for the control (no erosion control), seaweed and a rock berm. Rock berms are a border of a raised area of rock. The model for seaweed that I used was plastic shopping bags cut into strips and glued to the bottom of my container to mimic seaweed. My results were that the control had the most erosion which ranged from 2.75 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The seaweed was a little better than the control but was very variable and ranged from 1.5 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The rock berm worked the best out of all at controlling erosion with erosion ranging from 1.5 - 2 inches. My hypothesis was correct because the rock berm did best to control erosion compared to the control which had no erosion control and the model with seaweed.

  20. A watershed scale spatially-distributed model for streambank erosion rate driven by channel curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Mitchell; Hu, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Streambank erosion is a major source of fluvial sediment, but few large-scale, spatially distributed models exist to quantify streambank erosion rates. We introduce a spatially distributed model for streambank erosion applicable to sinuous, single-thread channels. We argue that such a model can adequately characterize streambank erosion rates, measured at the outsides of bends over a 2-year time period, throughout a large region. The model is based on the widely-used excess-velocity equation and comprised three components: a physics-based hydrodynamic model, a large-scale 1-dimensional model of average monthly discharge, and an empirical bank erodibility parameterization. The hydrodynamic submodel requires inputs of channel centerline, slope, width, depth, friction factor, and a scour factor A; the large-scale watershed submodel utilizes watershed-averaged monthly outputs of the Noah-2.8 land surface model; bank erodibility is based on tree cover and bank height as proxies for root density. The model was calibrated with erosion rates measured in sand-bed streams throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico coastal plain. The calibrated model outperforms a purely empirical model, as well as a model based only on excess velocity, illustrating the utility of combining a physics-based hydrodynamic model with an empirical bank erodibility relationship. The model could be improved by incorporating spatial variability in channel roughness and the hydrodynamic scour factor, which are here assumed constant. A reach-scale application of the model is illustrated on ∼1 km of a medium-sized, mixed forest-pasture stream, where the model identifies streambank erosion hotspots on forested and non-forested bends.

  1. Hillslope Erosion and Water Quality from the Rim Fire, Sierra Nevada, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, T. J.; Austin, L. J.; Forrester, H.; DeLong, S. B.; Lever, R.; Roche, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Rim Fire in 2013 burned approximately 1036 km2 in the Sierra Nevada (including 312 km2 within Yosemite National Park), generating considerable public concern regarding potential impacts to the Tuolumne River watershed, in terms of water quality and water supply infrastructure serving the City of San Francisco. Land management responses included a multi-million dollar watershed treatment project on USFS lands near Cherry Creek, with similar actions suggested for areas in the Hetch Hetchy and Lake Eleanor watersheds. In response to the concern that the post-burn landscape will negatively impact water quality, we are investigating hydrologic effects and hillslope erosion in two small burned basins (2.2 and 5.2 km2) within the Tuolumne River basin in Yosemite National Park. Within a month after fire containment, sites were equipped with instrumentation to record stream stage, turbidity, and total suspended sediment. We also installed 21 sediment fences that trap all sediment silt sized and larger on moderate (20%) to steep (50%) hillslopes from 100 m2 plots within moderate and high severity burn areas. Accumulated sediment is collected, weighed, and sub-sampled after each storm event, and, analyzed for dry weight, particle size, gravimetric water content, bulk density, pH, color, carbon and nitrogen content from % fine organics, and % coarse organics. As of July 31, 2014, four discrete storm events had been sampled. Data are used to calculate annual sediment yield, and to investigate organic carbon storage, deposition, and transport. We are also collecting repeat terrestrial laser scans to assess topographic change and identify the hillslope processes that contribute to erosion and deposition at plot- and hillslope-scale. These findings provide analogs for possible changes in adjacent burned areas and to inform management decisions in response to future fires and potential impacts to water quality in areas valued by the park, the City of San Francisco and other

  2. Soil organic carbon redistribution by water erosion--the role of CO2 emissions for the carbon budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Cammeraat, Erik L H; Romeijn, Paul; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    A better process understanding of how water erosion influences the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is sorely needed to unravel the role of soil erosion for the carbon (C) budget from local to global scales. The main objective of this study was to determine SOC redistribution and the complete C budget of a loess soil affected by water erosion. We measured fluxes of SOC, dissolved organic C (DOC) and CO2 in a pseudo-replicated rainfall-simulation experiment. We characterized different C fractions in soils and redistributed sediments using density fractionation and determined C enrichment ratios (CER) in the transported sediments. Erosion, transport and subsequent deposition resulted in significantly higher CER of the sediments exported ranging between 1.3 and 4.0. In the exported sediments, C contents (mg per g soil) of particulate organic C (POC, C not bound to soil minerals) and mineral-associated organic C (MOC) were both significantly higher than those of non-eroded soils indicating that water erosion resulted in losses of C-enriched material both in forms of POC and MOC. The averaged SOC fluxes as particles (4.7 g C m(-2) yr(-1)) were 18 times larger than DOC fluxes. Cumulative emission of soil CO2 slightly decreased at the erosion zone while increased by 56% and 27% at the transport and depositional zone, respectively, in comparison to non-eroded soil. Overall, CO2 emission is the predominant form of C loss contributing to about 90.5% of total erosion-induced C losses in our 4-month experiment, which were equal to 18 g C m(-2). Nevertheless, only 1.5% of the total redistributed C was mineralized to CO2 indicating a large stabilization after deposition. Our study also underlines the importance of C losses by particles and as DOC for understanding the effects of water erosion on the C balance at the interface of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  3. O factor de coberto vegetal, para árvores e Arbustos, em modelos de erosão hídrica The vegetation cover factor, for tree and bush canopies, in models of water erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Rolo Antunes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available O objectivo primordial do presente trabalho consiste na análise do comportamento de cobertos arbóreos e arbustivos, em termos do processo de intercepção da precipitação, designadamente, retenção e gotejo, e no estabelecimento de uma componente a incluir em modelos de erosão, que permita quantificar o factor de coberto vegetal em caso de ocupação do solo por estes cobertos, associados a culturas arvenses, em subcoberto, particularmente, na Equação Universal da Perda de Solo Revista (RUSLE. O trabalho experimental utilizou um simulador de chuva, tendo-se obtido valores do diâmetro das gotas (gotejo das folhas de espécies características dos sistemas de uso do solo mais comuns no Sul de Portugal, nomeadamente sobreiro (Quercus suber L., azinheira (Quercus ilex L. ssp. rotundifolia Lam e carrasco (Quercus coccifera L., e quantificado valores de retenção nas folhas. A partir dos resultados obtidos estimou-se a energia cinética para diferentes alturas de queda e, consequentemente, valores correctivos a aplicar aos valores de C tradicionalmente considerados, relativos às culturas agrícolas.The main objective of this work consists on the analyzes of tree and bush canopies behavior, in terms of the rainfall interception process, namely, leave retention, and dripping, and the establishment of a erosion model component to include in to quantify the cover factor (C of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE for mixed land covered systems with arable crops, in association with trees and bushes. In the experimental work a rainfall simulator was used and the characteristic values for the diameter of the dripping drops and retention of the leaves from characteristic species of the more common mixed land-use systems in Southern of Portugal, particularly with Cork oak (Quercus suber L., Holm or evergreen oak (Quercus ilex L. ssp. rotundifolia Lam and Kermes or wild oak (Quercus coccifera L., were obtained. From the obtained results

  4. Regional modeling of wind erosion in the North West and South West of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmousavi, S. H.

    2016-08-01

    About two-thirds of the Iran's area is located in the arid and semiarid region. Lack of soil moisture and vegetation is poor in most areas can lead to soil erosion caused by wind. So that the annual suffered severe damage to large areas of rich soils. Modeling studies of wind erosion in Iran is very low and incomplete. Therefore, this study aimed to wind erosion modeling, taking into three factors: wind speed, vegetation and soil types have been done. Wind erosion sensitivity was modeled using the key factors of soil sensitivity, vegetation cover and wind erodibility as proxies. These factors were first estimated separately by factor sensitivity maps and later combined by fuzzy logic into a regional-scale wind erosion sensitivity map. Large areas were evaluated by using publicly available datasets of remotely sensed vegetation information, soil maps and meteorological data on wind speed. The resulting estimates were verified by field studies and examining the economic losses from wind erosion as compensated by the state insurance company. The spatial resolution of the resulting sensitivity map is suitable for regional applications, as identifying sensitive areas is the foundation for diverse land development control measures and implementing management activities.

  5. Using the RBFN model and GIS technique to assess wind erosion hazards of Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huading; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhuang, Dafang; Hu, Yunfeng

    2006-08-01

    Soil wind erosion is the primary process and the main driving force for land desertification and sand-dust storms in arid and semi-arid areas of Northern China. Many researchers have paid more attention to this issue. This paper select Inner Mongolia autonomous region as the research area, quantify the various indicators affecting the soil wind erosion, using the GIS technology to extract the spatial data, and construct the RBFN (Radial Basis Function Network) model for assessment of wind erosion hazard. After training the sample data of the different levels of wind erosion hazard, we get the parameters of the model, and then assess the wind erosion hazard. The result shows that in the Southern parts of Inner Mongolia wind erosion hazard are very severe, counties in the middle regions of Inner Mongolia vary from moderate to severe, and in eastern are slight. The comparison of the result with other researches shows that the result is in conformity with actual conditions, proving the reasonability and applicability of the RBFN model.

  6. Cavitation Erosion Behavior of HPDL-Treated TWAS-Coated Ti6Al4V Alloy and Its Similarity with Water Droplet Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2012-06-01

    Twin wire arc-sprayed (TWAS) coating of commercially available SHS 7170-cored wire was obtained on Ti6AL4V alloy, and to improve its properties, it was further surface treated with high-power diode laser (HPDL). The cavitation erosion (CE) resistance of TWAS-coated samples was evaluated as per ASTM G-32-2003 and it was compared with laser-treated and untreated Ti6Al4V alloys. The CE resistance of TWAS-coated SHS 7170 samples after HPDL treatment has improved significantly. The main reasons for its improvement are elimination of pores, increased fracture toughness, reduced hardness, and brittleness. The CE resistance of HPDL-treated TWAS coating is compared with water droplet erosion resistance. It is observed that there is a similarity in the both the phenomenon.

  7. A Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling Scheme for Estimating Erosion Rates Under Current Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, L.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Computational modeling of surface erosion processes is inherently difficult because of the four-dimensional nature of the problem and the multiple temporal and spatial scales that govern individual mechanisms. Landscapes are modified via surface and fluvial erosion and exhumation, each of which takes place over a range of time scales. Traditional field measurements of erosion/exhumation rates are scale dependent, often valid for a single point-wise location or averaging over large aerial extents and periods with intense and mild erosion. We present a method of remotely estimating erosion rates using a Bayesian hierarchical model based upon the stream power erosion law (SPEL). A Bayesian approach allows for estimating erosion rates using the deterministic relationship given by the SPEL and data on channel slopes and precipitation at the basin and sub-basin scale. The spatial scale associated with this framework is the elevation class, where each class is characterized by distinct morphologic behavior observed through different modes in the distribution of basin outlet elevations. Interestingly, the distributions of first-order outlets are similar in shape and extent to the distribution of precipitation events (i.e. individual storms) over a 14-year period between 1998-2011. We demonstrate an application of the Bayesian hierarchical modeling framework for five basins and one intermontane basin located in the central Andes between 5S and 20S. Using remotely sensed data of current annual precipitation rates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and topography from a high resolution (3 arc-seconds) digital elevation map (DEM), our erosion rate estimates are consistent with decadal-scale estimates based on landslide mapping and sediment flux observations and 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than most millennial and million year timescale estimates from thermochronology and cosmogenic nuclides.

  8. Comparison of SWAT and GeoWEPP model in predicting the impact of stone bunds on runoff and erosion processes in the Northern Ethiopian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demelash, Nigus; Flagler, Jared; Renschler, Chris; Strohmeier, Stefan; Holzmann, Hubert; Feras, Ziadat; Addis, Hailu; Zucca, Claudio; Bayu, Wondimu; Klik, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Soil degradation is a major issue in the Ethiopian highlands which are most suitable for agriculture and, therefore, support a major part of human population and livestock. Heavy rainstorms during the rainy season in summer create soil erosion and runoff processes which affect soil fertility and food security. In the last years programs for soil conservation and afforestation were initiated by the Ethiopian government to reduce erosion risk, retain water in the landscape and improve crop yields. The study was done in two adjacent watersheds in the Northwestern highlands of Ethiopia. One of the watersheds is developed by soil and water conservation structures (stone bunds) in 2011 and the other one is without soil and water conservation structures. Spatial distribution of soil textures and other soil properties were determined in the field and in the laboratory and a soil map was derived. A land use map was evaluated based on satellite images and ground truth data. A Digital Elevation Model of the watershed was developed based on conventional terrestrial surveying using a total station. At the outlet of the watersheds weirs with cameras were installed to measure surface runoff. During each event runoff samples were collected and sediment concentration was analyzed. The objective of this study is 1) to assess the impact of stone bunds on runoff and erosion processes by using simulation models, and 2) to compare the performance of two soil erosion models in predicting the measurements. The selected erosion models were the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Geospatial Interface to the Water Erosion Prediction Project (GeoWEPP). The simulation models were calibrated/verified for the 2011-2013 periods and validated with 2014-2015 data. Results of this comparison will be presented.

  9. Erosion and deposition in depth-averaged models of dense, dry, inclined, granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, James T.; Berzi, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We derive expressions for the rates of erosion and deposition at the interface between a dense, dry, inclined granular flow and an erodible bed. In obtaining these, we assume that the interface between the flowing grains and the bed moves with the speed of a pressure wave in the flow, for deposition, or with the speed of a disturbance through the contacting particles in the bed, for erosion. We employ the expressions for the rates of erosion and deposition to show that after an abrupt change in the angle of inclination of the bed the characteristic time for the motion of the interface is much shorter than the characteristic time of the flow. This eliminates the need for introducing models of erosion and deposition rate in the mass balance; and the instantaneous value of the particle flux is the same function of the instantaneous value of the flow depth as in a steady, uniform flow.

  10. Wind erosion in semiarid landscapes: Predictive models and remote sensing methods for the influence of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, H. Brad

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: to develop and test predictive relations for the quantitative influence of vegetation canopy structure on wind erosion of semiarid rangeland soils, and to develop remote sensing methods for measuring the canopy structural parameters that determine sheltering against wind erosion. The influence of canopy structure on wind erosion will be investigated by means of wind-tunnel and field experiments using structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments using model roughness elements to simulate plant canopies. The canopy structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments as important in determining vegetative sheltering against wind erosion will then be measured at a number of naturally vegetated field sites and compared with estimates of these variables derived from analysis of remotely sensed data.

  11. MCCM-WEPS: Coupling of Meteorological, Air Quality and Erosion Models for Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, E. N.; Tatarko, J.; Jazcilevich, A. D.; García, A. R.; Caetano, E.

    2007-05-01

    Since natural dust emissions are an important factor in the air quality of Mexico City, a modeling effort to quantify their sources and evaluate their impact on the population is presented. The meteorological and air quality model Multiscale Climate and Chemistry Model (MCCM) provides the meteorological inputs to the erosion model Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) that then provides the natural PM10 emissions to be transported. The system was developed to study the particles dispersion from natural sources (unprotected soils) as agricultural lands and Lake of Texcoco. These sources are located around the Valley of Mexico City. As a result of this research we developed a system with the capability of modeling the phenomenon of air pollution by natural particles emitted by wind erosion and to generate case study scenarios useful to propose control policies. Some of them are presented here. Also an effort to predict with anticipation this phenomenon is under way.

  12. Controlled erosion in asbestos-cement pipe used in drinking water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ramos, P.

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Samples of asbestos-cement pipe used for drinking water conveyance, were submerged in distilled water, and subjected to two controlled erosive treatments, namely agitation (300 rpm for 60 min and ultrasound (47 kHz for 30 min. SEM was used to observe and compare the morphology of the new pipe with and without erosive treatment, and of samples taken from asbestos-cement pipes used in the distribution system of drinking water in Santiago city for 10 and 40-years of service. TEM was used to determine the concentration of asbestos fibers in the test water: 365 MFL and 1690 MFL (millions of fibers per litre as an agitation and result ultrasound, respectively. The erosive treatments by means of agitation or ultrasound applied to new asbestos-cement pipes used in the drinking water distribution system were evaluated as being equivalent to 4 and 10 years of service, respectively.

    Se sometió a dos tratamientos erosivos controlados uno por agitación (300 rpm, 60 min. y otro por ultrasonido (47 kHz, 30 min. a muestras de tubos de asbesto cemento, sumergidas en agua destilada, usados para el trasporte de agua potable. Con SEM se observó la morfología de muestras de tubos sin uso, con y sin tratamiento erosivo y la de muestras extraídas de tubos de asbesto cemento de la red de distribución de agua potable de ía ciudad de Santiago con 10 y 14 años de servicio. Con TEM se determinó la concentración de fibras de asbesto en el agua de ensayo: 365 MFL y 1690 MFL (millones de fibras por litro en agitación y ultrasonido, respectivamente. Se estimó en 4 y 10 años de servicio equivalente los tratamientos erosivos de agitación y ultrasonido, respectivamente en tubos de asbesto cemento empleados en la red de agua potable.

  13. Flow velocity effect on the corrosion/erosion in water injection systems; Efecto de la velocidad de flujo en la corrosion/erosion en sistemas de inyeccion de agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, C.; Mendez, J. [PDVSA Exploracion y reduccion, Departamento de Ingenieria de Instalaciones, Torres Petroleras EX-MRV, Torre Lama, Piso No. 6, Zulia, Apartado 4013, Venezuela (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    The main causes of fails at water injection lines on the secondary petroleum recovery systems are related with corrosion/erosion problems which are influenced by the flow velocity, the presence of dissolved oxygen, solids in the medium and the microorganisms proliferation. So too, this corrosion process promotes the suspended solids generation which affects the water quality injected, causing wells tamponage and loss of injectivity, with the consequent decrease in the crude production. This situation has been impacted in meaning order at the production processes of an exploration enterprise which utilizes the Maracaibo lake as water resource for their injection by pattern projects. Stating that, it was developed a study for determining in experimental order the effect of flow velocity on the corrosion/erosion process joined to the presence of dissolved oxygen which allows to determine the optimum range of the said working velocity for the water injection systems. This range is defined by critical velocities of bio layers deposition and erosion. They were realized simulation pilot tests of the corrosion standard variables, concentration of dissolved oxygen and fluid velocity in the injection systems with filtered and non filtered water. For the development of these tests it was constructed a device which allows to install and expose cylindrical manometers of carbon steel according to predetermined conditions which was obtained the necessary information to make correlations the results of these variables. Additionally, they were determined the mathematical models that adjusts to dynamical behavior of the corrosion/erosion process, finding the optimum range of the flow velocity for the control of this process, being necessary to utilize the following techniques: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray dispersion analysis (EDX) for encourage the surface studies. They were effected morphological analysis of the surfaces studies and the values were determined of

  14. Research on cohesive sediment erosion by flow: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Erosion of cohesive sediment by flow is a very complicated phenomenon occurring worldwide. Understanding and modeling of the erosion process are important for many issues such as the breaching of embankments, riverbank stability, siltation of harbors and navigation channels, service life of reservoirs, distribution of (heavy metal) pollutants and water quality problems. In the last few decades, numerous studies have been done on the erosion of cohesive sediment by flow. Nevertheless, the factors affecting the erosion resistance of cohesive sediment are still not fully understood and the knowledge of the physics of cohesive sediment erosion is in- adequate, as a result the mathematical modeling of this erosion is far from satis- factory. In this paper an overview of the studies on the erosion resistance, erosion threshold and the erosion rate of cohesive sediment by flow is presented. The outcomes achieved so far from the studies and the existing problems have been analyzed and summarized, based on which recommendations are proposed for future research.

  15. The Influence of Cathodic Protection on Erosion-Corrosion of Metals and Model Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-05

    stress above u critical or threshold value. Steele and Geankoplis 7 have also reported removal of material by an apparent shear erosion mechanism. 3 I...Chemical Engineering 83 (1975), 505-511. 7. L. R. Steele, and C. J. Geankoplis , Mass Transfer from a Solid Sphere to Water in Highly Turbulent Flow

  16. Evaluating the influence of physical, economic and managerial factors on sheet erosion in rangelands of SW Spain by performing a sensitivity analysis on an integrated dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, J; Lavado Contador, J F; Schnabel, S; Martínez Valderrama, J

    2016-02-15

    An integrated dynamic model was used to evaluate the influence of climatic, soil, pastoral, economic and managerial factors on sheet erosion in rangelands of SW Spain (dehesas). This was achieved by means of a variance-based sensitivity analysis. Topsoil erodibility, climate change and a combined factor related to soil water storage capacity and the pasture production function were the factors which influenced water erosion the most. Of them, climate change is the main source of uncertainty, though in this study it caused a reduction in the mean and the variance of long-term erosion rates. The economic and managerial factors showed scant influence on soil erosion, meaning that it is unlikely to find such influence in the study area for the time being. This is because the low profitability of the livestock business maintains stocking rates at low levels. However, the potential impact of livestock, through which economic and managerial factors affect soil erosion, proved to be greater in absolute value than the impact of climate change. Therefore, if changes in some economic or managerial factors led to higher stocking rates in the future, significant increases in erosion rates would be expected.

  17. Modelling soil erosion and associated sediment yield for small headwater catchments of the Daugava spillway valley, Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soms, Juris

    2015-04-01

    The accelerated soil erosion by water and associated fine sediment transfer in river catchments has various negative environmental as well as economic implications in many EU countries. Hence, the scientific community had recognized and ranked soil erosion among other environmental problems. Moreover, these matters might worsen in the near future in the countries of the Baltic Region, e.g. Latvia considering the predicted climate changes - more precisely, the increase in precipitation and shortening of return periods of extreme rainfall events, which in their turn will enable formation of surface runoff, erosion and increase of sediment delivery to receiving streams. Thereby it is essential to carry out studies focused on these issues in order to obtain reliable data in terms of both scientific and applied aims, e.g. environmental protection and sustainable management of soils as well as water resources. During the past decades, many of such studies of soil erosion had focused on the application of modelling techniques implemented in a GIS environment, allowing indirectly to estimate the potential soil losses and to quantify related sediment yield. According to research results published in the scientific literature, this approach currently is widely used all over the world, and most of these studies are based on the USLE model and its revised and modified versions. Considering that, the aim of this research was to estimate soil erosion rates and sediment transport under different hydro-climatic conditions in south-eastern Latvia by application of GIS-based modelling. For research purposes, empirical RUSLE model and ArcGIS software were applied, and five headwater catchments were chosen as model territories. The selected catchments with different land use are located in the Daugava spillway valley, which belongs to the upper Daugava River drainage basin. Considering lithological diversity of Quaternary deposits, a variety of soils can be identified, i.e., Stagnic

  18. Erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in mineral oil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in distilled water, ordinary tap water and a viscous mineral oil are presented. The mean depth of penetration for the mineral oil was about 40 percent of that for water at the end of a 40 min test. The mean depth of penetration and its rate did not differ significantly for distilled and tap water. The mean depth of penetration rate for both distilled and tap water increased to a maximum and then decreased with test duration, while that for mineral oil had a maximum during the initial period. The ratio h/2a of the pit depth h to the pit diameter 2a varied from 0.04 to 0.13 in water and from 0.06 to 0.20 in mineral oil. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the pits are initially formed over the grain boundaries and precipitates while the surface grains are deformed under cavitation attack.

  19. Effect of farmyard manure rate on water erosion of a Mediterranean soil: determination of the critical point of inefficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annabi, Mohamed; Bahri, Haithem; Cheick M'Hamed, Hatem; Hermessi, Taoufik

    2016-04-01

    Intensive cultivation of soils, using multiple soil tillage, led to the decrease of their organic matter content and structural stability in several cultivated area of the Mediterranean countries. In these degraded soils, the addition of organic products, traditionally the animal manure, should improve soil health among them the resistance of soil to water erosion. The aim of this study was to evaluate after 1 year of the addition to a cambisoil different doses of farmyard manure on soil organic matter content, on microbial activity and on aggregate stability (proxy to soil resistance to water erosion). The statistical process (bilinear model) was used to found a point at which the addition of the organic product no longer influences the soil resistance to erosion. The farmyard manure issued from a cow breeding was composted passively during 4 months and used to amend a small plots of a cultivated cambisol (silty-clay texture, 0.9% TOC) located in the northeast of Tunisia (Morneg region). The manure was intimately incorporate to the soil. The manure organic matter content was 31%, and its isohumic coefficient was 49%. Twelve dose of manure were tested: from 0 to 220 t C.ha-1. The experiment was started on September 2011. In November 2012, soil sampling was done and soil organic carbon content (Walkley-Black method) and soil aggregate stability (wet method of Le Bissonnais) were assessed. A laboratory incubations of soil+manure mixtures, with the same proportions as tested in the field conditions, was carried at 28°C and at 75% of the mixture field capacity water retention. Carbon mineralization was monitored during three months incubation. Results show that the addition of farmyard manure stimulated the microbial activity proportionally to the added dose. This activation is due to the presence of easily biodegradable carbon in the manure, which increases with increasing manure dose. On the other hand, the addition of manure increased the aggregate stability with

  20. An Integrated GIS/RS Approach for Soil Erosion Assessment and Modeling in Syrian Coastal Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An integrated remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) technique was employed to characterize the spatial distribution of the risk of soil erosion by water on Latakia district,Syria.The universal soil loss equation (USLE) was used to calculate the annual soil loss rates for Latakia soils.Mainly,remote sensing data,soil survey,land use inventory,elevation data and climatic atlases are used as resource data sets to generate USLE factor values.The results revealed that integration of GIS/RS with USLE was a practical and effective approach for monitoring soil erosion over large areas.

  1. A review of soil erodibility in water and wind erosion research%水蚀风蚀过程中土壤可蚀性研究述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋阳; 刘连友; 严平

    2005-01-01

    Soil erodibility is an important index to evaluate the soil sensitivity to erosion. The research on soil erodibility is a crucial tache in understanding the mechanism of soil erosion. Soil erodibility can be evaluated by measuring soil physiochemical properties, scouring experiment, simulated rainfall experiment, plot experiment and wind tunnel experiment. We can use soil erosion model and nomogram to calculate soil erodibility. Many soil erodibility indices and formulae have been put forward. Soil erodibility is a complex concept, it is influenced by many factors, such as soil properties and human activities. Several obstacles restrict the research of soil erodibility. Firstly, the research on soil erodibility is mainly focused on farmland; Secondly, soil erodibility in different areas cannot be compared sufficiently; and thirdly, the research on soil erodibility in water-wind erosion is very scarce. In the prospective research, we should improve method to measure and calculate soil erodibility, strengthen the research on the mechanism of soil erodibility, and conduct research on soil erodibility by both water and wind agents.

  2. Testing model parameters for wave-induced dune erosion using observations from Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, J. R.; Long, J. W.; Stockdon, H. F.

    2017-01-01

    Models of dune erosion depend on a set of assumptions that dictate the predicted evolution of dunes throughout the duration of a storm. Lidar observations made before and after Hurricane Sandy at over 800 profiles with diverse dune elevations, widths, and volumes are used to quantify specific dune erosion model parameters including the dune face slope, which controls dune avalanching, and the trajectory of the dune toe, which controls dune migration. Wave-impact models of dune erosion assume a vertical dune face and erosion of the dune toe along the foreshore beach slope. Observations presented here show that these assumptions are not always valid and require additional testing if these models are to be used to predict coastal vulnerability for decision-making purposes. Observed dune face slopes steepened by 43% yet did not become vertical faces, and only 50% of the dunes evolved along a trajectory similar to the foreshore beach slope. Observations also indicate that dune crests were lowered during dune erosion. Moreover, analysis showed a correspondence between dune lowering and narrower beaches, smaller dune volumes, and/or longer wave impact.

  3. Seasonal differences in hillslope development derived from TLS data and their implementation in erosion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugirg, Fabian; Kaiser, Andreas; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen; Becht, Michael; Haas, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Steep slopes with sparse vegetation or free of vegetation are a major sediment source in alpine catchments. The monitored slope in the Bavarian Alps, Germany consists of glacial tills from several glacial advances in the Pleistocene and is almost free of vegetation. It has been subject to several TLS data acquisitions dating back to the year 2009. The alignment of the acquired data was done by using permanently fixed tie points. Therefore, long term changes, as well as event based surface changes can be analysed. In combination with the climatic settings, snow during the winter months and some heavy rain events during the summer, it is subject to several different geomorphic processes that are acting at the slope. Different patterns and volumes of surface change, especially erosion could be detected in the course of a year: Mainly rill erosion during the summer, whereas the early winter period is characterized by accumulation in the rills and erosion on the slope. Snow melt and precipitation trigger small scale slides and debris flows at the end of the winter. The acquired DEMs were furthermore used to model erosion with two different kinds of erosion models: a physical-based and a statistical-based. The modelled values are in good agreement with the measured surface changes during the summer period, but they are inaccurate during the winter months and need some more improvements to model geomorphic winter processes.

  4. Testing model parameters for wave-induced dune erosion using observations from Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, Jacquelyn R.; Long, Joseph W.; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2017-01-01

    Models of dune erosion depend on a set of assumptions that dictate the predicted evolution of dunes throughout the duration of a storm. Lidar observations made before and after Hurricane Sandy at over 800 profiles with diverse dune elevations, widths, and volumes are used to quantify specific dune erosion model parameters including the dune face slope, which controls dune avalanching, and the trajectory of the dune toe, which controls dune migration. Wave-impact models of dune erosion assume a vertical dune face and erosion of the dune toe along the foreshore beach slope. Observations presented here show that these assumptions are not always valid and require additional testing if these models are to be used to predict coastal vulnerability for decision-making purposes. Observed dune face slopes steepened by 43% yet did not become vertical faces, and only 50% of the dunes evolved along a trajectory similar to the foreshore beach slope. Observations also indicate that dune crests were lowered during dune erosion. Moreover, analysis showed a correspondence between dune lowering and narrower beaches, smaller dune volumes, and/or longer wave impact.

  5. Model based optimization of wind erosion control by tree shelterbelt for suitable land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartus, M.; Farsang, A.; Szatmári, J.; Barta, K.

    2012-04-01

    The degradation of soil by wind erosion causes huge problem in many parts of the world. The wind erodes the upper, nutrition rich part of the soil, therefore erosion causes soil productivity loss. The length of tree shelterbelts was significantly reduced by the collectivisation (1960-1989) and the wind erosion affected areas expanded in Hungary. The tree shelterbelt is more than just a tool of wind erosion control; by good planning it can increase the yield. The tree shelterbelt reduces the wind speed and changes the microclimate providing better condition to plant growth. The aim of our work is to estimate wind erosion risk and to find the way to reduce it by tree shelterbelts. A GIS based model was created to calculate the risk and the optimal windbreak position was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk to the minimum. The model is based on the DIN 19706 (Ermitlung der Erosiongefährdung von Böden durch Wind, Estimation of Wind Erosion Risk) German standard. The model uses five input data: structure and carbon content of soil, average yearly wind speed at 10 meters height, the cultivated plants and the height and position of windbreak. The study field (16km2) was chosen near Szeged (SE Hungary). In our investigation, the cultivated plant species and the position and height of windbreaks were modified. Different scenarios were made using the data of the land management in the last few years. The best case scenario (zero wind erosion) and the worst case scenario (with no tree shelter belt and the worst land use) were made to find the optimal windbreak position. Finally, the research proved that the tree shelterbelts can provide proper protection against wind erosion, but for optimal land management the cultivated plant types should also controlled. As a result of the research, a land management plan was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk on the study field, which contains the positions of new tree shelterbelts planting and the optimal cultivation.

  6. Observations and Predictions of Wave Runup, Extreme Water Levels, and Medium-Term Dune Erosion during Storm Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Suanez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of dune erosion and accretion on the high-energy macrotidal Vougot beach in North Brittany (France over the past decade (2004–2014 has revealed significant morphological changes. Dune toe erosion/accretion records have been compared with extreme water level measurements, defined as the sum of (i astronomic tide; (ii storm surge; and (iii vertical wave runup. Runup parameterization was conducted using swash limits, beach profiles, and hydrodynamic (Hm0, Tm0,–1, and high tide water level—HTWL data sets obtained from high frequency field surveys. The aim was to quantify in-situ environmental conditions and dimensional swash parameters for the best calibration of Battjes [1] runup formula. In addition, an empirical equation based on observed tidal water level and offshore wave height was produced to estimate extreme water levels over the whole period of dune morphological change monitoring. A good correlation between this empirical equation (1.01Hmoξo and field runup measurements (Rmax was obtained (R2 85%. The goodness of fit given by the RMSE was about 0.29 m. A good relationship was noticed between dune erosion and high water levels when the water levels exceeded the dune foot elevation. In contrast, when extreme water levels were below the height of the toe of the dune sediment budget increased, inducing foredune recovery. These erosion and accretion phases may be related to the North Atlantic Oscillation Index.

  7. Rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings using discrete water jets: Effects of water cushioning, substrate geometry, impact distance, and coating properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Bernad, Pablo L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and reliable rain erosion screening of blade coatings for wind turbines is a strong need in the coatings industry. One possibility in this direction is the use of discrete water jets, where so-called jet slugs are impacted on a coating surface. Previous investigations have mapped...... the influence of water jet slug velocity and impact frequency. In the present work, the effects on coating erosion of water cushioning, substrate curvature, and water nozzle-coating distance were explored. The investigations showed that in some cases water cushioning (the presence of a liquid film...... on the coating surface prior to impact) influences the erosion. Contrary to this, substrate curvature and the water nozzle-coating distance (coatings, including tensile strength, flexibility...

  8. Australian net (1950s–1990 soil organic carbon erosion: implications for CO2 emission and land–atmosphere modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chappell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The debate about soil erosion substantially offsetting fossil fuel emissions and acting as an important source or sink of CO2 remains unresolved. There is little historical land use and management context to this debate which is central to Australia's recent past of European settlement, agricultural expansion and agriculturally-induced soil erosion. We use "catchment" scale (∼25 km2 estimates of 137Cs-derived net (1950s–1990 soil redistribution of all processes (wind, water and tillage to calculate the net soil organic carbon (SOC redistribution across Australia. We approximate the selective removal of SOC at net eroding locations and SOC enrichment of transported sediment and net depositional locations. We map net (1950s–1990 SOC redistribtion across Australia and estimate erosion by all processes ∼4 Tg SOC yr−1 which represents a~loss of ∼2% of the total carbon stock (0–10 cm of Australia. Assuming this net SOC loss is mineralised, the flux (∼15 Tg CO2-e yr−1 represents an omitted 12% of CO2-e emissions from all carbon pools in Australia. Although a small source of uncertainty in the Australian carbon budget, the mass flux interacts with energy and water fluxes and its omission from land surface models likely creates more uncertainty than has been previously recognised.

  9. Australian net (1950s-1990) soil organic carbon erosion: implications for CO2 emission and land-atmosphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, A.; Webb, N. P.; Viscarra Rossel, R. A.; Bui, E.

    2014-09-01

    The debate remains unresolved about soil erosion substantially offsetting fossil fuel emissions and acting as an important source or sink of CO2. There is little historical land use and management context to this debate, which is central to Australia's recent past of European settlement, agricultural expansion and agriculturally-induced soil erosion. We use "catchment" scale (∼25 km2) estimates of 137Cs-derived net (1950s-1990) soil redistribution of all processes (wind, water and tillage) to calculate the net soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution across Australia. We approximate the selective removal of SOC at net eroding locations and SOC enrichment of transported sediment and net depositional locations. We map net (1950s-1990) SOC redistribution across Australia and estimate erosion by all processes to be ∼4 Tg SOC yr-1, which represents a loss of ∼2% of the total carbon stock (0-10 cm) of Australia. Assuming this net SOC loss is mineralised, the flux (∼15 Tg CO2-equivalents yr-1) represents an omitted 12% of CO2-equivalent emissions from all carbon pools in Australia. Although a small source of uncertainty in the Australian carbon budget, the mass flux interacts with energy and water fluxes, and its omission from land surface models likely creates more uncertainty than has been previously recognised.

  10. Theoretical analysis for the dynamic and energy mechanism in soil water-erosion%土壤水力侵蚀能量力学机理的理论分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许五弟; 袁勘省; 杨瑾

    2001-01-01

    根据力学和物质与能量原理,对土壤水力侵蚀这一自然地理现象从哲学的高度进行分析,认为水动力作用是土壤水力侵蚀的根本原因;物质与能量守恒是土壤水力侵蚀的基本法则;侵蚀与沉积并存是土壤水力侵蚀的普遍规律。提出基于能量力学机理的3个土壤水力侵蚀的新理论,即侵蚀平衡理论、最大梯度理论和水流侵蚀力理论。指出按这种思想建立的数学模型能揭示土壤水力侵蚀的规律,因而具有重要的理论和应用价值。%According to the mechanics theories and the matter and energy principle affecting, soil water-erosion, a physical geographic phenomenon was analyzed at a philosophical level. This research reveals that dynamic action is the root reason for soil water-erosion, and that law of conservation of mass and energy is the basic principle of soil erosion, and that the coexistence of erosion and sediment is a universal rule of soilwater-erosion. Three new theories of soil water-erosion based on energy mechanics, namely, the erosion equilibrium theory, the most gradient theory and stream erosion mechanics theory are put forward. The mathematics model set up on the basis of this idea is practicable in that it helps reveal the rule of soil water-erosion.

  11. 风水复合侵蚀研究述评%A review of the research on complex erosion by wind and water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋阳; 严平; 刘连友

    2006-01-01

    Complex erosion by wind and water, which is also called aeolian-fluvial interactions, is an important erosion process and landscape in arid and semiarid regions. The effectiveness of links between wind and water process, spatial environmental transitions and temporal environmental change are the three main driving forces determining the geomorphologic significance of aeolian-fluvial interactions. As a complex interrelating and intercoupling system, complex erosion by wind and water has spatialtemporal variation features. The process of complex erosion by wind and water can be divided into palaeoenvironmental process and contemporary process. Early work in drylands has often been attributed 1930s that the research on complex erosion by wind and water had been conducted. There are two obstacles restricting the research of complex erosion by wind and water. Firstly, how to transform in different temporal and spatial scales is still unsettled; and secondly, the research methodology is still immature. In the future, the mechanism and control of erosion, the complex soil erodibility in wind and water erosion will be the focus of research on complex erosion by wind and water.

  12. Forecast of muddy floods using high-resolution radar precipitation forcasting data and erosion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsel, Phoebe; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    In the federal province of Saxony, Eastern Germany, almost 60 % of the agricultural land is endangered by erosion processes, mainly caused by heavy rainfall events. Beside the primary impact of soil loss and decreasing soil fertility, erosion can cause significant effects if transported sediments are entering downslope settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes. Available radar precipitation data are closing the gap between the conventional rainfall point measurements and enable the nationwide rainfall distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution. By means of the radar precipitation data of the German Weather Service (DWD), high-resolution radar-based rainfall data totals up to 5 minute time steps are possible. The radar data are visualised in a grid-based hourly precipitation map. In particular, the daily and hourly precipitation maps help to identify regions with heavy rainfall and possible erosion events. In case of an erosion event on agricultural land, these areas are mapped with an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV). The camera-equipped UAV delivers high-resolution images of the erosion event, that allow the generation of high-resolution orthophotos. By the application of the high-resolution radar precipitation data as an input for the process-based soil loss and deposition model EROSION 3D, these images are for validation purposes. Future research is focused on large scale soil erosion modelling with the help of the radar forecasting product and an automatic identification of sediment pass over points. The study will end up with an user friendly muddy flood warning tool, which allows the local authorities to initiate immediate measures in order to prevent severe damages in settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes.

  13. Modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching at Fire Island (NY) during hurricane Sandy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, P.L.M.; McCall, R.T.; Den Bieman, J.P.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Ormondt, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused a breach at Fire Island (NY, USA), near Pelican Island. This paper aims at modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching processes that occured during the hurricane event at this stretch of coast with the numerical model XBeach. By using the default settings, the ero

  14. Modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching at Fire Island (NY) during hurricane Sandy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, P.L.M.; McCall, R.T.; Den Bieman, J.P.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Ormondt, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused a breach at Fire Island (NY, USA), near Pelican Island. This paper aims at modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching processes that occured during the hurricane event at this stretch of coast with the numerical model XBeach. By using the default settings, the

  15. Modelling of erosion of bentonite gel by gel/sol flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu (Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    order of a metre per year the gel may penetrate several metres into the fracture when steady state is reached. The simulations were made with only sodium as counterion. Most simulations had sodium concentrations below the critical coagulation concentration, CCC. In the compacted bentonite at the fracture mouth it was 10 mM and 0.1 mM in the approaching water. At these concentrations the gel is expansive and can turn into a sol releasing colloidal particles. The low ion concentration has a strong impact on the fluid viscosity, which increases with decreasing ionic strength. At the same time, however the repulsion forces between the smectite particles increase causing a quicker expansion. Simulations with higher sodium concentrations had a marginal influence on the erosion rate. For the highest water flow rates the smectite loss could be up to 0.3 kg per year for one canister. This is more than one order of magnitude larger than what could be reached by smectite particle diffusion alone if fluid flow was neglected. In experiments in downward facing slits (fractures) it has been found that bentonite releases gel agglomerates much faster than expected. These are released and sediment also under conditions where it is expected that the smectite particles should have separated into individual smectite sheets, which would not noticeably be influenced by gravity. The reasons for this behaviour are not understood. In the modelling it is assumed that there are no other larger non-smectite particles that would be left behind to gradually build up a bed of particles that could act as filter, slowing down or even straining further smectite penetration into the fracture. The modelling results could therefore be highly pessimistic because bentonites contain tens of percent of accessory minerals that do not form colloids and the presence of which may cause the expansion to be slowed down by friction against the fracture walls

  16. Erosion study of Fe–W binary mixed layer prepared as model system for RAFM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, K., E-mail: kazuyoshi.sugiyama@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Roth, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Alimov, V.Kh. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Elgeti, S.; Koch, F.; Höschen, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Maier, H.; Jacob, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Fe–W binary mixed layers were prepared as a model system for reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic (RAFM) steel for studying their dynamic erosion behavior resulting from energetic deuterium (D) irradiation. This investigation aims toward an assessment of RAFM steels as plasma-facing material. The surface composition of the model layers is modified by D irradiation. W is enriched at the surface with D irradiation fluence due to the preferential sputtering of Fe. It depends on the D impinging energy as well as the initial W fraction of the Fe–W layer. No significant development of surface topography was observed within the examined conditions. The erosion yield of a Fe–W layer is comparable to that of pure Fe in the low-fluence range and decreases with increasing D fluence. These results indicate that the dynamic change of erosion yield is significantly correlated with the surface W enrichment.

  17. On internal erosion in embankment dams:a literature survey of the phenomenon and the prospect to model it numerically

    OpenAIRE

    Mattsson, Hans; Hellström, J. Gunnar I.; Lundström, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    The main objective with this literature survey is to elucidate the state of the art of internal erosion in embankment dams in order to be able to formulate a research program for numerical modelling of internal erosion in a physically sound manner. Since these processes normally are localised to specific zones in a dam, the ordinary continuum approach frequently utilised in soil modelling will not, by itself, be successful. The plan of the research group is therefore to treat internal erosion...

  18. Evaluation of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate to prevent enamel loss after erosive challenges using an intra-oral erosion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R; Rege, A; Corby, P; Klaczany, G; Allen, K; Hershkowitz, D; Godder, B; Wolff, M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the ability of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (Pro-Argin' Technology), and 1450 ppm fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP) to prevent enamel loss from an erosive acid challenge in comparison to a silica-based dentifrice with 1450 ppm fluoride as MFP using an intra-oral erosion model. The intra-oral clinical study used a double blind, two-treatment, crossover design. A palatal retainer was used to expose the enamel specimens to the oral environment during the five-day treatment period. The retainer was designed to house three partially demineralized bovine enamel samples. The study population was composed of 24 adults, ages 18 to 70 years. The study consisted of two treatment periods, with a washout period lasting seven (+/- three) days preceding each treatment phase. A silica-based dentifrice without fluoride was used during the washout period. The Test Dentifrice used in this study contained 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (Pro-Argin Technology), and 1450 ppm fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP). The Control Dentifrice was silica-based and contained 1450 ppm fluoride as MFP. The treatment period lasted five days, during which the panelists wore the retainer 24 hours a day (except during meals and the ex vivo acid challenges) and brushed with their assigned product while wearing the retainer. The panelists brushed once in the morning and once in the evening each day for one minute, followed by a one-minute swish with the slurry and a rinse with 15 ml of water. The panelists brushed only their teeth and not the specimens directly. There were four ex vivo challenges with 1% citric acid dispersed throughout the day: two in the morning, one in the afternoon, and one in the evening. Mineral loss was monitored by a quantitative light fluorescence (QLF) technique. Twenty-three of 24 subjects successfully completed the study. The one subject who did not complete the study did so for

  19. Soil Organic Carbon Fractions and Stocks Respond to Restoration Measures in Degraded Lands by Water Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Li, Zhongwu; Huang, Jinquan; Huang, Bin; Xiao, Haibing; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-01-11

    Assessing the degree to which degraded soils can be recovered is essential for evaluating the effects of adopted restoration measures. The objective of this study was to determine the restoration of soil organic carbon under the impact of terracing and reforestation. A small watershed with four typical restored plots (terracing and reforestation (four different local plants)) and two reference plots (slope land with natural forest (carbon-depleted) and abandoned depositional land (carbon-enriched)) in subtropical China was studied. The results showed that soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon concentrations in the surface soil (10 cm) of restored lands were close to that in abandoned depositional land and higher than that in natural forest land. There was no significant difference in soil organic carbon content among different topographic positions of the restored lands. Furthermore, the soil organic carbon stocks in the upper 60 cm soils of restored lands, which were varied between 50.08 and 62.21 Mg C ha(-1), were higher than 45.90 Mg C ha(-1) in natural forest land. Our results indicated that the terracing and reforestation could greatly increase carbon sequestration and accumulation and decrease carbon loss induced by water erosion. And the combination measures can accelerate the restoration of degraded soils when compared to natural forest only. Forest species almost have no impact on the total amount of soil organic carbon during restoration processes, but can significantly influence the activity and stability of soil organic carbon. Combination measures which can provide suitable topography and continuous soil organic carbon supply could be considered in treating degraded soils caused by water erosion.

  20. The wind-water two-phase erosion and sediment-producing processes in the middle Yellow River basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许炯心

    2000-01-01

    Based on data from the middle Yellow River basin, a wind-water two-phase mechanism for erosion and sediment-producing processes has been found. By using this mechanism, the extremely strong erosion and sediment yield in the study area can be better explained. The operation of wind and water forces is different in different seasons within a year. During winter and spring, strong wind blows large quantities of eolian sand to gullies and river channels, which are temporally stored there. During the next summer, rainstorms cause runoff that contains much fine loessic material and acts as a powerful force to carry the previously prepared coarse material. As a result, hyperconcentrated flows occur, resulting in high-intensity erosion and sediment yield.

  1. Approaches for delineating landslide hazard areas using receiver operating characteristic in an advanced calibrating precision soil erosion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Ghazvinei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is undesirable natural event that causes land degradation and desertification. Identify the erosion-prone areas is a major component of preventive measures. Recent landslide damages at different regions lead us to develop a model of the erosion susceptibility map using empirical method (RUSLE. A landslide-location map was established by interpreting satellite image. Field observation data was used to validate the intensity of soil erosion. Further, a correlation analysis was conducted to investigate the "Receiver Operating Characteristic" and frequency ratio. Results showed a satisfactory correlation between the prepared RUSLE-based soil erosion map and actual landslide distribution. The proposed model can effectively predict the landslide events in soil-erosion area. Such a reliable predictive model is an effective management facility for the regional landslide forecasting system.

  2. Soil tillage, water erosion, and calcium, magnesium and organic carbon losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertol Ildegardis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil tillage influences water erosion, and consequently, losses of calcium, magnesium and organic carbon in surface runoff. Nutrients and organic carbon are transported by surface runoff in particulate form, adsorbed to soil colloids or soluble in water, depending on the soil tillage system. This study was carried out on an Inceptisol, representative of the Santa Catarina highlands, southern Brazil, between November 1999 and October 2001, under natural rainfall. The soil tillage treatments (no replications were: no-tillage (NT, minimum soil tillage with chiseling + disking (MT, and conventional soil tillage with plowing + two diskings (CT. The crop cycles sequence was soybean (Glycine max, oats (Avena sativa, beans (Phaseolus vulgaris and vetch (Vicia sativa. Conventional soil tillage treatment with plowing + two disking in the absence of crops (BS was also studied. Calcium and magnesium concentrations were determined in both water and sediments of the surface runoff, while organic carbon was measured only in sediments. Calcium and magnesium concentrations were greater in sediments than in surface runoff, while total losses of these elements were greater in surface runoff than in sediments. The greatest calcium and magnesium concentrations in surface runoff were obtained under CT, while in sediments the greatest concentration occurred under MT. Organic carbon concentration in sediments did not differ under the different soil tillage systems, and the greatest total loss was under CT system.

  3. Green Water Credits – exploring its potential to enhance ecosystem services by reducing soil erosion in the Upper Tana basin, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.H.; Droogers, P.; Hunink, J.; Mwaniki, B.; Muchena, F.; Gicheru, P.; Bindraban, P.; Onduru, D.; Cleveringa, R.; Bouma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Food production, water availability and energy production are important ecosystem services of the Upper Tana basin (Kenya) and they decline due to upstream erosion affecting downstream water users. The effect of 11 soil conservation measures on soil erosion and the three ecosystem services was

  4. Water Erosion in Relation with Soil Management System and Crop Sequence during 20 Years on an Inceptisol in South Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, I.; Schick, J.; Barbosa, F. T.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Flores, M. T.; Paz González, A.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion still remains persistent at the world scale, even if big efforts have been done to control and reduce it, mainly using soil crop residues to protect soil surface. Although in South Brazil the main management system for most crops is no tillage and direct drilling, water erosion prevails as the most important soil erosion type, which is due both, to the high erosivity and the evenly distribution of rainfall over the year. Moreover, some crops are still grown under soil tillage systems consisting of ploughing, harrowing and less frequently chiselling. Starting 1992, a field experiment under natural rainfall has been conducted on an Inceptisol located in Lages, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, which objective was to assess rainfall water erosion. Two soil cover conditions and four soil management systems were studied: I) a crop rotation, which included oats (Avena strigosa), soybean (Glycine max), common vetch (Vicia sativa), maize (Zea mays), fodder radish (Raphanus sativus) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) under the following soil management types: 1) ploughing plus two levelling operations (CT), chiselling plus levelling (RT) and direct drilling with no tillage (NT), and II) bare soil (BS) without crop cover tilled by ploughing plus two levelling. In more than 90% of the study cases, soil losses were collected for single rain events with erosive power, whose erosivity was calculated. Total rain recorded during the 20 year experimental period was approximately 66,400 mm, which is equivalent to roughly 105,700, MJ mm ha-1 h-1 (EI30), whereas soil losses in the BS treatment were higher than 1,700 t.ha-1. On average, soil losses under RT treatment showed a 92% reduction in relation with BS, whereas under CT the reduction in relation to BS was about 66%. Soil management by direct drilling (NT) was the most efficient system to minimize water erosion, as soil losses decreased about 98% when compared with BS. Moreover, soil management systems with a crop

  5. Measurement and data analysis methods for field-scale wind erosion studies and model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zobeck, T.M.; Sterk, G.; Funk, R.F.; Rajot, J.L.; Stout, J.E.; Scott Van Pelt, R.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate and reliable methods of measuring windblown sediment are needed to confirm, validate, and improve erosion models, assess the intensity of aeolian processes and related damage, determine the source of pollutants, and for other applications. This paper outlines important principles to conside

  6. A geo-information theoretical approach to inductive erosion modelling based on terrain mapping units.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suryana, N.

    1997-01-01

    Three main aspects of the research, namely the concept of object orientation, the development of an Inductive Erosion Model (IEM) and the development of a framework for handling uncertainty in the data or information resulting from a GIS are interwoven in this thesis. The first and the second aspect

  7. Simulating CRN derived erosion rates in a transient Andean catchment using the TTLEM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Herman, Frédéric; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Tenrorio Poma, Gustavo; Govers, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the impact of mountain building and erosion on the earth surface is key to reconstruct and predict terrestrial landscape evolution. Landscape evolution models (LEMs) are an essential tool in this research effort as they allow to integrate our growing understanding of physical processes governing erosion and transport of mass across the surface. The recent development of several LEMs opens up new areas of research in landscape evolution. Here, we want to seize this opportunity by answering a fundamental research question: does a model designed to simulate landscape evolution over geological timescales allows to simulate spatially varying erosion rates at a millennial timescale? We selected the highly transient Paute catchment in the Southeastern Ecuadorian Andes as a study area. We found that our model (TTLEM) is capable to better explain the spatial patterns of ca. 30 Cosmogenic Radio Nuclide (CRN) derived catchment wide erosion rates in comparison to a classical, statistical approach. Thus, the use of process-based landscape evolution models may not only be of great help to understand long-term landscape evolution but also in understanding spatial and temporal variations in sediment fluxes at the millennial time scale.

  8. Soil erosion model predictions using parent material/soil texture-based parameters compared to using site-specific parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. B. Foltz; W. J. Elliot; N. S. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    Forested areas disturbed by access roads produce large amounts of sediment. One method to predict erosion and, hence, manage forest roads is the use of physically based soil erosion models. A perceived advantage of a physically based model is that it can be parameterized at one location and applied at another location with similar soil texture or geological parent...

  9. Impact of erosion and transfer processes in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon contamination of water bodies in the Seine River basin (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateuille, David; Evrard, Olivier; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Chevreuil, Marc; Mouchel, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) reach problematic concentrations in water and sediment of numerous streams of the world. In the Seine River (France), they prevent to achieve the good chemical status enforced by European law. However, the provenance and the fate of PAHs found in rivers are still poorly understood. Here, we combined chemical and fallout radionuclide measurements conducted on a large number of suspended sediment (SS) (n = 231) and soil (n = 37) samples collected at 62 sites during an entire hydrological year. A model was developed to estimate mean PAH concentration in sediment from the population density in the drainage area and good relationships were found during both low stage and flood periods. Influence of human population also appeared to be stronger during the latter period. However, some discrepancies between measured and modeled PAH concentrations were observed and the role of the origin of SS was investigated. During the low flow period, the observed differences were explained by the provenance of river sediment (agricultural topsoil vs. eroded channel banks). Time-averaged PAH concentrations measured in suspended sediment collected in the catchments where erosion of agricultural topsoil dominated were systematically higher than the predicted values. On the contrary, in the catchments where erosion mainly occurred in deep soil or river embankment, the supply of particles protected from atmospheric fallout contamination led to measure concentrations below the predicted values. As this relationship between population density and SS contamination was no longer valid during the flood period, the role of transfer times was also investigated. The percentages of freshly eroded sediment in samples were determined by comparing the 7Be/210Pb ratio in rainfall and SS. An annual turn-over cycle of sediment was observed but no relationship was found between PAH contamination and residence times of particles within rivers. This result suggested

  10. Uncertainty of soil erosion modelling using open source high resolution and aggregated DEMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Mondal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital Elevation Model (DEM is one of the important parameters for soil erosion assessment. Notable uncertainties are observed in this study while using three high resolution open source DEMs. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE model has been applied to analysis the assessment of soil erosion uncertainty using open source DEMs (SRTM, ASTER and CARTOSAT and their increasing grid space (pixel size from the actual. The study area is a part of the Narmada river basin in Madhya Pradesh state, which is located in the central part of India and the area covered 20,558 km2. The actual resolution of DEMs is 30 m and their increasing grid spaces are taken as 90, 150, 210, 270 and 330 m for this study. Vertical accuracy of DEMs has been assessed using actual heights of the sample points that have been taken considering planimetric survey based map (toposheet. Elevations of DEMs are converted to the same vertical datum from WGS 84 to MSL (Mean Sea Level, before the accuracy assessment and modelling. Results indicate that the accuracy of the SRTM DEM with the RMSE of 13.31, 14.51, and 18.19 m in 30, 150 and 330 m resolution respectively, is better than the ASTER and the CARTOSAT DEMs. When the grid space of the DEMs increases, the accuracy of the elevation and calculated soil erosion decreases. This study presents a potential uncertainty introduced by open source high resolution DEMs in the accuracy of the soil erosion assessment models. The research provides an analysis of errors in selecting DEMs using the original and increased grid space for soil erosion modelling.

  11. Modeling the reduction of gross lithium erosion observed under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, T., E-mail: tabrams@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R.; Nichols, J.H.; Stotler, D.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); De Temmerman, G.; Berg, M.A. van den; Meiden, H.J. van der; Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Associate EURATOM-FOM, BL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Both thin (<1 μm) and thick (∼500 μm) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied in the linear plasma device Magnum-PSI at ion fluxes >10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and surface temperatures <700 °C. During Ne plasma exposures, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li–I radiation exceed Langmuir Law evaporation, but no previous results exist to benchmark the binary collision approximation (BCA) and thermal sputtering measurements. Measured Li erosion rates during D plasma bombardment were compared to the adatom-evaporation model of thermal sputtering with an additional reduction term to account for the relative D/Li composition of the Li film. This model captures the qualitative evolution of the Li erosion yield but still overestimates the measured erosion by a factor of 5–10. This suggests that additional refinements to the mixed-material model are needed.

  12. Assessment of erosion and deposition in steep mountain basins by differencing sequential digital terrain models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marco; Goldin, Beatrice; Comiti, Francesco; Brardinoni, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) built from repeated topographic surveys permit producing DEM of Difference (DoD) that enables assessment of elevation variations and estimation of volumetric changes through time. In the framework of sediment transport studies, DEM differencing enables quantitative and spatially-distributed representation of erosion and deposition within the analyzed time window, at both the channel reach and the catchment scale. In this study, two high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) derived from airborne LiDAR data (2 m resolution) acquired in 2005 and 2011 were used to characterize the topographic variations caused by sediment erosion, transport and deposition in two adjacent mountain basins (Gadria and Strimm, Vinschgau - Venosta valley, Eastern Alps, Italy). These catchments were chosen for their contrasting morphology and because they feature different types and intensity of sediment transfer processes. A method based on fuzzy logic, which takes into account spatially variable DTMs uncertainty, was used to derive the DoD of the study area. Volumes of erosion and deposition calculated from the DoD were then compared with post-event field surveys to test the consistency of two independent estimates. Results show an overall agreement between the estimates, with differences due to the intrinsic approximations of the two approaches. The consistency of DoD with post-event estimates encourages the integration of these two methods, whose combined application may permit to overcome the intrinsic limitations of the two estimations. The comparison between 2005 and 2011 DTMs allowed to investigate the relationships between topographic changes and geomorphometric parameters expressing the role of topography on sediment erosion and deposition (i.e., slope and contributing area) and describing the morphology influenced by debris flows and fluvial processes (i.e., curvature). Erosion and deposition relations in the slope-area space display substantial

  13. Comparing the impacts of land-use management and climate change on soil erosion: a modeling exercise for humid and dry Mediterranean regions in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Carvalho-Santos, Cláudia

    2015-04-01

    Climate change could impact soil erosion rates in the Mediterranean, either directly via the concentration of rainfall in a smaller number of winter events, or indirectly through changes in vegetation cover. In particular, climate-induced changes in land-use management and associated agro-forestry practices could lead to much greater impacts than the ones expected from climate change alone. This work compares how future climate and land-use changes could impact soil erosion. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was applied to two contrasting watersheds in Portugal. The Vez has a humid Mediterranean climate (1500 mm/yr average rainfall) and is presently covered by plantation forests and shrublands. The Xarrama has a dry Mediterranean climate (600 mm/yr annual rainfall) and is presently occupied mostly by an agroforestry system consisting of pasture and evergreen oaks. Both watersheds currently experience very low erosion rates due to the landcover type. In both cases, climate scenarios presuppose a small decrease in rainfall (-4% in the Vez, -9% in the Xarrama) but more concentrated in winter, where an increase is expected. Possible future land-use scenarios could lead to an intensification of agriculture, due to the expansion of vineyard areas in the humid region and the plantation of sunflowers for biofuel production in the dry region (up to c. 45% of the watershed in both cases). The results for both study sites were similar. The impacts of climate change itself were an increase in erosion, of 28% in the Vez and 18% in the Xarrama, which still resulted in low erosion rates. However, the impacts of land-use change were much higher: an erosion increase of 529% in the Vez and 120% in the Xarrama, leading to important erosion rates in the new agricultural areas. Despite the different changes, which could be to a large degree attributed to the higher erosion rates usually found in vineyards, the conclusions in both sites point to the much higher impact of

  14. A comparison between riverbank erosion models with an evaluation of the risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, L.; Campo, L.

    2012-04-01

    The riverbank erosion constitutes one of the main morphological phenomena that shape natural channels with particular reference to the river planform. The quantification of the riverbank retreat requires the knowledge of both local hydrodynamic and erodibility characteristics. Several models exist in literature that allow the estimation of the riverbank shear stress, that is the fundamental parameter in evaluating the retreat given the discharge flow and the geometry of the river channel. In this study two hydrodynamic models were selected, specifically the 1-D model HEC-RAS and the 2-D model River-2D. Both models were then combined with three shear stress models (Simon and Senturk, 1977, Steffler and Blackburn, 2002 and Kean and Smith, 2006) in order to obtain an estimation of the retreat on a study case on the Cecina river in Tuscany, Central Italy. A calibration of the models was performed basing on observations from aerial photos of the region over a period of ten years (1994-2004) and on observed discharge flows time series in the same period. The results of the different combinations of the models were discussed and compared. A framework was also developed for the risk analysis of land loss due to bank erosion, and an application to the study case was provided by using the results of the fluvial erosion modelling.

  15. Erosion and Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Heeres, Glenn; Os, van Bertil; Derickx, Willem; Schoorl, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Slope soil erosion is one of the main threats to archaeological sites. Several methods were applied to establish the erosion rates at archaeological sites. Digital elevation models (DEMs) from three different dates were used. We compared the elevations from these three models to estimate erosion. We

  16. Analysis, simulation and modeling of atmospheric stratification erosion with lumped parameter codes; Analyse, Simulation und Modellierung der Erosion atmosphaerischer Schichtungen mit Lumped Parameter-Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    The courses and consequences of severe accidents in nuclear power plants are usually simulated with the help of so called Lumped Parameter-Codes which are especially designed for this purpose. These codes are able to simulate complex physical phenomena within short computing times since they are based on a simplified zone principle. Furthermore they are provided with a simplified flow model basis. This dissertation aims at the ability of the German Containment Code System (COCOSYS) to simulate local accumulations of hydrogen. During severe accidents with a melting reactor core (as in Harrisburg or Fukushima) hydrogen can be generated and then be released to the containment. In case of a local accumulation a detonation can occur that endangers the buildings integrity. The results show that the development and the erosion of these hydrogen accumulations based on bouant flows are qualitatively well simulated. From a systematic grid study general rules concerning the simulation of the stratification erosion have been derivated. Those have been applied and confirmed by several blind code-benchmarks. A detailed analysis has shown that the simulated erosion rate and the resistance of simulated hydrogen accumulations are directly related to the grid discretisation chosen by the user. Based upon this analysis a model concept has been developed, which is able to detect hydrogen accumulations and to determine their intensity of interaction with impinging flows by non-dimensional numbers. The erosion flow is controlled by adjusting local grid effects. The model is in the development phase.

  17. Modeling the Economics of Beach Nourishment Decisions in Response to Coastal Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, M.; Ashton, A. D.; Hoagland, P.; Jin, D.; Kite-Powell, H.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.

    2012-12-01

    Beaches are constantly moving and changing. The dynamic transformations of beaches are mostly the result of the erosion of sand, which can occur through movements alongshore caused by waves, movements off-shore due to storms, or submersion due to sea-level rise. Predicted climate change impacts include potential changes in storminess and accelerated sea-level rise, which will lead to increased coastal erosion. At the same time, the number of people residing in coastal communities is increasing. The risks from eroding beaches (increased coastal flooding, damage to infrastructure, and displaced residents) are therefore increasing in number and scale; and coastal residents are taking actions to protect their homes. One such action is beach nourishment, where sand is added to a resident's property in order to widen the beach. We have developed an economic model of beach nourishment decision-making to investigate the relationship between the optimal volume and timing of beach nourishment and factors such as property value, erosion rate, and initial beach width. In this model, waterfront property owners nourish a beach when the losses in net rental income exceed the costs incurred from nourishing the beach. (Rental income is a function of property value, which in turn depends upon the width of the beach.) It is assumed that erosion and sea-level rise are related. We examine different nourishment scenarios, including one-time nourishment in the first year; constant annual nourishment; and a myopic decision process in which the homeowner nourishes the beach if property losses from erosion over the next five years are expected to exceed the cost of nourishment. One-time nourishment delays property flooding for both constant and accelerating sea level rise; however, this delay is more substantial under constant sea level rise. With continual nourishment, the beach can be maintained under constant sea-level rise, provided that the erosion rate is comparable to the additional

  18. Application of a modified distributed-dynamic erosion and sediment yield model in a typical watershed of a hilly and gully region, Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Liu, Xia; Ma, Xiaoyi

    2016-11-01

    Soil erosion not only results in the destruction of land resources and the decline of soil fertility, but also contributes to river channel sedimentation. In order to explore the spatiotemporal evolution of erosion and sediment yield before and after returning farmland in a typical watershed of the hilly and gully region (Chinese Loess Plateau), a distributed-dynamic model of sediment yield based on the Chinese Soil Loss Equation (CSLE) was established and modified to assess the effects of hydrological factors and human activities on erosion and sediment yield between 1995 and 2013. Results indicate that (1) the modified model has the characteristics of a simple algorithm, high accuracy, wide practicability and easy expansion, and can be applied to predict erosion and sediment yield in the study area, (2) soil erosion gradations are closely related to the spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity and land use patterns, and the current soil and water conservation measures are not efficient for high rainfall intensities, and (3) the average sediment yield rate before and after model modification in the most recent 5 years (in addition to 2013) is 4574.62 and 1696.1 Mg km-2, respectively, decreasing by about 35.4 and 78.2 % when compared to the early governance (1995-1998). However, in July 2013 the once-in-a-century storm is the most important reason for maximum sediment yield. Results may provide an effective and scientific basis for soil and water conservation planning and ecological construction of the hilly and gully region, Chinese Loess Plateau.

  19. Process identification of soil erosion in steep mountain regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Konz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mountainous soil erosion processes were investigated in the Urseren Valley (Central Switzerland by means of measurements and simulations. The quantification of soil erosion was performed on hill slope scale (2·20 m for three different land use types: hayfields, pastures with dwarf shrubs and pastures without dwarf shrubs with three replicates each. Erosion rates during growing season were measured with sediment traps between June 2006 and November 2007. Long-term soil erosion rates were estimated based on Cs- 137 redistribution. In addition, soil moisture and surface flow were recorded during the growing season in the field and compared to model output. We chose the WEPP model (Water Erosion Prediction Project to simulate soil erosion during the growing season. Model parameters were determined in the field (slope, plant species, fractional vegetation cover, initial saturation level, by laboratory analyses (grain size, organic matter and by literature study. The WEPP model simulates sheet erosion processes (interrill and splash erosion processes, please note that no rill erosion occurs at our sites. Model output resulted in considerable smaller values than the measured erosion rates with sediment traps for the same period. We attribute the differences to observed random gravity driven erosion of soil conglomerates. The Cs-137 measurements deliver substantially higher mean annual erosion rates, which are most likely connected to snow cover related processes such as snow gliding and avalanche activities.

  20. Modeling Longshore Transport and Coastal Erosion Due to Storms at Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    Rapid erosion of Arctic coastlines is well-documented and is a major concern for the residents of Arctic coastal communities. This problem appears to be exacerbated by longer periods of ice-free conditions as the result of climate change. Despite substantial prior work and several engineering reports by agencies and firms charged with the investigation of mitigation options, there have been very few scientific studies aimed at modeling the dominant physical processes and making quantitative predictions of coastal erosion rates along Arctic coastlines in response to various forcing parameters/scenarios and storm return frequencies. Moreover, there has been virtually no work aimed at trying to quantify the relative contributions of various coastal erosion processes, including longshore sediment transport, cross-shore sediment transport due to storm surges and sediment inputs from coastal watersheds. In an effort to quantify erosion rates for the coastline near Barrow, Alaska, a numerical coastal erosion model has been developed that conserves sediment as longshore currents set up by oblique storm waves remove sediment from some locations and deposit it at others. This model uses the well-known CERC formula (or similar formulas), which expresses the longshore sediment transport rate as a nonlinear function of the angle that the coastline makes with the incoming wave crests. The rate of accretion or erosion is then computed from the spatial derivative of this sediment transport rate, with accretion where the derivative is negative and erosion where it is positive. Incoming wave angles are computed from hourly wind data by invoking the simple assumption that a fully-developed sea state is achieved in each time step. While this assumption is not valid in general, it is reasonable for the large, sustained storm events that are responsible for the bulk of the sediment transport. The 1955 coastline near Barrow, as digitized from aerial photos, was used to initialize the

  1. Atrazine incorporation and soil erosion: balancing competing water quality concerns for claypan soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S. Corn Belt, claypan soils are vulnerable to both erosion and transport of unincorporated herbicides. Thus, there is a need to identify tillage practices that can achieve a balance between herbicide transport and soil erosion for these soils. The objectives of this research were to compare...

  2. The impacts of climate change on soils. Investigations of impacts of climate change on soil erosion by water; Wirkungen der Klimaaenderungen auf die Boeden. Untersuchungen zu Auswirkungen des Klimawandels auf die Bodenerosion durch Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurbs, Daniel [Geoflux GbR, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Steininger, Michael [Mitteldeutsches Institut fuer angewandte Standortkunde und Bodenschutz (MISB), Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Climate forecasts regarding the 21st century raise expectations in soil erosion growth mainly due to changes in heavy precipitation characteristics and ground cover in line with the adaptation of the crop growing season to future climatic conditions. The aim of this study initiated by the Federal Environmental Agency was, to examine the impacts of climate change on soil erosion by water in Germany using data calculated by the statistical climate model WETTREG. Soil erosion by water was estimated following an USLE approach implemented in ABAGFlux and TerraFlux with focus on the usage-based erosion potential in German agricultural areas. In the 2nd project phase the USLE R factor was recalculated for the recent (1971-2000) and future climate periods (2011-2040, 2041-2070, 2071-2100) using statistical methods such as the peak over threshold method. Furthermore the climate-induced change of the C-factor was analyzed with respect to changes of culture periods, ground cover and the monthly R factor. Scenarios regarding future percentage of conservation tillage systems as also the potential and usage-based soil erosion for these four climate periods have been modelled. The results underline a requirement to differentiate the view on temporal and spatial development of R factors and potential soil erosion. There are minor changes between 2011 and 2040 followed by an increased erosion hazard in western and north-western Germany after 2041 while eastern and southern Germany face a downward trend of R factors, derived using WETTREG data of a reference period 1971 to 2000. Between 2071 and 2100 potential soil erosion rises with R factors above the actual state due to more heavy rain falls nearly all over Germany. The resulting temporal offset of culture periods and the monthly distribution of the R factor cause rising C factors in all time periods as also increasing usage-based soil erosion hazard in Germany. This study shows that soil erosion exists in Germany. The problem

  3. Does introduced fauna influence soil erosion? A field and modelling assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G R; Lowry, J B C; Dever, C; Braggins, M

    2015-06-15

    Pigs (Sus scrofa) are recognised as having significant ecological impacts in many areas of the world including northern Australia. The full consequences of the introduction of pigs are difficult to quantify as the impacts may only be detected over the long-term and there is a lack of quantitative information on the impacts of feral pigs globally. In this study the effect of feral pigs is quantified in an undisturbed catchment in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. Over a three-year period, field data showed that the areal extent of pig disturbance ranged from 0.3-3.3% of the survey area. The mass of material exhumed through these activities ranged from 4.3 t ha(-1) yr(-1) to 36.0 t ha(-1) yr(-1). The findings demonstrate that large introduced species such as feral pigs are disturbing large areas as well as exhuming considerable volumes of soil. A numerical landscape evolution and soil erosion model was used to assess the effect of this disturbance on catchment scale erosion rates. The modelling demonstrated that simulated pig disturbance in previously undisturbed areas produced lower erosion rates compared to those areas which had not been impacted by pigs. This is attributed to the pig disturbance increasing surface roughness and trapping sediment. This suggests that in this specific environment, disturbance by pigs does not enhance erosion. However, this conclusion is prefaced by two important caveats. First, the long term impact of soil disturbance is still very uncertain. Secondly, modelling results show a clear differentiation between those from an undisturbed environment and those from a post-mining landscape, in which pig disturbance may enhance erosion.

  4. Sunspot and starspot lifetimes in a turbulent erosion model

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Yuri E

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative models of sunspot and starspot decay predict the timescale of magnetic diffusion and may yield important constraints in stellar dynamo models. Motivated by recent measurements of starspot lifetimes, we investigate the disintegration of a magnetic flux tube by nonlinear diffusion. Previous theoretical studies are extended by considering two physically motivated functional forms for the nonlinear diffusion coefficient $D$: an inverse power-law dependence $D \\propto B^{-\

  5. Long-Term Impact of Sediment Deposition and Erosion on Water Surface Profiles in the Ner River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Dysarz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to test forecasting of the sediment transport process, taking into account two main uncertainties involved in sediment transport modeling. These are: the lack of knowledge regarding future flows, and the uncertainty with respect to which sediment transport formula should be chosen for simulations. The river reach chosen for study is the outlet part of the Ner River, located in the central part of Poland. The main characteristic of the river is the presence of an intensive morphodynamic process, increasing flooding frequency. The approach proposed here is based on simulations with a sediment-routing model and assessment of the hydraulic condition changes on the basis of hydrodynamic calculations for the chosen characteristic flows. The data used include Digital Terrain Models (DTMs, cross-section measurements, and hydrological observations from the Dabie gauge station. The sediment and hydrodynamic calculations are performed using program HEC-RAS 5.0. Twenty inflow scenarios are of a 10-year duration and are composed on the basis of historical data. Meyer-Peter and Müller and Engelund-Hansen formulae are applied for the calculation of sediment transport intensity. The methodology presented here seems to be a good tool for the prediction of long-term impacts on water surface profiles caused by sediment deposition and erosion.

  6. Understanding safety in healthcare: the system evolution, erosion and enhancement model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Carthey

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises previous theories of accident causation, human error, foresight, resilience and system migration. Five lessons from these theories are used as the foundation for a new model which describes how patient safety emerges in complex systems like healthcare: the System Evolution Erosion and Enhancement model. It is concluded that to improve patient safety, healthcare organisations need to understand how system evolution both enhances and erodes patient safety.

  7. Vegetation cover, avoided erosion and water quality in high Andean wetlands, Yeso River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Alejandro; Soto, Jorge; Seguel, Oscar; Pérez, Javier; Osses, Daniela; Leiva, Nicolás; Zerega, Linka

    2017-04-01

    Wetlands on the high Andes mountains near Santiago de Chile have been impacted by overgrazing and off-road tourists. We studied wetlands in El Yeso River basin. In February 2015 we established 36 exclusions and measured vegetation cover and height, biomass production in and out the exclusions starting in October. Water and undisturbed soil samples were collected. Data were analyzed statistically to estimate i) the recovery of vegetation, and ii) the influence of grazing and vehicle traffic on vegetation loss, and iii) impacts on soil and water quality. In areas with less intense traffic, the difference in vegetation coverage in and out the exclusions is 22% (± 11.4%); in areas with more intense traffic this difference is 16% (± 16%). Height of vegetation, in the less intense traffic areas, ranges from 6.25 cm (± 2.8) to 13.32 cm (± 6.3). With higher traffic it varies between 6.9 cm (± 3.1) and 13.6 cm (± 5.4). Biomass varies between 0.06 kg DM/m2 to 0.57 kg DM/m2 depending on botanical composition and date. After water circulates through the wetlands its content of nitrogen increases 37.33% to 0.37 mg N/l and the fecal coliforms 66.67% to 0.67 MPN/100 ml, because of cattle. On the contrary, turbidity decreases 20.67% to 0.21 UNT because sediments are captured by vegetation. We also estimated an avoided erosion rate, ranging between 1.23% and 31.87% (depending on the slope) due to the increase in coverage within the exclusions.

  8. The new conversion model MODERN to derive erosion rates from inventories of fallout radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Frenkel, Elena; A'Campo-Neuen, Annette; Iurian, Andra-Rada; Ketterer, Michael E.; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) has become one of the most commonly used methods to quantify soil erosion and depositional processes. FRNs include anthropogenic radionuclides (e.g. 137Cs, 239+240Pu) released into the atmosphere during nuclear bomb tests and power plant accidents (e.g Chernobyl, Fukushima-Daiichi), as well as natural radiotracers such as 210Pbex and 7Be. FRNs reach the land surface by dry and wet fallouts from the atmosphere. Once deposited, FRNs are tightly adsorbed by fine soil particles and their subsequent redistribution is mostly associated with soil erosion processes. FRNs methods are based on a qualitative comparison: the inventory (total radionuclide activity per unit area) at a given sampling site is compared to that of a so called reference site. The conversion of FRN inventories into soil erosion and deposition rates is done with a variety of models, which suitability is dependent on the selected FRN, soil cultivation (ploughed or unploughed) and movement (erosion or deposition). The authors propose a new conversion model, which can be easily and comprehensively used for different FRNs, land uses and soil redistribution processes. This new model i.e. MODERN (MOdelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides) considers the precise depth distribution of a given FRN at a reference site, and allows adapting it for any specific site conditions. MODERN adaptability and performance has been tested on two published case studies: (i) a 137Cs study in an alpine and unploughed area in the Aosta valley (Italy) and (ii) a 210Pbex study on a ploughed area located in Romania. The results show a good agreement and a significant correlation (r= 0.91, p<0.0001) between the results of MODERN and the published models currently used by the FRN scientific community (i.e. the Profile Distribution Model and the Mass Balance Model). The open access code and the cost free accessibility of MODERN will ensure the promotion of a wider

  9. The Erosion of Well-being: a Heuristic Mathematical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Thron, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a heuristic mathematical model of the changes over time in the statistical distribution of well-being of individuals in a society. The model predicts that when individuals overvalue the more overtly conspicuous aspects of well-being in their lifestyle choices, then under certain conditions the average well-being of the overall population may experience continuous decline. We investigate the influence of various effects, including the incidence of personal misfortune, heterogeneity in the population, and economic and/or technological progress.

  10. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Short-term measures for runoff water control on sloping land (temporary ditches and grass strips in controlling soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The agronomic measures made obligatory by the cross-compliance Standard Temporary measures for runoff water control on sloping land included in the Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies (MiPAAF decree on cross compliance until 2008, and by Standard 1.1 Creation of temporary ditches for the prevention of soil erosion in the 2009 decree, certainly appear to be useful for the control of soil erosion and runoff. The efficacy of temporary drainage ditches and of grass strips in controlling runoff and erosion has been demonstrated in trials conducted in field test plots in Italy. When level temporary drainage ditches are correctly built, namely with an inclination of not more than 2.5% in relation to the maximum hillslope gradient, they allow the suspended sediment eroded upstream to settle in the ditches, retaining the material carried away on the slope and, as a result, reducing the quantity of sediment delivered to the hydrographic network. In particular, among all the results, the erosion and runoff data in a trial conducted in Guiglia (Modena showed that in corn plots, temporary drainage ditches reduced soil erosion by 94%, from 14.4 Mg ha-1 year-1 (above the limit established by the NRCS-USDA of 11.2 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 0.8 Mg ha-1 year-1 (within the NRCS limit and also within the more restrictive limit established by the OECD of 6.0 Mg ha-1 year-1. With respect to the grass buffer strips the most significant research was carried out in Volterra. This research demonstrated their efficacy in reducing erosion from 8.15 Mg ha-1 to 1.6 Mg ha-1, which is approximately 5 times less than the erosion observed on bare soil. The effectiveness of temporary drainage ditches was also assessed through the application of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE erosion model to 60 areas under the control of the Agency for Agricultural Payments (AGEA in 2009, comparing the risk of erosion in these sample areas by simulating the presence and

  11. Two-dimensional time dependent hurricane overwash and erosion modeling at Santa Rosa Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, R.T.; Van Theil de Vries, J. S. M.; Plant, N.G.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Roelvink, J.A.; Thompson, D.M.; Reniers, A.J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    A 2DH numerical, model which is capable of computing nearshore circulation and morphodynamics, including dune erosion, breaching and overwash, is used to simulate overwash caused by Hurricane Ivan (2004) on a barrier island. The model is forced using parametric wave and surge time series based on field data and large-scale numerical model results. The model predicted beach face and dune erosion reasonably well as well as the development of washover fans. Furthermore, the model demonstrated considerable quantitative skill (upwards of 66% of variance explained, maximum bias - 0.21 m) in hindcasting the post-storm shape and elevation of the subaerial barrier island when a sheet flow sediment transport limiter was applied. The prediction skill ranged between 0.66 and 0.77 in a series of sensitivity tests in which several hydraulic forcing parameters were varied. The sensitivity studies showed that the variations in the incident wave height and wave period affected the entire simulated island morphology while variations in the surge level gradient between the ocean and back barrier bay affected the amount of deposition on the back barrier and in the back barrier bay. The model sensitivity to the sheet flow sediment transport limiter, which served as a proxy for unknown factors controlling the resistance to erosion, was significantly greater than the sensitivity to the hydraulic forcing parameters. If no limiter was applied the simulated morphological response of the barrier island was an order of magnitude greater than the measured morphological response.

  12. Impact erosion prediction using the finite volume particle method with improved constitutive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguizamón, Sebastián; Jahanbakhsh, Ebrahim; Maertens, Audrey; Vessaz, Christian; Alimirzazadeh, Siamak; Avellan, François

    2016-11-01

    Erosion damage in hydraulic turbines is a common problem caused by the high- velocity impact of small particles entrained in the fluid. In this investigation, the Finite Volume Particle Method is used to simulate the three-dimensional impact of rigid spherical particles on a metallic surface. Three different constitutive models are compared: the linear strainhardening (L-H), Cowper-Symonds (C-S) and Johnson-Cook (J-C) models. They are assessed in terms of the predicted erosion rate and its dependence on impact angle and velocity, as compared to experimental data. It has been shown that a model accounting for strain rate is necessary, since the response of the material is significantly tougher at the very high strain rate regime caused by impacts. High sensitivity to the friction coefficient, which models the cutting wear mechanism, has been noticed. The J-C damage model also shows a high sensitivity to the parameter related to triaxiality, whose calibration appears to be scale-dependent, not exclusively material-determined. After calibration, the J-C model is capable of capturing the material's erosion response to both impact velocity and angle, whereas both C-S and L-H fail.

  13. Experimental investigation of impinging jet erosion on model cohesive granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier-Coulin, Florian; Sarrat, Jean-Loup; Cuéllar, Pablo; Philippe, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    Erosion of soils affects both natural landscapes and engineering constructions as embankment dams or levees. Improving the safety of such earthen structures requires in particular finding out more about the elementary mechanisms involved in soil erosion. Towards this end, an experimental work was undertaken in three steps. First, several model materials were developed, made of grains (mostly glass beads) with solid bridges at particle contacts whose mechanical yield strength can be continuously varied. Furthermore, for most of them, we succeeded in obtaining a translucent system for the purpose of direct visualization. Second, these materials were tested against surface erosion by an impinging jet to determine a critical shear stress and a kinetic coefficient [2, 3]. Note that an adapted device based on optical techniques (combination of Refractive Index Matching and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence [3]) was used specifically for the transparent media. Third, some specifically developed mechanical tests, and particularly traction tests, were implemented to estimate the mechanical strength of the solid bridges both at micro-scale (single contact) and at macro-scale (sample) and to investigate a supposed relationship with soil resistance to erosion.

  14. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion - Part 2: Modelling large-scale landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egholm, D. L.; Andersen, J. L.; Knudsen, M. F.; Jansen, J. D.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2015-10-01

    There is growing recognition of strong periglacial control on bedrock erosion in mountain landscapes, including the shaping of low-relief surfaces at high elevations (summit flats). But, as yet, the hypothesis that frost action was crucial to the assumed Late Cenozoic rise in erosion rates remains compelling and untested. Here we present a landscape evolution model incorporating two key periglacial processes - regolith production via frost cracking and sediment transport via frost creep - which together are harnessed to variations in temperature and the evolving thickness of sediment cover. Our computational experiments time-integrate the contribution of frost action to shaping mountain topography over million-year timescales, with the primary and highly reproducible outcome being the development of flattish or gently convex summit flats. A simple scaling of temperature to marine δ18O records spanning the past 14 Myr indicates that the highest summit flats in mid- to high-latitude mountains may have formed via frost action prior to the Quaternary. We suggest that deep cooling in the Quaternary accelerated mechanical weathering globally by significantly expanding the area subject to frost. Further, the inclusion of subglacial erosion alongside periglacial processes in our computational experiments points to alpine glaciers increasing the long-term efficiency of frost-driven erosion by steepening hillslopes.

  15. Understanding safety in healthcare: the system evolution, erosion and enhancement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthey, Jane

    2013-12-01

    The paper summarises previous theories of accident causation, human error, foresight, resilience and system migration. Five lessons from these theories are used as the foundation for a new model which describes how patient safety emerges in complex systems like healthcare: the System Evolution Erosion and Enhancement model. It is concluded that to improve patient safety, healthcare organisations need to understand how system evolution both enhances and erodes patient safety. Significance for public healthThe article identifies lessons from previous theories of human error and accident causation, foresight, resilience engineering and system migration and introduces a new framework for understanding patient safety in healthcare; the System Evolution, Erosion and Enhancement (SEEE) model. The article is significant for public health because healthcare organizations around the world need to understand how safety evolves and erodes to develop and implement interventions to reduce patient harm.

  16. Sunspot and Starspot Lifetimes in a Turbulent Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative models of sunspot and starspot decay predict the timescale of magnetic diffusion and may yield important constraints in stellar dynamo models. Motivated by recent measurements of starspot lifetimes, we investigate the disintegration of a magnetic flux tube by nonlinear diffusion. Previous theoretical studies are extended by considering two physically motivated functional forms for the nonlinear diffusion coefficient D: an inverse power-law dependence D ∝ B‑ν and a step-function dependence of D on the magnetic field magnitude B. Analytical self-similar solutions are presented for the power-law case, including solutions exhibiting “superfast” diffusion. For the step-function case, the heat-balance integral method yields approximate solutions, valid for moderately suppressed diffusion in the spot. The accuracy of the resulting solutions is confirmed numerically, using a method which provides an accurate description of long-time evolution by imposing boundary conditions at infinite distance from the spot. The new models may allow insight into the differences and similarities between sunspots and starspots.

  17. Modeling the impacts of climate change and agricultural management practices on surface erosion in a dryland agricultural basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenbreit, E.; Adam, J. C.; Barber, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of climate change and agricultural management practices on suspended sediment concentrations in the Potlach River basin in northwestern Idaho. Suspended sediment is a pollutant in many water systems and contributes to the impairment of streams. Conventional tillage practices and rain-on-snow events in the Palouse region of northern Idaho and eastern Washington can produce some of the highest sediment losses per acre in the United States. Climate change may lead to further problems as more frequent and intense winter storm events are predicted to occur. Many hydrological models have been developed which examine suspended sediment in river systems. The Potlatch River basin near Julietta, ID was examined using the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM), which has a sediment module that includes surface erosion and channel sediment transport. DHSVM was calibrated and evaluated over the historical period of streamflow observations and was used to predict soil erosion rates and suspended sediment concentrations using a range of downscaled Global Climate Models (GCMs) emissions scenarios for the year 2045. Furthermore, the sensitivity of suspended sediment concentrations to conventional versus convservative tillage practices was explored. The results show that as the projected climate-driven intensity of storms increase, more sediment is predicted in the Potlatch River. Suspended sediment and streamflow are predicted to increase during the late fall through the early spring. This increase occurs during times of heightened runoff when suspended sediment concentration in the river is highest. Three tillage scenarios were incorporated into DHSVM for winter wheat: conventional till, reduced till, and no till. Erosion and suspended sediment were higher during storm events under conventional agricultural tillage scenarios. In the long-term, this research can lead to examination of the effects of climate

  18. The past 1-Myr of erosion in Fennoscandia via inverse modelling with CNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, John; Knudsen, Mads; Egholm, David; Andersen, Jane; Jacobsen, Bo; Heyman, Jakob

    2017-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide (CN) abundances at Earth's surface reflect the balance of accumulation during intervals of cosmic-ray exposure and loss via erosion and radioactive decay. Analyses of remnant CN inventories accumulated prior to the last glaciation (viz, CN inheritance) have granted valuable insights to the erosional legacy of polythermal ice masses. Simple exposure ages that match the timing of deglaciation imply >2-3 m of subglacial erosion via warm-based ice, whereas significant CN inheritance implies minimal erosion due to the development of frozen-bed patches. By comparing a compilation of simple 10Be bedrock exposure ages (n=355) to a recently published deglaciation chronology of Fennoscandia (±0.5 kyr) we find that 54% of samples contain appreciable (>2σ) CN inheritance, whereas just 7% of samples contain zero (>2σ) inheritance. With the aim of extracting deeper landscape history information from inherited CNs, we devised a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inverse approach that matches present-day CN (10Be-26Al) abundances with the most probable permutation of exposure history and erosion rates over multiple glacial and interglacial periods. Shifts in ice cover (and therefore cosmic-ray exposure) over successive glacial cycles are simulated via a free parameter threshold applied to a benthic δ18O record. Our MCMC model yields two key outputs integrated over the past 1-Myr: mean erosion (denudation) rate, and the ratio of burial to exposure. In addition, we propose a new measure of surface erosion history termed the 10Be-memory: the time since 1-1/e ( 63%) of 10Be atoms were accumulated, which effectively marks the starting point for landscape history recorded by 10Be. We apply our MCMC model to a subset (n=72) of Fennoscandian CN data spanning four bedrock landscape types: tors, blockfields, glacial troughs, and areally-scoured terrain. Our preliminary results (given as 1st-3rd quartile ranges) reveal that median erosion rates among all four landscape

  19. Coastal erosion vulnerability estimations by coupling field data and hydrodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finikianaki, Vasilia; Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim; Ghionis, George; Kampanis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    Wind generated waves are a dominant factor of coastal zone evolution as they induce nearshore sediment movement. Significant sediment transport and the associated morphological changes of the coastal zone are related, mainly, to storm events. In this study, the effects of a severe storm event, associated with the Etesian winds, that took place from the 24th to 30th of July at Gouves beach (north coast of Crete) were monitored ([1], [2]) and subsequently simulated, with the use of the Delft3D model, in order to provide necessary data for estimating beach vulnerability. Beach vulnerability to erosion was estimated by the BVI method ([3]), which has the ability to refer to smaller sectors of an individual beach. The interaction between waves and currents, which is required for the computation of the BVI, was obtained by the coupling of two models included in Delft3D: the Delft3D - FLOW, for the hydrodynamic computations and the sediment transport processes; and the Delft3D - WAVE, for the computation of the wave field. Boundary conditions were derived from the field data, assuming a JONSWAP spectrum. Additionally, 3 observation points were used for the monitoring of the computed quantities as a function of time. Their positions coincide with those of the three Valeport Autonomous Benthic Recorders, which were deployed at water depths of 2.60m, 3.95m and 5.62m during the field measurements. The outputs of the simulation fit well with the measured data, leading to accurate forecasted results regarding the morphodynamic conditions of the study area. Bottom changes occur mainly during the first peak of the event. The model slightly overestimates the significant wave height, the current velocity in the nearshore area and the suspended sediment concentration near the bed at the observation points. Furthermore, the model predicts a shoreward increase of sediment concentration at the observation points, with the value of accumulation at the second observation point being

  20. CUCKOO SEARCH VIA LÉVY FLIGHTS FOR OPTIMIZATION OF A PHYSICALLY-BASED RUNOFF-EROSION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso A. G. Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to calibrate a physically-based, event-oriented runoff-erosion model by means of a global optimization method known as cuckoo-host co-evolution (CHC which has co-evolutionary changes incorporated into the traditional cuckoo search algorithm. The physically-based erosion model that was chosen to be optimized here is the watershed erosion simulation program (WESP, which was developed for small semiarid basins to simulate runoff and erosion processes. The optimization technique was tested with the field data collected in an experimental watershed located in a semiarid region of Brazil, and such technique showed to be effective in order to locate the optimal erosion parameter values. On the basis of these results, such values for a semiarid region are given, which could be recommended as an initial estimate for other similar areas.

  1. Impacts of water and soil erosion in upstream watershed of Nenjiang River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Making a brief analysis of the water and soil loss present situation in Daxing'anling area which locates to the upstream region of Nenjiang River, and giving the water and soil loss of this area that have been made near 20 years, as well as the factors of the water and soil loss. According to the factors corresponding prevention measure and forecast model have been put forward, make a brief introduction to this model in this article. It is helpful to improve the local soil conservation and sustainable development.

  2. RETROGRESSIVE EROSION AND LONGITUDINAL PROFILE EVOLUTION IN NONCOHESIVE MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lien-Kuang CHEN; Su-Chin CHEN

    2006-01-01

    Retrogressive erosion plays a significant role in soil erosion and in channel morphology evolution.Retrogressive erosion occurs and migrates when the flow conditions and/or channel bed slope change.This study investigates through a series of experiments, the migration behavior of retrogressive erosion and the longitudinal profile evolution of a channel consisting of noncohesive sediment. Experimental results indicate that retrogressive erosion can be categorized into two types, stepped and rotating. In stepped erosion a nearly parallel erosion surface migrates upstream at a constant speed. The migration speed in rotating erosion is a function of the square root of time. The experimental results reveal that the discharge does not affect the migration speed of stepped erosion. However, the migration speed of rotating erosion increases with rising discharge. The crucial difference between rotating and stepped erosion, i.e. the threshold value separating the two forms of erosion is a function of the initial channel bed lowering and critical water depth. A model of retrogressive erosion in a noncohessive channel is developed based on the experimental results.

  3. Sea level driven marsh expansion in a coupled model of marsh erosion and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Walters, David C.; Reay, William G.; Carr, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Coastal wetlands are among the most valuable ecosystems on Earth, where ecosystem services such as flood protection depend nonlinearly on wetland size and are threatened by sea level rise and coastal development. Here we propose a simple model of marsh migration into adjacent uplands and couple it with existing models of seaward edge erosion and vertical soil accretion to explore how ecosystem connectivity influences marsh size and response to sea level rise. We find that marsh loss is nearly inevitable where topographic and anthropogenic barriers limit migration. Where unconstrained by barriers, however, rates of marsh migration are much more sensitive to accelerated sea level rise than rates of edge erosion. This behavior suggests a counterintuitive, natural tendency for marsh expansion with sea level rise and emphasizes the disparity between coastal response to climate change with and without human intervention.

  4. Muddied Waters: Estimating the national economic cost of soil erosion and sedimentation in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Soil erosion research in New Zealand has focused on the on-site costs of soil loss in the form of production loss and storm damage. Subsidization and implementation of soil conservation measures have primarily been justified through maintenance or improvement of farm productivity levels. The shift in responsibility for soil conservation management and damage remedies from national to regional government has highlighted public good issues raised by soil erosion. This paper develops an inventor...

  5. Analytical model for erosion behaviour of impacted fly-ash particles on coal-fired boiler components

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Das; K M Godiwalla; S P Mehrotra; K K M Sastry; P K Dey

    2006-10-01

    Fly ash particles entrained in the flue gas from boiler furnaces in coal-fired power stations can cause serious erosive wear on steel surfaces along the flow path. Such erosion can significantly reduce the operational life of the boiler components. A mathematical model embodying the mechanisms of erosion on behaviour, has been developed to predict erosion rates of coal-fired boiler components at different temperatures. Various grades of steels used in fabrication of boiler components and published data pertaining to boiler fly ash have been used for the modelling. The model incorporates high temperature tensile properties of the target metal surface at room and elevated temperatures and has been implemented in an user-interactive in-house computer code (EROSIM–1), to predict the erosion rates of various grades of steel. Predictions have been found to be in good agreement with the published data. The model is calibrated with plant and experimental data generated from a high temperature air-jet erosion-testing facility. It is hoped that the calibrated model will be useful for erosion analysis of boiler components.

  6. Analytical model for erosion behaviour of impacted fly-ash particles on coal-fired boiler components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.K.; Godiwalla, K.M.; Mehrotra, S.P.; Sastry, K.K.M.; Dey, P.K.

    2006-10-15

    Fly ash particles entrained in the flue gas from boiler furnaces in coal-fired power stations can cause serious erosive wear on steel surfaces along the flow path. Such erosion can significantly reduce the operational life of the boiler components. A mathematical model, embodying the mechanisms of erosion on behaviour, has been developed to predict erosion rates of coal-fired boiler components at different temperatures. Various grades of steels used in fabrication of boiler components and published data pertaining to boiler fly ash have been used for the modelling. The model incorporates high temperature tensile properties of the target metal surface at room and elevated temperatures and has been implemented in an user-interactive in-house computer code (EROSIM-1), to predict the erosion rates of various grades of steel. Predictions have been found to be in good agreement with the published data. The model is calibrated with plant and experimental data generated from a high temperature air-jet erosion-testing facility. It is hoped that the calibrated model will be useful for erosion analysis of boiler components.

  7. EVALUATION OF EROSION PRODUCTIVITY IMPACT CALCULATOR (EPIC) MODEL FOR MIDDLE MOUNTAIN REGION OF NEPAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sohan Kumar GHIMIRE; Mukand Singh BABEL

    2004-01-01

    This study verifies the applicability of EPIC model for an erosion plot (61.2 m2) and anupland terraced watershed (72 ha) using a total of 94 rainfall events over a study period of two years.In order to analyze the effect of storm size on runoff and soil loss processes,rainfall events are divided into three groups:small (<25mm),moderate (25-50mm) and large (>50mm).Results indicate that the model could predict reasonably well the runoff and soil loss from the erosion plot and the watershed for the moderate and large rainfall events.However,the runoff and soil loss prediction for the small rainfall events is found to be poor.On annual basis,both surface runoffand soil loss predictions match well the observations.In light of the importance of the moderate and large rainfall events in producing most of the annual runoff and soil loss in the study area,the EPIC model is applied to assess the impacts of erosion on agricultural productivity and to evaluate management practices to protect watersheds in the middle mountainous area of Nepal.

  8. Numerical Modelling of Wire-EDM for Predicting Erosion Rate of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kamlesh; Sharma, Gaurav; Dongre, Ganesh; Joshi, Suhas Sitaram

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a lot of work is carried out in photovoltaic industry for slicing Si ingots using non-conventional technique like wire-EDM apart from conventional techniques like inner diameter saw and multi-wire saw. It is an emerging technology in field of Si wafer slicing and has a potential to be cost efficient. It reduces the kerf-loss and produces crack-free Si wafers. In general, the process of Si wafer cutting using wire-EDM is less understood due to its complex nature. In this work, the complex phenomena like formation of plasma channel, melting and erosion of Si material has been modelled mathematically. Further, the effect of input energy parameters like current, open voltage and pulse on-time on plasma and plasma-ingot interface temperature has been studied. The model is further extended along the length of the wire to evaluate the erosion depth and rate. The effect of process parameters on erosion depth and rate was validated experimentally. The model considers variation in material removal through the `plasma flushing efficiency'.

  9. Development of a mobile application based on RUSLE model to predict erosion in olive groves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Moreno, Víctor Javier; Redel, María Dolores; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2017-04-01

    Environmental impact of agriculture in fragile areas such as the Mediterranean Basin due to its scarcity and/or variability of water resources or to their susceptibility to soil erosion may be extremely damaging. Over 96% of the world's olive oil is produced in Mediterranean countries (FAOSTAT, 2014). Suitable managements and environmental evaluations of the conditions in olive cultivation farms is of major relevance for countries such as Spain, particularly in Andalusia (in Southern Spain) with an olive orchard area of 1.5 Mha (CAP, 2016). The average erosion rates in olive orchard in Southern Spain are approximately 19 tons.ha-1.year-1. It is worth noting how 23% of this surface presents high or very high erosion rates with values over 50 tons.ha-1.year-1 (Areal, 2014). Most of farmers implement soil conservation practices only when have they perceived high erosion risk (Franco, 2011: Taguas and Gómez, 2015). On the other hand, technicians also require proper technological tools to evaluate in a straightforward way, soil loss risk in the field. Simple tools integrated into smartphones may enable us to evaluate soil erosion rates through minimum information; which would be a great help in raising farmer awareness as well as in environmental control. In this work, the preliminary version of RIESGO (Risk Index for Erosion Soil in Olive Groves) , -an APP mobile based in SECO (Soil Erosion Calculator in Olives; Marín-Moreno et al. 2013) that promises broad functionality to identify soil loss risk in the field,- is presented. Features such as simple screens, a reduced group of input data, calculations for R and K factors based on environmental information of Andalusia which are identified from geographical coordinates and a new method of obtaining factor C from empirical data have been integrated to fit its use in the field. RIESGO is and hybrid application which was programmed by using web technologies HTML, CSS and JavaScript, and built with Visual Studio Tools for

  10. Hydrology in a Mediterranean mountain environment, the Vallcebre Research basins (North Eastern Spain). IV. Testing hydrological and erosion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallart, F.; Latron, J.; Llorens, P.; Martinez-Carreras, N.

    2009-07-01

    Three modelling exercises were carried out in the Vallcebre research basins in order to both improve the understanding of the hydrological processes and test the adequate of some models in such Mediterranean mountain conditions. These exercises consisted of i) the analysis of the hydrological role of the agricultural terraces using the TOPMODEL topographic index, ii) the parametrisation of TOPMODEL using internal basin information, and iii) a test of the erosion model KINEROS2 for simulating badlands erosion. (Author) 13 refs.

  11. Experimental verification of a CFD model intended for the determination of restitution coefficients used in erosion modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernik Bartłomiej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion caused by solid particles transported with the steam or flue gas has a negative impact on the power unit reliability and availability. The erosion rate depends inter alia on the restitution of the particle velocity upon impact. The restitution coefficients determine the angle of the particle reflection off the tube surface and the particle post-impingement velocity, i.e., they determine the direction of the particle path, which has a substantial impact on the erosion phenomenon inside the tube. An attempt is made herein to develop a method of determination of restitution coefficients by means of numerical modelling assisted by experimental testing on physical models that will be implemented further in the Ansys Fluent code. Such a numerical procedure will verify the model of erosion caused by particles of iron oxides. The erodent impingement angle α1, the impingement velocity w1, and the reflection velocity w2 are measured using the Casio High-Speed Exilim EX-F1 camera, which enables filming at a high rate. The film is then processed graphically for “frame-by-frame” tracking. The following erodents were used in the testing: iron oxides, quartz sand with a different grain size (490, 1000, 1500, 2000 μm, and 1000 μm-diameter steel balls. The steel balls, due to their ideal shape, were treated as the comparative analysis reference standard. Erosion of three types of 5x10 cm plates was tested: a plasma-coated plate with an anti-erosion layer, an aluminium plate; and a steel sheet plate. Based on the restitution coefficient testing results, numerical simulations were performed of the particle reflection off the surface.

  12. Erosion sculptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, M. N. J.; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves the striking landscapes imprinted on the Earth and on the surfaces of our neighboring worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of clay bodies immersed in fast flowing water. Although commonly viewed as a smoothing process, we discover that erosion sculpts surprisingly sharp points and corners that persist as the body shrinks. These features result from a natural tendency to form surfaces that erode uniformly, and we argue that this principle may also apply to the more complex scenarios that occur in nature.

  13. Hydrology, erosion and nutrient transfers over a transition from semi-arid grassland to shrubland in the South-Western USA: A modelling assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Laura; Wainwright, John; Brazier, Richard E.

    2010-07-01

    SummaryLand degradation in arid and semi-arid areas, as a consequence of the invasion of grasslands by shrubs, is often associated with an increase in runoff and erosion and a change in nutrient transport. Modelling of nutrient transport during runoff events (in particular particulate-bound nutrients), is especially important, since the spatial redistribution of nutrients (in addition to water and sediment) can have significant implications for vegetation dynamics in these ecosystems. In this study, Mahleran (Model for Assessing Hillslope to Landscape Erosion Runoff, And Nutrients) is extensively evaluated against runoff and erosion data from four plots (representative of different stages of land degradation) over a transition from grassland to shrubland, at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico, USA. A new particulate-bound nutrient module was developed to include a representation of particulate-bound nutrient dynamics, which is an important form of nutrient transport in these ecosystems. Understanding dynamics of both dissolved and particulate-bound nutrient dynamics during runoff events is imperative, because of their differing roles in terms of nutrient bioavailability and potential implications for plant dynamics. Results of the model evaluation show that the runoff and erosion components of Mahleran perform reasonably well, as does the new particulate-bound nutrient sub-model, though not consistently. Performance of the particulate-bound nutrient model was better for the end-member plots, because of better parameterization data available for end-member vegetation types. Since the particulate-bound nutrient sub-model is by necessity strongly dependent on the simulated erosion rate, the performance of the particulate-bound nutrient model is dependent on the performance of the erosion component of Mahleran, so that when erosion is well represented by the model, so typically are particulate nutrient transfers. The performance of the dissolved

  14. Evaporation Erosion During the Relay Contact Breaking Process Based on a Simplified Arc Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xinglei; ZHOU Xue; ZHAI Guofu; PENG Xiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Evaporation erosion of the contacts is one of the fundamental failure mechanisms for relays.In this paper,the evaporation erosion characteristics are investigated for the copper contact pair breaking a resistive direct current (dc) 30 V/10 A circuit in the air.Molten pool simulation of thc contacts is coupled with the gas dynamics to cMculate the evaporation rate.A simplified arc model is constructed to obtain the contact voltage and current variations with time for the prediction of the current density and the heat flux distributions flowing from the arc into the contacts.The evaporation rate and mass variations with time during the breaking process are presented.Experiments are carried out to verify the simulation results.

  15. Landscape evolution in tidal embayments: Modeling the interplay of erosion, sedimentation, and vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpaos, Andrea; Lanzoni, Stefano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    We propose an ecomorphodynamic model which conceptualizes the chief land-forming processes operating on the intertwined, long-term evolution of marsh platforms and embedded tidal networks. The rapid network incision (previously addressed by the authors) is decoupled from the geomorphological dynamics of intertidal areas, governed by sediment erosion and deposition and crucially affected by the presence of vegetation. This allows us to investigate the response of tidal morphologies to different scenarios of sediment supply, colonization by halophytes, and changing sea level. Different morphological evolutionary regimes are shown to depend on marsh ecology. Marsh accretion rates, enhanced by vegetation growth, and the related platform elevations tend to decrease with distance from the creek, measured along suitably defined flow paths. The negative feedback between surface elevation and its inorganic accretion rate is reinforced by the relation between plant productivity and soil elevation in Spartina-dominated marshes and counteracted by positive feedbacks in multispecies-vegetated marshes. When evolving under constant sea level, unvegetated and Spartina-dominated marshes asymptotically tend to mean high water level (MHWL), different from multiple vegetation species marshes, which can make the evolutionary transition to upland. Equilibrium configurations below MHWL can be reached under constant rates of sea level rise, depending on sediment supply and vegetation productivity. Our analyses on marine regressions and transgressions show that when the system is in a supply-limited regime, network retreat and expansion (associated with regressions and transgressions, respectively) tend to be cyclic. Conversely, in a transport-limited regime, network reexpansion following a regression tends to take on a new configuration, showing a hysteretic behavior.

  16. Capability of Spaceborne Hyperspectral EnMAP Mission for Mapping Fractional Cover for Soil Erosion Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Malec

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion can be linked to relative fractional cover of photosynthetic-active vegetation (PV, non-photosynthetic-active vegetation (NPV and bare soil (BS, which can be integrated into erosion models as the cover-management C-factor. This study investigates the capability of EnMAP imagery to map fractional cover in a region near San Jose, Costa Rica, characterized by spatially extensive coffee plantations and grazing in a mountainous terrain. Simulated EnMAP imagery is based on airborne hyperspectral HyMap data. Fractional cover estimates are derived in an automated fashion by extracting image endmembers to be used with a Multiple End-member Spectral Mixture Analysis approach. The C-factor is calculated based on the fractional cover estimates determined independently for EnMAP and HyMap. Results demonstrate that with EnMAP imagery it is possible to extract quality endmember classes with important spectral features related to PV, NPV and soil, and be able to estimate relative cover fractions. This spectral information is critical to separate BS and NPV which greatly can impact the C-factor derivation. From a regional perspective, we can use EnMAP to provide good fractional cover estimates that can be integrated into soil erosion modeling.

  17. Soil erosion under climate change in Great Britain: long-term simulations using high-resolution regional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampalini, Rossano; Kendon, Elizabeth; Constantine, José Antonio; Schindewolf, Marcus; Hall, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Twenty-first century climate change simulations for Great Britain reveal an increase in heavy precipitation that may lead to widespread soil loss and reduced soil carbon stores by increasing the likelihood of surface runoff. We find the quality and resolution of the simulated rainfall used to drive soil loss variation can widely influence the results. Hourly high definition rainfall simulations from a 1.5km resolution regional climate model are used to examine the soil erosion response in two UK catchments. The catchments have different sensitivity to soil erosion. "Rother" in West Sussex, England, reports some of the most erosive events that have been observed during the last 50 years in the UK. "Conwy" in North Wales, is resilient to soil erosion because of the abundant natural vegetation cover and very limited agricultural practises. We modelled with Erosion3D to check variations in soil erosion as influenced by climate variations for the periods 1996-2009 and 2086-2099. Our results indicate the Rother catchment is the most erosive, while the Conwy catchment is confirmed as the more resilient to soil erosion. The values of the reference-base period are consistent with the values of those locally observed in the previous decades. A soil erosion comparison for the two periods shows an increasing of sediment production (off-site erosion) for the end of the century at about 27% in the Rother catchment and about 50% for the Conwy catchment. The results, thanks to high-definition rainfall predictions, throw some light on the effect of climatic change effects in Great Britain.

  18. A physically-based integrated numerical model for flow,upland erosion,and contaminant transport in surface-subsurface systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physically-based integrated hydrologic model that can simulate the rain-fall-induced 2D surface water flow, 3D variably saturated subsurface flow, upland soil erosion and transport, and contaminant transport in the surface-subsurface system of a watershed. The model couples surface and subsurface flows based on the assumption of continuity conditions of pressure head and exchange flux at the ground, considering infiltration and evapotranspiration. The upland rill/interrill soil erosion and transport are simulated using a non-equilibrium transport model. Contaminant transport in the integrated surface and subsurface domains is simulated using advection-diffusion equations with mass changes due to sediment sorption and desorption and exchanges between two domains due to infiltration, diffusion, and bed change. The model requires no special treatments at the interface of upland areas and streams and is suitable for wetland areas and agricultural watersheds with shallow streams.

  19. Hydro-abrasive erosion on coated Pelton runners: Partial calibration of the IEC model based on measurements in HPP Fieschertal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, D.; Abgottspon, A.; Albayrak, I.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    At medium- and high-head hydropower plants (HPPs) on sediment-laden rivers, hydro-abrasive erosion on hydraulic turbines is a major economic issue. For optimization of such HPPs, there is an interest in equations to predict erosion depths. Such a semi-empirical equation suitable for engineering practice is proposed in the relevant guideline of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62364). However, for Pelton turbines no numerical values of the model's calibration parameters have been available yet. In the scope of a research project at the high-head HPP Fieschertal, Switzerland, the particle load and the erosion on the buckets of two hard-coated 32 MW-Pelton runners have been measured since 2012. Based on three years of field data, the numerical values of a group of calibration parameters of the IEC erosion model were determined for five application cases: (i) reduction of splitter height, (ii) increase of splitter width and (iii) increase of cut-out depth due to erosion of mainly base material, as well as erosion of coating on (iv) the splitter crests and (v) inside the buckets. Further laboratory and field investigations are recommended to quantify the effects of individual parameters as well as to improve, generalize and validate erosion models for uncoated and coated Pelton turbines.

  20. Effects of Forest Management and Roads on Runoff, Erosion, and Water Quality: the Judd Creek Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, L. H.; James, C.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of forest management have long been a concern for land managers, and California has instituted particularly strict best management practices (BMPs) to minimize the potential adverse impacts of timber harvest on water quality and fisheries. This paper presents the results of the long-term study of Judd Creek, a 17.6 km2 watershed in the volcanic terrane of northeastern California. Runoff and turbidity monitoring began in late 2001 at five stations spaced along the main stem. In 2007 extensive road work was conducted in preparation for timber harvest, and this included abandoning 2.4 km of existing roads and constructing 4.23 km of new roads. In summer 2009 16% of the watershed was clearcut in 34 units that were 8-12 ha each. In 2011 detailed assessments were conducted on selected harvest units, 43 landings, streamside protection zones below clearcut units, and 23 km of roads; 30 sediment fences were installed to measure road sediment production. Elevations range from 970 to 1680 m, and mean annual precipitation is about 1200 mm. The clearcut units had little or no evidence of surface erosion, and this was attributed to the ripping and high surface cover from logging slash, rocks, and regrowth. Landings generated only eight rills or sediment plumes; none of these were longer than 24 m long and none were connected to a stream. Mean road sediment production in the relatively dry winter of 2011-12 was less than 10 Mg ha-1. Twenty-eight percent of the abandoned roads were connected to the streams, while only 7% of the new roads were connected. Mean daily turbidity values exceeded 25 NTU only 1.2% of the time, and single highest mean daily value was only slightly greater than 200 NTU. Runoff and turbidity levels are controlled primarily by the interannual variations in precipitation, and there was no evidence of a management impact on either runoff, turbidities, or suspended sediment concentrations. The combination of high infiltration rates, relatively

  1. Modelling of carbon erosion and re-deposition for the EAST movable limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hai; Ding, Rui; Chen, Junling; Sun, Jizhong

    2017-04-01

    The movable limiter at the mid-plane of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with carbon coatings on the surface was exposed to edge plasma to study the material erosion and re-deposition. After the experiments, the carbon erosion and re-deposition is modelled using the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO. The geometry of the movable limiter, 3D configuration of the plasma parameters and electromagnetic fields under both limiter and divertor configurations have been implemented into the code. In the simulations, the main uncertain parameters such as carbon concentration ρ c in the background plasma and cross-field transport coefficient D ⊥ in the vicinity of surface according to the ‘funneling model’, have been studied in comparison with experiments. The parameter ρ c mainly influences the net erosion and deposition profiles of the two sides of the movable limiter, while D ⊥ mostly changes the profiles on the top surface. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB107004 and 2013GB105003), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11375010, 11675218 and 11005125), and the Sino-German Center for Research Promotion under contract No GZ769.

  2. Effect of commercial fluoride dentifrices against hydrochloric acid in an erosion-abrasion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Vanara Florêncio; de Vasconcellos, Andréa Araújo; Pequeno, José Heriberto Pinheiro; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Santiago, Sérgio Lima

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of three commercial dentifrices with different fluoride-containing compounds in controlling the progression of dentin loss using an in vitro erosion-abrasion model. Dentin specimens were randomized into four groups (n = 10): control (no F), Elmex (1,400 ppm AmF), Meridol (1,400 ppm AmF/SnF2), and Crest Pro-Health (1,100 ppm SnF2). The dentin specimens were submitted to cycles of demineralization (HCl 0.01 M for 60 s), remineralization (artificial saliva for 60 min), and immersion in 1:3 w/w of dentifrice/artificial saliva, followed by toothbrushing (150 brushing strokes). The cycle was repeated three times daily for 5 days. Surface loss was quantified by stylus profilometry. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p fluoride can strengthen dental tissue against erosive acid damage. However, the beneficial effect of different fluorides present in commercial dentifrices is questionable. Thus, a determination of an effective fluoride dentifrice may be beneficial in the reduction of the erosive process in patients with gastric disorders.

  3. Modelling of carbon erosion and re-deposition for the EAST movable limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, XIE; Rui, DING; Junling, CHEN; Jizhong, SUN

    2017-04-01

    The movable limiter at the mid-plane of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with carbon coatings on the surface was exposed to edge plasma to study the material erosion and re-deposition. After the experiments, the carbon erosion and re-deposition is modelled using the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO. The geometry of the movable limiter, 3D configuration of the plasma parameters and electromagnetic fields under both limiter and divertor configurations have been implemented into the code. In the simulations, the main uncertain parameters such as carbon concentration ρ c in the background plasma and cross-field transport coefficient D ⊥ in the vicinity of surface according to the ‘funneling model’, have been studied in comparison with experiments. The parameter ρ c mainly influences the net erosion and deposition profiles of the two sides of the movable limiter, while D ⊥ mostly changes the profiles on the top surface. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB107004 and 2013GB105003), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11375010, 11675218 and 11005125), and the Sino-German Center for Research Promotion under contract No GZ769.

  4. Bank Erosion, Mass Wasting, Water Clarity, Bathymetry and a Sediment Budget Along the Dam-Regulated Lower Roanoke River, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Richter, Jean M.; Kroes, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Dam construction and its impact on downstream fluvial processes may substantially alter ambient bank stability, floodplain inundation patterns, and channel morphology. Most of the world's largest rivers have been dammed, which has prompted management efforts to mitigate dam effects. Three high dams (completed between 1953 and 1963) occur along the Piedmont portion of the Roanoke River, North Carolina; just downstream, the lower part of the river flows across largely unconsolidated Coastal Plain deposits. To document bank erosion rates along the lower Roanoke River, more than 700 bank erosion pins were installed along 124 bank transects. Additionally, discrete measurements of channel bathymetry, water clarity, and presence or absence of mass wasting were documented along the entire 153-kilometer-long study reach. Amounts of bank erosion in combination with prior estimates of floodplain deposition were used to develop a bank erosion and floodplain deposition sediment budget for the lower river. Present bank erosion rates are relatively high [mean 42 milimeters per year (mm/yr)] and are greatest along the middle reaches (mean 60 mm/yr) and on lower parts of the bank on all reaches. Erosion rates were likely higher along upstream reaches than present erosion rates such that erosion rate maxima have migrated downstream. Mass wasting and water clarity also peak along the middle reaches.

  5. Characteristics of Soil and Organic Carbon Loss Induced by Water Erosion on the Loess Plateau in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongwu; Nie, Xiaodong; Chang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Lin; Sun, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion has been a common environmental problem in the Loess Plateau in China. This study aims to better understand the losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) induced by water erosion. Laboratory-simulated rainfall experiments were conducted to investigate the characteristics of SOC loss induced by water erosion. The applied treatments included two rainfall intensities (90 and 120 mm h-1), four slope gradients (10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°), and two typical soil types- silty clay loam and silty loam. Results showed that the sediment OC enrichment ratios (ERoc) in all the events were relative stable with values ranged from 0.85 to1.21 and 0.64 to 1.52 and mean values of 0.98 and 1.01 for silty clay loam and silty loam, respectively. Similar to the ERoc, the proportions of different sized particles in sediment showed tiny variations during erosion processes. No significant correlation was observed between ERoc values and the proportions of sediment particles. Slope, rainfall intensity and soil type almost had no impact on ERoc. These results indicate that the transportation of SOC during erosion processes was nonselective. While the mean SOC loss rates for the events of silty clay loam and silty loam were 0.30 and 0.08 g m-2 min-1, respectively. Greater differences in SOC loss rates were found in events among different soil types. Meanwhile, significant correlations between SOC loss and soil loss for all the events were observed. These results indicated that the amount of SOC loss was influenced primarily by soil loss and the SOC content of the original soil. Erosion pattern and original SOC content are two main factors by which different soils can influence SOC loss. It seems that soil type has a greater impact on SOC loss than rainfall characteristics on the Loess Plateau of China. However, more kinds of soils should be further studied due to the special formation processes in the Loess Plateau.

  6. A semigroup approach to an integro-differential equation modeling slow erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Alberto; Shen, Wen

    2014-10-01

    The paper is concerned with a scalar conservation law with nonlocal flux, providing a model for granular flow with slow erosion and deposition. While the solution u=u(t,x) can have jumps, the inverse function x=x(t,u) is always Lipschitz continuous; its derivative has bounded variation and satisfies a balance law with measure-valued sources. Using a backward Euler approximation scheme combined with a nonlinear projection operator, we construct a continuous semigroup whose trajectories are the unique entropy weak solutions to this balance law. Going back to the original variables, this yields the global well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for the granular flow model.

  7. Plot-scale testing and sensitivity analysis of Be7 based soil erosion conversion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alex; Abdelli, Wahid; Barri, Bashar Al; Iurian, Andra; Gaspar, Leticia; Mabit, Lionel; Millward, Geoff; Ryken, Nick; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 2 decades, a growing number of studies have recognised the potential for short-lived cosmogenic Be-7 (half-life 53 days) to be used as a tracer to evaluate soil erosion from short-term inter-rill erosion to hillslope sediment budgets. While conversion modelling approaches are now established for event-scale and extended-time-series applications, there is a lack of validation and sensitivity analysis to underpin confidence in their use across a full range of agro-climatic zones. This contribution aims to close this gap in the context of the maritime temperate climate of southwest UK. Two plots of 4 x 35 m were ploughed and tilled at the beginning of winter 2013/2014 in southwest UK to create (1) a bare, sloped soil surface and (2) a bare flat reference site. The bounded lower edge of the plot fed into a collection bin for overland flow and associated sediment. The tilled surface had a low bulk density and high permeability at the start of the experiment (ksat > 100 mm/hr). Hence, despite high rainfall in December (200 mm), notable overland flow was observed only after intense rain storms during late 2013 and early January 2014 when the soil profile was saturated i.e. driven by Saturation Overland Flow (SOF). At the time of SOF initiation, ca. 70% of the final Be-7 inventory had been delivered to the site. Subsequent to a series SOF events across a 1 month period, the plot soil surface was intensively sampled to quantify Be-7 inventory patterns and develop a tracer budget. Captured eroded sediment was dried, weighed and analysed for Be-7. All samples were analysed for particle size by laser granulometry. Be-7 inventory data were converted to soil erosion estimates using (1) standard profile distribution model, (2) the extended time series distribution model and (3) a new 'antecedent rainfall' extended time series model to account for lack of soil erosion prior to soil saturation. Results were scaled up to deliver a plot-scale sediment budget to include

  8. Water erosion during a 17-year period under two crop rotations in four soil management systems on a Southbrazilian Inceptisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Ildegardis; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion still remains a persistent issue in the world, and this in spite of the efforts to ameliorate soil management systems taken into account the point of view of environmental protection against soil losses. In South Brazil water erosion is mainly associated to rainfall events with a great volume and high intensity, which are more or less evenly distributed all over the year. Nowadays, direct drilling is the most widely soil management system used for the main crops of the region. However, some crops still are grown on conventionally tilled soils, which means mainly ploughing and harrowing and less frequently chisel ploughing. In Lages-Santa Catarina State, Brazil, a plot experiment under natural rain was started in 1992 on an Inceptisol with the aim of quantifying soil and water losses. Treatments included bare and vegetated plots. The crop succession was: oats (Avena strigosa), soybean (Glycine max), vetch (Vicia sativa), maize (Zea mays), fodder radish (Raphanus sativus) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Soil tillage systems investigated in this study were: i) conventional tillage (CT), ii) reduced tillage (MT), iii) no tillage (NT) under crop rotation and iv) conventional tillage on bare soil (BS). Treatments CT and BS involved ploughing plus twice harrowing, whereas MT involved chisel ploughing plus harrowing. Rainfall erosivity from January 1 1992 to December 31 2009 was calculated. Soil losses from the BS treatment along the 17 year study period were higher than 1200 Mg ha-1. Crop cover significantly reduced erosion, so that under some crops soil losses in the CT treatment were 80% lower than in the BS treatment. In turn soil losses in the MT treatment, where tillage was performed by chiselling and harrowing, were on average about 50% lower than in the CT treatment. No tillage was the most efficient soil management system in reducing soil erosion, so that soil losses in the NT treatment were about 98% lower than in the BS treatment. The three

  9. RISK LEVEL ANALYSIS ON THE PREVENTIVE EROSION CAPACITY OF BRIDGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Deficiency of the Preventive Erosion Capacity (PEC) of a bridge pier is the main factor leading to bridge failures. In this paper, the PEC of bridge piers was analyzed using the stochastic analysis method. The definitions of the reliability and risk level of a bridge pier subjected to water erosion were proposed and a computational model for erosion depth and risk level in was suggested.

  10. Rill erosion rates in burned forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Peter R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wildfires often produce large increases in runoff and erosion rates (e.g., Moody and Martin, 2009), and land managers need to predict the frequency and magnitude of postfire erosion to determine the needs for hazard response and possible erosion mitigation to reduce the impacts of increased erosion on public safety and valued resources. The Water Erosion...

  11. Did tillage erosion play a role in millennial scale landscape development? - an evaluation in SE Spain using a landscape evolution model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, J.E.M.; Temme, A.J.A.M.; Schoorl, J.M.; Braakhekke, M.H.A.; Veldkamp, A.

    2012-01-01

    Landscape evolution models (LEMs) quantitatively simulate processes of sedimentation and erosion on millennial timescales. An important aspect of human impact on erosion is sediment redistribution due to agriculture, referred to herein as tillage erosion. In this study we aim to analyse the potentia

  12. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C.; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these hi

  13. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C.; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these

  14. Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the Apollo program, Leonard Roberts of the NASA Langley Research Center developed a remarkable analytical theory that predicts the blowing of lunar soil and dust beneath a rocket exhaust plume. Roberts assumed that the erosion rate was determined by the excess shear stress in the gas (the amount of shear stress greater than what causes grains to roll). The acceleration of particles to their final velocity in the gas consumes a portion of the shear stress. The erosion rate continues to increase until the excess shear stress is exactly consumed, thus determining the erosion rate. Roberts calculated the largest and smallest particles that could be eroded based on forces at the particle scale, but the erosion rate equation assumed that only one particle size existed in the soil. He assumed that particle ejection angles were determined entirely by the shape of the terrain, which acts like a ballistic ramp, with the particle aerodynamics being negligible. The predicted erosion rate and the upper limit of particle size appeared to be within an order of magnitude of small-scale terrestrial experiments but could not be tested more quantitatively at the time. The lower limit of particle size and the predictions of ejection angle were not tested. We observed in the Apollo landing videos that the ejection angles of particles streaming out from individual craters were time-varying and correlated to the Lunar Module thrust, thus implying that particle aerodynamics dominate. We modified Roberts theory in two ways. First, we used ad hoc the ejection angles measured in the Apollo landing videos, in lieu of developing a more sophisticated method. Second, we integrated Roberts equations over the lunar-particle size distribution and obtained a compact expression that could be implemented in a numerical code. We also added a material damage model that predicts the number and size of divots which the impinging particles will cause in hardware surrounding the landing

  15. FIRESTORM: Modelling the water quality risk of wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, C. I.; Sheridan, G. J.; Smith, H. G.; Jones, O.; Chong, D.; Tolhurst, K.

    2012-04-01

    Following wildfire, loss of vegetation and changes to soil properties may result in decreases in infiltration rates, less rainfall interception, and higher overland flow velocities. Rainfall events affecting burn areas before vegetation recovers can cause high magnitude erosion events that impact on downstream water quality. For cities and towns that rely upon fire-prone forest catchments for water supply, wildfire impacts on water quality represent a credible risk to water supply security. Quantifying the risk associated with the occurrence of wildfires and the magnitude of water quality impacts has important implications for managing water supplies. At present, no suitable integrative model exists that considers the probabilistic nature of system inputs as well as the range of processes and scales involved in this problem. We present FIRESTORM, a new model currently in development that aims to determine the range of sediment and associated contaminant loads that may be delivered to water supply reservoirs from the combination of wildfire and subsequent rainfall events. This Monte Carlo model incorporates the probabilistic nature of fire ignition, fire weather and rainfall, and includes deterministic models for fire behaviour and locally dominant erosion processes. FIRESTORM calculates the magnitude and associated annual risk of catchment-scale sediment loads associated with the occurrence of wildfire and rainfall generated by two rain event types. The two event types are localised, high intensity, short-duration convective storms, and widespread, longer duration synoptic-scale rainfall events. Initial application and testing of the model will focus on the two main reservoirs supplying water to Melbourne, Australia, both of which are situated in forest catchments vulnerable to wildfire. Probabilistic fire ignition and weather scenarios have been combined using 40 years of fire records and weather observations. These are used to select from a dataset of over 80

  16. A Model for Predicting the Future Risk of Incident Erosive Esophagitis in an Asymptomatic Population Undergoing Regular Check-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soo Hoon; Lim, Yaeji; Lee, Hyuk; Kim, Joungyoun; Chi, Sangah; Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Son, Hee Jung; Ryu, Seungho; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J

    2016-01-01

    Erosive esophagitis is a major risk factor for Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Information regarding the putative risk factors for developing erosive esophagitis is considerably heterogeneous; thus, a risk model is required to clinically predict the incidence of erosive esophagitis. This study was to derive and validate a predictive model for the incidence of developing erosive esophagitis after negative index endoscopy in a population subjected to routine health check-ups. This retrospective cohort study of health check-ups included 11,535 patients who underwent repeated screening endoscopy after >3 years from a negative index endoscopy. We used logistic regression analysis to predict the incidence of erosive esophagitis, and a Simple Prediction of Erosive Esophagitis Development score for risk assessment was developed and internally validated using the split-sample approach. The development and validation cohorts included 5765 patients (675 with erosive esophagitis [11.7%]) and 5770 patients (670 with erosive esophagitis [11.6%]), respectively. The final model included sex, smoking behavior, body mass index, hypertension, and the triglyceride level as variables. This model predicted 667 cases of erosive esophagitis, yielding an expected-to-observed ratio of 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-1.07). A simplified 5-item risk scoring system based on coefficients was developed, with a risk of erosive esophagitis of 6.2% (95% CI, 5.2-7.1) for the low-risk group (score ≤2), 15.1% (95% CI, 13.5-16.6) for the intermediate-risk group (score ≤3, 4), and 18.2% (95% CI, 15.2-21.3) for the high-risk group (score ≥5). The discriminative performance of the risk-prediction score was consistent in the derivation cohort and validation cohort (c-statistics 0.68 and 0.64, respectively); the calibration was good (Brier score 0.099 and 0.1, respectively). In conclusion, a simple risk-scoring model using putative risk factors can predict the future

  17. How to Make a Barranco: Modeling Erosion and Land-Use in Mediterranean Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Michael Barton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We use the hybrid modeling laboratory of the Mediterranean Landscape Dynamics (MedLanD Project to simulate barranco incision in eastern Spain under different scenarios of natural and human environmental change. We carry out a series of modeling experiments set in the Rio Penaguila valley of northern Alicante Province. The MedLanD Modeling Laboratory (MML is able to realistically simulate gullying and incision in a multi-dimensional, spatially explicit virtual landscape. We first compare erosion modeled in wooded and denuded landscapes in the absence of human land-use. We then introduce simulated small-holder (e.g., prehistoric Neolithic farmer/herders in six experiments, by varying community size (small, medium, large and land management strategy (satisficing and maximizing. We compare the amount and location of erosion under natural and anthropogenic conditions. Natural (e.g., climatically induced land-cover change produces a distinctly different signature of landscape evolution than does land-cover change produced by agropastoral land-use. Human land-use induces increased coupling between hillslopes and channels, resulting in increased downstream incision.

  18. Wind and water erosion on abandoned land in High Andalusia - First results of a portable combined wind and rainfall simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserloh, T.; Fister, W.; Marzen, M.; Ries, J. B.; Schmidt, R.-G.

    2009-04-01

    On abandoned land in semi-arid environments wind and water erosion are the main driving factors causing soil degradation. Recent research has proven the existence of very complex interactions between both processes. For in situ assessment of these interactions on soil erosion rates a portable combined wind and rainfall simulator was constructed and used in a field study in Andalusia. The main objective is to get first results for comparison of erosion rates with and without the influence of wind on plot scale on abandoned land in a semi-arid environment. The simulator is 4 m long, 0.7 m high, 0.7 m wide and rectangular in shape. A bounded plot of 2.2 m² can be irrigated by four downward spraying pressure nozzles (Lechler 460.608) in the roof of the tunnel producing a rainfall intensity of about 90 mm h-1. Approximate wind speed is 8 m s-1 free stream. For sediment collection a gutter system has been combined with two wedge-shaped sediment traps and a beam with four Modified Wilson & Cook Samplers. Runoff was collected with 0.5 l plastic bottles. Test duration is 30 min with measurement intervals of 2.5 min for surface runoff. The test runs were carried out with three variations in the following order on each plot: (1) single wind test run, (2) single rainfall test run and (3) simultaneous wind and rainfall test run. Runoff results show no distinctive differences between test runs without (2) and in combination with wind (3). The sediment loss seems to be higher with wind (3). This might indicate the influence of wind on the kinetic energy and impact angle of raindrops and consequently on the detachment and provision of soil particles. It could be argued that in addition to conventional rainfall simulations the inclusion of wind could assist a better understanding of soil erosion processes in the future.

  19. An Experimental Simulation Method of Erosion Process on Gully Erosion in Loess Plateau in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianen; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2017-04-01

    In view of simulation difficultment of the field gully erosion process because of complex of rainfall runoff erosion mechanism and gully geometry a design means and experimentation technology and its verification test were given based on similarity theory and hydrodynamic principles. The basic ideas was that the erosion process of the field erosion gully was forecast by constructing similar model. The model and antetype should be in obedience to the same physical equations of rainfall, runoff, erosion, sediment transport, bed deformation and Soil water transport. The geometric, kinematical and dynamic similarity must be obeyed for these models. The primary similarity scale relation expressions were the ones of the geometric, rainfall, flow, erosion sediment transport and soil water movement similarity etc. The similarity of the hydraulic boundary was the necessary and sufficient condition between the model and the prototype. The gully prototype is one of Majiagou of Ansai county of Yanan City of Shaanxi Province in China. Its location is 36°53'55.75"N and 109°13'39.08"E. The model experiment wan carried out in State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dry land Farming On the Loess Plateau in Institute of Soil and Water Conservation of Northwest A&F University. First soil was selected by starting velocity similar. Second, the normal and scale 10 experiment model was built under complying with the similarities of geometric, rainfall, flow, erosion production sediment transport and bed deformation etc. The model hydraulic boundary from the prototype was the factor of the test process of rainfall. The experiment results indicated that the extreme rainstorm gully erosion process of the prototype could be reappeared. The equivalent rainfall process of gully prototype were that the rainfall intensity was 1.25 mm/min and the lasting time was 508 min and precipitation was 636mmn. Both the erosion amount and the erosion gully topography of the scale model were successfully

  20. CFD Modelling of Bore Erosion in Two-Stage Light Gas Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    A well-validated quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for the analysis of the internal ballistics of two-stage light gas guns is modified to explicitly calculate the ablation of steel from the gun bore and the incorporation of the ablated wall material into the hydrogen working cas. The modified code is used to model 45 shots made with the NASA Ames 0.5 inch light gas gun over an extremely wide variety of gun operating conditions. Good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical piston velocities (maximum errors of +/-2% to +/-6%) and maximum powder pressures (maximum errors of +/-10% with good igniters). Overall, the agreement between the experimental and numerically calculated gun erosion values (within a factor of 2) was judged to be reasonably good, considering the complexity of the processes modelled. Experimental muzzle velocities agree very well (maximum errors of 0.5-0.7 km/sec) with theoretical muzzle velocities calculated with loading of the hydrogen gas with the ablated barrel wall material. Comparison of results for pump tube volumes of 100%, 60% and 40% of an initial benchmark value show that, at the higher muzzle velocities, operation at 40% pump tube volume produces much lower hydrogen loading and gun erosion and substantially lower maximum pressures in the gun. Large muzzle velocity gains (2.4-5.4 km/sec) are predicted upon driving the gun harder (that is, upon using, higher powder loads and/or lower hydrogen fill pressures) when hydrogen loading is neglected; much smaller muzzle velocity gains (1.1-2.2 km/sec) are predicted when hydrogen loading is taken into account. These smaller predicted velocity gains agree well with those achieved in practice. CFD snapshots of the hydrogen mass fraction, density and pressure of the in-bore medium are presented for a very erosive shot.

  1. Erosion, Transportation, and Deposition on Outer Solar System Satellites: Landform Evolution Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey Morgan; Howard, Alan D.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Mass movement and landform degradation reduces topographic relief by moving surface materials to a lower gravitational potential. In addition to the obvious role of gravity, abrasive mechanical erosion plays a role, often in combination with the lowering of cohesion, which allows disaggregation of the relief-forming material. The identification of specific landform types associated with mass movement and landform degradation provides information about local sediment particle size and abundance and transportation processes. Generally, mass movements can be classified in terms of the particle sizes of the transported material and the speed the material moved during transport. Most degradation on outer planet satellites appears consistent with sliding or slumping, impact erosion, and regolith evolution. Some satellites, such as Callisto and perhaps Hyperion and Iapetus, have an appearance that implies that some additional process is at work, most likely sublimation-driven landform modification and mass wasting. A variant on this process is thermally driven frost segregation as seen on all three icy Galilean satellites and perhaps elsewhere. Titan is unique among outer planet satellites in that Aeolian and fluvial processes also operate to erode, transport, and deposit material. We will evaluate the sequence and extent of various landform-modifying erosional and volatile redistribution processes that have shaped these icy satellites using a 3-D model that simulates the following surface and subsurface processes: 1) sublimation and re-condensation of volatiles; 2) development of refractory lag deposits; 3) disaggregation and downward sloughing of surficial material; 4) radiative heating/cooling of the surface (including reflection, emission, and shadowing by other surface elements); 5) thermal diffusion; and 6) vapor diffusion. The model will provide explicit simulations of landform development and thusly predicts the topographic and volatile evolution of the surface

  2. Modelling the effect of fire frequency on runoff and erosion in north-central Portugal using the revised Morgan-Morgan-Finney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mohammadreza; Nunes, João Pedro; González Pelayo, Oscar; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Ritsema, Coen; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    Models can be valuable for foreseeing the hydrological effects of fires and to plan and execute post-fire management alternatives. In this study, the revised Morgan-Morgan-Finney (MMF) model was utilized to simulate runoff and soil erosion in recently burned maritime pine plantations with different fire regimes, in a wet Mediterranean area of north-central Portugal. The MMF model was adjusted for burned zones in order to accommodate seasonal patterns in runoff and soil erosion, attributed to changes in soil water repellency and vegetation recovery. The model was then assessed by applying it for a sum of 18 experimental micro-plots (0.25 m2) at 9 1x-burnt and 9 4x-burnt slopes, using both literature-based and calibrated parameters, with the collected data used to assess the robustness of each parameterization. The estimate of erosion was more exact than that of runoff, with a general Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.54. Slope angle and the soil's effective hydrological depth (which relies on upon vegetation and additionally crop cover) were found to be the primary parameters enhancing model results, and different hydrological depths were expected to separate between the two differentiating fire regimes. This relative analysis demonstrated that most existing benchmark parameters can be utilized to apply MMF in burnt pine regions with moderate severity to support post-fire management; however it also showed that further endeavours ought to concentrate on mapping soil depth and vegetation cover to enhance these simulations.

  3. Evaluating a process-based model for use in streambank stabilization and stream restoration: insights on the bank stability and toe erosion model (BSTEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streambank retreat is a complex cyclical process involving subaerial processes, fluvial erosion, seepage erosion, and geotechnical failures and is driven by several soil properties that themselves are temporally and spatially variable. Therefore, it can be extremely challenging to predict and model ...

  4. Code and Solution Verification of 3D Numerical Modeling of Flow in the Gust Erosion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion microcosms are devices commonly used to investigate the erosion and transport characteristics of sediments at the bed of rivers, lakes, or estuaries. In order to understand the results these devices provide, the bed shear stress and flow field need to be accurately described. In this research, the UMCES Gust Erosion Microcosm System (U-GEMS) is numerically modeled using Finite Volume Method. The primary aims are to simulate the bed shear stress distribution at the surface of the sediment core/bottom of the microcosm, and to validate the U-GEMS produces uniform bed shear stress at the bottom of the microcosm. The mathematical model equations are solved by on a Cartesian non-uniform grid. Multiple numerical runs were developed with different input conditions and configurations. Prior to developing the U-GEMS model, the General Moving Objects (GMO) model and different momentum algorithms in the code were verified. Code verification of these solvers was done via simulating the flow inside the top wall driven square cavity on different mesh sizes to obtain order of convergence. The GMO model was used to simulate the top wall in the top wall driven square cavity as well as the rotating disk in the U-GEMS. Components simulated with the GMO model were rigid bodies that could have any type of motion. In addition cross-verification was conducted as results were compared with numerical results by Ghia et al. (1982), and good agreement was found. Next, CFD results were validated by simulating the flow within the conventional microcosm system without suction and injection. Good agreement was found when the experimental results by Khalili et al. (2008) were compared. After the ability of the CFD solver was proved through the above code verification steps. The model was utilized to simulate the U-GEMS. The solution was verified via classic mesh convergence study on four consecutive mesh sizes, in addition to that Grid Convergence Index (GCI) was calculated and based on

  5. A hierachical method for soil erosion assessment and spatial risk modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okoth, P.F.

    2003-01-01

      Though a lot has been done and achieved in erosion research and control in Kenya, most of the erosion research methods have in the past put emphasis more on quantifying soil loss or measuring soil erosion, rather than pinpointing to

  6. A hierachical method for soil erosion assessment and spatial risk modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okoth, P.F.

    2003-01-01

      Though a lot has been done and achieved in erosion research and control in Kenya, most of the erosion research methods have in the past put emphasis more on quantifying soil loss or measuring soil erosion, rather than pinpointing to area

  7. Evaluating sediment transport capacity relationships for use in ephemeral gully erosion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephemeral gully erosion on cropland in the U.S. may contribute up to 40% of the sediment delivered to the edge of the field. Well-tested, physically- and process-based tools for field and watershed scale prediction of gully erosion are lacking, as ephemeral gully erosion processes, often caused by h...

  8. EPANET water quality model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossman, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    EPANET represents a third generation of water quality modeling software developed by the U.S. EPA's Drinking Water Research Division, offering significant advances in the state of the art for network water quality analysis. EPANET performs extended period simulation of hydraulic and water quality behavior within water distribution systems. In addition to substance concentration, water age and source tracing can also be simulated. EPANET includes a full featured hydraulic simulation model that can handle various types of pumps, valves, and their control rules. The water quality module is equipped to handle constituent reactions within the bulk pipe flow and at the pipe wall. It also features an efficient computational scheme that automatically determines optimal time steps and pipe segmentation for accurate tracking of material transport over time. EPANET is currently being used in the US to study such issues as loss of chlorine residual, source blending and trihalomethane (THM) formation, how altered tank operation affects water age, and total dissolved solids (TDS) control for an irrigation network.

  9. Stream Water Quality Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — QUAL2K (or Q2K) is a river and stream water quality model that is intended to represent a modernized version of the QUAL2E (or Q2E) model (Brown and Barnwell 1987).

  10. Impact of gully on soil moisture of shrubland in wind-water erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Zhu; SHAO Ming-An; LISI

    2008-01-01

    The most serious erosion on the Loess Plateau of China exists in the wind-water erosion crisscross region where the annual precipitation is about 400 ram,the ecological environment is very fragile,and water is the key limiting factor for improving the environment.In this study,changes of soil moisture content for Caragana korshinskii Kom.shrubland in the gully bank of the Loess Plateau were studied using the methods of soil sampling and neutron probe.A typical gully (75 m long,28 m wide,and 10 m deep) was selected,and six neutron probe access tubes (6 m long) were installed at points 50,100,200,300,400,and 500 cm from the gully border for obtaining soil moisture data from July to October 2004 at approximately 10 d intervals.Soil samplings were simultaneously carried out for moisture determination at the six points.Results showed that the soil moisture of the shrubland in the gully bank significantly varied between 300 and 400 cm in the horizontal direction and up to 600 cm in vertical direction of the gully.Seasonal changes in soil moisture revealed a curve with a single peak that occurred at the end of August or early September.A linear regression equation was fit for soil water storage and the distance from the gully border,with coefficients depending on rainfall characteristics,sampling point,and time of measurement.

  11. Model of fluid flow and internal erosion of a porous fragile medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Clotet, Xavier

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the internal erosion and transport of particles leading to heterogeneity and channelization of a porous granular bed driven by fluid flow by introducing a model experimental system which enables direct visualization of the evolution of porosity from the single particle up to the system scale. Further, we develop a hybrid hydrodynamic-statistical model to understand the main ingredients needed to simulate our observations. A uniqueness of our study is the close coupling of the experiments and simulations with control parameters used in the simulations derived from the experiments. Understanding this system is of fundamental importance to a number of geophysical processes, and in the extraction of hydrocarbons in the subsurface including the deposition of proppants used in hydraulic fracturing. We provide clear evidence for the importance of curvature of the interface between high and low porosity regions in determining the flux rate needed for erosion and the spatial locations where channels grow. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences program under DE-SC0010274.

  12. A Review of Soil Erosion Models with Special Reference to the needs of Humid Tropical Mountainous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine Avwunudiogba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Humid tropical mountainous environments (HTMEs are generally considered sensitive ecological regions because anthropogenic disturbance often accelerate hillslope processes such as runoff, erosion, and sediment flux. Reducing accelerated erosion is necessary for the maintenance of the integrity, stability and sustainability of HTMEs. Soil erosion models (SOMs are potential tools for predicting soil erosion, sediment flux, and thedesign and assessment of effectiveness of conservation management practices in HTMEs. Within this context, this study provides a critical review of the available SOMs with afocus on their applicability in HTMEs. The review indicates that because most SOMs have been developed for “flat agricultural lands” in temperate regions, to be useful inconservation planning in HTMEs models should be calibrated for local conditions. For humid tropical mountainous regions, lumped parameter models (LPMs linked toGeographical Information Systems (GIS are more practicable for conservation planning than sophisticated distributed parameter models (DPMs. This is due to the less stringent data requirements and ease to which land managers can implement LPMs, an essential consideration within the physical and socioeconomic context of HTMEs.Keywords:Soil erosion models; Humid tropics, Mountainous environments; Conservation planning

  13. Simulation of soil erosion and deposition in a changing land use: A modelling approach to implement the support practice factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelacani, Samanta; Märker, Michael; Rodolfi, Giuliano

    2008-07-01

    Using the USPED (Unit Stream Power Erosion Deposition) model, three land use scenarios were analysed for an Italian small catchment (15 km 2) of high landscape value. The upper Orme stream catchment, located in the Chianti area, 30 km south of Florence, has a long historical agriculture record. Information on land use and soil conservation practices date back to 1821, hence offering an opportunity to model impacts of land use change on erosion and deposition. For this study, a procedure that takes into account soil conservation practices and potential sediment storage is proposed. The approach was to calculate and model the flow accumulation considering rural and logging roads, location of urban areas, drainage ditches, streams, gullies and permanent sediment sinks. This calculation attempts to assess the spatial variability, especially the impact of support practices ( P factor). Weather data from 1980-2003 were taken into account to calculate the R factor. However, to consider the intense pluviometric conditions in terms of the erosivity factor, the 0.75th quantile was used, while the lowest erosivity was modelled using the 0.25th quantile. Results of the USPED model simulation show that in 1821 the mean annual net erosion for the watershed was 2.8 Mg ha - 1 y - 1 ; in 1954 it was 4.2 Mg ha - 1 y - 1 ; and in 2004 it was 5.3 Mg ha - 1 y - 1 . Conservation practices can reduce erosion processes by ≥ 20 Mg ha - 1 y - 1 when the 1821 practices are introduced in the present management. On the other hand, if the support practices are not considered in the model, soil erosion risk is overestimated. Field observation for the present-day simulation confirmed that erosion and associated sediment deposition predicted by the model depend, as expected, on geomorphology and land use. The model shows limitations that are mainly due to the input data. A high resolution DEM is essential for the delineation of reliable topographic potential to predict erosion and deposition

  14. The Effect of Climate Change on Wind-water Complex Erosion Region%气候变化对风水蚀复合区的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安志山; 李栋梁; 王涛; 张伟民; 屈建军

    2012-01-01

    风水蚀复合区作为农牧交错带的敏感区域,对气候变化有着显著的响应。通过实地考察和气象资料的分析,厘定了风水蚀复合区的概念并对其范围加以界定。由于风水蚀复合区区内气候类型复杂、侵蚀动力多样、风季和雨季的交错分布及其脆弱的生态环境,造成水土流失和沙漠化相当严重,并发育了独特的地貌景观。风水蚀复合区的界限受降水的影响而呈南北摆动,干旱年,向东南方向移动;多雨年,向西北方向移动。%The wind-water complex erosion region is a sensitive part of agro-pasture interlocked zone in northern China, and has significant response to global climate change. The concept and geographical scope of the wind-water complex erosion region have been defined through on-the-spot investigation and meteoro- logical data analysis. In the wind-water complex erosion region, wind and water have combined action, and ecological environment there is vulnerable. Therefore, the diverse weather and erosion forces give rise to soil erosion and desertification, which are serious in the wind-water complex erosion region. It has also de- veloped unique geomorphologic landscape. The boundary of wind-water complex erosion region is influenced by precipitation and it exhibits a characteristic of north-south direction swing. It moves to southeast in dry years, and to northwest in humid years.

  15. Numerical models of mantle lithosphere weakening, erosion and delamination induced by melt extraction and emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2016-09-01

    Continental rifting caused by extension and heating from below affects the lithosphere or cratons in various ways. Volcanism and melt intrusions often occur along with thinning, weakening and even breaking lithosphere. Although mechanical necking models of the lithosphere are often applied, the aspects of melting and the implications due to melt transport and emplacement at shallower depths are not well understood. A two-phase flow approach employing melt extraction and shallow emplacement associated with thermal weakening is developed and compared with observations. The results of this comparison indicate the importance of partial melts and an asthenospheric magma source for increasing the rising rate of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary during extension. Thermo-mechanical physics of visco-plastic flow is approximated using the Finite Difference method with Eulerian formulation in 2D. The conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations are solved for a multi-component (crust-mantle) and two-phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature- and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. Melt is extracted and emplaced in predefined depth regions (emplacement zones) in the lithospheric mantle and crust. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation was applied; its validity was tested against the Full Compaction formulation and found fully satisfactory for the case of sublithospheric melting models. A simple model guided by the geodynamic situation of the Rwenzori region typically results in updoming asthenosphere with melt-assisted erosion of the lithosphere's base. Even with a conservative approach for a temperature anomaly melting alone doubles the lithospheric erosion rate in comparison with a model without melting. With melt extraction and intrusion lithospheric erosion and upwelling of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary speeds up by a

  16. A diffuser heat transfer and erosion code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, G. H.

    1985-10-01

    A computer code for diffuser heat transfer and erosion analysis (DHTE) has been developed which improves upon the earlier Rocket Engine Diffuser Thermal Analysis Program (REDTAP). Improvements contained within DHTE include provision for a radial temperature gradient within the diffuser wall, an improved model for the particle impingement accommodation coefficient, a model for particle debris shielding, and a model for wall erosion by particle impact. DHTE differs from an earlier diffuser heat transfer code (DHT) to the extent that it incorporates a simple erosion model and utilizes a more recent diffuser version of the JANNAF Standardized Plume Flow Field Model (SCP2ND). The 77-inch diffuser was instrumented to record the water side wall temperature and water jacket temperature at selected sites along the initial seven feet of the diffuser during routine test firings. Data is presented that supports the predictions of DHTE but is inadequate to validate the code.

  17. Modelling the erosion/deposition pattern of the Tore Supra Toroidal Pumped Limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotis, S. [CEA, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Pégourié, B., E-mail: bernard.pegourie@cea.fr [CEA, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Gunn, J. [CEA, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Marandet, Y.; Mellet, N. [PIIM, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-15

    This paper aims at understanding the main processes responsible for the erosion/deposition pattern observed on the surface of the Toroidal Pumped Limiter of Tore Supra, using the 3D local impurity transport code ERO. The influence of the plasma impurity content, CX-flux and surface temperature on the global carbon balance and erosion/deposition pattern is discussed. Main results are (1) that considering medium-range transport of C ions is mandatory for reproducing the main characteristics of the global C balance and erosion/deposition pattern, (2) that impurities and CX-atoms increase the erosion by a factor ⩽2 (without changing the net/gross erosion ratio), and (3) that chemical erosion is governed by the re-erosion of deposits, which depends strongly on the surface temperature.

  18. An integrated assessment of soil erosion dynamics with special emphasis on gully erosion: Case studies from South Africa and Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerker, Michael; Sommer, Christian; Zakerinejad, Reza; Cama, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is a significant problem in arid and semi arid areas of large parts of Iran. Water erosion is one of the most effective phenomena that leads to decreasing soil productivity and pollution of water resources. Especially in semiarid areas like in the Mazayjan watershed in the Southwestern Fars province as well as in the Mkomazi catchment in Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa, gully erosion contributes to the sediment dynamics in a significant way. Consequently, the intention of this research is to identify the different types of soil erosion processes acting in the area with a stochastic approach and to assess the process dynamics in an integrative way. Therefore, we applied GIS, and satellite image analysis techniques to derive input information for the numeric models. For sheet and rill erosion the Unit Stream Power-based Erosion Deposition Model (USPED) was utilized. The spatial distribution of gully erosion was assessed using a statistical approach which used three variables (stream power index, slope, and flow accumulation) to predict the spatial distribution of gullies in the study area. The eroded gully volumes were estimated for a multiple years period by fieldwork and Google Earth high resolution images as well as with structure for motion algorithm. Finally, the gully retreat rates were integrated into the USPED model. The results show that the integration of the SPI approach to quantify gully erosion with the USPED model is a suitable method to qualitatively and quantitatively assess water erosion processes in data scarce areas. The application of GIS and stochastic model approaches to spatialize the USPED model input yield valuable results for the prediction of soil erosion in the test areas. The results of this research help to develop an appropriate management of soil and water resources in the study areas.

  19. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Spinoni, Jonathan; Meusburger, Katrin; Michaelides, Silas; Beguería, Santiago; Klik, Andreas; Petan, Sašo; Janeček, Miloslav; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Diodato, Nazzareno; Kostalova, Julia; Rousseva, Svetla; Banasik, Kazimierz; Alewell, Christine; Panagos, Panos

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part of Britain and Ireland) in May and the highest values are registered during summer months. Starting from September, R-factor has a decreasing trend. The mean rainfall erosivity in summer is almost 4 times higher (315MJmmha(-1)h(-1)) compared to winter (87MJmmha(-1)h(-1)). The Cubist model has been selected among various statistical models to perform the spatial interpolation due to its excellent performance, ability to model non-linearity and interpretability. The monthly prediction is an order more difficult than the annual one as it is limited by the number of covariates and, for consistency, the sum of all months has to be close to annual erosivity. The performance of the Cubist models proved to be generally high, resulting in R(2) values between 0.40 and 0.64 in cross-validation. The obtained months show an increasing trend of erosivity occurring from winter to summer starting from western to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be

  20. Water Droplet and Cavitation Erosion Behavior of Laser-Treated Stainless Steel and Titanium Alloy: Their Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    This article deals with water droplet and cavitation erosion behavior of diode laser-treated X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy. After laser surface treatment, the water droplet and cavitation erosion resistance (WDER and CER) of these materials improved significantly. The main reason for the improvement is the increased surface hardness and formation of fine-grained microstructures after laser surface treatment. It is observed that there is a similarity in both the phenomena. The WDER and CER can be correlated with a single mechanical property based on modified ultimate resilience (MUR) provided the laser-treated layers are free from microcracks and interface defects. The CER and WDER behavior of HPDL-treated X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy samples using different test equipment as per ASTM G32-2003 and ASTM G73-1978, their correlation with MUR, and their damage mechanism compared on the basis of XRD analyses, optical and scanning electron micrographs are discussed and reported in this article.

  1. Effect of Hydrophobicity on Splash Erosion by a Single Drop Impact: From Model Soil to Real Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Doerr, Stefan H.; Douglas, Peter; Bryant, Robert; Hamlett, Christopher A. E.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.; Shirtcliffe, Neil J.

    2013-04-01

    Splash erosion is soil loss caused by raindrop impacts and can be a dominating process in low precipitation events or on barely vegetated slopes. Water repellent soils have been reported to have greater splash loss by multiple drop impacts than wettable soils either due to effects of a water layer (Terry and Shakesby 1993) or a wet crust (Fox et al. 2007) generated by accumulation of water. In previous work, using homogeneous glass beads as model soil material, we found that the impact of a single water drop results in significantly different splash behaviour between hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles (Ahn et al. 2012). Natural soils are more variable in particle shape, surface texture and morphology than the model material used. The aim of the study presented here was to examine to what degree this difference in splash behaviour between hydrophobic and hydrophilic spherical glass particles applies to natural sandy soil material. Splash behaviour of beach sands was compared with that previously obtained for the model material (glass beads) using the same single drop impact test procedure (Ahn et al. 2012). The sand particles were in the same size range (350~400 µm diameter) and chemically modified with HCl and chlorotrimethylsilane in the same method applied to glass beads. A single water drop was released from 40 cm above the target and its impact was recorded using a high-speed video camera (976 fps). Overall, the amount of splash detachment was significantly lower (50~80%) for the beach sand than for glass beads in both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cases. However, the difference in the amount of splash detachment between hydrophobic and hydrophilic sand was 3 times larger than that of glass beads. Potential factors for lower net detachment and higher contrast, of sand compared to glass beads, might be (i) particle mobility and (ii) enhanced water repellency on rougher surfaces, respectively. Mobility experiments (angle of repose and flowability) showed that

  2. Identification and mapping of soil erosion areas in the Blue Nile-Eastern Sudan using multispectral ASTER and MODIS satellite data and the SRTM elevation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Haj Tahir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a set of studies to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability of soil water in terms of natural as well as land-use changes as fundamental factors for vegetation regeneration in arid ecosystems in the Blue Nile-Sudan. The specific aim is to indicate the spatial distribution of soil erosion caused by the rains of 2006. The current study is conducted to determine whether automatic classification of multispectral Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER imagery could accurately discriminate erosion gullies. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM is used to orthoproject ASTER data. A maximum likelihood classifier is trained with four classes, Gullies, Flat_Land, Mountains and Water and applied to images from March and December 2006. Validation is done with field data from December and January 2006/2007, and using drainage network analysis of SRTM digital elevation model. The results allow the identification of erosion gullies and subsequent estimation of eroded area. Consequently the results were up-scaled using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS images of the same dates. Because the selected study site is representative of the wider Blue Nile province, it is expected that the approach presented could be applied to larger areas.

  3. Identification and mapping of soil erosion areas in the Blue Nile-Eastern Sudan using multispectral ASTER and MODIS satellite data and the SRTM elevation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj Tahir, M.; Kääb, A.; Xu, C.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of a set of studies to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability of soil water in terms of natural as well as land-use changes as fundamental factors for vegetation regeneration in arid ecosystems in the Blue Nile-Sudan. The specific aim is to indicate the spatial distribution of soil erosion caused by the rains of 2006. The current study is conducted to determine whether automatic classification of multispectral Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) imagery could accurately discriminate erosion gullies. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is used to orthoproject ASTER data. A maximum likelihood classifier is trained with four classes, Gullies, Flat_Land, Mountains and Water and applied to images from March and December 2006. Validation is done with field data from December and January 2006/2007, and using drainage network analysis of SRTM digital elevation model. The results allow the identification of erosion gullies and subsequent estimation of eroded area. Consequently the results were up-scaled using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images of the same dates. Because the selected study site is representative of the wider Blue Nile province, it is expected that the approach presented could be applied to larger areas.

  4. Weathering of Pisha-Sandstones in the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region on the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two types of pisha-sandstones of purple sandstones and gray sandstones, widely distributing in the wind-water erosion crisscross region of China, were selected and used in laboratory experiments for a better understanding of the drying-wetting-freezing weathering process resulting from the apportionment of water or salt solution to rock samples. Weathering experiments were carried out under the conditions of environment control (including temperature, moisture and salt solution). All rock samples were frequently subjected to 140 drying-wetting-freezing cycles. The influences of weathering process were evaluated. It was found that the different treatments of moisture and salt solution applications could affect the nature of the weathering products resulting from drying-wetting-freezing. It was also observed that salt solution could effectively alleviate the weathering of pisha-sandstones. Although not all the observations could be explained, it was apparent that simulated environmental factors had both direct and indirect effects on the weathering of rocks.

  5. Cavitation Erosion Behavior of CrMnN Duplex Stainless Steel in Distilled Water and 3% NaCl Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suzhen LUO; Yugui ZHENG; Wei LIU; Heming JING; Zhiming YAO; Wei KE

    2003-01-01

    The cavitation erosion (CE) behavior of CrMnN ferrite-austenite duplex stainless steel in distilled water and 3% NaCl solution was investigated by using a magnetostrictive-induced CE facility. The damaged surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that the CE resistance of CrMnN steel was higher than that of 0Cr13Ni5Mo steel. The mass loss rate of CrMnN steel in distilled water was similar to that in 3% NaCl except at the early stage of CE. The failure mode of ferrite phase was brittle fracture, which had adverse effect on the resistance to CE, while the failure of austenite phase was a ductile failure in CrMnN steel. The excellent resistance to CE was related to the good mechanical properties of austenitic phase and the consumption of CE energy by plastic deformation involving slip and twinning.

  6. Lumped surface and sub- surface runoff for erosion modeling within a small hilly watershed in northern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, Y.T.; Orange, D.; Visser, S.M.; Hoanh, C.T.; Laissus, M.; Poortinga, A.; Tran, D.T.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2014-01-01

    Developing models to predict on-site soil erosion and off-site sediment transport at the agricultural watershed scale represent an on-going challenge in research today. This study attempts to simulate the daily discharge and sediment loss using a distributed model that combines surface and sub-surfa

  7. 水力侵蚀预测模型GeoWEPP研究进展%Research development on geo-spatial interface for water erosion prediction project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝韵; 于瑞宏; 郝瑞英; 杨欢; 张宇瑾; 张笑欣

    2015-01-01

    总结了水力侵蚀预测模型GeoWEPP的发展历程、技术框架、适用性和局限性,从DEM数据、土地利用/覆被变化、管理因子和土壤要素等4个角度详细论述了GeoWEPP模型的研究进展,针对模型的优势及存在的问题,结合当前水文和侵蚀模型研究形势,对GeoWEPP模型未来发展的趋势与走向作了展望,指出该模型在DEM精度阈值的确定、空间尺度的转换、人类活动集中区的应用、与生态过程的结合以及WEPP与GIS集成开发5个方面有较大的拓展空间。%This paper summarized geo-spatial interface for water erosion prediction project ( GeoWEPP) model’ s development process, technical framework, applicability and limitations, and then respectively described current research development of GeoWEPP from the standpoints of dynamic effect model ( DEM) data, land use/cover change, management factors and soil factors. For the advantages and disadvantages combining with the research status of water erosion prediction model, this paper proposed development directions of the model and pointed out possibilities of development about GeoWEPP in five aspects:definition of the accuracy of DEM, transform of spatial scale, application in human activities center, combination with ecological process, and integrated development of WEPP and geographic information system ( GIS) .

  8. ESTIMATION OF THE WANDA GLACIER (SOUTH SHETLANDS) SEDIMENT EROSION RATE USING NUMERICAL MODELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Kátia Kellem Rosa; Rosemary Vieira; Jefferson Cardia Simões

    2013-01-01

    Glacial sediment yield results from glacial erosion and is influenced by several factors including glacial retreat rate, ice flow velocity and thermal regime. This paper estimates the contemporary subglacial erosion rate and sediment yield of Wanda Glacier (King George Island, South Shetlands). This work also examines basal sediment evacuation mechanisms by runoff and glacial erosion processes during the subglacial transport. This is small temperate glacier that has seen retreating for the l...

  9. Implementing contour bank farming practices into the J2000 model to improve hydrological and erosion modelling in semi-arid Western Cape Province of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steudel, T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available research efforts, the quantitative and qualitative impacts of contours on runoff generation and associated erosion dynamics or salinisation are rarely considered in process-based hydrological modelling approaches. In this study an approach was developed...

  10. Soil Erosion Prediction Using Morgan-Morgan-Finney Model in a GIS Environment in Northern Ethiopia Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebreyesus Brhane Tesfahunegn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though scientific information on spatial distribution of hydrophysical parameters is critical for understanding erosion processes and designing suitable technologies, little is known in Geographical Information System (GIS application in developing spatial hydrophysical data inputs and their application in Morgan-Morgan-Finney (MMF erosion model. This study was aimed to derive spatial distribution of hydrophysical parameters and apply them in the Morgan-Morgan-Finney (MMF model for estimating soil erosion in the Mai-Negus catchment, northern Ethiopia. Major data input for the model include climate, topography, land use, and soil data. This study demonstrated using MMF model that the rate of soil detachment varied from 170 t ha−1 y−1, whereas the soil transport capacity of overland flow (TC ranged from 5 t ha−1 y−1 to >42 t ha−1 y−1. The average soil loss estimated by TC using MMF model at catchment level was 26 t ha−1 y−1. In most parts of the catchment (>80%, the model predicted soil loss rates higher than the maximum tolerable rate (18 t ha−1 y−1 estimated for Ethiopia. Hence, introducing appropriate interventions based on the erosion severity predicted by MMF model in the catchment is crucial for sustainable natural resources management.

  11. Modeling the annual soil erosion rate in the mouth of river Pineios' sub-basin in Thessaly County, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilia, Ioanna; Loupasakis, Constantinos; Tsangaratos, Paraskevas

    2015-04-01

    Erosion is a natural - geomorphological phenomenon, active through geological time that is considered as one of the main agents that forms the earth surface. Soil erosion models estimate the rates of soil erosion and provide useful information and guidance for the development of appropriate intervention and soil conservation practices and strategies. A significant number of soil erosion models can be found in literature; however, the most extensively applied model is the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) established in 1997 by Renard KG, Foster GR, Weesies GA, McCool DK and Yoder DC. RUSLE is an empirically based model that enables the estimation of the average annual rate of soil erosion for an area of interest providing several alternative scenarios involving cropping systems, management methods and erosion control strategies. According to RUSLE model's specifications five major factors (rainfall pattern, soil type, topography, crop system, and management practices) are utilized for estimating the average annual erosion through the following equation: A=RxKxLxSxCxP, PIC where A is the computed spatial average soil loss and temporal average soil loss per unit area (tons ha-1 year-1), R the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor (MJ mm ha-1h-1 year-1), K the soil erodibility factor (tons h MJ-1 mm-1), L the slope - length factor, S the slope steepness factor, C the cover management factor and P the conservation support practice factor. L, S, C and P factors are all dimensionless. The present study aims to utilize a GIS-based RUSLE model in order to estimate the average annual soil loss rate in the sub-basin extending at the mouth of Pineios river in Thessaly County, Greece. The area covers approximate 775.9 km2 with a mean slope angle of 7.8o. The rainfall data of 39 gauge station from 1980 to 2000 where used in order to predict the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor (R). The K-factor was estimated using soil maps available from the European Soil Portal with a

  12. OEDGE modeling of outer wall erosion in NSTX and the effect of changes in neutral pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, J.H., E-mail: jnichols@pppl.gov; Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R.; Abrams, T.; Skinner, C.H.; Stotler, D.P.

    2015-08-15

    Gross erosion from the outer wall is expected to be a major source of impurities for high power fusion devices due to the low redeposition fraction. Scaling studies of sputtering from the all-carbon outer wall of NSTX are reported. It is found that wall erosion decreases with divertor plasma pressure in low/mid temperature regimes, due to increasing divertor neutral opacity. Wall erosion is found to consistently decrease with reduced recycling coefficient, with outer target recycling providing the largest contribution. Upper and lower bounds are calculated for the increase in wall erosion due to a low-field-side gas puff.

  13. Influence of emergent macrophyte (Phragmites australis) density on water turbulence and erosion of organic-rich sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HORPPILA Jukka; KAITARANTA Joni; JOENSUU Laura; NURMINEN Leena

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the emergent macrophyte Phragmites australis on water turbulence,bottom shear velocity and water turbidity were experimentally studied with the stem densities 0 stems/m2-100 stems/m2 and using organic-rich sediment.It is found that the maximum root-mean-square (rms) velocity and shear velocity decrease linearly with increasing stem density.By affecting the height of peak turbulence values,emergent plants can thus lower the frequency of sediment erosion events.Additionally,the slope of the rms turbulence increment decreases with increasing stem density.Thus,also the duration of strong turbulence is affected by the density of emergent macrophytes.The critical shear velocity for sediment resuspension is 0.0035 rn/s-0.0055 rn/s and not affected by the stem density.In the absence of macrophytes,water flow causes a 6.3-fold increment in turbidity,but with macrophytes turbidity values remain lower.The experiments suggest that even relatively low densities of Phragmites can have substantial effects on water turbulence and consequently on water quality.

  14. Magnitude of Annual Soil Loss from a Hilly Cultivated Slope in Northern Vietnam and Evaluation of Factors Controlling Water Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Kurosawa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A soil erosion experiment was conducted in northern Vietnam over three rainy seasons to clarify the magnitude of soil loss and factors controlling water erosion. The plot had a low (8% or medium (14.5% slope with land-cover of cassava or morning glory or being bare. Annual soil loss (177 to 2,361 g/m2 was a tolerable level in all low-slope plots but was not in some medium-slope plots. The effects of slope gradient and seasonal rainfall on the mean daily soil loss of the season were confirmed, but the effect of land-cover was not, owing to the small canopy cover ratio or leaf area index during the season. The very high annual soil loss (>2,200 g/m2 observed in the first year of some medium-slope plots was the site-specific effect from initial land preparation. Since the site-specific effect was large, the preparation must be done carefully on the slope.

  15. A surrogate modelling framework for the optimal deployment of check dams in erosion-prone areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Debasish; Tang, Honglei; Galelli, Stefano; Ran, Qihua

    2017-04-01

    Despite the great progresses made in the last decades, the control of soil erosion still remains a key challenge for land-use planning. The nonlinear interactions between hydrologic and morphologic processes and increase in extreme rainfall events predicted with climatic change create new areas of concern and make the problem unresolved. Spatially distributed models are a useful tool for modelling such processes and assessing the effect of large-scale engineering measures, but their computational requests prevent the resolution of problems requiring several model evaluations—sensitivity analysis or optimization, for instance. In this study, we tackle this problem by developing a surrogate modelling framework for the optimal deployment of check dams. The framework combines a spatially distributed model (WaTEM/SEDEM), a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm and artificial neural networks as surrogate model. We test the framework on Shejiagou catchment—a 14 km2 area located in the Loess Plateau, China—where we optimize check dam locations by maximizing the mass of sediments retained in the catchment and minimizing the total number of dams. Preliminary results show that the performance of the existing check dam system could be improved by changing the dam locations.

  16. Soil vulnerability to erosion assessed with remote sensing, digital elevation models and a fuzzy logic Multi-Criteria Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez-Pastor, I.; Navarro-Pedreño, J.; Gómez, I.; Koch, M.

    2009-04-01

    Soil vulnerability is the capacity of one or more of the ecological functions of the soil system to be harmed. Soil vulnerability is related with the sensitivity of the soil system to degradation processes like erosion, desertification or salinization. Vegetation plays a crucial role in soil vulnerability because is a source of organic matter and a protection against rain, wind and other erosive agents. A soil covered by a dense and vigorous vegetation is more resistant against erosion. Another important factor that determines soil vulnerability is the topography. Slope and aspect have a great influence on vegetation distribution and losses of soil due to erosive processes. A key problem with traditional erosion models (USLE; RUSLE, etc.) is that input parameters are obtained locally or with large intervals of time. This technical problem greatly limits the update of soil erosion maps and their modification according to landscape changes (land use change, forest fires, etc.). To solve this technical difficulties, remote sensing and GIS techniques has been employed to compute input parameters of erosion models or develop new methodological approaches for soil vulnerability and erosion assessment. This work presents a methodological approach to assess soil vulnerability using remote sensing and GIS techniques to estimate input variables and to develop calculations in a spatial basis. Input variables include information about vegetation status and topography. The main advantage of this approach is that input variables can be updated fast to reflect landscape changes and the phenological status of vegetation that substantially could affect soil vulnerability. Soil vulnerability is assessed with a fuzzy logic model. Fuzzy logic emanates from Fuzzy Sets theory developed by Zadeh (1965) as a way to express and operate with membership degrees of the elements in a set. Fuzzy logic works well with continuous variables and with data uncertainties, and thus is very suitable to

  17. Relative efficiency of three representative matorral species in reducing water erosion at the microscale in a semi-arid climate (Valencia, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochet, E.; Rubio, J. L.; Poesen, J.

    1998-06-01

    In the Mediterranean region, where rainfall is scarce but often of high intensity, the matorral vegetation cover provides essential protection to the soil against the erosivity of rainfall and reduces considerably the water erosion rate. Three representative species of the Mediterranean matorral displaying different morphologies ( Rosmarinus officinalis, L., Stipa tenacissima, L., Anthyllis cytisoides, L.) were selected for study at the microscale (plant scale) for their relative efficiency in reducing water erosion on slopes. The mechanical protection of the soil against raindrop detachment, and the improvement of the soil properties by the biological influence of an isolated plant, were compared for the three species. The quantification of interrill erosion and splash erosion rates under natural rainfall conditions was obtained using erosion microplots of individual plants, and splash cups placed at different distances from the plant axis, respectively. Soil samples were also taken in the microenvironment of the plants in order to evaluate possible differential influences of the three species on soil properties relevant to water erosion. The results show that the three selected species reduced runoff and soil loss in different ways. The `screen effect' arising from the very dense canopy of Stipa tussocks, represents an effective way to counteract rainfall erosivity and reducing splash erosion. However, in the case of Rosmarinus, in addition to the mechanical protection offered by its canopy and litter covers, the latter (which lies permanently at the soil surface under the plant canopy) improves moreover the topsoil structure because of the important incorporation of organic matter below the canopy cover. The role of litter cover in controlling erosion seems therefore to be predominant under Rosmarinus. As for Anthyllis, these deciduous shrubs provide little physical protection against the energetic impact of rain at the soil surface as compared to a bare surface

  18. How does slope form affect erosion in CATFLOW-SED?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelmann, Petra; Wienhöfer, Jan; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Erosion is a severe environmental problem in agro-ecosystems with highly erodible loess soils. It is controlled by various factors, e.g. rainfall intensity, initial wetness conditions, soil type, land use and tillage practice. Furthermore slope form and gradient have been shown to influence erosion amounts to a large extent. Within the last fifty years, various erosion models have been developed to describe the erosion process, estimate erosion amounts and identify erosion-prone areas. These models differ in terms of complexity, the processes which are considered, and the data required for model calibration and they can be categorised into empirical or statistical, conceptual, and physically-based models. CATFLOW-SED is a process-based hydrology and erosion model that can operate on catchment and hillslope scales. Soil water dynamics are described by the Richards equation including effective approaches for preferential flow. Evapotranspiration is simulated using an approach based on the Penman-Monteith equation. The model simulates overland flow using the diffusion wave equation. Soil detachment is related to the attacking forces of rainfall and overland flow, and the erosion resistance of soil. Sediment transport capacity and sediment deposition are related to overland flow velocity using the equation of Engelund and Hansen and the sinking velocity of grain sizes respectively. We performed a study to analyse the erosion process on different virtual hillslopes, with varying slope gradient and slope form, using the CATFLOW-SED model. We explored the role of landform on erosion and sedimentation, particularly we look for forms that either maximise or minimise erosion. Results indicate the importance to performing the process implementation within physically meaningful limits and choose appropriate model parameters respectively.

  19. Assessment of future scenarios for wind erosion sensitivity changes based on ALADIN and REMO regional climate model simulation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezősi Gábor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The changes in rate and pattern of wind erosion sensitivity due to climate change were investigated for 2021–2050 and 2071–2100 compared to the reference period (1961–1990 in Hungary. The sensitivities of the main influencing factors (soil texture, vegetation cover and climate factor were evaluated by fuzzy method and a combined wind erosion sensitivity map was compiled. The climate factor, as the driving factor of the changes, was assessed based on observed data for the reference period, while REMO and ALADIN regional climate model simulation data for the future periods. The changes in wind erosion sensitivity were evaluated on potentially affected agricultural land use types, and hot spot areas were allocated. Based on the results, 5–6% of the total agricultural areas were high sensitive areas in the reference period. In the 21st century slight or moderate changes of wind erosion sensitivity can be expected, and mostly ‘pastures’, ‘complex cultivation patterns’, and ‘land principally occupied by agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation’ are affected. The applied combination of multi-indicator approach and fuzzy analysis provides novelty in the field of land sensitivity assessment. The method is suitable for regional scale analysis of wind erosion sensitivity changes and supports regional planning by allocating priority areas where changes in agro-technics or land use have to be considered.

  20. Assessment of future scenarios for wind erosion sensitivity changes based on ALADIN and REMO regional climate model simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezősi, Gábor; Blanka, Viktória; Bata, Teodóra; Ladányi, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Gábor; Meyer, Burghard C.

    2016-07-01

    The changes in rate and pattern of wind erosion sensitivity due to climate change were investigated for 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 compared to the reference period (1961-1990) in Hungary. The sensitivities of the main influencing factors (soil texture, vegetation cover and climate factor) were evaluated by fuzzy method and a combined wind erosion sensitivity map was compiled. The climate factor, as the driving factor of the changes, was assessed based on observed data for the reference period, while REMO and ALADIN regional climate model simulation data for the future periods. The changes in wind erosion sensitivity were evaluated on potentially affected agricultural land use types, and hot spot areas were allocated. Based on the results, 5-6% of the total agricultural areas were high sensitive areas in the reference period. In the 21st century slight or moderate changes of wind erosion sensitivity can be expected, and mostly `pastures', `complex cultivation patterns', and `land principally occupied by agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation' are affected. The applied combination of multi-indicator approach and fuzzy analysis provides novelty in the field of land sensitivity assessment. The method is suitable for regional scale analysis of wind erosion sensitivity changes and supports regional planning by allocating priority areas where changes in agro-technics or land use have to be considered.

  1. Long-term Soil C and N Dynamics in Response to Enhanced Wind Erosion in Semiarid Grassland, Using CENTURY Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Okin, G. S.; Alavrez, L.; Epstein, H.

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies show that enhanced wind erosion changes soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in desert grasslands of southern New Mexico. However, long-term effects at the scale of decades to centuries are less known, especially under the conditions of drought, directional changes in climate, and land use pressures. Additionally, previous studies have focused on the isolated response of soil C and N, with little understanding of their interactions and differential response of other sub-pools. Using CENTURY, a process-based biogeochemical model, we evaluate the potential impacts of enhanced wind erosion on the long-term dynamics of C and N in the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. We find that enhanced wind erosion does have a significant effect on long-term dynamics of C and N that are similar to the short-term dynamics observed in a field experiment at Jornada. The relationships between pools of C and N, levels of wind erosion and vegetation cover reduction as well as the mechanisms by which wind erosion changes C and N cycling in desert grasslands are discussed.

  2. Plant/life form considerations in the rangeland hydrology and erosion model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resilience of rangeland to erosion has largely been attributed to adequate plant cover; however, plant life/growth form, and individual species presence can have a dramatic effect on hydrologic and erosion dynamics on rangelands. Plant life/growth form refers to genetic tendency of a plant to grow i...

  3. Leading edge erosion of coated wind turbine blades: Review of coating life models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, H.M.; Gelinck, E.R.M.; Rentrop, C.; Heider, E. van der

    2015-01-01

    Erosion of the leading edge of wind turbine blades by droplet impingement wear, reduces blade aerodynamic efficiency and power output. Eventually, it compromises the integrity of blade surfaces. Elastomeric coatings are currently used for erosion resistance, yet the life of such coatings cannot be p

  4. Using state-and-transition models to evaluate impacts of land cover change on wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion of rangeland soils is a global problem exacerbated by land cover change. Despite efforts to quantify the impacts of land cover change on wind erosion, assessment uncertainty remains large. We address this uncertainty by evaluating the application of ecological sites and state-and-transi...

  5. Key roles of micro-particles in water on occurrence of cavitation-erosion of hydro-machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JiaDao; CHEN HaoSheng; QIN Li; LI YongJian; CHEN DaRong

    2008-01-01

    It has been believed for about one hundred years that the cavitation directly induces the cavitation erosion. It is proposed in this research that cavitation is only the necessary condition but not the sufficient condition of the cavitation erosion. The experiment performed on the rotary disk cavitation system shows that the mi-cro-particles in the fluid play indispensable roles in the cavitation erosion process, and the generation of the erosion pits on the steel surface is also affected by the particles' size. These cracks and deformations on the sample surface indicate that the erosion is the result of the mechanical behavior. Numerical calculations are also provided to support this mechanism.

  6. Laboratory soil piping and internal erosion experiments: evaluation of a soil piping model for low-compacted soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil piping has been attributed as a potential mechanism of instability for embankments, hillslopes, dams, and streambanks. In fact, deterministic models have been proposed to predict soil piping and internal erosion. However, limited research has been conducted under controlled conditions to evalua...

  7. The wind-water two-phase erosion and sediment-producing processes in the middle Yellow River basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on data from the middle Yellow River basin,a wind-water two-phase mechanism for erosion and sediment-producing processes has been found.By using this mechanism,the extremely strong erosion and sediment yield in the study area can be better explained.The operation of wind and water forces is different in different seasons within a year.During winter and spring,strong wind blows large quantities of eolian sand to gullies and river channels,which are temporally stored there.During the next summer,rainstorms cause runoff that contains much fine loessic material and acts as a powerful force to carry the previously prepared coarse material.As a result,hyperconcentrated flows occur,resulting in high-intensity erosion and sediment yield.

  8. Modeling and analysis of Soil Erosion processes by the River Basins model: The Case Study of the Krivacki Potok Watershed, Montenegro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujacic, Dusko; Barovic, Goran; Mijanovic, Dragica; Spalevic, Velibor; Curovic, Milic; Tanaskovic, Vjekoslav; Djurovic, Nevenka

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research was to study soil erosion processes in one of Northern Montenegrin watersheds, the Krivacki Potok Watershed of the Polimlje River Basin, using modeling techniques: the River Basins computer-graphic model, based on the analytical Erosion Potential Method (EPM) of Gavrilovic for calculation of runoff and soil loss. Our findings indicate a low potential of soil erosion risk, with 554 m³ yr-1 of annual sediment yield; an area-specific sediment yield of 180 m³km-2 yr-1. The calculation outcomes were validated for the entire 57 River Basins of Polimlje, through measurements of lake sediment deposition at the Potpec hydropower plant dam. According to our analysis, the Krivacki Potok drainage basin is with the relatively low sediment discharge; according to the erosion type, it is mixed erosion. The value of the Z coefficient was calculated on 0.297, what indicates that the river basin belongs to 4th destruction category (of five). The calculated peak discharge from the river basin was 73 m3s-1 for the incidence of 100 years and there is a possibility for large flood waves to appear in the studied river basin. Using the adequate computer-graphic and analytical modeling tools, we improved the knowledge on the soil erosion processes of the river basins of this part of Montenegro. The computer-graphic River Basins model of Spalevic, which is based on the EPM analytical method of Gavrilovic, is highly recommended for soil erosion modelling in other river basins of the Southeastern Europe. This is because of its reliable detection and appropriate classification of the areas affected by the soil loss caused by soil erosion, at the same time taking into consideration interactions between the various environmental elements such as Physical-Geographical Features, Climate, Geological, Pedological characteristics, including the analysis of Land Use, all calculated at the catchment scale.

  9. Water quality modeling using geographic information system (GIS) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Bernard A

    1992-01-01

    Protection of the environment and natural resources at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is of great concern. The potential for surface and ground water quality problems resulting from non-point sources of pollution was examined using models. Since spatial variation of parameters required was important, geographic information systems (GIS) and their data were used. The potential for groundwater contamination was examined using the SEEPAGE (System for Early Evaluation of the Pollution Potential of Agricultural Groundwater Environments) model. A watershed near the VAB was selected to examine potential for surface water pollution and erosion using the AGNPS (Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution) model.

  10. GREAT I Study of the Upper Mississippi River. Technical Appendixes. Volume 4. Water Quality, Sediment & Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    oxygen levels. 25 The Metropolitan Council ( Oberts , 1978) has provided a valuable summarization and assessment of adverse water quality impacts from...Depart- ment of Commerce, Highlands, N.J. Oberts , Gary. 1978. "Assessment of Water Pollution from River Dredging Activities." Metropolitan Council, St...and Disposal in the Great Lakes with Emphasis on Canadian Centre for Inland Waters Directorate, Canada Centre for Inlpvd WAtprq. Burlington, Ontario

  11. An application of Landsat and computer technology to potential water pollution from soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Agricultural activity has been recognized as the primary source of nonpoint source water pollution. Water quality planners have needed information that is timely, accurate, easily reproducible, and relatively inexpensive to utilize to implement 'Best Management Practices' for water quality. In this paper, a case study shows how the combination of satellite data, which can give accurate land-cover/land-use information, and a computerized geographic information system, can assess nonpoint pollution at a regional scale and be cost effective.

  12. An application of Landsat and computer technology to potential water pollution from soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Agricultural activity has been recognized as the primary source of nonpoint source water pollution. Water quality planners have needed information that is timely, accurate, easily reproducible, and relatively inexpensive to utilize to implement 'Best Management Practices' for water quality. In this paper, a case study shows how the combination of satellite data, which can give accurate land-cover/land-use information, and a computerized geographic information system, can assess nonpoint pollution at a regional scale and be cost effective.

  13. Estimation of soil loss by water erosion in the Chinese Loess Plateau using Universal Soil Loss Equation and GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, S.; Seitz, F.; Eicker, A.; Güntner, A.; Wattenbach, M.; Menzel, A.

    2013-06-01

    For the estimation of soil loss by erosion in the strongly affected Chinese Loess Plateau we applied the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) using a number of input data sets (monthly precipitation, soil types, digital elevation model, land cover and soil conservation measures). Calculations were performed in ArcGIS and SAGA. The large-scale soil erosion in the Loess Plateau results in a strong non-hydrological mass change. In order to investigate whether the resulting mass change from USLE may be validated by the gravity field satellite mission GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment), we processed different GRACE level-2 products (ITG, GFZ and CSR). The mass variations estimated in the GRACE trend were relatively close to the observed sediment yield data of the Yellow River. However, the soil losses resulting from two USLE parameterizations were comparatively high since USLE does not consider the sediment delivery ratio. Most eroded soil stays in the study area and only a fraction is exported by the Yellow River. Thus, the resultant mass loss appears to be too small to be resolved by GRACE.

  14. Scaling in landscape erosion: Renormalization group analysis of a model with infinitely many couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Kakin, P. I.

    2017-02-01

    Applying the standard field theory renormalization group to the model of landscape erosion introduced by Pastor-Satorras and Rothman yields unexpected results: the model is multiplicatively renormalizable only if it involves infinitely many coupling constants (i.e., the corresponding renormalization group equations involve infinitely many β-functions). We show that the one-loop counterterm can nevertheless be expressed in terms of a known function V (h) in the original stochastic equation and its derivatives with respect to the height field h. Its Taylor expansion yields the full infinite set of the one-loop renormalization constants, β-functions, and anomalous dimensions. Instead of a set of fixed points, there arises a two-dimensional surface of fixed points that quite probably contains infrared attractive regions. If that is the case, then the model exhibits scaling behavior in the infrared range. The corresponding critical exponents turn out to be nonuniversal because they depend on the coordinates of the fixed point on the surface, but they satisfy certain universal exact relations.

  15. Research on cohesive sediment erosion by flow: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU YongHui; LU dinYou; LIAO HongZhi; WANG diaSheng; FAN BeiLin; YAO ShiMing

    2008-01-01

    Erosion of cohesive sediment by flow is a very complicated phenomenon occurring worldwide. Understanding and modeling of the erosion process are important for many issues such as the breaching of embankments, riverbank stability, siltation of harbors and navigation channels, service life of reservoirs, distribution of (heavy metal) pollutants and water quality problems. In the last few decades, numerous studies have been done on the erosion of cohesive sediment by flow. Nevertheless, the factors affecting the erosion resistance of cohesive sediment are still not fully understood and the knowledge of the physics of cohesive sediment erosion is in-adequate, as a result the mathematical modeling of this erosion is far from saris-factory. In this paper an overview of the studies on the erosion resistance, erosion threshold and the erosion rate of cohesive sediment by flow is presented. The outcomes achieved so far from the studies and the existing problems have been analyzed and summarized, based on which recommendations are proposed for future research.

  16. Polyanhydride degradation and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpferich, A; Tessmar, J

    2002-10-16

    It was the intention of this paper to give a survey on the degradation and erosion of polyanhydrides. Due to the multitude of polymers that have been synthesized in this class of material in recent years, it was not possible to discuss all polyanhydrides that have gained in significance based on their application. It was rather the intention to provide a broad picture on polyanhydride degradation and erosion based on the knowledge that we have from those polymers that have been intensively investigated. To reach this goal this review contains several sections. First, the foundation for an understanding of the nomenclature are laid by defining degradation and erosion which was deemed necessary because many different definitions exist in the current literature. Next, the properties of major classes of anhydrides are reviewed and the impact of geometry on degradation and erosion is discussed. A complicated issue is the control of drug release from degradable polymers. Therefore, the aspect of erosion-controlled release and drug stability inside polyanhydrides are discussed. Towards the end of the paper models are briefly reviewed that describe the erosion of polyanhydrides. Empirical models as well as Monte-Carlo-based approaches are described. Finally it is outlined how theoretical models can help to answer the question why polyanhydrides are surface eroding. A look at the microstructure and the results from these models lead to the conclusion that polyanhydrides are surface eroding due to their fast degradation. However they switch to bulk erosion once the device dimensions drop below a critical limit.

  17. Modelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides (MODERN) - Part 1: A new conversion model to derive soil redistribution rates from inventories of fallout radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Frenkel, Elena; A'Campo-Neuen, Annette; Iurian, Andra-Rada; Ketterer, Michael E; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of fallout radionuclides (FRN) has become one of the most commonly used tools to quantify sediment erosion or depositional processes. The conversion of FRN inventories into soil erosion and deposition rates is done with a variety of models, which suitability is dependent on the selected FRN, soil cultivation (ploughed or unploughed) and movement (erosion or deposition). The authors propose a new conversion model, which can be easily and comprehensively used for different FRN, land uses and soil redistribution processes. The new model MODERN (Modelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides) considers the precise depth distribution of any FRN at the reference site, and allows adapting it for any specific site conditions. MODERN adaptability and performance in converting different FRN inventories is discussed for a theoretical case as well as for two already published case studies i.e. a (137)Cs study in an alpine and unploughed area in the Aosta valley (Italy) and a (210)Pbex study on a ploughed area located in the Transylvanian Plain (Romania). The tests highlight a highly significant correspondence (i.e. correlation factor of 0.91) between the results of MODERN and the published results of other models currently used by the FRN scientific community (i.e. the Profile Distribution Model and the Mass Balance Model). The development and the cost free accessibility of MODERN (see modern.umweltgeo.unibas.ch) will ensure the promotion of wider application of FRNs for tracing soil erosion and sedimentation.

  18. Estimation of soil erosion for a sustainable land use planning: RUSLE model validation by remote sensing data utilization in the Kalikonto watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andriyanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology of Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS are increasingly used for planning and natural resources management. GIS and RS is based on pixels is used as a tool of spatial modeling for predicting the erosion. One of the methods developed for predicting the erosion is a Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE. RUSLE is the method used for predicting the erosion associated with runoff gained from five parameters, namely: rain erosivity (R, soil erodibility (K, length of slopes (L, slope (S, and land management (CP. The main constraint encountered in the process of operating the GIS is the calculation of the slope length factor (L.This study was designed to create a plan of sustainable land use and low erosion through the RULSE erosion modeling by utilizing the remote sensing data. With this approach, this study was divided into three activities, namely (1 the preparation and analysis of spatial data for the determination of the parameters and estimating the erosion by using RUSLE models, (2 the validation and calibration of the model of RUSLE by measuring soil erosion at the scale of plots on the field, and (3 Creating a plan of sustainable land use and low erosion with RUSLE. The validation erosion shows the value of R2 = 0.56 and r = 0.74. Results of this study showed that the RUSLE model could be used in the Kalikonto watershed. The erosions at the value of the actual estimation, spatial Plan (RTRW and land capability class in the Kalikonto watershed were 72t / ha / year, 62 t / ha / year and 58 t / ha / year, respectively.

  19. MODELING OF NATURAL VULNERABILITY TO EROSION THROUGH THE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN MORRO DO CHAPÉU-BA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocimara Souza Britto Lobão

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The environment is always in permanent change keeping its proper dynamics with its own rhythms.However, when the people move themselves occupying specific locations, some transformations can take place, constituting threats for the environment and for the manhimself. These changes are related to the enviroment degradation, which has erosion as one of its most significant processes.To understand this dynamic, it is necessary to model the environment in a way that is possible to identify areas with different degrees of natural vulnerability to erosion and thus provide actions that relieve these impacts.The erosive processes are part of the lithosphere modeling system and have its intensity degree more stable or more intense according to the sum of several physical variables (lithology, leveling, landscape, rainfall and hydrography, biological variables (ecosystem- the type of the original and second growth vegetation and anthropogenic variables (the type of human occupation and mining activities.The impact of the rain on the soil has its effects reduced because of the vegetation and so the pedogenesis is benefited and the erosive processes minimized. On the other hand, if there is no vegetation or if this is insuficient, morphogenesis becomes more intense and theerosive processes enhanced.

  20. Understanding soil erosion impacts in temperate agroecosystems: bridging the gap between geomorphology and soil ecology using nematodes as a model organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, C.; Rowan, J. S.; McKenzie, B. M.; Neilson, R.

    2013-11-01

    Soil is a key asset of natural capital, providing a myriad of goods and ecosystem services that sustain life through regulating, supporting and provisioning roles, delivered by chemical, physical and biological processes. One of the greatest threats to soil is accelerated erosion, which raises a natural process to unsustainable levels, and has downstream consequences (e.g.~economic, environmental and social). Global intensification of agroecosystems is a recognised major cause of soil erosion which, in light of predicted population growth and increased demand for food security, will continue or increase. Transport and redistribution of biota by soil erosion has hitherto been ignored and thus is poorly understood. With the move to sustainable intensification this is a key knowledge gap that needs to be addressed. Here we highlight the erosion-energy and effective-erosion-depth continuum in soils, differentiating between different forms of soil erosion, and argue that nematodes are an appropriate model taxa to investigate impacts of erosion on soil biota across scales. We review the different known mechanisms of soil erosion that impact on soil biota in general, and nematodes in particular, and highlight the few detailed studies, primarily from tropical regions, that have considered soil biota. Based on the limited literature and using nematodes as a model organism we outline future research priorities to initially address the important interrelationships between soil erosion processes and soil biota.

  1. Ditch blocking, water chemistry and organic carbon flux: evidence that blanket bog restoration reduces erosion and fluvial carbon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lorraine; Wilson, Jared; Holden, Joseph; Johnstone, Ian; Armstrong, Alona; Morris, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The potential for restoration of peatlands to deliver benefits beyond habitat restoration is poorly understood. There may be impacts on discharge water quality, peat erosion, flow rates and flood risk, and nutrient fluxes. This study aimed to assess the impact of drain blocking, as a form of peatland restoration, on an upland blanket bog, by measuring water chemistry and colour, and loss of both dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). The restoration work was designed to permit the collection of a robust experimental dataset over a landscape scale, with data covering up to 3 years pre-restoration and up to 3 years post-restoration. An information theoretic approach to data analyses provided evidence of a recovery of water chemistry towards more 'natural' conditions, and showed strong declines in the production of water colour. Drain blocking led to increases in the E4:E6 ratio, and declines in specific absorbance, suggesting that DOC released from blocked drains consisted of lighter, less humic and less decomposed carbon. Whilst concentrations of DOC showed slight increases in drains and streams after blocking, instantaneous yields of both DOC and POC declined markedly in streams over the first year post-restoration. Attempts were made to estimate total annual fluvial organic carbon fluxes for the study site, and although errors around these estimates remain considerable, there is strong evidence of a large reduction in aquatic organic carbon flux from the peatland following drain-blocking. Potential mechanisms for the observed changes in water chemistry and organic carbon release are discussed, and we highlight the need for more detailed information, from more sites, to better understand the full impacts of peatland restoration on carbon storage and release.

  2. Pinhole test for identifying susceptibility of soils to piping erosion: effect water quality and hydraulic head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadal Romero, E.; Verachtert, E.; Poesen, J.

    2009-07-01

    Piping has been observed in both natural and soils, as well as under different types of land uses and vegetation covers. Despite its importance, no standard widely-applied methodology exists to assess susceptibility of soils to piping. This study aims at evaluating the pinhole test for assessing the susceptibility of soils to piping under different conditions. More precisely, the effects of hydraulic head and water quality are being assessed. Topsoil samples (remoulded specimens) with a small range of water contents were taken in Central Belgium (Heverlee) and the susceptibility of these soil samples are investigated under standardized laboratory conditions with a pinhole test device. Three hydraulic heads (50,180 and 380 mm) and two water qualities (tap and distilled water) were used, reflecting dominant field conditions. (Author) 6 refs.

  3. Managing Soil Erosion Potential by Integrating Digital Elevation Models with the Southern China's Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation——A Case Study for the West Lake Scenic Spots Area of Hangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In China, many scenic and tourism areas are suffering from the urbanization that results from physical development of tourism projects, leading to the removal of the vegetative cover, the creation of areas impermeable to water, in-stream modifications,and other problems. In this paper, the risk of soil erosion and its ecological risks in the West Lake Scenic Spots (WLSS) area were quantitatively evaluated by integrating the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) with a digital elevation model (DEM) and geographical information system (GIS)software. The standard RUSLE factors were modified to account for local climatic and topographic characteristics reflected in the DEM maps, and for the soil types and vegetation cover types. An interface was created between the Arcinfo software and RUSLE so that the level of soil erosion and its ecological risk in the WLSS area could be mapped immediately once the model factors were defined for the area. The results from an analysis using the Arcinfo-RUSLE interface showed that the risk value in 93 % of the expanding western part of the WLSS area was moderate or more severe and the soil erosion risk in this area was thus large compared with that in the rest of the area. This paper mainly aimed to increase the awareness of the soil erosion risk in urbanizing areas and suggest that the local governments should consider the probable ecological risk resulting from soil erosion when enlarging and developing tourism areas.

  4. Formation and erosion of biogeomorphological structures: A model study on the tube-building polychaete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, B.W.; Bouma, T.J.; Rabaut, M.; Herman, P.M.J.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Borsje, B.W.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We study how organism traits and population densities of ecosystem engineering species, in combination withenvironmental factors, affect the formation and erosion rates of biogeomorphological structures, and focus on thewidely distributed marine tube-building polychaete Lanice conchilega, which live

  5. Methodology update for determination of the erosion coefficient(Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Radislav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The research and mapping the intensity of mechanical water erosion that have begun with the empirical methodology of S. Gavrilović during the mid-twentieth century last, by various intensity, until the present time. A many decades work on the research of these issues pointed to some shortcomings of the existing methodology, and thus the need for its innovation. In this sense, R. Lazarević made certain adjustments of the empirical methodology of S. Gavrilović by changing the tables for determination of the coefficients Φ, X and Y, that is, the tables for determining the mean erosion coefficient (Z. The main objective of this paper is to update the existing methodology for determining the erosion coefficient (Z with the empirical methodology of S. Gavrilović and amendments made by R. Lazarević (1985, but also with better adjustments to the information technologies and the needs of modern society. The proposed procedure, that is, the model to determine the erosion coefficient (Z in this paper is the result of ten years of scientific research and project work in mapping the intensity of mechanical water erosion and its modeling using various models of erosion in the Republic of Srpska and Serbia. By analyzing the correlation of results obtained by regression models and results obtained during the mapping of erosion on the territory of the Republic of Srpska, a high degree of correlation (R² = 0.9963 was established, which is essentially a good assessment of the proposed models.

  6. Accelerated shallow water modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandham, Rajesh; Medina, David; Warburton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    ln this talk we will describe our ongoing developments in accelerated numerical methods for modeling tsunamis, and oceanic fluid flows using two dimensional shallow water model and/or three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes model discretized with high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. High order discontinuous Galerkin methods can be computationally demanding, requiring extensive computational time to simulate real time events on traditional CPU architectures. However, recent advances in computing architectures and hardware aware algorithms make it possible to reduce simulation time and provide accurate predictions in a timely manner. Hence we tailor these algorithms to take advantage of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture that is seen in modern many core compute devices such as GPUs. We will discuss our unified and extensive many-core programming library OCCA that alleviates the need to completely re-design the solvers to keep up with constantly evolving parallel programming models and hardware architectures. We will present performance results for the flow simulations demonstrating performance leveraging multiple different multi-threading APIs on GPU and CPU targets.

  7. WATER DIVERSION MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.B. Case

    1999-12-21

    The distribution of seepage in the proposed repository will be highly variable due in part to variations in the spatial distribution of percolations. The performance of the drip shield and the backfill system may divert the water flux around the waste packages to the invert. Diversion will occur along the drift surface, within the backfill, at the drip shield, and at the Waste Package (WP) surface, even after the drip shield and WP have been breached by corrosion. The purpose and objective of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) are to develop a conceptual model and constitutive properties for bounding the volume and rate of seepage water that flows around the drip shield (CRWMS M&O 1999c). This analysis model is to be compatible with the selected repository conceptual design (Wilkins and Heath, 1999) and will be used to evaluate the performance of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), and to provide input to the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Model. This model supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) postclosure performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (SR). This document characterizes the hydrological constitutive properties of the backfill and invert materials (Section 6.2) and a third material that represents a mixture of the two. These include the Overton Sand which is selected as a backfill (Section 5.2), crushed tuff which is selected as the invert (Section 5.1), and a combined material (Sections 5.9 and 5.10) which has retention and hydraulic conductivity properties intermediate to the selected materials for the backfill and the invert. The properties include the grain size distribution, the dry bulk density and porosity, the moisture retention, the intrinsic permeability, the relative permeability, and the material thermal properties. The van Genuchten relationships with curve fit parameters are used to define the basic retention relationship of moisture potential to volumetric moisture content, and the basic relationship of unsaturated

  8. A relative Potential Erosion Detection (PED) model for the upper Buff Bay catchment, parish of Portland, Jamaica: A Geographical Information System application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacGillivray, C.M.I.; Donovan, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    This research introduces a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) model that predicts the location and relative susceptibility of humid subtropical hillslopes to sheetwash erosion. The extent of the erosion was based on the conservation potential of the existing vegetation cover. This is an original

  9. A Relative Potential Erosion Detection (PED) model for the upper Buff Bay catchment, parish of Portland, Jamaica: A Geographical Information System application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacGillivray, C.M.I.; Donovan, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    This research introduces a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) model that predicts the location and relative susceptibility of humid subtropical hillslopes to sheetwash erosion. The extent of the erosion was based on the conservation potential of the existing vegetation cover. This is an original

  10. A West Virginia case study: does erosion differ between streambanks clustered by the bank assessment of nonpoint source consequences of sediment (BANCS) model parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abby L. McQueen; Nicolas P. Zegre; Danny L. Welsch

    2013-01-01

    The integration of factors and processes responsible for streambank erosion is complex. To explore the influence of physical variables on streambank erosion, parameters for the bank assessment of nonpoint source consequences of sediment (BANCS) model were collected on a 1-km reach of Horseshoe Run in Tucker County, West Virginia. Cluster analysis was used to establish...

  11. Influence of Laser Power on the Hardening of Ti6Al4V Low-Pressure Steam Turbine Blade Material for Enhancing Water Droplet Erosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2011-03-01

    To overcome water droplet erosion of Ti6Al4V alloy blade material used in low-pressure steam turbine (LPST) of high-rating nuclear and super critical thermal power plants, high-power diode laser (HPDL) surface treatment at two temperatures corresponding to two different power levels was carried out. During incubation as well as under prolonged erosion testing, the HPDL surface treatment of this alloy has enhanced its resistance significantly. This is due to the formation of fine-grained martensitic (ά) phase due to rapid heating and cooling associated with laser treatment. The droplet erosion test results after HPDL surface treatment on this alloy, SEM, XRD analysis, and residual stresses developed due to HPDL surface treatment are given in this paper.

  12. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event‐scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R.; Hicks, D. M.; Brasington, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics‐based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth‐averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high‐flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high‐resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach‐scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers. PMID:27708477

  13. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event-scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R D; Measures, R; Hicks, D M; Brasington, J

    2016-08-01

    Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics-based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth-averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high-flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach-scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers.

  14. Soil Erosion and Surface Water Quality Impacts of Natural Gas Development in East Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew McBroom

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to greater demands for hydrocarbons and improvements in drilling technology, development of oil and natural gas in some regions of the United States has increased dramatically. A 1.4 ha natural gas well pad was constructed in an intermittent stream channel at the Alto Experimental Watersheds in East Texas, USA (F1, while another 1.1 ha well pad was offset about 15 m from a nearby intermittent stream (F2. V-notch weirs were constructed downstream of these well pads and stream sedimentation and water quality was measured. For the 2009 water year, about 11.76 cm, or almost 222% more runoff resulted from F1 than F2. Sediment yield was significantly greater at F1, with 13,972 kg ha−1 yr−1 versus 714 kg ha−1yr−1 at F2 on a per unit area disturbance basis for the 2009 water year. These losses were greater than was observed following forest clearcutting with best management practices (111–224 kg ha−1. Significantly greater nitrogen and phosphorus losses were measured at F1 than F2. While oil and gas development can degrade surface water quality, appropriate conservation practices like retaining streamside buffers can mitigate these impacts.

  15. Shuttle radar DEM hydrological correction for erosion modelling in small catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarihani, Ben; Sidle, Roy; Bartley, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that accurately replicate both landscape form and processes are critical to support modelling of environmental processes. Catchment and hillslope scale runoff and sediment processes (i.e., patterns of overland flow, infiltration, subsurface stormflow and erosion) are all topographically mediated. In remote and data-scarce regions, high resolution DEMs (LiDAR) are often not available, and moderate to course resolution digital elevation models (e.g., SRTM) have difficulty replicating detailed hydrological patterns, especially in relatively flat landscapes. Several surface reconditioning algorithms (e.g., Smoothing) and "Stream burning" techniques (e.g., Agree or ANUDEM), in conjunction with representation of the known stream networks, have been used to improve DEM performance in replicating known hydrology. Detailed stream network data are not available at regional and national scales, but can be derived at local scales from remotely-sensed data. This research explores the implication of high resolution stream network data derived from Google Earth images for DEM hydrological correction, instead of using course resolution stream networks derived from topographic maps. The accuracy of implemented method in producing hydrological-efficient DEMs were assessed by comparing the hydrological parameters derived from modified DEMs and limited high-resolution airborne LiDAR DEMs. The degree of modification is dominated by the method used and availability of the stream network data. Although stream burning techniques improve DEMs hydrologically, these techniques alter DEM characteristics that may affect catchment boundaries, stream position and length, as well as secondary terrain derivatives (e.g., slope, aspect). Modification of a DEM to better reflect known hydrology can be useful, however, knowledge of the magnitude and spatial pattern of the changes are required before using a DEM for subsequent analyses.

  16. Scaling in erosion of landscapes: renormalization group analysis of a model with turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Kakin, P. I.

    2017-02-01

    The model of landscape erosion, introduced in (1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 4349, 1998 J. Stat. Phys. 93 477) and modified in (2016 Theor. Math. Phys. in press (arXiv:1602.00432)), is advected by anisotropic velocity field. The field is Gaussian with vanishing correlation time and the pair correlation function of the form \\propto δ ≤ft(t-{{t}\\prime}\\right)/k\\botd-1+ξ , where {{k}\\bot}=|{{\\mathbf{k}}\\bot}| and {{\\mathbf{k}}\\bot} is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to a certain preferred direction—the d-dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda (1990 Commun. Math. Phys. 131 381). Analogous to the case without advection, the model is multiplicatively renormalizable and has infinitely many coupling constants. The one-loop counterterm is derived in a closed form in terms of the certain function V(h), entering the original stochastic equation, and its derivatives with respect to the height field h≤ft(t,\\mathbf{x}\\right) . The full infinite set of the one-loop renormalization constants, β-functions and anomalous dimensions is obtained from the Taylor expansion of the counter-term. Instead of a two-dimensional surface of fixed points there are two such surfaces; they are likely to contain infrared attractive region(s). If that is the case, the model exhibits scaling behaviour in the infrared range. The corresponding critical exponents are non-universal because they depend on the coordinates of the fixed points on the surface; they also satisfy certain universal exact relation.

  17. Estimating overland flow erosion capacity using unit stream power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)